WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology transition requires

  1. A cautionary approach in transitioning to 'green' energy technologies and practices is required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatiele, Puleng; Gulumian, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy technologies (wind turbines, solar cells, biofuels, etc.) are often referred to as 'clean' or 'green' energy sources, while jobs linked to the field of environmental protection and energy efficiency are referred to as 'green' jobs. The energy efficiency of clean technologies, which is likely to reduce and/or eliminate reliance on fossil fuels, is acknowledged. However, the potential contribution of green technologies and associated practices to ill health and environmental pollution resulting from consumption of energy and raw materials, generation of waste, and the negative impacts related to some life cycle phases of these technologies are discussed. Similarly, a point is made that the green jobs theme is mistakenly oversold because the employment opportunities generated by transitioning to green technologies are not necessarily safe and healthy jobs. Emphasis is put on identifying the hazards associated with these green designs, assessing the risks to the environment and worker health and safety, and either eliminating the hazards or minimizing the risks as essential elements to the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of green technologies. The perception that it is not always economically possible to consider all risk factors associated with renewable energy technologies at the beginning without hampering their implementation, especially in the poor developing countries, is dismissed. Instead, poor countries are encouraged to start implementing environmentally sound practices while transitioning to green technologies in line with their technological development and overall economic growth.

  2. Transitioning DARPA Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    canonical paths were used. 15 As illustrated by the HiPer -D case study in Appendix B, transition plans are generally submitted as part of a DARPA’s...initiatives studied revealed two programs that followed the DS&T transition path-the SPEAKeasy Advanced Tactical Radio System and HiPer - D (High Performance...introducing new technology into the legacy systems. For example, in the HiPer -D case, it was determined that open architecture would reduce costs over the

  3. Thresholds models of technological transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; Frenken, K.; Kupers, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic review of seven threshold models of technological transitions from physics, biology, economics and sociology. The very same phenomenon of a technological transition can be explained by very different logics, ranging from economic explanations based on price, performance and

  4. Major transitions in information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    When looking at the history of technology, we can see that all inventions are not of equal importance. Only a few technologies have the potential to start a new branching series (specifically, by increasing diversity), have a lasting impact in human life and ultimately became turning points. Technological transitions correspond to times and places in the past when a large number of novel artefact forms or behaviours appeared together or in rapid succession. Why does that happen? Is technological change continuous and gradual or does it occur in sudden leaps and bounds? The evolution of information technology (IT) allows for a quantitative and theoretical approach to technological transitions. The value of information systems experiences sudden changes (i) when we learn how to use this technology, (ii) when we accumulate a large amount of information, and (iii) when communities of practice create and exchange free information. The coexistence between gradual improvements and discontinuous technological change is a consequence of the asymmetric relationship between complexity and hardware and software. Using a cultural evolution approach, we suggest that sudden changes in the organization of ITs depend on the high costs of maintaining and transmitting reliable information. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431527

  5. Fusion technology status and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined

  6. FCS Technology Insertion and Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-18

    power and energy technologies in a “form, fit and function” environment. High Performance Engine Research ( HIPER ) Objective: Develop engine technology...tighter teaming between Soldiers and robots • Human Factors Technical Challenges BACK 13 Mobility: §High Performance Engine Research ( HIPER

  7. Evaluation of automated vehicle technology for transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the state of automated vehicle (AV) technology : in transit. The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) wishes to know what AV technology is : currently available that could be used in tran...

  8. Technological Change During the Energy Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijden, G.C.; Smulders, Sjak A.

    2014-01-01

    The energy transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources has important consequences for technological change and resource extraction. We examine these consequences by incorporating a non-renewable resource and an alternative energy source in a market economy model of endogenous growth

  9. Hydrogen tomorrow: Demands and technology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    National needs for hydrogen are projected and the technologies of production, handling, and utilization are evaluated. Research and technology activities required to meet the projected needs are determined.

  10. Transit safety retrofit package development : applications requirements document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    This Application Requirements Document for the Transit Safety Retrofit Package (TRP) Development captures the : system, hardware and software requirements towards fulfilling the technical objectives stated within the contract. : To achieve the object...

  11. Security Requirements for Post-Transition Cuba

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowther, Glenn A

    2007-01-01

    .... With that change, Cuba's security requirements will change as well. This monograph analyzes security requirements that the new Cuba will face and proposes what missions and structure the Cuban security forces might have after a...

  12. Rapid Transit Noise Abatement and Cost Requirements (MBTA Pilot Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    A methodology is described, based on a study conducted on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority Blue, Red and Orange Lines, to assess the acoustic noise climate of an urban rail transit system and the appropriate technology to cost-effectively redu...

  13. Smart gun technology requirements preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.R.; Brandt, D.J.; Tweet, K.D.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing surety technologies. This project is funded by the National Institute of Justice. This document reports the projects first objective: to find and document the requirements for a user-recognizing-and-authorizing firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. This report details the problem of firearm takeaways in law enforcement, the methodology used to develop the law enforcement officers` requirements, and the requirements themselves.

  14. Decommissioning of reactor facilities (2). Required technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning of reactor facilities was planned to perform progressive dismantling, decontamination and radioactive waste disposal with combination of required technology in a safe and economic way. This article outlined required technology for decommissioning as follows: (1) evaluation of kinds and amounts of residual radioactivity of reactor facilities with calculation and measurement, (2) decontamination technology of metal components and concrete structures so as to reduce worker's exposure and production of radioactive wastes during dismantling, (3) dismantling technology of metal components and concrete structures such as plasma arc cutting, band saw cutting and controlled demolition with mostly remote control operation, (3) radioactive waste disposal for volume reduction and reuse, and (4) project management of decommissioning for safe and rational work to secure reduction of worker's exposure and prevent the spreading of contamination. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Parts Obsolescence Management Technology Transition (POMTT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darling, David R; Cirillo, Tom; Fuller, Doug; Herald, Tom; Green, Jamie

    2004-01-01

    .... Tools, technologies, and methodologies were established and funded; and follow-on pilot demonstration programs were also established to evaluate the performance and commercial viability of these tools.

  16. Technologies and Species Transitions: Polanyi, on a Path to Posthumanity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doede, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Polanyi and Transhumanism both place technologies in pivotal roles in bringing about "Homo sapiens"' species transitions. The question is asked whether Polanyi's emphasis on the role of technology in "Homo sapiens"' rise out of mute beasthood indicates that he might have been inclined to embrace the Transhumanist vision of "Homo sapiens"'…

  17. Technology requirements for mesh VSAT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, R. K.; Price, K. M.; Inukai, T.; Fardis, F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper first examines the trends and the roles of VSAT services in the year 2010 time frame based on an overall network and service model for that period. An estimate of the VSAT traffic is then made and the service and general network requirements are identified. In order to accommodate these traffic needs, four satellite VSAT architectures based on the use of fixed or scanning multibeam antennas in conjunction with IF switching or onboard regeneration and baseband processing are suggested. The performance of each of these architectures is assessed and the key enabling technologies are identified.

  18. Tritium extraction technologies and DEMO requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demange, D., E-mail: david.demange@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Antunes, R.; Borisevich, O.; Frances, L. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rapisarda, D. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santucci, A. [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Utili, M. [ENEA CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We detail the R&D plan for tritium technology of the European DEMO breeding blanket. • We study advanced and efficient extraction techniques to improve tritium management. • We consider inorganic membranes and catalytic membrane reactor for solid blankets. • We consider permeator against vacuum and vacuum sieve tray for liquid blankets. - Abstract: The conceptual design of the tritium extraction system (TES) for the European DEMO reactor is worked out in parallel for four different breeding blankets (BB) retained by EUROfusion. The TES design has to be tackled in an integrated manner optimizing the synergy with the directly interfacing inner fuel cycle, while minimizing the tritium permeation into the coolant. Considering DEMO requirements, it is most likely that only advanced technologies will be suitable for the tritium extraction systems of the BB. This paper overviews the European work programme for R&D on tritium technology for the DEMO BB, summaries the general first outcomes, and details the specific and comprehensive R&D program to study experimentally immature but promising technologies such as vacuum sieve tray or permeator against vacuum for tritium extraction from PbLi, and advanced inorganic membranes and catalytic membrane reactor for tritium extraction from He. These techniques are simple, fully continuous, likely compact with contained energy consumption. Several European Laboratories are joining their efforts to deploy several new experimental setups to accommodate the tests campaigns that will cover small scale experiments with tritium and inactive medium scale tests so as to improve the technology readiness level of these advanced processes.

  19. Technology requirements and readiness for very large aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, D. W.; Vaughan, J. C., III

    1980-01-01

    The technology requirements for designing, manufacturing and operating any vehicle depend largely on the configuration of that vehicle. Under the general heading of Very Large Aircraft (VLA), configurations are many and varied, so, therefore, are the technology requirements. The present work is limited to technology requirements of particular interest to VLA. While many are of common interest, a few technology requirements critical to specific VLA types are also covered. Addressed in turn are common VLA concerns and how they influence configurations and technology; the methodology followed in selecting requirements and assessing readiness; the resultant technology requirements and readiness; and some overall observations regarding technology areas judged to be particularly critical. Over 50 technology requirements are identified as unique or particularly critical to VLA. However, none of the requirements is considered to have an excellent state of technology readiness.

  20. Nuclear imaging technology and global requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lele, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    After a brief review of the present state of availability of nuclear medicine services in the countries of world, a mention has been made of WHO programme on nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine services in the developing countries are dependent on the availability of appropriate instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals at affordable costs and existence of basic infrastructure required for giving such services. Basic infrastructure requirements are stable power supplies, air-conditioning systems, preventive maintenance and repair facilities. These are discussed. It is pointed out that the use of rectilinear scanners with 113m In instead of costly gamma cameras is still relevant in the third world countries. Need to develop a too low-cost gamma camera is emphasized. Electronics Corporation of India Ltd has plans to manufacture such cameras. Design of this camera is described. Foreign collaboration or technology transfer through concerned governement department needs to be explored so that the benefits of nuclear medicine can be brought to the third world countries by 2000 AD. (M.G.B.). 2 tabs

  1. Application Analysis of BIM Technology in Metro Rail Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Sun, Xianbin

    2018-03-01

    With the rapid development of urban roads, especially the construction of subway rail transit, it is an effective way to alleviate urban traffic congestion. There are limited site space, complex resource allocation, tight schedule, underground pipeline complex engineering problems. BIM technology, three-dimensional visualization, parameterization, virtual simulation and many other advantages can effectively solve these technical problems. Based on the project of Shenzhen Metro Line 9, BIM technology is innovatively researched throughout the lifecycle of BIM technology in the context of the metro rail transit project rarely used at this stage. The model information file is imported into Navisworks for four-dimensional animation simulation to determine the optimum construction scheme of the shield machine. Subway construction management application platform based on BIM and private cloud technology, the use of cameras and sensors to achieve electronic integration, dynamic monitoring of the operation and maintenance of underground facilities. Make full use of the many advantages of BIM technology to improve the engineering quality and construction efficiency of the subway rail transit project and to complete the operation and maintenance.

  2. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing, procuring...

  3. Assessment of US industry's technology trends and new technology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The utility and effectiveness of a novel approach (the Applications Development, or AD approach), intended to augment the efficiency of NASA's technology utilization (TU) through dissemination of NASA technologies and joint technology development efforts with U.S. industry is tested. The innovative AD approach consists of the following key elements: selection of NASA technologies appearing to have leading edge attributes; interaction with NASA researchers to assess the characteristics and quality of each selected technology; identification of industry's needs in the selected technology areas; structuring the selected technologies in terms of specifications and standards familiar to industry (industrial Spec. Sheets); identification and assessment of industry's interest in the specific selected NASA technologies, utilizing the greatly facilitated communication made possible by the availability of the industrial Spec. Sheets; and matching selected NASA technologies with the needs of selected industries.

  4. SIW based multilayer transition and power divider in LTCC technology

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Hattan

    2013-06-01

    A multilayer transition and balanced power divider are presented for millimeter-wave system-on-package (SoP). These two components operate at Ka-band and exploit the substrate integrate waveguide (SIW) technology with its shielding characteristics and the Low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) technology for its high density integration. A coupling slot has been used to perform vertical integration, which can be easily optimized through its length. The measured input return loss within the bandwidth of interest (32 GHz-38 GHz) is less than -15 dB and -18 dB for the multilayer transition and the power divider, respectively. The lateral dimensions of a multilayer system, such as a feed network of an array, can be greatly reduced by employing these 3D slot-coupled components. © 2013 IEEE.

  5. Technology Transition a Model for Infusion and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Vernotto C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has as part of its charter the mission of transferring technologies developed for the space program into the private sector for the purpose of affording back to the American people the economical and improved quality of life benefits associated with the technologies developed. In recent years considerable effort has been made to use this program for not only transitioning technologies out of the NASA Mission Directorate Programs, but also to transfer technologies into the Mission Directorate Programs and leverage the impact of government and private sector innovation. The objective of this paper is to outline an approach and the creation of a model that brings together industry, government, and commercialization strategies. When these elements are integrated, the probability of successful technology development, technology infusion into the Mission Programs, and commercialization into the private sector is increased. This model primarily addresses technology readiness levels between TRL 3 and TRL 6. This is typically a gap area known as the valley of death. This gap area is too low for commercial entities to invest heavily and not developed enough for major programs to actively pursue. This model has shown promise for increasing the probably of TRL advancement to an acceptable level for NASA programs and/or commercial entities to afford large investments toward either commercialization or infusion.

  6. Technology Sourcing and a 'Creative Transition' in Subsidiaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanastassiou, Marina; Pearce, Robert; Zhang, Si

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on a ‘creative transition' (CT) as a crucial tipping point in the strategic evolution of MNE subsidiaries. Before a CT a subsidiary's operations will be based around application (in a market-seeking or efficiency-seeking strategy) of the successful established technologies...... and products of the MNE group. After the CT (as, for example, a Product Mandate) the subsidiary will be deriving new sources of technology, notably from its host country, and developing new products from these. Thus, we argue, the sources of technology accessed and/or generated by a subsidiary are crucial...... the dominant imperative. But, contrary to traditional Product Mandates, a major strand of this innovation targets an embedded position in China's growth for MNEs....

  7. Fighter aircraft flight control technology design requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of fighter aircraft flight control technology is briefly surveyed. Systems engineering, battle damage considerations for adaptive flutter suppression, in-flight simulation, and artificial intelligence are briefly discussed.

  8. The Impact of Near-term Climate Policy Choices on Technology and Emissions Transition Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, James A.; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of delays associated with currently formulated climate policies (compared to optimal policies) for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the 2030-2050 period for ambitious mitigation strategies. In this period, the most rapid shift to non-greenhouse gas emitting technology occurs. In the delayed response emissions mitigation scenarios, an even faster transition rate in this period is required to compensate for the additional emissions before 2030. Our physical deployment measures indicate that, without CCS, technology deployment rates in the 2030-2050 period would become considerably high. Yet the presence of CCS greatly alleviates the challenges to the transition particularly after the delayed climate policies. The results also highlight the critical role that bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage (BECCS) could play. If this technology is available, transition pathways exceed the emissions budget in the mid-term, removing the excess with BECCS in the long term. Excluding either BE or CCS from the technology portfolio implies that emission reductions need to take place much earlier.

  9. Scenarios for a urban energy transition. Actors, regulations, technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debizet, Gilles; Blanco, Sylvie; Buclet, Nicolas; Forest, Fabrice; Gauthier, Caroline; La Branche, Stephane; Menanteau, Philippe; Schneuwly, Patrice; Tabourdeau, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Cities concentrate populations, consumptions, levers of actions, and are places of various experiments for energy transition. This book aims at giving an overview of possible scenarios of development of renewable energies in urban context. It is based on interviews of actors of the energy, building and urban planning sectors by researchers in town planning, management, technology, political and economic sciences. The authors examine what would occur if large companies would manage entire quarters, if local authorities would supervise production and supply, if the State would take control of all fields of action again, or if consumer cooperatives would exchange energy and pool productions. In its different chapters, the book presents four scenarios of energy coordination in urban context by 2040, discuss energy transition in urban spaces, discuss the perspectives of evolution towards more autonomous cities and quarters from an energetic point of view, and discuss business models and urban energetic innovations

  10. The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission:. [Progress and Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Taylor, William J.; Ginty, Carol A.; Melis, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Mission from formulation through Systems Requirements Review and into preparation for Preliminary Design Review. Accomplishments of the technology maturation phase of the project are included. The presentation then summarizes the transition, due to Agency budget constraints, of CPST from a flight project into a ground project titled evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo).

  11. A Systematic Analysis of Transition Coursework Required for Special Education Licensure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Diehm, Kendra L.; Rowe, Dawn A.; Johnson, Margaret C.; Guilmeus, Jean Francois

    2018-01-01

    The field of secondary special education and transition has long advocated for quality training at the preservice level. However, transition-focused coursework is not required for all special education licensure programs. Licensure programs requiring this coursework do not cover all transition-related knowledge and skills needed for teachers to…

  12. 19 CFR 122.117 - Requirements for transit air cargo transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for transit air cargo transport. 122... Requirements for transit air cargo transport. (a) Transportation—(1) Port to port. Transit air cargo may be... cargo, a receipt shall be given. The receipt shall be made by the airline responsible for transport or...

  13. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Requirements Engineering and Design Technology Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ganska, Ralph

    1995-01-01

    This report reviews the STSC's recommendations for the selection and usage of software engineering products aimed at the requirements analysis and high-level design portions of the software lifecycle...

  15. Participating to the Transition Towards New Energy Technology Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosato, G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyses possible implications for Croatia of a global transition towards new energy technology systems, as depicted by the recent report on scenarios and strategies to 2050 of the International Energy Agency [ETP2008]. The analysis is based upon the present Croatian energy balance. It takes into account some draft results of the USAID-supported Regional Energy Demand Planning (REDP) study under the South East Europe Regional Energy Market Support (SEE REMS) Project. The paper then presents ongoing EC-funded energy research projects, such as RES2020 (Monitoring and Evaluation of the Renewable Energy Sources directives implementation in EU27 and policy recommendations for 2020), REACCESS (Risk of Energy Availability: Common Corridors for Europe Supply Security) and REALISEGRID (REseArch, methodoLogIes and technologieS for the effective development of pan-European key GRID infrastructures to support the achievement of a reliable, competitive and sustainable electricity supply). The participation of Croatian research organizations to EC-funded research projects could make the transition towards new energy system an opportunity for economic development.(author)

  16. Stakeholder and Process Alignment in Navy Installation Technology Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    report : We have numerous technical success stories that are not fully integrated because of certain circumstances or conditions— some of which are totally...simultaneously integrate tech- nologies with existing systems, secure stakeholder support and integrate with shore planning and funding, program and...process requirements, the ARLs measure progress across three domains: technology integration , stakeholders and processes. Hurdles in any one of

  17. Transition process from emerging NDT technology to production inspection application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jappe, William; Wood, Nancy; Johnson, Maurice

    1995-07-01

    The successful application of emerging NDT technologies for specific aging aircraft inspections requires an integration of efforts between aircraft operators, airframe manufacturers, NDT equipment designers, and government regulators. This paper describes the development process that was followed to establish an alternate inspection technique for a DC-10 crown skin butt joint inspection. Initial investigation, intermediate development, and final evaluations are discussed.

  18. Technology requirements and readiness for very large vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Common concerns of very large vehicles in the areas of economics, transportation system interfaces and operational problems were reviewed regarding their influence on vehicle configurations and technology. Fifty-four technology requirements were identified which are judged to be unique, or particularly critical, to very large vehicles. The requirements were about equally divided among the four general areas of aero/hydrodynamics, propulsion and acoustics, structures, and vehicle systems and operations. The state of technology readiness was judged to be poor to fair for slightly more than one half of the requirements. In the classic disciplinary areas, the state of technology readiness appears to be more advanced than for vehicle systems and operations.

  19. 48 CFR 311.7000 - Defining electronic information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defining electronic information technology requirements. 311.7000 Section 311.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH... Accessibility Standards 311.7000 Defining electronic information technology requirements. HHS staff that define...

  20. Digital video technologies and their network requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Tsang; H. Y. Chen; J. M. Brandt; J. A. Hutchins

    1999-11-01

    Coded digital video signals are considered to be one of the most difficult data types to transport due to their real-time requirements and high bit rate variability. In this study, the authors discuss the coding mechanisms incorporated by the major compression standards bodies, i.e., JPEG and MPEG, as well as more advanced coding mechanisms such as wavelet and fractal techniques. The relationship between the applications which use these coding schemes and their network requirements are the major focus of this study. Specifically, the authors relate network latency, channel transmission reliability, random access speed, buffering and network bandwidth with the various coding techniques as a function of the applications which use them. Such applications include High-Definition Television, Video Conferencing, Computer-Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW), and Medical Imaging.

  1. Smart grid standards specifications, requirements, and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takuro; Duan, Bin; Macuha, Martin; Zhou, Zhenyu; Wu, Jun; Tariq, Muhammad; Asfaw, Solomon A

    2015-01-01

    With numerous existing Smart Grid standards, it is clear that governments and industrial organizations world-wide have understood and acknowledged the critical role they play. This timely book is a useful guide for Smart Grid professionals in easily classifying fundamental Smart Grid standards, and to quickly find the building blocks they need to analyse and implement a Smart Grid system. The standards are organized in a systematic manner that aids identification, according to grid requirements. It also covers broader Smart Grid areas including, but not limited to, the following: A fully c

  2. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.37 Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. (a) Performance objectives. (1...

  3. Decentering technology in technology assessment : . Prospects for socio-technical transitions in electric mobility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truffer, Bernhard; Schippl, Jens; Fleischer, Torsten

    Sustainability transitions of sectors like energy, transport or water have become explicit goals of national policy programs in several parts of the world. The governance of associated innovation and transformation processes requires an integrated assessment on how new and seemingly superior

  4. Socio-Economic Impact Assessment of Automated Transit Information Systems Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    This report is the final product of a program to assess the socio-economic impacts of automated transit information system (ATIS) technology deployments on the transit industry's telephone information/marketing function. In the course of this program...

  5. Technological implications of fusion power: requirements and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    The major technological requirements for fusion power, as implied by current conceptual designs of fusion power plants, are identified and assessed relative to the goals of existing technology programs. The focus of the discussion is on the tokamak magnetic confinement concept; however, key technological requirements of mirror magnetic confinement systems and of inertial confinement concepts will also be addressed. The required technology is examined on the basis of three general areas of concern: (a) the power balance, that is, the unique power handling requirements associated with the production of electrical power by fusion; (b) reactor design, focusing primarily on the requirements imposed by a tritium-based fuel cycle, thermal hydraulic considerations, and magnet systems; and (c) materials considerations, including radiation damage effects, neutron-induced activation, and resource limitations

  6. Concept for advanced satellite communications and required technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramler, J. R.; Salzman, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program of NASA is aimed at the development of high risk technologies that will enable exploiting higher frequency bands and techniques for improving frequency reuse. The technologies under development include multiple beam spacecraft antennas, on-board switching and processing, RF devices and components and advanced earth stations. The program focus is on the Ka-band (30/20 GHz) as the implementing frequency since it has five times the bandwidth of either the C- or Ku-bands. However, the technology being developed is applicable to other frequency bands as well and will support a wide range of future communications systems required by NASA, other Government agencies and the commercial sector. An overview is presented of an operational 30/20 GHz satellite system that may evolve. How the system addresses service requirements is discussed, and the technology required and being developed is considered. Previously announced in STAR as N83-11210

  7. Industry-Oriented Competency Requirements for Mechatronics Technology in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2012-01-01

    This study employed a three-phase empirical method to identify competency indicators for mechatronics technology according to industry-oriented criteria. In Phase I, a list of required competencies was compiled using Behavioral Event Interviews (BEI) with three engineers specializing in the field of mechatronics technology. In Phase II, the Delphi…

  8. A Transitive Recommendation System for Information Technology Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Ali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social networks have become a new trend for research among computer scientist around the world. Social network had an impact on users' way of life. One of social network usages is recommendation systems. The need of recommendation systems is arising when users try to know best choice for them in many items types (books, experts, locations, technologies...etc. The problem is that a single person can't try all alternatives in all possibles life goals to compare. Thus, a person has to use his friends' expertise to select better option in any item category. This process is the main idea of “Recommendation Systems”. Recommendation systems usually depend on users-to-items ratings in a network (graph. Two main challenges for recommendation systems are accuracy of recommendation and computation size. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a suggested technique for transitive recommendation system based on users' collaborative ratings, and also to balance loading of computation. All this has to be applied on a special type of social network. Our work studied the transitivity usage in connections to get a relation (path as a recommendation for nodes not directly connected. The target social network has eight types of nodes. So, there are techniques that are not suitable to this complex type of network. Those we can present a new support for recommending items of several types to users with several types. We believe that this functionality hasn't been fully provided elsewhere. We have suggested using single source shortest path algorithm combined with Map Reduce technique, and mathematically deduced that we have a speeding up of algorithm by 10% approximately. Our testing results shows an accuracy of 89% and false rejection of 99% compared to traditional algorithms with less configuration parameters and more steady count of recommendations.

  9. Wireless Technology Use Case Requirement Analysis for Future Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Ali; Wilkerson, DeLisa

    2016-01-01

    This report presents various use case scenarios for wireless technology -including radio frequency (RF), optical, and acoustic- and studies requirements and boundary conditions in each scenario. The results of this study can be used to prioritize technology evaluation and development and in the long run help in development of a roadmap for future use of wireless technology. The presented scenarios cover the following application areas: (i) Space Vehicles (manned/unmanned), (ii) Satellites and Payloads, (iii) Surface Explorations, (iv) Ground Systems, and (v) Habitats. The requirement analysis covers two parallel set of conditions. The first set includes the environmental conditions such as temperature, radiation, noise/interference, wireless channel characteristics and accessibility. The second set of requirements are dictated by the application and may include parameters such as latency, throughput (effective data rate), error tolerance, and reliability. This report provides a comprehensive overview of all requirements from both perspectives and details their effects on wireless system reliability and network design. Application area examples are based on 2015 NASA Technology roadmap with specific focus on technology areas: TA 2.4, 3.3, 5.2, 5.5, 6.4, 7.4, and 10.4 sections that might benefit from wireless technology.

  10. Emergence of controversy in technology transitions: Green revolution and Bt cotton in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramani, S.V.; Thutupalli, A.

    2015-01-01

    Technology transitions following radical technological breakthroughs are often marked by controversies and the transitions to Green Revolution (GR) and Genetically Modified (GM) seeds in India were no exceptions to this rule. Controversies can trigger social dilemmas, but in economics we do not yet

  11. Fuels from microalgae: Technology status, potential, and research requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neenan, B.; Feinberg, D.; Hill, A.; McIntosh, R.; Terry, K.

    1986-08-01

    Although numerous options for the production of fuels from microalgae have been proposed, our analysis indicates that only two qualify for extensive development - gasoline and ester fuel. In developing the comparisons that support this conclusion, we have identified the major areas of microalgae production and processing that require extensive development. Technology success requires developing and testing processes that fully utilize the polar and nonpolar lipids produced by microalgae. Process designs used in these analyses were derived from fragmented, preliminary laboratory data. These results must be substantiated and integrated processes proposed, tested, and refined to be able to evaluate the commercial feasibility from microalgae. The production of algal feedstocks for processing to gasoline or ester fuel requires algae of high productivity and high lipid content that efficiently utilize saline waters. Species screening and development suggest that algae can achieve required standards taken individually, but algae that can meet the integrated requirements still elude researchers. Effective development of fuels from microalgae technology requires that R and D be directed toward meeting the integrated standards set out in the analysis. As technology analysts, it is inappropriate for us to dictate how the R and D effort should proceed to meet these standards. We end our role by noting that alternative approaches to meeting the feasibility targets have been identified, and it is now the task of program managers and scientists to choose the appropriate approach to assure the greatest likelihood of realizing a commercially viable technology. 70 refs., 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  12. Redefining Requirements of Ancillary Services for Technology Agnostic Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondy, Daniel Esteban Morales; MacDonald, Jason; Kara, Emre Can

    2018-01-01

    New sources for ancillary services are needed, yet the requirements for service provision in most countries are explicitly formulated for traditional generators. This leads to waste of the potential for new technologies to deliver ancillary services. In order to harness this potential, we propose...... to parameterize the requirements of ancillary services so that reserves can be built by combining the advantageous properties of different technologies. The proposal is exemplified through a laboratory test where it shown that the system needs can be covered through cheaper and smaller reserves....

  13. Long-Term Stewardship Program Science and Technology Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joan McDonald

    2002-09-01

    Many of the United States’ hazardous and radioactively contaminated waste sites will not be sufficiently remediated to allow unrestricted land use because funding and technology limitations preclude cleanup to pristine conditions. This means that after cleanup is completed, the Department of Energy will have long-term stewardship responsibilities to monitor and safeguard more than 100 sites that still contain residual contamination. Long-term stewardship encompasses all physical and institutional controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms required to protect human health and the environment from the hazards remaining. The Department of Energy Long-Term Stewardship National Program is in the early stages of development, so considerable planning is still required to identify all the specific roles and responsibilities, policies, and activities needed over the next few years to support the program’s mission. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was tasked with leading the development of Science and Technology within the Long-Term Stewardship National Program. As part of that role, a task was undertaken to identify the existing science and technology related requirements, identify gaps and conflicts that exist, and make recommendations to the Department of Energy for future requirements related to science and technology requirements for long-term stewardship. This work is summarized in this document.

  14. Requirements for supercomputing in energy research: The transition to massively parallel computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses: The emergence of a practical path to TeraFlop computing and beyond; requirements of energy research programs at DOE; implementation: supercomputer production computing environment on massively parallel computers; and implementation: user transition to massively parallel computing.

  15. Memo Clarifying Requirements and State Reporting Guidance to Transition to the Revised Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memorandum provides guidance to primacy agencies with enforcement responsibility under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) concerning the requirements to transition public water systems (PWSs) from the Total Coliform Rule (TCR) to the RTCR

  16. The impact of technology on fighter aircraft requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.; Foss, W. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Technology integration studies were made to examine the impact of emerging technologies on fighter aircraft. The technologies examined included advances in aerodynamics, controls, structures, propulsion, and systems and were those which appeared capable of being ready for application by the turn of the century. A primary impetus behind large increases in figher capability will be the rapid increase in fighter engine thrust-to-weight ratio. High thrust-weight engines, integrated with other advanced and emerging technologies, can result in small extremely maneuverable fighter aircraft that have thrust-weight ratios of 1.4+ and weight one-half as much as today's fighters. Future fighter aircraft requirements are likely to include a turn capability in excess of 7g's throughout much of the maneuver envelope, post-stall maneuverability, STOVL or VTOL, and a single engine for low cost.

  17. TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING WORKSHOP REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

    2009-06-30

    In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and

  18. Technology Requirements For In Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

    2009-01-01

    In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and where the private

  19. Clean air program : use of hydrogen to power the advanced technology transit bus (ATTB) : an assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Advanced Technology Transit Bus (ATTB), developed under primary funding from : the U.S. DOT/Federal Transit Administration (FTA), currently uses a power plant : based on a natural gas burning IC engine-generator set. FTA is interested in : demons...

  20. Understanding the Transition from School to University in Music and Music Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterson, Julia; Russ, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the transition from school to university in Music and Music Technology, continuing the discussion of transitional issues which began in Volume 2 of "Arts and Humanities in Higher Education". The focus of the article is a survey of undergraduates, examining areas that were key to their first experience of studying…

  1. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP): A Proven, Growth Technology for Fast Transit Human Missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The "fast conjunction" long surface stay mission option was selected for NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study because it provided adequate time at Mars (approx. 540 days) for the crew to explore the planet's geological diversity while also reducing the "1-way" transit times to and from Mars to approx. 6 months. Short transit times are desirable in order to reduce the debilitating physiological effects on the human body that can result from prolonged exposure to the zero-gravity (0-gE) and radiation environments of space. Recent measurements from the RAD detector attached to the Curiosity rover indicate that astronauts would receive a radiation dose of approx. 0.66 Sv (approx. 66 rem)-the limiting value established by NASA-during their 1-year journey in deep space. Proven nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) technology, with its high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp approx. 900 s), can cut 1-way transit times by as much as 50 percent by increasing the propellant capacity of the Mars transfer vehicle (MTV). No large technology scale-ups in engine size are required for these short transit missions either since the smallest engine tested during the Rover program-the 25 klbf "Pewee" engine is sufficient when used in a clustered arrangement of three to four engines. The "Copernicus" crewed MTV developed for DRA 5.0 is a 0-gE design consisting of three basic components: (1) the NTP stage (NTPS); (2) the crewed payload element; and (3) an integrated "saddle truss" and LH2 propellant drop tank assembly that connects the two elements. With a propellant capacity of approx. 190 t, Copernicus can support 1-way transit times ranging from approx. 150 to 220 days over the 15-year synodic cycle. The paper examines the impact on vehicle design of decreasing transit times for the 2033 mission opportunity. With a fourth "upgraded" SLS/HLV launch, an "in-line" LH2 tank element can be added to Copernicus allowing 1-way transit times of 130 days. To achieve 100

  2. Technical requirement of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Tillak, M.; Gierszwski, P.; Grover, J.; Puigh, R.; Sze, D.K.; Berwald, D.

    1986-06-01

    The technical issues and requirements of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology (FNT) have been investigated. The nuclear subsystems addressed are: a) blanket, b) radiation shield, c) tritium processing system, and d) plasma interactive components. Emphasis has been placed on the important and complex development problems of the blanket. A technical planning process for FNT has been developed and applied, including four major elements: 1) characterization of issues, 2) quantification of testing requirements, 3) evaluation of facilities, and 4) development of a test plan to identify the role, timing, characteristics and costs of major experiments and facilities

  3. Transitioning science and technology into acquisition programs: assessing one government laboratory’s processes

    OpenAIRE

    Bonano, Norman; Magidson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This paper examined the strengths and weaknesses of the overall technology transition process between Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) and its partnered program offices in transitioning technology into established Programs of Record. This examination was a direct review and comparison of Department of Defense policies, U.S. Government Accountability Office reports and recommendations, and ARDEC and the prog...

  4. Sustainable transition of socio-technological systems: How can Governance Network Research and Transition Theory contribute to the transition to biofuel for transportation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Erik; Stærdahl, Jens; Søndergård, Bent

    The paper suggests that the challenge of sustainability demands a shift of the attention of environmental planning and policy to the transition of socio-technological systems. Deliberate planning for sustainability then becomes a question of addressing governance structures of socio-technological...... activities provides both a theoretical and empirical body of knowledge of such governance processes. The paper presents these approaches and demonstrates how they can be used in relation to the process of developing bio-fuel systems for transportation.......-technological systems, calling attention to how such governance structures emerge, stabilize and become dominant, which functions governance structures have to serve to become efficient, and how they can be made subject to deliberate and purposeful shaping and transition. Taking this approach, research in planning...

  5. Demonstration of artificial intelligence technology for transit railcar diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report will be of interest to railcar maintenance professionals concerned with improving railcar maintenance fault-diagnostic capabilities through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. It documents the results of a demonstration ...

  6. Evaluation of automated vehicle technology for transit : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Automated transportation has been portrayed in : futuristic literature since the 19th century, but : making vehicles truly autonomous has only been : possible in recent decades with advanced control : and computer technologies. Automating cars is a :...

  7. 77 FR 7095 - Transitional Program for Covered Business Method Patents-Definition of Technological Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... upon either the patent failing to meet the proposed definition for technological invention or because... Patents-- Definition of Technological Invention AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office... invention in a transitional post-grant review proceeding for covered business method patents. The provision...

  8. Technology Transition and Adoption: A Study in Search of Metrics for Evaluating Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    transfer programs ( Spann , Adams, and Souder, 1995, February). Measuring successful transition gives justification for R&D funding provided by the...organizations using only cost, schedule, and performance to track their success. As Spann , Adams, and Souder (1995, February) summarized, [Sponsors...of the International Conference on Engineering Design. Stanford, CA: Stanford University. Spann , M. S., Adams, M., & Souder, W. E. (1995, February

  9. Perception of transition readiness and preferences for use of technology in transition programs: teens' ideas for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Mark A; Lawson, Erica F; von Scheven, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to facilitate transition of care to adult providers for adolescents with chronic disease are not uniformly successful and many patients encounter challenges. The goal of this study was to assess transition readiness and preferences for tools to aid in the transition process with an emphasis on technology and social media. We surveyed and performed focus groups on patients aged 13-21 years from a pediatric university-based rheumatology and general pediatric practice. Demographics and transition readiness were assessed using a questionnaire. Transition readiness was assessed by examining patient knowledge and independence with care. Focus groups were conducted to elicit perspectives about desirable features of a transition program and useful tools. Thirty-five patients completed surveys; and 20 patients and 13 of their parents participated in a focus group. The median patient age was 17 years and 74.3% were female. A Likert scale (0-10, 10=most) was used to evaluate concern over changing to an adult medical provider, (mean=6.4, SD=2.6), preparedness for disease self-management (mean=6.0, SD=2.8), and perceived importance of self-managing their condition (mean=7.1, SD=3.1). Themes that emerged from focus groups included a desire for support groups with other teens, a preference for using text messaging for communication and a desire for an online health management program. Teens with chronic disease are able to identify health maintenance tasks and strategies that will aid in developing independence with healthcare management. These findings support the idea that developing engaging applications and support groups will assist teens in the transitioning.

  10. Assessment of the impact of dipped guideways on urban rail transit systems: Ventilation and safety requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The ventilation and fire safety requirements for subway tunnels with dipped profiles between stations as compared to subway tunnels with level profiles were evaluated. This evaluation is based upon computer simulations of a train fire emergency condition. Each of the tunnel configurations evaluated was developed from characteristics that are representative of modern transit systems. The results of the study indicate that: (1) The level tunnel system required about 10% more station cooling than dipped tunnel systems in order to meet design requirements; and (2) The emergency ventilation requirements are greater with dipped tunnel systems than with level tunnel systems.

  11. Pedagogy with Information and Communications Technologies in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of ways in which pedagogy with information and communications technologies (ICTs) may need to adapt to accommodate to a major shift in our conceptions of knowledge and learning. A holistic approach to this analysis based on Checkland's "systems thinking" suggested changes in pedagogy needed for 21st…

  12. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER NETWORKS ON PAPAYA PRODUCTION WITH TRANSITIONAL GROWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Cano-Reyes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Social networks analysis applied to rural innovation processes becomes a very useful technology transfer tool, since it helps to understand the complexity of social relationships among people and/or institutions in their environment, and it also defines those innovation networks given in specific working groups or regions. This study was conducted from April to May 2011 to determine those networks and key players present in the group of growers associated as “Productora y Comercializadora de Papaya de Cotaxtla S.P.R. de R.L.”, that influence the technology transfer process in Cotaxtla, Veracruz, Mexico. Data were analyzed using UCINET 6 software. Three centrality measures were obtained: range, degree of mediation and closeness. Of 32 network players, 27 actively diffuse innovations according to their interests; alliances must be established with them to transfer technology. Four growers stand out as central actors, which along with the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agricolas y Pecuarias, the Colegio de Postgraduados and the growers’ organization itself, could be the most appropriate actors to establish a technology transfer program to accelerate the diffusion and adoption of innovations. Wholesalers, middlemen and credit institutions do not participate in this process, but having capital they could be incorporated in the innovation diffusion process.

  13. 76 FR 22833 - Swap Data Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements: Pre-Enactment and Transition Swaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... the IFRs. Comments generally fell into one or more of several broad categories and in a number of instances were common to both IFRs. Some commenters observed that issuance of IFRs in advance of regulations... required to keep records as provided in the Commission's IFRs concerning pre-enactment and transition swaps...

  14. Technology scale and supply chains in a secure, affordable and low carbon energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoggett, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy systems need to decarbonise, provide security and remain affordable. • There is uncertainty over which technologies will best enable this to happen. • A strategy to deal with uncertainty is to assess a technologies ability to show resilience, flexibility and adaptability. • Scale is important and smaller scale technologies are like to display the above characteristics. • Smaller scale technologies are therefore more likely to enable a sustainable, secure, and affordable energy transition. - Abstract: This research explores the relationship between technology scale, energy security and decarbonisation within the UK energy system. There is considerable uncertainty about how best to deliver on these goals for energy policy, but a focus on supply chains and their resilience can provide useful insights into the problems uncertainty causes. Technology scale is central to this, and through an analysis of the supply chains of nuclear power and solar photovoltaics, it is suggested that smaller scale technologies are more likely to support and enable a secure, low carbon energy transition. This is because their supply chains are less complex, show more flexibility and adaptability, and can quickly respond to changes within an energy system, and as such they are more resilient than large scale technologies. These characteristics are likely to become increasingly important in a rapidly changing energy system, and prioritising those technologies that demonstrate resilience, flexibility and adaptability will better enable a transition that is rapid, sustainable, secure and affordable

  15. Technology requirements for commercial applications of inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.G.; Rossi, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research is directed primarily at physics experiments intended to provide confidence in the scientific feasibility of the basic concept. In conjunction with these experiments, a variety of laser and particle beam drivers having potential for eventual use in fusion power plants is being developed. Expectations are that the scientific feasibility of ICF will be demonstrated in the latter part of the 1980s. At that time, the emphasis of the program will shift to engineering, economic, environmental, and licensing issues with the necessary technology development effort continuing into the early part of the next century. This paper discusses the technology requirements for the successive phases of engineering development leading to commercial application of ICF. The engineering areas requiring significant effort for ICF application include high average power driver development; pulsed high-energy power supply development; reactor cavity and heat transport system design; tritium extraction and control; commercial pellet development; pellet injection, tracking, and targeting systems design; materials radiation, fatigue, and corrosion behavior; and reactor plant systems integration and demonstration

  16. Research of paste transition to substrate in LTCC-technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litunov, S. N.; Yurkov, V. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The electronics development demands for accuracy of printed technologies, in particular, to screen printing. Under a flat blade operation the print form is deformed and the image is distorted relative to the original. A squeegee in a form of a smooth cylinder reduces distortion, but it allows obtaining satisfactory print quality only when using high density grids. The paper shows findings of using roller squeegee with dosed ink supply. The roller squeegee is provided with an elastic layer. Dosage is carried out due to the cells on the elastic layer surface. There were used meshes 100-31 and 120-34 for the stencil. The experiments were carried out with layers of photopolymers and rubber. The carried out calculations made possible to choose the optimum printing pressure. Under the selected conditions, the printed image had minimal distortion. The findings allow drawing a conclusion about the possibility of roller squeegee using in chips manufacture according to LTCC-technology.

  17. The Transition Of Fiber-Optic Gyro Technology Into Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, E.; Wagoner, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in recent years toward the development of producible fiber-optic rotation sensors. An overview is presented of the movement of the fiber-optic gyro into a product at McDonnell Douglas from early developments to a fieldable oil drilling tool. The current state-of-the-art of fiber-optic gyro technology with respect to near term product prospects is assessed.

