WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology success stories

  1. Education Technology Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M.; Bleiberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology are enabling dramatic changes in education content, delivery, and accessibility. Throughout history, new technologies have facilitated the exponential growth of human knowledge. In the early twentieth century, the focus was on the use of radios in education. But since then, innovators have seen technology as a way to improve…

  2. Norwegian petroleum technology. A success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In many ways, the Norwegian petroleum industry is an economic and technological fairy tale. In the course of a little more than 30 years Norway has developed a petroleum industry with world class products and solutions. This book highlights some of the stories behind this Norwegian success. A strong Norwegian home market has helped Norwegian industries to develop technologies in the absolute forefront. In some important areas, like the subsea market, the Norwegian 'oil cluster' became world leaders through companies like Vetco, Aker Kvaerner and FMC Technologies. Advanced products for the domestic market, with cost effective and flexible solutions, are also sought after in the international market place. Norwegian companies are now involved in some of the world's foremost projects, from Sakhalin in the east to Brazil in the west and Angola in the south. Norway, with its 4.5 million inhabitants, is a very small country indeed. As an energy supplier, however, Norway will play an increasingly important role. This will require an even stronger emphasis on research, competence and technology development. Today some 75.000 highly qualified people are working directly in the Norwegian petroleum industry, where the domestic market is still strong with large field developments like Snoehvit and Ormen Lange. Norway has established a unique Petroleum Fund, which currently is passing $ 160 billion, and political leaders in resource rich oil countries are looking to Norway for inspiration and guidance. This book describes some of the best technology stories that have emerged from Norwegian research institutions. Financial support, text and illustrations from the companies and institutions presented in the book have made its publication possible and are gratefully acknowledged. An editorial committee has been responsible for producing the book under the chairmanship of Research Director Ole Lindefjeld of ConocoPhillips, who once demonstrated a multiplier effect of at least 15

  3. Federal Technology Transfer Act Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) partnerships demonstrate the many advantages of technology transfer and collaboration. EPA and partner organizations create valuable and applicable technologies for the marketplace.

  4. Hanford technology integration: A success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenehjem, E.J.; Pond, D.J.; Widrig, J.E.; Deonigi, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes recent activities of the Richland Northwest Laboratory in the area of technology transfer. A major thrust within major DOE laboratories has been the implementation of technology transfer activities which transfer scientific knowledge, transfer technologies developed to deal with the production or conservation of energy, and transfer spinoff technologies into the private sector. Several activities which are in process or have been implemented are described in this paper

  5. OUT Success Stories: Solar Hot Water Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clyne, R.

    2000-08-31

    Solar hot water technology was made great strides in the past two decades. Every home, commercial building, and industrial facility requires hot water. DOE has helped to develop reliable and durable solar hot water systems. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors. Flat-plate collectors are commonly used in residential hot water systems and can be integrated into the architectural design of the building.

  6. OUT Success Stories: Solar Hot Water Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyne, R.

    2000-08-01

    Solar hot water technology was made great strides in the past two decades. Every home, commercial building, and industrial facility requires hot water. DOE has helped to develop reliable and durable solar hot water systems. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors. Flat-plate collectors are commonly used in residential hot water systems and can be integrated into the architectural design of the building.

  7. Using Esri Story Map Technology to Demonstrate SERVIR Global Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E. C.; Flores, A.; Muench, R.; Coulter, D.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.

    2016-12-01

    A joint development initiative of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), SERVIR works in partnership with leading regional organizations world-wide to help developing countries build their capacity to use information provided by Earth observing satellites and geospatial technologies for managing climate and weather risks, food security and agriculture, land use change, water resources, and natural disaster response. The SERVIR network currently includes 4 regional hubs: Eastern and Southern Africa, Hindu-Kush-Himalaya, the Lower Mekong region, and West Africa, and has completed project activities in the Mesoamerica region. SERVIR has activities in over 40 countries, has developed 70 custom tools, and has collaborated with 155 institutions to apply current state of the art science and technology to decision making. Many of these efforts have the potential to continue to influence decision-making at new institutions throughout the globe; however, engaging those stakeholders and society while maintaining a global brand identity is challenging. Esri story map technologies have allowed the SERVIR network to highlight the applications of SERVIR projects. Conventional communication approaches have been used in SERVIR to share success stories of our geospatial projects; however, the power of Esri story telling offers a great opportunity to convey effectively the impacts of the geospatial solutions provided through SERVIR to end users. This paper will present use cases of how Esri story map technologies are being used across the SERVIR network to effectively communicate science to SERVIR users and general public. The easy to use design templates and interactive user interface are ideal for highlighting SERVIR's diverse products. In addition, the SERVIR team hopes to continue using story maps for project outreach and user engagement.

  8. INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND LOCALIZATION: SUCCESS STORIES IN NUCLEAR BRANCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia V. Chernyakhovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available countries are considering nuclear power industry development [2, p. 3; 3, p. 3; 4]. For newcomer-countries it is of great importance to stimulate the national industry through NPP projects implementation based on technology transfer and localization (TTL. The study and systematization of world experience is useful in purpose to elaborate the national industry development programs. Objectives. The aim of article is to determine success factors of TTL; tasks: 1 to study TTL international experience in the fi eld of nuclear power technologies; 2 on the ground of the world practice to analyze preconditions, contents, stages, arrangement modes, formats and results of TTL. Methods. The following methods are utilized in the study: analysis and synthesis including problem-chronological, cause and eff ect and logical analysis and historical-diachronic method (method of periodization. Results. The following conclusions presented below have been made on the basis of the three cases study related to nuclear industry development using TTL (France, South Korea and China. Conclusions. The TTL success factors includes: Government support that provides long-term governmental development plan of nuclear power and industry for nuclear power based on TTL, and an appropriate international cooperation (under favorable conditions of “NPP buyers market”; Complex approach to implementation of the national TTL program and NPP construction projects: signing of NPP construction contracts with vendors stipulating technology transfer; NPP designing and constructing should be performed jointly with training and transferring of technical documentation and software. Technology transfer cooperation should be implemented through the licenses agreements and setting up joint ventures; Public acceptance and support.

  9. Technology transfer: A cooperative agreement and success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reno, H.W.; McNeel, K.; Armstrong, A.T.; Vance, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and Envirocare of Utah, Inc., wherein the former transferred macroencapsulative technology to the latter for purposes of demonstrating commercialization of treatment and disposal of 225, 000 Kg of radioactive lead stored at departmental installations

  10. ACTS – SUCCESS STORY

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. ACTS – SUCCESS STORY. Totally 103 experiments were conducted and the programme succeeded in the areas. Medicine; Education; Defence; Emergency Response; Maritime and Aeronautical Mobile Communications; Science and Astronomy.

  11. A compendium of energy conservation success stories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office/endash/Energy Utilization Research/endash/sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  12. A Compendium of Energy Conservation Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office{endash}Energy Utilization Research{endash}sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  13. Bangladesh becomes "success story".

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The State Minister for Health and Family of Bangladesh, Dr. Mohammed Amanullah, highlighted some of the successes being achieved by his country in lowering fertility and improving the lives of the people since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Some of these successes include practical measures to eliminate violence against women; introduction of a quota for women in public sector employment; and launching of the Health and Population Sector Program to provide a one-stop, full range of essential reproductive health, family planning and child health services through an integrated delivery mechanism. Moreover, the Minister informed the Forum participants that their success is attributable to many factors which include support from the government, from non-governmental organizations, civil society, mass media, religious and other community leaders, intersectoral collaboration, microcredit and income-generation activities.

  14. OUT Success Stories: Sunrayce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, G.

    2000-01-01

    This long-distance solar car race provides a unique opportunity to increase America's awareness of a variety of important issues: renewable energy sources and technologies, environmentally clean energy options, improvements in transportation and opportunities in new, fast-growing energy-related businesses

  15. European Success Stories in Industrial Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban, Maria J; Lery, Thibaut; Maday, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    This unique book presents real world success stories of collaboration between mathematicians and industrial partners, showcasing first-hand case studies, and lessons learned from the experiences, technologies, and business challenges that led to the successful development of industrial solutions based on mathematics. It shows the crucial contribution of mathematics to innovation and to the industrial creation of value, and the key position of mathematics in the handling of complex systems, amplifying innovation. Each story describes the challenge that led to the industrial cooperation, how the

  16. Research and Energy Efficiency: Selected Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, P. W.; Garland, R. W.

    1997-06-26

    Energy use and energy technology play critical roles in the U.S. economy and modern society. The Department of Energy (DOE) conducts civilian energy research and development (R&D) programs for the purpose of identifying promising technologies that promote energy security, energy efficiency, and renewable energy use. DOE-sponsored research ranges from basic investigation of phenomena all the way through development of applied technology in partnership with industry. DOE`s research programs are conducted in support of national strategic energy objectives, however austere financial times have dictated that R&D programs be measured in terms of cost vs. benefit. In some cases it is difficult to measure the return on investment for the basic "curiosity-driven" research, however many applied technology development programs have resulted in measurable commercial successes. The DOE has published summaries of their most successful applied technology energy R&D programs. In this paper, we will discuss five examples from the Building Technologies area of the DOE Energy Efficiency program. Each story will describe the technology, discuss the level of federal funding, and discuss the returns in terms of energy savings, cost savings, or national economic impacts.

  17. Success Stories in Year-Round Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    Reports success stories from three communities that have changed to year-round education. Lists address of contact persons at the schools and of the National Association for Year-Round Education. (MLF)

  18. The California cogeneration success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neiggemann, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter describes the involvement of Southern California Gas Company(SoCalGas) in the promotion and demonstration of the benefits of cogeneration in California. The topics covered in this chapter are market strategy, cogeneration program objectives, cogeneration program, incentive cofunding, special gas rate, special service priority, special gas pressure and main options, advertising, promotional brochures and handbooks, technical support, program accomplishments, cogeneration outlook, and reasons for success of the program

  19. A Risk Communication Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peecook, Keith

    2010-01-01

    A key success of the decommissioning effort at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Plum Brook Reactor Facility (PBRF) has been the public outreach program. The approach has been based on risk communications rather than a public relations approach. As a result it has kept the public feeling more involved in the process. It ensures they have the information needed to understand the project and its goals, and to make recommendations. All this is done so that NASA can better plan and execute the necessary work without delays or suprises.

  20. Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-10-13

    ISBN: 9781552504611. Download PDF · Read the e-book · Order the book. Les exemples présentés dans Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture illustrent la nature unique de l'aquaculture en Asie et cernent, pour la première fois, le parcours et ...

  1. Dangote cement : an African success story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akinyoade, A.; Uche, C.U.

    2016-01-01

    This paper critiques the rise of Dangote Cement plc to become the dominant player in the Nigerian cement industry. Although the close relationship between the company's founder, Aliko Dangote, and subsequent Nigerian governments has been an important factor in this success story, we argue that it is

  2. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McNeilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson’s School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The “minimal-marking” concept (Haswell, 1983, which requires dramatically more student engagement, resulted in more successful learning outcomes for surface-level knowledge acquisition than the more traditional approach of “teacher-corrects-all.” Results suggest it would be effective, not just for grammar, punctuation, and word usage, the objective here, but for any material that requires rote-memory learning, such as the Associated Press or Canadian Press style rules used by news publications across North America.

  3. A Canadian isotope success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides some historical background on the commercial production of radioisotopes in Canada, and the evolution of the present vendor, MDS Nordion. The chief isotopes are molybdenum 99, iodine 131, and cobalt 60. Cobalt 60 for medical sterilization and irradiation is considered to be a significant growing market. Food irradiation is believed to be a big marketing opportunity, although attempts to popularize it have so far met with limited success. Candu reactors supply the bulk of the world's 60 Co supply. Eighty percent of the world's 99 Mo supply for medical imaging comes from Canada, and is at present produced in NRU Reactor, which is to be replaced by two Maple reactors coming into production in 1999 and 2000

  4. The success story of crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Diffractionists usually place the birth of crystallography in 1912 with the first X-ray diffraction experiment of Friedrich, Knipping and Laue. This discovery propelled the mathematical branch of mineralogy to global importance and enabled crystal structure determination. Knowledge of the geometrical structure of matter at atomic resolution had revolutionary consequences for all branches of the natural sciences: physics, chemistry, biology, earth sciences and material science. It is scarcely possible for a single person in a single article to trace and appropriately value all of these developments. This article presents the limited, subjective view of its author and a limited selection of references. The bulk of the article covers the history of X-ray structure determination from the NaCl structure to aperiodic structures and macromolecular structures. The theoretical foundations were available by 1920. The subsequent success of crystallography was then due to the development of diffraction equipment, the theory of the solution of the phase problem, symmetry theory and computers. The many structures becoming known called for the development of crystal chemistry and of data banks. Diffuse scattering from disordered structures without and with partial long-range order allows determination of short-range order. Neutron and electron scattering and diffraction are also mentioned.

  5. The program success story: a valuable tool for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinghouze, Rene; Price, Ann Webb; Smith, Kisha-Ann

    2007-10-01

    Success stories are evaluation tools that have been used by professionals across disciplines for quite some time. They are also proving to be useful in promoting health programs and their accomplishments. The increasing popularity of success stories is due to the innovative and effective way that they increase a program's visibility, while engaging potential participants, partners, and funders in public health efforts. From the community level to the federal level, program administrators are using success stories as vehicles for celebrating achievements, sharing challenges, and communicating lessons learned. Success stories are an effective means to move beyond the numbers and connect to readers-with a cause they can relate to and want to join. This article defines success stories and provides an overview of several types of story formats, how success stories can be systematically collected, and how they are used to communicate program success.

  6. The story of laser brazing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Dierken, Roland

    2012-03-01

    This article gives an overview on the development of laser brazing technology as a new joining technique for car body production. The story starts with fundamental research work at German institutes in 1993, continues with the first implementations in automobile production in 1998, gives examples of applications since then and ends with an outlook. Laser brazing adapted design of joints and boundary conditions for a safe processing are discussed. Besides a better understanding for the sensitivity of the process against joint irregularities and misalignment, the key to successful launch was an advanced system technology. Different working heads equipped with wire feeding device, seam tracking system or tactile sensors for an automated teaching are presented in this paper. Novel laser heads providing a two beam technology will allow improved penetration depth of the filler wire and a more ecological processing by means of energy consumption.

  7. DMD reliability: a MEMS success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) developed by Texas Instruments (TI) has made tremendous progress in both performance and reliability since it was first invented in 1987. From the first working concept of a bistable mirror, the DMD is now providing high-brightness, high-contrast, and high-reliability in over 1,500,000 projectors using Digital Light Processing technology. In early 2000, TI introduced the first DMD chip with a smaller mirror (14-micron pitch versus 17-micron pitch). This allowed a greater number of high-resolution DMD chips per wafer, thus providing an increased output capacity as well as the flexibility to use existing package designs. By using existing package designs, subsequent DMDs cost less as well as met our customers' demand for faster time to market. In recent years, the DMD achieved the status of being a commercially successful MEMS device. It reached this status by the efforts of hundreds of individuals working toward a common goal over many years. Neither textbooks nor design guidelines existed at the time. There was little infrastructure in place to support such a large endeavor. The knowledge we gained through our characterization and testing was all we had available to us through the first few years of development. Reliability was only a goal in 1992 when production development activity started; a goal that many throughout the industry and even within Texas Instruments doubted the DMD could achieve. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that we succeeded by exceeding the reliability goals.

  8. Learning "While" Working: Success Stories on Workplace Learning in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardinois, Rocio

    2011-01-01

    Cedefop's report "Learning while working: success stories on workplace learning in Europe" presents an overview of key trends in adult learning in the workplace. It takes stock of previous research carried out by Cedefop between 2003 and 2010 on key topics for adult learning: governance and the learning regions; social partner roles in…

  9. Science to compliance: The WIPP success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howarth, S.M.; Chu, M.S.; Shephard, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed to provide in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. The success of the program, however, is defined by the regulator in the context of compliance with performance criteria, rather than by the in-depth technical understanding typical of most scientific programs. The WIPP project was successful in making a transformation from science to compliance by refocusing and redirecting programmatic efforts toward the singular goal of meeting regulatory compliance requirements while accelerating the submittal of the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) by two months from the April 1994 Disposal Decision Plan (DDP) date of December 1996, and by reducing projected characterization costs by more than 40%. This experience is unparalleled within the radioactive waste management community and has contributed to numerous lessons learned from which the entire community can benefit

  10. Indonesia's family planning story: success and challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, T H; Hull, V J; Singarimbun, M

    1977-11-01

    A historical overview and descriptions of family planning programs in Indonesia are presented. 85 million of the 135 million inhabitants of the Indonesian archipelago are concentrated on the island of Java, which comprises about 7% of the Indonesian land mass. The Dutch colonial government preferred a policy ("transmigration") which advocated the redistribution of population from Java to the other islands to relieve overpopulation. This policy was also advocated by President Sukarno after the Indonesian Revolution of 1940. The need for family planning was recognized by small groups, and official policy supported national family planning programs to replace transmigration programs only after Sukarno became president in 1966. The focus of the program was on Java and Bali, the 2 most populous islands. Local clinics became the locus for birth control efforts. Fieldworkers affiliated with the clinics were given the job of advocating birth control use door-to-door. Fieldworkers "incentive programs," area "target" (quota) programs, and "special drives" were organized to create new contraceptive "acceptors." A data reporting system and a research program increase the effectiveness of the family planning drive by ascertaining trends in contraceptive use which can determine where and how money and effort can best be applied. "Village Contraception Distribution Centers" bring the contraceptive means closer to the people than do the clinics. Figures from the years 1969-1977 show the great increase in acceptance of contraceptives by the inhabitants of the Java-Bali area. Steps are now being taken to alleviate the large monthly variations in the number of (often temporary) acceptors caused by the "target programs" and "special drives." The average acceptor is 27-years-old, has 2.6 children, has not finished primary school, and has a husband of low social status. Bali has shown the greatest success in family planning. It is a small island with a highly developed system of local

  11. Introducing Interactive Technology--"Toy Story 3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    "To infinity and beyond!" is the catchphrase of Buzz Lightyear, Universe Protection Unit space ranger, a character in the Disney/Pixar "Toy Story" franchise. The three films in the franchise--"Toy Story," 1993; "Toy Story 2," 1999; and "Toy Story 3," 2010--incorporate an innovative blend of many different genres, having spun off video games and…

  12. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: A SUCCESS STORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mining Waste generated by active and inactive mining operations is a growing problem for the mining industry, local governments, and Native American communities because of its impact on human health and the environment. In the US, the reported volume of mine waste is immense: 2 b...

  14. Success factors in technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Universities in the U.S. have a significant impact on business through the transfer of technology. This paper describes goals and philosophy of the Technology Licensing Office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This paper also relates the critical factors for susscessful technology transfer, particularly relating to new business formation. These critical factors include the quality of the technology, the quality of the management, the quality of the investor, the passion for success, and the image of the company. Descriptions of three different levels of investment are also given and the most successful level of investment for starting a new company is reviewed. Licensing to large companies is also briefly reviewed, as this type of licensing requires some different strategies than that of licensing to start-up companies. High quality critical factors and intelligent investment create rewards for the parties and successful ventures.

  15. Artistic Technology Integration: Stories From Primary and Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Barbara; Shinas, Valerie Harlow; Van Vaerenewyck, Leah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform teachers about the ways technology can be integrated to add value to literacy instruction. Artistic technology-integrated literacy and disciplinary instruction in preK through grade 4 classrooms is described through the stories of five teachers who were identified as both strong teachers of literacy and…

  16. Solving a Health Information Management Problem. An international success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    The management of health care delivery requires the availability of effective 'information management' tools based on e-technologies [eHealth]. In developed economies many of these 'tools' are readily available whereas in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) there is limited access to eHealth technologies and this has been defined as the "digital divide". This paper provides a short introduction to the fundamental understanding of what is meant by information management in health care and how it applies to all social economies. The core of the paper describes the successful implementation of appropriate information management tools in a resource poor environment to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic and other disease states, in sub-Saharan Africa and how the system has evolved to become the largest open source eHealth project in the world and become the health information infrastructure for several national eHealth economies. The system is known as Open MRS [www.openmrs.org). The continuing successful evolution of the OpenMRS project has permitted its key implementers to define core factors that are the foundations for successful eHealth projects.

  17. Experimental forests and ranges : 100 years of research success stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail Wells; Deborah Hayes; Katrina Krause; Ann Bartuska; Susan LeVan-Green; Jim Anderson; Tivoli Gough; Mary Adams; Thomas Schuler; Randy Kolka; Steve Sebestyen; Laura Kenefic; John Brissette; Susan Stout; Keith Kanoti; Fred Swanson; Sarah Greene; Margaret Herring; Martin Ritchie; Carl Skinner; Tom Lisle; Elizabeth Keppeler; Leslie Reid; Peter Wohlegemuth; Stanley Kitchen; Ward McCaughey; Jim Guldin; Don Bragg; Michael Shelton; David Loftis; Cathryn Greenberg; Julia Murphy

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, Forest Service Research and Development celebrated the Centennial Anniversary of these Experimental Forests and Ranges. This publication celebrates the many scientists who over the course of decades conducted the long-term studies that began and are continuing to shed light on important natural resource issues. Story suggestions were solicited from the...

  18. A compendium of energy conservation: Success stories 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy proudly presents this summary of some its most successful projects and activities. The projects included in this document have made significant contributions to improving energy efficiency and fuel flexibility in the United States. The energy savings that can be realized from these projects are considerable. Americans have shown an impressive ability to reduce energy consumption since 1973. Studies show that 34 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy were saved in 1988 alone as a result of energy conservation and other factors. These savings, worth approximately $180 billion, represent more energy than the United States obtains from any other single source. The availability of new, energy-efficient technologies has been an important ingredient in achieving these savings. Federal efforts to develop and commercialize energy-saving technologies and processes are a part of the reason for this progress. Over the past 10 years, DOE has carefully invested more than $2 billion in hundreds of research and development (R D) projects to ensure the availability of advanced technology in the marketplace. These energy-efficient projects are carried out through DOE's Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy and reflect opportunities in the three energy-consuming, end-use sectors of the economy: buildings, transportation, and industry.

  19. A Compendium of Energy Conservation: Success Stories 90

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy proudly presents this summary of some its most successful projects and activities. The projects included in this document have made significant contributions to improving energy efficiency and fuel flexibility in the United States. The energy savings that can be realized from these projects are considerable. Americans have shown an impressive ability to reduce energy consumption since 1973. Studies show that 34 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy were saved in 1988 alone as a result of energy conservation and other factors. These savings, worth approximately $180 billion, represent more energy than the United States obtains from any other single source. The availability of new, energy-efficient technologies has been an important ingredient in achieving these savings. Federal efforts to develop and commercialize energy-saving technologies and processes are a part of the reason for this progress. Over the past 10 years, DOE has carefully invested more than $2 billion in hundreds of research and development (R&D) projects to ensure the availability of advanced technology in the marketplace. These energy-efficient projects are carried out through DOE's Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy and reflect opportunities in the three energy-consuming, end-use sectors of the economy: buildings, transportation, and industry.

  20. What is Working Today: Success stories in marketing, rights management, and more

    OpenAIRE

    Leary, Heather; Mower, Allyson; Armstrong, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This panel session will be a discussion of success stories by various IR Coordinators in their daily work with marketing, copyright clearance, workflow, distinctions between the Digital Library and IR, and more.

  1. Understanding Modelling in Technology and Science: The Potential of Stories from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Compton, Vicki J.; Gilbert, John K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tells the story of how two biotechnologists used models, one working as a technologist and the other as a scientist. These stories were collected during the development of the key ideas about the nature of technology and technological knowledge during the latest curriculum development in New Zealand. Their stories of how and why they…

  2. Success stories in landscape management for functional biodiversity: an assessment from 5 west-European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoo, de G.R.; Burgio, G.; Eggenschwiler, L.; Gerowitt, B.; Mante, J.; Powell, W.; Alebeek, van F.A.N.; Kragten, S.; Rossing, W.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    Within IOBC, a small scale inventory was made to collect success stories in landscape management for functional biodiversity. Five projects from different European countries were analysed to define the indicators in the people, planet and profit domains being seen as important for success. Projects

  3. DOE Success Stories: The Energy Mission in the Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Many outputs of Department of Energy research and development have had substantial economic success in the marketplace and have proven to be fundamentally important in technical areas, positioning U.S. industry at the forefront of global competition.