  18. Transition towards Sustainable Solutions: Product, Service, Technology, and Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Nasiri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the horse industry can be considered as an important industry in European countries and has a major role in agricultural industry throughout the world. Although today the diversity of the horse-related companies provides new markets and business opportunities, there are also some sustainable issues which needs to be addressed. Therefore, this study contributes to this research gap by reviewing the concept of sustainability and existing approaches to find sustainable solutions for companies. These sustainable approaches can be applied to products, services and technologies as well as business models, such as the product-service-system (PSS, circular economy (CE and industrial symbiosis (IS. Although there seems to be a growing understanding of sustainable approaches and their role in sustainable development, there is a lack of research at the empirical level regarding the types of sustainability approaches (i.e., technologies, services, products and business models that evolve in specific industries. The empirical data in this research have been collected from a cross-section of Finnish horse industry operators to determine how willing companies are to exploit approaches to sustainable solutions, as well as what the existing sustainable solutions are in this industry. The response rate of this study is approximately 24 percent, including 139 received valid responses among the sample of 580 operators.

  19. Law in Transition Biblioessay: Globalization, Human Rights, Environment, Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marien

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As globalization continues, many transformations in international and domestic laws areunderway or called for. There are too many laws and too few, too much law that is inadequateor obsolete, and too much law-breaking. This biblioessay covers some 100 recentbooks, nearly all recently published, arranged in four categories. 1 International Lawincludes six overviews/textbooks on comparative law, laws related to warfare and security,pushback against demands of globalization, and gender perspectives; 2 Human Rightsencompasses general overviews and normative visions, several books on how some statesviolate human rights, five items on how good laws can end poverty and promote prosperity,and laws regulating working conditions and health rights; 3 Environment/Resources coversgrowth of international environmental law, visions of law for a better environmental future,laws to govern genetic resources and increasingly stressed water resources, two books onprospects for climate change liability, and items on toxic hazards and problems of compliance;4 Technology, Etc. identifies eight books on global crime and the failed war on drugs,books on the response to terrorism and guarding privacy and mobility in our high-tech age,seven books on how infotech is changing law and legal processes while raising intellectualproperty questions, biomedical technologies and the law, and general views on the need forupdated laws and constitutions. In sum, this essay suggests the need for deeper and timelyanalysis of the many books on changes in law.

  20. A Software Technology Transition Entropy Based Engineering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    D., The Double Helix, A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA , Simon and Schuster, New York, 1968. (Wehrl 1978) Wehrl, Alfred...Basili, Victor R., and Musa , John D., “The Future Engineering of Software: A Management Perspective,” Computer, pp. 90-96, September 1991. (Basili...calculations required. The tables and data were extracted from a supporting document (Behnke 2001) which describes the calculations. This represents

  1. Mars Sample Return: Mars Ascent Vehicle Mission and Technology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Huynh, Loc C.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Jiang, Xun J.

    2013-01-01

    A Mars Sample Return mission is the highest priority science mission for the next decade recommended by the recent Decadal Survey of Planetary Science, the key community input process that guides NASAs science missions. A feasibility study was conducted of a potentially simple and low cost approach to Mars Sample Return mission enabled by the use of developing commercial capabilities. Previous studies of MSR have shown that landing an all up sample return mission with a high mass capacity lander is a cost effective approach. The approach proposed is the use of an emerging commercially available capsule to land the launch vehicle system that would return samples to Earth. This paper describes the mission and technology requirements impact on the launch vehicle system design, referred to as the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV).

  2. Transitions in the wrong direction? Digital technologies and daily life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2013-01-01

    . The purpose of this paper is to complement the existing research by applying a perspective in which everyday life takes centre stage. A theoretical framework for describing and analysing the energy impacts of everyday life is outlined, based on a combination of practice theory and time geography....... The framework is applied to a discussion of how ICT co-develops with changing everyday practices and energy-demanding features of everyday life. Based on empirical findings, we explore how the use of ICT affects practices in relation to time and space, and it is argued that observed changes may increase energy......The environmental implications of information and communication technology (ICT) have been the subject of study since the early 1990s. Although previous research covers energy issues quite extensively, the treatment of the energy impacts of ICT integration in everyday life is still inadequate...

  3. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Mahatab

    2011-01-01

    Technology and policy play a twofold role in international environmental laws. Stronger environmental policies encourage new green technologies and likewise, better technologies make it easier to regulate. “Technology transfer” refers to the transfer from one party, an association or institution that developed the technology, to another that adopts, adapts, and uses it. As different kinds of threats posed by climate change are continuously increasing all over the world the issue of “technolog...

  4. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Bourov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With due account for the coming new (VI-th world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technological environment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th technological structure level basic technologies are shown for industrial and household waste processing techniques as an example.

  5. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Bourov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With due account for the coming new (VI-th world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technologicalenvironment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th technological structure level basic technologies are shown for industrial and household waste processing techniques as an example.

  6. A Model for Assessing the Extent of Transition to Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrenfurth, Michael J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Implementation of the Illinois Plan for Industrial Technology Education was assessed through interviews with 117 teachers. The assessment model (based on Stufflebeam's Context, Input, Process, Product) blended qualitative and quantitative information. Six key dimensions of change were identified, and the Transition Assessment Inventory proved…

  7. An Analysis of Technological Issues Emanating from Faculty Transition to a New Learning Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanga, Mapopa William

    2016-01-01

    This case study investigated the process 119 faculty members underwent as they transitioned from using Desire to Learn (D2L) learning management system (LMS), to using Canvas LMS. Other than analyzing technological issues faculty members encountered while navigating various aspects of the Canvas interface, the study also analyzed technological…

  8. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (Transitional Provisions) Act 1987 - No 4 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Act implements certain transitional provisions consequent to the enactment of the ANSTO Act 1987. The legislation provides for the continuation of the body corporate from its present form as the Australian Atomic Energy Commission to the new body corporate, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. (NEA) [fr

  9. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Mahatab

    Technology and policy play a twofold role in international environmental laws. Stronger environmental policies encourage new green technologies and likewise, better technologies make it easier to regulate. “Technology transfer” refers to the transfer from one party, an association or institution...... that developed the technology, to another that adopts, adapts, and uses it. As different kinds of threats posed by climate change are continuously increasing all over the world the issue of “technology transfer” especially the transfer of environmentally sound technologies has become one of the key topics...... of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  10. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    OpenAIRE

    B. L. Bourov; E. S. Dashut; N. I. Komkov

    2011-01-01

    With due account for the coming new (VI-th) world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technologicalenvironment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th ...

  11. Overview of bladder heating technology: matching capabilities with clinical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; van Rhoon, Gerard C.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate temperature hyperthermia (40–450°C for one hour) is emerging as an effective treatment to enhance best available chemotherapy strategies for bladder cancer. A rapidly increasing number of clinical trials have investigated the feasibility and efficacy of treating bladder cancer with combined intravesical chemotherapy and moderate temperature hyperthermia. To date, most studies have concerned treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) limited to the interior wall of the bladder. Following the promising results of initial clinical trials, investigators are now considering protocols for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). This paper provides a brief overview of the devices and techniques used for heating bladder cancer. Systems are described for thermal conduction heating of bladder wall via circulation of hot fluid, intravesical microwave antenna heating, capacitively coupled RF current heating, and radiofrequency phased array deep regional heating of the pelvis. Relative heating characteristics of the available technologies are compared based on published feasibility studies, and the systems correlated with clinical requirements for effective treatment of MIBC and NMIBC. PMID:26939993

  12. Emerging Requirements for Technology Management: A Sector-based Scenario Planning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Patrick Philbin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the emerging requirements for technology management will help organisations to prepare for the future and remain competitive. Indeed technology management as a discipline needs to develop and respond to societal and industrial needs as well as the corresponding technology challenges. Therefore, following a review of technology forecasting methodologies, a sector-based scenario planning approach has been used to derive the emerging requirements for technology management. This structured framework provided an analytical lens to focus on the requirements for managing technology in the healthcare, energy and higher education sectors over the next 5-10 years. These requirements include the need for new business models to support the adoption of technologies; integration of new technologies with existing delivery channels; management of technology options including R&D project management; technology standards, validation and interoperability; and decision-making tools to support technology investment.

  13. Review on the Traction System Sensor Technology of a Rail Transit Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghua Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-speed intelligent rail transit has increased the number of sensors applied on trains. These play an important role in train state control and monitoring. These sensors generally work in a severe environment, so the key problem for sensor data acquisition is to ensure data accuracy and reliability. In this paper, we follow the sequence of sensor signal flow, present sensor signal sensing technology, sensor data acquisition, and processing technology, as well as sensor fault diagnosis technology based on the voltage, current, speed, and temperature sensors which are commonly used in train traction systems. Finally, intelligent sensors and future research directions of rail transit train sensors are discussed.

  14. Review on the Traction System Sensor Technology of a Rail Transit Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianghua; Xu, Junfeng; Liao, Wu; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The development of high-speed intelligent rail transit has increased the number of sensors applied on trains. These play an important role in train state control and monitoring. These sensors generally work in a severe environment, so the key problem for sensor data acquisition is to ensure data accuracy and reliability. In this paper, we follow the sequence of sensor signal flow, present sensor signal sensing technology, sensor data acquisition, and processing technology, as well as sensor fault diagnosis technology based on the voltage, current, speed, and temperature sensors which are commonly used in train traction systems. Finally, intelligent sensors and future research directions of rail transit train sensors are discussed. PMID:28604615

  15. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2013-01-01

    SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

  16. How energy technology innovation affects transition of coal resource-based economy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Pibin; Wang, Ting; Li, Dan; Zhou, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research paper is to investigate factors and mechanisms that may facilitate the transition from coal resource-based economy to sustainability. Based on the energy technology innovation theory, factors that may influence the transition of coal resource-based economy were categorized into four types, including: innovation policy, innovation input, innovation ability, and innovation organization. Hypotheses were proposed regarding the mechanisms of these factors. Data were collected from surveys administered to 314 Chinese energy firms, and a structural equation model (SEM) was employed to test the hypotheses. Ten of fifteen hypotheses were retained based on the reliability tests, validity tests, and SEM. The results show that the four proposed factors are crucial in transforming the coal resource-based economy, and the effects become statistically significant through three intermediate variables, namely, transition of energy consumption structure, correction of resource wealth investment, and improvement of transition environment. - Highlights: •Approximately, 66% of energy relies on coal in China. •Serious environment problems have occurred in many coal-based regions. •Energy technology innovation can promote the transition of coal-based economy. •China should accelerate the development of clean energy.

  17. Information Technology: The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Transition of Advanced Information Technology Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ugone, Mary

    2002-01-01

    .... The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's mission is to develop imaginative, innovative, and often high-risk research ideas offering a significant technological impact on DoD and commercial systems...

  18. 76 FR 57044 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Ensuring Safe Transitions From Hospital to Home”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Hospital to Home'' Authority: 15 U.S.C. 3719. AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The ``Ensuring Safe Transitions from Hospital to Home... the head of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, for claims by...

  19. Requiring sobriety at program entry: impact on outcomes in supported transitional housing for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger J; Kasprow, Wesley; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    An important distinction in models of housing for the homeless is whether programs that require abstinence prior to program admission produce better outcomes than unrestricted programs. Data from a large transitional housing program were used to compare client characteristics of and outcomes from programs requiring abstinence at admission and programs not requiring abstinence. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Northeast Program Evaluation Center provided records of individuals who were admitted into, and discharged from, the VA Grant and Per Diem program in 2003-2005. Records contained information from intake interviews, program discharge information, and descriptions of provider characteristics. Analyses were based on 3,188 veteran records, 1,250 from programs requiring sobriety at admission and 1,938 from programs without a sobriety requirement. Group differences were examined with t tests and chi square analyses; predictors of program outcome were determined with logistic regression. Individuals using drugs or alcohol at program admission had more problematic histories, as indicated by several general health and mental health variables, and shorter program stays. There were significant differences between groups in the frequency of program completion, recidivism for homelessness, and employment on program discharge, but effect sizes for these analyses were uniformly small and of questionable importance. Regression analyses did not find meaningful support for the importance of sobriety on program entry on any of the outcome measures. The results add evidence to the small body of literature supporting the position that sobriety on program entry is not a critical variable in determining outcomes for individuals in transitional housing programs.

  20. Technology and transition : ‘Progressive Evolution of Regimes and the Consequences for Energy Regime Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Read, S.A.; Lindhult, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Transition of energy systems has been under-theorised. We have argued previously that energy efficiency as a strategy for fossil fuel replacement is inadequate as energy demand is not being reduced by efficiency alone. This paper is intended to elaborate further on the reasons. We require better

  1. 75 FR 15655 - Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections... Request for Requirements for Control Technology Determinations from Major Sources in Accordance with Clean... available from the Clean Air Technology Center developed pursuant to section 112(l)(3) of the Act; (5...

  2. 48 CFR 1352.239-72 - Security requirements for information technology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... information technology resources. 1352.239-72 Section 1352.239-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Clauses 1352.239-72 Security requirements for information technology resources. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.270(b), insert the following clause: Security Requirements for Information Technology Resources...

  3. 14 CFR 1274.937 - Security requirements for unclassified information technology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... information technology resources. 1274.937 Section 1274.937 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... Conditions § 1274.937 Security requirements for unclassified information technology resources. Security Requirements for Unclassified Information Technology Resources July 2002 (a) The Recipient shall be responsible...

  4. 42 CFR 495.336 - Health information technology planning advance planning document requirements (HIT PAPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health information technology planning advance... STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.336 Health information technology planning advance planning document requirements...

  5. Costs and Technology of Public Transit Systems in Italy:Some Insights to Face Inefficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Fraquelli; Massimiliano Piacenza; Graziano Abrate

    2001-01-01

    This study provides fresh evidence about the characteristics of technology and cost structure of public transit systems in Italy. The aim is to suggest useful guidelines for facing detected inefficiencies. The analysis is carried out through the estimation of a translog variable cost function. The sample includes 45 Italian public companies. Firms are observed in the years 1996, 1997 and 1998, and operate both in the urban and extra-urban compartments. Results support previous evidence on the...

  6. Task 4 supporting technology. Densification requirements definition and test objectives. Propellant densification requirements definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lak, Tibor; Weeks, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    The primary challenge of the X-33 CAN is to build and test a prototype LO2 and LH2 densification ground support equipment (GSE) unit, and perform tank thermodynamic testing within the 15 month phase 1 period. The LO2 and LH2 propellant densification system will be scaled for the IPTD LO2 and LH2 tank configurations. The IPTD tanks were selected for the propellant technology demonstration because of the potential benefits to the phase 1 plan: tanks will be built in time to support thermodynamic testing; minimum cost; minimum schedule risk; future testing at MSFC will build on phase 1 data base; and densification system will be available to support X-33 and RLV engine test at IPTD. The objective of the task 1 effort is to define the preliminary requirements of the propellant densification GSE and tank recirculation system. The key densification system design parameters to be established in Task 1 are: recirculation flow rate; heat exchanger inlet temperature; heat exchanger outlet temperature; maximum heat rejection rate; vent flow rate (GN2 and GH2); densification time; and tank pressure level.

  7. Transition to Glass: Pilot Training for High-Technology Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Chute, Rebecca D.; Moses, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This report examines the activities of a major commercial air carrier between 1993 and late 1996 as it acquired an advanced fleet of high-technology aircraft (Boeing 757). Previously, the airline's fleet consisted of traditional (non-glass) aircraft, and this report examines the transition from a traditional fleet to a glass one. A total of 150 pilots who were entering the B-757 transition training volunteered for the study, which consisted of three query phases: (1) first day of transition training, (2) 3 to 4 months after transition training, and (3) 12 to 14 months after initial operating experience. Of these initial 150 pilots, 99 completed all three phases of the study, with each phase consisting of probes on attitudes and experiences associated with their training and eventual transition to flying the line. In addition to the three questionnaires, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Although the primary focus of this study was on the flight training program, additional factors such as technical support, documentation, and training aids were investigated as well. The findings generally indicate that the pilot volunteers were highly motivated and very enthusiastic about their training program. In addition, the group had low levels of apprehension toward automation and expressed a high degree of satisfaction toward their training. However, there were some concerns expressed regarding the deficiencies in some of the training aids and lack of a free-play flight management system training device.

  8. 48 CFR 652.239-71 - Security Requirements for Unclassified Information Technology Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Unclassified Information Technology Resources. 652.239-71 Section 652.239-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Provisions and Clauses 652.239-71 Security Requirements for Unclassified Information Technology Resources. As... Technology Resources (SEP 2007) (a) General. The Contractor shall be responsible for information technology...

  9. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  10. Requirements for and barriers towards interoperable ehealth technology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijeweme-d'Hollosy, Wendeline; van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Huygens, Martine; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Despite eHealth technology's rapid growth, eHealth applications are rarely embedded within primary care, mostly because systems lack interoperability. This article identifies requirements for, and barriers towards, interoperable eHealth technology from healthcare professionals' perspective -- the

  11. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency: Key Factors Drive Transition of Technologies, but Better Training and Data Dissemination Can Increase Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    would permit military computing systems to provide critical functionality at all times, despite damage caused by unintentional software errors or...operations. However, in the other two cases, an immediate military need for the technology was not as prevalent . A fifth program that transitioned...included several technological components, including volume bragg grating (VBG) technology. VBG is a transparent device made of refractive glass

  12. Information technology - Security techniques - Information security management systems - Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    ISO/IEC 27001:2005 covers all types of organizations (e.g. commercial enterprises, government agencies, not-for profit organizations). ISO/IEC 27001:2005 specifies the requirements for establishing, implementing, operating, monitoring, reviewing, maintaining and improving a documented Information Security Management System within the context of the organization's overall business risks. It specifies requirements for the implementation of security controls customized to the needs of individual organizations or parts thereof. ISO/IEC 27001:2005 is designed to ensure the selection of adequate and proportionate security controls that protect information assets and give confidence to interested parties. ISO/IEC 27001:2005 is intended to be suitable for several different types of use, including the following: use within organizations to formulate security requirements and objectives; use within organizations as a way to ensure that security risks are cost effectively managed; use within organizations to ensure comp...

  13. Coated fuel particles: requirements and status of fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Vygen, P.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel cycle, design, and irradiation performance requirements impose restraints on the fabrication processes. Both kernel and coating fabrication processes are flexible enough to adapt to the needs of the various existing and proposed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Extensive experience has demonstrated that fuel kernels with excellent sphericity and uniformity can be produced by wet chemical processes. Similarly experience has shown that the various multilayer coatings can be produced to fully meet design and specification requirements. Quality reliability of coated fuel particles is ensured by quality control and quality assurance programs operated by an aduiting system that includes licensing officials and the customer

  14. Transition Management: Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şiir Kilkiş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper integrates several streams of literature in transition management and proposes a holistic framework for its application in policy-making. Separate fields of study, such as motors of change and strategic intelligence tools, are unified in a single analytical process. The process involves five steps that may be repeated until a desired policy objective is achieved. The pilot, integrated technology roadmap process that has been launched in Turkey is analyzed as a case study. The Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap has been completed with the participation of over 160 experts in 5 different stages. It involved the collection of over 349 Delfi statements, their consolidation for a Delfi survey with 16 statements, the analysis of the results, a focal group meeting to develop roadmaps for the 7 selected goals, and the consultation of the roadmaps to the sector. The paper concludes that an integrated technology roadmap process, as described in the pilot case study, provides an advanced version of transition management, which is needed to mobilize research, development, and innovation for sustainable development.

  15. Technology-Enhanced Simulation Improves Trainee Readiness Transitioning to Cardiothoracic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick G; Schaheen, Lara W; Chan, Ernest G; Cook, Chris C; Luketich, James D; D'Cunha, Jonathan

    2018-03-09

    Transitioning from medical school and general surgery training to cardiothoracic (CT) surgical training poses unique challenges for trainees and patient care. We hypothesized that participation in technology-enhanced simulation modules that provided early exposure to urgent/emergent CT patient problems would improve cognitive skills and readiness to manage common urgencies/emergencies. Traditional and integrated cardiothoracic residents at our institution participated in a technology-enhanced simulation curriculum. The course comprised of didactics, hands-on simulation, virtual models, and mock oral examinations. Residents also were given a validated pretest and post-test to evaluate knowledge retention and integration. Resident performance was graded using a previously validated objective structured clinical examination. Resident perception of course usefulness and relevance was determined through the completion of a perception survey. This study occurred at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine with the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. The facility used was the Peter Winter Institute for Simulation, Education and Research. From 2013 to 2015, 25 traditional and integrated cardiothoracic residents participated in these training modules who have completed all portions of the simulation were used for analysis. For our participants, knowledge base significantly increased by 7.9% (pretest = 76.0% vs. post-test = 83.9%, p technology-enhanced course combining didactics, simulation, and real-time assessment, residents demonstrated objective improvements in cognitive skills and readiness in managing CT patients. Resident postcourse feedback indicated enhanced confidence, suggesting increased preparedness transitioning to CT surgery. This has strong implications for improved patient safety during these potentially labile transition periods. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 48 CFR 3052.204-70 - Security requirements for unclassified information technology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... unclassified information technology resources. 3052.204-70 Section 3052.204-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations... for unclassified information technology resources. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3004.470-3, insert a clause substantially the same as follows: Security Requirements for Unclassified Information Technology...

  17. 48 CFR 352.239-72 - Security requirements for Federal information technology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal information technology resources. 352.239-72 Section 352.239-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Provisions and Clauses 352.239-72 Security requirements for Federal information technology resources. As... Federal Information Technology Resources (January 2010) (a) Applicability. This clause applies whether the...

  18. 48 CFR 1252.239-70 - Security requirements for unclassified information technology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... unclassified information technology resources. 1252.239-70 Section 1252.239-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations... of Provisions and Clauses 1252.239-70 Security requirements for unclassified information technology... Unclassified Information Technology Resources (APR 2005) (a) The Contractor shall be responsible for...

  19. 42 CFR 495.338 - Health information technology implementation advance planning document requirements (HIT IAPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health information technology implementation... CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.338 Health information technology implementation advance planning document...

  20. 34 CFR 400.9 - What additional requirements govern the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Applied Technology Education Programs? 400.9 Section 400.9 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 400.9 What additional requirements govern the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs? In addition to the Act, applicable...

  1. Technology requirements for an orbiting fuel depot - A necessary element of a space infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, R. M.; Corban, R. R.; Willoughby, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced planning within NASA has identified several bold space exploration initiatives. The successful implementation of these missions will require a supporting space infrastructure which would include a fuel depot, an orbiting facility to store, transfer and process large quantities of cryogenic fluids. In order to adequately plan the technology development programs required to enable the construction and operation of a fuel depot, a multidisciplinary workshop was convened to assess critical technologies and their state of maturity. Since technology requirements depend strongly on the depot design assumptions, several depot concepts are presented with their effect of criticality ratings. Over 70 depot-related technology areas are addressed.

  2. Technology requirements for an orbiting fuel depot: A necessary element of a space infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, R. M.; Corban, R. R.; Willoughby, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced planning within NASA has identified several bold space exploration initiatives. The successful implementation of these missions will require a supporting space infrastructure which would include a fuel depot, an orbiting facility to store, transfer and process large quantities of cryogenic fluids. In order to adequately plan the technology development programs required to enable the construction and operation of a fuel depot, a multidisciplinary workshop was convened to assess critical technologies and their state of maturity. Since technology requirements depend strongly on the depot design assumptions, several depot concepts are presented with their effect on criticality ratings. Over 70 depot-related technology areas are addressed.

  3. 48 CFR 1804.470 - Security requirements for unclassified information technology (IT) resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Security requirements for unclassified information technology (IT) resources. 1804.470 Section 1804.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Classified Information Within Industry 1804.470 Security requirements for unclassified information technology...

  4. Planetary entry aerothermodynamics. I - Technology requirements and experimental facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration has been given to the entry of vehicles into the atmospheres of all planets with the exception of Pluto and to missions for returning samples to Earth from all the planets (excepting Pluto), the satellites of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, the Moon, the asteroids, and certain comets. The efficient planning of the space missions including the appropriate design of the spacecraft requires that operational and environmental parameter values for the large range of mission options included be adequately known. The need to obtain the data required as a basis for the computational studies involved makes it necessary to conduct a comprehensive experimental research program. Details concerning the experimental facilities employed in this program are discussed, giving attention to shock tubes, the planetary-entry radiation facility, ballistic ranges, an expansion tube, a hypersonic tetrafluoromethane tunnel, and arcjet facilities.

  5. Linking Technology Capabilities to Marketing Requirements: Case of Indonesian Aircraft Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulianto Suharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The relationship between strategic technology planning and the overall business strategy has been one of the growing fields that attract much interest both from academics and industrials point of view. The increasingly important role that technology plays in today’s business success is well established.Strategic technology planning activities--within a corporate level--are often implemented by applying integrated planning instrument, which allow firms to consider both technology-oriented and product-oriented aspects. This paper is an attempt to explore the role of strategic planning in the high tech industry using a specific case of aerospace industry in Indonesia.  In order to compete effectively inthe open global marketplace, the company must learn to integrate technology managementwith strategic planning. In other words, all top managers have to linktheir technology capabilities to marketing requirements.Keywords:  technology planning; business strategy; technology capability; marketing requirement; strategic mix 

  6. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  7. Solar sorptive cooling. Technologies, user requirements, practical experience, future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treffinger, P. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Hardthausen (Germany); Hertlein, H.P. [eds.] [Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Sorptive cooling techniques permit the use of low-temperature solar heat, i.e. a renewable energy of low cost and world-wide availability. The Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie intends to develop solar sorptive cooling technologies to the prototype stage and, in cooperation with the solar industry and its end users, to promote practical application in air conditioning of buildings and cold storage of food. The workshop presents an outline of the state of development of solar sorptive cooling from the view of users and developers. Exemplary solar cooling systems are described, and the potential of open and closed sorptive processes is assessed. Future central activities will be defined in an intensive discussion between planners, producers, users and developers. [German] Der Einsatz von Sorptionstechniken zur Kaelteerzeugung erlaubt es, als treibende Solarenergie Niedertemperatur-Solarwaerme einzusetzen, also eine regenerative Energie mit sehr geringen Kosten und weltweiter Verfuegbarkeit. Der Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie hat sich als Aufgabe gestellt, die Techniken der solaren Sorptionskuehlung bis zum Prototyp zu entwickeln und mit Industrie und Nutzern die praktische Anwendung voranzubringen. Die Anwendungsfelder sind die Klimatisierung von Gebaeuden und die Kaltlagerung von Lebensmitteln. Der Workshop gibt einen Ueberblick zum Entwicklungsstand der solaren Sorptionskuehlung aus der Sicht der Anwender und Entwickler. Bereits ausgefuehrte Beispiele zur solaren Kuehlung werden vorgestellt und das Potential geschlossener und offener Sorptionsverfahren angegeben. In intensiver Diskussion zwischen Planern, Herstellern, Nutzern und Entwicklern sollen kuenftige Arbeitsschwerpunkte herausgearbeitet werden. (orig.)

  8. The importance of health information technology in care coordination and transitional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Pamela F; Bowles, Kathryn; Dailey, Maureen; Dykes, Patricia; Lamb, Gerri; Naylor, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination and transitional care services are strategically important for achieving the priorities of better care, better health, and reduced costs embodied in the National Strategy for Quality Improvement in Health Care (National Quality Strategy [NQS]). Some of the most vulnerable times in a person’s care occur with changes in condition as well as movement within and between settings of care. The American Academy of Nursing (AAN) believes it is essential to facilitate the coordination of care and transitions by using health information technology (HIT) to collect, share, and analyze data that communicate patient-centered information among patients, families, and care providers across communities. HIT makes information accessible, actionable, timely, customizable, and portable. Rapid access to information also creates efficiencies in care by eliminating redundancies and illuminating health history and prior care. The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and information systems can enable care coordination to be more effective but only when a number of essential elements are addressed to reflect the team-based nature of care coordination as well as a focus on the individual’s needs and preferences. To that end, the AAN offers a set of recommendations to guide the development of the infrastructure, standards, content, and measures for electronically enabled care coordination and transitions in care as well as research needed to build the evidence base to assess outcomes of the associated interventions.

  9. Security Transition Program Office (STPO), technology transfer of the STPO process, tools, and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauth, J.T.; Forslund, C.R.J.; Underwood, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    In 1990, with the transition from a defense mission to environmental restoration, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site began a significant effort to diagnose, redesign, and implement new safeguards and security (SAS) processes. In 1992 the Security Transition Program Office (STPO) was formed to address the sweeping changes that were being identified. Comprised of SAS and other contractor staff with extensive experience and supported by staff experienced in organizational analysis and work process redesign, STPO undertook a series of tasks designed to make fundamental changes to SAS processes throughout the Hanford Site. The goal of STPO is to align the SAS work and organization with the new Site mission. This report describes the key strategy, tools, methods, and techniques used by STPO to change SAS processes at Hanford. A particular focus of this review is transferring STPO`s experience to other DOE sites and federal agency efforts: that is, to extract, analyze, and provide a critical review of the approach, tools, and techniques used by STPO that will be useful to other DOE sites and national laboratories in transitioning from a defense production mode to environmental restoration and other missions. In particular, what lessons does STPO provide as a pilot study or model for implementing change in other transition activities throughout the DOE complex? More broadly, what theoretical and practical contributions do DOE transition efforts, such as STPO, provide to federal agency streamlining efforts and attempts to {open_quotes}reinvent{close_quotes} government enterprises in the public sector? The approach used by STPO should provide valuable information to those examining their own processes in light of new mission requirements.

  10. Technology neutral licensing requirements: have we been successful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is Canada's nuclear regulator. In preparation for the licensing of the next generation of nuclear reactors in Canada, the CNSC has made major changes in its processes and procedures associated with all aspects of the licensing life cycle. These include: development of key regulatory documents outlining the CNSC expectations for the design and siting of new reactors; creation of applicant guidelines for completing licensing applications; creation of a comprehensive set of review guides, specifying how topics in applications are to be reviewed; performing pre-project design reviews for proposed new reactor technologies; and streamlining processes wherever possible, such as performing the environmental assessment and license to prepare site activities in parallel. The predicted workload associated with the nuclear renaissance in Canada is real. The CNSC is currently performing: 4 pre-project design reviews (for AECL's ACR-1000 and EC-6, Areva's EPR and Westinghouse's AP-1000), has received applications for 4 new builds (at Darlington, Bruce, Nanticoke and in Alberta) and is in the midst of performing the combined environmental assessment and license to prepare site phases for these sites. This is in addition to the work associated with: the licensing of new uranium mines; oversight of the existing reactor fleet; refurbishments at Bruce/Gentilly/Point Lepreau; license renewal for the NRU reactor; and oversight of our general client base of over 5000 licensees. In this presentation, experience to date with these new processes and procedures will be discussed, including: status of the current new build projects; anticipated new activities; lessons learned, especially the technology neutral approach; application to our other licensed activities, including non-power reactors; and work underway to further develop CNSC methods. Qualifications Needed to Design, Construct and Manufacture Nuclear Systems and Equipment, C. Voutsinos

  11. From biological neural networks to thinking machines: Transitioning biological organizational principles to computer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the vestibular macula is under study by computer assisted reconstruction and simulation methods as a model for more complex neural systems. One goal of this research is to transition knowledge of biological neural network architecture and functioning to computer technology, to contribute to the development of thinking computers. Maculas are organized as weighted neural networks for parallel distributed processing of information. The network is characterized by non-linearity of its terminal/receptive fields. Wiring appears to develop through constrained randomness. A further property is the presence of two main circuits, highly channeled and distributed modifying, that are connected through feedforward-feedback collaterals and biasing subcircuit. Computer simulations demonstrate that differences in geometry of the feedback (afferent) collaterals affects the timing and the magnitude of voltage changes delivered to the spike initiation zone. Feedforward (efferent) collaterals act as voltage followers and likely inhibit neurons of the distributed modifying circuit. These results illustrate the importance of feedforward-feedback loops, of timing, and of inhibition in refining neural network output. They also suggest that it is the distributed modifying network that is most involved in adaptation, memory, and learning. Tests of macular adaptation, through hyper- and microgravitational studies, support this hypothesis since synapses in the distributed modifying circuit, but not the channeled circuit, are altered. Transitioning knowledge of biological systems to computer technology, however, remains problematical.

  12. Student Attitudes in the Transition to an Active-Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Brooks, Bill J.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in student perceptions to a novel technology-based, active-learning pedagogy using a custom, sophisticated, personal response system called WISE were studied over the first five years it was used. Students tended to view active learning more favorably over time, particularly in regards to statements that required them to be interpretive of…

  13. Fostering technological transition to sustainable land management through stakeholder collaboration in the western highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutoko, M.C.; Shisanya, C.A.; Hein, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Application of sustainable land management (SLM) practices is essential to lessen the negative impacts of land degradation on rural welfare in sub-Saharan Africa. Scaling-up of SLM technologies requires collaboration of diverse stakeholders across multiple scales. We follow inter-disciplinary

  14. ERK3 is required for metaphase-anaphase transition in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ERK3 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 is an atypical member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase family of serine/threonine kinases. Little is known about its function in mitosis, and even less about its roles in mammalian oocyte meiosis. In the present study, we examined the localization, expression and functions of ERK3 during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Immunofluorescent analysis showed that ERK3 localized to the spindles from the pre-MI stage to the MII stage. ERK3 co-localized with α-tubulin on the spindle fibers and asters in oocytes after taxol treatment. Deletion of ERK3 by microinjection of ERK3 morpholino (ERK3 MO resulted in oocyte arrest at the MI stage with severely impaired spindles and misaligned chromosomes. Most importantly, the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 could be detected on kinetochores even in oocytes cultured for 10 h. Low temperature treatment experiments indicated that ERK3 deletion disrupted kinetochore-microtubule (K-MT attachments. Chromosome spreading experiments showed that knock-down of ERK3 prevented the segregation of homologous chromosomes. Our data suggest that ERK3 is crucial for spindle stability and required for the metaphase-anaphase transition in mouse oocyte maturation.

  15. DoD Environmental Technology Program Research and Development Requirements Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    for Printed Wiring Assemblies which Does Not Require Hazardous Solvents (Trichloroethane, Xylene , Methylene Chloride) to Remove Conformal Coatings...84 Alternative Repair Technology for Printed Wiring Assemblies which Does Not Require Hazardous Solvents (Trichloroethane, Xylene , Methylene...controls, from large area sensors such as FTIR , and how to maximize coverage to minimize costs. High APPENDIX E REQUIREMENTS CATEGORY

  16. Parents’ perspectives of the transition to home when a child has complex technological health care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Brenner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increasing number of children with complex care needs, however, there is limited evidence of the experience of families during the process of transitioning to becoming their child's primary care giver. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ perspectives of the transition to home of a child with complex respiratory health care needs.Methods: Parents of children with a tracheostomy with or without other methods of respiratory assistance, who had transitioned to home from a large children's hospital in the last 5 years, were invited to participate in the interviews. Voice-centred relational method of qualitative analysis was used to analyse parent responses.Results: Four key themes emerged from the interviews including “stepping stones: negotiating the move to home”, “fighting and frustration”, “questioning competence” and “coping into the future”.Discussion: There is a need for clear and equitable assessments and shared policies and protocols for the discharge of children with complex care needs. Direction and support are required at the level of health service policy and planning to redress these problems. This study provides evidence that the transition of children with complex care needs from hospital to home is a challenging dynamic in need of further improvement and greater negotiation between the parent and health service provider. There are tangible issues that could be addressed including the introduction of a standardised approach to assessment of the needs of the child and family in preparation for discharge and for clear timelines and criteria for reassessment of needs once at home.

  17. Supporting Technology at GRC to Mitigate Risk as Stirling Power Conversion Transitions to Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2009-01-01

    Stirling power conversion technology has been reaching more advanced levels of maturity during its development for space power applications. The current effort is in support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Sunpower Inc., and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. Of paramount importance is the reliability of the power system and as a part of this, the Stirling power convertors. GRC has established a supporting technology effort with tasks in the areas of reliability, convertor testing, high-temperature materials, structures, advanced analysis, organics, and permanent magnets. The project utilizes the matrix system at GRC to make use of resident experts in each of the aforementioned fields. Each task is intended to reduce risk and enhance reliability of the convertor as this technology transitions toward flight status. This paper will provide an overview of each task, outline the recent efforts and accomplishments, and show how they mitigate risk and impact the reliability of the ASC s and ultimately, the ASRG.

  18. Effects of the Interest Rate and Reserve Requirement Ratio on Bank Risk in China: A Panel Smooth Transition Regression Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies the Panel Smooth Transition Regression (PSTR model to simulate the effects of the interest rate and reserve requirement ratio on bank risk in China. The results reveal the nonlinearity embedded in the interest rate, reserve requirement ratio, and bank risk nexus. Both the interest rate and reserve requirement ratio exert a positive impact on bank risk for the low regime and a negative impact for the high regime. The interest rate performs a significant effect while the reserve requirement ratio shows an insignificant effect on bank risk on a statistical basis for both the high and low regimes.

  19. Requirements for cross-border spatial planning technologies in the European context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication paper investigates requirements for cross-border spatial planning technologies. We refer to European cross-border regions, which are located in the European Baltic Sea Region. We hypothesize that there is no efficient cross-border spatial planning without engagement from various stakeholders, supported by novel spatial planning technologies. This study presents the results from a survey that identifies the requirements for spatial planning technologies adequate for cross - border regions. On the basis of this survey, carried out within the INTECRE project partners coming from the Baltic Sea Region, the study provides general recommendations about cross - border spatial planning technologies. Addressed in the survey are the following central issues: definition of the scope of such technologies, the data base and international planning data provision, features and properties of planning technologies, and stakeholder involvement. The research findings are transferable to wider European and extra- European contexts.

  20. Integrating Requirements Engineering, Modeling, and Verification Technologies into Software and Systems Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broy, Manfred; Leucker, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this project is the development of an integrated suite of technologies focusing on end-to-end software development supporting requirements analysis, design, implementation, and verification...

  1. Geminin is required for zygotic gene expression at the Xenopus mid-blastula transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Kerns

    Full Text Available In many organisms early development is under control of the maternal genome and zygotic gene expression is delayed until the mid-blastula transition (MBT. As zygotic transcription initiates, cell cycle checkpoints become activated and the tempo of cell division slows. The mechanisms that activate zygotic transcription at the MBT are incompletely understood, but they are of interest because they may resemble mechanisms that cause stem cells to stop dividing and terminally differentiate. The unstable regulatory protein Geminin is thought to coordinate cell division with cell differentiation. Geminin is a bi-functional protein. It prevents a second round of DNA replication during S and G2 phase by binding and inhibiting the essential replication factor Cdt1. Geminin also binds and inhibits a number of transcription factors and chromatin remodeling proteins and is thought to keep dividing cells in an undifferentiated state. We previously found that the cells of Geminin-deficient Xenopus embryos arrest in G2 phase just after the MBT then disintegrate at the onset of gastrulation. Here we report that they also fail to express most zygotic genes. The gene expression defect is cell-autonomous and is reproduced by over-expressing Cdt1 or by incubating the embryos in hydroxyurea. Geminin deficient and hydroxyurea-treated blastomeres accumulate DNA damage in the form of double stranded breaks. Bypassing the Chk1 pathway overcomes the cell cycle arrest caused by Geminin depletion but does not restore zygotic gene expression. In fact, bypassing the Chk1 pathway by itself induces double stranded breaks and abolishes zygotic transcription. We did not find evidence that Geminin has a replication-independent effect on transcription. We conclude that Geminin is required to maintain genome integrity during the rapid cleavage divisions, and that DNA damage disrupts zygotic gene transcription at the MBT, probably through activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

  2. Drosophila p115 is required for Cdk1 activation and G2/M cell cycle transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2017-04-01

    Golgi complex inheritance and its relationship with the cell cycle are central in cell biology. Golgi matrix proteins, known as golgins, are one of the components that underlie the shape and functionality of this organelle. In mammalian cells, golgins are phosphorylated during mitosis to allow fragmentation of the Golgi ribbon and they also participate in spindle dynamics; both processes are required for cell cycle progression. Little is known about the function of golgins during mitosis in metazoans in vivo. This is particularly significant in Drosophila, in which the Golgi architecture is distributed in numerous units scattered throughout the cytoplasm, in contrast with mammalian cells. We examined the function of the ER/cis-Golgi golgin p115 during the proliferative phase of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc. Knockdown of p115 decreased tissue size. This phenotype was not caused by programmed cell death or cell size reductions, but by a reduction in the final cell number due to an accumulation of cells at the G2/M transition. This phenomenon frequently allows mitotic bypass and re-replication of DNA. These outcomes are similar to those observed following the partial loss of function of positive regulators of Cdk1 in Drosophila. In agreement with this, Cdk1 activation was reduced upon p115 knockdown. Interestingly, these phenotypes were fully rescued by Cdk1 overexpression and partially rescued by Myt1 depletion, but not by String (also known as Cdc25) overexpression. Additionally, we confirmed the physical interaction between p115 and Cdk1, suggesting that the formation of a complex where both proteins are present is essential for the full activation of Cdk1 and thus the correct progression of mitosis in proliferating tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Behind the development of technology: The transition of innovation modes in China’s wind turbine manufacturing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru Peng; Zhi Qiang; Zhang Fang; Zhong Xiaotian; Li Jianqiang; Su Jun

    2012-01-01

    The market scale of China’s wind turbine manufacturing industry has grown immensely. Despite China still having a limited capacity in terms of technology innovation, the institutional support has promoted the technology capability development of the wind turbine manufacturing industry. This paper explores the driving forces underlying this development by reviewing the transition of the innovation modes and the dynamic interactions among the technology capability, innovation modes, market formation, and wind energy policy. The innovation mode in China began with imitative innovation, then transitioned to cooperative innovation, and has more recently set its sights on attaining truly indigenous innovation. Public policy serves as a key driving force for the evolution of innovation modes, as well as the development of the market. The policy focus has evolved in the following sequence: 1. building the foundation for technological innovation; 2. encouraging technology transfer; 3. enhancing local R and D and manufacturing capabilities; 4. enlarging the domestic market; and 5. cultivating an open environment for global competition and sustainable market development in China. - Highlights: ► New data were provided for China’s wind turbine manufacturing industry. ► The transition of innovation modes in the industry is reviewed. ► The interaction among the technology, market, policy, and innovation mode is explored. ► Public policies are the key driving forces for the transition.

  4. The Impact of Training on the Time Required to Implement Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Troy

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers are using technology to improve student achievement, but only a few are attaining an improvement in student achievement. The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify: (1) how much time teachers spend integrating technology into their classroom, (2) how much time teachers believe is required to maximize the effectiveness of…

  5. An overview of exhaust emissions regulatory requirements and control technology for stationary natural gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, H.N.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a practical overview of stationary natural gas engine exhaust emissions control technology and trends in emissions regulatory requirements is presented. Selective and non-selective catalytic reduction and lean burn technologies are compared. Particular emphasis is focussed on implications of the Clean Air Act of 1990. Recent emissions reduction conversion kit developments and a practical approach to continuous monitoring are discussed

  6. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

  7. Transit Operations Decision Support System (TODSS) core requirements prototype development case study and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Transit Operations Decision Support Systems (TODSS) are systems designed to support dispatchers and others in real-time operations : management in response to incidents, special events, and other changing conditions. As part of a joint Federal Transi...

  8. Transit Operations Decision Support System (TODSS) core requirements evaluation and update recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Transit Operations Decision Support Systems (TODSS) are systems designed to support dispatchers and others in real-time operations : management in response to incidents, special events, and other changing conditions in order to improve operating spee...

  9. Definition of common support equipment and space station interface requirements for IOC model technology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard A.; Waiss, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the common support equipment and Space Station interface requirements for the IOC (initial operating capabilities) model technology experiments. In particular, each principal investigator for the proposed model technology experiment was contacted and visited for technical understanding and support for the generation of the detailed technical backup data required for completion of this study. Based on the data generated, a strong case can be made for a dedicated technology experiment command and control work station consisting of a command keyboard, cathode ray tube, data processing and storage, and an alert/annunciator panel located in the pressurized laboratory.

  10. Requirements for effective technology transfer for engineering and project management. The views of the recipient country and the technology supplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, K.W.

    1986-04-01

    Technology transfer in the area of engineering and project management for nuclear power plant projects is considered a rather complex and sophisticated matter. Therefore only within a long-term nuclear co-operation a meaningful transfer of such a multifaceted technology can reasonably be achieved. A long-term nuclear co-operation anticipates a nuclear power plant program consisting of a few nuclear power plants of a certain type and size in order to achieve the indispensable effect ''learning by doing''. The objectives of nuclear technology transfer may be in general or in particular; absorption of a foreign nuclear technology and its adaptation to the conditions and needs of the receiver's country; built-up of industrial infrastructure for planning, construction and operation of nuclear power plants; raising of the general industrial level and achieve a spin-off effect; creation of a basis for independent development of nuclear technology. The technology transfer on one side and the construction program of nuclear power plants on the other side cannot be practiced by two parallel but separated event, however, they form one unit. Contrary to the import of industrial equipment in terms of ''black box'', by means of a nuclear technology transfer the introduction of new dependencies will be prevented. The technology transfer can remarkably be facilitated by forming a joint venture engineering company in the recipient country. The required know-how potential within a certain time period determines the intensity of the technology transfer and consequently the man power to be involved. The realization of such technology transfer is demonstrated by means of practical examples. (author). 12 figs

  11. A Conceptual Methodology for Assessing Acquisition Requirements Robustness against Technology Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shuo-Ju

    2011-12-01

    In recent years the United States has shifted from a threat-based acquisition policy that developed systems for countering specific threats to a capabilities-based strategy that emphasizes the acquisition of systems that provide critical national defense capabilities. This shift in policy, in theory, allows for the creation of an "optimal force" that is robust against current and future threats regardless of the tactics and scenario involved. In broad terms, robustness can be defined as the insensitivity of an outcome to "noise" or non-controlled variables. Within this context, the outcome is the successful achievement of defense strategies and the noise variables are tactics and scenarios that will be associated with current and future enemies. Unfortunately, a lack of system capability, budget, and schedule robustness against technology performance and development uncertainties has led to major setbacks in recent acquisition programs. This lack of robustness stems from the fact that immature technologies have uncertainties in their expected performance, development cost, and schedule that cause to variations in system effectiveness and program development budget and schedule requirements. Unfortunately, the Technology Readiness Assessment process currently used by acquisition program managers and decision-makers to measure technology uncertainty during critical program decision junctions does not adequately capture the impact of technology performance and development uncertainty on program capability and development metrics. The Technology Readiness Level metric employed by the TRA to describe program technology elements uncertainties can only provide a qualitative and non-descript estimation of the technology uncertainties. In order to assess program robustness, specifically requirements robustness, against technology performance and development uncertainties, a new process is needed. This process should provide acquisition program managers and decision

  12. Creation and transition of digital light processing technology to defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    2005-05-01

    A key challenge to defense science and technology programs is the identification of areas ripe for focused government investment so as to make impossible things possible on an accelerated schedule. The creation, transfer to commercial products, and transition to operational military systems of the Texas Instruments (TI) digital micromirror device (DMD) projection display technology from 1987-2005 is a case study in how DoD seeks invest in S&T for warfighting advantage while renewing the civil economy and enabling domestic production of key electronic components. The DoD investment in DMD reduced the risk enough to merit TI productization and resulted in the first VGA single ship color wheel prototype in 1992 (introduced as first commercial product in 1996) and in the first 2.36 Mpx 3-chip color demonstration system in 1995 (a resolution that is only now being introduced as a mass production product). The 1995 demonstrator was the world"s first 100% digital display system. The tenth anniversary of this 2005 achievement presents an appropriate occasion to review and document the success of this prior Air Force and DARPA investment as measured by the subsequent adoption in a wide range of civil and, especially, defense applications.

  13. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Jinming, Cai [Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four

  14. The demographic effects of technological change and capitalist transformation--a re-interpretation of the demographic transition theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, P

    1992-06-01

    The interrelationship between demographic transition, capitalist transformation, and technological change in the 2 contrasting cases of the UK and India is explored. In the UK, technological change evolved from the extensive to the intensive phase, while technological change was introduced in India from the UK and other developed economies. The Demographic Transition Model is re-examined for these cases while the extensive and intensive phases of technological change with their effects on labor demand and consequent effects on fertility rate are analyzed. Changes in economic structure, demography, and factor pricing systems are presented as indicators of capitalist transformation of an economy. At the onset of capitalist transformation, population growth tends to decline as a result of increasing demand for labor in productive activities. Accordingly, the pattern of population growth depends upon the growth of demand for labor in productive activities which in turn depends upon the nature of the source of technological change; Demographic Transition theory ignores this point. Debate remains over whether imported technology, once reaching maturity, may effect capitalist transformation of economies toward true integrated development.

  15. Real-time estimation of transit OD patterns and delays using low cost-ubiquitous advanced technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop and conduct limited testing of novel sensors using Bluetooth technology : (BT) to estimate OD demands and station wait times for users of public transit stations. The NYU research team tested the : fea...

  16. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: 1) analysis techniques, 2) testing, 3) subsystem and component development, 4) packaging systems development support, and 5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  17. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: (1) analysis techniques; (2) testing; (3) subsystem and component development; (4) packaging systems development support; and (5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  18. Access from Space: A New Perspective on NASA's Space Transportation Technology Requirements and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    The need for robust and reliable access from space is clearly demonstrated by the recent loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia; as well as the NASA s goals to get the Shuttle re-flying and extend its life, build new vehicles for space access, produce successful robotic landers and s a q k retrr? llisrions, and maximize the science content of ambitious outer planets missions that contain nuclear reactors which must be safe for re-entry after possible launch aborts. The technology lynch pin of access from space is hypersonic entry systems such the thermal protection system, along with navigation, guidance and control (NG&C). But it also extends to descent and landing systems such as parachutes, airbags and their control systems. Current space access technology maturation programs such as NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program or the In-Space Propulsion (ISP) program focus on maturing laboratory demonstrated technologies for potential adoption by specific mission applications. A key requirement for these programs success is a suitable queue of innovative technologies and advanced concepts to mature, including mission concepts enabled by innovative, cross cutting technology advancements. When considering space access, propulsion often dominates the capability requirements, as well as the attention and resources. From the perspective of access from space some new cross cutting technology drivers come into view, along with some new capability opportunities. These include new miniature vehicles (micro, nano, and picosats), advanced automated systems (providing autonomous on-orbit inspection or landing site selection), and transformable aeroshells (to maximize capabilities and minimize weight). This paper provides an assessment of the technology drivers needed to meet future access from space mission requirements, along with the mission capabilities that can be envisioned from innovative, cross cutting access from space technology developments.

  19. Technology and Research Requirements for Combating Human Trafficking: Enhancing Communication, Analysis, Reporting, and Information Sharing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; West, Curtis L.; Olson, Jarrod

    2011-03-17

    DHS’ Science & Technology Directorate directed PNNL to conduct an exploratory study on the domain of human trafficking in the Pacific Northwest in order to examine and identify technology and research requirements for enhancing communication, analysis, reporting, and information sharing – activities that directly support efforts to track, identify, deter, and prosecute human trafficking – including identification of potential national threats from smuggling and trafficking networks. This effort was conducted under the Knowledge Management Technologies Portfolio as part of the Integrated Federal, State, and Local/Regional Information Sharing (RISC) and Collaboration Program.

  20. Energy access and transition to cleaner cooking fuels and technologies in Sri Lanka: Issues and policy limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, Anoja

    2011-01-01

    Easy energy access is a trigger for human, social, and economic development. A research project was undertaken in Sri Lanka to broaden the understanding of human dimension of energy access and technologies. A questionnaire survey, covering 2269 households, gathered data on socio-economic contexts and issues influencing a transition towards clean cooking facilities. The findings reveal that the transition is impeded by four factors: the lack of motivation and the pressure for switching over to cleaner facilities, the lack of modern energy technology options, the financial risks, and the lack of financing and other support. The paper describes the delicate two-way interrelation between women earning wages and the transitions to cleaner cooking fuels and technologies. The findings suggest the need for a policy framework involving the stakeholders, financing and standardised technologies. To make a change it is proposed to introduce a national, integrated policy incorporating financing and energy governance. - Highlights: ► Households in Sri Lanka lack access to modern energy technology options for cooking. ► Cooking with fuel wood and residues is the norm in Sri Lanka, particularly in rural households. ► A survey of rural households revealed that most cannot afford to switch to cleaner cooking options. ► Most households have little awareness of the health impacts of biomass cooking. ► Women in regular formal employment are more likely to value cleaner cooking options that save time.

  1. Pharmacy in transition: A work sampling study of community pharmacists using smartphone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Jeroen M; Geljon, Jurjen G; Belitser, Svetlana V; Frederix, Geert W J; Hövels, Anke M; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2018-03-09

    The nature of community pharmacy is changing, shifting from the preparation and distribution of medicines to the provision of cognitive pharmaceutical services (CPS); however, often the provision of traditional services leaves little time for innovative services. This study investigated the time community pharmacists spend on the tasks and activities of daily practice and to what extent they are able to implement CPS-related services in daily practice. Self-reporting work sampling was used to register the activities of community pharmacists. A smartphone application, designed specifically for this purpose, alerted participants to register their current activity five times per working day for 6 weeks. Participants also completed an online survey about baseline characteristics. Ninety-one Dutch community pharmacists provided work-sampling data (7848 registered activities). Overall, 51.5% of their time was spent on professional activities, 35.4% on semi-professional activities, and 13.1% on non-professional activities. The proportion of time devoted to CPS decreased during the workweek, whereas the time spent on traditional task increased. This study shows it is feasible to collect work-sampling data using smartphone technology. Community pharmacists spent almost half of their time on semi-professional and non-professional activities, activities that could be delegated to other staff members. In practice, the transition to CPS is hampered by competing traditional tasks, which prevents community pharmacists from profiling themselves as pharmaceutical experts in daily practice. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Power-to-Syngas: An Enabling Technology for the Transition of the Energy System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foit, Severin R; Vinke, Izaak C; de Haart, Lambertus G J; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2017-05-08

    Power-to-X concepts promise a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions simultaneously guaranteeing a safe energy supply even at high share of renewable power generation, thus becoming a cornerstone of a sustainable energy system. Power-to-syngas, that is, the electrochemical conversion of steam and carbon dioxide with the use of renewably generated electricity to syngas for the production of synfuels and high-value chemicals, offers an efficient technology to couple different energy-intense sectors, such as "traffic and transportation" and "chemical industry". Syngas produced by co-electrolysis can thus be regarded as a key-enabling step for a transition of the energy system, which offers additionally features of CO 2 -valorization and closed carbon cycles. Here, we discuss advantages and current limitations of low- and high-temperature co-electrolysis. Advances in both fundamental understanding of the basic reaction schemes and stable high-performance materials are essential to further promote co-electrolysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative : ICM Surveillance and Detection Requirements for Arterial and Transit Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The primary objective of the ICM Initiative is to demonstrate how Intelligent Transportation : System (ITS) technologies can efficiently and proactively facilitate the movement of people and : goods through major transportation corridors that compris...

  4. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-01

    Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the

  5. Technology Required to Image and Characterize an exo-Earth from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) guides the development of technology that enables the direct imaging and characterization of exo-Earths in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars with future space observatories. Here we present the 2018 ExEP Technology Gap List, an annual update to ExEP's list of technologies, to be advanced in the next 1-5 years. Key technology gaps are starlight suppression with a coronagraph (internal occulters) or a starshade (external occulters), enabling imaging at extreme contrast (more than 10 billion) by blocking on-axis starlight, while allowing the reflected light of off-axis exoplanets be detected. Building and operating a space coronagraph capable of imaging an exo-Earth will require new technologies beyond those of WFIRST, the first high-contrast coronagraph in space. A starshade has never been used in a space mission and requires new capabilities in precision deployment of large structures, starlight suppression, and in formation sensing and control. We review the current state-of-the-art in coronagraph and starshade technology and the performance level that must be achieved to discover and characterize Earth analogs.

  6. A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach to Developing Human Machine Interface Requirements for New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Lisa Carolynn

    This dissertation examines the challenges inherent in designing and regulating to support human-automation interaction for new technologies that will be deployed into complex systems. A key question for new technologies with increasingly capable automation, is how work will be accomplished by human and machine agents. This question has traditionally been framed as how functions should be allocated between humans and machines. Such framing misses the coordination and synchronization that is needed for the different human and machine roles in the system to accomplish their goals. Coordination and synchronization demands are driven by the underlying human-automation architecture of the new technology, which are typically not specified explicitly by designers. The human machine interface (HMI), which is intended to facilitate human-machine interaction and cooperation, typically is defined explicitly and therefore serves as a proxy for human-automation cooperation requirements with respect to technical standards for technologies. Unfortunately, mismatches between the HMI and the coordination and synchronization demands of the underlying human-automation architecture can lead to system breakdowns. A methodology is needed that both designers and regulators can utilize to evaluate the predicted performance of a new technology given potential human-automation architectures. Three experiments were conducted to inform the minimum HMI requirements for a detect and avoid (DAA) system for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The results of the experiments provided empirical input to specific minimum operational performance standards that UAS manufacturers will have to meet in order to operate UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS). These studies represent a success story for how to objectively and systematically evaluate prototype technologies as part of the process for developing regulatory requirements. They also provide an opportunity to reflect on the lessons learned in order

  7. Evolving Technologies Require Educational Policy Change: Music Education for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Renee

    2013-01-01

    There is growing discussion among education and government authorities on rethinking education in the 21st century. This increasing area of interest has come in response to the evolution of technology and its effect on the future needs and requirements of society. Online applications and social networking capabilities have accelerated in…

  8. Employers' Perceptions of Information Technology Competency Requirements for Management Accounting Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraakman, Gary; O'Grady, Winifred; Askarany, Davood; Akroyd, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Management accountants work in a computerized workplace with information technology (IT) for producing financial ledgers and for reporting. Thus, the role of the management accountant has shifted from capturing and recording transactions to analyzing business issues. The research question is: what IT knowledge and skills do employers require of…

  9. Mammalian Toxicology Testing: Problem Definition Study, Technology Changes Impact on Testing Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Ecotoxicology and Env. Safety 1:151-173. 67 TR-477-14-12 FORECAST OF POTENTIAL TECHNOLOGY CHANGES THAT 1AY IMPACT TOXICOLOGICAL TESTING REQUIREMENTS...subjects for many years after exposure. Aside from pharmaceutical compounds, most people are not exposed directly to chemicals, except in occupational

  10. 75 FR 22548 - Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2009-0746; FRL-9143-3] RIN 2060-AP91 Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections... Clean Air Act. We are announcing an extension of the public comment period to May 27, 2010. DATES...

  11. Consequences for people from changed economic requirements and implementations of new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myhre, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    The offshore oil and gas business has reached mature levels where improvements and efficiency, optimisation and down-sizing are necessary to achieve required economic performance. The paper discusses the oil worker in future with the focus on manning and safety as a consequence of new technologies and cost reduction. 1 fig

  12. 47 CFR 15.120 - Program blocking technology requirements for television receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program blocking technology requirements for television receivers. 15.120 Section 15.120 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO... transmitted pursuant to industry standard EIA/CEA-766-A “U.S. and Canadian Region Rating Tables (RRT) and...

  13. Virtual environment and computer-aided technologies used for system prototyping and requirements development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cory; Maida, James; Goldsby, Michael; Clark, Jim; Wu, Liew; Prenger, Henk

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Data Management System (DMS) consists of distributed hardware and software which monitor and control the many onboard systems. Virtual environment and off-the-shelf computer technologies can be used at critical points in project development to aid in objectives and requirements development. Geometric models (images) coupled with off-the-shelf hardware and software technologies were used in The Space Station Mockup and Trainer Facility (SSMTF) Crew Operational Assessment Project. Rapid prototyping is shown to be a valuable tool for operational procedure and system hardware and software requirements development. The project objectives, hardware and software technologies used, data gained, current activities, future development and training objectives shall be discussed. The importance of defining prototyping objectives and staying focused while maintaining schedules are discussed along with project pitfalls.

  14. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  15. Emergence of a phase transition for the required amount of storage in highly renewable electricity systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Vissing; Greiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    -up of the required amount of storage, with renewable penetration being the control parameter and average relative storage filling level being the order parameter. A singularity appears for the required storage energy capacity at a renewable penetration determined by the parameters of the storage. For an ideal...

  16. To Evaluate Zero Emission Propulsion and Support Technology for Transit Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Chandler; Leslie Eudy

    2006-11-01

    This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in San Jose, California, in partnership with the San Mateo County Transit District in San Carlos, California. VTA has been operating three fuel cell transit buses in extra revenue service since February 28, 2005. This report provides descriptions of the equipment used, early experiences, and evaluation results from the operation of the buses and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure from March 2005 through July 2006.

  17. Planetary mission requirements, technology and design considerations for a solar electric propulsion stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cork, M. J.; Hastrup, R. C.; Menard, W. A.; Olson, R. N.

    1979-01-01

    High energy planetary missions such as comet rendezvous, Saturn orbiter and asteroid rendezvous require development of a Solar Electric Propulsion Stage (SEPS) for augmentation of the Shuttle-IUS. Performance and functional requirements placed on the SEPS are presented. These requirements will be used in evolution of the SEPS design, which must be highly interactive with both the spacecraft and the mission design. Previous design studies have identified critical SEPS technology areas and some specific design solutions which are also presented in the paper.

  18. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations From Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  19. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations from Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  20. Energy and lysine requirements and balances of sows during transition and lactation: A factorial approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyera, Takele; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify daily requirements for metabolizable energy (ME) and standard ileal digestible (SID) lysine in late gestating and lactating sows using a factorial approach. Metabolizable energy and SID lysine required for fetal and mammary growth, colostrum and milk production, uterine...... components (including uterus wall, placenta and membrane fluids) and maintenance were estimated. It was estimated that maintenance, additional heat loss, colostrum production, fetal growth, mammary growth and uterine components accounted for 66.8%, 19.3%, 7.2%, 5.0%, 1.3% and 0.5% of total ME requirements......, respectively, in the last 12 days of gestation. Oxidation/transamination, fetal growth, mammary growth, colostrum production, maintenance and uterine components were estimated to account for 29.5%, 22.7%, 16.8%, 16.1%, 10.4% and 4.5% of total SID lysine requirements, respectively, in the last 12 days...

  1. Parents' perspectives of the transition to home when a child has complex technological health care needs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brenner, Maria

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing number of children with complex care needs, however, there is limited evidence of the experience of families during the process of transitioning to becoming their child\\'s primary care giver. The aim of this study was to explore parents\\' perspectives of the transition to home of a child with complex respiratory health care needs.

  2. Requirements and solutions for future pellet technology; Krav och loesningar foer framtidens pelletsteknik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulrud, Susanne; Roennbaeck, Marie; Ryde, Daniel; Laitila, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Requirements and solutions for future pellet burning technologies Since 2006, sales of pellet burning technologies to the Swedish residential market have fallen. The main reasons for this decrease are: many of the economically favorable easy conversions from oil to pellets have been made; competition from heat pumps; warm winters; a stable electricity price; and the current structure of heating in residential buildings, where electric heating dominates. To change this falling trend pellets need to become more attractive to consumers. This project aimed to analyze the requirements for the next generation of pellets systems and to develop potential solutions, in collaboration with the pellets industry. More specifically, the study looked at consumers' attitudes toward heating choices and different heating through a survey to 2000 house owners across Sweden. The project included a market analysis of Swedish and international technologies and examines the conditions for Swedish pellet burning technology in different markets. In addition, new solutions and developments for Swedish pellets burning technology are described

  3. Evaluation of the measurement technologies required for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, D. E.; Kisner, R. A.; Bryan, W. L.; Hardy, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) evaluation of the measurement technologies required for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) reactor. The specific reactor parameters considered are neutron flux, temperature, coolant flow, and control element position. All four of the notional reactor module concepts are considered, to the extent technically relevant (i.e., liquid metal-thermoelectric, liquid metal-Brayton, heat pipe-Brayton, and direct cycle gas-cooled-Brayton). The mission environmental condition and the associated survival requirement assumptions are based upon the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) descriptions of the mission profile and ORNL estimation of the reactor contribution to the environment. Each reactor parameter measurement section includes a survey of the current state-of-the-art to identify candidate measurement technologies given the environmental conditions and duration of the JIMO mission and an evaluation of the potential technologies as well as the selection process rationale underlying the evaluation. The environmental conditions and performance requirements for fore-of-shield neutron detectors require technologies significantly beyond the current commercial state-of-the-art. The most challenging mission requirement is the combination of the necessity to observe the initial reactor approach to critical with fresh, highly enriched fuel combined with the strong desirability of the capability to monitor low-power, hot reactor dynamics in space with a long-lifetime detector system. The mission background radiation environment would significantly contaminate the signals from non-fission-based detector technologies located aft-of-shield. Shielded fission counters are, therefore, a strongly preferred detector technology due to their larger signal pulse sizes (which provides the additional benefit of being able to drive longer cable lengths) and consequent signal separability from the background space radiation

  4. Exploration Requirements Development Utilizing the Strategy-to-Task-to-Technology Development Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bret G.; Josten, B. Kent; Monell, Donald W.

    2004-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration provides direction for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to embark on a robust space exploration program that will advance the Nation s scientific, security, and economic interests. This plan calls for a progressive expansion of human capabilities beyond low earth orbit seeking to answer profound scientific and philosophical questions while responding to discoveries along the way. In addition, the Vision articulates the strategy for developing the revolutionary new technologies and capabilities required for the future exploration of the solar system. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration faces new challenges in successfully implementing the Vision. In order to implement a sustained and affordable exploration endeavor it is vital for NASA to do business differently. This paper provides an overview of the strategy-to-task-to-technology process being used by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop the requirements and system acquisition details necessary for implementing a sustainable exploration vision.

  5. Potential and requirements of IT for ambient assisted living technologies. Results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitalewsky, K; Rochon, J; Ganzinger, M; Knaup, P

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies are developed to enable elderly to live independently and safely. Innovative information technology (IT) can interconnect personal devices and offer suitable user interfaces. Often dedicated solutions are developed for particular projects. The aim of our research was to identify major IT challenges for AAL to enable generic and sustainable solutions. Delphi Survey. An online questionnaire was sent to 1800 members of the German Innovation Partnership AAL. The first round was qualitative to collect statements. Statements were reduced to items by qualitative content analysis. Items were assessed in the following two rounds by a 5-point Likert-scale. Quantitative analyses for second and third round: descriptive statistics, factor analysis and ANOVA. 81 in first, 173 in second and 70 in third round. All items got a rather high assessment. Medical issues were rated as having a very high potential. Items related to user-friendliness were regarded as most important requirements. Common requirements to all AAL-solutions are reliability, robustness, availability, data security, data privacy, legal issues, ethical requirements, easy configuration. The complete list of requirements can be used as framework for customizing future AAL projects. A wide variety of IT issues have been assessed important for AAL. The extensive list of requirements makes obvious that it is not efficient to develop dedicated solutions for individual projects but to provide generic methods and reusable components. Experiences and results from medical informatics research can be used to advance AAL solutions (e.g. eHealth and knowledge-based approaches).

  6. Nuclear power of the coming century and requirements to the nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.; Leonov, V.; Sila-Novitski, A.; Smirnov, V.; Tsikunov, V.; Filin, A.

    2001-01-01

    Current state of nuclear power in the world has been considered and the reasons for its falling short of the great expectations relating to its vigorous development in the outgoing century are considered. Anticipated energy demand of mankind in the next century is evaluated, suggesting that with exhausted resources of cheap fossil fuel and ecological restrictions it can be satisfied by means of a new nuclear technology meeting the requirements of large-scale power generation in terms of safety and economic indices, moreover, the technology can be elaborated in the context of achievements made in civil and military nuclear engineering. Since the developing countries are the most interested parties, it is just their initiative in the development of nuclear technology at the next stage that could provide an impetus for its actual advance. It is shown that large-scale development of nuclear power, being adequate to increase in energy demand, is possible even if solely large NPP equipped with breeders providing BR≥1 are constructed. Requirements for the reactor and fuel cycle technologies are made, their major aspects being: efficient utilization of Pu accumulated and reduction of U specific consumption by at least an order of magnitude; natural inherent safety and deterministic elimination of accidents involving high radioactive releases; assurance of a balance between radiation hazard posed by radioactive wastes disposed and uranium extracted from the ground; nuclear weapons nonproliferation due to fuel reprocessing ruling out potentiality of Pu diversion; reduction of the new generation reactor costs below the costs of today's LWR. (author)

  7. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 6: SPS technology requirements and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Volume 6 of the SPS Concept Definition Study is presented and also incorporates results of NASA/MSFC in-house effort. This volume includes a supporting research and technology summary. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are as follows: (1) Executive Summary; (2) SPS System Requirements; (3) SPS Concept Evolution; (4) SPS Point Design Definition; (5) Transportation and Operations Analysis; and Volume 7, SPS Program Plan and Economic Analysis.

  8. Technology and Health Care: Efficiency, Frustration, and Disconnect in the Transition to Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates one medical facility's transition to electronic medical records (becoming "paperless"). We utilized face-to-face interviews to investigate the transition process with one implementer (the vice president of the medical facility) and three stakeholders from one of the four offices (an assistant office manager, a nurse, and a medical technician). We discuss the dominant themes of efficiency, frustration, and disconnect as well as conclusions and implications.

  9. Tritium interactions of potential importance to fusion reactor systems: technology requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkes, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    The tritium technology requirements created by the controlled thermonuclear research program to develop a demonstration fusion power reactor by the year 2000 are reviewed. It is found that the majority of the technological advances which are needed to ensure adequate tritium containment in a tritium breeding power reactor need to be demonstrated on a pilot scale by approximately 1983, so that they may be incorporated into EPR-II, the second of two planned experimental power reactors. The most important advances include development of containment materials with permeabilities to tritium well below measured values for stainless steel; large scale, low inventory deuterium-tritium separation systems; and improved monitoring and assay systems. There are less critical requirements for information about the effects of tritium and helium on the mechanical properties of materials, the effects of tritium on biological systems, and data on physical and chemical properties of tritium. Substantial progress needs to be made on these problems early enough to permit possible solutions to be tested on EPR-I. In addition, major improvements in tritium handling equipment are required for EPR-I. Those technological problems for which solutions have not yet been demonstrated by EPR-II must be solved by 1989 if they are to be assured successful application in the demonstration reactor

  10. A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach to Developing HMI Requirements for New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Lisa Carolynn

    2016-01-01

    This document examines the challenges inherent in designing and regulating to support human-automation interaction for new technologies that will deployed into complex systems. A key question for new technologies, is how work will be accomplished by the human and machine agents. This question has traditionally been framed as how functions should be allocated between humans and machines. Such framing misses the coordination and synchronization that is needed for the different human and machine roles in the system to accomplish their goals. Coordination and synchronization demands are driven by the underlying human-automation architecture of the new technology, which are typically not specified explicitly by the designers. The human machine interface (HMI) which is intended to facilitate human-machine interaction and cooperation, however, typically is defined explicitly and therefore serves as a proxy for human-automation cooperation requirements with respect to technical standards for technologies. Unfortunately, mismatches between the HMI and the coordination and synchronization demands of the underlying human-automation architecture, can lead to system breakdowns. A methodology is needed that both designers and regulators can utilize to evaluate the expected performance of a new technology given potential human-automation architectures. Three experiments were conducted to inform the minimum HMI requirements a detect and avoid system for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The results of the experiments provided empirical input to specific minimum operational performance standards that UAS manufacturers will have to meet in order to operate UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS). These studies represent a success story for how to objectively and systematically evaluate prototype technologies as part of the process for developing regulatory requirements. They also provide an opportunity to reflect on the lessons learned from a recent research effort in order to

  11. Transition strategies for managing technological discontinuities: lessons from the history of the semiconductor industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the nature of competition under conditions of technological change and asks how firms can manage technological discontinuities. By drawing on the literatures on strategic management and technology dynamics, it is proposed that firms should change the nature of their strategy as a

  12. Transition from Realistic to Real World Problems with the Use of Technology in Elementary Mathematical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinski, Natalija; Milinkovic, Dragica

    2017-01-01

    The availability of technology has a big impact on education, and that is the main reason for discussing the use of technologies in mathematical education in our paper. The availability of technology influences how mathematical contents could be presented to students. We present the benefits of learning mathematical concepts through real life…

  13. Science requirements for a global change technology initiative architecture trade study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttles, John T.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    Science requirements for a Global Change Technology Initiative (GCTI) Architecture Trade Study were established by reviewing and synthesizing results from recent studies. A scientific rationale was adopted and used to identify a comprehensive set of measurables and their priorities. Spatial and temporal requirements for a number of measurement parameters were evaluated based on results from several working group studies. Science requirements were defined using these study results in conjunction with guidelines for investigating global changes over a time scale of decades to centuries. Requirements are given separately for global studies and regional process studies. For global studies, temporal requirements are for sampling every 1 to 12 hours for atmospheric and radiation parameters and 1 day or more for most Earth surface measurements. Therefore, the atmospheric measurables provide the most critical drivers for temporal sampling. Spatial sampling requirements vary from 1 km for land and ocean surface characteristics to 50 km for some atmospheric parameters. Thus, the land and ocean surface parameters have the more significant spatial variations and provide the most challenging spatial sampling requirements.

  14. Technological requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems for fast Earth-Mars transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérend, N.; Epenoy, R.; Cliquet, E.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Avril, S.

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in electric propulsion technologies such as magnetoplasma rockets gave a new momentum to the study of nuclear electric propulsion concepts for Mars missions. Some recent works have been focused on very short Earth-to-Mars transfers of about 40 days with high-power, variable specific impulse propulsion systems [1]. While the interest of nuclear electric propulsion appears clearly with regard to the payload mass ratio (due to a high level of specific impulse), its interest with regard to the transfer time is more complex to define, as it depends on many design parameters. In this paper, a general analysis of the capability of nuclear electric propulsion systems considering both criteria (the payload mass ratio and the transfer time) is performed, and the technological requirements for fast Earth-Mars transfers are studied. This analysis has been performed in two steps. First, complete trajectory optimizations have been performed by CNES-DCT in order to obtain the propulsion requirements of the mission for different technological hypotheses regarding the engine technology (specific impulse levels and the throttling capability) and different mission requirements. The methodology used for designing fuel-optimal heliocentric trajectories, based on the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be presented. Trajectories have been computed for various power levels combined with either variable or fixed Isp. The second step consisted in evaluating a simpler method that could easily link the main mission requirements (the transfer time and the payload fraction) to the main technological requirements (the specific mass of the power generation system and the structure mass ratio of the whole vehicle, excluding the power generation system). Indeed, for power-limited systems, propulsion requirements can be characterized through the "trajectory characteristic" parameter, defined as the integral over time of the squared thrust acceleration. Technological requirements for

  15. An evolving-requirements technology assessment process for advanced propulsion concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin Kathleen

    The following dissertation investigates the development of a methodology suitable for the evaluation of advanced propulsion concepts. At early stages of development, both the future performance of these concepts and their requirements are highly uncertain, making it difficult to forecast their future value. Developing advanced propulsion concepts requires a huge investment of resources. The methodology was developed to enhance the decision-makers understanding of the concepts, so that they could mitigate the risks associated with developing such concepts. A systematic methodology to identify potential advanced propulsion concepts and assess their robustness is necessary to reduce the risk of developing advanced propulsion concepts. Existing advanced design methodologies have evaluated the robustness of technologies or concepts to variations in requirements, but they are not suitable to evaluate a large number of dissimilar concepts. Variations in requirements have been shown to impact the development of advanced propulsion concepts, and any method designed to evaluate these concepts must incorporate the possible variations of the requirements into the assessment. In order to do so, a methodology was formulated to be capable of accounting for two aspects of the problem. First, it had to systemically identify a probabilistic distribution for the future requirements. Such a distribution would allow decision-makers to quantify the uncertainty introduced by variations in requirements. Second, the methodology must be able to assess the robustness of the propulsion concepts as a function of that distribution. This dissertation describes in depth these enabling elements and proceeds to synthesize them into a new method, the Evolving Requirements Technology Assessment (ERTA). As a proof of concept, the ERTA method was used to evaluate and compare advanced propulsion systems that will be capable of powering a hurricane tracking, High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned

  16. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a minimum...

  17. Framework for the quality assurance of 'omics technologies considering GLP requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Hans-Martin; Kamp, Hennicke; Fuchs, Regine; Chorley, Brian N; Deferme, Lize; Ebbels, Timothy; Hackermüller, Jörg; Perdichizzi, Stefania; Poole, Alan; Sauer, Ursula G; Tollefsen, Knut E; Tralau, Tewes; Yauk, Carole; van Ravenzwaay, Ben

    2017-12-01

    'Omics technologies are gaining importance to support regulatory toxicity studies. Prerequisites for performing 'omics studies considering GLP principles were discussed at the European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) Workshop Applying 'omics technologies in Chemical Risk Assessment. A GLP environment comprises a standard operating procedure system, proper pre-planning and documentation, and inspections of independent quality assurance staff. To prevent uncontrolled data changes, the raw data obtained in the respective 'omics data recording systems have to be specifically defined. Further requirements include transparent and reproducible data processing steps, and safe data storage and archiving procedures. The software for data recording and processing should be validated, and data changes should be traceable or disabled. GLP-compliant quality assurance of 'omics technologies appears feasible for many GLP requirements. However, challenges include (i) defining, storing, and archiving the raw data; (ii) transparent descriptions of data processing steps; (iii) software validation; and (iv) ensuring complete reproducibility of final results with respect to raw data. Nevertheless, 'omics studies can be supported by quality measures (e.g., GLP principles) to ensure quality control, reproducibility and traceability of experiments. This enables regulators to use 'omics data in a fit-for-purpose context, which enhances their applicability for risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of electricity storage and hydrogen technologies in enabling global low-carbon energy transitions

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, M.; Johnson, N.; Strubegger, M.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have noted the importance of electricity storage and hydrogen technologies for enabling large-scale variable renewable energy (VRE) deployment in long-term climate change mitigation scenarios. However, global studies, which typically use integrated assessment models, assume a fixed cost trajectory for storage and hydrogen technologies; thereby ignoring the sensitivity of VRE deployment and/or mitigation costs to uncertainties in future storage and hydrogen technology costs. Y...

  19. Inflammasome-independent NLRP3 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Du, Qianming; Lu, Ping; Fan, Huimin; Lu, Jinrong; Hu, Rong

    2016-03-15

    Inflammasome NLRP3 plays a crucial role in the process of colitis and colitis--associated colon cancer. Even though much is known regarding the NLRP3 inflammasome that regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release in innate immune cells, the role of NLRP3 in non-immune cells is still unclear. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 was highly expressed in mesenchymal-like colon cancer cells (SW620), and was upregulated by tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) respectively, during EMT in colon cancer epithelial cells HCT116 and HT29. Knockdown of NLRP3 retained epithelial spindle-like morphology of HCT116 and HT29 cells and reversed the mesenchymal characteristic of SW620 cells, indicated by the decreased expression of vimentin and MMP9 and increased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, knockdown of NLRP3 in colorectal carcinoma cells displayed diminished cell migration and invasion. Interestingly, during the EMT process induced by TNF-α or TGF-β1, the cleaved caspase-1 and ASC speck were not detected, indicating that NLRP3 functions in an inflammasome-independent way. Further studies demonstrated that NLRP3 protein expression was regulated by NF-κB signaling in TNF-α or TGF-β1-induced EMT, as verified by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Moreover, NLRP3 knockdown reduced the expression of Snail1, indicating that NLRP3 may promote EMT through regulating Snail1. In summary, our results showed that the NLRP3 expression, not the inflammasome activation, was required for EMT in colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire Requirements and Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L. (Editor); Pitts, Felix L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The results of the Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire (FBL/PBW) Workshop held on March 17-19, 1992, at the NASA Langley Research Center are presented. The FBL/PBW program is a joint NASA LeRC/LaRC effort to develop the technology base for confident application of integrated FBL/PBW systems to transport aircraft. The objectives of the workshop were to ascertain the FBL/PBW program technical requirements and satisfy the requirements and needs from the industry viewpoint, provide a forum for presenting and documenting alternative technical approaches which satisfy the requirements, and assess the plan adequacy in accomplishing plan objectives, aims, and technology transfer. Areas addressed were: optical sensor systems, power-by-wire systems, FBL/PBW fault-tolerant architectures, electromagnetic environment assessment, and system integration and demonstration. The workshop consisted of an introductory meeting, a 'keynote' presentation, a series of individual panel sessions covering the above areas, with midway presentations by the panel chairpersons, followed by a final summarizing/integrating session by the individual panels, and a closing plenary session summarizing the results of the workshop.

  1. Feeding the world in the coming decades requires improvements in investment, technology and institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lawrence; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2002-11-01

    The world is food secure at the global level, yet nearly 800 million are food insecure. "Business as usual" is not going to bring us close to meeting the Millennium Development Goal of halving the proportion of the population consuming less than the minimum energy requirement. So what has to change? The three papers in this session offer clues in three broad areas: (a) increased investment-by developing and developed countries-in public goods such as agricultural research, education, and clean water, (b) technologies to boost agricultural productivity for the poor and institutions that guide the diffusion and application of technology that need to be developed and (c) national-level institutions and governance structures to be strengthened and held accountable for protecting and respecting human rights, for providing the right types of national-level public goods to those that most need them and for preserving peace and stability.

  2. An assistive technology for hearing-impaired persons: analysis, requirements and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Matthias; Grunewald, Armin; Bruck, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, a concept of an assistive technology for hearing-impaired and deaf persons is presented. The concept applies pattern recognition algorithms and makes use of modern communication technology to analyze the acoustic environment around a user, identify critical acoustic signatures and give an alert to the user when an event of interest happened. A detailed analysis of the needs of deaf and hearing-impaired people has been performed. Requirements for an adequate assisting device have been derived from the results of the analysis, and have been turned into an architecture for its implementation that will be presented in this article. The presented concept is the basis for an assistive system which is now under development at the Institute of Microsystem Engineering at the University of Siegen.

  3. 78 FR 31542 - FCC Technology Transitions Policy Task Force Seeks Comment on Potential Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... with the National 9-1-1 Implementation Coordination Office and seek comment on the best ways to... or evaluated. Finally, we also seek comment on the impact of consumer migration to wireless and IP... communications services for low-income Americans? For example, as the transition from wireline to wireless...

  4. Building mobile technologies to improve transitions of care in adolescents with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common type of birth defects. Improvements in CHD care have led to roughly 1.4 million survivors reaching adulthood. This emerging "survivor" population are often palliated but not cured. Thus successful transition from pediatric to adult care for CHD pa...

  5. The impact of near-term climate policy choices on technology and emission transition pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, Jae; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of delays (to 2030) in implementing optimal policies for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the period 2030-2050

  6. Important requirements for RF generators for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    All Accelerator-Driven Transmutation applications require very large amounts of RF Power. For example, one version of a Plutonium burning system requires an 800-MeV, 80-mA, proton accelerator running at 100% duty factor. This accelerator requires approximately 110-MW of continuous RF power if one assumes only 10% reserve power for control of the accelerator fields. In fact, to minimize beam spill, the RF controls may need as much as 15 to 20% of reserve power. In addition, unlike an electron accelerator in which the beam is relativistic, a failed RF station can disturb the synchronism of the beam, possibly shutting down the entire accelerator. These issues and more lead to a set of requirements for the RF generators which are stringent, and in some cases, conflicting. In this paper, we will describe the issues and requirements, and outline a plan for RF generator development to meet the needs of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies. The key issues which will be discussed include: operating efficiency, operating linearity, effect on the input power grid, bandwidth, gain, reliability, operating voltage, and operating current

  7. Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Integration Requirements Study. Providing Guidance on Technology Development and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Meintz, A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hardy, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bohn, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Smart, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scoffield, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hovsapian, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Saxena, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); MacDonald, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kiliccote, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kahl, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pratt, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-28

    The report begins with a discussion of the current state of the energy and transportation systems, followed by a summary of some VGI scenarios and opportunities. The current efforts to create foundational interface standards are detailed, and the requirements for enabling PEVs as a grid resource are presented. Existing technology demonstrations that include vehicle to grid functions are summarized. The report also includes a data-based discussion on the magnitude and variability of PEVs as a grid resource, followed by an overview of existing simulation tools that vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. can be used to explore the expansion of VGI to larger grid functions that might offer system and customer value. The document concludes with a summary of the requirements and potential action items that would support greater adoption of VGI.

  8. Field demonstration and transition of SCAPS direct push VOC in-situ sensing technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, William M.

    1999-01-01

    This project demonstrated two in-situ volatile organic compound (VOC) samplers in combination with the direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometer (DSITMS). The technologies chosen were the Vadose Sparge and the Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) sensing systems. Tests at two demonstration sites showed the newer VOC technologies capable of providing in situ contaminant measurements at two to four times the rate of the previously demonstrated Hydrosparge sensor. The results of this project provide initial results supporting the utility of these new technologies to provide rapid site characterization of VOC contaminants in the subsurface

  9. Field demonstration and transition of SCAPS direct push VOC in-situ sensing technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William M. Davis

    1999-11-03

    This project demonstrated two in-situ volatile organic compound (VOC) samplers in combination with the direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometer (DSITMS). The technologies chosen were the Vadose Sparge and the Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) sensing systems. Tests at two demonstration sites showed the newer VOC technologies capable of providing in situ contaminant measurements at two to four times the rate of the previously demonstrated Hydrosparge sensor. The results of this project provide initial results supporting the utility of these new technologies to provide rapid site characterization of VOC contaminants in the subsurface.