  4. OUT Success Stories: Renewable Energy at the Olympics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.

    2000-01-01

    Many energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies were featured at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. Most of the projects that contributed to the Olympics continue to provide a meaningful demonstration and learning experience for the people of Atlanta

  5. A Success Story of Organizing Small Scale Farmers in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    , will through this have a chance to contribute to national development, but to also enhance their own livelihood. The big problem of relying on small scale farmers is an organization model that ensures endurance and reliability. The Kenya Tea Development Agency (KTDA) has through almost 50 years been successful...... in integrating 600.000 smallholders in the tea production making tea number one income earner in Kenya and enhancing the livelihoods of the involved contract growers. The article argues that lessons should be learned from the success of KTDA in possibly replicating the organizational model to other crops...

  6. From Foster Care to College: Student Stories of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Tory

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the different factors that empower young adults that were in foster care to be successful in a college environment. It has been documented that foster youth have significant challenges during secondary education (Conger & Rebeck, 2001; Geenen & Powers, 2006). Due to these challenges,…

  7. Strategy: What Universities Can Learn from Corporate Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, Chandra

    2018-01-01

    This paper identifies the need to view strategic management and implementation with new insights from entrepreneurs and researchers who have attained and studied successful enterprises. The backdrop is the rate of disruption taking place all over the U.S. as well as globally. The objective is to understand major changes to garner ideas for more…

  8. A Quartet of Success Stories: How to Make Inclusion Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Leslie

    1996-01-01

    As the profiles of four mentally handicapped teenagers show, students with severe disabilities can benefit from being included in subject-area classes. To facilitate inclusion, teachers can allow peers to facilitate learning, prime students to be successful participants, give students valued roles, utilize existing expertise, and adapt the…

  9. OUT Success Stories: Photovoltaics in the National Parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchford, P.

    2000-01-01

    As part of its energy management program, the National Park Service (NPS) has been actively promoting energy conservation and the greater use of renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaics (PV). PV is proving to be a very effective way to produce electricity in our parks

  10. OUT Success Stories: Photovoltaic Deployment in West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strawn, N.

    2000-01-01

    Bringing electric power to thousands of people in India allows them to pump water electrically and to light their homes at night. For these applications, photovoltaic (PV) electricity is often the least expensive and most reliable power alternative. This market represents one of the largest and fastest growing sectors for renewable energy technology

  11. New Equipment, New Building, New Image: A Marketing Success Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Christine

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Rochester (New York) Public Library's expansion and renovation. Highlights include funding; public relations and marketing plans; access to state-of-the-art technology, including dial-in access; marketing surveys; connecting with local media; involvement of the private sector; and meeting users' heightened expectations for library…

  12. OUT Success Stories: Photovoltaic Deployment in West Bengal, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strawn, N.

    2000-08-31

    Bringing electric power to thousands of people in India allows them to pump water electrically and to light their homes at night. For these applications, photovoltaic (PV) electricity is often the least expensive and most reliable power alternative. This market represents one of the largest and fastest growing sectors for renewable energy technology.

  13. Selling a Story: How to Write a Successful Press Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Press releases are an important part of communicating new discoveries with the general public. However, if they are confusing or difficult to read then they are unlikely to be picked up by media outlets. This article details how to create a successful press release by addressing a series of points: learning how to identify the audience; writing text that is both eye catching and clear; including multimedia and contact details; getting your press release to the media; and timing.

  14. Success stories and emerging themes in conservation physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madliger, Christine L.; Cooke, Steven J.; Crespi, Erica J.; Funk, Jennifer L.; Hultine, Kevin R.; Hunt, Kathleen E.; Rohr, Jason R.; Sinclair, Brent J.; Suski, Cory D.; Willis, Craig K. R.; Love, Oliver P.

    2016-01-01

    The potential benefits of physiology for conservation are well established and include greater specificity of management techniques, determination of cause–effect relationships, increased sensitivity of health and disturbance monitoring and greater capacity for predicting future change. While descriptions of the specific avenues in which conservation and physiology can be integrated are readily available and important to the continuing expansion of the discipline of ‘conservation physiology’, to date there has been no assessment of how the field has specifically contributed to conservation success. However, the goal of conservation physiology is to foster conservation solutions and it is therefore important to assess whether physiological approaches contribute to downstream conservation outcomes and management decisions. Here, we present eight areas of conservation concern, ranging from chemical contamination to invasive species to ecotourism, where physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy. We also discuss the shared characteristics of these successes, identifying emerging themes in the discipline. Specifically, we conclude that conservation physiology: (i) goes beyond documenting change to provide solutions; (ii) offers a diversity of physiological metrics beyond glucocorticoids (stress hormones); (iii) includes approaches that are transferable among species, locations and times; (iv) simultaneously allows for human use and benefits to wildlife; and (v) is characterized by successes that can be difficult to find in the primary literature. Overall, we submit that the field of conservation physiology has a strong foundation of achievements characterized by a diversity of conservation issues, taxa, physiological traits, ecosystem types and spatial scales. We hope that these concrete successes will encourage the continued evolution and use of physiological tools within conservation-based research and

  15. Success stories and emerging themes in conservation physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madliger, Christine L; Cooke, Steven J; Crespi, Erica J; Funk, Jennifer L; Hultine, Kevin R; Hunt, Kathleen E; Rohr, Jason R; Sinclair, Brent J; Suski, Cory D; Willis, Craig K R; Love, Oliver P

    2016-01-01

    The potential benefits of physiology for conservation are well established and include greater specificity of management techniques, determination of cause-effect relationships, increased sensitivity of health and disturbance monitoring and greater capacity for predicting future change. While descriptions of the specific avenues in which conservation and physiology can be integrated are readily available and important to the continuing expansion of the discipline of 'conservation physiology', to date there has been no assessment of how the field has specifically contributed to conservation success. However, the goal of conservation physiology is to foster conservation solutions and it is therefore important to assess whether physiological approaches contribute to downstream conservation outcomes and management decisions. Here, we present eight areas of conservation concern, ranging from chemical contamination to invasive species to ecotourism, where physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy. We also discuss the shared characteristics of these successes, identifying emerging themes in the discipline. Specifically, we conclude that conservation physiology: (i) goes beyond documenting change to provide solutions; (ii) offers a diversity of physiological metrics beyond glucocorticoids (stress hormones); (iii) includes approaches that are transferable among species, locations and times; (iv) simultaneously allows for human use and benefits to wildlife; and (v) is characterized by successes that can be difficult to find in the primary literature. Overall, we submit that the field of conservation physiology has a strong foundation of achievements characterized by a diversity of conservation issues, taxa, physiological traits, ecosystem types and spatial scales. We hope that these concrete successes will encourage the continued evolution and use of physiological tools within conservation-based research and management

  16. Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards and success stories in disaster prevention and mitigation in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The Philippines, being a locus of typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, is a hotbed of disasters. Natural hazards inflict loss of lives and costly damage to property in the country. In 2011, after tropical storm Washi devastated cities in southern Philippines, the Department of Science and Technology put in place a responsive program to warn and give communities hours-in-advance lead-time to prepare for imminent hazards and use advanced science and technology to enhance geohazard maps for more effective disaster prevention and mitigation. Since its launch, there have been many success stories on the use of Project NOAH, which after Typhoon Haiyan was integrated into the Pre-Disaster Risk Assessment (PDRA) system of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), the government agency tasked to prepare for, and respond to, natural calamities. Learning from past disasters, NDRRMC now issues warnings, through scientific advise from DOST-Project NOAH and PAGASA (Philippine Weather Bureau) that are hazards-specific, area-focused and time-bound. Severe weather events in 2015 generated dangerous hazard phenomena such as widespread floods and massive debris flows, which if not for timely, accessible and understandable warnings, could have turned into disasters. We call these events as "disasters that did not happen". The innovative warning system of the Philippine government has so far proven effective in addressing the impacts of hydrometeorological hazards and can be employed elsewhere in the world.

  17. EPICS: A control system software co-development success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, M.; Gurd, D.; Lewis, S.; Thuot, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS) is the result of a software sharing and co-development effort of major importance now underway. The initial two participants, LANL and ANL, have now been joined by three other labs, and an earlier version of the software has been transferred to three commercial firms and is currently undergoing separate development. The reasons for EPICS's success may be useful to enumerate and explain and the desire and prospects for its continued development are certainly worth examining

  18. What history tells us XL. The success story of the expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 1. What history tells us XL. The success story of the expression 'genome editing'. Michel Morange. Series Volume 41 Issue 1 March 2016 pp 9-11. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/041/01/0009-0011 ...

  19. A Qualitative Analysis of Success Stories from Michiana Coordinated School Health Leadership Institute Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Natalie; Lohrmann, David K.; O'Neill, James; Clark, Jeffrey K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to detect and document common themes among success stories, along with challenges, as related by participants in the Michiana Coordinated School Health Leadership Institute. Four-member teams from 18 Michigan and Indiana school districts participated in semiannual Institute workshops over a 3-year period…

  20. What history tells us XL. The success story of the expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 1. What history tells us XL. The success story of the expression 'genome editing'. Michel Morange. Series Volume 41 Issue 1 March 2016 pp 9-11. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/041/01/0009-0011 ...

  1. Shifting Inductive Bias with Success-Story Algorithm, Adaptive Levin Search, and Incremental Self-Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidhuber, J.; Zhao, J.; Wiering, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    We study task sequences that allow for speeding up the learners average reward intake through appropriate shifts of inductive bias changes of the learner's policy. To evaluate long-term effects of bias shifts setting the stage for later bias shifts we use the "success-story algorithm" (SSA).SSA

  2. Ocular safety: a silent (in vitro) success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, Rodger D; Harbell, John W

    2002-12-01

    Ocular irritation testing has been one of the animal test methods most criticised by animal welfare advocates. Additional criticism has arisen from within the scientific community, based on the variability of the animal test results and the questionable relevance of the extremely high dose levels employed. As a result, the Draize eye irritation test has been one of the main targets for in vitro replacement. Despite extensive efforts, however, there is still no in vitro method that is fully validated as a regulatory replacement. In spite of this, many individual companies are using diverse in vitro ocular irritation tests to gain important safety and efficacy information about their products and raw materials, eliminating the need for animal testing in the process. This is done in a safe fashion by applying intelligent testing paradigms. ECVAM has played a major role in this success, through its many programmes that have emphasised the importance of understanding the true toxicological need, and then using in vitro tests to provide that information. Thus, even in the absence of a successfully validated regulatory assay, the desired result of reducing animal testing is being met.

  3. Success Stories in Control: Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA plays an important role in advancing the state of the art in flight control systems. In the case of Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) NASA supported initial implementation of the theory in an aircraft and demonstration in a space vehicle. Dr. Dale Enns of Honeywell Aerospace Advanced Technology performed this work in cooperation with NASA and under NASA contract. Honeywell and Lockheed Martin were subsequently contracted by AFRL to create "Design Guidelines for Multivariable Control Theory". This foundational work directly contributed to the advancement of the technology and the credibility of the control law as a design option. As a result Honeywell collaborated with Lockheed Martin to produce a Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion controller for the X-35 and subsequently Lockheed Martin did the same for the production Lockheed Martin F-35 vehicle. The theory behind NDI is to use a systematic generalized approach to controlling a vehicle. Using general aircraft nonlinear equations of motion and onboard aerodynamic, mass properties, and engine models specific to the vehicle, a relationship between control effectors and desired aircraft motion can be formulated. Using this formulation a control combination is used that provides a predictable response to commanded motion. Control loops around this formulation shape the response as desired and provide robustness to modeling errors. Once the control law is designed it can be used on a similar class of vehicle with only an update to the vehicle specific onboard models.

  4. Synchrotron light: A success story over six decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaritondo, G.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation research continues to be a major factor in the progress of science and technology, as it has been for more than half a century. We present different aspects of its history, starting with an unconventional approach: a fictional version, which should bring to light the reasons that make this field so broadly important. Then, we narrate the real history from three different points of view: the progress of electron accelerators, the evolution of synchrotron-based experiments, and the human factors. Finally, we discuss the present situation, characterized by the arrival of a new generation of sources with exceptional performances: the x-ray free electron lasers (x-FEL's).

  5. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botney, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  6. Hadoop distributed batch processing for Gaia: a success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riello, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The DPAC Cambridge Data Processing Centre (DPCI) is responsible for the photometric calibration of the Gaia data including the low resolution spectra. The large data volume produced by Gaia (~26 billion transits/year), the complexity of its data stream and the self-calibrating approach pose unique challenges for scalability, reliability and robustness of both the software pipelines and the operations infrastructure. DPCI has been the first in DPAC to realise the potential of Hadoop and Map/Reduce and to adopt them as the core technologies for its infrastructure. This has proven a winning choice allowing DPCI unmatched processing throughput and reliability within DPAC to the point that other DPCs have started following our footsteps. In this talk we will present the software infrastructure developed to build the distributed and scalable batch data processing system that is currently used in production at DPCI and the excellent results in terms of performance of the system.

  7. Process improvement: a multi-registry database abstraction success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrich, Victor; Rokey, Roxann; Devadas, Christopher; Uebel, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The St. Joseph Hospital/Marshfield Clinic Cardiac Database Registry submits data to the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) and to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database. Delayed chart abstraction is problematic, since hospital policy prohibits patient care clarifications made to the medical record more than 1 month after hospital discharge. This can also lead to late identification of missed care opportunities and untimely notification to providers. Our institution was 3.5 months behind in retrospective postdischarge case abstraction. A process improvement plan was implemented to shorten this delay to 1 month postdischarge. Daily demand of incoming cases and abstraction capacity were determined for 4 employees. Demand was matched to capacity, with the remaining time allocated to reducing backlog. Daily demand of new cases was 17.1 hours. Daily abstraction capacity was 24 hours, assuming 6 hours of effective daily abstraction time per employee, leaving 7 hours per day for backlogged case abstraction. The predicted time to reach abstraction target was 10 weeks. This was accomplished after 10 weeks, as predicted, leading to a 60% reduction of backlogged cases. The delay of postdischarge chart abstraction was successfully shortened from 3.5 months to 1 month. We intend to maintain same-day abstraction efficiency without reaccumulating substantial backlog.

  8. [Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) a success story in apical surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of apical surgery is to retain teeth with persistent apical pathosis following orthograde root canal treatment if endodontic non-surgical revision is difficult or associated with risks, or is even declined by the patient. Since the most frequent cause of recurrent apical disease is bacterial reinfection from the (remaining) root canal system, the bacteria-tight root-end filling is the most important step in apical surgery. In the early 1990s, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed at the Loma Linda University in California/USA. Preclinical studies clearly showed that MTA has a high sealing capability, a good material stability and an excellent biocompatbility. Multiple experimental studies in animals highlighted the mild tissue reactions observed adjacent to this material. Furthermore, histological analysis of the periapical regions demonstrated a frequent deposition of new cementum not only onto the resection plane (cut dentinal surface), but also directly onto MTA. For these reasons, MTA is considered a bioactive material. In 1997 MTA was cleared for clinical use in patients. Multiple prospective clinical and randomized studies have documented high and constant success rates of MTA-treated teeth in apical surgery. A recently published longitudinal study showed that MTA-treated teeth remained stable over five years; hence the high healed rates documented after one year are maintained during long-term observation.

  9. 10 Years of Car-2-X Communication - a Success Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischhof, Lars; Ebner, André

    2012-05-01

    For more than ten years, car-2-x communication has been a major topic of research in the scientific community and an important development focus for the automotive industry. First, this article takes a retrospective look at the evolution of car-2-x and the two different communication paradigms: decentralized car-2-car communication and centralized cellular solutions. Afterwards, a comparison of their technical advantages and limitations is presented, respectively. The result shows that in order to implement safety-relevant applications, car-2-car communication has strong advantages compared to cellular technologies but requires high market penetration. However, its introduction solely for safety applications is difficult since the required penetration will not be achieved until several years after initial deployment. Therefore, car-2-car communication must provide a benefit to the customer, even in the phase of market introduction. For this purpose, the article outlines an approach called SODAD (Segment-Oriented Data Abstraction and Dissemination). It offers a possibility to introduce decentralized vehicular applications with early customer benefit, in order to enable safety applications based on car-2-car communication on a long term.

  10. A recent Cleanroom success story: The Redwing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Philip A.

    1992-12-01

    Redwing is the largest completed Cleanroom software engineering project in IBM, both in terms of lines of code and project staffing. The product provides a decision-support facility that utilizes artificial intelligence (AI) technology for predicting and preventing complex operating problems in an MVS environment. The project used the Cleanroom process for development and realized a defect rate of 2.6 errors/KLOC, measured from first execution. This represents the total amount of errors that were found in testing and installation at three field test sites. Development productivity was 486 LOC/PM, which included all development labor expended in design specification through completion of incremental testing. In short, the Redwing team produced a complex systems software product with an extraordinarily low error rate, while maintaining high productivity. All of this was accomplished by a project team using Cleanroom for the first time. An 'introductory implementation' of Cleanroom was defined and used on Redwing. This paper describes the quality and productivity results, the Redwing project, and how Cleanroom was implemented.

  11. A recent Cleanroom success story: The Redwing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Redwing is the largest completed Cleanroom software engineering project in IBM, both in terms of lines of code and project staffing. The product provides a decision-support facility that utilizes artificial intelligence (AI) technology for predicting and preventing complex operating problems in an MVS environment. The project used the Cleanroom process for development and realized a defect rate of 2.6 errors/KLOC, measured from first execution. This represents the total amount of errors that were found in testing and installation at three field test sites. Development productivity was 486 LOC/PM, which included all development labor expended in design specification through completion of incremental testing. In short, the Redwing team produced a complex systems software product with an extraordinarily low error rate, while maintaining high productivity. All of this was accomplished by a project team using Cleanroom for the first time. An 'introductory implementation' of Cleanroom was defined and used on Redwing. This paper describes the quality and productivity results, the Redwing project, and how Cleanroom was implemented.

  12. Universal immunization in urban areas: Calcutta's success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, E R

    1990-01-01

    The Central Government of Calcutta, India aimed to immunize 85% (85,262) of the city's 12 month old infants against polio, diphtheria, measles, tuberculosis, pertussis and tetanus. The Universal Immunization Program (UIP) achieved this target 3 months earlier than intended. In fact, at the end of December 1990, it achieved 110.6% for DPT3, 142.16% for OPV3, 151.96% for BCG, and 97% for measles. UIP was able to surpass its targets by emphasizing team work. Government, the private sector, UNICEF, and the voluntary sector made up the Apex Coordination Committee on Immunization headed up by the mayor. The committee drafted an action plan which included routine immunization sessions on a fixed day and intensive immunization drives. Further the involved organizations pooled together cold chain equipment. In addition, the District Family Welfare Bureau was the distribution center for vaccines, syringes, immunization cards, report formats, vaccine carriers, and ice packs. Health workers administered immunizations from about 300 centers generally on Wednesday, National Immunization Day. Intensive immunization drives focused on measles immunizations. UIP leaders encouraged all center to routinely record coverage and submit monthly progress reports to the District Family Welfare Bureau. The Calcutta Municipal Corporation coordinated promotion activities and social mobilization efforts. Promotion included radio and TV announcements, newspaper advertisements, cinema slides, billboards, and posters. The original UIP plan to use professional communicators to mobilize communities was ineffective, so nongovernmental organizations entered the slums to encourage people to encourage their neighbors to immunize their children. Further Islamic, Protestant, and Catholic leaders encouraged the faithful to immunize their children. A UNICEF officer noted that this success must be sustained, however.

  13. Biomass energy success stories: a portfolio illustrating current economic uses of renewable biomass energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-03-01

    This second edition of the Biomass Energy Success Stories covers a wide range of examples of organizations which have experienced economic benefits by substituting renewable biomass energy for non-renewable fossil fuels. In addition to the broader spectrum of industry seen to be pursuing this approach, the cases illustrate a move towards innovative and technologically more sophisticated approaches. For example, the Quebec Community's thermal accumulator acts as a buffer to accommodate the variable fuel value of boiler fuel consisting of unpredictable residues of variable moisture content. By this innovative approach, the quality of steam to its year-round customer can be held within the contractual limits. Another unique development appears in the use of the LAMB-CARGATE wet cell burner which is able to cope with wood residue fuels containing up to 70% moisture. Two of the more interesting and promising developments in the race to substitute renewable energy for fossil fuels are Fluidized Bed and Fuel-alcohol on-farm distilleries. For this reason appendices are included giving some useful insights concerning them.

  14. SMD Technology Development Story for NASA Annual Technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the Nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by Agency goals, input from the science community-including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys-and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions-Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics-develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs. Often the breakthrough science required to answer these questions requires significant technological innovation-e.g., instruments or platforms with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. SMD's targeted technology investments fill technology gaps, enabling NASA to build the challenging and complex missions that accomplish groundbreaking science.

  15. Applications of a Case Library of Technology Integration Stories for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Kwei; Jonassen, David H.; Strobel, Johannes; Cernusca, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    Stories are the most natural form of communication and learning among humans. In this paper, we describe how we have designed and implemented an case library of technology integration stories to support pre-service and in-service teachers learning how to integrate technologies into their teaching. The case library was built using the artificial…

  16. Information technology boosts contractor's economic success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penny, M.; Vasey, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    This article will discuss the advantages of Information Technology (IT) and how one drilling contractor, Global Marine, has applied this technology. The company has applied it in an efficient manner which has provided business benefits and cost reductions that have helped its operations be more successful. The following are the different aspects of information technology that led to the contractor's success: cost reduction measures; migration to a client/server IT infrastructure; IT business benefits; and keys to obtaining business benefits from IT

  17. "Don't lock me out": life-story interviews of family business owners facing succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alexandra; Breunlin, Douglas; Panattoni, Katherine; Gustafson, Mara; Ransburg, David; Ryan, Carol; Hammerman, Thomas; Terrien, Jean

    2011-06-01

    This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to analyze life-story interviews obtained from 10 family business owners regarding their experiences in their businesses with the goal of understanding the complexities of family business succession. The grounded theory that emerged from this study is best understood as a potential web of constraints that can bear on the succession process. Coding of these interviews revealed four key influences, which seem to have the potential to facilitate or constrain the family business owner's approach to succession. Influence 1, "The business within," captures intrapsychic dynamics of differentiation and control. Influence 2, "The marriage," addresses how traditional gender roles shape succession. Influence 3, "The adult children," examines the role of having a natural (accidental, organic, passively groomed) successor. Influence 4, "The vision of retirement," captures the impact of owners' notions of life post-succession. Family therapists frequently encounter family systems in which the family business is facing succession. Even if succession is not the presenting problem, and even if the business owner is in the indirect (rather than direct) system, this research reminds clinicians of the importance of the family's story about the family business. Therefore, clinical implications and recommendations are included. 2011 © FPI, Inc.

  18. Towards the Realization of the ICT Education Living Lab – The TechTeachers.co.za Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus A. K. Buitendag

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the success story of the intuitive vision of an Information and Communication Technology (ICT high school educator in South Africa. The growth and evolution of a Community of Practice towards a full-fledged living lab is investigated. A grounded theory study analyses the living lab concept and highlights some of the current challenges secondary high school ICT education face within the South African educational landscape. Some of the concepts, ideas, best practices, and lessons learned in the establishment and running of two web based technologies to support secondary school ICT subjects is discussed. The researchers present a motivation for the use of living labs to address some of the issues identified and highlights how the existing platforms fits into bigger design.

  19. Rituximab for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a story of rapid success in translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Andrew M; Thalji, Nassir M; Greenberg, Alexandra J; Tapia, Carmen J; Windebank, Anthony J

    2014-02-01

    Translational stories range from straightforward to complex. In this commentary, the story of the rapid and successful translation of rituximab therapy for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is examined. Development of this monoclonal antibody therapy began in the late 1980s. In 1994, rituximab received its first approval for the treatment of NHL by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Rituximab has since been approved for additional indications and has transformed medical practice. However, the social and political implications of these rapid successes are only beginning to become clear. In this commentary, key events in the rapid translation of rituximab from the bench to bedside are highlighted and placed into this historical framework. To accomplish this, the story of rituximab is divided into the following six topics, which we believe to be widely applicable to case studies of translation: (1) underlying disease, (2) key basic science, (3) key clinical studies in translation, (4) FDA approval process, (5) changes to medical practice, and (6) the social and political influences on translation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Rituximab for Non‐Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Story of Rapid Success in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Nassir M.; Greenberg, Alexandra J.; Tapia, Carmen J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Translational stories range from straightforward to complex. In this commentary, the story of the rapid and successful translation of rituximab therapy for the treatment of non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is examined. Development of this monoclonal antibody therapy began in the late 1980s. In 1994, rituximab received its first approval for the treatment of NHL by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Rituximab has since been approved for additional indications and has transformed medical practice. However, the social and political implications of these rapid successes are only beginning to become clear. In this commentary, key events in the rapid translation of rituximab from the bench to bedside are highlighted and placed into this historical framework. To accomplish this, the story of rituximab is divided into the following six topics, which we believe to be widely applicable to case studies of translation: (1) underlying disease, (2) key basic science, (3) key clinical studies in translation, (4) FDA approval process, (5) changes to medical practice, and (6) the social and political influences on translation. PMID:24528902

  1. THE MYTH OF MATERIAL SUCCESS AS REFLECTED IN SAM WALTON: MADE IN AMERICA-MY STORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Kurniati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available American myth of material success had been orchestrated five basic beliefs that were reflected in Sam Walton’s biography, Sam Walton: Made in America-My Story. Those beliefs were: 1 Having a strong will to be successful man in America, Sam Walton was aware that the American democracy allowed its citizens to rise above any limitation in which they may have been born; 2 Then, he rose up from his limitation by hard work. His hard work successfully brought him to the riches and physical comforts; 3 He believed that those rewards came to those who were deserving of them (virtuous; 4 He also believed that those rewards came to those who had the drive and ambition to attain them. Therefore, he was optimistic to attain success in America; 5 Hard work to attain success made Sam Walton a lucky man who received good luck in his life. As a result, his dream of being a successful man in America came true. Keywords: the myth of material success, American dream, hard work

  2. Successful Implementation of Clinical Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, V.; Bruner, K.; Maciaz, G.; Saucedo, L.; Catzoela, L.; Ramirez, R.; Jacobs, W.J.; Nguyen, P.; Patel, L.; Webster, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To identify and describe the most critical strategic and operational contributors to the successful implementation of clinical information technologies, as deployed within a moderate sized system of U.S. community hospitals. Background and Setting CHRISTUS Health is a multi-state system comprised of more than 350 services and 60 hospitals with over 9 000 physicians. The Santa Rosa region of CHRISTUS Health, located in greater San Antonio, Texas is comprised of three adult community hospital facilities and one Children’s hospital each with bed capacities of 142–180. Computerized Patient Order Entry (CPOE) was first implemented in 2012 within a complex market environment. The Santa Rosa region has 2 417 credentialed physicians and 263 mid-level allied health professionals. Methods This report focuses on the seven most valuable strategies deployed by the Health Informatics team in a large four hospital CHRISTUS region to achieve strong CPOE adoption and critical success lessons learned. The findings are placed within the context of the literature describing best practices in health information technology implementation. Results While the elements described involved discrete de novo process generation to support implementation and operations, collectively they represent the creation of a new customer-centric service culture in our Health Informatics team, which has served as a foundation for ensuring strong clinical information technology adoption beyond CPOE. Conclusion The seven success factors described are not limited in their value to and impact on CPOE adoption, but generalize to – and can advance success in – varied other clinical information technology implementations across diverse hospitals. A number of these factors are supported by reports in the literature of other institutions’ successful implementations of CPOE and other clinical information technologies, and while not prescriptive to other settings, may be adapted to yield

  3. Application of GIS technology in public health: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Lartey, Stephanie M; Caprarelli, Graziella

    2016-04-01

    The uptake and acceptance of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology has increased since the early 1990s and public health applications are rapidly expanding. In this paper, we summarize the common uses of GIS technology in the public health sector, emphasizing applications related to mapping and understanding of parasitic diseases. We also present some of the success stories, and discuss the challenges that still prevent a full scope application of GIS technology in the public health context. Geographical analysis has allowed researchers to interlink health, population and environmental data, thus enabling them to evaluate and quantify relationships between health-related variables and environmental risk factors at different geographical scales. The ability to access, share and utilize satellite and remote-sensing data has made possible even wider understanding of disease processes and of their links to the environment, an important consideration in the study of parasitic diseases. For example, disease prevention and control strategies resulting from investigations conducted in a GIS environment have been applied in many areas, particularly in Africa. However, there remain several challenges to a more widespread use of GIS technology, such as: limited access to GIS infrastructure, inadequate technical and analytical skills, and uneven data availability. Opportunities exist for international collaboration to address these limitations through knowledge sharing and governance.

  4. DNA in the Criminal Justice System: The DNA Success Story in Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Anna A; Kloosterman, Ate D; de Poot, Christianne J

    2015-07-01

    Current figures on the efficiency of DNA as an investigative tool in criminal investigations only tell part of the story. To get the DNA success story in the right perspective, we examined all forensic reports from serious (N = 116) and high-volume crime cases (N = 2791) over the year 2011 from one police region in the Netherlands. These data show that 38% of analyzed serious crime traces (N = 384) and 17% of analyzed high-volume crime traces (N = 386) did not result in a DNA profile. Turnaround times (from crime scene to DNA report) were 66 days for traces from serious crimes and 44 days for traces from high-volume crimes. Suspects were truly identified through a match with the Offender DNA database of the Netherlands in 3% of the serious crime cases and in 1% of the high-volume crime cases. These data are important for both the forensic laboratory and the professionals in the criminal justice system to further optimize forensic DNA testing as an investigative tool. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  6. Science, sex, superflies [A spin-off of nuclear science and technology has changed the dynamics of a complex mating game. Along the way, it has spawned success stories - some small, some large - around the world during the IAEA's first half century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedekind, L.

    2007-01-01

    The Medfly (Ceratitis capitata) is on the most unwanted list of farmers and food inspectors in about 80 countries. If not controlled, the pest can nest in more than 300 fruit and vegetable crops (from Granny Smith to Beurre D'Anjou) and ravage them. VIENNA 8 tsl is tailor-made to yield only male flies that stay strong enough after gamma sterilization to become virile agents of Medfly family planning. Once the sterile males are released into the wild, their mission is to compete in the mating game and win over willing females. The union is, of course, fruitless, and the outdoor fly population falls to nothing when systematically targeted over time. Biological birth control. The genetic sexing strain is a 21st-century feature of the sterile insect technique (SIT). The technology has spawned success stories in unlikely places during the IAEA's first half century as the world's 'atoms for peace' organization. What started out in the 1950s and 1960s on a small laboratory scale has peacefully 'mushroomed' into a multi-million dollar affair that continues to attract more and more players. VIENNA 8 tsl is among advances registered through the IAEA's joint work since 1964 with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). At any given moment, more than four billion sterile insects - 3.5 billion of them Medflies bred using genetic sexing strains - are being reared for weekly use at 30 SIT facilities worldwide. Among the latest are mass-rearing plants built in Bahia, Brazil, and Valencia, Spain. All the SIT facilities supply pest eradication, suppression and prevention programmes against various insect pests. A main common goal: to protect the quality of food and agricultural products, including livestock, that the pests can attack and destroy. Successes include winning battles from the Americas to Africa and the Middle East to Europe, Asia and Australia - against screwworm flies endangering cattle herds, tsetse flies killing livestock and humans, moths ruining crops and

  7. Telling stories with digital technologies in corporative training context

    OpenAIRE

    Hack, Josias Ricardo; Ramos, Fernando; Santos, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The art of telling stories in digital format is currently widely available due to the popularization of digital cameras, computers and other mobile devices. In this paper we discuss the use of collaborative learning strategies based on Digital Storytelling in corporative training. The text includes a concise review on theoretical and technical foundations about educational communication through the use of audiovisual products based on disciplines such as Communication, Educatio...

  8. The emerging story of emerging technologies in neuropsychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Coffey, M. Justin; Coffey, C. Edward

    2016-01-01

    The growth of new technologies in health care is exponential, and the impact of such rapid technological innovation on health care delivery is substantial. This review describes two emerging technologies?mobile applications and wearable technologies?and uses a virtual case report to illustrate the impact of currently available technologies on the health care experience of a patient with neuropsychiatric illness.

  9. The emerging story of emerging technologies in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, M Justin; Coffey, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    The growth of new technologies in health care is exponential, and the impact of such rapid technological innovation on health care delivery is substantial. This review describes two emerging technologies-mobile applications and wearable technologies-and uses a virtual case report to illustrate the impact of currently available technologies on the health care experience of a patient with neuropsychiatric illness.

  10. A success story of multi-national efforts in innovative soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, M.J., P.E.

    1994-01-01

    The global and institutional issues relating to the implementation of innovative technologies in the environmental cleanup market can be significant, limiting, and confusing. Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) has made real progress in utilizing soil washing for full-scale cleanups hazardous waste and low-level radioactive waste sites. ART was formed in 1990 as joint venture between Geraghty ampersand Miller, Inc. (USA) and Heidemij (The Netherlands) for the purpose of using the proven Dutch soil washing technology in the U.S. market. The purpose of this paper is to present the opportunities, methods of implementation, and to examine future developments in the transfer of technology for environmental restoration and waste management applications. The effective transfer of technology is a multi-faceted task integrating the technology itself with an objective understanding of the market coupled with a business plan that can support the financial and administrative requirements of commercialization. This paper contends that technology transfer that falls short of commercialization is not successful since the benefits offered by the technology do not become available for full scale use. ART's specific objective in accomplishing a transfer of technology was to bring a soil washing technology, proven in Europe, to the U.S. to fill an unsatisfied market niche for the treatment of contaminated soils. The measurement of this objective was clear from the beginning...commercialize the technology by performing projects profitably while growing the business. Significant side benefits resulted from this focus, and those will be discussed later

  11. Ultrasound Collaboration across Europe: An EFSUMB success story in politically troubled times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, P S

    2016-10-01

    In these days of political vagueness, to use a kinder term, although many would describe the situation as turmoil, in Europe, there are success stories to be lauded. Notwithstanding the direction individual countries choose in relation to closer or not so close co-operation in Europe and the direction the political agenda will travel over the next few years, I believe science and in particular medicine has benefited enormously form close co-operation across the European Union and with colleagues outside this political and trading block of nations. Ultrasound within the community of medical scientists and clinicians is a unique imaging tool that links various disparate specialities that collaborate little in any sphere other than imaging with the tool of sonography. An umbrella organization that allows co-operation between the medical specialities, and brings basic scientist under one roof to co-operate closely is undoubted of benefit ultimately with the customer, in this case the patient.The European Federation of Societies of Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) has over the last few years in particular achieved this unique position of bringing together peoples from across the European nation in collaboration in numerous projects, using skilled expertise from different nations to forge the common aim of advancing the practice of ultrasound as applied to biology and medicine. The success of this collaboration is demonstrated by the number of guidelines issued by EFSUMB over the years, well received across the globe and respected by numerous citations in the literature. The main areas of expertise has been in the guidelines associated with contrast ultrasound 1 2 and elastography 3 4, but also with guidelines pertaining to interventional ultrasound 5, student education 6 and recently contrast ultrasound in paediatric practice 7. More guidelines are planned, with input from many different experts from societies within the family of EFSUMB. These guidelines set

  12. Intimate partner violence: advanced practice nurses clinical stories of success and challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykczynski, Karen A; Crane, Patricia; Medina, Cindy K; Pedraza, Dora

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study presents knowledge from clinical experiences of advanced practice nurses (APNs) working with women who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with ten APNs to discover their ways of being with, supporting, and helping women who have experienced IPV. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using interpretive phenomenology. Analysis proceeded from whole to parts and back to whole with ongoing attention to maintaining the situational context to guide interpretation of meanings. APNs experience both challenges and successes in caring for women who live with IPV. Findings consist of interpretations of clinical stories to uncover knowledge embedded in practice. Healing practices and ways of being survival facilitators for women and children are identified and described. APNs are in a unique position to help families who live with abuse, but may lack resources and knowledge about the most effective interventions. They may become cynical and frustrated with feelings of futility when faced with the repeating patterns associated with the cycle of violence. The goals of this study are to promote more comprehensive understanding of IPV and stimulate changes in education, practice, research, and health policy. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Success stories showing the diversity of kidney foundations: Turkish Kidney Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Timur

    Founded in 1985, the Turkish Kidney Foundation serves the society with 3 dialysis centers and a 113-bed general hospital. Interacting with public authorities and advocating end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients' rights are essential services of this non-governmental organization (NGO). Over the last 30 years, keeping with the trend of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the country, the foundation raised awareness in the population for this condition and prepared an activity road map by using statistical facts and data. Goals were set keeping in mind the local culture and traditions, debating on them with colleagues, PR agencies, and other experts in this field. The best strategy embrace the society, and all activities are made as cost-effective as possible in keeping with a tight budget. Various communication channels, especially social media, are used to communicate the message to the public, always keeping in mind that such messages are to be succinct and precise. Every effort is taken to make our foundation reliable and trustworthy in the eyes of the public at large. Reliability, credibility, and trust are the key success corner stones of our NGO. Every opportunity is taken to capitalize on participation of celebrities and real stories of people. Testimonies of real ESRD patients are always interesting and can touch the hearts of the rest of the population.

  14. Lanthanide amidinates and guanidinates in catalysis and materials science: a continuing success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Frank T

    2012-12-07

    Today the rare-earth elements play a critical role in numerous high-tech applications. This is why various areas of rare-earth chemistry are currently thriving. In organolanthanide chemistry the search for new ligand sets which are able to satisfy the coordination requirements of the large lanthanide cations continues to be a hot topic. Among the most successful approaches in this field is the use of amidinate and guanidinate ligands of the general types [RC(NR')(2)](-) (R = H, alkyl, aryl; R' = alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, SiMe(3)) and [R(2)NC(NR')(2)](-) (R = alkyl, SiMe(3); R' = alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, SiMe(3)), which can both be regarded as steric cyclopentadienyl equivalents. Mono-, di- and trisubstituted lanthanide amidinate and guanidinate complexes are all readily available. Various rare earth amidinates and guanidinates have turned out to be very efficient homogeneous catalysts e.g. for the polymerization of olefins and dienes, the ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters or the guanylation of amines. Moreover, certain alkyl-substituted lanthanide tris(amidinates) and tris(guanidinates) were found to be highly volatile and are thus promising precursors for ALD (= atomic layer deposition) and MOCVD (= metal-organic chemical vapor deposition) processes in materials science, e.g. for the production of lanthanide nitride thin layers. This tutorial review covers the continuing success story of lanthanide amidinates and guanidinates which have undergone an astonishing transition from mere laboratory curiosities to efficient homogeneous catalysts as well as ALD and MOCVD precursors within the past 10 years.

  15. Secret of success for invention technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwan Hyeong

    1990-12-01

    This book deals with importance, meaning, history of invention technology, technique of invention technology, and invention in connection with the duties. It covers importance, meaning, flow of invention technology development, basis of invention technology development, development, development investment, development workforce of invention technology, and development of invention technology introduction. It also contains outline, research, management of technology development information, outline, research, management of patent information, and reality of invention technology research development.

  16. Successful holistic management of type 2 diabetes with depression: a very personal story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Linda Denise; Aekwarangkoon, Saifon; Ward, Earlise C

    2011-01-01

    We used illness narrative methods to evaluate the retrospective illness story of a bereaved woman who has recovered from type 2 diabetes and depression with comorbid hypertension, hyperlipidemia, vertigo, and obesity. Her spoken illness story was obtained with a single interview question: What happened? Our findings show that the patient searched for and found personal meaning in her illness. The finding of meaning in her illness appears to have supported her efforts to adopt more positive health beliefs and health behaviors. Although she received excellent health care throughout her illness, she attributes her return to good health to spiritual growth. We discuss the practice implications of this patient's illness story for clinicians who seek new insights into patients who have complex illness stories.

  17. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Bingham, Alpheus

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa’s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about “Mobile phones and Africa: a success story”. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves indus...

  18. EURATOM Success Stories in Facilitating Pan-European E&T Collaborative Efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbil, R.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) Research and Training framework programmes are benefiting from a consistent success in pursuing excellence in research and facilitating Pan-European collaborative efforts across a broad range of nuclear science and technologies, nuclear fission and radiation protection. To fulfil Euratom R&D programmes keys objectives of maintaining high levels of nuclear knowledge and building a more dynamic and competitive European industry, promotion of Pan-European mobility of researchers are implemented by co-financing transnational access to research infrastructures and joint research activities through to research and innovation and coordination and support actions funding schemes. Establishment by the research community of European technology platforms are being capitalized. Mapping of research infrastructures and E&T capabilities is allowing a closer cooperation within the European Union and beyond, benefiting from multilateral international agreements and from closer cooperation between Euratom, OECD/NEA and IAEA and international fora. “Euratom success stories” in facilitating Pan-European E&T collaborative efforts through research and training framework programmes show the benefits of research efforts in key fields, of building an effective “critical mass”, of promoting the creation of “centres of excellence” with an increased support for “open access to key research infrastructures”, exploitation of research results, management of knowledge, dissemination and sharing of learning outcomes. (author

  19. Winrock International's Renewable Energy Support Office (REPSO) network: success stories and lessons learned from the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azurdia-Bravo, I.; Panggabean, L.M.; Pereira, O.S.; Ramana, V.V.; Santibanez-Yeneza, G.G.

    2000-01-01

    Winrock International's Clean Energy Group (CEG) is dedicated to the increased use of environmentally sustainable renewable energy technologies in a manner that enhances economic development. One specific objective of the CEG is to reduce the relative risks associated with investing in such technology options and to facilitate their widespread commercialization and use. A key component of the CEG's approach has been to establish a network of Renewable Energy Project Support Offices (REPSOs) in those developing countries with the greatest current and projected growth in demand for electricity and related energy services. Through these locally staffed REPSOs, Winrock has built on-the-ground capacity in renewable energy, accelerated scale-up and commercialization of renewable energy technologies, improved access to rural energy services, and facilitated industry linkages. To date, the consortium of the CEG, the REPSO network, and all Winrock's private and public partners have facilitated the installation of more than 500 MW of on-grid capacity, roughly 7,000 off-grid systems, mobilized at least 50 businesses or joint ventures, and leveraged over 1 billion US dollars in clean energy financing. The following paper shares some of the major lessons learned in the institutional and technical capacity building of the REPSO network and in the projects and activities it has implemented. This paper presents recent noteworthy REPSO successes and results, and also describes Winrock and the REPSOs goals for the new Millennium. (author)

  20. Creating Synergies from Renewable Energy Investments, a Community Success Story from Lolland, Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Bassi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The island of Lolland is a showcase example of a remote local community being able to stand up to the challenges of facing environmental and social consequences of climate change while creating economic opportunities. This island has had many years of experience in implementing renewable energy (RE projects as a way to combating peripheral poverty and promoting economic growth in a relatively remote area. The development strategy lies within the unique concept of Lolland Community Testing Facilities (CTF, which creates a forum between the private sector, research institutions and local political authorities by exploiting synergies among green investments and providing an international testing and demonstration platform for renewable energy technology and products. The present paper aims at giving an overview of integrated longer term energy planning based on Lolland CTF, its components and main features, while highlighting those critical characteristics that could make the CTF model successful and relevant for RE-based local development worldwide.

  1. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  2. Critical success factors in information technology projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the critical success factors (CSF of IT projects in Pa-kistan. The identified factors cannot only be functional to exact type IT projects but also to all types of IT projects, their success directly affects the achievement of whole organization. The proposed study of this paper has determined 15 factors influencing the most on the success of IT projects through multiple regression analysis. The survey has disclosed that many CSFs were found related to IT projects but these 15 factors are also the backbone of IT projects. The re-search results obtained clearly indicated that the Leadership Qualities played a significant role in obtaining Top Management support in order to access to resources however, the Leadership Qualities did not play any role on the trained and capable Project Team Members. Besides, it is undoubtedly defined effective communication of the project was established to be influential on the conclusion and contributing factor towards the Success of IT projects in Pakistan. Top Man-agement Support as a whole was not found to play a key role in the IT Project Success.

  3. Application of «thematic analysis» to a set of businesses success stories in tge internationalizaton process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Nuno Rodrigues Brás

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This current work is an example of applying the methodology of "thematic analysis" to a set of business success stories in the process of internationalization. It is assumed that these cases, as a hypothesis, constitute discourses obtained appropriately allowing synthesizing and relating some of the basic features inherent in the internationalization of companies. Results showed the prevalence of stimuli intrinsic to the company, to the detriment of extrinsic stimuli, and lower incidence that companies expose their barriers to internationalization. In the area of internationalization of firms, it confirms the association of entrepreneurial characteristics and the fundamental export nature of Portuguese business companies.

  4. Review of Trenchless Technologies' Successes and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... costly construction modifications, and use of substandard borrow material, environmental damage to the site, post construction remedial work, and even failure of a structure and subsequent litigation. Trenchless technology can be defined as the use of construction methods to install and repair underground infrastructure ...

  5. Beyond an Elevator Speech: Define Your Story to Find Success - 13581

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouhard, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Diversify or die has been a familiar industry chant, growing louder over the past five years. As companies seek opportunities in new markets, succinctly communicating who they are and what they do to people they've never met becomes common practice. Large and small, most companies lack a clear, concise story and communication tools to articulate what makes them unique amongst the competition. As a result business is lost with prospects and needs of current customers may never be identified. These, along with a common set of core challenges can be overcome by definition, standardization, on-going education and consistent / accurate communication at the brand level. (author)

  6. Managing forests as ecosystems: A success story or a challenge ahead?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1997-10-01

    To manage forests as ecosystems, the many values they hold for different users must be recognized, and they must be used so that those assets are not destroyed. Important ecosystem features of forests include nutrient cycling, habitat, succession, and water quality. Over time, the ways in which humans value forests have changed as forest uses have altered and as forests have declined in size and quality. Both ecosystem science and forest ecology have developed approaches that are useful to manage forests to retain their value. A historical perspective shows how changes in ecology, legislation, and technology have resulted in modern forest-management practices. However, current forest practices are still a decade or so behind current ecosystem science. Ecologists have done a good job of transferring their theories and approaches to the forest manager classroom but have done a poor job of translating these concepts into practice. Thus, the future for ecosystem management requires a closer linkage between ecologists and other disciplines. For example, the changing ways in which humans value forests are the primary determinant of forest-management policies. Therefore, if ecologists are to understand how ecosystem science can influence these policies, they must work closely with social scientists trained to assess human values.

  7. Workplace Factors That Shape Information Technology Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan Schilling

    2013-01-01

    Information technology (IT) project success depends on having a project manager with effective decision making, leadership, and project management skills. Project success also depends on completing the project in a given budget, time, and scope. Despite these critical qualities of a successful project manager, little research has explored the…

  8. Technology assisted education: An overview of success factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Asgarkhani

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on the role of digital and web technologies in learning. It discusses that technology alone cannot deliver successful learning outcomes. In rolling out technology-enabled learning solutions a range of other factors must be taken into consideration. A model for technology-based learning values and pilot study of a group of technology-enabled digital learning initiatives in institutions are presented to highlight the importance of people and process related factors alongside technology. The outcome of this preliminary study is presented; it indicates no significant strategic gains were derived from the use of web-technologies.

  9. LEDS GP Success Story: Fostering Coordinated LEDS Support in Kenya (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) strives to advance climate-resilient, low-emission development through catalyzing collaboration, information exchange, and action on the ground. The Government of Kenya is a key LEDS GP member and offers an inspiring example of how LEDS GP is having an impact globally. The 2012 LEDS Collaboration in Action workshop in London provided an interactive space for members to share experiences on cross-ministerial LEDS leadership and to learn about concrete development impacts of LEDS around the world. Inspired by these stories, the Kenya's Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 (MPND) began to collaborate closely with the Ministry of Environment and Mineral Resources to create strong links between climate change action and development in the country, culminating in the integration of Kenya's National Climate Change Action Plan and the country's Medium Term Development Plan.

  10. The limits of a success story: Fair trade and the history of postcolonial globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, P.

    2015-01-01

    The history of fair trade is the matter of a heated debate wrapped up in differences regarding the ideals, goals and allies of a movement which has achieved highly visible successes in recent years. The emerging historiography challenges the common narrative of recent and sudden success. It draws

  11. OUT Success Stories: Thin-Film PV: Leadership in Materials R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchford, P.