  10. Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

    2006-07-01

    This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

  11. Whole-transcriptome analysis of endothelial to hematopoietic stem cell transition reveals a requirement for Gpr56 in HSC generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Vink, Chris S; de Pater, Emma; van der Linden, Reinier; Marks-Bluth, Jonathon; van der Sloot, Anthon; van den Hout, Mirjam; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; van Schaick-Solernó, M Lucila; Delwel, Ruud; Pimanda, John E; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2015-01-12

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generated via a natural transdifferentiation process known as endothelial to hematopoietic cell transition (EHT). Because of small numbers of embryonal arterial cells undergoing EHT and the paucity of markers to enrich for hemogenic endothelial cells (ECs [HECs]), the genetic program driving HSC emergence is largely unknown. Here, we use a highly sensitive RNAseq method to examine the whole transcriptome of small numbers of enriched aortic HSCs, HECs, and ECs. Gpr56, a G-coupled protein receptor, is one of the most highly up-regulated of the 530 differentially expressed genes. Also, highly up-regulated are hematopoietic transcription factors, including the "heptad" complex of factors. We show that Gpr56 (mouse and human) is a target of the heptad complex and is required for hematopoietic cluster formation during EHT. Our results identify the processes and regulators involved in EHT and reveal the surprising requirement for Gpr56 in generating the first HSCs. © 2015 Solaimani Kartalaei et al.

  12. Spallation-based science and technology and associated nuclear data requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.; Lisowski, P.W.; Arthur, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    Rapid advances in accelerator technology in recent years promise average proton beam currents as high as 250 mA with energies greater than one GeV. Such an accelerator could produce very high intensities of neutrons and other nuclear particles thus opening up new areas of science and technology. An example is the efficient burning of transuranic and fission product waste. With such a spallation-burner it appears that high-level waste might be converted to low-level waste on a time scale comparable to the human lifespan at a reasonable additional cost for electric power generation. The emphasis of this paper is on the design of a high power proton target for neutron production, on the nuclear data needed to operate this target safely and effectively, and on data requirements for transmutation. It is suggested that a pilot facility consisting of a 1.6 GeV accelerator and target operating at 25 ma is the next major step in developing this technology. Bursts of protons near the terawatt level might also be generated using such an accelerator with a proton accumulator ring. Research prospects based on such proton bursts are briefly described. The status of established nuclear data needs and of accelerator-based sources for nuclear data measurements is reviewed. (author)

  13. Leveraging CubeSat Technology to Address Nighttime Imagery Requirements over the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. J.; Mamula, D.; Caulfield, M.; Gallagher, F. W., III; Spencer, D.; Petrescu, E. M.; Ostroy, J.; Pack, D. W.; LaRosa, A.

    2017-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has begun planning for the future operational environmental satellite system by conducting the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study. In support of the NSOSA study, NOAA is exploring how CubeSat technology funded by NASA can be used to demonstrate the ability to measure three-dimensional profiles of global temperature and water vapor. These measurements are critical for the National Weather Service's (NWS) weather prediction mission. NOAA is conducting design studies on Earth Observing Nanosatellites (EON) for microwave (EON-MW) and infrared (EON-IR) soundings, with MIT Lincoln Laboratory and NASA JPL, respectively. The next step is to explore the technology required for a CubeSat mission to address NWS nighttime imagery requirements over the Arctic. The concept is called EON-Day/Night Band (DNB). The DNB is a 0.5-0.9 micron channel currently on the operational Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument, which is part of the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership and Joint Polar Satellite System satellites. NWS has found DNB very useful during the long periods of darkness that occur during the Alaskan cold season. The DNB enables nighttime imagery products of fog, clouds, and sea ice. EON-DNB will leverage experiments carried out by The Aerospace Corporation's CUbesat MULtispectral Observation System (CUMULOS) sensor and other related work. CUMULOS is a DoD-funded demonstration of COTS camera technology integrated as a secondary mission on the JPL Integrated Solar Array and Reflectarray Antenna mission. CUMULOS is demonstrating a staring visible Si CMOS camera. The EON-DNB project will leverage proven, advanced compact visible lens and focal plane camera technologies to meet NWS user needs for nighttime visible imagery. Expanding this technology to an operational demonstration carries several areas of risk that need to be addressed prior to an operational mission

  14. Soft-robotic arm inspired by the octopus: II. From artificial requirements to innovative technological solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolai, B; Margheri, L; Cianchetti, M; Dario, P; Laschi, C

    2012-06-01

    Soft robotics is a current focus in robotics research because of the expected capability of soft robots to better interact with real-world environments. As a point of inspiration in the development of innovative technologies in soft robotics, octopuses are particularly interesting 'animal models'. Octopus arms have unique biomechanical capabilities that combine significant pliability with the ability to exert a great deal of force, because they lack rigid structures but can change and control their degree of stiffness. The octopus arm motor capability is a result of the peculiar arrangement of its muscles and the properties of its tissues. These special abilities have been investigated by the authors in a specific study dedicated to identifying the key principles underlying these biological functions and deriving engineering requirements for robotics solutions. This paper, which is the second in a two-part series, presents how the identified requirements can be used to create innovative technological solutions, such as soft materials, mechanisms and actuators. Experiments indicate the ability of these proposed solutions to ensure the same performance as in the biological model in terms of compliance, elongation and force. These results represent useful and relevant components of innovative soft-robotic systems and suggest their potential use to create a new generation of highly dexterous, soft-bodied robots.

  15. Future mission opportunities and requirements for advanced space photovoltaic energy conversion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    The variety of potential future missions under consideration by NASA will impose a broad range of requirements on space solar arrays, and mandates the development of new solar cells which can offer a wide range of capabilities to mission planners. Major advances in performance have recently been achieved at several laboratories in a variety of solar cell types. Many of those recent advances are reviewed, the areas are examined where possible improvements are yet to be made, and the requirements are discussed that must be met by advanced solar cell if they are to be used in space. The solar cells of interest include single and multiple junction cells which are fabricated from single crystal, polycrystalline and amorphous materials. Single crystal cells on foreign substrates, thin film single crystal cells on superstrates, and multiple junction cells which are either mechanically stacked, monolithically grown, or hybrid structures incorporating both techniques are discussed. Advanced concentrator array technology for space applications is described, and the status of thin film, flexible solar array blanket technology is reported.

  16. Soft-robotic arm inspired by the octopus: II. From artificial requirements to innovative technological solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzolai, B; Margheri, L; Cianchetti, M; Dario, P; Laschi, C

    2012-01-01

    Soft robotics is a current focus in robotics research because of the expected capability of soft robots to better interact with real-world environments. As a point of inspiration in the development of innovative technologies in soft robotics, octopuses are particularly interesting ‘animal models’. Octopus arms have unique biomechanical capabilities that combine significant pliability with the ability to exert a great deal of force, because they lack rigid structures but can change and control their degree of stiffness. The octopus arm motor capability is a result of the peculiar arrangement of its muscles and the properties of its tissues. These special abilities have been investigated by the authors in a specific study dedicated to identifying the key principles underlying these biological functions and deriving engineering requirements for robotics solutions. This paper, which is the second in a two-part series, presents how the identified requirements can be used to create innovative technological solutions, such as soft materials, mechanisms and actuators. Experiments indicate the ability of these proposed solutions to ensure the same performance as in the biological model in terms of compliance, elongation and force. These results represent useful and relevant components of innovative soft-robotic systems and suggest their potential use to create a new generation of highly dexterous, soft-bodied robots. (paper)

  17. Studies of dose optimization and image quality in technological transition in mammography; Estudos de otimizacao de dose e qualidade de imagem em processos de transicao tecnologica em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furquim, Tania C.; Nersissian, Denise Y., E-mail: tfurquim@iee.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies in mammography may improve image quality; however, it may unnecessarily increase doses if optimization processes are not studied. In this work, radiation doses of the moment of transition of conventional to digital mammography have been analyzed. The presented data have been acquired from 2005 to 2009, in hospitals and clinics of Sao Paulo city, to 4 conventional and 5 digital equipment. The results show that even after optimization processes, new technologies still impart higher doses. Thus, individualized studies are needed when technological transitions occur, in order to maintain image quality without significant dose increase. (author)

  18. Study of dose optimization and image in technological transition in mammography; Estudos de otimizacao de dose e qualidade de imagem em processos de transicao tecnologica em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furquim, Tania A.C.; Nersissian, Denise Y. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2010-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies in mammography may improve image quality; however, it may unnecessarily increase doses if optimization processes are not studied. In this work, radiation doses of the moment of transition of conventional to digital mammography have been analyzed. The presented data have been acquired from 2005 to 2009, in hospitals and clinics of Sao Paulo city, to 4 conventional and 5 digital equipment. The results show that even after optimization processes, new technologies still impart higher doses. Thus, individualized studies are needed when technological transitions occur, in order to maintain image quality without significant dose increase. (author)

  19. Timing Is everything: quantifying regulatory and market readiness levels for technology transition policy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, La Tonya Nicole [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Borns, David James [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you’ll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. This notion of steady installation growth over acute installations of technology to meet policy goals is the core topic of discussion for this research. This research operationalizes this notion by developing the theoretical underpinnings of regulatory and market acceptance delays by building upon the common Technology Readiness Level (TRL) framework and offers two new additions to the research community. The new and novel Regulatory Readiness Level (RRL) and Market Readiness Level (MRL) frameworks were developed. These components, collectively called the Technology, Regulatory and Market (TRM) readiness level framework allow one to build new constraints into existing Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) to address research questions such as, ‘To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?’

  20. Hearing the way: requirements and preferences for technology-supported navigation aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura; Sharples, Sarah; Chandler, Ed; Worsfold, John

    2015-05-01

    Many systems have been developed to assist wayfinding for people with sight problems. There is a need for user requirements for such systems to be defined. This paper presents a study which aimed to determine such user requirements. An experiment was also conducted to establish the best way of guiding users between locations. The focus group results indicated that users require systems to provide them with information about their surroundings, to guide them along their route and to provide progress information. They also showed that users with sight conditions interact with systems differently to sighted users, thereby highlighting the importance of designing systems for the needs of these users. Results of the experiment found that the preferred method of guiding users was a notification when they were both on and off track. However, performance was best when only provided with the off track notification, implying that this cue is particularly important. Technology has the potential to support navigation for people with sight problems. Users should have control over cues provided and for these cues should supplement environmental cues rather than replacing them. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Design principles for corporate venture transition processes in established technology firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Burg, J.C.; de Jager, S.; Reymen, I.M.M.J.; Cloodt, M.

    2012-01-01

    Corporate venturing has become a well-known approach toward new business development and strategic renewal for established technology firms. However, without an effectively designed process for aligning and integrating a corporate venture in the established business, the firm increases the risk of

  2. Electronic Communications Technologies and the Transition to College: Links to Parent-Child Attachment and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigiani, Pamela A.; Trumbell, Jill M.; Camarena, Phame M.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic communications technologies (ECTs) help college students and parents remain in contact. Because recent reports have emphasized a link between ECTs, helicopter parenting, and autonomy issues, this study focused on the significance of contact patterns for attachment and student adjustment. First-semester college students (199 female, 81…

  3. System Requirements Analysis and Technological Support for the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) - FY07 Progress Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Auguston, M; Drusinsky, D; Hutchins, R; Knorr, J. B; Michael, J. B; Otani, T; Pace, P. E; Sting, M; Tummala, M; Cook, T

    2007-01-01

    ... the communication requirements of the net-centric Ballistic Missile Defense warfare, and the use of architectural patterns and other software technologies to shape the emergent behavior of the BMDS taking...

  4. Information Technologies and Material Requirement Planning (MRP in Supply Chain Management (SCM as a Basis for a New Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagbansua

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, information technologies, one of the biggest enablers of the modern supply chain management (SCM, are discussed. Types and ways of information technologies related to supply chain management are analyzed. Material Requirement Planning (MRP, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP, and electronic trade are discussed to provide an example.

  5. Integrated ultrasonic inspection technology to meet the requirements of CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Maynard, K.; Chan, K.; Malkiewicz, T.; Prince, J.; Huggins, J.

    2009-01-01

    For over a decade, ultrasonic (UT) inspection techniques with TRUSTIE (Tiny Rotating UltraSonic Tube Inspection Equipment) have been providing inspection capability that can assess the severity of flaws in Steam Generator (SG) tubes, and accurately monitor their growth. TRUSTIE, a high-resolution ultrasonic imaging system specialized for small diameter tube inspection, plays an important role in CANDU Steam Generator life cycle management. The increasing demand for production-oriented outage management strategies is focused on shortening outage windows. Advanced technologies in the areas of data analysis, multi-element probes, high torque servo systems, and integrated fibre-optic cable networks are being integrated into the existing TRUSTIE system to meet the new and challenging inspection requirements. This paper presents an overview of the advanced technical developments and enhancements that are currently underway and being implemented for SG tube UT inspections in CANDU nuclear power plants. (author)

  6. Accuracy required and achievable in radiotherapy dosimetry: have modern technology and techniques changed our views?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, David

    2013-06-01

    In this review of the accuracy required and achievable in radiotherapy dosimetry, older approaches and evidence-based estimates for 3DCRT have been reprised, summarising and drawing together the author's earlier evaluations where still relevant. Available evidence for IMRT uncertainties has been reviewed, selecting information from tolerances, QA, verification measurements, in vivo dosimetry and dose delivery audits, to consider whether achievable uncertainties increase or decrease for current advanced treatments and practice. Overall there is some evidence that they tend to increase, but that similar levels should be achievable. Thus it is concluded that those earlier estimates of achievable dosimetric accuracy are still applicable, despite the changes and advances in technology and techniques. The one exception is where there is significant lung involvement, where it is likely that uncertainties have now improved due to widespread use of more accurate heterogeneity models. Geometric uncertainties have improved with the wide availability of IGRT.

  7. It’s the workflows, stupid! What is required to make ‘offsetting’ work for the open access transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Geschuhn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes the case for stronger engagement of libraries and consortia when it comes to negotiating and drafting offsetting agreements. Two workshops organized by the Efficiencies and Standards for Article Charges (ESAC initiative in 2016 and 2017 have shown a clear need for an improvement of the current workflows and processes between academic institutions (and libraries and the publishers they use in terms of author identification, metadata exchange and invoicing. Publishers need to invest in their editorial systems, while institutions need to get a clearer understanding of the strategic goal of offsetting. To this purpose, strategic and practical elements, which should be included in the agreements, will be introduced. Firstly, the 'Joint Understanding of Offsetting', launched in 2016, will be discussed. This introduces the ‘pay-as-you-publish’ model as a transitional pathway for the agreements. Secondly, this paper proposes a set of recommendations for article workflows and services between institutions and publishers, based on a draft document which was produced as part of the 2nd ESAC Offsetting Workshop in March 2017. These recommendations should be seen as a minimum set of practical and formal requirements for offsetting agreements and are necessary to make any publication-based open access business model work.

  8. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  9. Calreticulin Is Required for TGF-β-Induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition during Cardiogenesis in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Opas, Michal

    2017-05-09

    Calreticulin, a multifunctional endoplasmic reticulum resident protein, is required for TGF-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and subsequent cardiomyogenesis. Using embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from calreticulin-null and wild-type (WT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we show that expression of EMT and cardiac differentiation markers is induced during differentiation of WT EBs. This induction is inhibited in the absence of calreticulin and can be mimicked by inhibiting TGF-β signaling in WT cells. The presence of calreticulin in WT cells permits TGF-β-mediated signaling via AKT/GSK3β and promotes repression of E-cadherin by SNAIL2/SLUG. This is paralleled by induction of N-cadherin in a process known as the cadherin switch. We show that regulated Ca 2+ signaling between calreticulin and calcineurin is critical for the unabated TGF-β signaling that is necessary for the exit from pluripotency and the cadherin switch during EMT. Calreticulin is thus a key mediator of TGF-β-induced commencement of cardiomyogenesis in mouse ESCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Calreticulin Is Required for TGF-β-Induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition during Cardiogenesis in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Karimzadeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin, a multifunctional endoplasmic reticulum resident protein, is required for TGF-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and subsequent cardiomyogenesis. Using embryoid bodies (EBs derived from calreticulin-null and wild-type (WT embryonic stem cells (ESCs, we show that expression of EMT and cardiac differentiation markers is induced during differentiation of WT EBs. This induction is inhibited in the absence of calreticulin and can be mimicked by inhibiting TGF-β signaling in WT cells. The presence of calreticulin in WT cells permits TGF-β-mediated signaling via AKT/GSK3β and promotes repression of E-cadherin by SNAIL2/SLUG. This is paralleled by induction of N-cadherin in a process known as the cadherin switch. We show that regulated Ca2+ signaling between calreticulin and calcineurin is critical for the unabated TGF-β signaling that is necessary for the exit from pluripotency and the cadherin switch during EMT. Calreticulin is thus a key mediator of TGF-β-induced commencement of cardiomyogenesis in mouse ESCs.

  11. Phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of Aquaporin-4 is required for Golgi transition in primary cultured astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadohira, Ikuko; Abe, Yoichiro; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Sano, Kazumi; Tsuji, Shoji; Arimitsu, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Yasui, Masato

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed in the perivascular and subpial astrocytes end-feet in mammalian brain, and plays a critical component of an integrated water and potassium homeostasis. Here we examine whether AQP4 is phosphorylated in primary cultured mouse astrocytes. Astrocytes were metabolically labeled with [ 32 P]phosphoric acid, then AQP4 was immunoprecipitated with anti-AQP4 antibody. We observed that AQP4 was constitutively phosphorylated, which is reduced by treatment with protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. To elucidate the phosphorylation of AQP4 by CK2, myc-tagged wild-type or mutant AQP4 was transiently transfected in primary cultured astrocytes. Substitution of Ala residues for four putative CK2 phosphorylation sites in the C terminus abolished the phosphorylation of AQP4. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that the quadruple mutant was localized in the Golgi apparatus. These observations indicate that the C-terminal domain of AQP4 is constitutively phosphorylated at least in part by protein kinase CK2 and it is required for Golgi transition.

  12. Ionizing radiations in aseptic bottling: a comparison between technologies and safety requirements [beverages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottani, E.; Rizzo, R.; Vignali, G.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiations, commonly adopted in the medical field, are recently experiencing a wide diffusion in industrials applications. One of the most widespread uses of ionizing radiations refers to foodstuffs and packaging sterilization. In the aseptic bottling area, the application of this technology on polymeric caps is quickly developing. In such application, sterilization could be obtained with beta-rays, generated by an electron beam, or with gamma-rays, emitted by a radioactive source. After a brief explanation of physical properties of ionizing radiations, the aim of this paper is to discuss the use of radiations in aseptic bottling. Based on results available in literature, radiations effects on treated materials are discussed, as well as safety requirements aiming at reducing risks related to radiation exposure. Finally, sterilization plants with gamma and beta radiation are compared, with the aim of examining functioning principles and management complexity. As a result of the comparison between the two technologies, the electron beam (beta-rays) adoption for caps sterilization process proves to be preferable [it

  13. Assessing Space Exploration Technology Requirements as a First Step Towards Ensuring Technology Readiness for International Cooperation in Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Satoh, Maoki; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Neumann, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Advancing critical and enhancing technologies is considered essential to enabling sustainable and affordable human space exploration. Critical technologies are those that enable a certain class of mission, such as technologies necessary for safe landing on the Martian surface, advanced propulsion, and closed loop life support. Others enhance the mission by leading to a greater satisfaction of mission objectives or increased probability of mission success. Advanced technologies are needed to reduce mass and cost. Many space agencies have studied exploration mission architectures and scenarios with the resulting lists of critical and enhancing technologies being very similar. With this in mind, and with the recognition that human space exploration will only be enabled by agencies working together to address these challenges, interested agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) have agreed to perform a technology assessment as an important step in exploring cooperation opportunities for future exploration mission scenarios. "The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination" was developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Since the fall of 2008, several International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon. They have identified technologies considered critical and enhancing of sustainable space exploration. Technologies such as in-situ resource utilization, advanced power generation/energy storage systems, reliable dust resistant mobility systems, and closed loop life support systems are important examples. Similarly, agencies such as NASA, ESA, and Russia have studied Mars exploration missions and identified critical technologies. They recognize that human and robotic precursor missions to destinations such as LEO, moon, and near earth objects provide opportunities to demonstrate the

  14. Delivering power system transition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiahai; Xu Yan; Hu Zhaoguang

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the transition to low carbon power systems in China. The methodology is built on the newly developed multi-level perspective (MLP) transitions, as well as literature on innovation systems. Three lines of thought on the transition process are integrated to probe the possible transition pathways in China's power sector. Five transition pathways, namely reproduction, transformation, substitution, reconfiguration, de-alignment/re-alignment and reconfiguration, with their possible technology options are presented. The requirements for a smart grid in the socio-technical transition process are addressed within the MLP framework. The paper goes further to propose an interactive framework for low carbon transition management in China. Representative technology options are appraised by employing innovation theory to demonstrate the logic of policy design within the framework. The work presented in this paper will be useful in informing policy-makers and other stakeholders in China and it may prove to be a valuable reference for other countries in energy transition management. - Highlights: ► The transition to low carbon power systems is studied from a multi-level perspective. ► Transition pathways with possible technology options are presented. ► An interactive framework is proposed for managing this transition. ► Representative technology options are appraised within the framework to show the logic of policy design.

  15. [Chapter 2. Transitions in drug-discovery technology and drug-development in Japan (1980-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Noriko; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In 1970s, the material patent system was introduced in Japan. Since then, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies have endeavored to create original in-house products. From 1980s, many of the innovative products were small molecular drugs and were developed using powerful medicinal-chemical technologies. Among them were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive organs and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese companies were able to launch some blockbuster drugs. At the same time, the pharmaceutical market, which had grown rapidly for two decades, was beginning to level off. From the late 1990s, drug development was slowing down due to the lack of expertise in biotechnology such as genetic engineering. In response to the circumstances, the research and development on biotechnology-based drugs such as antibody drugs have become more dynamic and popular at companies than small molecule drugs. In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the transitions in drug discovery and development between 1980 and 2010.

  16. IMPROVING THE QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF TOURIST SERVICES THROUGH INNOVATION AND THE TRANSITION TO THE BEST AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Belozerova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the factors contributing to innovation. Describes the organizational conditions are necessary for successful implementation of innovations. The author pays special attention to the existing innovation infrastructure: engineering centers and industrial parks. The author leads the way in the use of these facilities for innovation in tourism and hospitality. Also consider the strengthening of interaction of the enterprises of the tourism industry with institutions of innovative activity development, which act as a catalyst for private investment in priority sectors and sectors of the economy and create conditions for the development of innovation infrastructure. The article addresses the issues of changing the personal training concept. Tourism industry needs the personal, which will be oriented towards innovation and quality growth. The author developed a list of organizational, information and human activities and a roadmap for the implementation of innovations in the sphere of tourist services and the transition to the best available technologies.

  17. What governs the transition to a sustainable hydrogen economy? Articulating the relationship between technologies and political institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisschemoeller, Matthijs; Bode, Ries; Kerkhof, Marleen van de

    2006-01-01

    There is a lack of integrated knowledge on the transition to a sustainable energy system. The paper focuses on the relationship between technologies and institutions in the field of hydrogen from the perspective of political theory. The paper unfolds four paradigms of governance: 'Governance by policy networking', Governance by government', 'Governance by corporate business', and 'Governance by challenge', and looks into the major line of argument in support of these paradigms and into their possible bias with respect to hydrogen options. Each of these paradigms reveals an institutional bias in that it articulates specific opportunities for collaboration and competition in order to stimulate the transition to a sustainable hydrogen economy. The paper makes the observation that there is a compelling need to reframe fashionable discourse such as the necessary shift from government to governance or from government to market. Instead, specific questions with respect to the impact of guiding policy frameworks on innovation will highlight that neither 'neutral' nor 'optimal' frameworks for policy making exist, where competing hydrogen options are at stake. The identification of paradigms of governance maybe considered a methodological device for (participator) policy analysis

  18. Cardiovascular pressure measurement in safety assessment studies: technology requirements and potential errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazan, R Dustan

    2014-01-01

    In the early days of in vivo nonclinical pressure measurement, most laboratories were required to have considerable technical/engineering expertise to configure and maintain pressure transducers, amplifiers, tape recorders, chart recorders, etc. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows typically had some training in the requirements and limitations of the technology they used and were closely engaged in the collection and evaluation of data from their own experiments. More recently, pressure sensing telemetry and data acquisition/analysis systems are provided by vendors as turnkey systems, often resulting in a situation where users are less familiar with the technicalities of their operation. Also, investigators are now more likely to be absent and rely on technical staff for the collection of raw in vivo pressure data from their experiments than in the past. Depending on the goals of an experiment, an investigator may require the measurement of a variety of different pressure parameters, over varying periods of time. A basic understanding of the requirements and limitations that can affect the accuracy and precision of these parameters is important to ensure that the results and conclusions from an experiment are reliable. Factors to consider include the possibility of hydrostatic pressure effects from blood inside the vasculature of the animal, depending on the location of the sensor, as well as from fluid inside a fluid-filled catheter system; long-term stability (lack of drift) of a sensor over time, which can affect the interpretation of absolute pressure changes over a prolonged experiment; frequency response of the sensor and associated electronics; and the phase shift that occurs depending on location of the sensor in the vasculature or because of a fluid-filled catheter system. Each of these factors is discussed, and the particular requirements of frequency response as applied to the measurement of cardiac left ventricular pressure are emphasized. When

  19. Animal testing, 3R models and regulatory acceptance : Technology transition in a risk-averse context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, M.J.W.A.

    2016-01-01

    Risk avoidance has resulted in a broad range of regulations to guarantee the safety of products such as pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Many of these regulations rely on animal tests. About 3 million laboratory animals are used annually in Europe to meet such regulatory requirements.Regulatory animal

  20. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pododimenko, Inna

    2014-01-01

    The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of…

  1. Technology decision making. A constructive approach to planning and acquisition will require a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, D A; Swan, M M

    1993-01-01

    Technology should be viewed as an integrating rather than a divisive element in hospital planning. In the past, technology decision-making responsibility has often been diffused throughout hospitals, but providers are beginning to take a more considered and coherent approach. The process of making decisions about technology has four key elements: assessment, planning, acquisition, and management. The most important aspect of the assessment phase is the formation of a technology advisory committee to review and evaluate requests for new and emerging technology; review capital budget requests for new and replacement technology; and set mission-based and strategic priorities for new, emerging, and replacement technologies. Technology planning allows hospitals to set long-term goals for technology acquisition. The process involves an audit of existing technologies, evaluation of other hospitals' technologies, and review of technology trends. A well-defined technology plan will, in turn, facilitate the acquisition and management process, allowing hospitals greater flexibility in negotiating costs and budgeting for training, spare parts, service, upgrades, and support. By pooling resources with other providers in their region, hospitals can further enhance the effectiveness of their use and acquisition of technology. Collaboration allows providers to share the risks of technologically volatile and intensive services and avoid costly duplication of equipment and facilities.

  2. Accumulation of operational history through emulation test to meet proven technology requirement for newly developed I and C technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeong Cheol, Shin; Sung Kon, Kang; Han Seong, Son

    2006-01-01

    As new advanced digital I and C technology with potential benefits of higher functionality and better cost effectiveness is available in the market, NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) operators are inclined to use the new technology for the construction of new plant and the upgrade of existing plants. However, this new technology poses risks to the NPP operators at the same time. These risks are mainly due to the poor reliability of newly developed technology. KHNP's past experiences with the new equipment shows many cases of reliability problems. And their consequences include unintended plant trips, lowered acceptance of the new digital technology by the plant I and C maintenance crew, and increased licensing burden in answering for questions from the nuclear regulatory body. Considering the fact that the risk of these failures in the nuclear plant operation is far greater than those in other industry, nuclear power plant operators want proven technology for I and C systems. This paper presents an approach for the emulation of operational history through which a newly developed technology becomes a proven technology. One of the essential elements of this approach is the feedback scheme of running the new equipment in emulated environment, gathering equipment failure, and correcting the design(and test bed). The emulation of environment includes normal and abnormal events of the new equipment such as reconfiguration of control system due to power failure, plant operation including full spectrum of credible scenarios in an NPP. Emulation of I and C equipment execution mode includes normal operation, initialization and termination, abnormal operation, hardware maintenance and maintenance of algorithm/software. Plant specific simulator is used to create complete profile of plant operational conditions that I and C equipment is to experience in the real plant. Virtual operating crew technology is developed to run the simulator scenarios without involvement of actual operators

  3. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Analysis of space station requirements for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Vinkey, Victor F.; Runge, Fritz C.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) might benefit from the use of the space station for assembly, checkout, deployment, servicing, refurbishment, and technology development. Requirements that must be met by the space station to supply benefits for a selected scenario are summarized. Quantitative and qualitative data are supplied. Space station requirements for LDR which may be utilized by other missions are identified. A technology development mission for LDR is outlined and requirements summarized. A preliminary experiment plan is included. Space Station Data Base SAA 0020 and TDM 2411 are updated.

  4. Nucleoporin98-96 function is required for transit amplification divisions in the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B Parrott

    Full Text Available Production of specialized cells from precursors depends on a tightly regulated sequence of proliferation and differentiation steps. In the gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, the daughters of germ line stem cells (GSC go through precisely four rounds of transit amplification divisions to produce clusters of 16 interconnected germ line cells before entering a stereotypic differentiation cascade. Here we show that animals harbouring a transposon insertion in the center of the complex nucleoporin98-96 (nup98-96 locus had severe defects in the early steps of this developmental program, ultimately leading to germ cell loss and sterility. A phenotypic analysis indicated that flies carrying the transposon insertion, designated nup98-96(2288, had dramatically reduced numbers of germ line cells. In contrast to controls, mutant testes contained many solitary germ line cells that had committed to differentiation as well as abnormally small clusters of two, four or eight differentiating germ line cells. This indicates that mutant GSCs rather differentiated than self-renewed, and that these GSCs and their daughters initiated the differentiation cascade after zero, or less than four rounds of amplification divisions. This phenotype remained unaffected by hyper-activation of signalling pathways that normally result in excessive proliferation of GSCs and their daughters. Expression of wildtype nup98-96 specifically in the germ line cells of mutant animals fully restored development of the GSC lineage, demonstrating that the effect of the mutation is cell-autonomous. Nucleoporins are the structural components of the nucleopore and have also been implicated in transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. The nuclear envelopes of germ cells and general nucleocytoplasmic transport in nup98-96 mutant animals appeared normal, leading us to propose that Drosophila nup98-96 mediates the transport or transcription of targets required for the developmental timing

  5. Nucleoporin98-96 Function Is Required for Transit Amplification Divisions in the Germ Line of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Benjamin B.; Chiang, Yuting; Hudson, Alicia; Sarkar, Angshuman; Guichet, Antoine; Schulz, Cordula

    2011-01-01

    Production of specialized cells from precursors depends on a tightly regulated sequence of proliferation and differentiation steps. In the gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, the daughters of germ line stem cells (GSC) go through precisely four rounds of transit amplification divisions to produce clusters of 16 interconnected germ line cells before entering a stereotypic differentiation cascade. Here we show that animals harbouring a transposon insertion in the center of the complex nucleoporin98-96 (nup98-96) locus had severe defects in the early steps of this developmental program, ultimately leading to germ cell loss and sterility. A phenotypic analysis indicated that flies carrying the transposon insertion, designated nup98-962288, had dramatically reduced numbers of germ line cells. In contrast to controls, mutant testes contained many solitary germ line cells that had committed to differentiation as well as abnormally small clusters of two, four or eight differentiating germ line cells. This indicates that mutant GSCs rather differentiated than self-renewed, and that these GSCs and their daughters initiated the differentiation cascade after zero, or less than four rounds of amplification divisions. This phenotype remained unaffected by hyper-activation of signalling pathways that normally result in excessive proliferation of GSCs and their daughters. Expression of wildtype nup98-96 specifically in the germ line cells of mutant animals fully restored development of the GSC lineage, demonstrating that the effect of the mutation is cell-autonomous. Nucleoporins are the structural components of the nucleopore and have also been implicated in transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. The nuclear envelopes of germ cells and general nucleocytoplasmic transport in nup98-96 mutant animals appeared normal, leading us to propose that Drosophila nup98-96 mediates the transport or transcription of targets required for the developmental timing between

  6. Epithelial mesenchymal transition is required for acquisition of anoikis resistance and metastatic potential in adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jia

    Full Text Available Human adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is characterized by diffused invasion of the tumor into adjacent organs and early distant metastasis. Anoikis resistance and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT are considered prerequisites for cancer cells to metastasize. Exploring the relationship between these processes and their underlying mechanism of action is a promising way to better understand ACC tumors. We initially established anoikis-resistant sublines of ACC cells; the variant cells revealed a mesenchymal phenotype through Slug-mediated EMT-like transformation and displayed enhanced metastatic potential both in vitro and in vivo. Suppression of EMT by knockdown of Slug significantly impaired anoikis resistance, migration, and invasion of the variant cells. With overexpression of Slug and Twist, we determined that induction of EMT in normal ACC cells could prevent anoikis, albeit partially. These findings strongly suggest that EMT is indispensable in anoikis resistance, at least in ACC cells. Furthermore, we found that the EGFR/PI3K/Akt pathway acts as the common regulator for EMT-like transformation and anoikis resistance, as confirmed by their specific inhibitors. Gefitinib and LY294003 restored the sensibilities of anoikis-resistant cells to anoikis and simultaneously impaired their metastatic potential. In addition, the results from our in vivo model of metastasis suggest that pretreatment with gefitinib promotes mouse survival by alleviating pulmonary metastasis. Most importantly, immunohistochemistry of human ACC specimens showed a correlation between the overexpression of Slug and EGFR staining. This study has demonstrated that Slug-mediated EMT-like transformation is required by human ACC cells to achieve anoikis resistance and their metastatic potential. Targeting the EGFR/PI3K/Akt pathway holds potential as a preventive strategy against distant metastasis of ACC.

  7. Development of test practice requirements for a standard method on fracture toughness testing in the transition range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Zerbst, U.; Heerens, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers the resolution of several issues that are relevant to the ductile to brittle transition range of structural steels. One of this issues was to compare a statistical-based weakest-link method to constraint data adjustment methods for modeling the specimen size effects on fracture toughness. Another was to explore the concept of a universal transition temperature curve shape (Master Curve). Data from a Materials Properties Council round robin activity were used to test the proposals empirically. The findings of this study are inclosed in an activity for the development of a draft standard test procedure ''Test Practice for Fracture Toughness in the Transition Range''. (orig.) [de

  8. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive Information...

  9. Monitoring Conformance and Containment for Geological Carbon Storage: Can Technology Meet Policy and Public Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, D. C.; Osadetz, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Province of Alberta, Canada identified carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a key element of its 2008 Climate Change strategy. The target is a reduction in CO2 emissions of 139 Mt/year by 2050. To encourage uptake of CCS by industry, the province has provided partial funding to two demonstration scale projects, namely the Quest Project by Shell and partners (CCS), and the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line Project (pipeline and CO2-EOR). Important to commercial scale implementation of CCS will be the requirement to prove conformance and containment of the CO2 plume injected during the lifetime of the CCS project. This will be a challenge for monitoring programs. The Containment and Monitoring Institute (CaMI) is developing a Field Research Station (FRS) to calibrate various monitoring technologies for CO2 detection thresholds at relatively shallow depths. The objective being assessed with the FRS is sensitivity for early detection of loss of containment from a deeper CO2 storage project. In this project, two injection wells will be drilled to sandstone reservoir targets at depths of 300 m and 700 m. Up to four observation wells will be drilled with monitoring instruments installed. Time-lapse surface and borehole monitoring surveys will be undertaken to evaluate the movement and fate of the CO2 plume. These will include seismic, microseismic, cross well, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, gravity, geodetic and geomechanical surveys. Initial baseline seismic data from the FRS will presented.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics research at the United Technologies Research Center requiring supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of research activities at the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented. The requirement and use of various levels of computers, including supercomputers, for the CFD activities is described. Examples of CFD directed toward applications to helicopters, turbomachinery, heat exchangers, and the National Aerospace Plane are included. Helicopter rotor codes for the prediction of rotor and fuselage flow fields and airloads were developed with emphasis on rotor wake modeling. Airflow and airload predictions and comparisons with experimental data are presented. Examples are presented of recent parabolized Navier-Stokes and full Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic shock-wave/boundary layer interaction, and hydrogen/air supersonic combustion. In addition, other examples of CFD efforts in turbomachinery Navier-Stokes methodology and separated flow modeling are presented. A brief discussion of the 3-tier scientific computing environment is also presented, in which the researcher has access to workstations, mid-size computers, and supercomputers.

  11. Transitioning From Paper to Digital: State Statutory and Regulatory Frameworks for Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Cason; Sunshine, Gregory; Pepin, Dawn; Ramanathan, Tara; Menon, Akshara; Penn, Matthew

    In all health system sectors, electronic health information (EHI) is created, used, released, and reused. We examined states' efforts to address EHI uses in law to provide an understanding of the EHI legal environment. Attorney researchers used WestlawNext to search for EHI-related statutes and regulations of the US states, US territories, and the District of Columbia in effect as of January 2014. The researchers independently catalogued provisions by the EHI use described in the law. Researchers resolved discrepancies through peer review meetings and recorded the consensus codes for each law. This study identified 2364 EHI-related laws representing 49 EHI uses in 54 jurisdictions. A total of 18 EHI uses were regulated by ≥10 jurisdictions. More than 750 laws addressed 2 or more EHI uses. Jurisdictions varied by the number of EHI laws in effect, with a mean of 44 laws. Texas had the most EHI laws (n = 145). Hawaii and South Carolina had the fewest (n = 14 each). The EHI legal landscape is complex. The large quantity and diversity of laws complicate legal analysis, likely delay implementation of public health solutions, and might be detrimental to the development of emerging health information technology. Research is needed to understand the effect of EHI-related laws.

  12. Photovoltaic and solar-thermal technologies in residential building codes, tackling building code requirements to overcome the impediments to applying new technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L. [authors] and Wiechman, J.; Hayter, S.; Gwinner, D. [eds.

    1999-10-04

    This report describes the building code requirements and impediments to applying photovoltaic (PV) and solar-thermal technologies in residential buildings (one- or two-family dwellings). It reviews six modern model building codes that represent the codes to be adopted by most locations in the coming years: International Residential Code, First Draft (IRC), International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), International Mechanical Code (IMC), International Plumbing Code (IPC), International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC), and National Electrical Code (NEC). The IRC may become the basis for many of the building codes in the United States after it is released in 2000, and it references the other codes that will also likely become applicable at that time. These codes are reviewed as they apply to photovoltaic systems in buildings and building-integrated photovoltaic systems and to active-solar domestic hot-water and space-heating systems. The first discussion is on general code issues that impact the s e technologies-for example, solar access and sustainability. Then, secondly, the discussion investigates the relationship of the technologies to the codes, providing examples, while keeping two major issues in mind: How do the codes treat these technologies as building components? and Do the IECC and other codes allow reasonable credit for the energy impacts of the technologies? The codes can impact the implementation of the above technologies in several ways: (1) The technology is not mentioned in the codes. It may be an obstacle to implementing the technology, and the solution is to develop appropriate explicit sections or language in the codes. (2) The technology is discussed by the codes, but the language is confusing or ambiguous. The solution is to clarify the language. (3) The technology is discussed in the codes, but the discussion is spread over several sections or different codes. Practitioners may not easily find all of the relevant material that should be considered. The

  13. The constraints in managing a transition towards clean energy technologies in developing nations: reflection on energy governance and alternative policy options.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiam, D.R.; Moll, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework stimulating a sustainable energy transition in developing nations. Based on the existing literature, we first index theoretical factors preventing deployment of low carbon technologies. After having identified these factors, we provide

  14. The evolution of atmospheric science goals and enhanced technology needed to satisfy remote sensing requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. M., III

    2017-12-01

    The era of satellite observations of Earth's atmosphere has undergone a remarkable and dramatic evolution since temperature measurements were first made from the Nimbus 3 satellite launched in April 1969. Since those early days of discovery, amazing progress has occurred in scientific understanding of the atmosphere. The launch of Nimbus 7 in October 1978 provided an explosion of information on the composition of the stratosphere revealing for the first time the global distributions of stratospheric O3, H2O, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, HNO3 and aerosols. The SAGE series of satellites begun in 1979 and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite deployed from the Space Shuttle in October 1991 added new and more tenuous stratospheric gases especially in the odd chlorine family. Measurements of stratospheric ozone destroying chlorine and bromine compounds have continued with the EOS suite of satellites. Measurements from the TIMED satellite have provided a 15-year data set for study of the energetics, chemistry and dynamics of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere and vertical coupling between atmospheric regions. The AIM satellite has provided a 10-year data base of the tenuous layer of mesopause level noctilucent clouds and horizontal coupling between hemispheres. This progression of knowledge and measurement capability has evolved together as the needs developed to observe and characterize less abundant but more important atmospheric constituents and processes. This talk summarizes some of the key science results, the technology challenges that had to be overcome to enable the measurements and a view toward the future to meet new science requirements.

  15. Technology Requirements For a Square-Meter, Arcsecond-Resolution Telescope for X-Rays: The SMART-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.; Allured, Ryan; Bookbinder, Jay; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Forman, William; Freeman, Mark; McMuldroch, Stuart; Reid, Paul; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey; hide

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the astrophysical problems of the 2020's requires sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with square meter effective area. Such requirements can be derived, for example, by considering deep x-ray surveys to find the young black holes in the early universe (large redshifts) which will grow into the first supermassive black holes. We have envisioned a mission based on adjustable x-ray optics technology, in order to achieve the required reduction of mass to collecting area for the mirrors. We are pursuing technology which effects this adjustment via thin film piezoelectric "cells" deposited directly on the non-reflecting sides of thin, slumped glass. While SMARTX will also incorporate state-of-the-art x-ray cameras, the remaining spacecraft systems have no more stringent requirements than those which are well understood and proven on the current Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  16. Functional requirements for assistive technology for people with cognitive impairments and dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. de Witte; R.M. Dröes; I. Karkowski; M. Blom; M.E. de Boer; M.D. Mulvenna; F.J.M. Meiland; Joost van Hoof; J. van der Leeuw

    2012-01-01

    The amount of technological aids on the market to support people in their everyday functioning is increasing. For example mobile telephone, electronic diary, skyping and domotics. Many of these aids are too complicated to operate for people with cognitive impairments, like dementia. For technology

  17. Functional requirements for assistive technology for people with cognitive impairments and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, F.J.M.; Boer, M.E. de; Hoof, J. van; Leeuw, J. van der; Witte, L. de; Blom, M.; Karkowski, I.P.; Mulvenna, M.D.; Droes, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    The amount of technological aids on the market to support people in their everyday functioning is increasing. For example mobile telephone, electronic diary, skyping and domotics. Many of these aids are too complicated to operate for people with cognitive impairments, like dementia. For technology

  18. Addressing AACSB Global and Technology Requirements: Exploratory Assessment of a Marketing Management Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Scott; Bao, Yongchuan

    2009-01-01

    The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) standards mandate knowledge of global and technology issues. Businesses desire employees with ability to analyze international markets and to be adept with technology. Taxpayers supporting public universities and organizations hiring business school graduates expect accountability…

  19. Competencies Required for Healthcare Information Technology to Be an Effective Strategic Business Change Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    One of the core strategies to transform the United States national healthcare system is the implementation of key technologies such as the electronic patient medical record. Such key technologies improve patient care and help the organization gain competitive advantage. With a high demand for strategic and operational change, healthcare providers…

  20. Design and Development of Maize Dehusker cum Sheller: A Technology for Northern Transition Zone of Karnataka, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilur, Rudragouda; Kumar, Sushilendra

    2018-02-01

    The Maize (Zea mays L.) crop is one of the most important cereal in agricultural production systems of Northern Transition Zone (Hyderabad-Karnataka region) in India. These Hyderabad Karnataka farmers (small-medium) are lack of economic technologies with maize dehusking and shelling, which fulfils the two major needs as crops and as livestock in farming. The portable medium size (600 kg/h capacity) electric motor (2.23 kW) operated Maize Dehusker cum Sheller (MDS) was designed to resolve the issue by considering engineering properties of maize. The developed trapezium shaped MDS machine having overall dimensions (length × (top and bottom) × height) of 1200 × (500 and 610) × 810 mm. The selected operational parameters viz, cylinder peripheral speed (7.1 m/s), concave clearance (25 mm) and feed rate (600 kg/h) were studied for machine-performance and seed-quality parameters. The performance of machine under these parameters showed the dehusking efficiency of 99.56%, shelling efficiency of 98.01%, cleaning efficiency of 99.11%, total loss of 3.63% machine capacity of 527.11 kg/kW-h and germination percentage of 98.93%. Overall machine performance was found satisfactory for maize dehusking cum shelling operation as well as to produce the maize grains for seeding purpose.