    2000-08-31

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a modern energy technology that makes use of semiconductor materials to convert sunlight directly to electricity. The idea of thin film technology is to produce truly low-cost PV devices by using pennies worth of active semiconductor materials.

  12. Conditions for Successful Use of Technology in Social Studies Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, Meskerem; Plevyak, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the authors in this review is to examine how teacher-related, context-related, and project-related conditions interact in successful cases of technology integration projects in social studies classrooms. A close examination of different dimensions of these conditions in the implementation of 33 successful cases of…

  13. Characteristics Contributing to High-Technology Start-Up Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goslin, L.; Brown, W.; Palm, T.

    1993-01-01

    The factors contributing to the success of high technology start-up firms have received much discussion in current business literature. The discussion of the characteristics of success has been based on increasing substantiation by empirical research. The available information suggests that the p...

  14. Psychological principles of successful aging technologies: A mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin; Schellenbach, Michael; Li, Shu-Chen; Krüger, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Based on resource-oriented conceptions of successful life-span development, we propose three principles for evaluating assistive technology: (a) net resource release; (b) person specificity, and (c) proximal versus distal frames of evaluation. We discuss how these general principles can aid the design and evaluation of assistive technology in adulthood and old age, and propose two technological strategies, one targeting sensorimotor and the other cognitive functioning. The sensorimotor strate...

  15. STORIES OF TECHNOLOGY-ENHANCEMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION – A CRITICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Fossland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a large body of research on technology-enhanced learning, but questions related to the educational effectiveness of technology use still needs to be questioned. In this paper, I argue that digital innovators’ stories about technology enhancement may constitute a rich source for understanding this complex educational phenomenon both in relation to teachers’ daily practices and the implementation of ICT in higher education at large. Based on biographical interviews with “digital innovators”, the aim of this paper is to investigate how [their] digital competence is used to enhance teaching and learning in higher education. This paper asks; how do digital innovators approach the use of ICT to enhance students’ learning and what are the organisational conditions for this approach? The findings suggests that technology-enhancement is linked to nine key characteristics: different educational models, authenticity, pedagogical added values, meaningful student activities, changing approaches to feedback, assessment and connection with the outside world, as well as holistic planning, supportive leaders and strong micro-cultures. This paper proposes a more nuanced understanding of the term technology enhanced learning and suggests strategies for educational development and further investigations related to this phenomenon in higher education.

  16. The Digital Story: Designing Professional Development in Technology Integration for Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Hayes Capo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of three professional development lessons were produced to teach high school teachers how to create their own content specific digital stories for use in their classroom instruction. A systems design method was employed to design the original lesson and also to design the final three lessons. The teachers were local high school teachers of one South Florida high school. The design approach for the lessons was grounded in activity theory. According to a description of activity theory by Jonassen, Tessmer, and Hannum (1999 the subjects use tools to transform objects in order to reach a learning outcome. School leadership and representative teachers expressed a need for technology integration in classroom instruction. Important shortcomings of the original lesson design were that adult learning theory was overlooked. Additionally, the main goal of the lesson was sacrificed to accommodate time constraints, and some of the images provided to complete the lesson contained the wrong aspect ratio. Adults require “self-direction” (Knowles, 1998, and the original lesson design afforded the participating adults little control over the construction process of their digital story. These shortcomings resulted in a need for a redesign of the lesson into three lessons. Furthermore, the final product became a series of three print-based lessons, to be distributed via compact disc to teachers for the upcoming school year.

  17. Integrating the Wall Street Journal into a Business School Curriculum: A Success Story at Samford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, David L.; Carson, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    In the Spring of 2006 Samford University's School of Business made a decision to participate in The Wall Street Journal's Academic Partnership (AP) program beginning with the Fall semester of 2006. This paper examines School of Business student and faculty attitudes and usage of the WSJ that made for a successful implementation this past year.…

  18. Success in nuclear technology transfer: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, D.S.; Stevens, J.E.S.; Boulton, J.

    1986-10-01

    Technology transfer has played a significant part in the expansion of nuclear power to many countries of the world. Canada's involvement in nuclear technology transfer spans four decades. The experience gained through technology transfer, initially to Canadian industry and then to other countries in association with the construction of CANDU nuclear power plants, forms a basis from which to assess the factors which contribute to successful technology transfer. A strong commitment from all parties, in terms of both financial and human resources, is essential to success. Detailed planning of both the scope and timing of the technology transfer program is also required together with an assessment of the impact of the introduction of nuclear power on other sectors of the economy. (author)

  19. Making the invisible visible: UViRCO, an innovation success story

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wallis, J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available . This prototype had global impact potential that led to the development of updated versions of the technology with a sizeable export opportunity fostered by the use of an international network of distribution agents. The CoroCAM and MultiCAM series of imaging...

  20. A successful story of translational orthodontic research: Micro-osteoperforation-from experiments to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Yuching Chou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The gap between basic science research and clinical application has long existed and therefore translational research has emerged in recent years to bridge such gap. Consortium for Translational Orthodontic Research (CTOR was established with missions to integrate resources from different entities and to provide a platform for interdisciplinary groups who share the same vision to exchange ideas and inspire innovations. During its short existence, CTOR has successfully carried out several research projects which led to various innovations. Micro-osteoperforation is by far one of the most successful examples of translational research in the orthodontic field. It exemplifies how translational research can benefit scientists, clinicians, and patients. In this article, the process of its development, the rationale and scientific evidence from animal and clinical studies, and how it can be applied in daily practice will be depicted.

  1. Reforestation after the Fountain fire in northern California: an untold success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwei Zhang; Jeff Webster; Robert F. Powers; John Mills

    2008-01-01

    Forest fires have been burning ‘hot’ across the United States and particularly in the West recent years. So, too, will the debate on post-fire management strategies. In this paper, we present a successful reforestation project after a catastrophic fire in 1992. Sixteen years later, most lands are covered with vigorous young forest stands. These regenerated stands have...

  2. Extreme Environments Facilitate Hybrid Superiority - The Story of a Successful Daphnia galeata × longispina Hybrid Clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Johanna; Gießler, Sabine; Poxleitner, Monika; Navas Faria, Amanda; Yin, Mingbo; Wolinska, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization within the animal kingdom has long been underestimated. Hybrids have often been considered less fit than their parental species. In the present study, we observed that the Daphnia community of a small lake was dominated by a single D. galeata × D. longispina hybrid clone, during two consecutive years. Notably, in artificial community set-ups consisting of several clones representing parental species and other hybrids, this hybrid clone took over within about ten generations. Neither the fitness assay conducted under different temperatures, or under crowded and non-crowded environments, nor the carrying capacity test revealed any outstanding life history parameters of this hybrid clone. However, under simulated winter conditions (i.e. low temperature, food and light), the hybrid clone eventually showed a higher survival probability and higher fecundity compared to parental species. Hybrid superiority in cold-adapted traits leading to an advantage of overwintering as parthenogenetic lineages might consequently explain the establishment of successful hybrids in natural communities of the D. longispina complex. In extreme cases, like the one reported here, a superior hybrid genotype might be the only clone alive after cold winters. Overall, superiority traits, such as enhanced overwintering here, might explain hybrid dominance in nature, especially in extreme and rapidly changing environments. Although any favoured gene complex in cyclic parthenogens could be frozen in successful clones independent of hybridization, we did not find similarly successful clones among parental species. We conclude that the emergence of the observed trait is linked to the production of novel recombined hybrid genotypes.

  3. Success Stories: Data Collection And Ground Truth For The Portuguese Case Study (Caia Irrigation District)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, A.; Oliveira, P.; Chinita, A.; Chinita, S.; Maia, J.; Nunes, J.

    2006-08-01

    A Field Campaign has been carried on the Caia Irrigation District area pilot zone, in order to obtain ground truth for EO calibration and for an improved Irrigation Advisory System, owing to supply a more reliable and quick information to the water board district and to the farmer. These ground truth observations included weekly data on crop phenology and vegetation fraction for Maize, Sugar Beet and Tomato. The aim of the operation was to provide maps based on GIS technology of crop phenological parameters, based on methods (models and algorithms) in order to derive them from EO (for each pixel) and to obtain DEMETER products (which may involve spatial aggregation or separation). Irrigation Advisory Services using Earth Observation Technologies are important management tools, owing to improve monitoring and water management, supplying farmers with important information concerning water use in order to be in accordance with the eco-compatibility principles

  4. Explanatory Definitions of the Technology Push Success Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Jari Matti Sarja

    2015-01-01

    The main task for most development-intensive organizations is to create, develop and commercialize new products and services. Because development processes are risky and failure rates are high, especially in the case of technology pushed projects, unambiguous success factors are valuable knowledge for the management of development-intensive firms. New product development and innovation literature has presented many success factors for developed products, but, unfortunately, many of them are n...

  5. Past and Present of Total Artificial Heart Therapy: A Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Rahmanian, Parwis B.; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wippermann, Jens; Wahlers, Thorsten; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Karck, Matthias; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, André R.; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The totally artificial heart (TAH) is among the most prominent medical innovations of the 21st century, especially due to the increasing population with end-stage heart failure. The progressive course of the disease, its resistance to conventional therapy, and the scarcity of hearts available for transplantation were the prime impetus for developing a TAH, especially when other options of mechanical circulatory assist devices are exhausted. In this review, we narrate the history of TAH, give an overview of its technology, and address the pros and cons of the currently available TAH models in light of published clinical experience. PMID:26343363

  6. Project Management Meets Change Management - A Success Story. Focus Area: Tech Perspectives TI012SN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing the concepts and terminology from Project Management, the process of planning and executing a Change Management (CM) Infrastructure improvement project is described. The primary audience for this presentation includes both experienced and relatively new CM administrators and their managers. It also includes anyone with an interest in the application of project management knowledge to CM administration. There are several benefits: the complexity of the CM tool technology is more manageable, CM administrators get to use project management knowledge to complete a project (not "firefighting"), improve relations with your customers (that means developers and managers), and get the opportunity to do it again.

  7. Asian success stories in promoting energy efficiency in industry and building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming [International Inst. for Energy Conservation (IIEC), Bangkok (Thailand)

    1996-12-31

    This article describes the program of the International Institute for Energy Conservation (IIEC), which has offices in Washington, Bangkok, Santiago, and London, in addition to staff in a number of other countries. The mission of this private organization is to promote the efficient use of energy as a tool for sustainable development by supporting the development of policies, technologies, and practices. Its focus is on energy efficiency, transportation systems, and renewable energy sources. Examples of specific program activities in Thailand, China, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore are discussed.

  8. Toshiba's activity concerning technology succession and human resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Hoshide, Akehiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, from the viewpoint of the reduction of carbon-dioxide emission that cause global warming and the energy security, the importance of nuclear power generation is recognized again as an effective approach for solving the problems, and many nuclear power plants are planed to be constructed worldwide. On the other hand, the experienced engineers will face the time of the retirement in the near future and technology succession and human resource development has become important problems. In this paper, Toshiba's Nuclear Energy Systems and Services Division's activity concerning technology succession and human resource development will be introduced. (author)

  9. Teamwork and technology: Success factors for creating growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The petroleum industry faces many challenges moving toward the next century. How effectively these challenges are addressed and managed will determine whether or not the exploration and production business grows and prospers in the future. This presentation relates to success factors for growth creation. Themes discussed here are succeeding in a global energy market, evolution of relationships between oil and gas companies and service companies, the power of technology, and effectively combining teamwork and technology

  10. The Standard Autonomous File Server, A Customized, Off-the-Shelf Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semancik, Susan K.; Conger, Annette M.; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Standard Autonomous File Server (SAFS), which includes both off-the-shelf hardware and software, uses an improved automated file transfer process to provide a quicker, more reliable, prioritized file distribution for customers of near real-time data without interfering with the assets involved in the acquisition and processing of the data. It operates as a stand-alone solution, monitoring itself, and providing an automated fail-over process to enhance reliability. This paper describes the unique problems and lessons learned both during the COTS selection and integration into SAFS, and the system's first year of operation in support of NASA's satellite ground network. COTS was the key factor in allowing the two-person development team to deploy systems in less than a year, meeting the required launch schedule. The SAFS system has been so successful; it is becoming a NASA standard resource, leading to its nomination for NASA's Software of the Year Award in 1999.

  11. Regulation of Three Virulence Strategies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Jesse C. J.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the deadliest diseases. Emergence of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains makes treating tuberculosis increasingly challenging. In order to develop novel intervention strategies, detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the success of this pathogen is required. Here, we review recent literature to provide a systems level overview of the molecular and cellular components involved in divalent metal homeostasis and their role in regulating the three main virulence strategies of M. tuberculosis: immune modulation, dormancy and phagosomal rupture. We provide a visual and modular overview of these components and their regulation. Our analysis identified a single regulatory cascade for these three virulence strategies that respond to limited availability of divalent metals in the phagosome. PMID:29364195

  12. Creating an international forum - The success story of the International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bond, L.J.; Carpenter, C.E.; Hwang, I.S.; Martin, O.; Reister, R.; Shoji, T.; Tilley, R.

    2012-01-01

    As the benefits of extending the safe operating life of nuclear power plants has become more evident, so has the need to increase international cooperation in reactor aging management research. This paper describes how individuals and organizations from Asia, Europe, and North America teamed to create the International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM). The mission of IFRAM is to facilitate the appropriate exchange of information among those parties and organizations around the world that are presently, or are planning to, address issues of nuclear power plant (NPP) systems, structures and components aging management. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the steps to success in creating IFRAM. The desired attributes, charter, and operational methods of IFRAM are described and the key contributors for creating IFRAM are identified. (author)

  13. Growth of Astronomy Education in Chile: a late but successful story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Hernán

    2017-06-01

    The first present international observatories were stablished in Chile by 1963, at a time when local astronomy was devoted to traditional Fundamental Astronomy research, as in most other Latin-american countries. For over 35 years little was achieved in the way of effectively developing a healthy university teaching in the field, in spite of initiatives started and helped in the mid-sixties by some astronomers at CTIO or ESO. Up to 1998, when a second try to start a university degree, this time at U. Católica, was unexpectedly successful, the number of Chileans astronomers had remained constant or slightly decreased. The number started to grow significantly when the new degree attracted the keen interest of students, reaching the potential widely recognized since a long time. Today some 13 universities have astronomy courses or degrees and the number of students and post-docs are in the hundreds.The series of events and university policies originally prevailing in the country, and the changes that allowed the new state of affairs, will be reviewed and described. This will include the barriers and difficulties encountered, and the ways devised to overcome these.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Success Stories of X-Plane Design to Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Gary B.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of the design and flight test of three true X-planes are described, particularly X-plane design techniques that relied heavily on computational fluid dynamics(CFD) analysis. Three examples are presented: the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft, the X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle, and the X-48B Blended Wing Body Demonstrator Aircraft. An overview is presented of the uses of CFD analysis, comparison and contrast with wind tunnel testing, and information derived from CFD analysis that directly related to successful flight test. Lessons learned on the proper and improper application of CFD analysis are presented. Highlights of the flight-test results of the three example X-planes are presented. This report discusses developing an aircraft shape from early concept and three-dimensional modeling through CFD analysis, wind tunnel testing, further refined CFD analysis, and, finally, flight. An overview of the areas in which CFD analysis does and does not perform well during this process is presented. How wind tunnel testing complements, calibrates, and verifies CFD analysis is discussed. Lessons learned revealing circumstances under which CFD analysis results can be misleading are given. Strengths and weaknesses of the various flow solvers, including panel methods, Euler, and Navier-Stokes techniques, are discussed.

  15. A story of success: continuous quality improvement in cystic fibrosis care in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Goss, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) in healthcare can be described as a reiterative approach to improving processes to reduce unexpected variation in health outcomes. CQI represents one model to achieve quality improvement (QI) and has long been recognized as a key to success in the manufacturing industry with companies like Toyota leading the way. Healthcare, and specifically pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine represent ideal settings for the application of CQI. This opinion piece will describe QI and CQI initiatives in the US Cystic fibrosis (CF) population. QI in CF care in the United States has been ongoing since inception of the US CF Foundation (CFF) in 1955. This effort has included work to improve the quality of clinical care provided at CF centers and work to improve clinical outcomes in CF. More recently, QI methods have been applied to the conduct of clinical research. The CF community has become a leader in the area of QI and has pointed out the opportunities for others to follow in the area of lung diseases.

  16. Successful Community-Based Conservation: The Story of Millbank and Pterourus (Papilio) homerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Eric; Parnell, John; Lewis, Delano S

    2017-07-14

    The literature on community-based environmental management is very extensive and the discussion of the pros and cons is continuing. Presented here is an example of a successful interaction between university-based entomologists and a local rural community, detailing the change in the attitude of the town of Millbank, Jamaica, from a Giant Swallowtail Butterfly collecting site to a model for community protection of a species and its environment. A review of some of the research work on community-based conservation efforts is included. These linkages take a considerable time to establish and the efforts spent by scientific personnel, governmental representatives and eco-tourists are itemized to emphasize how specific conservation activities have inspired confidence in the local community, thus engendering trust and mutual respect between the two groups. Reviews of the developed legislative support from both international and state entities also must be in place, and these are included in chronological detail as much as possible. Finally, a review of the long-term funding of educational and other local programs providing a level of stability to the conservation effort, until the local community can take over the protection of the species and/or habitat, is provided. Of utmost importance is a comprehensive educational campaign to not only sensitize the community, but the larger society, so that there can be buy-in from all stakeholders.

  17. Turning patient-centeredness from ideal to real: lessons from 2 success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenson, Michael L; DiGioia, Anthony M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Swieskowski, David

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report established patient-centeredness as 1 of 6 core principles for health system redesign. Yet, turning aspiration into accomplishment has proven arduous. Patient-centered care has components that challenge established professional norms, and the term itself has not always been clearly defined. However, these barriers can be overcome using Rogers' principles of diffusion of innovation, as is shown by 2 case histories. One involves care at an urban academic medical center, the other outpatient care at multiple physician sites located in urban, suburban, and rural locations. At the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the Patient- and Family-Centered Care Methodology and Practice has become the new "operating system" in 60 clinical areas, using a 6-step approach to engage patients and families as codesigners of ideal care. Meanwhile, the Health Coach Program at Mercy Clinics, Inc, Des Moines, Iowa, has used a "high-tech/high-touch" combined approach to change the organizational culture through patient-centered initiatives. By doing so, it has put the organization in a position to accept risk for populations of patients. Importantly, both programs have been financially and clinically successful, are accepted by frontline physicians and senior management, and are nationally recognized. Common principles include physician leadership, comfort with uncertainty during innovation, organizational structures that send a consistent message about expectations, and quality improvement as a constant cycle with no end point.

  18. NEPA scoping averts agency funds from blowing in the wind: A NEPA success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.C.; Van Dyke, J.; Crew, J.

    1998-06-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process has been successful without the preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) or an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has used early application of the NEPA process to make an informed decision and thus avoid negative ecological and financial results. The NEPA process was initiated to assess the potential impacts of constructing and operating a 6--9 megawatt wind turbine farm. The farm was to consist of up to 18 turbines to be placed along the spine of Plum Island which lies in the Atlantic Ocean off the shore of eastern Long Island. The rationale for the proposal was to provide an alternative energy source and thus avoid the expenditure of more than one million dollars per year on electricity and the dependency on the mainland public utility companies. A sufficient wind resource is readily available on Plum Island. Complicating the issue was a window of opportunity to obtain federal production tax credits if the wind energy system could become operational before July 1, 1999

  19. Onshore wind power development in China: Challenges behind a successful story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jingyi; Mol, Arthur P.J.; Lu Yonglong; Zhang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Wind energy utilization, especially onshore grid-connected wind power generation, has a history of 30 years in China. With the increasing attention to renewable energy development in recent years, wind energy has become the focus of academic research and policy-making. While the potential and advantages of wind energy are widely recognized, many questions regarding the effectiveness of policies and performances of current practices remain unanswered. This paper takes Inner Mongolia, the province that has the most abundant wind energy resources in China, as a case to assess the performance of Chinese onshore wind power projects, focusing on the institutional setting, economic and technological performance, as well as environmental and social impacts. Results show that China is experiencing a rapid growth in wind power generation, which brings China great environmental, energy security and social benefits. However, for a full development of wind energy in China a number of barriers need to be removed: high generation cost, low on-grid price, and stagnating development of domestic manufacture. These findings lead to three policy recommendations.

  20. Successful Implementation of Technological Innovations in Health Care Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Weijers; T.L. Finch; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2015-01-01

    In order to accept and implement technology in a successful manner, not only determinants (acceptance barriers or facilitators) related to individual persons, for instance, health care providers as well as health care recipients, are important. Also interpersonal relationships on the work floor as

  1. Success Stories in Radiotherapy Development Projects: Lessons Learned from Radiotherapy Development Projects. Chapter 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubizarreta, E.; Van Der Merwe, D.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines some problems found to be common in the process of setting up, running or expanding radiotherapy facilities. The establishment of radiotherapy services is essential to consolidate any national cancer control plan. In other words, such a plan cannot exist without radiotherapy. The IAEA guidance on setting up a radiotherapy programme covering the clinical, medical physics, radiation protection and safety aspects gives an estimate of one teletherapy machine needed per million population]. The IAEA’s Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) shows that the number of megavoltage (MV) machines per million population varies from 8.2 in the United States of America to 5.5 in western Europe. There are still many countries without a single radiotherapy department, especially in Africa, and many others have very low coverage, e.g. up to one external beam radiotherapy machine to cover a population of 35 million, which is close to having no coverage. There are many possible reasons for this situation. In many low income countries, the combination of lower life expectancy, low income taxes, a small budget for public health, and unmet basic needs such as housing, prevention and/or treatment of infectious diseases (malaria, tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), diarrhoea), drinkable water and sewerage makes the cancer control problem a lower priority. The indicators shown illustrate these points. Establishing a radiotherapy programme requires careful planning, including the requirement for successive phases. Resources should be available for designing, building, purchasing, maintaining and replacing equipment, and for providing training in its use. In the case of a first radiotherapy facility with basic staffing levels, there is not likely to be enough expertise to guide and oversee the process in many or all of these areas.

  2. Eradication of Transboundary Animal Diseases: Can the Rinderpest Success Story be Repeated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, G R; Penrith, M-L

    2017-04-01

    A matrix system was developed to aid in the evaluation of the technical amenability to eradication, through mass vaccination, of transboundary animal diseases (TADs). The system involved evaluation of three basic criteria - disease management efficiency, surveillance and epidemiological factors - each in turn comprised of a number of elements (17 in all). On that basis, 25 TADs that have occurred or do occur in southern Africa and for which vaccines are available, in addition to rinderpest (incorporated as a yardstick because it has been eradicated worldwide), were ranked. Cluster analysis was also applied using the same criteria to the 26 diseases, creating division into three groups. One cluster contained only diseases transmitted by arthropods (e.g. African horse sickness and Rift Valley fever) and considered difficult to eradicate because technologies for managing parasitic arthropods on a large scale are unavailable, while a second cluster contained diseases that have been widely considered to be eradicable [rinderpest, canine rabies, the Eurasian serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus (O, A, C & Asia 1) and peste des petits ruminants] as well classical swine fever, Newcastle disease and lumpy skin disease. The third cluster contained all the other TADs evaluated with the implication that these constitute TADs that would be more difficult to eradicate. However, it is acknowledged that the scores assigned in the course of this study may be biased. The point is that the system proposed offers an objective method for assessment of the technical eradicability of TADs; the rankings and groupings derived during this study are less important than the provision of a systematic approach for further development and evaluation. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Princess Elisabeth Antarctica: an International Polar Year outreach and media success story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Cheek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the priorities of the fourth International Polar Year (IPY was to increase awareness of the polar regions and polar science among the general public through education, communication and other forms of outreach. This paper reports on the media coverage of Princess Elisabeth Antarctica (PEA, Belgium's “zero-emission” Antarctic research station designed by the non-profit International Polar Foundation (IPF to run on wind and solar energy and to employ state-of-the-art forms of energy management and other “green” technology. This paper provides background information on PEA, a review of IPF's media strategy for the project, a description of media coverage of the station and a discussion of the way in which the IPF's main messages were reported in the media. IPF staff surveyed approximately 300 media reports released between February 2004, when the PEA project was announced to the general public, and June 2010, when the IPF presented their findings at the IPY conference in Oslo. PEA was featured 580 times in print and web media in Belgium, and 303 times outside Belgium. Major international agencies such as the Associated Press, Agence France Presse, the BBC, Al-Jazeera and Reuters covered the project. On television and radio, PEA was featured in news broadcasts from all four major television networks in Belgium, most major radio stations and 34 different television and radio news outlets outside Belgium. The paper concludes that the media coverage for PEA was significant and suggests reasons why the project was so widely reported.