  1. Brain-wave measures of workload in advanced cockpits: The transition of technology from laboratory to cockpit simulator, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.; Munson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The present Phase 2 small business innovation research study was designed to address issues related to scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) indices of mental workload and to transition this technology from the laboratory to cockpit simulator environments for use as a systems engineering tool. The project involved five main tasks: (1) Two laboratory studies confirmed the generality of the ERP indices of workload obtained in the Phase 1 study and revealed two additional ERP components related to workload. (2) A task analysis' of flight scenarios and pilot tasks in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) defined cockpit events (i.e., displays, messages, alarms) that would be expected to elicit ERPs related to workload. (3) Software was developed to support ERP data analysis. An existing ARD-proprietary package of ERP data analysis routines was upgraded, new graphics routines were developed to enhance interactive data analysis, and routines were developed to compare alternative single-trial analysis techniques using simulated ERP data. (4) Working in conjunction with NASA Langley research scientists and simulator engineers, preparations were made for an ACFS validation study of ERP measures of workload. (5) A design specification was developed for a general purpose, computerized, workload assessment system that can function in simulators such as the ACFS.

  2. E-learning as a technological tool to meet the requirements of occupational standards in training of it specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, N. A.; Tyatyushkina, O. Y.; Cheremisina, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss issues of updating educational programs to meet requirements of the labor market and occupational standards of IT industry. We suggest the technology of e-learning that utilizes an open educational resource to provide the employers' participation in the development of educational content and the intensification of practical training.

  3. Virtual reality technology as a tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Silva, Antonio C.F.; Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Dutra, Marco A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Virtual Reality (VR) is an advanced computer interface technology that allows the user to internet or to explore a three-dimensional environment through the computer, as was part of the virtual world. This technology presents great applicability in the most diverse areas of the human knowledge. This paper presents a study on the use of the VR as tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks. Moreover, this paper presents a case study: a virtual model of the control desk, developed using virtual reality technology to be used in the human factors requirements evaluation. This case study was developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory at IEN, and understands the stereo visualization of the Argonauta research nuclear reactor control desk for a static ergonomic evaluation using check-lists, in accordance to the standards and human factors nuclear international guides (IEC 1771, NUREG-0700). (author)

  4. Grand Challenges: Science, Engineering, and Societal Advances, Requiring Networking and Information Technology Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...the U.S. Government makes critical decisions about appropriate investments in IT R and D to help society forward both socially and economically. To inform that...

  5. Women as a resource for the flexibility required for high technology innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlaire, Ruth Dasso

    1994-01-01

    What do women scientists need to know for career advancement into senior level positions? Our declining economic conditions have been the cause for major political and technological changes. The U.S. Congress is turning toward technology to increase our competitive edge in the world. Allowing women scientists, and women engineers in particular, more voice in the decision making process may be an innovative alternative for the diversity and flexibility needed for the unknown technological problems of the future. But first women scientists need to know how the system measures scientific achievement and how to identify the processes needed to increase our technological capability in order for them to formidably compete and win higher ranking positions.

  6. The Potential of RFID Technology in the Textile and Clothing Industry: Opportunities, Requirements and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnani, Elena; Cavalieri, Sergio; Pinto, Roberto; Dotti, Stefano

    In the current competitive environment, companies need to extensively exploit the use of advanced technologies in order to develop a sustainable advantage, enhance their operational efficiency and better serve customers. In this context, RFID technology has emerged as a valid support for the company progress and its value is becoming more and more apparent. In particular, the textile and clothing industry, characterised by short life-cycles , quick response production , fast distribution, erratic customer preferences and impulsive purchasing, is one of the sectors which can extensively benefit from the RFID technology. However, actual applications are still very limited, especially in the upstream side of the supply network. This chapter provides an insight into the main benefits and potentials of this technology and highlights the main issues which are currently inhibiting its large scale development in the textile and clothing industry. The experience of two industry-academia projects and the relative fallouts are reported.

  7. Biological aspects of nuclear technology: nuclear technology potent medicine against malignancy care required to guard against harmful aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear technology while producing energy is also used to produce Radioisotopes, so called artificial radioactivity. Radiations emitted by radioisotopes are very helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant diseases. The subject of Radiation Biology developed with the need to study the effects of radiations on specific organs and areas of the human body. Along with the radioisotopes, instruments like Scanners, Cameras and Teletherapy machines were also developed to scan, map, deliver, and treat the specific parts of the body. A very large number of radioisotopes are now made, many of which are used for labeling compounds (radiopharmaceuticals) for targeting specific body organs in the sense that they tend to concentrate in those organs. Thus by scanning the organ, its condition is mapped or seen. This can then be treated by suitable amounts of the radioisotope delivered in a specific manner. Thus new disciplines of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics, developed as it became necessary to mark the cancerous area and calculate precisely the dose to be delivered and map its distribution. The other side of radioisotopes applications is their harmful effects on biological material which are also well known and well documented. Maximum limits of dose have been prescribed by National and International Organs to safeguard the health of the users. (author)

  8. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  10. The iPad and mobile technology revolution: benefits and challenges for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, David; Light, Janice

    2013-06-01

    The iPad and other mobile technologies provide powerful new tools to potentially enhance communication for individuals with developmental disabilities, acquired neurogenic disorders, and degenerative neurological conditions. These mobile technologies offer a number of potential benefits, including: (a) increased awareness and social acceptance of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), (b) greater consumer empowerment in accessing AAC solutions, (c) increased adoption of AAC technologies, (d) greater functionality and interconnectivity, and (e) greater diffusion of AAC research and development. However, there remain a number of significant challenges that must be addressed if these benefits are to be fully realized: (a) to ensure the focus is on communication, not just technology, (b) to develop innovative models of AAC service delivery to ensure successful outcomes, (c) to ensure ease of access for all individuals who require AAC, and, (d) to maximize AAC solutions to support a wide variety of communication functions. There is an urgent need for effective collaboration among key stakeholders to support research and development activities, and to ensure the successful implementation of mobile technologies to enhance communication outcomes for individuals who require AAC and their families.

  11. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pododimenko Inna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of innovative approaches to the training of future ІТ specialists with the aim to increase their professional level. The content of standards of professional training and development of information technologies specialists in foreign countries, particularly in Japan, has been analyzed and generalized. On the basis of analysis of educational and professional standards of Japan, basic requirements to the engineer in industry of information communication technology in the conditions of competitive environment at the labour market have been comprehensively characterized. The competencies that graduate students of educational qualification level of bachelor in the conditions of new state policy concerning upgrading the quality of higher education have been considered. The constituents of professional competence in the structure of an engineer-programmer’s personality, necessary on different levels of professional improvement of a specialist for the development of community of highly skilled ІТ specialists, have been summarized. Positive features of foreign experience and the possibility of their implementation into the native educational space have been distinguished. Directions for modernization and upgrading of the quality of higher education in Ukraine and the prospects for further scientific research concerning the practice of specialists in information technologies training have been suggested

  12. 75 FR 62515 - Notice of Availability of Report on the Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... constructive dialogue with other interested parties. In developing its report entitled, ``Communications... the public comment process, as well as other information pertaining to communications requirements of...

  13. 42 CFR 495.332 - State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... data-access mechanisms. (7) A description of how each State will support integration of clinical and... program, including a description and organizational charts for workgroups within State government..., consistent with § 495.306(g). (2)(i) A revised definition of meaningful use of certified EHR technology...

  14. Maritime Science and Technology Experimentation Capability Project: Maritime Capability Evaluation Laboratory (MCEL) Data Centre Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    near to office cubicles or meeting rooms. Where possible, site network/server rooms near mechanical rooms, janitorial rooms, storage rooms etc. This has...Internet Service Provider ISR Integrated Services Router ISSO Information System Security Officer IT Information Technology ITSG Information

  15. Technologies required for safe and profitable deep level gold mining, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Willis, PH

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 14th CMMI conference, held in Edinburgh in 1990, at which a paper was presented by the author (Willis, 1990) reviewing the role of integrating new technology as a survival strategy for South African gold mines, considerable change has...

  16. Barriers and requirements for achieving interoperable eHealth technology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijeweme-d'Hollosy, Wendeline; van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its great promises, eHealth is not yet structurally embedded within the IT infrastructure of primary care. This is mainly due to the fact that healthcare technologies have been developed without coordination and a centralized approach [1], which in turn has led to a lack of shared standards

  17. Information technology -- Telecommunications and information exchange between systems -- Local and metropolitan area networks -- Specific requirements -- Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    Information technology -- Telecommunications and information exchange between systems -- Local and metropolitan area networks -- Specific requirements -- Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications

  18. Development of a helium-cooled divertor concept: design-related requirements on materials and fabrication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norajitra, P. E-mail: prachai.norajitra@imf.fzk.de; Boccaccini, L.V.; Diegele, E.; Filatov, V.; Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Janeschitz, G.; Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Kruessmann, R.; Malang, S.; Mazul, I.; Moeslang, A.; Petersen, C.; Reimann, G.; Rieth, M.; Rizzi, G.; Rumyantsev, M.; Ruprecht, R.; Slobodtchouk, V

    2004-08-01

    Within the framework of the EU power plant conceptual study (PPCS), a modular He-cooled divertor concept with integrated pin array (HEMP) is being developed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The design goal is to achieve a high heat flux of at least about 10-15 MW/m{sup 2}, which is proposed for a near-term reactor model like DEMO. The development and optimization of the divertor concept require a close link between the main issues: design, analyses, materials and fabrication technology, and experiments with feedbacks between them to be accounted for. Design-specific requirements on materials and fabrication issues will be discussed.

  19. Development of a helium-cooled divertor concept: design-related requirements on materials and fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Diegele, E.; Filatov, V.; Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Janeschitz, G.; Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Kruessmann, R.; Malang, S.; Mazul, I.; Moeslang, A.; Petersen, C.; Reimann, G.; Rieth, M.; Rizzi, G.; Rumyantsev, M.; Ruprecht, R.; Slobodtchouk, V.

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU power plant conceptual study (PPCS), a modular He-cooled divertor concept with integrated pin array (HEMP) is being developed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The design goal is to achieve a high heat flux of at least about 10-15 MW/m 2 , which is proposed for a near-term reactor model like DEMO. The development and optimization of the divertor concept require a close link between the main issues: design, analyses, materials and fabrication technology, and experiments with feedbacks between them to be accounted for. Design-specific requirements on materials and fabrication issues will be discussed

  20. Introducing RFID technology in dynamic and time-critical medical settings: requirements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Siddika; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S

    2012-10-01

    We describe the process of introducing RFID technology in the trauma bay of a trauma center to support fast-paced and complex teamwork during resuscitation. We analyzed trauma resuscitation tasks, photographs of medical tools, and videos of simulated resuscitations to gain insight into resuscitation tasks, work practices and procedures. Based on these data, we discuss strategies for placing RFID tags on medical tools and for placing antennas in the environment for optimal tracking and activity recognition. Results from our preliminary RFID deployment in the trauma bay show the feasibility of our approach for tracking tools and for recognizing trauma team activities. We conclude by discussing implications for and challenges to introducing RFID technology in other similar settings characterized by dynamic and collocated collaboration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Photovoltaic solar array technology required for three wide scale generating systems for terrestrial applications: rooftop, solar farm, and satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Three major options for wide-scale generation of photovoltaic energy for terrestrial use are considered: (1) rooftop array, (2) solar farm, and (3) satellite station. The rooftop array would use solar cell arrays on the roofs of residential or commercial buildings; the solar farm would consist of large ground-based arrays, probably in arid areas with high insolation; and the satellite station would consist of an orbiting solar array, many square kilometers in area. The technology advancement requirements necessary for each option are discussed, including cost reduction of solar cells and arrays, weight reduction, resistance to environmental factors, reliability, and fabrication capability, including the availability of raw materials. The majority of the technology advancement requirements are applicable to all three options, making possible a flexible basic approach regardless of the options that may eventually be chosen. No conclusions are drawn as to which option is most advantageous, since the feasibility of each option depends on the success achieved in the technology advancement requirements specified.

  2. The advancement of electric vehicles - case: Tesla Motors. Disruptive technology requiring systemic innovating

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtinen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Electric vehicles have existed for over 100 years as a disruptive innovation. Even though they have always been easier to use, quieter and cleaner, gasoline cars have beaten it in price, range and faster fueling. As gasoline cars have been the technological standard for the past 150 years there has been no motivation by car manufacturers to advance electric vehicles. By producing electric vehicles Tesla Motors has appropriately become the first successful startup car manufacturer in over 100 ...

  3. Phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Sole, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Sol, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions--changes between different states of organization in a complex system--have long helped to explain physics concepts, such as why water freezes into a solid or boils to become a gas. How might phase transitions shed light on important problems in biological and ecological complex systems? Exploring the origins and implications of sudden changes in nature and society, Phase Transitions examines different dynamical behaviors in a broad range of complex systems. Using a compelling set of examples, from gene networks and ant colonies to human language and the degradation of diverse ecosystems, the book illustrates the power of simple models to reveal how phase transitions occur. Introductory chapters provide the critical concepts and the simplest mathematical techniques required to study phase transitions. In a series of example-driven chapters, Ricard Solé shows how such concepts and techniques can be applied to the analysis and prediction of complex system behavior, including the origins of ...

  4. A life-cycle approach to technology, infrastructure, and climate policy decision making: Transitioning to plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and low-carbon electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Constantine

    In order to mitigate the most severe effects of climate change, large global reductions in the current levels of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are required in this century to stabilize atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations at less than double pre-industrial levels. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report states that GHG emissions should be reduced to 50-80% of 2000 levels by 2050 to increase the likelihood of stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In order to achieve the large GHG reductions by 2050 recommended by the IPCC, a fundamental shift and evolution will be required in the energy system. Because the electric power and transportation sectors represent the largest GHG emissions sources in the United States, a unique opportunity for coupling these systems via electrified transportation could achieve synergistic environmental (GHG emissions reductions) and energy security (petroleum displacement) benefits. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), which use electricity from the grid to power a portion of travel, could play a major role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector. However, this thesis finds that life cycle GHG emissions from PHEVs depend on the electricity source that is used to charge the battery, so meaningful GHG emissions reductions with PHEVs are conditional on low-carbon electricity sources. Power plants and their associated GHGs are long-lived, and this work argues that decisions made regarding new electricity supplies within the next ten years will affect the potential of PHEVs to play a role in a low-carbon future in the coming decades. This thesis investigates the life cycle engineering, economic, and policy decisions involved in transitioning to PHEVs and low-carbon electricity. The government has a vast array of policy options to promote low-carbon technologies, some of which have proven to be more successful than others. This thesis uses life

  5. Personal radiation detector at a high technology readiness level that satisfies DARPA's SN-13-47 and SIGMA program requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, D.; Knafo, Y.; Manor, A.; Seif, R.; Ghelman, M.; Ellenbogen, M.; Pushkarsky, V.; Ifergan, Y.; Semyonov, N.; Wengrowicz, U.; Mazor, T.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.; Osovizky, A.

    2015-06-01

    There is a need to develop new personal radiation detector (PRD) technologies that can be mass produced. On August 2013, DARPA released a request for information (RFI) seeking innovative radiation detection technologies. In addition, on December 2013, a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the SIGMA program was released. The RFI requirements focused on a sensor that should possess three main properties: low cost, high compactness and radioisotope identification capabilities. The identification performances should facilitate the detection of a hidden threat, ranging from special nuclear materials (SNM) to commonly used radiological sources. Subsequently, the BAA presented the specific requirements at an instrument level and provided a comparison between the current market status (state-of-the-art) and the SIGMA program objectives. This work presents an optional alternative for both the detection technology (sensor with communication output and without user interface) for DARPA's initial RFI and for the PRD required by the SIGMA program. A broad discussion is dedicated to the method proposed to fulfill the program objectives and to the selected alternative that is based on the PDS-GO design and technology. The PDS-GO is the first commercially available PRD that is based on a scintillation crystal optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), a solid-state light sensor. This work presents the current performance of the instrument and possible future upgrades based on recent technological improvements in the SiPM design. The approach of utilizing the SiPM with a commonly available CsI(Tl) crystal is the key for achieving the program objectives. This approach provides the appropriate performance, low cost, mass production and small dimensions; however, it requires a creative approach to overcome the obstacles of the solid-state detector dark current (noise) and gain stabilization over a wide temperature range. Based on the presented results, we presume that

  6. Complex Systems Engineering : Designing in sociotechnical systems for the energy transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moncada Escudero, J.A.; Nava Guerrero, G.D.C.; Park Lee, H.; Okur, Ö.; Chakraborty, S.T.; Lukszo, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The EU has set ambitious targets for an energy transition. While research often focuses on technology, institutions or actors, a transition requires complex coordination and comprehensive analysis and design. We propose a framework accounting for technology, institutions and actors' perspective

  7. Diverse and uneven pathways towards transition to low carbon development: The case of diffusion of solar PV technology in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iizuka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Transition towards low carbon development (LCD) is an urgent challenge for the global community. As increased economic activities usually result in more carbon emissions, this challenge is particularly crucial for rapidly growing emerging countries. For these countries, reducing carbon emissions

  8. Technology Requirements for a Square Meter, Arcsecond Resolution Telescope for X-Rays: The SMART-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.; Allured, Ryan; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Forman, William R.; Freeman, Mark D.; McMuldroch, Stuart; Reid, Paul B.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the astrophysical problems of the 2020's requires sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with square meter effective area. Such requirements can be derived, for example, by considering deep x-ray surveys to find the young black holes in the early universe (large redshifts) which will grow into the first super-massive black holes. We have envisioned a mission, the Square Meter Arcsecond Resolution Telescope for X-rays (SMART-X), based on adjustable x-ray optics technology, incorporating mirrors with the required small ratio of mass to collecting area. We are pursuing technology which achieves sub-arcsecond resolution by on-orbit adjustment via thin film piezoelectric "cells" deposited directly on the non-reflecting sides of thin, slumped glass. While SMART-X will also incorporate state-of-the-art x-ray cameras, the remaining spacecraft systems have no requirements more stringent than those which are well understood and proven on the current Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  9. Effect of power system technology and mission requirements on high altitude long endurance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine how various power system components and mission requirements affect the sizing of a solar powered long endurance aircraft. The aircraft power system consists of photovoltaic cells and a regenerative fuel cell. Various characteristics of these components, such as PV cell type, PV cell mass, PV cell efficiency, fuel cell efficiency, and fuel cell specific mass, were varied to determine what effect they had on the aircraft sizing for a given mission. Mission parameters, such as time of year, flight altitude, flight latitude, and payload mass and power, were also altered to determine how mission constraints affect the aircraft sizing. An aircraft analysis method which determines the aircraft configuration, aspect ratio, wing area, and total mass, for maximum endurance or minimum required power based on the stated power system and mission parameters is presented. The results indicate that, for the power system, the greatest benefit can be gained by increasing the fuel cell specific energy. Mission requirements also substantially affect the aircraft size. By limiting the time of year the aircraft is required to fly at high northern or southern latitudes, a significant reduction in aircraft size or increase in payload capacity can be achieved.

  10. Material property requirements for application leak-before-break technology on nuclear power plant high-energy piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chengliang; Deng Xiaoyun; Yin Zhiying; Liu Meng

    2012-01-01

    The application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology on nuclear power plant high-energy piping systems can improve their safety and economy, while propose some new requirements on testing material properties. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's LBB related standard review plan and implementation specifications were analyzed, and test items, object, temperature, quantity and thermal aging effect of five general requirements were summarized. In addition, four key testing technical requirements, such as specimen size, side grooves, strain range and the orientation of specimens were also discussed to ensure the test data usefulness, representativeness and integrity. This study can provide some guidance for the aforementioned test program on domestic materials. (authors)

  11. Assessment of the technology required to develop photovoltaic power system for large scale national energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwack, R.

    1974-01-01

    A technical assessment of a program to develop photovoltaic power system technology for large-scale national energy applications was made by analyzing and judging the alternative candidate photovoltaic systems and development tasks. A program plan was constructed based on achieving the 10 year objective of a program to establish the practicability of large-scale terrestrial power installations using photovoltaic conversion arrays costing less than $0.50/peak W. Guidelines for the tasks of a 5 year program were derived from a set of 5 year objectives deduced from the 10 year objective. This report indicates the need for an early emphasis on the development of the single-crystal Si photovoltaic system for commercial utilization; a production goal of 5 x 10 to the 8th power peak W/year of $0.50 cells was projected for the year 1985. The developments of other photovoltaic conversion systems were assigned to longer range development roles. The status of the technology developments and the applicability of solar arrays in particular power installations, ranging from houses to central power plants, was scheduled to be verified in a series of demonstration projects. The budget recommended for the first 5 year phase of the program is $268.5M.

  12. Pantothenate kinase 1 is required to support the metabolic transition from the fed to the fasted state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Leonardi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme A (CoA biosynthesis is regulated by the pantothenate kinases (PanK, of which there are four active isoforms. The PanK1 isoform is selectively expressed in liver and accounted for 40% of the total PanK activity in this organ. CoA synthesis was limited using a Pank1(-/- knockout mouse model to determine whether the regulation of CoA levels was critical to liver function. The elimination of PanK1 reduced hepatic CoA levels, and fasting triggered a substantial increase in total hepatic CoA in both Pank1(-/- and wild-type mice. The increase in hepatic CoA during fasting was blunted in the Pank1(-/- mouse, and resulted in reduced fatty acid oxidation as evidenced by abnormally high accumulation of long-chain acyl-CoAs, acyl-carnitines, and triglycerides in the form of lipid droplets. The Pank1(-/- mice became hypoglycemic during a fast due to impaired gluconeogenesis, although ketogenesis was normal. These data illustrate the importance of PanK1 and elevated liver CoA levels during fasting to support the metabolic transition from glucose utilization and fatty acid synthesis to gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. The findings also suggest that PanK1 may be a suitable target for therapeutic intervention in metabolic disorders that feature hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia.

  13. Phenoloxidase and its zymogen are required for the larval-pupal transition in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ping-Ping; Xie, Yi-Fei; Shen, Guang-Mao; Wei, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Phenoloxidases (POs) play a key role in melanin production, are involved in invertebrate immune mechanisms, and are considered important enzymes in the insect development process. In the present study, we report the developmental stage and tissue-specific expression patterns of BdPPO1 and PO activity from Bactrocera dorsalis. The results showed that the activity of PO and its zymogen expression were closely related to the development of B. dorsalis during the larval-pupal transition, particularly in the integument. Additionally, biochemical characterization showed that PO from different developmental stages and tissues all had maximum activity at pH 7.5 and 37°C. After feeding a metal ion-containing artificial diet, the activity of PO and expression of BdPPO1 were significantly increased, indicating that PO was a metalloprotein and it could be activated by Zn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Cu2+. The functional analysis showed that the expression of BdPPO1 could be regulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) after injection. Furthermore, injection of the double-stranded RNA of BdPPO1 into the 3rd instar larvae significantly reduced mRNA levels after 24 h and 48 h, and resulted in a lower pupation rate and abnormal phenotype. These results expand the understanding of the important role of PO and its zymogen in the growth of B. dorsalis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deriving Requirements for Pervasive Well-Being Technology From Work Stress and Intervention Theory: Framework and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldijk, Saskia; Kraaij, Wessel

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress in office environments is a big concern, often leading to burn-out. New technologies are emerging, such as easily available sensors, contextual reasoning, and electronic coaching (e-coaching) apps. In the Smart Reasoning for Well-being at Home and at Work (SWELL) project, we explore the potential of using such new pervasive technologies to provide support for the self-management of well-being, with a focus on individuals' stress-coping. Ideally, these new pervasive systems should be grounded in existing work stress and intervention theory. However, there is a large diversity of theories and they hardly provide explicit directions for technology design. Objective The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive and concise framework that can be used to design pervasive technologies that support knowledge workers to decrease stress. Methods Based on a literature study we identify concepts relevant to well-being at work and select different work stress models to find causes of work stress that can be addressed. From a technical perspective, we then describe how sensors can be used to infer stress and the context in which it appears, and use intervention theory to further specify interventions that can be provided by means of pervasive technology. Results The resulting general framework relates several relevant theories: we relate “engagement and burn-out” to “stress”, and describe how relevant aspects can be quantified by means of sensors. We also outline underlying causes of work stress and how these can be addressed with interventions, in particular utilizing new technologies integrating behavioral change theory. Based upon this framework we were able to derive requirements for our case study, the pervasive SWELL system, and we implemented two prototypes. Small-scale user studies proved the value of the derived technology-supported interventions. Conclusions The presented framework can be used to systematically develop theory

  15. Deriving Requirements for Pervasive Well-Being Technology From Work Stress and Intervention Theory: Framework and Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldijk, Saskia; Kraaij, Wessel; Neerincx, Mark A

    2016-07-05

    Stress in office environments is a big concern, often leading to burn-out. New technologies are emerging, such as easily available sensors, contextual reasoning, and electronic coaching (e-coaching) apps. In the Smart Reasoning for Well-being at Home and at Work (SWELL) project, we explore the potential of using such new pervasive technologies to provide support for the self-management of well-being, with a focus on individuals' stress-coping. Ideally, these new pervasive systems should be grounded in existing work stress and intervention theory. However, there is a large diversity of theories and they hardly provide explicit directions for technology design. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive and concise framework that can be used to design pervasive technologies that support knowledge workers to decrease stress. Based on a literature study we identify concepts relevant to well-being at work and select different work stress models to find causes of work stress that can be addressed. From a technical perspective, we then describe how sensors can be used to infer stress and the context in which it appears, and use intervention theory to further specify interventions that can be provided by means of pervasive technology. The resulting general framework relates several relevant theories: we relate "engagement and burn-out" to "stress", and describe how relevant aspects can be quantified by means of sensors. We also outline underlying causes of work stress and how these can be addressed with interventions, in particular utilizing new technologies integrating behavioral change theory. Based upon this framework we were able to derive requirements for our case study, the pervasive SWELL system, and we implemented two prototypes. Small-scale user studies proved the value of the derived technology-supported interventions. The presented framework can be used to systematically develop theory-based technology-supported interventions to address work stress. In

  16. Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities, assistive technology and information and communication technology requirements: where do we stand on implementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Martin; Leblois, Axel; Cesa Bianchi, Francesca; Montenegro, Viviana

    2015-07-01

    This article presents 2013 data from a survey provided by G3ict and Disabled Peoples International (DPI). The Progress Report identifies the degree that each of the CRPD dispositions on ATs and ICTs accessibility are enacted in local laws, policies and regulations and their impacts. The initial methodology used to develop the survey involved several steps. First, a systematic review of CRPD AT and ICT technology requirements was conducted. Second, 57 variables were identified. Third, variables were grouped into three clusters representing countries': (a) legal, regulatory and programmatic commitments; (b) capacity to implement; and (c) actual implementation results. Surveys were completed by experts in a total of 74 countries. With respect to select CRPD AT and ICT dispositions, respondent countries report an: (a) average degree of compliance within their general legal and regulatory framework at 66%; (b) average 29% of the capacity to implement; and (c) average degree of implementation and impact of 42%. Implications for Rehabilitation Survey results reflect low levels of ratifying countries implementation of laws, policies or programs that promote awareness-raising and training programs about the CRPD and its AT and ICT technology requirements. Implication 1: CRPD ratifying countries need to promote disability-inclusive AT and ICT policies and programs identified as priority areas by key stakeholders Implication 2: Government leaders and key policymakers need to address gaps in capacity building such as professional training of professionals in the areas of AT and ICT accessibility and programming through disability-inclusive cooperative development practices.

  17. Expert Perspectives on Using Mainstream Mobile Technology for School-Age Children Who Require Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC): A Policy Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh-An

    2017-01-01

    Despite legislation in the U.S.A requiring the use of assistive technology in special education, there remains an underutilization of technology-based speech intervention for young students who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The purpose of this Policy Delphi study was to address three guiding research questions that…

  18. Analysis of indirect treatment comparisons in national health technology assessment assessments and requirements for industry submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Skali, Ischa J; Spoors, John

    2018-03-28

    To determine the preferred methodologies of health technology assessment (HTA) agencies across Europe, Canada and Australia to ascertain acceptance of indirect treatment comparisons (ITC) as a source of comparative evidence. A review of official submission guidelines and analysis of comments in HTA submissions that have used different ITC methodologies. ITC is generally accepted as a technique that allows demonstration of noninferiority to a comparator provided the chosen methodology and underlying assumptions are clear and justified. However, HTA agencies are more likely to closely scrutinize submitted data and evaluate statistical significance of results when superiority is claimed. In addition, the HTA agencies in scope tended to be cautious and only accept ITC data as support for similarity of treatments.

  19. IMPROVING TEACHING MATHEMATICS USING MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN FORMATION MATHEMATICAL COMPETENCE REQUIRED FUTURE SKIPPERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gudyreva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to consideration of issues related to identifying the potential for teaching mathematics using network (Internet technology and the introduction of elements of distance learning into educational process of higher educational establishments of the sea profile, as well as achievement of formation of mathematical competence of students of the University generally, and of the University's Maritime profile, in particular. Based on the analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature highlights the factors that influence the increase of efficiency of independent work of students of higher educational institutions and on the formation of steady skills of self-education that ultimately leads to quality of formation of mathematical competence of a student. Specific features of teaching mathematics at the University of the sea profile. The description of the project (complex sites "KSMA. Higher mathematics navigators", who developed and used in the Kherson state Maritime Academy in the teaching of mathematics and the organization of individual techniques of distance learning, shows the simplicity and accessibility of working with complex sites, as well as the simplicity and accessibility of design "personal website", but in fact complex sites, by a teacher of any discipline of higher education. Shown, also a training process with the use of the project "KSMA. Higher mathematics navigators", analyzes the experience of teaching the course "Higher mathematics" in a higher educational institution of the marine profile with the use of a personal website, a teacher and shown positive results in students mastery of basic mathematical competencies.

  20. Scénarios de transition énergétique en ville. Acteurs, régulations, technologies (dir. Gilles Debizet)

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrieux, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    L’ouvrage « Scénarios de transition énergétique en ville. Acteurs, régulations, technologies » (dir. Gilles Debizet) cherche à comprendre comment s’opère concrètement la transition énergétique dans les villes, c'est-à-dire le passage d’un usage systématique des énergies carbonisées à l’usage plus fréquent, mais pas exclusif, des énergies renouvelables. Au-delà des grands mots d’ordre sur la baisse de la consommation des énergies fossiles et le développement de solutions à grande échelle, Gill...

  1. Mitigating pesticide pollution in China requires law enforcement, farmer training, and technological innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huizhen; Zeng, Eddy Y; You, Jing

    2014-05-01

    To feed an ever-growing population, it is necessary to take all measures to increase crop yields, including the use of pesticides. It has long been a difficult task to boost agricultural production and simultaneously minimize the impact of pesticide application on the environment, particularly in China, a developing country with more than 1.3 billion people. China has recently become the world's leading producer and consumer of pesticides, with production and consumption reaching 265 tons and 179 tons, respectively, in 2011, and a national average pesticide application dosage of more than 14 kg/ha. The large quantities of pesticides applied in agricultural fields have resulted in serious environmental deterioration. Organochlorine pesticides, such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and hexachlorohexane, have become ubiquitous in the environment of China, with spatial distributions in soils and aquatic systems similar to their historic application patterns in different geographic regions: southeast > central > northwest. Pollution by current-use pesticides, for example, organophosphates and pyrethroids, has also been of great concern. To mitigate pesticide pollution in China, a significant reduction in pesticide inputs into the environment is mandatory. This can be accomplished only with joint efforts by the government, professionals, and citizens in combination with rigorous enforcement of laws and regulations, training of farmers in pesticide knowledge and environmental awareness, and technological innovation for producing low-risk pesticides and developing efficient application approaches. Restoring contaminated sites is also an urgent task. Finally, food security and environmental pollution are not problems for a sole country, and international cooperation and communication are necessary. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. Preparation of safety regulatory requirements for new technology like digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Juichiro; Takita, Masami

    2011-01-01

    The current regulatory requirements on digital instrumentation and control system have been reviewed by JNES, considering international trend discussed in DICWG (Digital Instrumentation and Control Working Group) of MDEP (Multinational Design Evaluation Program). MDEP DICWG held in OECD/NEA (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency) gives the opportunity to identify the convergence of applicable standards. The working group's activities include: identifying and prioritising the member countries' challenges, practices, and needs regarding standards and regulatory guidance regarding digital instrumentation and control; identifying areas of importance and needs for convergence of existing standards and guidance or development of new standards; sharing of information; and identifying common positions among the member countries for areas of particular importance and need. The DICWG drafted common positions on specific issues which are based on the existing standards, national regulatory guidance, best practices, and group inputs using an agreed upon process and framework. Five general common positions are under discussion in this fiscal year. Simplicity in Design, Software Common Cause Failures, Software Tools, Data communication, Verification and Validation throughout the life cycle of safety systems using digital computers. In addition, the technical evaluation of standards of the Japan Electric Association about digital system for safety was made to support NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency). (author)

  3. Combined cycles, impacts of technological requirements; Ciclos combinados, impactos de requerimientos tecnologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Santalo, Jose Miguel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The fundamental growth of the Mexican electrical sector for the next ten years is planned on base of the installation of 20 thousand Mw plants of combined cycle. This article presents an analysis of the impact of these power stations finding out that the power stations of combined cycle are at the moment cheaper - from 600 to 700 dollars by installed kW- than the alternative coal options or fuel oil, that are in the range of 900 to 1200 dollars per kW, in addition to which the time required for their construction is shorter. [Spanish] El crecimiento fundamental del sector electrico mexicano para los proximos diez anos esta planeado con base en la instalacion de 20 mil Mw de plantas de ciclo combinado. Este articulo presenta un analisis del impacto de dichas centrales encontrando que las centrales de ciclo combinado actualmente resultan mas baratas - de 600 a 700 dolares por kW instalado - que las opciones alternativas de carbon o combustoleo que estan en el rango de 900 a 1200 dolares por kW, ademas de que los tiempos requeridos para su construccion son menores.

  4. Transitioning Design and Technology Education from Physical Classrooms to Virtual Spaces: Implications for Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Marnie; MacGregor, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Technology-mediated teaching and learning enables access to educational opportunities, irrespective of locality, ruruality or remoteness. The design, development and delivery of technology enhanced learning in pre-service teacher education programs is therefore gaining momentum, both in Australia and internationally. Much research regarding…

  5. Technological resources and personnel costs required to implement an automated alert system for ambulatory physicians when patients are discharged from hospitals to home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry S Field

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background With the adoption of electronic medical records by medical group practices, there are opportunities to improve the quality of care for patients discharged from hospitals. However, there is little guidance for medical groups outside integrated hospital systems to automate the flow of patient information during transitions in care.Objective To describe the technological resources, expertise and time needed to develop an automated system providing information to ambulatory physicians when their patients are discharged from hospitals to home.Development Within a medical group practice, we developed an automated alert system that provides notification of discharges, reminders of the need for follow-up visits, drugs added during inpatient stays, and recommendations for laboratory monitoring of high-risk drugs. We tracked components of the information system required and the time spent by team members. We used USA national averages of hourly wages to estimate personnel costs.Application Critical components of the information system are notifications of hospital discharges through an admission, discharge and transfer registration (ADT interface, linkage to the group’s scheduling system, access to information on pharmacy dispensing and lab tests, and an interface engine. Total personnel cost was $76,314. Nearly half (47% was for 614 hours by physicians who developed content, provided overall project management, and reviewed alerts to ensure that only ‘actionable’ alerts would be sent.Conclusion Implementing a system to provide information about hospital discharges requires strong internal informatics expertise, cooperation between facilities and ambulatory providers, development of electronic linkages, and extensive commitment of physician time.

  6. Trajectory Orientation: A Technology-Enabled Concept Requiring a Shift in Controller Roles and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiden, Ken; Green, Steven

    2000-01-01

    The development of a decision support tool (DST) for the en-route domain with accurate conflict prediction time horizons of 20 minutes has introduced an interesting problem. A 20 minute time horizon for conflict prediction often results in the predicted conflict occurring one or more sectors downstream from the sector controller who "owns" (i-e., is responsible for the safe separation of aircraft) one or both of the aircraft in the conflict pair. Based on current roles and responsibilities of today's en route controllers, the upstream controller would not resolve this conflict. In most cases, the downstream controller would wait until the conflicting aircraft entered higher sector before resolving the conflict. This results in a delay of several minutes from the time when the conflict was initially predicted. This delay is inefficient from both a controller workload and user's cost of operations perspective. Trajectory orientation, a new concept for facilitating an efficient, conflict-free flight path across several sectors while conforming to metering or miles-in-trail spacing, is proposed as an alternative to today's sector-oriented method. This concept necessitates a fundamental shift in thinking about inter-sector coordination. Instead of operating independently, with the main focus on protecting their internal airspace, controllers would work cooperatively, depending on each other for well-planned, conflict-free flow of aircraft. To support the trajectory orientation concept, a long time horizon (15 to 20 minutes) for conflict prediction and resolution would most likely be a primary requirement. In addition, new tools, such as controller-pilot data link will be identified to determine their necessity and applicability for trajectory orientation. Finally, with significant controller participation from selected Air Route Traffic Control Centers, potential shifts in R-side/D-side roles and responsibilities as well as the creation of a new controller position for

  7. Joint Statement on the Energy Transition in France and Germany by the Four Academies: Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften Leopoldina, acatech - Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften, Academie des Sciences, Academie des Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balibar, Sebastien; Brechignac, Catherine; Brezin, Edouard; Candel, Sebastien; Fontecave, Marc; Guillaumont, Robert; Roux, Didier; Appert, Olivier; Bamberger, Yves; Bugat, Alain; Chambolle, Thierry; Charpin, Jean-Michel; Escatha, Yannik d'; Florette, Marc; Revellin-Falcoz, Bruno; Roucairol, Gerard; Tardieu, Bernard; Gehrisch, Wolf; Bolt, Harald; Haucap, Justus; Huettl, Reinhard; Jakobs, Eva-Maria; Muench, Wolfram; Renn, Ortwin; Umbach, Eberhard; Glotzbach, Ulrich; Grosskurth, Philipp; Stephanos, Cyril; Bradshaw, Alexander; Rehtanz, Christian; Schueth, Ferdi; Schwarze, Reimund; Wagner, Hermann-Josef; Wittig, Sigmar; Anton, Christian; Narmann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A source of welfare, health, social and economic development, energy is essential to human life. Meeting world energy demand, restraining energy consumption in developed countries, and reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) raises fundamental challenges for the future of our planet. Because the problem is so pervasive and because of the approaching 21. UN Climate Change Conference, COP 21, the four National Academies of science and technology in France and Germany decided to enhance their mutual cooperation and to organize two workshops on the 'energy transition'. This initiative is intended to provide a framework for sharing knowledge, anticipating future challenges, identifying areas for closer cooperation between our countries and generating advice for decision makers and society in general. The workshops defined priority areas for further collaboration. These include energy efficiency, grid infrastructure and smart grids, mobility, nuclear energy (fission): safety and waste management, fusion, renewable energies, energy storage as well as social and economic aspects of the energy transition. In view of the complex challenges, compounded by the political debate, and the different conditions and starting points for the energy transition in the two countries, the four academies also identified the following common lines of action. 1. Creating a sustainable energy system. The overriding aim of energy and climate policy in this century will be to create a sustainable system of energy supply, i.e. one in which GHG emissions are substantially reduced worldwide, while at the same time ensuring security of supply. This will require a long-term perspective, as well as a suitable balance between environmental goals, social expectations, and economic objectives. 2. Promoting collaborative policies. The academies welcome the stated intention of both governments to support effective energy and climate policies on a European level through the medium of

  8. Building a transnational biosurveillance network using semantic web technologies: requirements, design, and preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Douglas; Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Emonet, Stéphane; Ruch, Patrick; Lovis, Christian

    2012-05-29

    Antimicrobial resistance has reached globally alarming levels and is becoming a major public health threat. Lack of efficacious antimicrobial resistance surveillance systems was identified as one of the causes of increasing resistance, due to the lag time between new resistances and alerts to care providers. Several initiatives to track drug resistance evolution have been developed. However, no effective real-time and source-independent antimicrobial resistance monitoring system is available publicly. To design and implement an architecture that can provide real-time and source-independent antimicrobial resistance monitoring to support transnational resistance surveillance. In particular, we investigated the use of a Semantic Web-based model to foster integration and interoperability of interinstitutional and cross-border microbiology laboratory databases. Following the agile software development methodology, we derived the main requirements needed for effective antimicrobial resistance monitoring, from which we proposed a decentralized monitoring architecture based on the Semantic Web stack. The architecture uses an ontology-driven approach to promote the integration of a network of sentinel hospitals or laboratories. Local databases are wrapped into semantic data repositories that automatically expose local computing-formalized laboratory information in the Web. A central source mediator, based on local reasoning, coordinates the access to the semantic end points. On the user side, a user-friendly Web interface provides access and graphical visualization to the integrated views. We designed and implemented the online Antimicrobial Resistance Trend Monitoring System (ARTEMIS) in a pilot network of seven European health care institutions sharing 70+ million triples of information about drug resistance and consumption. Evaluation of the computing performance of the mediator demonstrated that, on average, query response time was a few seconds (mean 4.3, SD 0.1 × 10

  9. Requirements of a new communication technology for handover and the escalation of patient care: a multi-stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Maximilian J; King, Dominic; Arora, Sonal; Cooper, Kerri; Panda, Neha Aparajita; Gosling, Rebecca; Singh, Kaushiki; Sanders, Bradley; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2014-08-01

    In order to enable safe and efficient information transfer between health care professionals during clinical handover and escalation of care, existing communication technologies must be updated. This study aimed to provide a user-informed guide for the development of an application-based communication system (ABCS), tailored for use in patient handover and escalation of care. Current methods of inter-professional communication in health care along with information system needs for communication technology were identified through literature review. A focus group study was then conducted according to a topic guide developed by health innovation and safety researchers. Fifteen doctors and 11 nurses from three London hospitals participated in a mixture of homogeneous and heterogeneous sessions. The sessions were recorded and transcribed verbatim before being subjected to thematic analysis. Seventeen information system needs were identified from the literature review. Participants identified six themes detailing user perceptions of current communication technology, attitudes to smartphone technology and anticipated requirements of an application produced for handover and escalation of care. Participants were in favour of an ABCS over current methods and expressed enthusiasm for a system with integrated patient information and group-messaging functions. Despite concerns regarding confidentiality and information governance a robust guide for development and implementation of an ABCS was produced, taking input from multiple stakeholders into account. Handover and escalation of care are vital processes for patient safety and communication within these must be optimized. An ABCS for health care professionals would be a welcome innovation and may lead to improvements in patient safety. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Exploring Transition of Large Technological Systems through Relational Data - A Study of The Danish Smart Grid Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurowetzki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Combining elements form the Science, Technology and Society (STS) tradition with the Technological Innovation System (TIS) framework and utilising unstructured and relational data as well as novel analysis tools, this thesis explores the development of the Danish smart grid and the associated...... transformation of the energy grid infrastructure. The focus is set on how the interplay between established and new technologies and actors determines the direction and outcomes of innovation in large technological systems (such as the Danish smart grid). Results of several chapters indicate that in the Danish...... in the transformation process. While they can contribute with resources, capabilities, and their connections to the development of the new grid infrastructure, they may also impede innovation given their ownership of and assumed interest in the established system. These insights should be considered in policy...

  11. Early Jet Engines and the Transition from Centrifugal to Axial Compressors: A Case Study in Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    all historians agree that technological change isd an evolutionary process. Joseph Schumpeter , for example, saw technological change as revolutionary...NOTES ’ Joseph A. Schumpeter , Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy, 3rd ed. (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1950), p. 83, n. 2. 2 Edward W. Constant...Maxwell Reprint Co., 1970. ., Schumpeter , Joseph A. Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy. 3rd ed. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1950. ;,.’, Usher, Abbott

  12. Solar-grade silicon by a direct route based on carbothermic reduction of silica. Requirements and production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerligs, L.J.; Wyers, G.P. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Jensen, R.; Raaness, O.; Waernes, A.N. [Sintef Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Santen, S. [ScanArc Plasma Technologies, Hofors (Sweden); Reinink, A.; Wiersma, B. [Sunergy, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    In the European projects SOLSILC and SPURT, a process is developed for the production of solar grade silicon (SOG-Si) by carbothermic reduction of silica, based on very pure raw materials. The purity of the raw materials greatly reduces the requirements on purification of the silicon, from dopants and other impurities. This paper reports the technology used for the Si production, which is suitable for the available high purity silica and carbon materials. It also reports results from the carbon removal process, which brings the carbon content of the silicon from several hundred ppmw to below 5 ppmw. Finally, it discusses experiments on the allowable impurity concentrations in SOG-Si feedstock for directional solidification. Segregation observed during directional solidification is better than previously published, and allowable concentrations of Fe and Ti are similar to what was previously published for monocrystalline material by Westinghouse Corp.

  13. Research to Operations: The Critical Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) specializes in transitioning technology and knowledge to medical operations. This activity encompasses funding a spectrum of research and technology efforts, such as understanding fundamental biological mechanisms altered by microgravity and executing technology watches for state of the art diagnostic imaging equipment. This broad spectrum approach to fulfilling the need to protect crewmember health and performance during long and short duration missions to the International Space Station, moon and Mars is made possible by having a line of site between research and operations. Currently, SLSD's line of site is articulated in a transition to medical practice (TMP) process. This process is designed to shepherd information and knowledge gained through fundamental and mechanistic research toward the development of an operational solution such as a pre-flight selection criteria; an in-flight countermeasure, monitoring capability or treatment; or a post-flight reconditioning program. The TMP process is also designed to assist with the customization of mature hardware or technology for NASA specific use. The benefits of this process are that the concept of operational usability is interjected early in the research, design, or acquisition phase, and stakeholders are involved early to identify requirements and also periodically asked to assess requirements compliance of research or technology development project. Currently a device known as the actiwatch is being assessed for the final transition to operational use. Specific examples of research to operations transition success help to illustrate the process and bolster communication between the research and medical operations communities.

  14. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG). Volume 2, appendix A: Selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A consistent approach was sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. It appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

  15. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  16. The CYCLIN-A CYCA1;2/TAM Is Required for the Meiosis I to Meiosis II Transition and Cooperates with OSD1 for the Prophase to First Meiotic Division Transition

    OpenAIRE

    d'Erfurth, Isabelle; Cromer, Laurence; Jolivet, Sylvie; Girard, Chlo?; Horlow, Christine; Sun, Yujin; To, Jennifer P. C.; Berchowitz, Luke E.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Mercier, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Meiosis halves the chromosome number because its two divisions follow a single round of DNA replication. This process involves two cell transitions, the transition from prophase to the first meiotic division (meiosis I) and the unique meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show here that the A-type cyclin CYCA1;2/TAM plays a major role in both transitions in Arabidopsis. A series of tam mutants failed to enter meiosis II and thus produced diploid spores and functional diploid gametes. These d...

  17. Vertical flight training: An overview of training and flight simulator technology with emphasis on rotary-wing requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, Thomas S.; Ascencio-Lee, Carmen E.; Bray, Richard; Carlton, John; Dohme, Jack; Eshow, Michelle M.; Francis, Stephen; Lee, Owen M.; Lintern, Gavan; Lombardo, David A.

    1994-01-01

    The principal purpose of this publication is to provide a broad overview of the technology that is relevant to the design of aviation training systems and of the techniques applicable to the development, use, and evaluation of those systems. The issues addressed in our 11 chapters are, for the most part, those that would be expected to surface in any informed discussion of the major characterizing elements of aviation training systems. Indeed, many of the same facets of vertical-flight training discussed were recognized and, to some extent, dealt with at the 1991 NASA/FAA Helicopter Simulator Workshop. These generic topics are essential to a sound understanding of training and training systems, and they quite properly form the basis of any attempt to systematize the development and evaluation of more effective, more efficient, more productive, and more economical approaches to aircrew training. Individual chapters address the following topics: an overview of the vertical flight industry: the source of training requirements; training and training schools: meeting current requirements; training systems design and development; transfer of training and cost-effectiveness; the military quest for flight training effectiveness; alternative training systems; training device manufacturing; simulator aero model implementation; simulation validation in the frequency domain; cockpit motion in helicopter simulation; and visual space perception in flight simulators.

  18. Demonstration of New Technologies Required for the Treatment of Mixed Waste Contaminated with {ge}260 ppm Mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M.I.

    2002-02-06

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) defines several categories of mercury wastes, each of which has a defined technology or concentration-based treatment standard, or universal treatment standard (UTS). RCRA defines mercury hazardous wastes as any waste that has a TCLP value for mercury of 0.2 mg/L or greater. Three of these categories, all nonwastewaters, fall within the scope of this report on new technologies to treat mercury-contaminated wastes: wastes as elemental mercury; hazardous wastes with less than 260 mg/kg [parts per million (ppm)] mercury; and hazardous wastes with 260 ppm or more of mercury. While this report deals specifically with the last category--hazardous wastes with 260 ppm or more of mercury--the other two categories will be discussed briefly so that the full range of mercury treatment challenges can be understood. The treatment methods for these three categories are as follows: Waste as elemental mercury--RCRA identifies amalgamation (AMLGM) as the treatment standard for radioactive elemental mercury. However, radioactive mercury condensates from retorting (RMERC) processes also require amalgamation. In addition, incineration (IMERC) and RMERC processes that produce residues with >260 ppm of radioactive mercury contamination and that fail the RCRA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limit for mercury (0.20 mg/L) require RMERC, followed by AMLGM of the condensate. Waste with <260 ppm mercury--No specific treatment method is specified for hazardous wastes containing <260 ppm. However, RCRA regulations require that such wastes (other than RMERC residues) that exceed a TCLP mercury concentration of 0.20 mg/L be treated by a suitable method to meet the TCLP limit for mercury of 0.025 mg/L. RMERC residues must meet the TCLP value of {ge}0.20 mg/L, or be stabilized and meet the {ge}0.025 mg/L limit. Waste with {ge}260 ppm mercury--For hazardous wastes with mercury contaminant concentrations {ge}260 ppm and RCRA

  19. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  20. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Erik; Søndergård, Bent

    2014-01-01

    What. The chapter addresses designing for sustainability as interventions in socio-technical systems and social practices of users and communities. It calls for reflexive design practices challenging dominant regimes and shaping alternative design spaces. The specific case is the reconfiguration...... of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...... transition processes. Where. Addresses design processes aimed at sustainable transition enacted in complex social settings, socio-technical systems involving many different actors and agendas. How. The chapter outlines a conceptual and analytic framework for a reflexive design practice for sustainability...

  1. Improving the safety of health information technology requires shared responsibility: It is time we all step up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F; Belmont, Elisabeth; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-14

    In 2011, an Institute of Medicine report on health information technology (IT) and patient safety highlighted that building health-IT for safer use is a shared responsibility between key stakeholders including: "vendors, care providers, healthcare organizations, health-IT departments, and public and private agencies". Use of electronic health records (EHRs) involves all these stakeholders, but they often have conflicting priorities and requirements. Since 2011, the concept of shared responsibility has gained little traction and EHR developers and users continue to attribute the substantial, long list of problems to each other. In this article, we discuss how these key stakeholders have complementary roles in improving EHR safety and must share responsibility to improve the current state of EHR use. We use real-world safety examples and outline a comprehensive shared responsibility approach to help guide development of future rules, regulations, and standards for EHR usability, interoperability and security as outlined in the 21st Century Cures Act. This approach clearly defines the responsibilities of each party and helps create appropriate measures for success. National and international policymakers must facilitate the local organizational and socio-political climate to stimulate the adoption of shared responsibility principles. When all major stakeholders are sharing responsibility, we will be more likely to usher in a new age of progress and innovation related to health IT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transition to parenthood in the neonatal care unit: a qualitative study and conceptual model designed to illuminate parent and professional views of the impact of webcam technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Susan; King, Caroline; Hogg, Rhona; McPherson, Kerri; Hanley, Janet; Brierton, Maggie; Ainsworth, Sean

    2017-07-11

    Complications during pregnancy, childbirth and/or the postnatal period may result in the admission of a baby to a neonatal unit (NNU). While the survival and long-term prospects of high-risk infants are enhanced by admission, the enforced separation of the parent and child may have psychological consequences for both. There is a need to develop and evaluate interventions to help parents 'feel closer' to their infants in circumstances where they are physically separated from them. In this paper we present findings from an in-depth, theoretically-driven, evaluation of a technological innovation designed to address this need. The study sought to explore parent and professional views of the impact of the technology, which transmits real-time images of the baby via a webcam from the NNU to the mother's bedside in the post-natal care environment. A qualitative approach was adopted, guided by a critical realist perspective. Participants were recruited purposively from a NNU located in East-central Scotland. Thirty-three parents and 18 professionals were recruited. Data were collected during individual, paired and small group interviews and were analysed thematically. Following the initial analysis process, abductive inference was used to consider contextual factors and mechanisms of action appearing to account for reported outcomes. Views on the technology were overwhelmingly positive. It was perceived as a much needed and important advancement in care delivery. Benefits centred on: enhanced feelings of closeness and responsiveness; emotional wellbeing; physical recovery; and the involvement of family/friends. These benefits appeared to function as important mechanisms in supporting the early bonding process and wider transition to parenthood. However, for a small number of the parents, use of the technology had not enhanced their experience and it is important, as with any intervention, that professionals monitor the parents' response and act accordingly. With a current

  3. The cyclin-A CYCA1;2/TAM is required for the meiosis I to meiosis II transition and cooperates with OSD1 for the prophase to first meiotic division transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle d'Erfurth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis halves the chromosome number because its two divisions follow a single round of DNA replication. This process involves two cell transitions, the transition from prophase to the first meiotic division (meiosis I and the unique meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show here that the A-type cyclin CYCA1;2/TAM plays a major role in both transitions in Arabidopsis. A series of tam mutants failed to enter meiosis II and thus produced diploid spores and functional diploid gametes. These diploid gametes had a recombined genotype produced through the single meiosis I division. In addition, by combining the tam-2 mutation with AtSpo11-1 and Atrec8, we obtained plants producing diploid gametes through a mitotic-like division that were genetically identical to their parents. Thus tam alleles displayed phenotypes very similar to that of the previously described osd1 mutant. Combining tam and osd1 mutations leads to a failure in the prophase to meiosis I transition during male meiosis and to the production of tetraploid spores and gametes. This suggests that TAM and OSD1 are involved in the control of both meiotic transitions.

  4. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  5. Rapid transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrin, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy programs are entering a critical transitional period as we move from the initial marketing of solar technologies into a phase of widespread commercialization. We face the dual challenge of trying to get enough solar systems in place fast enough to prove solar is a viable alternative, while trying to ensure the systems are designed and installed properly, proving the energy savings as promised. This is a period of both great opportunity and high risk as the field becomes crowded with new solar cheerleaders and supporters but seldom enough competent players. The status of existing and proposed programs for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy in California is described.

  6. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  7. Modeling sulfate reduction in methane hydrate-bearing continental margin sediments: Does a sulfate-methane transition require anaerobic oxidation of methane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverno, A.; Pohlman, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition (SMT), a biogeochemical zone where sulfate and methane are metabolized, is commonly observed at shallow depths (1-30 mbsf) in methane-bearing marine sediments. Two processes consume sulfate at and above the SMT, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulfate reduction (OSR). Differentiating the relative contribution of each process is critical to estimate methane flux into the SMT, which, in turn, is necessary to predict deeper occurrences of gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. To evaluate the relative importance of these two sulfate reduction pathways, we developed a diagenetic model to compute the pore water concentrations of sulfate, methane, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). By separately tracking DIC containing 12C and 13C, the model also computes ??13C-DIC values. The model reproduces common observations from methane-rich sediments: a well-defined SMT with no methane above and no sulfate below and a ??13C-DIC minimum at the SMT. The model also highlights the role of upward diffusing 13C-enriched DIC in contributing to the carbon isotope mass balance of DIC. A combination of OSR and AOM, each consuming similar amounts of sulfate, matches observations from Site U1325 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311, northern Cascadia margin). Without AOM, methane diffuses above the SMT, which contradicts existing field data. The modeling results are generalized with a dimensional analysis to the range of SMT depths and sedimentation rates typical of continental margins. The modeling shows that AOM must be active to establish an SMT wherein methane is quantitatively consumed and the ??13C-DIC minimum occurs. The presence of an SMT generally requires active AOM. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Vasohibin-2 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition of ovarian cancer cells by modulating transforming growth factor-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norita, Rie; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Furutani, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kazuki; Yoshimatsu, Yasuhiro; Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A; Watabe, Tetsuro; Sato, Yasufumi

    2017-03-01

    Vasohibin-2 (VASH2) is a homolog of VASH1, an endothelium-derived angiogenesis inhibitor. Vasohibin-2 is mainly expressed in cancer cells, and has been implicated in the progression of cancer by inducing angiogenesis and tumor growth. Although VASH2 has been recently reported to be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), its precise roles are obscure. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of VASH2 in the EMT of cancer cells in relation to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, which is a major stimulator of EMT. Decreased expression of VASH2 in ovarian cancer cells significantly repressed the expression of TGF-β type I receptor, namely activin receptor-like kinase 5. Transforming growth factor-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 was markedly decreased in VASH2 knockdown cells while the expression of Smad2 and Smad3 was unchanged. Accordingly, the responses to TGF-β1 shown by promoter assay and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression were significantly attenuated in VASH2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, knockdown of VASH2 in cancer cells abrogated the TGF-β1-induced reduced expression of epithelial markers including E-cadherin, and the elevated expression of mesenchymal markers including fibronectin, ZEB2, and Snail2, suggesting that endogenous VASH2 is required for TGF-β1-induced EMT. In accordance with these results, the effects of TGF-β1 on cell morphology, migration, invasion, and MMP2 expression were also abrogated when VASH2 was knocked down. These results indicate that VASH2 played a significant role in the EMT by modulating the TGF-β signaling. We propose that VASH2 would be a novel molecular target for the prevention of EMT in cancers. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. A Study to Develop Transition Plan Requirements for the Occupancy of the New Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    5.3 (1973): 24-29. 242 Books Allen, Rex Whitaker, and Ilona Von Karolyi. Hospital Planning Handbook. New York: Wiley, 1976. Beckhard , Richard , and...process from the outset. Change Process A successful transition planning process cannot ignore the most basic element of transition--change. Beckhard and...to create the environment and conditions which will allow its personnel to cope and for the organization to move forward ( Beckhard 5). Viewing the

  10. Personal radiation detector at a high technology readiness level that satisfies DARPA’s SN-13-47 and SIGMA program requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, D., E-mail: dimgiz@rotemi.co.il [Radiation Detection Department, Rotem Industries Ltd. (Israel); Knafo, Y.; Manor, A. [Radiation Detection Department, Rotem Industries Ltd. (Israel); Seif, R.; Ghelman, M. [Electronics & Control Laboratories, Nuclear Research Center, Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Ellenbogen, M.; Pushkarsky, V. [Radiation Detection Department, Rotem Industries Ltd. (Israel); Ifergan, Y. [Electronics & Control Laboratories, Nuclear Research Center, Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Semyonov, N. [Radiation Detection Department, Rotem Industries Ltd. (Israel); Wengrowicz, U.; Mazor, T.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y. [Electronics & Control Laboratories, Nuclear Research Center, Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Osovizky, A. [Radiation Detection Department, Rotem Industries Ltd. (Israel)

    2015-06-01

    There is a need to develop new personal radiation detector (PRD) technologies that can be mass produced. On August 2013, DARPA released a request for information (RFI) seeking innovative radiation detection technologies. In addition, on December 2013, a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the SIGMA program was released. The RFI requirements focused on a sensor that should possess three main properties: low cost, high compactness and radioisotope identification capabilities. The identification performances should facilitate the detection of a hidden threat, ranging from special nuclear materials (SNM) to commonly used radiological sources. Subsequently, the BAA presented the specific requirements at an instrument level and provided a comparison between the current market status (state-of-the-art) and the SIGMA program objectives. This work presents an optional alternative for both the detection technology (sensor with communication output and without user interface) for DARPA’s initial RFI and for the PRD required by the SIGMA program. A broad discussion is dedicated to the method proposed to fulfill the program objectives and to the selected alternative that is based on the PDS-GO design and technology. The PDS-GO is the first commercially available PRD that is based on a scintillation crystal optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), a solid-state light sensor. This work presents the current performance of the instrument and possible future upgrades based on recent technological improvements in the SiPM design. The approach of utilizing the SiPM with a commonly available CsI(Tl) crystal is the key for achieving the program objectives. This approach provides the appropriate performance, low cost, mass production and small dimensions; however, it requires a creative approach to overcome the obstacles of the solid-state detector dark current (noise) and gain stabilization over a wide temperature range. Based on the presented results, we presume that

  11. Developing technologies for lunar-based astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Burns, Jack O.; Chua, Koon Meng; Wetzel, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Prospects for lunar-based astronomy and the development of the required technologies are briefly reviewed. A systematic approach to lunar-based astronomy includes a progression in capability from small automated telescopes to the 16-meter reflector on the moon. A next step beyond the 16-meter reflector will be a Lunar Optical/Ultraviolet/Infrared Synthesis Array. Intermediate steps are represented by the Lunar Transit Telescope and the Lunar Cluster Telescope Experiment. Priorities for the required technology development are identified.

  12. 78 FR 31571 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the “Technology-based Products to Prevent High...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... product can be accessible through (5 points). Quality of Product Performance (40 points maximum... Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science... design, performance, and developer's qualifications (for more detailed information, read the section...

  13. Quantum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, S.

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions are normally associated with changes of temperature but a new type of transition - caused by quantum fluctuations near absolute zero - is possible, and can tell us more about the properties of a wide range of systems in condensed-matter physics. Nature abounds with phase transitions. The boiling and freezing of water are everyday examples of phase transitions, as are more exotic processes such as superconductivity and superfluidity. The universe itself is thought to have passed through several phase transitions as the high-temperature plasma formed by the big bang cooled to form the world as we know it today. Phase transitions are traditionally classified as first or second order. In first-order transitions the two phases co-exist at the transition temperature - e.g. ice and water at 0 deg., or water and steam at 100 deg. In second-order transitions the two phases do not co-exist. In the last decade, attention has focused on phase transitions that are qualitatively different from the examples noted above: these are quantum phase transitions and they occur only at the absolute zero of temperature. The transition takes place at the ''quantum critical'' value of some other parameter such as pressure, composition or magnetic field strength. A quantum phase transition takes place when co-operative ordering of the system disappears, but this loss of order is driven solely by the quantum fluctuations demanded by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The physical properties of these quantum fluctuations are quite distinct from those of the thermal fluctuations responsible for traditional, finite-temperature phase transitions. In particular, the quantum system is described by a complex-valued wavefunction, and the dynamics of its phase near the quantum critical point requires novel theories that have no analogue in the traditional framework of phase transitions. In this article the author describes the history of quantum phase transitions. (UK)

  14. Provision of a draft version for standard classification structure for information of radiation technologies through analyzing their information and derivation of its applicable requirements to the information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sol Ah; Kim, Joo Yeon; Yoo, Ji Yup; Shin, Woo Ho; Park, Tai Jin; Song, Myung Jae [Korean Association for Radiation Application, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Radiation technology is the one for developing new products or processes by applying radiation or for creating new functions in industry, research and medical fields, and its application is increasing consistently. For securing an advanced technology competitiveness, it is required to create a new added value by information consumer through providing an efficient system for supporting information, which is the infrastructure for research and development, contributed to its collection, analysis and use with a rapidity and structure in addition to some direct research and development. Provision of the management structure for information resources is especially crucial for efficient operating the system for supporting information in radiation technology, and then a standard classification structure of information must be first developed as the system for supporting information will be constructed. The standard classification structure has been analyzed by reviewing the definition of information resources in radiation technology, and those classification structures in similar systems operated by institute in radiation and other scientific fields. And, a draft version of the standard classification structure has been then provided as 7 large, 25 medium and 71 small classifications, respectively. The standard classification structure in radiation technology will be developed in 2015 through reviewing this draft version and experts' opinion. Finally, developed classification structure will be applied to the system for supporting information by considering the plan for constructing this system and database, and requirements for designing the system. Furthermore, this structure will be designed in the system for searching information by working to the individual need of information consumers.

  15. Provision of a draft version for standard classification structure for information of radiation technologies through analyzing their information and derivation of its applicable requirements to the information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sol Ah; Kim, Joo Yeon; Yoo, Ji Yup; Shin, Woo Ho; Park, Tai Jin; Song, Myung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Radiation technology is the one for developing new products or processes by applying radiation or for creating new functions in industry, research and medical fields, and its application is increasing consistently. For securing an advanced technology competitiveness, it is required to create a new added value by information consumer through providing an efficient system for supporting information, which is the infrastructure for research and development, contributed to its collection, analysis and use with a rapidity and structure in addition to some direct research and development. Provision of the management structure for information resources is especially crucial for efficient operating the system for supporting information in radiation technology, and then a standard classification structure of information must be first developed as the system for supporting information will be constructed. The standard classification structure has been analyzed by reviewing the definition of information resources in radiation technology, and those classification structures in similar systems operated by institute in radiation and other scientific fields. And, a draft version of the standard classification structure has been then provided as 7 large, 25 medium and 71 small classifications, respectively. The standard classification structure in radiation technology will be developed in 2015 through reviewing this draft version and experts' opinion. Finally, developed classification structure will be applied to the system for supporting information by considering the plan for constructing this system and database, and requirements for designing the system. Furthermore, this structure will be designed in the system for searching information by working to the individual need of information consumers

  16. An assessment method for system innovation and transition (AMSIT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Marc W.; Hofman, Erwin; Kuhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    To address comprehensive system innovations that may occur in a future transition, a suitable ex ante assessment method is required. The technological innovation system approach is useful for the retrospective study of the conditions for success or failure of innovation trajectories, and the

  17. Industry evolution, rational agents and the transition to sustainable electricity production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Safarzynska, K.E.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Guiding a transition to low carbon electricity requires a good understanding of the substitution of old by new technologies in the electricity industry. With the aim of explaining historical change from coal to gas in the British electricity industry, we develop a formal model of technological

  18. Waste Socio-technological Transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata Campos, Maria José; Zapata, Patrik; Eriksson-Zetterquist, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    able to replace other production or construction materials. It also means that the consumption of the amount of virgin material decreases and saves energy. Despite the growing material recycling rates, the amount of waste per person, and packaging waste among others, continues to increase. High......The transformation of packaging waste from a problem into a resource has had significant consequences for a more sustainable use of natural resources and even the reduction of potential C02 emissions and its contribution to the climate change. Material recycling leads to separated material being...... recycling rates can be pointless if the amount of waste does not decrease. This is an example of how well established waste recovery regimes can stand in the way of more sustainable forms to handle waste (Corvellec et al, 2013) and, ultimately, hinder the development towards the EU objective (2008...

  19. User requirements for innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycle technologies in the area of economics, environment, safety, waste management, proliferation resistance and cross cutting issues, and methodology for innovative technologies assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, Juergen; Depisch, Frank; Allan, Colin

    2003-01-01

    The IAEA General Conference in 2000 has invited ''all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the Agency in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology''. In response to this invitation, the IAEA initiated an ''International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles'', INPRO. The overall objectives of INPRO is to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling in a sustainable manner energy needs in the 21st century, and to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles that use sound and economically competitive technology. Phase-I of INPRO was initiated in May 2001. During Phase-I, work was subdivided in two sub phase: Phase 1A (finished in June 2003) and Phase 1B (started in June 2003). Phase 1A dealt with the definition of Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria, and the development of a methodology for the evaluation of innovative nuclear technologies. In Phase 1A, task groups for several areas were established: (a) Prospects and Potentials of Nuclear Power, (b) Economics; (c) Sustainability and Environment, (d) Safety of Nuclear Installations, (e) Waste Management, (f) Proliferation Resistance, (g) Crosscutting issues and (h) for the Methodology for Assessment. In Phase-IB evaluations of innovative nuclear energy technologies will be performed by Member States against the INPRO Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria. This paper summarizes the results achieved in the Phase 1A of INPRO and is a cooperative effort of the INPRO team, consisting of all INPRO cost free experts and task managers. (author)

  20. Methodology for Examining Potential Technology Breakthroughs for Mitigating CO2 and Application to Centralized Solar Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggressive reductions in US greenhouse gas emissions will require radical changes in how society generates and uses energy. Technological breakthroughs will be necessary if we are to make this transition cost effectively. With limited resources, understanding the breakthrough pot...

  1. RAISING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES COMPETENCE OF SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL EMPLOYEES - A KEY REQUIREMENT OF THE QUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article it was analyzed one of the basic conditions of providing the quality of higher education according to the system of internal quality assurance standards ESG (European quality assurance standards and guidelines to increase the ICT competence of scientific-pedagogical staff of the University. It was described the modular system of training for scientific and pedagogical staff of the Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University. Special attention is paid to the description of the system of raising the level of formation the ICT competence as one of the key competences of the modern teacher. The system of professional development, which is based on creating mixed studying and technology of "flipped classroom", formative assessment, innovative educational and ICT technologies according to the specially designed informative module "Informational and communication technologies", which allows scientific-pedagogical staff to use modern ICT and educational technologies effectively for their further applying in the provision of educational services and the development of quality of open educational content and open educational e-environment available to the student at any convenient time, which will significantly improve the quality of the educational process.

  2. Deriving Requirements for Pervasive Well-Being Technology From Work Stress and Intervention Theory : Framework and Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koldijk, S.; Kraaij, W.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress in office environments is a big concern, often leading to burn-out. New technologies are emerging, such as easily available sensors, contextual reasoning, and electronic coaching (e-coaching) apps. In the Smart Reasoning for Well-being at Home and at Work (SWELL) project, we

  3. Requirements and feasibility study of flight demonstration of Active Controls Technology (ACT) on the NASA 515 airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the NASA 515 airplane as a flight demonstration vehicle, and to develop plans, schedules, and budget costs for fly-by-wire/active controls technology flight validation in the NASA 515 airplane. The preliminary design and planning were accomplished for two phases of flight validation.

  4. MEGASTAR: The meaning of growth. An assessment of systems, technologies, and requirements. [methodology for display and analysis of energy production and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A methodology for the display and analysis of postulated energy futures for the United States is presented. A systems approach methodology including the methodology of technology assessment is used to examine three energy scenarios--the Westinghouse Nuclear Electric Economy, the Ford Technical Fix Base Case and a MEGASTAR generated Alternate to the Ford Technical Fix Base Case. The three scenarios represent different paths of energy consumption from the present to the year 2000. Associated with these paths are various mixes of fuels, conversion, distribution, conservation and end-use technologies. MEGASTAR presents the estimated times and unit requirements to supply the fuels, conversion and distribution systems for the postulated end uses for the three scenarios and then estimates the aggregate manpower, materials, and capital requirements needed to develop the energy system described by the particular scenario.

  5. Transitional Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood...... to be the provision of ordinary criminal justice in contexts of exceptional political transition....

  6. Underground openings in clay formations - Technical requirements on drifting technology and support systems for underground openings and their impact on retreat systems for the installation of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mischo, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Several countries are currently investigating the possibility of long-term storage of nuclear waste in clay formations, with a special focus on mud-stone formations. During the last decades extensive research has been conducted on the suitability of mud-stone as repository and the related special requirements of the clay matrix - with significant success. The knowledge base on the behaviour of the host formations during the mining phase of the excavations on the other hand is relatively limited compared to that of other investigated host rock formations, e.g. salt. With the low value of mud-stone and its relatively limited industrial application range, there have not been any large scale commercial underground mining activities in recent years to provide a significant and independent database on the behaviour of the selected mud-stone formations or their geological analogue during mining activities. Most information currently used for the assessment of this type of sediment and the planning of the mining activities has been gathered either during the execution of logistics and tunneling projects or during the excavation of today's underground laboratories. There is, however, a database on a vast variety of clay deposit types and morphologies available from commercial underground clay mining activities worldwide. The data available on commercial clay mining shows significant differences for each and every technological stage of clay mining as compared to the stages of any other mining operation. This is, amongst other things, due to the high and partly extreme ductility and creeping properties of typical clay formations, especially when considering their sensitiveness to a changing water content. In general the technical and technological differences include the applicable mining technology for the excavation of underground openings, the need for an advancement of any available technology to waterless variants as

  7. The NLC Software Requirements Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoaee, Hamid

    2002-08-20

    We describe the software requirements and development methodology developed for the NLC control system. Given the longevity of that project, and the likely geographical distribution of the collaborating engineers, the planned requirements management process is somewhat more formal than the norm in high energy physics projects. The short term goals of the requirements process are to accurately estimate costs, to decompose the problem, and to determine likely technologies. The long term goal is to enable a smooth transition from high level functional requirements to specific subsystem and component requirements for individual programmers, and to support distributed development. The methodology covers both ends of that life cycle. It covers both the analytical and documentary tools for software engineering, and project management support. This paper introduces the methodology, which is fully described in [1].

  8. SafeLand guidelines for landslide monitoring and early warning systems in Europe - Design and required technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, S.

    2012-04-01

    Landslide monitoring means the comparison of landslide characteristics like areal extent, speed of movement, surface topography and soil humidity from different periods in order to assess landslide activity. An ultimate "universal" methodology for this purpose does not exist; every technology has its own advantages and disadvantages. End-users should carefully consider each one to select the methodologies that represent the best compromise between pros and cons, and are best suited for their needs. Besides monitoring technology, there are many factors governing the choice of an Early Warning System (EWS). A people-centred EWS necessarily comprises five key elements: (1) knowledge of the risks; (2) identification, monitoring, analysis and forecasting of the hazards; (3) operational centre; (4) communication or dissemination of alerts and warnings; and (5) local capabilities to respond to the warnings received. The expression "end-to-end warning system" is also used to emphasize that EWSs need to span all steps from hazard detection through to community response. The aim of the present work is to provide guidelines for establishing the different components for landslide EWSs. One of the main deliverables of the EC-FP7 SafeLand project addresses the technical and practical issues related to monitoring and early warning for landslides, and identifies the best technologies available in the context of both hazard assessment and design of EWSs. This deliverable targets the end-users and aims to facilitate the decision process by providing guidelines. For the purpose of sharing the globally accumulated expertise, a screening study was done on 14 EWSs from 8 different countries. On these bases, the report presents a synoptic view of existing monitoring methodologies and early-warning strategies and their applicability for different landslide types, scales and risk management steps. Several comprehensive checklists and toolboxes are also included to support informed

  9. Formal Transition in Agent Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matson, Eric; DeLoach, Scott

    2005-01-01

    ... capable of taking on problems that require self-organization, adaptation, and recovery. To capture and understand the concept of organization and reorganization, we must define organization transition...

  10. Technologies for destruction of long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste: Overview and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper, and this topical session on Nuclear Waste Minimization, Management and Remediation, focuses on two nuclear systems, and their associated technologies, that have the potential to address concerns surrounding long-lived radionuclides in high-level waste. Both systems offer technology applicable to HLW from present light-water reactors (LWR). Additionally these systems represent advanced nuclear power concepts that have important features associated with integrated management of wastes, long-term fuel supplies, and enhanced safety. The first system is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. This system incorporates a metal-fueled fast reactor coupled with chemical separations based on pyroprocessing to produce power while simultaneously burning long-lived actinide waste. IFR applications include burning of actinides from current LWR spent fuel and energy production in a breeder environment. The second concept, Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW), is based upon an accelerator-induced intense source of thermal neutrons and is aimed at destruction of long-lived actinides and fission products. This concept can be applied to long-lived radionuclides in spent fuel HLW as well as a future fission power source built around use of natural thorium or uranium as fuels coupled with concurrent waste destruction

  11. The unfolded protein response is not necessary for the G1/S transition, but it is required for chromosome maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey A Henry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The unfolded protein response (UPR is a eukaryotic signaling pathway, from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the nucleus. Protein misfolding in the ER triggers the UPR. Accumulating evidence links the UPR in diverse aspects of cellular homeostasis. The UPR responds to the overall protein synthesis capacity and metabolic fluxes of the cell. Because the coupling of metabolism with cell division governs when cells start dividing, here we examined the role of UPR signaling in the timing of initiation of cell division and cell cycle progression, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report that cells lacking the ER-resident stress sensor Ire1p, which cannot trigger the UPR, nonetheless completed the G1/S transition on time. Furthermore, loss of UPR signaling neither affected the nutrient and growth rate dependence of the G1/S transition, nor the metabolic oscillations that yeast cells display in defined steady-state conditions. Remarkably, however, loss of UPR signaling led to hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress and a ten-fold increase in chromosome loss. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results strongly suggest that UPR signaling is not necessary for the normal coupling of metabolism with cell division, but it has a role in genome maintenance. These results add to previous work that linked the UPR with cytokinesis in yeast. UPR signaling is conserved in all eukaryotes, and it malfunctions in a variety of diseases, including cancer. Therefore, our findings may be relevant to other systems, including humans.

  12. Radical innovation in scaling up: Boeing’s Dreamliner and the challenge of socio-technical transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Slayton, Rebecca; Spinardi, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Radical technological innovations are needed to achieve sustainability, but such innovations confront unusually high barriers, as they often require sociotechnical transitions. Here we use the theoretical perspectives and methods of Science and Technology Studies (STS) to demonstrate ways that existing theories of innovation and sociotechnical transitions, such as the Multi-Level Perspective (MLP), can be expanded. We test the MLP by applying STS methods and concepts to analyze the history of...

  13. The case for applying an early-lifecycle technology evaluation methodology to comparative evaluation of requirements engineering research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Martin S.

    2003-01-01

    The premise of this paper is taht there is a useful analogy between evaluation of proposed problem solutions and evaluation of requirements engineering research itself. Both of these application areas face the challenges of evaluation early in the lifecycle, of the need to consider a wide variety of factors, and of the need to combine inputs from multiple stakeholders in making thse evaluation and subsequent decisions.

  14. Temperature Controlled Aircraft Unit Load Devices: The Technological Response to Growing Global Air Cargo Cool Chain Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Baxter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unit load devices (ULDs are pallets and containers which are used to carry air cargo, mail and passengers baggage on wide-body aircraft. Using an in-depth case study, an empirical investigation was undertaken to examine the recent technological developments and innovations in the temperature-controlled containers that are used extensively in the growing and highly important air cargo cool chains. The results demonstrated that advances in refrigeration systems and the use of composite materials used in the construction of these containers have enhanced the ability of key stakeholders to provide unbroken cool-chains. The study further demonstrated that the services and expertise of Envirotainer, the case company, as well as its strategic partnerships with key stakeholders, underpin its ability to deliver and capture value from its participation in the industry.

  15. A symmetrical current injection addressed by ENTSO-E draft network code. Requirements and development of technology for WEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diedrichs, Volker; Lorenzen, Helge [University of Applied Sciences Wilhelmshaven (Germany); Mackensen, Ingo; Gertjegerdes, Stefan [ENERCON GmbH, Aurich (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Substitution of conventional power plants equipped with synchronous generators by inverter-based technologies mainly due to large scale integration of wind power is also associated with increasing concerns regarding negative sequence phenomena in power systems (over-voltages in the healthy phases and excitation of protection relays during asymmetrical faults, grid-wide increasing 'unbalancing' level of voltages due to unbalanced load or transmission equipment during normal operation). The paper presents concepts for asymmetrical current injection with inverters used in type IV wind turbines, results from model-based analyses and measurements from a laboratory test power system for both areas of concern. Feasibility and potential efficiency of asymmetrical current injection is the centre of interest. (orig.)

  16. Supporting Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asima; Petrucco, James

    2018-01-01

    Meadowbrook Primary School has explored the use of The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) to support transition, initially for transfer to secondary school and now for transition from Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) into Key Stage 1 (ages 5-7). This article will consider an example of a secondary transition project and discuss the…

  17. Continuous remote monitoring of COPD patients-justification and explanation of the requirements and a survey of the available technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasic, Ivan; Tomasic, Nikica; Trobec, Roman; Krpan, Miroslav; Kelava, Tomislav

    2018-04-01

    Remote patient monitoring should reduce mortality rates, improve care, and reduce costs. We present an overview of the available technologies for the remote monitoring of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, together with the most important medical information regarding COPD in a language that is adapted for engineers. Our aim is to bridge the gap between the technical and medical worlds and to facilitate and motivate future research in the field. We also present a justification, motivation, and explanation of how to monitor the most important parameters for COPD patients, together with pointers for the challenges that remain. Additionally, we propose and justify the importance of electrocardiograms (ECGs) and the arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO 2 ) as two crucial physiological parameters that have not been used so far to any great extent in the monitoring of COPD patients. We cover four possibilities for the remote monitoring of COPD patients: continuous monitoring during normal daily activities for the prediction and early detection of exacerbations and life-threatening events, monitoring during the home treatment of mild exacerbations, monitoring oxygen therapy applications, and monitoring exercise. We also present and discuss the current approaches to decision support at remote locations and list the normal and pathological values/ranges for all the relevant physiological parameters. The paper concludes with our insights into the future developments and remaining challenges for improvements to continuous remote monitoring systems. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  18. Solar transit stops on Central Avenue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This initiative sought to demonstrate existing commercially available transportation technologies for transit customer amenities that could significantly enhance transit experience and attract more riders therefore making the Capital District Tra...

  19. Solar transit stops on Central Avenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This initiative sought to demonstrate existing commercially available transportation technologies for transit customer amenities that could significantly enhance transit experience and attract more riders therefore making the Capital District Tra...

  20. The educational needs of health information managers in an electronic environment: what information technology and health informatics skills and knowledge are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Merryn; Callen, Joanne

    The profile of health information managers (HIMs) employed within one metropolitan area health service in New South Wales (NSW) was identified, together with which information technology and health informatics knowledge and skills they possess, and which ones they require in their workplace. The subjects worked in a variety of roles: 26% were employed in the area's Information Systems Division developing and implementing point-of-care clinical systems. Health information managers perceived they needed further continuing and formal education in point-of-care clinical systems, decision support systems, the electronic health record, privacy and security, health data collections, and database applications.

  1. U.S. aerospace industry opinion of the effect of computer-aided prediction-design technology on future wind-tunnel test requirements for aircraft development programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the U.S. aerospace industry in late 1977 suggests that there will be an increasing use of computer-aided prediction-design technology (CPD Tech) in the aircraft development process but that, overall, only a modest reduction in wind-tunnel test requirements from the current level is expected in the period through 1995. Opinions were received from key spokesmen in 23 of the 26 solicited major companies or corporate divisions involved in the design and manufacture of nonrotary wing aircraft. Development programs for nine types of aircraft related to test phases and wind-tunnel size and speed range were considered.

  2. Man as a protective barrier in nuclear power technology: the requirements, viewed by the Federal Minister for Home Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, J.B.

    1981-06-01

    Evaluation of nuclear power plant incidents frequently reveals man as a major element of risk. Yet, in a nuclear power plant man has the function of an important protective barrier, either by maintaining the plant, by detecting and limiting faults or incidents, or by taking proper measures in accidents. This is true despite, or perhaps because of, the high degree of plant automation. For this reason, it is indispensable that a high level of engineered plant safeguards be accompanied by a minimum of faults contributed by human action. This implies that the staff and their working conditions must meet the same stringent safety requirements as the nuclear power plant proper. Reactor manufacturers, nuclear power plant operators and the responsible authorities try to optimize this human contribution. The Federal Ministry of the Interior, through its Special Technical Guidelines and its continuation training measures, occupies an important position in this respect. Further measures and ordinances are being prepared by that Ministry

  3. Radiological source tracking in oil/gas, medical and other industries: requirements and specifications for passive RFID technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, Farid U. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface sensors that employ radioisotopes, such 241Am-Be and 137Cs, for reservoir characterization must be tracked for safety and security reasons. Other radiological sources are also widely used in medicine. The radiological source containers, in both applications, are small, mobile and used widely worldwide. The nuclear sources pose radiological dispersal device (RDD) security risks. Security concerns with the industrial use of radionuclide sources is in fact quite high as it is estimated that each year hundreds of sealed sources go missing, either lost or stolen. Risk mitigation efforts include enhanced regulations, source-use guidelines, research and development on electronic tracking of sources. This report summarizes the major elements of the requirements and operational concepts of nuclear sources with the goal of developing automated electronic tagging and locating systems.