  4. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndelu Lindiwe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO. Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work. The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into “toolkits” used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international

  5. Changing the conversation: how ANS is telling a different story about nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, B.

    2014-01-01

    'Full text': As nuclear scientists and engineers, our focus and expertise is in science and technology that yields benefits for society. Yet, we are also often in the position of explaining what can be very complex and technical issues to individuals who are not technical, and who perhaps are guided by misinformation about nuclear science and technology. Being effective communicators, and having an effective communications program at organizations like ANS,is critical if we are to maintain support for nuclear energy. Nuclear plants have shut down in the United States over the past year largely due to economic circumstances. The low price of natural gas and other factors make it extremely challenging for some nuclear plants to be competitive right now. Although this situation will eventually change, clear communications is critical.Fostering a good understanding of nuclear science and technology is needed now more than ever to help people gain an appreciation for the benefits that nuclear energy offers. Last year, ANS created a strategic communications plan. This communications plan called for improvements in all of our communication and outreach efforts. We have many work groups actively working on those improvements, which will be highlighted during the session. We also publicly launched the Center for Nuclear Science and Technology Information, a special communications initiative of ANS. The Center allows ANS to better leverage resources while building awareness about nuclear science and technology among a variety of audiences. Through the Center, ANS seeks to improve public understanding of nuclear science and technology, inform policy makers and their staff about nuclear fundamentals,engage journalists in telling a truthful story based on science, and inspire young people to explore nuclear science and technology. The Center allows ANS to produce improved public education tools that nuclear professionals and advocates can use when doing outreach. The

  6. Technology success: Integration of power plant reliability and effective maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, K.

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear power generation sector has a tradition of utilizing technology as a key attribute for advancement. Companies that own, manage, and operate nuclear power plants can be expected to continue to rely on technology as a vital element of success. Inherent with the operations of the nuclear power industry in many parts of the world is the close connection between efficiency of power plant operations and successful business survival. The relationship among power plant availability, reliability of systems and components, and viability of the enterprise is more evident than ever. Technology decisions need to be accomplished that reflect business strategies, work processes, as well as needs of stakeholders and authorities. Such rigor is needed to address overarching concerns such as power plant life extension and license renewal, new plant orders, outage management, plant safety, inventory management etc. Particular to power plant reliability, the prudent leveraging of technology as a key to future success is vital. A dominant concern is effective asset management as physical plant assets age. Many plants are in, or are entering in, a situation in which systems and component design life and margins are converging such that failure threats can come into play with increasing frequency. Wisely selected technologies can be vital to the identification of emerging threats to reliable performance of key plant features and initiating effective maintenance actions and investments that can sustain or enhance current reliability in a cost effective manner. This attention to detail is vital to investment in new plants as well This paper and presentation will address (1) specific technology success in place at power plants, including nuclear, that integrates attention to attaining high plant reliability and effective maintenance actions as well as (2) complimentary actions that maximize technology success. In addition, the range of benefits that accrue as a result of

  7. Adaptation Stories

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    By Reg'

    formed a real foundation for endogenous, and, therefore, sustainable, strategies for adaptation to climate change. The stories reinforce what we already knew: that successful adaptation must come from the people who are living on the front lines, facing the many problems caused by climate change and climate variation.

  8. Bringing to Market Technological Innovation: What Distinguishes Success from Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Frattini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization is a critical step in technological innovation. Nevertheless, many scholars believe that it is often the least well-managed activity of the whole innovation process. The launch stage seems to be particularly critical in high-technology markets because of the volatility, interconnectedness and the proliferation of new technologies they experience. However, academic and practitioners’ literature has not, so far, developed a clear understanding of the factors that distinguish an effective commercialization from an unsuccessful one, especially in high-technology environments. This paper discusses the results of a research project that aimed to understand the ingredients for success in the commercialization of a technological innovation. The first stage of the research consisted of a comparative historical analysis of 18 innovations, which were commercialized in consumer high-tech markets in the last 30 years. The analysis advocates that an effective commercialization comprises three sub-strategies: Early adoption strategy, Adoption network configuration strategy and Mainstream adoption strategy, with each one characterized by a coherent set of commercialization dimensions. The relative importance of each sub-strategy in determining the innovation commercial success depends on the type of innovation that is commercialized, be it radical or incremental and discontinuous or continuous.

  9. QA success stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, R.B.

    1982-07-01

    Many manufacturers who have implemented quality programs are claiming substantial benefits from them. They consider costs due to quality in the same light as design development or manufacturing improvement, as an investment. Benefits include reduced scrap, rework and warranty claims and increased sales. They have proven that a strong quality program can have a very positive financial impact on a business

  10. PIME - success story continues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.

    2004-01-01

    ENS PIME 2004 - the latest in the annual series of conferences for nuclear communicators - took place in Barcelona on 8 to 12 February. This year, the main themes were nuclear and politics, public opinion, public acceptance, strategy and messages, stakeholder dialogue, nuclear safety, sustainable development and corporate social responsibility, experiences of the Spanish nuclear sector, media relations, crisis communications, communicating locally and the future of nuclear. The next PIME is due to be held in the Paris area on 13 to 16 February 2005. (orig.)

  11. The success factors in the new technology based firms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, C.; Villar, L.

    2007-01-01

    New Technology Based Firms (NTBFs) are taking an important role around competitive strategies inside different administrative frameworks, understanding their value for society and the need based on work plans to support their development. In this case, next lines are focused on conceptual side about NTBFs reality even more an analytical model proposal based on a structure composed by tangible and intangible assets what creating a global vision of entrepreneurial process and main issues what impacting on success rate. (Author) 88 refs

  12. Innovations in precision seed drilling technology: successes or failures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Benninger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the development of various technological alternatives in precision seed drilling, it has become a matter of research whether there are clear criteria for the success or failure of technological innovations. Around the turn to the 20th century, two very different precision seed drill methods were developed almost at the same time. Band seeding made it possible to achieve nearly perfect single grain sowing. For this purpose, individual, equally spaced seeds were embedded into bands of paper or cotton. In the field, these seed tapes were then unreeled from large drums. The pneumatic system proposed in 1897, by contrast, introduced grain singling using a vacuum for the first time. Although band seeding presented a satisfactory technological solution, it was never widely applied. Pneumatic systems, on the other hand, took long to catch on and only started to be successful in the late 1960s. Up to then, these innovative systems had to be considered as failures. Changing the period under review, however, may completely reverse the assessment of whether an innovation is a success or a failure.

  13. Explanatory Definitions of the Technology Push Success Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Matti Sarja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main task for most development-intensive organizations is to create, develop and commercialize new products and services. Because development processes are risky and failure rates are high, especially in the case of technology pushed projects, unambiguous success factors are valuable knowledge for the management of development-intensive firms. New product development and innovation literature has presented many success factors for developed products, but, unfortunately, many of them are nebulous in nature. The aim of this paper is to clarify what elements comprise the exact factors. After an extensive review and screening of the technology push success factor related literature, a total of 13 success factors were rationalized and transcribed according the previous literature. As a result, three separate keynotes were recognized, and the survey instrument framework was proposed. The practical relevance of this study is to help firm management to recognize the real actions needed to reduce product development risks and also to help scholars to focus on key issues when studying the key factors of breakthrough development cases.

  14. Success story: Nuclear production, fuel cycle and high level waste management in France: a contribution to long term energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear energy, with no CO 2 emission, is a prominent contributor to energy sustainability for long term electricity production, but within a set of major conditions for its continuation and development: - Maintaining both a high level of safety, in accordance with international state of art, and the overall competitiveness of nuclear energy in the long term; - Pursuing the development of credible, efficient and economic solutions for a good management of high level waste issue, while meeting the long term institutional and financial responsibilities; - Maintaining the nuclear option fully open, with long term operation of the existing NPPs, preparation of advanced future LWR and future design (Generation IV); - Providing continued effective proliferation resistance of nuclear energy systems; - Preserving future option for energy resource. This 'success story' will focus on the situation in France for nuclear production, spent fuel and high level waste management and mid term prospective. The paper has the following structure: Introduction; Nuclear industry in France; The current fuel cycle; The current studies for future back end options; Conclusion. In conclusion one underlines that nuclear generation plays a major role in France, as a safe, clean, economic and independent energy resource, and will continue in the long term, while preparing for advanced reactors (EPR and GEN4). The closed fuel cycle strategy implemented in France, involving reprocessing of spent fuel and MOX recycling, has gained an extensive experience feedback and has reached an industrial and mature stage. It brings a robust answer to HLW treatment, with vitrification of high level waste within glass canister, while preserving energy resource for long term and meeting cost effectiveness imperative with existing facilities operated in the long run

  15. Kayla's Story Is Our Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strusberg, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    As a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, I find myself reading a lot of posts on various birth-related Facebook groups. It's important for me to know the issues women are talking about, asking about, and concerned about. Late last year, I found myself drawn to the real-time labor of a woman in New Mexico who was desperately trying for a successful vaginal birth after cesarean. She was using the virtual Facebook group as her literal emotional support, and the reaction was unlike anything I have ever seen online before. Literally hundreds of women around the world were following her story and rallying behind her-a woman they had never met. This is Kayla's story, and it is our story.

  16. Risk and Performance Technologies: Identifying the Keys to Successful Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, Lynn; Smith, Art; O'Regan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear power industry has been utilizing risk and performance based technologies for over thirty years. Applications of these technologies have included risk assessment (e.g. Individual Plant Examinations), burden reduction (e.g. Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection, RI-ISI) and risk management (Maintenance Rule, 10CFR50.65). Over the last five to ten years the number of risk-informed (RI) burden reduction initiatives has increased. Unfortunately, the efficiencies of some of these applications have been questionable. This paper investigates those attributes necessary to support successful, cost-effective RI-applications. The premise to this paper is that by understanding the key attributes that support one successful application, insights can be gleaned that will streamline/coordinate future RI-applications. This paper is an extension to a paper presented at the Pressure Vessel and Piping (PVP-2001) Conference. In that paper, a number issues and opportunities were identified that needed to be assessed in order to support future (and efficient) RI-applications. It was noted in the paper that a proper understanding and resolution of these issues will facilitate implementation of risk and performance technology in the operation, maintenance and design disciplines. In addition, it will provide the foundation necessary to support regulatory review and approval. (authors)

  17. SUCCESS CONCEPT ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio C. Montenegro Duarte

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the concept of success in project management that is applicable to the IT universe, from the classical theory associated with the techniques of project management. Therefore, it applies the theoretical analysis associated to the context of information technology in enterprises as well as the classic literature of traditional project management, focusing on its application in business information technology. From the literature developed in the first part of the study, four propositions were prepared for study which formed the basis for the development of the field research with three large companies that develop projects of Information Technology. The methodology used in the study predicted the development of the multiple case study. Empirical evidence suggests that the concept of success found in the classical literature in project management adjusts to the environment management of IT projects. Showed that it is possible to create the model of standard IT projects in order to replicate it in future derivatives projects, which depends on the learning acquired at the end of a long and continuous process and sponsorship of senior management, which ultimately results in its merger into the company culture.

  18. Success in large high-technology projects: What really works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, P.

    2014-08-01

    Despite a plethora of tools, technologies and management systems, successful execution of big science and engineering projects remains problematic. The sheer scale of globally funded projects such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Square Kilometre Array telescope means that lack of project success can impact both on national budgets, and collaborative reputations. In this paper, I explore data from contemporary literature alongside field research from several current high-technology projects in Europe and Australia, and reveal common `pressure points' that are shown to be key influencers of project control and success. I discuss the how mega-science projects sit between being merely complicated, and chaotic, and explain the importance of understanding multiple dimensions of project complexity. Project manager/leader traits are briefly discussed, including capability to govern and control such enterprises. Project structures are examined, including the challenge of collaborations. I show that early attention to building project resilience, curbing optimism, and risk alertness can help prepare large high-tech projects against threats, and why project managers need to understand aspects of `the silent power of time'. Mission assurance is advanced as a critical success function, alongside the deployment of task forces and new combinations of contingency plans. I argue for increased project control through industrial-style project reviews, and show how post-project reviews are an under-used, yet invaluable avenue of personal and organisational improvement. Lastly, I discuss the avoidance of project amnesia through effective capture of project knowledge, and transfer of lessons-learned to subsequent programs and projects.

  19. An evaluation of health information technology outsourcing success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malovec, Shannon N; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2015-01-01

    Outsourcing involves contracting out functions performed by an organization to another organization. Many healthcare organizations are exploring outsourcing as a way to address demands for health information technology (HIT). This study researches the success of outsourcing in the health informatics industry in Canada. The study is designed to help understand whether outsourcing four functions of HIT (i.e. development, implementation, operations, and maintenance) can prove successful for an organization. Findings demonstrate that outsourcing these four functions occurs in Canada; however, the research from the semi-structured interviews finds that operations and maintenance may be more commonly outsourced in Canada, over development and implementation functions. Despite this, findings from this research suggest that outsourcing development and implementation may offer more benefits and fewer challenges than outsourcing operations and maintenance. The research also finds that there can be benefits of outsourcing, such as gaining access to expertise and improving service levels. A weakness of outsourcing may be that internal knowledge is lost and having to manage the change required from outsourcing. The study proposes that there are many factors that need to be considered when outsourcing to ensure it is successful.

  20. Successful Teaching, Learning, and Use of Digital Mapping Technology in Mazvihwa, Rural Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitzel Solera, M. V.; Madzoro, S.; Solera, J.; Mhike Hove, E.; Changarara, A.; Ndlovu, D.; Chirindira, A.; Ndlovu, A.; Gwatipedza, S.; Mhizha, M.; Ndlovu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Participatory mapping is now a staple of community-based work around the world. Particularly for indigenous and rural peoples, it can represent a new avenue for environmental justice and can be a tool for culturally appropriate management of local ecosystems. We present a successful example of teaching and learning digital mapping technology in rural Zimbabwe. Our digital mapping project is part of the long-term community-based participatory research of The Muonde Trust in Mazvihwa, Zimbabwe. By gathering and distributing local knowledge and also bringing in visitors to share knowledge, Muonde has been able to spread relevant information among rural farmers. The authors were all members of Muonde or were Muonde's visitors, and were mentors and learners of digital mapping technologies at different times. Key successful characteristics of participants included patience, compassion, openness, perseverance, respect, and humility. Important mentoring strategies included: 1) instruction in Shona and in English, 2) locally relevant examples, assignments, and analogies motivated by real needs, 3) using a variety of teaching methods for different learning modalities, 4) building on and modifying familiar teaching methods, and 5) paying attention to the social and relational aspects of teaching and learning. The Muonde mapping team has used their new skills for a wide variety of purposes, including: identifying, discussing, and acting on emerging needs; using digital mapping for land-use and agropastoral planning; and using mapping as a tool for recording and telling important historical and cultural stories. Digital mapping has built self-confidence as well as providing employable skills and giving Muonde more visibility to other local and national non-governmental organizations, utility companies, and educational institutions. Digital mapping, as taught in a bottom-up, collaborative way, has proven to be both accessible and of enormous practical use to rural Zimbabweans.

  1. Issues Impairing the Success of Neural Implant Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spiers

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available By monitoring signals from the central nervous system, humans can be provided with a novel extra channel of communication that can, for example, be used for the voluntary control of peripheral devices. Meanwhile, stimulation of neural tissue can bring about sensation such as touch, can facilitate feedback from external, potentially remote devices and even opens up the possibility of new sensory input for the individual to experience. The concept of successfully harnessing and stimulating nervous system activity is though something that can only be achieved through an appropriate interface. However, interfacing the nervous system by means of implant technology carries with it many problems and dangers. Further, results achieved may not be as expected or as they at first appear. This paper describes a comparative study investigating different implant types and procedures. It is aimed at highlighting potential problem areas and is intended to provide a useful reference explaining important tolerances and limits.

  2. E-Counselling Implementation: Students' Life Stories and Counselling Technologies in Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolog, Emmanuel Awuni; Sutinen, Erkki; Vanhalakka-Ruoho, Marjatta

    2014-01-01

    Given the current global trend of mimicking real life situations into digital counselling games and its related digital counselling platforms, we decided to contextually understand from the Ghanaian senior high school students, their life challenges arising from their life stories. The study also explores the extent to which ICT is currently being…

  3. Midwifery education and technology enhanced learning: Evaluating online story telling in preregistration midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    A major issue regarding the implementation of blended learning for preregistration health programmes is the analysis of students' perceptions and attitudes towards their learning. It is the extent of the embedding of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) into the higher education curriculum that makes this analysis so vital. This paper reports on the quantitative results of a UK based study that was set up to respond to the apparent disconnect between technology enhanced education provision and reliable student evaluation of this mode of learning. Employing a mixed methods research design, the research described here was carried to develop a reliable and valid evaluation tool to measure acceptability of and satisfaction with a blended learning approach, specifically designed for a preregistration midwifery module offered at level 4. Feasibility testing of 46 completed blended learning evaluation questionnaires - Student Midwife Evaluation of Online Learning Effectiveness (SMEOLE) - using descriptive statistics, reliability and internal consistency tests. Standard deviations and mean scores all followed predicted pattern. Results from the reliability and internal consistency testing confirm the feasibility of SMEOLE as an effective tool for measuring student satisfaction with a blended learning approach to preregistration learning. The analysis presented in this paper suggests that we have been successful in our aim to produce an evaluation tool capable of assessing the quality of technology enhanced, University level learning in Midwifery. This work can provide future benchmarking against which midwifery, and other health, blended learning curriculum planning could be structured and evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. E3 Success Story -Reducing Rework With the Lean and Green Advantage: Metal Finishing Technologies, Inc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Suppliers Network representatives Judy Wlodarczyk and Bill Caplan, of CONNSTEP, Inc., trained the MFT review team, and together they completed current and future state value stream maps for the zinc plating line.

  5. Tracking Success in Large Introductory Classes using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    A common problem frequently encountered in large introductory classes is the anonymity experienced by students. An effort is underway at Ball State University to explore the impact of technology on reducing this anonymity and improving student performance and success. In preparation for this study, performance and success measures for students in a previous class have been examined to provide background for construction of a model for formal testing and a control group for comparison of future results. Student performance measures obtained early in the course and final course grades were examined to identify potential early warning indicators that might be used to plan interventions much earlier than the traditional midterm course reports used to alert freshmen at academic risk. Class participation scores were based on data obtained with a personal response system (i>clicker). The scores were scaled to reflect about 80% comprehension and 20% attendance. Homework scores were obtained using the LON-CAPA Course Management System and instructional materials created by the author. Substantial linear correlations exist between 1) Exam 1 Scores after Four Weeks and 2) Raw Class Participation Scores for the First Six Weeks and the Final Course Score. A more modest linear correlation was found between 3) Homework Scores for First Six Weeks and Final Course Score. Of these three measures, only Class Participation Scores identified all students who ultimately received course grades lower than C. Several students scored in the danger zone according to Homework and Class Participation Scores but earned course grades of C or better. It appears that an early warning plan based on Class Participation Scores would permit effective identification of at-risk students early in the course.

  6. Development and approval of live attenuated influenza vaccines based on Russian master donor viruses: Process challenges and success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Larisa; Yeolekar, Leena; Kiseleva, Irina; Isakova-Sivak, Irina

    2016-10-26

    Influenza is a viral infection that affects much of the global population each year. Vaccination remains the most effective tool for preventing the disease. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has been used since the 1950s to protect humans against seasonal influenza. LAIVs developed by the Institute of Experimental Medicine (IEM), Saint Petersburg, Russia, have been successfully used in Russia since 1987. In 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a Global action plan for influenza vaccines (GAP). WHO, recognizing potential advantages of LAIV over the inactivated influenza vaccine in a pandemic situation, included LAIV in the GAP. BioDiem Ltd., a vaccine development company based in Melbourne, Australia which held the rights for the Russian LAIV, licensed this technology to WHO in 2009. WHO was permitted to grant sub-licenses to vaccine manufacturers in newly industrialized and developing countries to use the Russian LAIV for the development, manufacture, use and sale of pandemic and seasonal LAIVs. To date, WHO has granted sub-licenses to vaccine manufacturers in China (Changchun BCHT Biotechnology Co., Ltd.), India (Serum Institute of India Pvt. Ltd.) and Thailand (Government Pharmaceutical Organization). In parallel, in 2009, IEM signed an agreement with WHO, under which IEM committed to supply pandemic and seasonal candidate vaccine viruses to the sub-licensees. This paper describes the progress made by collaborators from China, India, Russia and Thailand in developing preventive measures, including LAIV against pandemic influenza. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sustainable Technologies: Finding Success the Second Time Around

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, Kevin

    2016-03-03

    Presentation provides background on how to identify and quantify improvements for advanced vehicle technology and commercial fleet operations. It gives examples of next generation technology improvements that have been implemented within commercial fleets.

  8. Liability and the marketing of high-tech law enforcement technologies: the air bag and barrier strip stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlin, Trudy K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will present information regarding the fate of technologies developed in the national laboratory, which were designed to meet a specific law enforcement user need, but were or were not successful in making it to market. The two examples, one successful and one not completely successful, will be presented in a perspective to provide discussion as too why their individual fates were as such. The two examples, air bag restraint and barriers strip, both law enforcement technologies, were both designed to meet a targeted need, and yet their success was different. One has been licensed to an industry partner and is currently on the shelf for purchase. The other is awaiting a licensee and its future is still undetermined. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the specific paths these technologies have taken to market, and to demonstrate that even when researchers have a good idea, their technology may never make it to the shelf. This paper also addresses some of the pitfalls of what occurs when researchers are too distant from the user community and what that distance can do to a successful or unsuccessful technology. Understanding this process is essential to the user communities that anticipate the market of technologies that they often help assist with or provide insight to. It is also important for users and manufacturers to understand why the research and development process can take years, and why some things do not fully actualize in accepted technologies.

  9. Successes of Small Business Innovation Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Ganss, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    This booklet of success stories highlights the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that support NASA missions and also have high commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. This booklet emphasizes the integration and incorporation of technologies into NASA missions and other government projects. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further usage and application of the SBIR developed technologies and also to promote further commercialization of these products.

  10. European Union funded project on the development of a whole complement deficiency screening ELISA-A story of success and an exceptional manager: Mohamed R. Daha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würzner, Reinhard; Tedesco, Francesco; Garred, Peter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Truedsson, Lennart; Turner, Malcolm W; Sommarin, Yngve; Wieslander, Jörgen; Sim, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    A whole complement ELISA-based assay kit, primarily designed to screen for deficiencies in components of the complement system was developed during a European Union grant involving more than a dozen European scientists and a small-medium enterprise company (Wieslab, which later merged into Eurodiagnostica). The consortium was led by Prof. Mohamed R. Daha who had already guided a preceding European grant which prepared the ground for this endeavor to create a novel and sophisticated complement measurement tool. The final result of the grant was a scientific publication (Seelen et al., 2005, J. Immunol. Methods 296, 187-198) and a commercially available complement deficiency screening kit, WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen. Thereafter, the group decided to carry on with a grant, located at Innsbruck Medical University, and supported by royalties and unrestricted educational grants from Eurodiagnostica, Malmö, entitled "Search for Applications for WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen (SAW)" with the aim to look for further applications of this assay. During the latter project the group organized several scientific meetings aimed at evaluating the use of the assay as well as developing further branches of its platform. A look back over almost two decades reveals a great story of excellent research which was also commercially successful, fulfilling the aims of European Union grants. It is also a story of ageless friendship, only possible due to the vision and guidance of an exceptional manager: Moh Daha. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenomenological Investigation of Elementary School Teachers Who Successfully Integrated Instructional Technology into the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lori Raquel; Shepard, MaryFriend

    2011-01-01

    Technology integration in school curricula promotes student achievement, yet many teachers are not successfully integrating technology for learning. This phenomenological study explored the strategies of 10 elementary teachers in Georgia who overcame barriers to technology integration to successfully incorporate lessons within the public school…

  12. Bringing to Market Technological Innovation: What Distinguishes Success from Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Frattini, Federico; Massis, Alfredo De; Chiesa, Vittorio; Cassia, Lucio; Campopiano, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Commercialization is a critical step in technological innovation. Nevertheless, many scholars believe that it is often the least well-managed activity of the whole innovation process. The launch stage seems to be particularly critical in high-technology markets because of the volatility, interconnectedness and the proliferation of new technologies they experience. However, academic and practitioners' literature has not, so far, developed a clear understanding of the factors that distinguish a...

  13. Examining the Relationship between Technology Leadership Behaviors and Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations invest substantial resources into technology initiatives intended to generate advantages associated with improved use of human resources, increased operational efficiencies, and creating new capacities within processes and products; however, there is limited knowledge regarding how technology leadership behaviors influence project…

  14. A Synthesis and Survey of Critical Success Factors for Computer Technology Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    The author investigated the existence of critical success factors for computer technology projects. Current research literature and a survey of experienced project managers indicate that there are 23 critical success factors (CSFs) that correlate with project success. The survey gathered an assessment of project success and the degree to which…

  15. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program (Overview of the Evolution and Success Stories from MOD During the Space Shuttle program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbell, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA's other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. This paper provides specific examples that illustrate how MOD's focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. This paper will discuss specific examples for the Plan, Train, Fly, and Facilities aspects within MOD. This paper also provides a discussion of the joint civil servant/contractor environment and the relative badge-less society within MOD. Several Shuttle mission related examples have also been included that encompass all of the aforementioned MOD elements and attributes, and are used to show significant MOD successes within the Shuttle Program. These examples include the STS-49 Intelsat recovery and repair, the (post-Columbia accident) TPS inspection process and the associated R-Bar Pitch Maneuver for ISS missions, and the STS-400 rescue mission preparation efforts for the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.

  16. Successful Student Recruitment Using Direct Marketing and Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merante, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    Educational marketing--which uses marketing methods unique to education institutions, including segmentation, direct mail, and information technology--is discussed. A model for student recruitment developed by the University of Pittsburgh is described. (Author/MLW)

  17. The Use of Peer Tutoring to Improve the Passing Rates in Mathematics Placement Exams of Engineering Students: A Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Rolando; Morales, Juan C.; Rivera, Gloribel

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a highly successful peer tutoring program that has resulted in an improvement in the passing rates of mathematics placement exams from 16% to 42%, on average. Statistical analyses were conducted using a Chi-Squared (?[superscript 2]) test for independence and the results were statistically significant (p-value much less than…

  18. Intraoral Scanner Technologies: A Review to Make a Successful Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Richert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome difficulties associated with conventional techniques, impressions with IOS (intraoral scanner and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies were developed for dental practice. The last decade has seen an increasing number of optical IOS devices, and these are based on different technologies; the choice of which may impact on clinical use. To allow informed choice before purchasing or renewing an IOS, this article summarizes first the technologies currently used (light projection, distance object determination, and reconstruction. In the second section, the clinical considerations of each strategy such as handling, learning curve, powdering, scanning paths, tracking, and mesh quality are discussed. The last section is dedicated to the accuracy of files and of the intermaxillary relationship registered with IOS as the rendering of files in the graphical user interface is often misleading. This overview leads to the conclusion that the current IOS is adapted for a common practice, although differences exist between the technologies employed. An important aspect highlighted in this review is the reduction in the volume of hardware which has led to an increase in the importance of software-based technologies.

  19. Correlational Study of Risk Management and Information Technology Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Seth J.

    2014-01-01

    Many IT projects fail despite the best efforts to keep these projects within budget, schedule, and scope. Few studies have looked at the effect of project risk management tools and techniques on project success. The primary focus of this study was to examine the extent to which utilization of project risk management processes influence project…

  20. Success tree analysis on the technologies development for FBR commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Shigehiro; Taniyama, Hiroshi; Nagai, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain a secure energy supply in future, it is important to establish a system for plutonium utilization via the FBR which is superior to the uranium utilization system with respect to both safety and good economics. In spite of this obvious need, the commercialization of the FBR is facing delays. Although several factors, for example, improvement of LWR technologies, stable supply of low cost uranium, opposition to nuclear power, etc. are contributors, the primary reason for the delay is the unfavorable economics of the FBR itself. In this paper the key technologies leading to reduced FBR costs are identified and their development strategies are discussed. (author)

  1. How great is Latvia's success story? The economic, social and political consequences of the recent financial crisis in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Austers, Aldis

    2014-01-01

    The current state of Latvia can be best described in medical terms: the patient is pale, but alive. The financial woes have been successfully resolved, but economic, social and political challenges remain. The crisis is continuing to affect the fabric of social and political life in Latvia. This paper looks at the economic, social and political consequences of the recent financial crisis and the ensuing economic collapse in Latvia and suggests some remedial actions.

  2. Technology Successes in Hanford Tank Waste Storage and Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, E. J.

    2002-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is leading the River Protection Project (RPP), which is responsible for dispositioning approximately 204,000 cubic meters (54 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste that has accumulated in 177 large underground tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. The RPP is comprised of five major elements: storage of the waste, retrieval of the waste from the tanks, treatment of the waste, disposal of treated waste, and closure of the tank facilities. Approximately 3785 cubic meters (1 million gallons) of waste have leaked from the older ''single-shell tanks.'' Sixty-seven of the 147 single shell tanks are known or assumed ''leakers.'' These leaks have resulted in contaminant plumes that extend from the tank to the groundwater in a number of tank farms. Retrieval and closure of the leaking tanks complicates the ORP technical challenge because cleanup decisions must consider the impacts of past leaks along with a strategy for retrieving the waste in the tanks. Completing the RPP mission as currently planned and with currently available technologies will take several decades and tens of billions of dollars. RPP continue to pursue the benefits from deploying technologies that reduce risk to human health and the environment, as well as, the cost of cleanup. This paper discusses some of the recent technology partnering activities with the DOE Office of Science and Technology activities in tank waste retrieval and storage

  3. Aerospace Technology Curriculum Guide. Invest in Success. Vo. Ed. #260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains standards for an articulated secondary and postsecondary curriculum in aerospace technology. The curriculum standards can be used to ensure that vocational programs meet the needs of local business and industry. The first part of the document contains a task list and student performance standards for the aerospace technology…

  4. Barriers to Successful Information Technology (IT) Utilization by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research evaluated barriers to the use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) among librarians in academic libraries in Ogun State, Nigeria. One hundred and twenty one (121) structured questionnaires were administered in a total sampling technique among librarians in twelve institutions. The questionnaire ...

  5. Two perspectives on a successful lab/industry technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; Ulbrich, R.

    1995-01-01

    Technology transfer from government laboratories to private business is of increasing concern in today's marketplace. Some prospective partners (on both sides) believe that technology transfer is a relatively simple process requiring little or no extra effort from the participants. In the authors experience this is not true and, in fact, positive results from a collaboration are directly proportional to the effort that both parties invest in the relationship. Communication, both between prospective partners before an agreement and between partners following the agreement, is essential. Neither technology nor marketing can stand by itself; it is the combination of the two that can produce a useful and available product. Laboratories and industries often have very different ways of looking at almost everything. Misunderstandings arising from these differences can short-circuit the transfer process or result in the production of a product that is unsalable. The authors will cover some of their experiences, potential problems, and their solutions. Examples discussed here is transfer of technology for long-range alpha detection developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and transferred to Eberline Instrument Corporation

  6. Field experience with the application and operation of permanent magnet motors in the ESP Industry: success stories and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagalovskiy, A.; Gorshenin, K. [Borets Company, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Over the past 7 years Borets Company has commercialized a permanent magnet motor (PMM) with a specialized controller that is capable of replacing the traditional motor used in ESP systems. Since 2006 more than 1400 Borets Company PMM systems have been installed by oil companies. This paper will provide an overview of the application environment covered by these installations and contrast the performance for the PMM system versus the traditional 2- pole, 3-phase ESP systems that were replaced. Results will include the lessons learned, best practices developed, and benefits realized by the operator. The PMM practice will be of value to new operators as this technology is introduced to other regions of the globe as well as the expansion of this technology into the ESPCP-PMM market. (author)

  7. Final Verification Success Story Using the Triad Approach at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Melton Valley Soils and Sediment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.A.; Haas, D.A.; Cange, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently published guidance on the Triad approach, which supports the use of smarter, faster, and better technologies and work strategies during environmental site assessment, characterization, and cleanup. The Melton Valley Soils and Sediment Project (Project) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory embraced this three-pronged approach to characterize contaminants in soil/sediment across the 1000-acre Melton Valley Watershed. Systematic Project Planning is the first of three prongs in the Triad approach. Management initiated Project activities by identifying key technical personnel, included regulators early in the planning phase, researched technologies, and identified available resources necessary to meet Project objectives. Dynamic Work Strategies is the second prong of the Triad approach. Core Team members, including State and Federal regulators, helped develop a Sampling and Analysis Plan that allowed experienced field managers to make real-time, in-the-field decisions and, thus, to adjust to conditions unanticipated during the planning phase. Real-time Measurement Technologies is the third and last prong of the Triad approach. To expedite decision-making, the Project incorporated multiple in-field technologies, including global positioning system equipment integrated with field screening instrumentation, magnetometers for utility clearance, and an on-site gamma spectrometer (spec) for rapid contaminant speciation and quantification. As a result of a relatively complex but highly efficient program, a Project field staff of eight collected approximately 1900 soil samples for on-site gamma spec analysis (twenty percent were also shipped for off-site analyses), 4.7 million gamma radiation measurements, 1000 systematic beta radiation measurements, and 3600 systematic dose rate measurements between July 1, 2004, and October 31, 2005. The site database previously contained results for less than 500 soil samples dating

  8. Factors that Impact Software Project Success in Offshore Information Technology (IT) Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edara, Venkatarao

    2011-01-01

    Information technology (IT) projects are unsuccessful at a rate of 65% to 75% per year, in spite of employing the latest technologies and training employees. Although many studies have been conducted on project successes in U.S. companies, there is a lack of research studying the impact of various factors on software project success in offshore IT…

  9. Extreme Environments Facilitate Hybrid Superiority – The Story of a Successful Daphnia galeata × longispina Hybrid Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Johanna; Gießler, Sabine; Poxleitner, Monika; Navas Faria, Amanda; Yin, Mingbo; Wolinska, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization within the animal kingdom has long been underestimated. Hybrids have often been considered less fit than their parental species. In the present study, we observed that the Daphnia community of a small lake was dominated by a single D. galeata × D. longispina hybrid clone, during two consecutive years. Notably, in artificial community set-ups consisting of several clones representing parental species and other hybrids, this hybrid clone took over within about ten generations. Neither the fitness assay conducted under different temperatures, or under crowded and non-crowded environments, nor the carrying capacity test revealed any outstanding life history parameters of this hybrid clone. However, under simulated winter conditions (i.e. low temperature, food and light), the hybrid clone eventually showed a higher survival probability and higher fecundity compared to parental species. Hybrid superiority in cold-adapted traits leading to an advantage of overwintering as parthenogenetic lineages might consequently explain the establishment of successful hybrids in natural communities of the D. longispina complex. In extreme cases, like the one reported here, a superior hybrid genotype might be the only clone alive after cold winters. Overall, superiority traits, such as enhanced overwintering here, might explain hybrid dominance in nature, especially in extreme and rapidly changing environments. Although any favoured gene complex in cyclic parthenogens could be frozen in successful clones independent of hybridization, we did not find similarly successful clones among parental species. We conclude that the emergence of the observed trait is linked to the production of novel recombined hybrid genotypes. PMID:26448651

  10. Simulation: Moving from Technology Challenge to Human Factors Success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, Derek A.; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J.; Kilkenny, Caroline; White, Mark D.; Bech, Bo; Lonn, Lars; Bello, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.

  11. Successful transfer of nuclear technology by the aid of scientific and technological cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Nentwich, D.

    1977-01-01

    The good results obtained with the nuclear power plants in operation and especially the world-wide increase of prices of fossile energy sources have caused many developing countries to take a special interest in the use of nuclear energy for a long-term energy supply and the set-up and extension of their own industry as a means to ameliorate the living standard. On the other hand, the pre-conditions for the preparation, planning and the economical use of nuclear energy which cannot be realized by simply purchasing a modern nuclear power station are lacking in most of these countries. A timely and careful preparation is therefore imperative to realize the plan of introducing nuclear energy. This can certainly be done only with the help of international support in the frame of bilateral or multilateral agreements. Without going into details of the variety of possibilities within international organizations, such as IAEA, this paper shows examples of successfully carried out bilateral cooperation between the Federal Republic of Germany and a number of developing countries of very different characteristics. A basic requirement for a successful transfer of technology is a high knowledge level of the indigenous scientists and engineers. Therefore, programmes for training and education and for information exchange in the Federal Republic of Germany as well as in the partner country are presented. Based on these, the means and methods of planning, performance and quality assurance are explained by practical examples and are related to the progress achieved in the use of nuclear energy and in establishing a national industry in the developing countries. Finally, the achieved results are critically analyzed, recommendations for future projects with other countries are given, and the successful interconnection of bilateral efforts with multilaterial projects of IAEA, UNDP, etc., is shown as a particularly promising method

  12. Assessing the Relationship between Ethical Project Management and Information Technology Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Byron Winter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to assess the relationship between ethical project management and information technology (IT) project success. The success of IT projects is important for organizational success, but the rate of IT projects is historically low, costing billions of dollars annually. Using four key ethical variables…

  13. Building our stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for our first TEFI regional conference. Storytelling is a powerful way of exploring, linking and crafting values, articulating them is such a way as to instil action. This conference proceedings assembles 31research stories of sustainable, caring and ethical worldmaking in tourism.......Tourism transforms people and places. New stakeholders are emerging, landscapes of power are shifting, and lines of responsibilities are being redrawn. Everyday stories of coping, success, empowerment, nurturing, relationship building and activism are important tools for reflection and learning...

  14. How to improve the success rate of mouse cloning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, Nguyen Van; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-02-01

    It has now been 13 years since the first cloned mammal Dolly the sheep was generated from somatic cells using nuclear transfer (SCNT). Since then, this technique has been considered an important tool not only for animal reproduction but also for regenerative medicine. However, the success rate is still very low and the mechanisms involved in genomic reprogramming are not yet clear. Moreover, the NT technique requires donated fresh oocyte, which raises ethical problems for production of human cloned embryo. For this reason, the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for genomic reprogramming and for regenerative medicine is currently a hot topic in this field. However, we believe that the NT approach remains the only valid way for the study of reproduction and basic biology. For example, only the NT approach can reveal dynamic and global modifications in the epigenome without using genetic modification, and it can generate offspring from a single cell or even a frozen dead body. Thanks to much hard work by many groups, cloning success rates are increasing slightly year by year, and NT cloning is now becoming a more applicable method. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  15. Radical Technological Innovation–Comparison of a Critical Success Factors Framework with Existing Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Wohlfeil; Orestis Terzidis; Louisa Hellmann

    2015-01-01

    Radical technological innovations enable companies to reach strong market positions and are thus desirable. On the other hand, the innovation process is related to significant costs and risks. Hence, the knowledge of the factors that influence success is crucial for technology driven companies. Taking a previously developed framework of Critical Success Factors for radical technological innovations as a reference model, we conducted a structured and focused literature rev...

  16. From molecular insights and chemical technologies to communications and expert systems: A few short thermodynamic stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This Hugh M. Huffman Memorial Award Lecture illustrates the power of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics and the unique role of thermochemical data by a variety of studies in very diverse scientific and industrial fields ranging from conformational analysis to optimization of high-tech space and mass-scale chemical technologies and from data communications to data expert systems for chemical process design

  17. Qatar's Educational System in the Technology-Driven Era: Long Story Short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Qatar's educational system. Specifically, it focuses on the national educational reform that has been unfolding since 2003, tracks its progress, and describes the extent to which educational technology is utilized within Qatari institutions of the higher education. The paper ends with recommendations for practice…

  18. Success Stories in Radiotherapy Development Projects: Upgrading Radiotherapy Services in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Chapter 28.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojkovski, I.

    2017-01-01

    In summary, the assistance from the IAEA has been essential and has helped the University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology to achieve its current level of competence in radiation oncology. Proper re-equipment of the Clinic and building of human resource capacity led to the successful implementation of three complex projects. In addition, the involvement of and support by the IAEA played a role in making the case for the importance of radiotherapy in the country’s health care system, leading to a substantial investment by the Government in comprehensive cancer care. The benefits of these achievements have reached all stakeholders. Medical professionals have become more motivated with the improvement in working conditions and are now able to provide the best possible care to their patients. Patients are also satisfied that they are receiving modern radiotherapy treatment in their home country. Finally, there will be a positive financial impact resulting from the substantial decrease in costs of patients’ treatments made possible by building radiotherapy capacity in the country. These are concrete and effective actions taken by an international organization in the fight against cancer, and represent the investment of significant resources that have resulted in improved infrastructure, an expanded workforce and increased access for patients to modern diagnosis and treatment

  19. Remediating Contaminated Sediments in the Ashtabula Harbor as Part of the Ashtabula River Area of Concern: A Collaboration Success Story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diggs, I.W.; Case, J.L.; Rule, R.W.; Snyder, M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District (USACE), in close collaboration with the USEPA and members of an Ashtabula, Ohio, stakeholder advocacy group, were able to achieve major success in mitigating ecological impacts from contaminated sediments deposited in the lower Ashtabula River and Ashtabula Harbor after years of effort to obtain the federal funding needed to do so. The river and harbor were subject to unregulated discharges of hazardous chemicals, heavy metals, and low-level radiological contaminants from decades of operations by a variety of industrial, manufacturing, processing and production activities located near or adjacent to the river and harbor areas. Conditions in the ecosystem in and around the lower portion of the river deteriorated to the point that it was designated a Great Lakes Area of Concern (AOC) in 1983. The advocacy group known as the Ashtabula River Partnership (ARP), facilitated through efforts by both USACE and USEPA, developed an innovative plan to remediate the Ashtabula River AOC by conducting a two-phase project, completed with combined funding authorized under the Great Lakes Legacy Act (GLLA) of 2002, and Section 312(a) of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1990. Removal of nearly 527,000 m 3 of contaminated sediments from the AOC would significantly reduce the contaminant source term and produce favorable conditions for re-establishing ecosystem balance. This would also be the first project in the nation completed by USACE under its authority to perform environmental dredging covered by WRDA Section 312(a). (authors)

  20. "Physics Stories": How the Early Technologies of High Voltage and High Vacuum Led to "Modern Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2018-05-01

    Some of you may remember the 1979 television series "Connections" that was written and narrated by James Burke, a British science writer. Burke's technique was to choose a number of seemingly unrelated ideas and show how they led to developments in science and technology. This is an enjoyable business, even if some of the connections seem to be stretched at times, and led to a book by Burke. In a number of talks that I have given over the years, I have made somewhat less fanciful connections that suggest how the technologies of high vacuum and high voltage led to what used to be called "modern physics." Today we might limit the "modern" era to the years from 1890 to 1920 that gave the first workable theories of small-scale physics.

  1. Creativity and Technology in Mathematics: From Story Telling to Algorithmic with Op'Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercat, Christian; Filho, Pedro Lealdino; El-Demerdash, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    This article describes some of the results of the European project mcSquared (http://mc2-project.eu/) regarding the use of Op'Art and optical illusion pieces as a tool to foster modeling and creative mathematical thinking in students. We present briefly the c-book technology and some results we got experimenting it. The Op'Art movement, with…

  2. Stratospheric ozone, global warming, and the principle of unintended consequences-An ongoing science and policy success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stephen O; Halberstadt, Marcel L; Borgford-Parnell, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    In 1974, Mario Molina and F. Sherwood Rowland warned that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could destroy the stratospheric ozone layer that protects Earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation. In the decade after, scientists documented the buildup and long lifetime of CFCs in the atmosphere; found the proof that CFCs chemically decomposed in the stratosphere and catalyzed the depletion of ozone; quantified the adverse effects; and motivated the public and policymakers to take action. In 1987, 24 nations plus the European Community signed the Montreal Protocol. Today, 25 years after the Montreal Protocol was agreed, every United Nations state is a party (universal ratification of 196 governments); all parties are in compliance with the stringent controls; 98% of almost 100 ozone-depleting chemicals have been phased out worldwide; and the stratospheric ozone layer is on its way to recovery by 2065. A growing coalition of nations supports using the Montreal Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons, which are ozone safe but potent greenhouse gases. Without rigorous science and international consensus, emissions of CFCs and related ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) could have destroyed up to two-thirds of the ozone layer by 2065, increasing the risk of causing millions of cancer cases and the potential loss of half of global agricultural production. Furthermore, because most ODSs are also greenhouse gases, CFCs and related ODSs could have had the effect of the equivalent of 24-76 gigatons per year of carbon dioxide. This critical review describes the history of the science of stratospheric ozone depletion, summarizes the evolution of control measures and compliance under the Montreal Protocol and national legislation, presents a review of six separate transformations over the last 100 years in refrigeration and air conditioning (A/C) technology, and illustrates government-industry cooperation in continually improving the environmental performance of motor vehicle A/C. [Box

  3. Stratospheric ozone, global warming, and the principle of unintended consequences--an ongoing science and policy success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stephen O; Halberstadt, Marcel L; Borgford-Parnell, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    In 1974, Mario Molina and F. Sherwood Rowland warned that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could destroy the stratospheric ozone layer that protects Earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation. In the decade after scientists documented the buildup and long lifetime of CFCs in the atmosphere; found the proof that CFCs chemically decomposed in the stratosphere and catalyzed the depletion of ozone; quantified the adverse effects; and motivated the public and policymakers to take action. In 1987, 24 nations plus the European Community signed the Montreal Protocol. Today, 25 years after the Montreal Protocol was agreed, every United Nations state is a party (universal ratification of 196 governments); all parties are in compliance with the stringent controls; 98% of almost 100 ozone-depleting chemicals have been phased out worldwide; and the stratospheric ozone layer is on its way to recovery by 2065. A growing coalition of nations supports using the Montreal Protocol to phase down hydrofluorocarbons, which are ozone safe but potent greenhouse gases. Without rigorous science and international consensus, emissions of CFCs and related ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) could have destroyed up to two-thirds of the ozone layer by 2065, increasing the risk of causing millions of cancer cases and the potential loss of half of global agricultural production. Furthermore, because most, ODSs are also greenhouse gases, CFCs and related ODSs could have had the effect of the equivalent of 24-76 gigatons per year of carbon dioxide. This critical review describes the history of the science of stratospheric ozone depletion, summarizes the evolution of control measures and compliance under the Montreal Protocol and national legislation, presents a review of six separate transformations over the last 100 years in refrigeration and air conditioning (A/C) technology, and illustrates government-industry cooperation in continually improving the environmental performance of motor vehicle A/C.

  4. Barriers affecting successful technology enablement of supply chain: An Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, R.; Haleem, A.; Farooquie, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    In order to compete, organizations need to focus on improving supply chain and technology acts as a major enabler. Technology enablement of supply chain has not always been successful and has been examined by many researchers. The purpose of this paper is to do a systematic literature review of technology enabled supply chain from a strategic viewpoint. The literature is examined from two perspectives. Firstly, it studies the growing interest in technology-enabled supply chain in India. Secondly, it studies barriers affecting technology enablement of supply chain. The literature review identifies that technology enabled supply chain helps in improving performance via effective decision making, monitoring entire supply chain, faster reaction to customer service problems, etc. The research has emphasized the importance of 12 barriers affecting technology enablement. This research will help as a guide for practitioners in order to successfully implement technology and fills the gap in existing literature by highlighting and consolidating the significant research work done in past.