  4. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented

  5. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

  6. Technology Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shoji; Stern, Sam

    1993-01-01

    Describes the history, current status, and future direction of technology education in Japan, including the process of curriculum transition, secondary and postsecondary structure, and lack of resources. (SK)

  7. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Veronica Rutledge; Candido Pereira; Jackie Copple; Kurt Frey; John Krebs; Laura Maggos; Kevin Nichols; Kent Wardle; Pratap Sadasivan; Valmor DeAlmieda; David Depaoli

    2011-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets

  8. Technology Development Risk Assessment for Space Transportation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Godsell, Aga M.; Go, Susie

    2006-01-01

    A new approach for assessing development risk associated with technology development projects is presented. The method represents technology evolution in terms of sector-specific discrete development stages. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate development probability distributions based on statistical models of the discrete transitions. Development risk is derived from the resulting probability distributions and specific program requirements. Two sample cases are discussed to illustrate the approach, a single rocket engine development and a three-technology space transportation portfolio.

  9. Computational advances in transition phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Kondo, S.; Tobita, Y.; Shirakawa, N.; Brear, D.J.; Fischer, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, historical perspective and recent advances are reviewed on computational technologies to evaluate a transition phase of core disruptive accidents in liquid-metal fast reactors. An analysis of the transition phase requires treatment of multi-phase multi-component thermohydraulics coupled with space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics. Such a comprehensive modeling effort was initiated when the program of SIMMER-series computer code development was initiated in the late 1970s in the USA. Successful application of the latest SIMMER-II in USA, western Europe and Japan have proved its effectiveness, but, at the same time, several areas that require further research have been identified. Based on the experience and lessons learned during the SIMMER-II application through 1980s, a new project of SIMMER-III development is underway at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan. The models and methods of SIMMER-III are briefly described with emphasis on recent advances in multi-phase multi-component fluid dynamics technologies and their expected implication on a future reliable transition phase analysis. (author)

  10. Transition radiation and transition scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transition radiation is a process of a rather general character. It occurs when some source, which does not have a proper frequency (for example, a charge) moves at a constant velocity in an inhomogeneous and (or) nonstationary medium or near such a medium. The simplest type of transition radiation takes place when a charge crosses a boundary between two media (the role of one of the media may be played by vacuum). In the case of periodic variation of the medium, transition radiation possesses some specific features (resonance transition radiation or transition scattering). Transition scattering occurs, in particular, when a permittivity wave falls onto an nonmoving (fixed) charge. Transition scattering is closely connected with transition bremsstrahlung radiation. All these transition processes are essential for plasma physics. Transition radiation and transition scattering have analogues outside the framework of electrodynamics (like in the case of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation). In the present report the corresponding range of phenomena is elucidated, as far as possible, in a generally physical aspect. (Auth.)

  11. Transitional Phenomena on Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wójcik Tadeusz M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant problem with technology development is transferring of large heat fluxes, which requires constant heat transfer temperature (in the specified temperature range. This problem concern mainly the nuclear energetics, space technologies, military technologies and most of all electronics containing integrated circuits with very large scale of integrations. Intensive heat transfer and thermal energy storage are possible by the use of phase change materials (PCMs. In the paper there are presented preliminary results of research on the use of liquid-gas (L-G PCMs and solid-solid phase change materials (S-S PCMs. For L-G PCMs the boiling characteristics were determined by increasing and decreasing the heat flux, which for certain sets of structural parameters of the heating surface and the physical properties of the liquid induce a variety of forms of transitional phenomena. Thermal energy storage is much more effective when using PCMs than sensible heat.

  12. CSIR Technology Impact 2000

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This millennium issue of Technology Impact celebrates the CSIR's contributions during the transitional 1999/2000 year. It presents a rich canvas portrays technology solutions and information which have touched the lives of people both within...

  13. A cloaking device for transiting planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.; Teachey, Alex

    2016-06-01

    The transit method is presently the most successful planet discovery and characterization tool at our disposal. Other advanced civilizations would surely be aware of this technique and appreciate that their home planet's existence and habitability is essentially broadcast to all stars lying along their ecliptic plane. We suggest that advanced civilizations could cloak their presence, or deliberately broadcast it, through controlled laser emission. Such emission could distort the apparent shape of their transit light curves with relatively little energy, due to the collimated beam and relatively infrequent nature of transits. We estimate that humanity could cloak the Earth from Kepler-like broad-band surveys using an optical monochromatic laser array emitting a peak power of ˜30 MW for ˜10 hours per year. A chromatic cloak, effective at all wavelengths, is more challenging requiring a large array of tunable lasers with a total power of ˜250 MW. Alternatively, a civilization could cloak only the atmospheric signatures associated with biological activity on their world, such as oxygen, which is achievable with a peak laser power of just ˜160 kW per transit. Finally, we suggest that the time of transit for optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is analogous to the water-hole in radio SETI, providing a clear window in which observers may expect to communicate. Accordingly, we propose that a civilization may deliberately broadcast their technological capabilities by distorting their transit to an artificial shape, which serves as both a SETI beacon and a medium for data transmission. Such signatures could be readily searched in the archival data of transit surveys.

  14. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  15. Information technology -- Telecommunications and information exchange between systems -- Local and metropolitan area networks -- Specific requirements -- Part 9: Integrated Services (IS) LAN Interface at the Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical (PHY) Layers

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Information technology -- Telecommunications and information exchange between systems -- Local and metropolitan area networks -- Specific requirements -- Part 9: Integrated Services (IS) LAN Interface at the Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical (PHY) Layers

  16. Technologies for deposition of transition metal oxide thin films: application as functional layers in “Smart windows” and photocatalytic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesheva, K; Ivanova, T; Bodurov, G; Szilágyi, I M; Justh, N; Kéri, O; Boyadjiev, S; Nagy, D; Aleksandrova, M

    2016-01-01

    “Smart windows” are envisaged for future low-energy, high-efficient architectural buildings, as well as for the car industry. By switching from coloured to fully bleached state, these windows regulate the energy of solar flux entering the interior. Functional layers in these devices are the transition metals oxides. The materials (transitional metal oxides) used in smart windows can be also applied as photoelectrodes in water splitting photocells for hydrogen production or as photocatalytic materials for self-cleaning surfaces, waste water treatment and pollution removal. Solar energy utilization is recently in the main scope of numerous world research laboratories and energy organizations, working on protection against conventional fuel exhaustion. The paper presents results from research on transition metal oxide thin films, fabricated by different methods - atomic layer deposition, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition, physical vapour deposition, and wet chemical methods, suitable for flowthrough production process. The lower price of the chemical deposition processes is especially important when the method is related to large-scale glazing applications. Conclusions are derived about which processes are recently considered as most prospective, related to electrochromic materials and devices manufacturing. (paper)

  17. Managing transition to a hybrid operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2011-01-01

    Managers of interventional radiology departments and medical imaging personnel who work in surgical suites deal with regular technical innovations in their work, but large-scale innovations seldom come along that transform markets and require massive architectural, training, and technological changes. The hybrid interventional/operating suite is one such massive change. This article presents an overview of the transition to hybrid procedures and designs, the benefits and challenges of the new delivery method, and change management issues for managers of cardiovascular and vascular interventional departments. ©2011 by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  18. Science and Technology Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baark, Erik

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the status of science and technology in Mongolia, and discusses the policy issues which have emerged with the transition to market economy in recent years.......This paper examines the status of science and technology in Mongolia, and discusses the policy issues which have emerged with the transition to market economy in recent years....

  19. Lattice Location of Transition Metals in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS366 %title\\\\ \\\\Transition metals (TMs) in semiconductors have been the subject of considerable research for nearly 40 years. This is due both to their role as important model impurities for deep centers in semiconductors, and to their technological impact as widespread contaminants in Si processing, where the miniaturization of devices requires to keep their sheet concentration below 10$^{10}$ cm$^{-2}$. As a consequence of the low TM solubility, conventional ion beam methods for direct lattice location have failed completely in identifying the lattice sites of isolated transition metals. Although electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has yielded valuable information on a variety of TM centers, it has been unable to detect certain defects considered by theory, e.g., isolated interstitial or substitutional Cu in Si. The proposed identity of other EPR centers such as substitutional Fe in Si, still needs confirmation by additional experimental methods. As a consequence, the knowledge on the structural propert...

  20. Milestoning with transition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Alexander T.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2011-12-01

    Milestoning is a method used to calculate the kinetics and thermodynamics of molecular processes occurring on time scales that are not accessible to brute force molecular dynamics (MD). In milestoning, the conformation space of the system is sectioned by hypersurfaces (milestones), an ensemble of trajectories is initialized on each milestone, and MD simulations are performed to calculate transitions between milestones. The transition probabilities and transition time distributions are then used to model the dynamics of the system with a Markov renewal process, wherein a long trajectory of the system is approximated as a succession of independent transitions between milestones. This approximation is justified if the transition probabilities and transition times are statistically independent. In practice, this amounts to a requirement that milestones are spaced such that trajectories lose position and velocity memory between subsequent transitions. Unfortunately, limiting the number of milestones limits both the resolution at which a system's properties can be analyzed, and the computational speedup achieved by the method. We propose a generalized milestoning procedure, milestoning with transition memory (MTM), which accounts for memory of previous transitions made by the system. When a reaction coordinate is used to define the milestones, the MTM procedure can be carried out at no significant additional expense as compared to conventional milestoning. To test MTM, we have applied its version that allows for the memory of the previous step to the toy model of a polymer chain undergoing Langevin dynamics in solution. We have computed the mean first passage time for the chain to attain a cyclic conformation and found that the number of milestones that can be used, without incurring significant errors in the first passage time is at least 8 times that permitted by conventional milestoning. We further demonstrate that, unlike conventional milestoning, MTM permits

  1. Power System Concepts for the Lunar Outpost: A Review of the Power Generation, Energy Storage, Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) System Requirements and Potential Technologies for Development of the Lunar Outpost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Z.; Vranis, A.; Zavoico, A.; Freid, S.; Manners, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will review potential power system concepts for the development of the lunar outpost including power generation, energy storage, and power management and distribution (PMAD). In particular, the requirements of the initial robotic missions will be discussed and the technologies considered will include cryogenics and regenerative fuel cells (RFC), AC and DC transmission line technology, high voltage and low voltage power transmission, conductor materials of construction and power beaming concepts for transmitting power to difficult to access locations such as at the bottom of craters. Operating conditions, component characteristics, reliability, maintainability, constructability, system safety, technology gaps/risk and adaptability for future lunar missions will be discussed for the technologies considered.

  2. What drives energy consumers? : Engaging people in a sustainable energy transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Linda; Shwom, Rachel; Dietz, Thomas

    Providing clean, safe, reliable, and affordable energy for people everywhere will require converting to an energy system in which the use of fossil fuels is minimal. A sustainable energy transition means substantial changes in technology and the engagement of the engineering community. But it will

  3. Transit transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Public transit agencies have employed intelligent systems for determining : schedules and routes and for monitoring the real-time location and status of their : vehicle fleets for nearly two decades. But until recently, the data generated by : daily ...

  4. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix from Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA APRIL 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...DATES COVERED (From - To) FEB 2013 – NOV 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...possible exploitation. Our technology, called Kevlar , includes key security technologies are protective transformations and targeted recovery. The

  5. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix for Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA MARCH 2016 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) FEB 2015 – SEP 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE 5a. CONTRACT...subject to possible exploitation. Our technology, called Kevlar , includes key security technologies are protective transformations and targeted

  6. "Don't Be a Smart Arse": Social Enterprise-Based Transitional Labour-Market Programmes as Neo-Liberal Technologies of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter James; Campbell, Perri Bree Ellis; Harrison, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we re-visit the work of celebrity chef Jamie Oliver and the social enterprise Fifteen Foundation and their development of a programme designed to train unemployed young people in the hospitality industry. We argue, drawing on the Foucauldian literature on governmentality and technologies of the self, that social enterprise-based…

  7. Fission Surface Power Systems (FSPS) Project Final Report for the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP): Fission Surface Power, Transition Face to Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Donald T.

    2011-01-01

    The Fission Surface Power Systems Project became part of the ETDP on October 1, 2008. Its goal was to demonstrate fission power system technology readiness in an operationally relevant environment, while providing data on fission system characteristics pertinent to the use of a fission power system on planetary surfaces. During fiscal years 08 to 10, the FSPS project activities were dominated by hardware demonstrations of component technologies, to verify their readiness for inclusion in the fission surface power system. These Pathfinders demonstrated multi-kWe Stirling power conversion operating with heat delivered via liquid metal NaK, composite Ti/H2O heat pipe radiator panel operations at 400 K input water temperature, no-moving-part electromagnetic liquid metal pump operation with NaK at flight-like temperatures, and subscale performance of an electric resistance reactor simulator capable of reproducing characteristics of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of system-level testing, and a longer list of component technologies included in the attached report. Based on the successful conclusion of Pathfinder testing, work began in 2010 on design and development of the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU), a full-scale 1/4 power system-level non-nuclear assembly of a reactor simulator, power conversion, heat rejection, instrumentation and controls, and power management and distribution. The TDU will be developed and fabricated during fiscal years 11 and 12, culminating in initial testing with water cooling replacing the heat rejection system in 2012, and complete testing of the full TDU by the end of 2014. Due to its importance for Mars exploration, potential applicability to missions preceding Mars missions, and readiness for an early system-level demonstration, the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration program is currently planning to continue the project as the Fission Power Systems project, including emphasis on the TDU completion and testing.

  8. Lander Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavers, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Since 2006 NASA has been formulating robotic missions to the lunar surface through programs and projects like the Robotic Lunar Exploration Program, Lunar Precursor Robotic Program, and International Lunar Network. All of these were led by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Due to funding shortfalls, the lunar missions associated with these efforts, the designs, were not completed. From 2010 to 2013, the Robotic Lunar Lander Development Activity was funded by the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to develop technologies that would enable and enhance robotic lunar surface missions at lower costs. In 2013, a requirements-driven, low-cost robotic lunar lander concept was developed for the Resource Prospector Mission. Beginning in 2014, The Advanced Exploration Systems funded the lander team and established the MSFC, Johnson Space Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory team with MSFC leading the project. The lander concept to place a 300-kg rover on the lunar surface has been described in the New Technology Report Case Number MFS-33238-1. A low-cost lander concept for placing a robotic payload on the lunar surface is shown in figures 1 and 2. The NASA lander team has developed several lander concepts using common hardware and software to allow the lander to be configured for a specific mission need. In addition, the team began to transition lander expertise to United States (U.S.) industry to encourage the commercialization of space, specifically the lunar surface. The Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (CATALYST) initiative was started and the NASA lander team listed above is partnering with three competitively selected U.S. companies (Astrobotic, Masten Space Systems, and Moon Express) to develop, test, and operate their lunar landers.

  9. Transitioning to digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, F., E-mail: Francisco.Miranda@pwc.ca [Pratt & Whitney Canada, Longueuil, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    This article provides insight on the technical and business considerations necessary to implement or to transition to digital radiography Continued refinements in digital radiography technology have resulted in significant improvements in image quality and detectability of indications. These improvements have resulted in the acceptance of the technology by users and aerospace primes for final product inspection and disposition. Digital radiography has also been identified as an interesting cost reduction initiative with the potential of providing gains in productivity through increased throughput and decreased inspection lead-times and resulting costs. (author)

  10. Energy transition. Selective bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    At the occasion of the promulgation on August 17, 2015 of law no. 2015-992 relative to energy transition, this bibliography reviews the legal, economical and political aspects of the recent evolutions in the energy domain. Basic and synthetic documents are listed first. Then follow documents dealing with: general data, energy models, sustainable agriculture, green technologies, energy conservation, waste processing, renewable energy sources, sustainable cities and buildings. The bibliography ends with a selection of relevant web sites

  11. U.S. electric power sector transitions required to achieve 80% reductions in economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions: Results based on a state-level model of the U.S. energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Gokul C.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, Gordon P.; Ledna, Catherine M.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Wise, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    The United States has articulated a deep decarbonization strategy for achieving a reduction in economy-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 80% below 2005 levels by 2050. Achieving such deep emissions reductions will entail a major transformation of the energy system and of the electric power sector in particular. , This study uses a detailed state-level model of the U.S. energy system embedded within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM-USA) to demonstrate pathways for the evolution of the U.S. electric power sector that achieve 80% economy-wide reductions in GHG emissions by 2050. The pathways presented in this report are based on feedback received during a workshop of experts organized by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis. Our analysis demonstrates that achieving deep decarbonization by 2050 will require substantial decarbonization of the electric power sector resulting in an increase in the deployment of zero-carbon and low-carbon technologies such as renewables and carbon capture utilization and storage. The present results also show that the degree to which the electric power sector will need to decarbonize and low-carbon technologies will need to deploy depends on the nature of technological advances in the energy sector, the ability of end-use sectors to electrify and level of electricity demand.

  12. Development of design technology on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles. II-rod bowing effect on boiling transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ohnuki, Akira; Takase, Kazuyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic feasibility project for an Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) has been performed since 2002. In this R and D project, large-scale thermal-hydraulic tests, several model experiments and development of advanced numerical analysis codes have been carried out. In this paper, we will describe the critical power characteristics in a 37-rod tight-lattice bundle with rod-bowing under both steady and transient states. It is observed that no matter it is run under a steady or a transient state, boiling transition (BT) always occurs axially at exit elevation of upper high-heat-flux region and transversely in the central area of the bundle. Steady critical power increases monotonically with the increase of mass velocity, with the decrease of inlet water temperature and with the decrease of exit pressure. These trends are same as those in the base case test without rod-bowing. The steady critical power with rod-bowing is about 10% lower than that without rod-bowing. For the postulated power increase and flow decrease cases that may be possibly met in a normal operation of the FLWR, it is confirmed that no BT occurs when Initial Critical Power Ratio (ICPR) is 1.3. Moreover, when the transitions are run under severer ICPR that causes BT, the transient critical powers are generally same as the steady ones. The experiments are analyzed with TRAC-BF1 code. The TRAC-BF1 code shows good prediction for the occurrence or the non occurrence of the BT and predicts the BT starting time within the accuracy of critical power correlation. Traditional quasi - steady state prediction of the transient BT is confirmed being applicable for the postulated abnormal transient processes in the tight lattice bundle with rod - bowing. (author)

  13. Initial training and technology transfer during the generational transition in the personnel of maintenance; Formacion inicial y transferencia del conocimiento en el cambio generacional del personal de mantenimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Anez, F.

    2006-07-01

    A significant progress in training capabilities of nuclear power plants maintenance personnel has taken place since mid of nineties. In the past, maintenance personnel acquired their competence throughout the years on their job positions. A greater flexibility and new polyvalence requirements demand efficient training actions. In addition, the new personnel incomes associated to the generational change require clear qualification processes. The objective is to develop didactic means and to have competent instructors to preserve and to transfer the knowledge acquires during all these past years to the new incorporations. This article describes a summary of actions and methods followed for the design, development and implantation of training plans for maintenance personnel. (Author)

  14. Advanced technology's impact on compressor design and development - A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Calvin L.

    1989-01-01

    A historical perspective of the impact of advanced technologies on compression system design and development for aircraft gas turbine applications is presented. A bright view of the future is projected in which further advancements in compression system technologies will be made. These advancements will have a significant impact on the ability to meet the ever-more-demanding requirements being imposed on the propulsion system for advanced aircraft. Examples are presented of advanced compression system concepts now being studied. The status and potential impact of transitioning from an empirically derived design system to a computationally oriented system are highlighted. A current NASA Lewis Research Center program to enhance this transitioning is described.

  15. Advanced technologies impact on compressor design and development: A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Calvin L.

    1989-01-01

    A historical perspective of the impact of advanced technologies on compression system design and development for aircraft gas turbine applications is presented. A bright view of the future is projected in which further advancements in compression system technologies will be made. These advancements will have a significant impact on the ability to meet the ever-more-demanding requirements being imposed on the propulsion system for advanced aircraft. Examples are presented of advanced compression system concepts now being studied. The status and potential impact of transitioning from an empirically derived design system to a computationally oriented system are highlighted. A current NASA Lewis Research Center program to enhance this transitioning is described.

  16. Transit space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Kirsten Marie

    2008-01-01

    and the interaction of cultural, social, and spatial organizations, as seen from the point of view of people living in Skåde Bakker and Fedet. The focus is on the city dwellers’ representations of the central district of Århus with specific reference to the concept of transit space. When applied to various Århusian...

  17. Out with the old, out with the new--The effect of transitions in TVs and monitors technology on consumption and WEEE generation in Sweden 1996-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykova, Yuliya; Patrício, João; Rosado, Leonardo; Berg, P E O

    2015-12-01

    The recycling of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is important due to its content of valuable and hazardous compounds. This study investigates the case of the recent technology change within television sets (TVs) and monitors, its impact on the generation of WEEE, and the implications for the recycling industry. In particular, material flow analysis for the time series of 1996-2014 for TVs and monitors by type of technology (CRT, Plasma and LCD) in physical units is combined with empirical data on product lifespans. The number of consumed TVs and monitors has grown exponentially. As a result, despite a 3-fold reduction in the weight of the products, the weight of the corresponding WEEE is also growing exponentially. Out with the old, out with the new - a peak in WEEE from both CRT and flat-screen displays is expected during 2014-2020, due to the simultaneous obsolesce of the last wave of CRT products and the short-lived flat-screen products that substituted the CRTs. The lifespans of LCD and LED TVs were found to be three times shorter than of the CRT TVs, with many TVs discarded while still functional. This is the consequence of two events - replacement of the CRT TVs in combination with lifestyle purchases of TVs, i.e. the premature replacement of flat-screen displays with new sets with extra-large screens and/or new features. The throughput of TVs and monitors consumed has been estimated annually from 2014 until 2040, by quantity and type of device, as well as by component and material type. The annual economic value of the corresponding secondary materials, by material type, has also been estimated. The point in time when the final disposal of CRT products is likely to take place has been identified and should be noted by the recycling industry. Among the important contributions of this study to the accounting and predicting of amounts and types of WEEE are the lifespan distributions, size and weight distributions, and material composition for

  18. Understanding human movement through spatial technologies. The role of natural areas of transit in the Late Prehistory of South-western Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrieta-Flores, Patricia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological, historical, and ethnographic research has demonstrated how mountainous environments influence the socio-cultural dynamics of the communities that live in them and in their neighbouring areas. The development of these communities tends to occur at the margins, often far away from centres of political power. This marginality is also extended to movement in these regions, where mountain ranges regularly constitute mighty obstacles on account of their natural configuration which plays a central role in strategy, commerce and travelling. In the case of western Sierra Morena in Spain, its constitution shaped both the ways of transit through the mountains during Later Prehistory and the historical routes of communication that traverse Andalucía. Using a GIS methodology developed specifically to identify particular characteristics of the landscape relevant to human movement, such as passageways, crossing points, and natural areas of transit, we examine the role that natural accessibility had for the late prehistoric societies of this region. We conclude that the location of their habitats and symbolic places are strongly related to corridors, possibly due to an increasing importance of herding activities.

    Investigaciones arqueológicas, históricas y etnográficas han demostrado como los ambientes de montaña tienen una profunda influencia en las dinámicas socioculturales de las comunidades que viven en ellos y en sus áreas vecinas. El desarrollo de estas sociedades tiende a producirse en los márgenes, usualmente lejos de los centros de poder político. Esta marginación se extiende también a la circulación en estas regiones, donde las cordilleras suelen constituir poderosos obstáculos debido a su configuración natural que juega un papel central en sus estrategias, comercio y movimiento humano. Durante la Prehistoria Reciente, la constitución de Sierra Morena Occidental (España moldeó tanto las vías de tránsito a trav

  19. Current State and Model for Development of Technology-Based Care for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Benyakorn, Songpoom; Riley, Steven J.; Calub, Catrina A.; Schweitzer, Julie B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Care (i.e., evaluation and intervention) delivered through technology is used in many areas of mental health services, including for persons with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Technology can facilitate care for individuals with ADHD, their parents, and their care providers. The adoption of technological tools for ADHD care requires evidence-based studies to support the transition from development to integration into use in the home, school, or work for pers...

  20. Modal Transition Systems with Weight Intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Line; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Srba, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We propose weighted modal transition systems, an extension to the well-studied specification formalism of modal transition systems that allows to express both required and optional behaviours of their intended implementations. In our extension we decorate each transition with a weight interval...

  1. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  2. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOFFHEINS, B.; ANNESE, C.; GOODMAN, M.; OCONNOR, W.; GUSHUE, S.; PEPPER, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors' load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The presentation will include a

  3. Technology alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Boczar, P.G.; Kugler, G.

    1991-10-01

    In the field of nuclear technology, Canada and Korea developed a highly successful relationship that could serve as a model for other high-technology industries. This is particularly significant when one considers the complexity and technical depth required to design, build and operate a nuclear reactor. This paper will outline the overall framework for technology transfer and cooperation between Canada and Korea, and will focus on cooperation in nuclear R and D between the two countries

  4. Innovative Competencies of Mining engineers in Transition to the Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechetov, Andrey; Khoreshok, Alexey; Blumenstein, Valery

    2017-11-01

    The transition to the sustainable development posed new challenges to the system of mining higher education. They are determined by the acceleration of scientific and technological progress and widespread introduction of innovations, convergence of technologies from various industries. On the one hand, globalization and rapid technology development are constantly increasing quality requirements for the labor resources of the mineral and raw materials complex and constant improvement of their skills. On the other hand, the transition to the sustainable development provides the necessity for rational use of raw materials and environmental protection. This requires the improvement of staff support system for mining operations and the interaction of enterprises with universities training mining engineers, aimed at the innovative competencies development of future miners.

  5. Presidential Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-09

    done to facilitate the transition.52 CRS-12 53 David T. Stanley, Changing Administrations (Washington: Brookings Institution, 1965), p. 6. 54 “Pre...Conference of Mayors; Sharleen Hirsch, an educational administrator; and Jule Sugarman , a public administrator. Staff members were assigned to task forces...Issues,” Washington Post, Nov. 13, 1980, p. Al. 77 David Hoffman, “Bush Names Baker Secretary of State,” Washington Post, Nov. 10, 1988, pp. Al and

  6. Prospects for sustainable development of the nickel industry of Russia in conditions of transition in the world economy to the new technological mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolbov A. G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The essence of new technological mode in the world economy, some features of innovative development of the mineral complex and the nickel industry, dynamics of world production and consumption of nickel have been considered. The organization and economic structure of the nickel industry in Russia has been characterized. The prospects for sustainable development of the nickel industry in conditions of the sixth technological mode have been justified. Рассмотрены сущность нового технологического уклада в мировой экономике, особенности инновационного развития минерально-сырьевого комплекса и никелевой промышленности, динамика мирового производства и потребления никеля. Дана характеристика организационно-экономической структуры никелевой промышленности России. Обоснованы перспективы устойчивого развития никелевой промышленности в условиях шестого технологического уклада

  7. Transit safety retrofit package development : TRP concept of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    This document describes the Concept of Operations (ConOps) for the Transit Safety Retrofit Package (TRP). The : ConOps describes the current state of operations with respect to the integration of Connected Vehicle technology in : transit buses, estab...

  8. Transit bus stop pedestrian warning application : concept of operations document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-04

    This document describes the Concept of Operations (ConOps) for the Transit Bus Stop Pedestrian Warning (TSPW) application. The ConOps describes the current state of operations with respect to the integration of connected vehicle technology in transit...

  9. An analysis of results of measuring the speed passing through a material in a technological process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benková

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The process approach requires a smoothness and continuity for each individual technological /production process. From the viewpoint of ownership of each process a required input into the process technical and operation parameters for a required output of the process is important. From the viewpoint of monitoring a concrete process, the material entering the process having a temperature required by technological instruction is important.The speed of transition of a material through the technological mechanism should be constant and a product from the process should have required internal and external parameters. The speed is critical for the technological process. When using a measurement, values of speed are obtained, can be analysed from the point of view of variation in time and normality. For a comparison of real and required values, the box plot was prepared. The capability indexes were counted and the „overlaps” of tolerance interval for the required value of speed were compared.

  10. What Types of Instructional Shifts Do Students Experience? Investigating Active Learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Classes across Key Transition Points from Middle School to the University Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Akiha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the need for a strong Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM workforce, there is a high attrition rate for students who intend to complete undergraduate majors in these disciplines. Students who leave STEM degree programs often cite uninspiring instruction in introductory courses, including traditional lecturing, as a reason. While undergraduate courses play a critical role in STEM retention, little is understood about the instructional transitions students encounter upon moving from secondary to post-secondary STEM courses. This study compares classroom observation data collected using the Classroom Observation Protocol for Undergraduate STEM from over 450 middle school, high school, introductory-level university, and advanced-level university classes across STEM disciplines. We find similarities between middle school and high school classroom instruction, which are characterized by a large proportion of time spent on active-learning instructional strategies, such as small-group activities and peer discussion. By contrast, introductory and advanced university instructors devote more time to instructor-centered teaching strategies, such as lecturing. These instructor-centered teaching strategies are present in classes regardless of class enrollment size, class period length, or whether or not the class includes a separate laboratory section. Middle school, high school, and university instructors were also surveyed about their views of what STEM instructional practices are most common at each educational level and asked to provide an explanation of those perceptions. Instructors from all levels struggled to predict the level of lecturing practices and often expressed uncertainty about what instruction looks like at levels other than their own. These findings suggest that more opportunities need to be created for instructors across multiple levels of the education system to share their active-learning teaching practices and

  11. FTA real-time transit information assessment : white paper on literature review of real-time transit information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time transit information systems are key technology applications within the transit industry designed to provide better customer service by disseminating timely and accurate information. Riders use this information to make various decisions abou...

  12. Transit space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Kirsten Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with representations of one specific city, Århus, Denmark, especially its central district. The analysis is based on anthropological fieldwork conducted in Skåde Bakker and Fedet, two well-off neighborhoods. The overall purpose of the project is to study perceptions of space...... and the interaction of cultural, social, and spatial organizations, as seen from the point of view of people living in Skåde Bakker and Fedet. The focus is on the city dwellers’ representations of the central district of Århus with specific reference to the concept of transit space. When applied to various Århusian...

  13. A low carbon industrial revolution? Insights and challenges from past technological and economic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, Peter J.G.; Foxon, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts to promote a transition to a low carbon economy have been influenced by suggestions that a low carbon transition offers challenges and might yield economic benefits comparable to those of the previous industrial revolutions. This paper examines these arguments and the challenges facing a low carbon transition, by drawing on recent thinking on the technological, economic and institutional factors that enabled and sustained the first (British) industrial revolution, and the role of ‘general purpose technologies’ in stimulating and sustaining this and subsequent industrial transformation processes that have contributed to significant macroeconomic gains. These revolutions involved profound, long drawn-out changes in economy, technology and society; and although their energy transitions led to long-run economic benefits, they took many decades to develop. To reap significant long-run economic benefits from a low carbon transition sooner rather than later would require systemic efforts and incentives for low carbon innovation and substitution of high-carbon technologies. We conclude that while achieving a low carbon transition may require societal changes on a scale comparable with those of previous industrial revolutions, this transition does not yet resemble previous industrial revolutions. A successful low carbon transition would, however, amount to a different kind of industrial revolution. - Highlights: ► Investigates lessons for a low carbon transition from past industrial revolutions. ► Explores the implications of ‘general purpose technologies’ and their properties. ► Examines analysis of ‘long waves’ of technological progress and diffusion. ► Draws insights for low carbon transitions and policy.

  14. Mathematical modeling for optimizing skip-stop rail transit operation strategy using genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    "With skip-stop rail transit operation, transit agencies can reduce their operating costs and fleet size, : and passengers can experience reduced in-transit travel times without extra track and technological : improvement. However, since skip-stop op...

  15. Moved by a Rapid Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, C.

    2013-04-01

    Enticing by virtue of its predictability, historical utility, and spectacle, the transit of Venus is a niche event among astronomical phenomena. Though the value of a transit for scientific purposes is now diminished, the brief appearance of Venus silhouetted against the background of the Sun in 2004 moved the artistic community to celebrate the rare alignment. Artists of all ages combined old traditions with fresh technology to create a 21st-century tapestry of music, sculpture, paintings, glasswork, quilts, sky shows, and digital imagery. A full catalog of transit-related art generated over the centuries would feature the sampling of entries presented here and at the Moved by a Rapid Transit website.

  16. Coal, an energy for the future: Energy transition - Promises difficult to be kept; Asset repurchasing - those who still believe in it; Technologies - in the pursuit of green coal; Interview 'Coal will still be here in 2040'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognasse, Olivier; Delamarche, Myrtille; Dupin, Ludovic

    2017-01-01

    A first article evokes the recent evolution of world coal demand which is notably due to its ban in some European countries, and to its decrease in China for environmental reasons and in the USA for economic reasons (emergence of shale gas). However, the demand is still increasing in India, in South-East Asia and in Africa. The article also evokes the difficulties of banks and governments to implement their commitments to phase out coal, and outlines that some emerging countries are able to implement a better transition. As the main European energy utilities are committed in phasing out coal, a second article evokes various purchases of coal plants made by other actors (utilities or investors) in different countries. The third article proposes an overview of technological efforts and achievements to reduce CO 2 emissions by coal plants (super-critical and ultra-critical plants, projects of carbon capture and storage). The next article presents the case of the German RDK8 supercritical coal plant which, as other new German coal plants, implements new technologies to improve its efficiency. An article proposes an overview of the various carbon and particle emissions and water pollution associated with the different stages of coal use, from its extraction to its use in the most modern thermal plants. Finally, an expert comments in an interview the general trend of thermal coal, the shutting down of Chinese installations and the evolution of Chinese consumption, and expected evolutions in other Asian countries, in the USA and in Europe. She outlines that coal will still be present in 2040

  17. Energy innovation and transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Anita

    technology can be applied or developed to achieve the ultimate target of reducing CO2 emissions. In this connection smart cities are increasingly gathering attention. An urbanization with a population shift from rural to urban areas, is occuring and is going hand -in-hand with a higher emphasis on mitigation......, sewage systems, and traffic to the content of the garbage container. Smart grids and energy systems may be identified as a key enablers for a future low-carbon electricity system, facilitating demand-side efficiency, increasing the shares of renewables and distributed generation, and enabling......, are therefore undergoing significant innovation and change. Energy innovations include a transition from fossil fuels to more renewable energy sources, increasing energy efficiency, removing CO2 emissions via storage and the development of new technologies in general. In this connection it is a question how...

  18. Transition plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-02

    Although the 9-1-1 system has been a success for nearly 40 years, changes in the publics use of : technology, the saturation of the mobile market, and the spread of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) : telephony over broadband are contributing to...

  19. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP). Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program seeks to deliver needed technologies, timely and cost-effectively, to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The scope of characterizations monitoring, and sensor technology needs that are required by those organizations encompass: (1) initial location and characterization of wastes and waste environments - prior to treatment; (2) monitoring of waste retrieval, remediation and treatment processes; (3) characterization of the co-position of final waste treatment forms to evaluate the performance of waste treatments processes; and (4) site closure and compliance monitoring. Wherever possible, the CMST-IP fosters technology transfer and commercialization of technologies that it sponsors.

  20. The transition of mouse pluripotent stem cells from the naïve to the primed state requires Fas signaling through 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate structures recognized by the HS4C3 antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Van Kuppevelt, Toin H. [Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 280 P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Fas transcript increases during the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► 3OST-5 transcript, the HS4C3 epitope synthesis gene, increases during the transition. ► Fas signaling regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► HS4C3-binding epitope regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► Fas signaling is regulated by the HS4C3 epitope during the transition. -- Abstract: The characteristics of pluripotent embryonic stem cells of human and mouse are different. The properties of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are similar to those of mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs), which are in a later developmental pluripotency state, the so-called “primed state” compared to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) which are in a naïve state. As a result of the properties of the primed state, hESCs proliferate slowly, cannot survive as single cells, and can only be transfected with genes at low efficiency. Generating hESCs in the naïve state is necessary to overcome these problems and allow their application in regenerative medicine. Therefore, clarifying the mechanism of the transition between the naïve and primed states in pluripotent stem cells is important for the establishment of stable methods of generating naïve state hESCs. However, the signaling pathways which contribute to the transition between the naïve and primed states are still unclear. In this study, we carried out induction from mESCs to mEpiSC-like cells (mEpiSCLCs), and observed an increase in the activation of Fas signaling during the induction. The expression of Fgf5, an epiblast marker, was diminished by inhibition of Fas signaling using the caspase-8 and -3 blocking peptides, IETD and DEVD, respectively. Furthermore, during the induction, we observed increased expression of 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) structures synthesized by HS 3-O-sulfotransferase (3OST), which are recognized by the HS4C3 antibody (HS4C3-binding epitope

  1. The transition of mouse pluripotent stem cells from the naïve to the primed state requires Fas signaling through 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate structures recognized by the HS4C3 antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Nishihara, Shoko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fas transcript increases during the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► 3OST-5 transcript, the HS4C3 epitope synthesis gene, increases during the transition. ► Fas signaling regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► HS4C3-binding epitope regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► Fas signaling is regulated by the HS4C3 epitope during the transition. -- Abstract: The characteristics of pluripotent embryonic stem cells of human and mouse are different. The properties of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are similar to those of mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs), which are in a later developmental pluripotency state, the so-called “primed state” compared to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) which are in a naïve state. As a result of the properties of the primed state, hESCs proliferate slowly, cannot survive as single cells, and can only be transfected with genes at low efficiency. Generating hESCs in the naïve state is necessary to overcome these problems and allow their application in regenerative medicine. Therefore, clarifying the mechanism of the transition between the naïve and primed states in pluripotent stem cells is important for the establishment of stable methods of generating naïve state hESCs. However, the signaling pathways which contribute to the transition between the naïve and primed states are still unclear. In this study, we carried out induction from mESCs to mEpiSC-like cells (mEpiSCLCs), and observed an increase in the activation of Fas signaling during the induction. The expression of Fgf5, an epiblast marker, was diminished by inhibition of Fas signaling using the caspase-8 and -3 blocking peptides, IETD and DEVD, respectively. Furthermore, during the induction, we observed increased expression of 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) structures synthesized by HS 3-O-sulfotransferase (3OST), which are recognized by the HS4C3 antibody (HS4C3-binding epitope

  2. Transformative Learning in Managerial Role Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the nature of learning in work role transitions from specialist roles to managerial roles in a context of a large international technology organisation. Prior theorisation of learning in role transitions has been based on quantitative, psychologically-oriented studies prescribing different role and…

  3. Predictable Patterns in Planetary Transit Timing Variations and Transit Duration Variations Due to Exomoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Rene; Hippke, Michael; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moon system, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures, as long as the drift of the moons' pericenters is suciently slow.We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or the largest integer in the MMR ratio.We use a Bayesian model and Monte Carlo simulations to test the discoverability of exomoons using TTV-TDV diagrams with current and near-future technology. In a blind test, two of us (BP, DA) successfully retrieved a large moon from simulated TTV-TDV by co-authors MH and RH, which resembled data from a known Kepler planet candidate. Single exomoons with a 10 percent moon-to-planet mass ratio, like to Pluto-Charon binary, can be detectable in the archival data of the Kepler primary mission. Multi-exomoon systems, however, require either larger telescopes or brighter target stars. Complementary detection methods invoking a moon's own photometric transit or its orbital sampling effect can be used for validation or falsification. A combination of TESS, CHEOPS, and PLATO data would offer a compelling opportunity for an exomoon discovery around a bright star.

  4. System Operations Studies for Automated Guideway Transit Systems : Discrete Event Simulation Model Programmer's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    In order to examine specific automated guideway transit (AGT) developments and concepts, UMTA undertook a program of studies and technology investigations called Automated Guideway Transit Technology (AGTT) Program. The objectives of one segment of t...

  5. Energy transition in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Alain

    2014-01-01

    After having recalled the main issues and stakes addressed by the French national debate on energy transition (strategic stakes, priority to a reduction of French energy consumption, options for the evolution of the French energy mix), the author comments the possible evolution of energy prices and of the energy taxing policy (evolution of oil prices, carbon price). In a second part, the author addresses the issue of financing of building and housing renovation. He shows that this operation cannot be only based on financial markets which are not efficient. This means that a public intervention is required, and different solutions are then possible. Some of them seem difficult to implement (creation of money by the central Bank, creation of a public bank which could lend money to private actors), and some others need to be further examined (creation of a financing company for energy transition, use of national savings, simplified circuits for a financing of local projects by local savings, and so on)

  6. Energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    The yearly environmental conference will hold on September 2013 to evaluate the negotiations led at the national and local levels for december 2012. The government will have then to decide of an energy programming bill which will be submitted to the Parliament at the beginning of the year 2014. 30 main propositions have emerged of the decentralised debates. One of them is the ecological taxation which raise the question of the gas oil and petrol taxation. The current environmental taxes are for almost three quarters of them taxes on energy consumptions and mainly on fossil energies. The Economic, Social and Environmental Council, gives his opinion on the way to find resources to ensure the ecological and energy transition while reducing the public deficit of the State. (O.M.)

  7. Simulating Energy Transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappin, E.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever wanted to know whether a CO2 tax outperforms the EU emissions trading scheme? Or how long it really takes markets to change and to let consumers choose differently? In this book, the author explores simulation models to provide us with answers before policy interventions are implemented and shows that, by developing agent-based models, we can simulate energy transition. Learn about a new framework that enables us to model energy infrastructure systems as complex socio-technical systems, which evolve as a result of distributed decision making by actors in the system. See how running agent-based models let the system structure and dynamics emerge from the interactions between actors and technologies. Understand how actors, who decide on operation and investment, are responsive to policy interventions, market rules, and technological development. Find out from simulations of the electricity production sector, the LNG market, and consumer lighting that interventions in these energy systems do alter their evolution -- they invoke structural, systemic change: transition. This thesis thus demonstrates that agent-based models yield a powerful tool for governments and companies: they allow them to assess the long-term effect of their policies and strategies in our complex, interconnected world.