  5. Evaluation of Plant- Compost -Microorganisms Synergy for the Remediation of Diesel contaminated Soil: Success Stories from the Field Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Imran; Wimmer, Bernhard; Soja, Gerhard; Sessitsch, Angela; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2016-04-01

    Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contain a mixture of crude oil, gasoline, creosote and diesel is one of the most common groups of persistent organic pollutants. TPH enters into the ecosystem (soil, water and air) through leakage of underground storage tanks (LUST), accidental oil spills, transportation losses and industrial processes. Pollution associated with diesel oil and its refined products is of great concern worldwide due to its threats/damages for human and ecosystem health, soil structure and ground water quality. Extensive soils pollution with petroleum hydrocarbons results in extreme harsh surroundings, produce hydrophobic conditions and infertile soils that ultimately lead towards less plant and microorganisms growth. Among biological methods, bioremediation and phytoremediation are promising technologies that have both technical and ecological benefits as compared to convention methods. Within phytoremediation, rhizoremediation based on stimulation of degrading microorganism's population influenced by plant rhizospheric effect is known as main mechanism for phytoremediation of petroleum polluted soils. Composting along with rhizodegradtion was used to remediate freshly spilled soils at Lysimeter station Siebersdof, Austria. Experiment was started in July 2013 and will be monitored up to September 2016. Field station has 12 Lysimeter in total; each has length, width and depth of 100 cm respectively. Each Lysimeter was filled with normal agricultural soil from Siebersdof (0-70 cm), sand (70-85 cm) and stones (85-100cm). Sand and stones were added to support the normal leaching and percolation of water as we collected leachate samples after regular intervals. After filling, commercial diesel oil (2% w/w of 0-70 cm soil) was spilled on top of each Lysimeter as accidental spill occurs in filed. Compost was added at 0-15 cm layer (5% w/w of soil) to stimulate plant as well as microorganisms growth. Whole Lysimeter station was divided into three treatments

  6. Technology neutral licensing requirements: have we been successful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is Canada's nuclear regulator. In preparation for the licensing of the next generation of nuclear reactors in Canada, the CNSC has made major changes in its processes and procedures associated with all aspects of the licensing life cycle. These include: development of key regulatory documents outlining the CNSC expectations for the design and siting of new reactors; creation of applicant guidelines for completing licensing applications; creation of a comprehensive set of review guides, specifying how topics in applications are to be reviewed; performing pre-project design reviews for proposed new reactor technologies; and streamlining processes wherever possible, such as performing the environmental assessment and license to prepare site activities in parallel. The predicted workload associated with the nuclear renaissance in Canada is real. The CNSC is currently performing: 4 pre-project design reviews (for AECL's ACR-1000 and EC-6, Areva's EPR and Westinghouse's AP-1000), has received applications for 4 new builds (at Darlington, Bruce, Nanticoke and in Alberta) and is in the midst of performing the combined environmental assessment and license to prepare site phases for these sites. This is in addition to the work associated with: the licensing of new uranium mines; oversight of the existing reactor fleet; refurbishments at Bruce/Gentilly/Point Lepreau; license renewal for the NRU reactor; and oversight of our general client base of over 5000 licensees. In this presentation, experience to date with these new processes and procedures will be discussed, including: status of the current new build projects; anticipated new activities; lessons learned, especially the technology neutral approach; application to our other licensed activities, including non-power reactors; and work underway to further develop CNSC methods. Qualifications Needed to Design, Construct and Manufacture Nuclear Systems and Equipment, C. Voutsinos

  7. Decommissioning successes at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, A.C.; Hughes, F.P.; Trice, K.D.; Wolf, H.C.; Wheeler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Building 779, a cluster of 13 buildings located at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), was originally constructed in the early 1960s. The building was used to perform research and development associated with the nuclear weapons programs. The primary contaminants were plutonium and uranium, and these contaminants were dispersed throughout the facility. In 1998, Building 779 was selected to be the first plutonium facility at RFETS to be decommissioned. After extensive training, fieldwork was initiated with a single crew of 14 workers. Dismantling of the facility started with the removal and disposition of excess property. Today, thousands of pieces of property have been dispositioned and either recycled or disposed of as radioactive waste. The second facility at RFETS to begin D and D is Building 771. This facility was selected because of its extreme complexity and the desire to accelerate the RFETS closure to 2006. Building 771 is a 200,000-ft 2 , 10-structure, multistory facility with more than 230 glove boxes and 8 miles of plutonium processing piping. Building 771 was used for processing plutonium and actinides between 1953 and 1989. The facility experienced many modifications, substantial variation in operations, and several upsets resulting in radiological contamination over its 40-yr operating history. The most significant event was a major fire in 1957. The 1994 Plutonium Working Group Report on Environmental Safety and Health Vulnerabilities Associated with the Department of Energy's Plutonium Storage determined that Building 771 was the most dangerous building in America. Since the report was issued, a significant quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) has been removed, hydrogen has been vented, and the draining of high- and low-level solutions from tanks has been completed. Although these activities have lowered the risk, numerous complex tasks still remain to take the building to its final end point of a slab. Three major areas of

  8. Keys to successful D and D technology deployments at the INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.M.; Meservey, R. H.; Shoemaker, H.

    2000-01-01

    Seven improved decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) technologies were successfully deployed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) during the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (IDandD) project. The use of these improved technologies saved the INEEL $462K in fiscal year 1999, and is projected to save about $14M over the next ten years. Since deploying new technologies on DandD projects shows great potential for cost-savings, factors that led to successful deployment have been documented. These factors are described here as they apply to the seven deployments at the INEEL to assist with deployments at other DOE sites

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ...

  10. Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The means of producing high quality and safe rice and aquatic products through environmentally friendly approaches have become the focus of development of modern day rice-fish culture. Various research and experiments have been carried out to develop rice–fish eco-culture systems and models, which include design ...

  11. The Role of the Project Management Office on Information Technology Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jacob S.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of failed and challenged Information Technology (IT) projects is too high according to the CHAOS Studies by the Standish Group and the literature on project management (Standish Group, 2008). The CHAOS Studies define project success as meeting the triple constraints of scope, time, and cost. Assessing critical success factors is another…

  12. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. The relationship between systems development methodologies and Information Technology project success / Maphisa Shirley Nkone

    OpenAIRE

    Nkone, Maphisa Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between systems development methodologies (SDMs) and the success of Information Technology (IT) projects. The study also seeks to find other critical success factors (CSFs) that influence IT projects success. What initiated this study, with reference to the literature review, is the apparent general view that IT project deliveries are still late, over budget, and unpredictable (Chow & Cao, 2008:961; The Standish Group, 2004). To...

  14. The Effect of the Digital Classroom on Academic Success and Online Technologies Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozerbas, Mehmet Arif; Erdogan, Bilge Has

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe whether the learning environment created by digital classroom technologies has any effect on the academic success and online technologies self-efficacy of 7th grade students. In this study, an experimental design with a pre-test/post-test control group was used. The research was conducted with 58 students in a secondary…

  15. Technology Transfer Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Since its inception, Goddard has pursued a commitment to technology transfer and commercialization. For every space technology developed, Goddard strives to identify secondary applications. Goddard then provides the technologies, as well as NASA expertise and facilities, to U.S. companies, universities, and government agencies. These efforts are based in Goddard's Technology Commercialization Office. This report presents new technologies, commercialization success stories, and other Technology Commercialization Office activities in 1999.

  16. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  17. Revisiting Teacher Adoption of Technology: Research Implications and Recommendations for Successful Full Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckenmeyer, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Most teachers are still failing to fully integrate technologies in their classrooms to improve student achievement. If certain conditions exist, however, they are more likely to accept and use appropriate technologies in significant instructional ways. Relevant professional development and continuous access to needed resources are two significant…

  18. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-08

    This FY 2015 report updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  19. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-01

    This FY 2014 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  20. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-04-30

    This FY 2013 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  1. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  2. Analyzing the effects of information technology on supply chain integration: The role of ERP success mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Alimohamadian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzes the effects of Information Technology (IT on Supply Chain Integration (SCI through ERP mediator by proposing a conceptual model among these components. We also hypothesize that three constructs of IT influence on enterprise resource planning (ERP success and one construct of ERP success influences on SCI. To clarify the relationships among the constructs, structural equation model (SEM is conducted to examine the model fit and seven hypotheses. The data was collected from three Iranian firms through questionnaire with 23 questions adopted by past researches. The results confirmed that top management support of IT and employees’ general IT skills factors of IT enhance ERP success, and ERP success positively influences on Supply Chain Integration, so these two IT factors influence Supply Chain Integration through ERP success. Our data unsupported negative impact of satisfaction with legacy IT system on ERP success.

  3. The Power of Story: Using Personal Narrative, Computer Technology and Podcasting with Young Adult English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Susan Jacques

    2014-01-01

    One way to ensure a high quality, personalized literacy program for English language learners is to use the learners' own lives and experiences as curriculum. Creating spaces for students to compose and share stories results in a strong sense of community facilitates the development of authentic literacy skills and increases student motivation and…

  4. Assisted reproductive technology--IVF treatment in Ireland: a study of couples with successful outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Evelyn; Cotter, Noelle

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the experiences of twelve Irish couples who had successful IVF treatment in Ireland. Irish Medical guidelines specify that IVF may only be used when no other treatment is likely to be effective. This article is based on data drawn from a longitudinal research study by Cotter (2009) which tells the stories of 34 couples who sought fertility treatment. Initially, the women assumed that they would become pregnant when they stopped using contraception. As a couple, it was the 'right time' for them to have a child--they were ready, socially and financially. For several months they were patient, hoping it would happen naturally. With envy and some despair they watched as their friends had babies. Infertility came as a shock to most of them. They were reluctant to talk about it to anyone, and over time their anxieties were accompanied by feelings of regret, stigma and social exclusion. They finally sought medical treatment. The latter involved a series of diagnostic treatments, which eventually culminated in IVF which offered them a final chance of having a 'child of their own'. While IVF can be clinically assessed in terms of cycle success rates, their stories showed treatment as a series of discoveries, as an extensive range of diagnostic tests and procedures helped to reveal to them where their problems might lie. They described their treatments as a series of sequential 'hurdles' that they had to overcome, which further strengthened their resolve to try IVF. Much more knowledgeable at that stage, they embraced IVF as a final challenge with single minded dedication while drawing on all their psychological and biological resources to promote a successful outcome. Of the 34 couples who took part in the study, twelve got pregnant. Unfortunately, two children died shortly after birth but eighteen babies survived (see Table I). The findings suggest that health policy should raise awareness of infertility, and advise women to become aware of it

  5. Data Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts, Laura; Nafus, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    ‘Big Data’ rises and accumulates today from so much of our activity, off and online, that our lives seem almost suffused by ‘The Cloud’. But perhaps data might be otherwise? In this collection, Laura Watts and Dawn Nafus, two ethnographers, bring together stories from different data sites: from...... the marine energy industry, and from the Quantified Self movement. These Data Stories speak, not of clouds, but of transformations: in things, in energy, and in experience....

  6. Analyzing the effects of information technology on supply chain integration: The role of ERP success mediator

    OpenAIRE

    Samaneh Alimohamadian; Farshid Abdi

    2014-01-01

    This research analyzes the effects of Information Technology (IT) on Supply Chain Integration (SCI) through ERP mediator by proposing a conceptual model among these components. We also hypothesize that three constructs of IT influence on enterprise resource planning (ERP) success and one construct of ERP success influences on SCI. To clarify the relationships among the constructs, structural equation model (SEM) is conducted to examine the model fit and seven hypotheses. The data was collecte...

  7. Investigation and evaluation of key success factors in technological innovation development based on BWM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Ghaffari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing innovation, based on knowledge and technology, as a driving force of the economy, is necessary for survival and is required in having strong interactions within the globalized world of business. Innovation and technology development require an intertwined network of organizational interactions between public and private sector. The activities and interactions of these firms are the reasons for innovation development in the framework of innovation systems. Following strategies is of crucial necessity and importance in industries such as aerospace and remotely-piloted helicopters (RPH with their complex characteristics, costly and time-consuming processes. Understanding the business environment and identifying the success factors is a significant step towards adopting innovative strategies and planning for technology development. The aim of this article is to evaluate the key success factors in technological innovation development of remotely-piloted helicopters (RPH industry. The methodology used in this article is Best-Worst method which is considered as one of the most prominent and effective MCDM methods. Based on a case study and by reviewing the extant and relevant literature, the key success factors of technological innovation development of remotely-piloted helicopters (RPH industry in Iran were identified. Then by applying the “Best-Worst” method and the experts’ opinions, the key success factors were analyzed and prioritized. Finally, some suggestions are made by considering the results of the study.

  8. High technology in developing countries: Analysis of technology strategy, technology transfer, and success factors in the aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Economical development is highly related to technological development. It is therefore not surprising that many of the industrially developing nations follow explicit strategies to increase their technological competence level. Industrially developing countries may even pursue a strategy of

  9. Developing technology pushed breakthroughs:defining and assessing success factors in ICT industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sarja, J. (Jari)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The main task for most development-intensive organisations is to create, develop and commercialise new products and services. The technology push (TP) concept is considered an important competitive advantage for companies trying to create breakthrough products. Because development processes are risky and failure rates are high, especially in the case of technology pushed projects, defined success factors are valuable knowledge for the management of development-intensive firms. ...

  10. High technology in developing countries: Analysis of technology strategy, technology transfer, and success factors in the aircraft industry

    OpenAIRE

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Economical development is highly related to technological development. It is therefore not surprising that many of the industrially developing nations follow explicit strategies to increase their technological competence level. Industrially developing countries may even pursue a strategy of developing high technology competencies. This paper analysis the strategies of some developing countries in a particular high technology industry: the aircraft manufacturing industry. The focus is on Brazi...

  11. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-09-28

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

  12. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    2011-09-29

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

  13. Technology partnerships: Enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    An overview of the Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies and its private sector partnerships is presented. Commercial success stories and real-world benefits of the technology partnerships are discussed.

  14. Automated Story Capture From Conversational Speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, Andrew S; Ganesan, Kavita

    2005-01-01

    While storytelling has long been recognized as an important part of effective knowledge management in organizations, knowledge management technologies have generally not distinguished between stories...

  15. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Sebastiaan Theodorus Michaël; Wouters, Eveline J M; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2016-05-03

    There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults' needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying differences emerged, for example, with regard

  16. Impact of Mathematics and Physics on the Success of South African Engineering Technology Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wyk, Ben; Hofman, W.A.H.; Louw, I.

    2015-01-01

    The general conclusion arrived at in the literature is that the South African National Senior Certificate (NSC) is not a reliable predictor of academic success at traditional universities. By sharing research undertaken at a South African University of Technology (UoT) on the impact of individual

  17. Invisible Success: Problems with the Grand Technological Innovation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates a "grand" educational technology innovation through theoretical lenses inspired by Cervero and Wilson's (1994, 1998) work. Through taking this approach it is possible to show how ideas about the form of the innovation and perceptions of its ultimate "success" or "failure", varied between stakeholder groups. The project was…

  18. International career motives, repatriation and career success of Indian women in science & technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Reimira; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, Marloes; Godbole, R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into international career motives, repatriation and career success of Indian women in Science and Technology. Design/methodology/approach In total, 30 semi-structured interviews were conducted with (upper) middle-class Indian women in Science and

  19. A Correlational Study Assessing the Relationships among Information Technology Project Complexity, Project Complication, and Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The specific problem addressed in this study was the low success rate of information technology (IT) projects in the U.S. Due to the abstract nature and inherent complexity of software development, IT projects are among the most complex projects encountered. Most existing schools of project management theory are based on the rational systems…

  20. Success Rates by Software Development Methodology in Information Technology Project Management: A Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerald P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite over half a century of Project Management research, project success rates are still too low. Organizations spend a tremendous amount of valuable resources on Information Technology projects and seek to maximize the utility gained from their efforts. The author investigated the impact of software development methodology choice on ten…

  1. Successful Implementation of Clinical Information Technology: Seven Key Lessons from CPOE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, G A; Hill, V; Bruner, K; Maciaz, G; Saucedo, L; Catzoela, L; Ramirez, R; Jacobs, W J; Nguyen, P; Patel, L; Webster, S L

    2015-01-01

    To identify and describe the most critical strategic and operational contributors to the successful implementation of clinical information technologies, as deployed within a moderate sized system of U.S. community hospitals. CHRISTUS Health is a multi-state system comprised of more than 350 services and 60 hospitals with over 9 000 physicians. The Santa Rosa region of CHRISTUS Health, located in greater San Antonio, Texas is comprised of three adult community hospital facilities and one Children's hospital each with bed capacities of 142-180. Computerized Patient Order Entry (CPOE) was first implemented in 2012 within a complex market environment. The Santa Rosa region has 2 417 credentialed physicians and 263 mid-level allied health professionals. This report focuses on the seven most valuable strategies deployed by the Health Informatics team in a large four hospital CHRISTUS region to achieve strong CPOE adoption and critical success lessons learned. The findings are placed within the context of the literature describing best practices in health information technology implementation. While the elements described involved discrete de novo process generation to support implementation and operations, collectively they represent the creation of a new customer-centric service culture in our Health Informatics team, which has served as a foundation for ensuring strong clinical information technology adoption beyond CPOE. The seven success factors described are not limited in their value to and impact on CPOE adoption, but generalize to - and can advance success in - varied other clinical information technology implementations across diverse hospitals. A number of these factors are supported by reports in the literature of other institutions' successful implementations of CPOE and other clinical information technologies, and while not prescriptive to other settings, may be adapted to yield value elsewhere.

  2. Advanced digital I and C technology in nuclear power plants. A success story from Finland and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebschner, T.; Heidowitzsch, B.

    2005-01-01

    FRAMATOME ANP together with Siemens PGL have just commissioned the I and C systems for the Chinese Nuclear Power Plant Tianwan Unit 1, design the I and C systems for the first European Pressurized Water Reactor Olkiluoto 3 in Finland and started one of the most extensive and ambitious modernization project in a nuclear power plant for Loviisa NPP in Finland. The presentation delivers an insight into the problematic of digital I and C systems integration and focuses on aspects regarding design criteria, Structure and test approaches. (author)

  3. Policy stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    planning and execution and of event outcomes beyond the narrow confines of bed nights and legacies. Second, we introduce policies as an entry point to unlock discussions and manifestations of value and futures which connect to AWG. In order to exemplify the workings of the AWG event in these domains, we...... present three central policy stories from the field. The stories tell of how the event was first interested, then activated and finally evaluated. Besides adding a new understanding to policy-driven events as a locus of value creation, we also argue that the AWG 2016 offer speculative bets for new...

  4. How we develop and sustain innovation in medical education technology: Keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, James B; Kanter, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    The use of information technology to support the educational mission of academic medical centers is nearly universal; however, the scope and methods employed vary greatly (Souza et al. 2008 ). This article reviews the methods, processes, and specific techniques needed to conceive, develop, implement, and assess technology-based educational programs across healthcare disciplines. We discuss the core concepts, structure, and techniques that enable growth, productivity, and sustainability within an academic setting. Herein are specific keys to success with examples including project selection, theory-based design, the technology development process, implementation, and evaluation that can lead to broad participation and positive learning outcomes. Most importantly, this article shares methods to involve students, faculty, and stakeholders in technology design and the development process that fosters a sustainable culture of educational innovation.

  5. A Cross-country Comparison of Success Factor Priorities for Health Information Technology Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Eikebrokk, Tom Roar; Moe, Carl Erik

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of Health Information Technology (HIT) can improve the provision of highquality and efficient healthcare services; however, it has met with significant challenges in many cases. Despite the challenges occurring in many countries, prior research on HIT implementation success...... factors is, however, mainly from the USA. This research conducted a survey to IT managers in Nordic countries’ healthcare organizations and compiled a list of the HIT implementation success factors that these managers considered important in each country. It was found that IT managers in Nordic countries...

  6. The Marketplace Variables in Successful and Unsuccessful NPD Projects in Technology Intensive Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti J. Haverila

    2010-12-01

    Our findings indicate that managers perceive the marketplace in multiple ways during the NPD process and also that differences exist in metric equivalence across successful and unsuccessful NPD projects. Also, although half of the marketplace variables are positively related to NPD success, managers in Finnish technology companies appear to attach higher relative importance to market attractiveness rather than market competitiveness variables. Marketplace variables appear to be less important than in the Korean and Chinese samples, and much more important than  in the Canadian sample in the Mishra et all study (1996, and similarly much more important than in the Cooper study (1979b.

  7. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about...

  8. Improving internal communication between marketing and technology functions for successful new food product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Grunert, Klaus G; Søndergaard, Helle Alsted

    2014-01-01

    and technology experts within the NPD process from a food industry point of view. The review provides practical implications for improving internal communication in food companies and identifies knowledge gaps. By focusing on optimising organisational structure, team composition, management support......, and knowledge management, food companies can enhance internal communication between market and technology functions during the NPD process.......In order to increase the new product development (NPD) success for novel food products, it is crucial to understand how information can be optimally disseminated within companies. This systematic literature review concentrates on factors influencing internal communication between market...

  9. TEACHING SPEAKING THROUGH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STORY TELLING TECHNIQUE BY USING STORY-TELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwatiningsih Purwatiningsih

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning a language especially English is expected to help students to be able to use it as a means of communication. Communicating is understanding and expressing information, thought and feeling, and expanding science, technology and culture. Communicating ability means being able to understand a discourse, namely being able to understand and produce spoken and written texts through the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing this classroom action research was conducted to solve the students’ problems in speaking. It is to improve the students’ ability in speaking through story-telling technique using picture series in terms of content and delivery of the story. The design of this study is classroom action research which was conducted in two cycles consisting of six meetings. The subjects of this study were students of grade x-9 of MAN 2 Madiun in 2012/2013 academic year. The instruments to collect the data were observation checklists, field notes, speaking task measured using scoring rubrics, and questionnaire. The criteria of success were determined on the basis of the students’ participation in the teaching-learning process, the students’ speaking achievement in terms of score (telling a story individually, and the students’ responses to the implementation of story-telling technique using picture series. The finding of the study indicated that the implementation of the technique was successful in improving the students’ speaking ability, since the criteria of success were achieved. The first criterion was if 70% of the students participate or are actively involved in the teaching and learning process, and the data analysis confirmed that 84% of students were actively involved. Concerning the second criterion was if 70% of the students achieve the score greater than or equal to 75, the finding showed that 81% of the students already achieved scores greater than 75. The last criterion, if 70% of students

  10. The X-Factor of Cultivating Successful Entrepreneurial Technology-Enabled Start-Ups

    OpenAIRE

    Elsje Scott; Terrina Govender; Nata van der Merwe

    2016-01-01

    In the fast changing global economic landscape, the cultivation of sustainable entrepreneurial ventures is seen as a vital mechanism that will enable businesses to introduce new innovative products to the market faster and more effectively than their competitors. This research paper investigated phenomena that may play a significant role when entrepreneurs implement creative ideas resulting in successful technology enabled start-ups within the South African market place. Constant and sign...

  11. Radical Technological Innovations within the Mechanical Engineering Industry - An Empirical Study for Successful Realization

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlfeil, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Based on a thorough qualitative and quantitative study, Florian Wohlfeil develops a critical success factors framework for the realization of radical technological innovations within the mechanical engineering industry. Furthermore, the author detects five clearly distinguishable innovation archetypes that are based on the project specific contextual circumstances. Finally, he provides an operational framework which serves as a hands-on tool to derive concrete recommendations for action.

  12. Improving internal communication between marketing and technology functions for successful new food product development

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, L.F.; Grunert, K.G.; Søndergaard, H.A.; Steenbekkers, B.; Dekker, M.; Lähteenmäki, L.

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the new product development (NPD) success for novel food products, it is crucial to understand how information can be optimally disseminated within companies. This systematic literature review concentrates on factors influencing internal communication between market and technology experts within the NPD process from a food industry point of view. The review provides practical implications for improving internal communication in food companies and identifies knowledge gaps...

  13. Critical Success in E-learning: An Examination of Technological and Institutional Support Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslin Masrom

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, information technology (IT becomes prominent to support teaching and learning activities. IT tools allow us to create, collect, store and use the information and knowledge. E-learning was one of IT tools introduced at College of Science and Technology (CST, University Technology Malaysia (UTM Kuala Lumpur since 2001. It has enabled a paradigm shift from institutio n-centered instruction to anywhere, anytime and anybody learning models. In CST the e-learning technology was used for accessing the syllabus and course content, submitting assignments, and taking class quizzes. This paper focuses on issues relating to the e-learning critical success factors (CSFs from university students’ perspective. In this study, two main factors related to the e-learning CSFs within a university environment included technological and institutional support factors were examined. Confirmatory factor modeling approach was used to assess the criticality of the measures included in each factor. The results indicated that the most critical measures for technological factor in terms of ease of access and infrastructure are the browser efficiency, course website ease of use and computer network reliability. Meanwhile, for institutional support factor, the most critical measure is the availability of technical support or help desk.