  8. [Health technology in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, C; Faba, G; Martuscelli, J

    1992-01-01

    The features of the health technology cycle are presented, and the effects of the demographic, epidemiologic and economic transition on the health technology demand in Mexico are discussed. The main problems of science and technology in the context of a decreasing scientific and technological activity due to the economic crisis and the adjustment policies are also analyzed: administrative and planning problems, low impact of scientific production, limitations of the Mexican private sector, and the obstacles for technology assessment. Finally, this paper also discusses the main support strategies for science and technology implemented by the Mexican government during the 1980s and the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

  9. The Sociocultural Factors That Influenced the Success of Non-Traditional, Latina, Pre-Service Teachers in a Required Online Instructional Media and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Reyes, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Home computer ownership and Internet access have become essential to education, job security and economic opportunity. The digital divide, the gap between those who can afford and can use computer technologies remains greatest for ethnic/racial groups placing them at a disadvantage for economic and educational opportunities. The purpose of the…

  10. A Field Study on the Approach of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs to the Information and Communication Technologies and Its Required Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Koçak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs are the main driver of a country’s economic growth. SMEs are thought to be an important source and factor in job creation and they provide flexible working opportunities for the white collar workers. The importance of the SMEs is growing since they have an important impact on the economy which is recently in crises. The rising unemployment rates of the countries cause many social and economic problems in the world. Therefore, SMEs, as an engine in economies, should be studied in terms of their adaption of new technologies which are the most important means to enter new markets and create new jobs. With the globalization, SMEs couldn’t go beyond their national borders as much as big companies did and lagged behind of the new global markets. To be able to reach new customers who are far from their countries and to compete with their rivals in both national and international arena, SMEs should adapt to the information and communication technologies. These technologies make them faster and stronger by establishing new channels, reducing time to market, providing opportunities to work more flexible and creating new jobs. In order to catch up with these new developments, which make the firms more competitive, SMEs should consider the ICTs as a strategic integral part. In this study, it is aimed to find out to what extend small and medium companies use information technologies, if they integrate these technologies into their business processes, cut their costs by using ICTs and want to invest more for information technologies. In this work, the subject is separated into 2 sections. In the first section, the literature is reviewed and some explanations and examples are given from the world and Turkey. In the second section of the study, the survey is used to find answers to the questions mentioned above in relation to SMEs and their integration with information and communication technologies. This survey was

  11. Nuclear fuel cycle transition scenario studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Future nuclear fuel cycles could effectively address radioactive waste issues with the implementation of partitioning and transmutation (P and T). Previous studies have defined the infrastructure requirements for several key technical approaches. While these studies have proven extremely valuable, several countries have also recognised the complex, dynamic nature of the infrastructure problem: severe new issues arise when attempting to transit from current open or partially closed cycles to a final equilibrium or burn-down mode. While the issues are country-specific when addressed in detail, it is believed that there exists a series of generic issues related only to the current situation and to the desired end point. These issues are critical to implementing a sustainable nuclear energy infrastructure. The present report focuses on the definition of key issues, the assessment of technologies and national scenario assessments. (author)

  12. Hydrogen technologies and the technology learning curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.-H.

    1998-01-01

    On their bumpy road to commercialization, hydrogen production, delivery and conversion technologies not only require dedicated research, development and demonstration efforts, but also protected niche markets and early adopters. While niche markets utilize the unique technological properties of hydrogen, adopters exhibit a willingness to pay a premium for hydrogen fueled energy services. The concept of the technology learning curve is applied to estimate the capital requirements associated with the commercialization process of several hydrogen technologies. (author)

  13. AFRL Nanoscience Technologies: Applications, Transitions and Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    capacity. Pulsed laser deposition was used to create a multilayered superconductor with a carefully controlled nano-particle dispersion, essential...were achieved at SuperPower, Inc. and American Superconductor Corp. through a Defense Production Act Title III program and dual use funding from...Pumped Semiconductor Room-Temperature Terahertz Radiation Accomplishment: The first room-temperature electrically pumped semiconductor source of

  14. A Conceptual Framework for Software Technology Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    transfer of sientific and technical information for DoD personnel. DoD contractrs and potential contractors. and other U.S. Government agency...distributed by organizations such as the In- stitute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), American National Standards Institute(- ANSI), and

  15. Cognitive technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Mello, Alan; Figueiredo, Fabrício; Figueiredo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the next generation optical networks as well as mobile communication technologies. The reader will find chapters on Cognitive Optical Network, 5G Cognitive Wireless, LTE, Data Analysis and Natural Language Processing. It also presents a comprehensive view of the enhancements and requirements foreseen for Machine Type Communication. Moreover, some data analysis techniques and Brazilian Portuguese natural language processing technologies are also described here. .

  16. On the 'Interim summary of requirements and criteria for nationwide scientific screening by the geological disposal technology working group.'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochiyama, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In order to make progress on the permanent geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the government of Japan revised, in May 2015, the basic plan to expand the site selection process, in which a set of site screening criteria was issued based on the existing geoscientific knowledge. These criteria were developed by the Geological Disposal Technology Working Group of the Nuclear Energy Subcommittee which was created by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). (author)

  17. The multipurpose application of radio frequency identification (RFID) in the Tourism industry: On a requirement analysis for employing RFID technology in the hotel sector

    OpenAIRE

    Hassannia, Raheleh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study tried to evaluate the effects of Radio Frequency Identification ( RFID) as the new and latest technological advancement towards the implementation of profit chain model (Heskett et al, 1997) on international tourists (inbound) in the case of North Cyprus. North Cyprus is blessed with natural endowments and proximity to tourist market, especially the European countries. It has numerous regional and geographical advantages for a full-blown tourism industry. The study has fo...

  18. Li-ion batteries: Phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Peiyu; Zhang Yantao; Zhang Lianqi; Chu Geng; Gao Jian

    2016-01-01

    Progress in the research on phase transitions during Li + extraction/insertion processes in typical battery materials is summarized as examples to illustrate the significance of understanding phase transition phenomena in Li-ion batteries. Physical phenomena such as phase transitions (and resultant phase diagrams) are often observed in Li-ion battery research and already play an important role in promoting Li-ion battery technology. For example, the phase transitions during Li + insertion/extraction are highly relevant to the thermodynamics and kinetics of Li-ion batteries, and even physical characteristics such as specific energy, power density, volume variation, and safety-related properties. (topical review)

  19. Environmental Management Long-Term Stewardship Transition Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after the completion of facility cleanup. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. This report describes the background of long-term stewardship and gives general guidance about considerations when ownership and/or responsibility of a site should be transferred to a long-term stewardship program. This guidance document will assist the U.S. Department of Energy in: (a) ensuring that the long-term stewardship program leads transition planning with respect to facility and site areas, and (b) describing the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete.

  20. Transition pathways for a UK low carbon electricity future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxon, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving long-term targets for greenhouse gas emissions reductions, such as the UK's legally-binding target of reducing its emissions by 80% by 2050, will require a transition in systems for meeting and shaping energy service demands, involving radical substitution to low-carbon supply technologies and improvements in end-use energy efficiency. This paper describes the development and high-level analysis of a set of transition pathways to a UK low carbon electricity system, explaining key features of the core pathways developed and the distinctiveness and value of the approach. The pathways use an ‘action space’ concept to explore the dynamic interactions between choices made by actors, which are influenced by the competing governance ‘framings’ or ‘logics’ that different actors pursue. The paper sets out three core transition pathways – Market Rules, Central Co-ordination and Thousand Flowers, in which market, government and civil society logics respectively dominate. It summarises the key technological and institutional changes in these pathways, and the roles of actors in bringing these about. This leads to an identification of the key risks to the realisation of each of the pathways, and of the challenges for individuals, businesses, social movements and policy-makers in taking action to bring them about and sustain them. - Highlights: ► Development of a set of transition pathways to a UK low carbon electricity system. ► Action space to explore the dynamic interactions between choices made by actors. ► Three core pathways in which market, government and civil society logics dominate. ► Key technological and institutional changes, and the roles of actors in pathways. ► Challenges for different actors in realising pathways.

  1. Waste management system functional requirements for Interim Waste Management Facilities (IWMFs) and technology demonstrations, LLWDDD [Low-Level Disposal Development and Demonstration] Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to build upon the preceding decisions and body of information to prepare draft system functional requirements for each classification of waste disposal currently proposed for Low-Level Waste Disposal Development Demonstration (LLWDDD) projects. Functional requirements identify specific information and data needs necessary to satisfy engineering design criteria/objectives for Interim Waste Management Facilities. This draft will suppor the alternatives evaluation process and will continue to evolve as strategy is implemented, regulatory limits are established, technical and economic uncertainties are resolved, and waste management plans are being implemented. This document will become the planning basis for the new generation of solid LLW management facilities on new sites on the Reservation. Eighteen (18) general system requirements are identified which are applicable to all four Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal classifications. Each classification of LLW disposal is individually addressed with respect ot waste characteristics, site considerations, facility operations, facility closure/post-closure, intruder barriers, institutional control, and performance monitoring requirements. Three initial LLW disposal sites have been proposed as locations on the ORR for the first demonstrations

  2. Reliability evaluation under new requirements for the safety system control technology in nuclear power plants. Analysis of the application practice; Zuverlaessigkeitsbewertung unter neuen Anforderungen an Sicherheitsleittechnik in Kernkraftwerken. Analysen der Anwendungspraxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jopen, Manuela; Quester, Claudia; Roemer, Sarah; Sommer, Dagmar; Stiller, Jan; Ulrich, Birte

    2016-10-15

    In many German nuclear power plants computer-based of programmable control systems are integrated in the operational control technology; but there exist significant differences. For a reliability evaluation the backfitting/retrofitting of safety relevant equipment has to be considered. The problems result from the fact that at the time of license application only few exactly formulated requirements for computer based of programmable control systems were available. The RSK considers the existing DIN norms as not sufficient, further the norms exceeding methods are supposed to be necessary to guarantee an optimal and verifiable design against common cause failures of control systems. A comparison of national and international norms has shown the existence of detailed requirements in several standards. The transferability of these requirements is discussed.

  3. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  4. Technology-Capable Teachers Transitioning to Technology-Challenged Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbel, Faiza

    2017-01-01

    Developing countries lacking capabilities, funds and human resources are compelled to improve the digital literacy rates of their task force through educational initiatives. This is the case of Tunisia where a stand-alone in-service teacher education (Ted) initiative was implemented in 2014 and 2015. The aim of this project, the Tech Age Teacher…

  5. Health Informatics 3.0 and other increasingly dispersed technologies require even greater trust: promoting safe evidence-based health informatics. Contribution of the IMIA Working Group on Technology Assessment & Quality Development in Health Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, M; Ammenwerth, E; Talmon, J; Nykänen, P; Brender, J; de Keizer, N

    2011-01-01

    Health informatics is generally less committed to a scientific evidence-based approach than any other area of health science, which is an unsound position. Introducing the new Web 3.0 paradigms into health IT applications can unleash a further great potential, able to integrate and distribute data from multiple sources. The counter side is that it makes the user and the patient evermore dependent on the 'black box' of the system, and the re-use of the data remote from the author and initial context. Thus anticipatory consideration of uses, and proactive analysis of evidence of effects, are imperative, as only when a clinical technology can be proven to be trustworthy and safe should it be implemented widely - as is the case with other health technologies. To argue for promoting evidence-based health informatics as systems become more powerful and pro-active yet more dispersed and remote; and evaluation as the means of generating the necessary scientific evidence base. To present ongoing IMIA and EFMI initiatives in this field. Critical overview of recent developments in health informatics evaluation, alongside the precedents of other health technologies, summarising current initiatives and the new challenges presented by Health Informatics 3.0. Web 3.0 should be taken as an opportunity to move health informatics from being largely unaccountable to one of being an ethical and responsible science-based domain. Recent and planned activities of the EFMI and IMIA working groups have significantly progressed key initiatives. Concurrent with the emergence of Web 3.0 as a means of new-generation diffuse health information systems comes an increasing need for an evidence-based culture in health informatics.

  6. Dark excitons in transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Ermin; Selig, Malte; Feierabend, Maja; Brem, Samuel; Christiansen, Dominik; Wendler, Florian; Knorr, Andreas; Berghäuser, Gunnar

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit a remarkably strong Coulomb interaction that manifests in tightly bound excitons. Due to the complex electronic band structure exhibiting several spin-split valleys in the conduction and valence band, dark excitonic states can be formed. They are inaccessibly by light due to the required spin-flip and/or momentum transfer. The relative position of these dark states with respect to the optically accessible bright excitons has a crucial impact on the emission efficiency of these materials and thus on their technological potential. Based on the solution of the Wannier equation, we present the excitonic landscape of the most studied TMD materials including the spectral position of momentum- and spin-forbidden excitonic states. We show that the knowledge of the electronic dispersion does not allow to conclude about the nature of the material's band gap since excitonic effects can give rise to significant changes. Furthermore, we reveal that an exponentially reduced photoluminescence yield does not necessarily reflect a transition from a direct to a nondirect gap material, but can be ascribed in most cases to a change of the relative spectral distance between bright and dark excitonic states.

  7. Positioning Nuclear Power in the Low-Carbon Electricity Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviel Verbruggen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing climate change requires de-carbonizing future energy supplies in an increasingly energy-dependent world. The IEA and the IPCC (2014 mention the following as low-carbon energy supply options: ‘renewable energy, nuclear power and fossil fuels with carbon capture and storage’. Positioning nuclear power in the decarbonization transition is a problematic issue and is overridden by ill-conceived axioms. Before probing these axioms, we provide an overview of five major, postwar energy-related legacies and some insight into who is engaged in nuclear activities. We check whether low-carbon nuclear power passes the full sustainability test and whether it is compatible with the unfettered deployment of variable renewable power sourced from the sun and from wind and water currents, which delivers two negative answers. We show that the best approach of the sustainable energy transition was Germany’s 2011 decision to phase out nuclear power for a fast development and full deployment of renewable power. This is the best approach for the sustainable energy transition. We offer five practical suggestions to strengthen and accelerate carbon- and nuclear-free transitions. They are related to institutional issues like the role of cost-benefit analysis and the mission of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to the costs of nuclear risks and catastrophes, and to the historical record of nuclear technology and business.

  8. Europe’s electricity regime: restoration or thorough transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviel Verbruggen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about climate change, diminishing social acceptance of traditional fuels, and technological innovations have led several countries to pursue energy transition strategies, typically by massive diffusion of renewable electricity supplies. The German ‘Energiewende’ has been successful so far in terms of deploying renewable power, mainly by applying particular feed-in tariffs, and by bundling public, academic, industrial and political support. So far though, only few EU member states proceed with a similar transition. In March 2014 CEOs of Europe’s major energy companies publicly opposed a fast and thorough transformation of electricity supplies to become fully renewable. In April 2014 the European Commission published new state aid guidelines, generally mandating renewable energy support mechanisms (premiums, tenders of lesser performance than regularly adjusted, specific feed-in tariffs. The new guidelines are likely to be pernicious for the fast deployment of renewable electricity supplies. In light of these challenges, this position paper highlights two implications of power sector transitions. First, the engineering-economics theory of power generation systems needs fundamental revision, mainly since a growing share of power sources no longer function on command. Second, and based on the experience in Germany, the paper sketches out a strategy for a thorough transition of the power sector, which, in the end, also entails normative judgements. Deep changes in energy systems and associated ways of living require societal consensus building based on ethical considerations.

  9. Energy storage deployment and innovation for the clean energy transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittner, Noah; Lill, Felix; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2017-09-01

    The clean energy transition requires a co-evolution of innovation, investment, and deployment strategies for emerging energy storage technologies. A deeply decarbonized energy system research platform needs materials science advances in battery technology to overcome the intermittency challenges of wind and solar electricity. Simultaneously, policies designed to build market growth and innovation in battery storage may complement cost reductions across a suite of clean energy technologies. Further integration of R&D and deployment of new storage technologies paves a clear route toward cost-effective low-carbon electricity. Here we analyse deployment and innovation using a two-factor model that integrates the value of investment in materials innovation and technology deployment over time from an empirical dataset covering battery storage technology. Complementary advances in battery storage are of utmost importance to decarbonization alongside improvements in renewable electricity sources. We find and chart a viable path to dispatchable US$1 W-1 solar with US$100 kWh-1 battery storage that enables combinations of solar, wind, and storage to compete directly with fossil-based electricity options.

  10. A review of nuclear data needs and their status for fusion reactor technology with some suggestions on a strategy to satisfy the requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Cheng, E.T.

    1991-09-01

    A review was performed on the needs and status of nuclear data for fusion-reactor technology. Generally, the status of nuclear data for fusion has been improved during the past two decades due to the dedicated effort of the nuclear data developers. However, there are still deficiencies in the nuclear data base, particularly in the areas of activation and neutron scattering cross sections. Activation cross sections were found to be unsatisfactory in 83 of the 153 reactions reviewed. The scattering cross sections for fluorine and boron will need to be improved at energies above 1 MeV. Suggestions concerning a strategy to address the specific fusion nuclear data needs for dosimetry and activation are also provided

  11. An assessment of electric vehicles: technology, infrastructure requirements, greenhouse-gas emissions, petroleum use, material use, lifetime cost, consumer acceptance and policy initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucchi, M A; Yang, C; Burke, A F; Ogden, J M; Kurani, K; Kessler, J; Sperling, D

    2014-01-13

    Concerns about climate change, urban air pollution and dependence on unstable and expensive supplies of foreign oil have led policy-makers and researchers to investigate alternatives to conventional petroleum-fuelled internal-combustion-engine vehicles in transportation. Because vehicles that get some or all of their power from an electric drivetrain can have low or even zero emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and urban air pollutants, and can consume little or no petroleum, there is considerable interest in developing and evaluating advanced electric vehicles (EVs), including pure battery-electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel-cell electric vehicles. To help researchers and policy-makers assess the potential of EVs to mitigate climate change and reduce petroleum use, this paper discusses the technology of EVs, the infrastructure needed for their development, impacts on emissions of GHGs, petroleum use, materials use, lifetime costs, consumer acceptance and policy considerations.

  12. The design of IPv6's transitional scheme in university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biqing; Li, Zhao

    2017-05-01

    According to the current network environment of campus, the specific scheme of network transition is proposed, which has conducted detailed analyses for the basic concepts, the types of address, the necessary technology for transition and the agreement and principle of transition. According to the tunneling technology of IPv6, the IPv4 network and IPv6 network can communicate with each other, and the network of whole campus can operate well.

  13. Analysis Report for Exascale Storage Requirements for Scientific Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruwart, Thomas M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Over the next 10 years, the Department of Energy will be transitioning from Petascale to Exascale Computing resulting in data storage, networking, and infrastructure requirements to increase by three orders of magnitude. The technologies and best practices used today are the result of a relatively slow evolution of ancestral technologies developed in the 1950s and 1960s. These include magnetic tape, magnetic disk, networking, databases, file systems, and operating systems. These technologies will continue to evolve over the next 10 to 15 years on a reasonably predictable path. Experience with the challenges involved in transitioning these fundamental technologies from Terascale to Petascale computing systems has raised questions about how these will scale another 3 or 4 orders of magnitude to meet the requirements imposed by Exascale computing systems. This report is focused on the most concerning scaling issues with data storage systems as they relate to High Performance Computing- and presents options for a path forward. Given the ability to store exponentially increasing amounts of data, far more advanced concepts and use of metadata will be critical to managing data in Exascale computing systems.

  14. Stimulating transitions towards sustainable farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzen, B.; Barbier, M.; Cerf, M.; Grin, J.

    2012-01-01

    How can the dynamics of the agro-food sector in the long run be addressed? We argue that sustainable agro-food systems cannot be developed through a simple improvement of existing systems, but will require a transition. Therefore, we focus on how transitions to sustainability could be initiated and

  15. Transition to smart grids : A psychological perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, Ellen; Perlaviciute, Goda; Steg, Linda; Beaulieu, Anne; de Wilde, Jaap; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2016-01-01

    A transition to smart grids requires a wide range of changes in household energy behaviour. In this chapter we discuss four key issues important for understanding and promoting behaviour in smart grids. First, we need to identify which behaviour needs to be changed. A transition to smart grids

  16. Middle Grades Transition Programs around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Colin; Bishop, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Transitions into and out of the middle grades can be challenging for many reasons. Students need to acclimate to new policies, practices, and buildings; teachers require accurate data about their new students' capacities; and families must navigate relationships with new personnel. All school transitions present different and, at times, puzzling…

  17. Design & development of the LCO-140H series hydraulic hybrid low floor transit bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Automation Alley, Altair, and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), in a public-private partnership, teamed up to advance a new transit bus initiative that would improve Americas local and regional transit systems while requiring no infrastruc...

  18. Graphite technology development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  19. Strategic Technologies for Deep Space Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Deep space transportation capability for science and exploration is fundamentally limited by available propulsion technologies. Traditional chemical systems are performance plateaued and require enormous Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO) whereas solar electric propulsion systems are power limited and unable to execute rapid transits. Nuclear based propulsion and alternative energetic methods, on the other hand, represent potential avenues, perhaps the only viable avenues, to high specific power space transport evincing reduced trip time, reduced IMLEO, and expanded deep space reach. Here, key deep space transport mission capability objectives are reviewed in relation to STMD technology portfolio needs, and the advanced propulsion technology solution landscape is examined including open questions, technical challenges, and developmental prospects. Options for potential future investment across the full compliment of STMD programs are presented based on an informed awareness of complimentary activities in industry, academia, OGAs, and NASA mission directorates.

  20. Solar Thermal Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    Solar Thermal Energy Technology (PST) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide research and development information that would expand the technology base required for the advancement of solar thermal systems as a significant energy resource.

  1. Organizing a Collaborative Development of Technological Design Requirements Using a Constructive Dialogue on Value Profiles: A Case in Automated Vehicle Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Steven M; Puylaert, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Following societal and policy pressures for responsible innovation, innovators are more and more expected to consider the broader socio-ethical context of their work, and more importantly, to integrate such considerations into their daily practices. This may require the involvement of 'outsiders' in innovation trajectories, including e.g. societal and governmental actors. However, methods on how to functionally organize such integration in light of responsible innovation have only recently started to emerge. We present an approach to do just that, in which we first develop value profiles of the involved actors, and second, design a workshop setting that allows innovators to develop design requirements in collaboration with representatives of parties that are not usually involved in such innovation design practices. Using a case study in automated vehicle development, we positively demonstrate the possibility and utility of our approach. We stress that in this study we wish to demonstrate the functionality of our developed method, and did not search for scientifically valid outcomes regarding this technical field.

  2. Strategies for implementing transit priority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    Increased urbanization in Canada has placed pressure on an eroding, ageing infrastructure and raised concerns about declining air quality. In addition to reducing emissions, well-designed transit systems can reduce traffic and improve road safety. This paper presented a set of transit best practices which addressed the need to improve supply, influence demand, and make operational improvements with the least environmental impact. The objective of this paper was to gather the best implementation strategies for urban roads from municipalities across Canada, and to focus on solutions that can be applied to bus and streetcar systems to make better use of shared facilities. Bus bulbs, signal priority, queue jumps and green waves were recommended, as well as dedicated lanes and exclusive transit facilities. Advances in technology were reviewed, as well as the use of intelligent transportation systems to improve transit with little or no impact on other road users. Case studies were presented from various municipalities across Canada. Various stages of project development, design and construction, operations and maintenance strategies for the various projects were reviewed. The most successful installations were found to be in cities that have established a clear policy on transit improvements. It was suggested that defining the need for priority and determining where it can be implemented is central to the development of a strategic program. Dedicated programs looking at transit priority were recommended, and risks arising from integrating new infrastructure were reviewed. It was suggested that the range of stakeholders involved, and the internal organization of the implementing authority bore a significant impact on overall cost and schedule of transit projects. It was concluded that appropriate planning is needed to control risks. 20 refs., 3 figs

  3. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program seeks to deliver needed technologies, timely and cost-effectively, to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The scope of characterizations monitoring, and sensor technology needs that are required by those organizations encompass: (1) initial location and characterization of wastes and waste environments - prior to treatment; (2) monitoring of waste retrieval, remediation and treatment processes; (3) characterization of the co-position of final waste treatment forms to evaluate the performance of waste treatments processes; and (4) site closure and compliance monitoring. Wherever possible, the CMST-IP fosters technology transfer and commercialization of technologies that it sponsors

  4. Change Requires Change! Information Technology, Student Preparedness and Industry Collaboration: Supporting the Bridging Process between Education and Training with Innovative Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Anne O'Sullivan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper, Change Requires Change: will relate that bridging the gap between education: of what we teach and training: of what industry looks for in prepared skills for students, needs to be relevant to today's situations. We need to re-evaluate traditional industry academic partnerships which have been relatively successful including; internships, work-study programs, curriculum advisory boards, guest lectures and capstone courses, to identify gaps and opportunities for what is needed to support our future. Do we want to continue with the status-quo or enhance education? Should we be cognizant of emerging trends? What could be the implications on changing academic-industry partnerships? How can we improve? This paper proposes several new approaches to academics and industry practitioner's towards greater successful collaborations towards student preparation.

  5. Understanding & modeling bus transit driver availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Bus transit agencies are required to hire extraboard (i.e. back-up) operators to account for unexpected absences. Incorrect sizing of extra driver workforce is problematic for a number of reasons. Overestimating the appropriate number of extraboard o...

  6. Seamless Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Naumchev, Alexandr; Meyer, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Popular notations for functional requirements specifications frequently ignore developers' needs, target specific development models, or require translation of requirements into tests for verification; the results can give out-of-sync or downright incompatible artifacts. Seamless Requirements, a new approach to specifying functional requirements, contributes to developers' understanding of requirements and to software quality regardless of the process, while the process itself becomes lighter...

  7. Addressing the Resource Requirements Mismatch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, William

    2003-01-01

    ... on the other, appear to be developing a requirements-resource mismatch. The goals and objectives of the transformation rhetoric intuitively resonate with the military's increasingly technologic culture...

  8. Assessing the dynamic material criticality of infrastructure transitions: A case of low carbon electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelich, Katy; Dawson, David A.; Purnell, Phil; Knoeri, Christof; Revell, Ruairi; Busch, Jonathan; Steinberger, Julia K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a method to analyse material criticality of infrastructure transitions. • Criticality is defined as the potential for, and exposure to, supply disruption. • Our method is dynamic reducing the probability of lock-in to at-risk technologies. • We show that supply disruption potential is reducing but exposure is increasing. - Abstract: Decarbonisation of existing infrastructure systems requires a dynamic roll-out of technology at an unprecedented scale. The potential disruption in supply of critical materials could endanger such a transition to low-carbon infrastructure and, by extension, compromise energy security more broadly because low carbon technologies are reliant on these materials in a way that fossil-fuelled energy infrastructure is not. Criticality is currently defined as the combination of the potential for supply disruption and the exposure of a system of interest to that disruption. We build on this definition and develop a dynamic approach to quantifying criticality, which monitors the change in criticality during the transition towards a low-carbon infrastructure goal. This allows us to assess the relative risk of different technology pathways to reach a particular goal and reduce the probability of being ‘locked in’ to currently attractive but potentially future-critical technologies. To demonstrate, we apply our method to criticality of the proposed UK electricity system transition, with a focus on neodymium. We anticipate that the supply disruption potential of neodymium will decrease by almost 30% by 2050; however, our results show the criticality of low carbon electricity production increases ninefold over this period, as a result of increasing exposure to neodymium-reliant technologies

  9. Advancement in Engineering Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalia, Kartik; Rehman, M. Atiqur; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2016-01-01

    but to harvest those ideas, technology is a must. With the huge requirement of engineering equipment's, the industry needs specialists who can manage and operate these technologies. Detailed information about the merits and demerits of technology is also mentioned in this paper. Findings: Technology has affected...... the environment on a great scale; in some cases, technology is even replacing human being or use of manpower. So proper counter measures have been mentioned, which can be used to control and limit harmful effect....

  10. Hybrid Life Support System Technology Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, R. C.; Wetzel, J. P.; Richter, R. C.

    2018-02-01

    Demonstration of plant-based hybrid life support technologies in deep space will validate the function of these technologies for long duration missions, such as Mars transit, while providing dietary variety to improve habitability.

  11. Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

  12. STELLAR TRANSITS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10 6 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ∼10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  13. Radioisotope Power Systems Technology Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the RPS's technology portfolio is to advance performance of radioisotope power systems through new and novel innovations being developed and transitioned...

  14. Transit spectroscopy with GTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osorio M.R. Zapatero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to different ground-based surveys and space missions, nowadays we have a fairly large sample of discovered extra-solar planets to study and, without a doubt, this number will increase in the future. One of the most succesful techniques that allows us to prove the physical properties and atmospheric composition of these exoplanets is transmission spectroscopy. The level of precision that is require to measure these effects provides a technical challenge that is solved by using big telescopes and stable instruments to reach low noise levels. In this article, we will discuss the use of the 10m class telescope GTC to observed planetary transits in spectroscopic mode and some of the results that we are currently obtaining.

  15. Automated transit planning, operation, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Rongfang

    2016-01-01

    This book analyzes the successful implementations of automated transit in various international locations, such as Paris, Toronto, London, and Kuala Lumpur, and investigates the apparent lack of automated transit applications in the urban environment in the United States. The book begins with a brief definition of automated transit and its historical development. After a thorough description of the technical specifications, the author highlights a few applications from each sub-group of the automated transit spectrum. International case studies display various technologies and their applications, and identify vital factors that affect each system and performance evaluations of existing applications. The book then discusses the planning and operation of automated transit applications at both macro and micro levels. Finally, the book covers a number of less successful concepts, as well as the lessons learned, allow ng readers to gain a comprehensive understanding of the topic.

  16. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solis, Kyle Jameson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  17. For a citizen energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geze, Patrick; Bernon, Francoise; Alphandery, Claude; Albizzati, Amandine; Ballandras, Marc; Berland, Olivier; Peullemeulle, Justine; Causse, Laurent; Olivier, Dominique; Damerval, Francois; Lepage, Corinne; Dughera, Jacques; Bouchart, Christiane; Duracka, Nicolas; Ferrari, Albert; Noe, Julien; Soulias, Emmanuel; Gaspard, Albane; Greenwood, Marianne; Guy, Lionel; Kretzschmar, Cyril; Lalu, Delphine; Naett, Caroline; Raguet, Alex; Rouchon, Jean-Philippe; Ruedinger, Andreas; Sautter, Christian; Tudor, Ivan; Vaquie, Pierre-Francois; Vernier, Christophe; Youinou, Jean-Michel; Verny, Emmanuel; Claustre, Raphael; Leclercq, Michel

    2015-09-01

    This publication by a think tank specialised in social and solidarity economy first outlines that energy transition means a transition from the present energy model to a new model based on three pillars: a drastic reduction of energy consumption through sobriety (energy saving, struggle against wastage), an improvement of energy efficiency, and an energy mix based on renewable and sustainable resources. A first part proposes a discussion of what 'citizen' energy transition can be: general framework of energy transition, pioneering examples in Europe, citizen empowerment, importance of a decentralised model which is anchored in territories, general interest as a priority. Each of these issues and aspects is illustrated by examples. Then, as this evolution towards a citizen-based model requires a change of scale, the authors discuss how to involve public authorities and to adapt regulation, how to develop financing tools, how to support the emergence and development of projects, and how to be part of international dynamics. The author then discuss what their think tank can do to accelerate energy transition. Proposals made in the different chapters are then summarized

  18. Financing environmental and energy transition - Opinion of the Economic, Social and Environmental Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virlouvet, Gael

    2013-09-01

    point of the transition: it must be financed by stakeholders in the field, and supported by financial stakeholders. Ecological transition must be properly appropriated by citizens and offer them a future of new prosperity: new jobs, improvement of well-being, the equitable sharing of effort and reduction of inequalities. The financing of ecological and energy transition requires three categories of investments: firstly, training, mobilisation and support for change, then new technological solutions, and finally the maintenance and improvement of existing solutions

  19. Maglev trains key underlying technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhigang; Li, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    The motion of the train depends on the traction of linear motors in the vehicle. This book describes a number of essential technologies that can ensure the safe operation of Maglev trains, such as suspension and orientation technologies, network control and diagnosis technologies. This book is intended for researchers, scientists, engineers and graduate students involved in the rail transit industry, train control and diagnosis, and Maglev technology.

  20. 19 CFR 123.41 - Truck shipments transiting Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Truck shipments transiting Canada. 123.41 Section... OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO United States and Canada In-Transit Truck Procedures § 123.41 Truck shipments transiting Canada. (a) Manifest required. Trucks with merchandise...

  1. Health technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, Delphine; Dangleant, Caroline; Ganier, Aude; Kaczmarek, Delphine

    2008-01-01

    The CEA is an organization with a primarily technological focus, and one of the key areas in which it carries out research is Health Technology. This field of research was recognized and approved by the French Atomic Energy Committee on July 20, 2004. The expectations of both the public and health care professionals relate to demands for the highest standards of health care, at minimum risk. This implies a need to diagnose illness and disease as accurately and as at early a stage as possible, to target surgery precisely to deal only with damaged organs or tissues, to minimize the risk of side effects, allergies and hospital-acquired infections, to follow-up and, as far as possible, tailor the health delivery system to each individual's needs and his or her lifestyle. The health care sector is subject to rapid changes and embraces a vast range of scientific fields. It now requires technological developments that will serve to gather increasing quantities of useful information, analyze and integrate it to obtain a full understanding of highly complex processes and to be able to treat the human body as un-invasively as possible. All the technologies developed require assessment, especially in the hospital environment. (authors)

  2. Biodiesel Mass Transit Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The Biodiesel Mass Transit Demonstration report is intended for mass transit decision makers and fleet managers considering biodiesel use. This is the final report for the demonstration project implemented by the National Biodiesel Board under a gran...

  3. Public Transit Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — fixed rail transit stations within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of transit that are serviced...

  4. Transition Matrix Cluster Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Yevick, David; Lee, Yong Hwan

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that a series of simple procedures for increasing the efficiency of transition matrix calculations can be realized by integrating the standard single-spin reversal transition matrix method with global cluster inversion techniques.

  5. Transit operator absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    A nationwide survey of transit operators indicated that absenteeism among transit operators is a significant problem and that the associated costs are substantial. The objective of the research reported here was to determine the scope of operator abs...

  6. Transition and Closeout of the Former DOE Mound Plant Site: Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, C. P.; Marks, M. L.; Smiley, S.L.; Gallaher, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) manages the Miamisburg Closure Project (MCP) by cleaning up the Mound site, located in Miamisburg, Ohio, to specific environmental standards, conveying all excess land parcels to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation, and transferring all continuing DOE post-closure responsibilities to the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Presently, the EM cleanup contract of the Mound site with CH2M Hill Mound Inc. is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2006. LM manages the Mound transition efforts and also post-closure responsibilities at other DOE sites via a contract with the S.M. Stoller Corporation. The programmatic transfer from EM to LM is scheduled to take place on October 1, 2006. The transition of the Mound site has required substantial integration and coordination between the EM and LM. Several project management principles have been implemented to help facilitate the transfer of programmatic responsibility. As a result, several lessons learned have been identified to help streamline and improve integration and coordination of the transfer process. Lessons learned from the Mound site transition project are considered a work in progress and have been summarized according to a work breakdown structure for specific functional areas in the transition schedule. The functional areas include program management, environmental, records management, information technology, property management, stakeholder and regulatory relations, procurement, worker pension and benefits, and project closeout. Specific improvements or best practices have been recognized and documented by the Mound transition team. The Mound site is one of three major cleanup sites within the EM organization scheduled for completion in 2006. EM, EM cleanup contractor, LM, and LM post-closure contractor have identified lessons learned during the transition and closure of the Mound site. The transition effort from

  7. Energy and population: transitional issues and eventual limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbos, P J

    1990-08-01

    The implication of population size for US energy requirements is explored in this essay. The basic argument is that the present supply of fuels and energy technologies is not sustainable in the long run, that a wide range of choices is possible when a complete transition is made to sustainable technologies, and that the growth of population and the composition of this growth during the next 30 years are the most serious problems impacting on the achievement of sustainable technology. The importance and future of fuel oil is discussed as well as the transition to sustainable energy supplies: conservation, renewables, nuclear and coal. Dependency on oil can only be changed through time and the infusion of money, but even with these givens, the transition is also dependent on the political and budgetary climate. The race is between crisis and cure. It is argued that the soft energy systems (biomass, solar water heater, wind, hydro, and geothermal energy) along with conservation will increase easily and naturally, but the total potential from these sources amounts to only 10% of the present US energy supply. Conservation offers greater hope because 80% of end-use fossil fuel is used in transportation and industry. Further growth of the population in the US would create a demand to desalinate water, which would increase the demand for energy. A totally soft energy economy is probably not feasible without a drastic reduction in US population. The expected direction is in the increased use of coal, and then nuclear energy. Unfortunately, coal contributes to greenhouse warming, and the supply is limited to 60-100 years. Nuclear proliferation and terrorism is connected to the widespread use of nuclear energy. Some breakthrough technology with cold fusion may offer a safer alternative. High technology renewables such as solar cells can be competitive with nuclear energy, if prices can be kept down. on earth or in space, are being investigated. Exploring a variety of advanced

  8. Building the vision, a series of AZTech ITS model deployment success stories for the Phoenix metropolitan area : number ten : high-tech transit, using state-of-the art technology to keep bus riders informed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, the biggest problem experienced by transit riders is a lack of information. They may not have access to a bus schedule. Or, even if they do have a copy of the Bus Book, they have no way of : knowing if their particular bus is on schedu...

  9. Three is a crowd? Exploring the potential of crowdfunding for renewable energy in the Netherlands : New approaches for transitions to low fossil carbon societies: promoting opportunities for effective development, diffusion andimplementation of technologies, policies and strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasileiadou, E.; Huijben, J.C.C.M.; Raven, R.P.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41331927X

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is a huge gap between demand and supply of finance for energy transitions, and the financial and economic crisis have had a negative impact in the already meagre funds for transforming the energy system towards renewable sources. In this paper we explore whether crowdfunding for

  10. Origins of evolutionary transitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An `evolutionary transition in individuality' or `major transition' is a transformation in the hierarchical level at which natural selection operates on a population. In this article I give an abstract (i.e. level-neutral and substrate-neutral) articulation of the transition process in order to precisely understand how such processes can ...

  11. Microwave stability at transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Colestock, P.L.

    1995-05-01

    The question of microwave stability at transition is revisited using a Vlasov approach retaining higher order terms in the particle dynamics near the transition energy. A dispersion relation is derived which can be solved numerically for the complex frequency in terms of the longitudinal impedance and other beam parameters. Stability near transition is examined and compared with simulation results

  12. Transit manager's handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This handbook provides an overview of public transit in Iowa and how to do business with the Iowa Department of Transportation (Iowa DOT) Office of Public Transit (OPT). It is intended to be a tool to assist transit managers navigate through the many...

  13. Modeling for Transition Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, Emile J L; Dijkema, Gerard P.J.

    2015-01-01

    A framework for the modeling and simulation of transitions is presented. A transition, “substantial change in the state of a socio-technical system”, typically unfolds over a long timespan. We therefore suggest to use simulation to inform transition managers on the effect of their decisions.

  14. Transit labor relations guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    This report is designed as a guide for those involved in labor relations in the transit industry. It begins with a history of transit labor relations. The economic, political, and legal environment of transit relations is then discussed. A section fo...

  15. Training for Technology Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monds, Fabian; van Barneveld, Dick

    1988-01-01

    Describes the structures and features of two training programs to help graduate technologists make the transition from full-time education to successful entrepreneurial activity: European Technology Entrepreneurs Programme operating in Northern Ireland and Temporal Entrepreneural Placement operating in Netherlands. Concludes that technology…

  16. Tool-based requirement traceability between requirement and design artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Turban, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Processes for developing safety-critical systems impose special demands on ensuring requirements traceability. Achieving valuable traceability information, however, is especially difficult concerning the transition from requirements to design. Bernhard Turban analyzes systems and software engineering theories cross-cutting the issue (embedded systems development, systems engineering, software engineering, requirements engineering and management, design theory and processes for safety-critical systems). As a solution, the author proposes a new tool approach to support designers in their thinkin

  17. Building professional capacity in ITS : assessment of ITS training and education needs : the transit perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    If there are to be successful deployments of new technologies by transit operators, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) recognizes a great need exists for further professional development. This consists of enhancing the knowledge and skills base...

  18. An Institutional Approach to Understanding Energy Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Auriane Magdalena

    Energy is a central concern of sustainability because how we produce and consume energy affects society, economy, and the environment. Sustainability scientists are interested in energy transitions away from fossil fuels because they are nonrenewable, increasingly expensive, have adverse health effects, and may be the main driver of climate change. They see an opportunity for developing countries to avoid the negative consequences fossil-fuel-based energy systems, and also to increase resilience, by leap-frogging-over the centralized energy grid systems that dominate the developed world. Energy transitions pose both challenges and opportunities. Obstacles to transitions include 1) an existing, centralized, complex energy-grid system, whose function is invisible to most users, 2) coordination and collective-action problems that are path dependent, and 3) difficulty in scaling up RE technologies. Because energy transitions rely on technological and social innovations, I am interested in how institutional factors can be leveraged to surmount these obstacles. The overarching question that underlies my research is: What constellation of institutional, biophysical, and social factors are essential for an energy transition? My objective is to derive a set of "design principles," that I term institutional drivers, for energy transitions analogous to Ostrom's institutional design principles. My dissertation research will analyze energy transitions using two approaches: applying the Institutional Analysis and Development Framework and a comparative case study analysis comprised of both primary and secondary sources. This dissertation includes: 1) an analysis of the world's energy portfolio; 2) a case study analysis of five countries; 3) a description of the institutional factors likely to promote a transition to renewable-energy use; and 4) an in-depth case study of Thailand's progress in replacing nonrenewable energy sources with renewable energy sources. My research will

  19. Highlights from a Mach 4 Experimental Demonstration of Inlet Mode Transition for Turbine-Based Combined Cycle Hypersonic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Lancert E.; Saunders, John D., Jr.; Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is focused on technologies for combined cycle, air-breathing propulsion systems to enable reusable launch systems for access to space. Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems offer specific impulse (Isp) improvements over rocket-based propulsion systems in the subsonic takeoff and return mission segments along with improved safety. Among the most critical TBCC enabling technologies are: 1) mode transition from the low speed propulsion system to the high speed propulsion system, 2) high Mach turbine engine development and 3) innovative turbine based combined cycle integration. To address these challenges, NASA initiated an experimental mode transition task including analytical methods to assess the state-of-the-art of propulsion system performance and design codes. One effort has been the Combined-Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE-LIMX) which is a fully integrated TBCC propulsion system with flowpath sizing consistent with previous NASA and DoD proposed Hypersonic experimental flight test plans. This experiment was tested in the NASA GRC 10 by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) Facility. The goal of this activity is to address key hypersonic combined-cycle engine issues including: (1) dual integrated inlet operability and performance issues-unstart constraints, distortion constraints, bleed requirements, and controls, (2) mode-transition sequence elements caused by switching between the turbine and the ramjet/scramjet flowpaths (imposed variable geometry requirements), and (3) turbine engine transients (and associated time scales) during transition. Testing of the initial inlet and dynamic characterization phases were completed and smooth mode transition was demonstrated. A database focused on a Mach 4 transition speed with limited off-design elements was developed and will serve to guide future TBCC system studies and to validate higher level analyses.

  20. Fuel cell vehicle technologies, infrastructure and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) use hydrogen as fuel and exhaust only water and heat. They : provide driving ranges and fueling times comparable to gasoline vehicles. Despite the advantages, : FCEVs have been in and out of the spot light of the a...