  14. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE SUCCESS OF TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION: A CASE STUDY OF INDONESIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Ellitan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the role of technology management as a factor of success in technological innovation has been a subject of significant interest among practitioners and academicians. Despite the plethora of attention given to the numerous issues of management of new technology adoption and implementation, many organizations still fail to manage their technology efficiently, effectively, and strategically. This paper is based on a field investigation via face to face interviews with top management in East Java involving medium and large manufacturing companies from the tobacco, plastic, pulp, furniture, textile, cable and plywood sectors. This research seeks to investigate the extent of technology adoption and its management in medium and large Indonesian manufacturing companies. Further, this study investigates the technology benefits perceived by respondents. The study found that: (1 Indonesian manufacturing companies still lack a strategic perspective when adopting technologies and they are more concerned with short-term issues; (2 they face problems related to people, organizational issues, limited budgets and lack of government support; (3 these problems limit the choice of technologies and together with the national economic situation, reinforces the short-term mindset of top management. In addition, the investigation of critical success factors and inhibitors of technology adoption is necessary for identification of a proper vision and strategic viewpoint of managing new technology. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Sampai sekarang, peranan manajemen teknologi sebagai factor keberhasilan dalam inovasi teknologi menjadi topik yang menarik perhatian para praktisis maupun akademisi. Walaupun masalah-masalah manajemen teknologi dan implementasinya telah banyak diperhatikan, masih ada banyak perusahaan yang belum mampu mengatur teknologi secara efisien, secara efektif atau dengan strategi yang tepat. Makalah ini dibuat berdasarkan survei lapangan yang

  15. R&D to Market Success: BTO-Supported Technologies Commercialized from 2010-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-04-01

    Technology commercialization plays an essential role in almost every facet of the U.S. economy. It spurs private sector funding that supports innovative breakthroughs, drives growth through increased productivity and product development, increases American competitiveness, and creates domestic jobs. The BTO Technology Commercialization report is an annual publication offering the latest information on successfully commercialized technologies resulting in part from BTO’s research partnerships. This report defines a “commercialized technology” as a process, technique, design, machine, tool, material, or software that was developed with funds provided at least in part by BTO, and that has resulted in domestic sales or is in use in the U.S. This definition also applies to open-source software products developed with support from BTO, all of which are currently distributed freely but are actively used for commercial purposes.

  16. [Diethylstilbestrol story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournaire, Michel; Epelboin, Sylvie; Devouche, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    This story, that has been going on for 75 years begins with an infatuation for a "miraculous" drug supposed to, according to a theory and without scientific proof of effectiveness, reduce the pregnancy complications, especially the number of miscarriages. The next steps are painful with the discovery during the seventies, for the in utero exposed daughters, of particular cancers (clear cells adenocarcinoma) of the uterus cervix or the vagina, then during the eighties infertility and pregnancy accidents. This story is exemplary because it involves the different society actors whose roles will be analysed: health professionals, health authorities, patients associations, media and pharmaceutical companies. We will propose lessons for the future. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  17. Indira's story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Eric Dawe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Indira is an independent woman who does not live a traditional Nepali life. She rescues abandoned and abused young women from sexual exploitation and provides them with love, support, and education. Her story highlights the key role of the social determinants of health in caring for marginalized populations. Challenges and benefits of attempting to learn from another’s personal narrative are also considered.

  18. Multi story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Ho; Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the use of narrative coaching as a powerful tool of co-creation and collaboration of the coach and client that emphasizes values and aspirations. Narrative coaches listen to the stories of lived experience and help clients identify values and skills. Narrative coaching has two...... central foundations which are societal/cultural and learning. The approach consists of the techniques of externalizing conversations and re-authoring and remembering....

  19. The story is as good as the real thing: early customer input on product applications of radically new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hende, E.A.; Schoormans, J.P.L.

    2012-01-01

    Early customer input on applications that use radically new technologies is crucial for gaining an understanding of the benefits and value of these new technologies. Potential customers should have a clear understanding of a new technology application before they give their input on it. Prototypes

  20. Building the vision, a series of AZTech ITS model deployment success stories for the Phoenix metropolitan area : number seven : spectacular views sharing closed circuit TV between operations centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Advanced communications technology is the engine that continually moves AZTech closer to its goal of integrating transportation systems throughout the region. At the heart of this technology is a state-of-the-art Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) syst...

  1. The Story of Azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banić Tomišić, Z.

    2011-12-01

    the negotiations and signing of a contract between PLIVA, Croatian pharmaceutical company, the patent holder, and Pfizer, one of the world largest pharmaceutical companies in the field of proprietary research. The dihydrate form of azithromycin is also discussed. The azithromycin (i.e. Sumamed and Zithromax story, which dates from the second half of the last century, can be considered as the first and foremost example of successful knowledge and technology transfer in Croatia ever. On their web pages, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO reports the PLIVA azithromycin story as a case study and excellent example of proactive licensing strategy. For the discovery of azithromycin, in addition to receiving numerous awards, in the year 2000, PLIVA's scientists D. Sc. S. Đokić and M. Sc. G. Kobrehel, together with the representatives from the US-based Pfizer, were granted the honorable titles of "Heroes of Chemistry 2000" by the American Chemical Society (ACS, a non-profit association of American chemists and chemical engineers, and the largest association of scientists in the world. This high award is rightly taken to be also recognition of the achievement of PLIVA's entire team working on azithromycin. The success of azithromycin has placed PLIVA among the few pharmaceutical companies in the world that have developed their own blockbuster drug, and has entitled Croatia to join a small group of nations that have developed a new antibiotic.

  2. Technical and economic assessments commercial success for IGCC technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, T.

    1998-01-01

    The experiences gained from several Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration plants operating in the US and Europe facilitate commercial success of this advanced coal-based power generation technology. However, commercialization of coal-based IGCC technology in the West, particularly in the US, is restricted due to the low price of natural gas. On the contrary, in China--the largest coal producer and consumer in the world--a lack of natural gas supply, strong demand for air pollution control and relatively low costs of manufacturing and construction provide tremendous opportunities for IGCC applications. The first Chinese IGCC demonstration project was initiated in 1994, and other potential IGCC projects are in planning. IGCC applications in re-powering, fuel switching and multi-generation also show a great market potential in China. However, questions for IGCC development in China remain; where are realistic opportunities for IGCC projects and how can these opportunities be converted into commercial success? The answers to these questions should focus on the Chinese market needs and emphasize economic benefits, not just clean, or power. High price of imported equipment, high financing costs, and the technical risk of first-of-a-kind installation barricade IGCC development in China. This paper presents preliminary technical and economic assessments for four typical IGCC applications in the Chinese marketplace: central power station, fuel switching, re-powering, and multi-generation. The major factors affecting project economics--such as plant cost, financing, prices of fuel and electricity and operating capacity factor--are analyzed. The results indicate that well-proven technology for versatile applications, preferred financing, reduction of the plant cost, environmental superiority and appropriate project structure are the key for commercial success of IGCC in China

  3. Organizational and technological insight as important factors for successful implementation of IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikula, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Politicians and hospital management in Sweden and Denmark focus on IT and especially Electronic Patient Record, EPR as a tool for changes that will lead to better economy as well as better quality and service to the patients. These changes are not direct effects of the new medium for patient records but indirect effects due to the possibilities embedded in the new technology. To ensure that the implementation is successful, i.e. leads to changes in organization structure and workflow, we need tools to prepare clinicians and management. The focus of this paper is the individual insight in technology and organization and it proposes a model to assess and categorize the possibilities of individuals and groups to participate in and make an implementation process powerful. PMID:10566426

  4. Investing in New Technology in Pulmonary Medicine: Navigating the Tortuous Path to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruklitis, Robert; French, Kim; Cangelosi, Michael Joseph; Kovitz, Kevin L

    2017-09-01

    The introduction of new technologies offers the promise to advance medicine. This occurs alongside improved efforts to control costs of health care by hospital administrators, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) pivot to value programs, and commercial payers' efforts to reduce reimbursement. These trends present a challenge for the pulmonologist, among others, who must navigate increasingly complex and highly scrutinized evaluation processes used to secure new technology (NT). Health-care providers are turning toward value assessments while simultaneously tasked with the mission of offering state of the art technologies and services. Pulmonologists desiring NT are thus faced with increased scrutiny in their evaluation of costs and clinical data to support investments. Consideration of this scrutiny and further evidence to temper the evaluation will improve the likelihood of adoption and patient access to clinically impactful technology. The identification of this evidence may provide a comprehensive view of the clinical and economic benefits of such technologies to both administrators and pulmonary clinicians. It is imperative that all parties involved in the decision process work collaboratively to deploy value added and clinically impactful technologies. Although a physician group might invest in such NT, the capital required often leads such decisions to a larger organization such as a hospital, health-care system, or privately owned entity. This article aims to provide a framework for pulmonary clinicians to better understand the processes that purchasers use to evaluate NT, the pressures that influence their consideration, and what resources may be leveraged toward success. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The intersection of discipline and roles: Dr. Pauline Mack's story as an instrumental case study with implications for leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younkin, Winnifred Gail

    Widespread concerns currently exist regarding our nation's ability to attract, educate, and retain talented, diverse individuals in STEM fields. These concerns are exacerbated by globalized competition and critical economic conditions. With these issues in mind, this instrumental case study was designed to examine the life story of Dr. Pauline Beery Mack in order to inform secondary and tertiary educational leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Dr. Mack's life story was written from the interpretive view and analyzed through a number of theoretical frameworks appropriate to understanding the complexity of an individual in time and place: the psychobiosocial model, constructivism, creativity, perspective of the field, and the capstone framework of leadership. Data for the construction of Dr. Mack's life story were obtained from Pennsylvania State University Archives, The Women's Collection at Texas Woman's University (TWU), original publications, news media archives, and other sources. Interviews conducted for TWU's archives and interviews conducted by the author provided personal insight into Dr. Mack's life and work. Dr. Mack (1891-1974) lived, learned, created, and taught in a STEM arena that was predominately male. She pursued research with zeal, and was highly adept in attracting jobs, funding, students, and the right people to get the jobs done. Her longitudinal nutrition research, based on a methodology she invented, was innovative in its scope and scale. She served as an advocate for consumers, the undernourished, women, and minorities. Along the way, she changed perceptions of what women could accomplish. Bone density, school lunches, Victory Gardens, flammability, textile industry scandal, and space travel. Dr. Mack with her insatiable need to know was involved in it all. Her multiplicity of roles and contexts yielded a rich and complex life from which to draw implications for educational leadership in secondary and

  6. NASA Technology Transfer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Peter B.; Okimura, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    NTTS is the IT infrastructure for the Agency's Technology Transfer (T2) program containing 60,000+ technology portfolio supporting all ten NASA field centers and HQ. It is the enterprise IT system for facilitating the Agency's technology transfer process, which includes reporting of new technologies (e.g., technology invention disclosures NF1679), protecting intellectual properties (e.g., patents), and commercializing technologies through various technology licenses, software releases, spinoffs, and success stories using custom built workflow, reporting, data consolidation, integration, and search engines.

  7. The X-Factor of Cultivating Successful Entrepreneurial Technology-Enabled Start-Ups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsje Scott

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the fast changing global economic landscape, the cultivation of sustainable entrepreneurial ventures is seen as a vital mechanism that will enable businesses to introduce new innovative products to the market faster and more effectively than their competitors. This research paper investigated phenomena that may play a significant role when entrepreneurs implement creative ideas resulting in successful technology enabled start-ups within the South African market place. Constant and significant changes in technology provide several challenges for entrepreneurship. Various themes such as innovation, work experience, idea generation, education and partnership formation have been explored to assess their impact on entrepreneurship. Reflection and a design thinking approach underpinned a rigorous analysis process to distill themes from the data gathered through semi structured interviews. From the findings it was evident that the primary success influencers include the formation of partnership, iterative cycles, and certain types of education. The secondary influencers included the origination of an idea, the use of innovation. and organizational culture as well as work experience. This research illustrates how Informing Science as a transdisicpline can provide a philosophical underpinning to communicate and synthesise ideas from constituent disciplines in an attempt to create a more cohesive whole. This diverse environment, comprising people, technology, and business, requires blending different elements from across diverse fields to yield better science. With this backdrop, this preliminary study provides an important foundation for further research in the context of a developing country where entrepreneurial ventures may have a socio-economical impact. The themes that emerged through this study could provide avenues for further research.

  8. Bridging the Gap: Technology Trends and Use of Technology in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cher Ping; Zhao, Yong; Tondeur, Jo; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Considerable investment has been made to bring technology to schools and these investments have indeed resulted in many "success stories." However there are two significant gaps in educational uses of technology that must be addressed. The first is a usage gap. Compared to how and how much today's students use technology outside…

  9. Fixed Broadband deployment in the Netherlands: Success and failure in policy and technology or the paradox of successful competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; Doorenspleet, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the underlying policy and technological/market framework that created this situation of two competing local networks. We will explain why and how the present strong fixed infrastructure competition could develop by using an integrated multi-disciplinary approach. On the one hand

  10. Successful Information Technology Outsourcing: A Case Study on How a U.S.-Based Company Achieves Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daluisio, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the Eastman Kodak company initiated what would become one of the biggest trends in information technology (IT): outsourcing. IT outsourcing (ITO) allows a company to focus on the services that will differentiate it from its competitors and farm out nondifferentiating services. ITO has grown from the initial landmark effort at…

  11. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  12. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  13. Barriers and solutions for the application and development of renewable energy technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinica, V.

    1999-01-01

    Renewable electricity technologies have overwhelmingly higher advantages over conventional fuel-systems. Nevertheless, after more than three decades since their conceptualization their presence in electricity systems is hardly visible, except for few success stories in the US and several European

  14. Summarizing and Comparing Story Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Amos-Binks, Adam; Roberts, David L.; Young, R. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Branching story games have gained popularity for creating unique playing experiences by adapting story content in response to user actions. Research in interactive narrative (IN) uses automated planning to generate story plans for a given story problem. However, a story planner can generate multiple story plan solutions, all of which equally-satisfy the story problem definition but contain different story content. These differences in story content are key to understanding the story branches ...

  15. The International System on Occupational Exposure. An ALARA Success Story Relying on Strong Individual Commitments, Effective International Feedback and Exchanges, and a Robust Database - 20 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Christian; Doty, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Why, more than 20 years ago, did there emerge the need for an International System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)? How was it created? What were the problems and their possible solutions? Who were the main stakeholders? These are a few of the questions that the ISOE NEA Secretariat and Bureau asked Christian Lefaure, ex CEPN Deputy Director, to address in preparing a report on the history of ISOE and its progress. He had been directly involved in the brainstorming that preceded ISOE establishment, and he became the first head of the ISOE European Technical Centre, in charge of the world database development and management from 1991 to 2007. For writing this report, he made use of his own souvenirs and documentation as well as of those of tens of ISOE participants, both from major international and regional organisations (OECD/NEA, IAEA, EC and BNL), nuclear power plant utilities and national regulatory authorities. He voluntarily focused not only on the technical aspects but also on the human components of that story. This was done through personal interviews with many individuals who have played an important role at one moment of ISOE life, the analysis of answers to a questionnaire, and reviews of the minutes of many ISOE meetings that were held before and after the official establishment of the ISOE, along its lifespan to date. The most important inputs were the accounts from many individuals having very actively participated in the ISOE life at one step or another. The contacts were not always easy to make 15 or 20 years later. But in general, the questions were welcomed and the answers to the interviews and to a short questionnaire have fed this report. More than 50 individuals have answered these requests one way or another. Some have followed ISOE birth and premises; some have not seen the first steps of ISOE but have participated later on or are still participating. Some have been able to provide pictures, drawings or relevant publications. All their

  16. A Mixed Methodology Study of the Role of Trust between Clients and Contractors in the Success of Information Technology Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrone, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that many information technology (IT) projects achieve success, while many more do not. Further, researchers have identified various causes of this problem and have suggested remedies. However, these studies have not focused on the nature of the relationship between trust and success in IT projects. Consequently, this study…

  17. Identifying Success in the Application of Information and Communication Technology as a Curriculum Teaching and Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Lesley Rocha

    2006-01-01

    This research seeks to identify generic factors that have contributed to the successful integration of information and communication technology (ICT) across the curriculum in the secondary section of an international school in Brazil. The research took a case-study approach, focusing on one "successful" department to identify…

  18. Ames Infusion Stories for NASA Annual Technology Report: Nano Entry System for CubeSat-Class Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Jan, Darrell Leslie; Venkatapathy, Etiraj

    2015-01-01

    The Nano Entry System for CubeSat-Class Payloads led to the development of the Nano-Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology ("Nano-ADEPT"). Nano-ADEPT is a mechanically deployed entry, descent, and landing (EDL) system that stows during launch and cruise (like an umbrella) and serves as both heat shield and primary structure during EDL. It is especially designed for small spacecraft where volume is a limiting constraint.

  19. Investigation into the situation of technology succession; Gijutsu keisho jokyo chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The paper made a fundamental investigation to promote historical succession and creative use of the industrial scientific technology. As for the wind power generation, the large-scaling became centralized wind power plants, and the downsizing became the distribution to remote areas. The solar power generation shifted from the thermal power generation to the light power generation. There is also a method to use solar heat directly. As to power systems and the distribution of electric power, the subjects are a combination of energy source, geographical energy transportation, and heightening of consumption efficiency. It was indicated that the subjects changed with a lapse of time under technical/social/systematical conditions, and under the developable energy amount prescribed by those conditions. Heightening of efficiency, which can be realized even by a paper simulation, was realized partly helped by the developing measuring technology. The environmental problem becomes historically severe as a condition of the technical development. However, aimed at was the process where discharged matters and by-products are effectively used and disused matters are not produced. In the coal-thermal power generation, for example, a load of flue gas purification was reduced by the conversion to LNG. 253 refs., 65 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Health Information Technology (HIT) Adaptation: Refocusing on the Journey to Successful HIT Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Po-Yin; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; Huerta, Timothy R

    2017-09-07

    In past years, policies and regulations required hospitals to implement advanced capabilities of certified electronic health records (EHRs) in order to receive financial incentives. This has led to accelerated implementation of health information technologies (HIT) in health care settings. However, measures commonly used to evaluate the success of HIT implementation, such as HIT adoption, technology acceptance, and clinical quality, fail to account for complex sociotechnical variability across contexts and the different trajectories within organizations because of different implementation plans and timelines. We propose a new focus, HIT adaptation, to illuminate factors that facilitate or hinder the connection between use of the EHR and improved quality of care as well as to explore the trajectory of changes in the HIT implementation journey as it is impacted by frequent system upgrades and optimizations. Future research should develop instruments to evaluate the progress of HIT adaptation in both its longitudinal design and its focus on adaptation progress rather than on one cross-sectional outcome, allowing for more generalizability and knowledge transfer. ©Po-Yin Yen, Ann Scheck McAlearney, Cynthia J Sieck, Jennifer L Hefner, Timothy R Huerta. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 07.09.2017.

  1. Facilitating change from a distance - a story of success? A discussion on leaders' styles in facilitating change in four nursing homes in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øye, Christine; Mekki, Tone Elin; Jacobsen, Frode Fadnes; Førland, Oddvar

    2016-09-01

    To examine the influence of leadership when facilitating change in nursing homes. The study is a part of an education intervention for care staff to prevent the use of restraint in nursing home residents with dementia in 24 nursing homes (NHs) in Norway. Leadership is known to be a fundamental factor for success of evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in health services. However, the type of leadership that strengthens the processes of change remains to be clarified. A multi-site comparative ethnography was performed in four nursing homes to investigate how contextual factors influenced the implementation. The analysis was informed by the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework, and in particular the sub-element of leadership. Different leadership styles to facilitate change were identified. Paradoxically, a strong collective and collaborative leadership style was found to hamper change in one particular home, whereas a remote leadership style combined with almost no cooperation with staff proved successful in another setting. The study indicates that leadership cannot be understood on a low-high continuum as suggested by the PARIHS framework, but rather as a factor characterised by diversity. Our study indicates, as a minimum, that a leader's presence is necessary to facilitate the internal processes in order more successfully to implement EBP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Exaggerated Claims for Interactive Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, David; Bulitko, Vadim; Spetch, Marcia; Webb, Michael

    As advertising becomes more crucial to video games' success, developers risk promoting their products beyond the features that they can actually include. For features of interactive storytelling, the effects of making such exaggerations are not well known, as reports from industry have been anecdotal at best. In this paper, we explore the effects of making exaggerated claims for interactive stories, in the context of the theory of advertising. Results from a human user study show that female players find linear and branching stories to be significantly less enjoyable when they are advertised with exaggerated claims.

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less Comments are disabled ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  5. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapies to Fight HIV: How Far from a Success Story? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Victor Campos Coelho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community still faces the challenge of developing strategies to cure HIV-1. One of these pursued strategies is the development of immunotherapeutic vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs, pulsed with the virus, that aim to boost HIV-1 specific immune response. We aimed to review DCs-based therapeutic vaccines reports and critically assess evidence to gain insights for the improvement of these strategies. We performed a systematic review, followed by meta-analysis and meta-regression, of clinical trial reports. Twelve studies were selected for meta-analysis. The experimental vaccines had low efficiency, with an overall success rate around 38% (95% confidence interval = 26.7%–51.3%. Protocols differed according to antigen choice, DC culture method, and doses, although multivariate analysis did not show an influence of any of them on overall success rate. The DC-based vaccines elicited at least some immunogenicity, that was sometimes associated with plasmatic viral load transient control. The protocols included both naïve and antiretroviral therapy (ART-experienced individuals, and used different criteria for assessing vaccine efficacy. Although the vaccines did not work as expected, they are proof of concept that immune responses can be boosted against HIV-1. Protocol standardization and use of auxiliary approaches, such as latent HIV-1 reservoir activation and patient genomics are paramount for fine-tuning future HIV-1 cure strategies.

  6. INFORMATION SYSTEM QUALITY INFLUENCE ON ORGANIZATION PERFORMANCE: A MODIFICATION OF TECHNOLOGY-BASED INFORMATION SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE AND SUCCESS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisnawati N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of information system quality on technology-based accounting information systems usage and their impact on organizational performance on local government. This study is based on Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, IS Success Model, and the success of technology-based information systems. This study is a combination of previous studies conducted by Seddon and Kiew (1997, Saeed and Helm (2008, and DeLone and McLean (1992. This study used survey method and took 101 respondents from accounting staff working in Malang and Mojokerto regencies. This study uses Partial Least Square to examine research data. Research result exhibits information system qualities affecting benefit perception and user satisfaction. Technology-based accounting information systems usage in local government is influenced by benefits perception and user satisfaction. Research result concluded that technology-based accounting information systems usage will affect the performance of local government organizations.

  7. A Little Solar Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Bashir

    1997-01-01

    Experiences from use of solar cookers in India and many other places are different. But the story which is based on a field study in Gujarat state of India shows that during last twenty years there has been a tendency that many families do not continue to use their solar cookers. The study shows...... that the tendency is related with the lack of compatibility of this new technology (solar cooker) with the everyday real-life conditions of the families. In principle the findings are supported by an evaluation report on a solar cooker project in Burkina Faso. The conclusion is that the user should be involved...... in the solar cooker technological development process....

  8. Customer Discovery as the First Essential Step for Successful Health Information Technology System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamjamrassri, Punyotai; Song, YuJin; Tak, JaeHyun; Kang, HoYong; Hong, Jeeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Customer discovery (CD) is a method to determine if there are actual customers for a product/service and what they would want before actually developing the product/service. This concept, however, is rather new to health information technology (IT) systems. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to demonstrate how to use the CD method in developing a comprehensive health IT service for patients with knee/leg pain. Methods We participated in a 6-week I-Corps program to perform CD, in which we interviewed 55 people in person, by phone, or by video conference within 6 weeks: 4 weeks in the United States and 2 weeks in Korea. The interviewees included orthopedic doctors, physical therapists, physical trainers, physicians, researchers, pharmacists, vendors, and patients. By analyzing the interview data, the aim was to revise our business model accordingly. Results Using the CD approach enabled us to understand the customer segments and identify value propositions. We concluded that a facilitating tele-rehabilitation system is needed the most and that the most suitable customer segment is early stage arthritis patients. We identified a new design concept for the customer segment. Furthermore, CD is required to identify value propositions in detail. Conclusions CD is crucial to determine a more desirable direction in developing health IT systems, and it can be a powerful tool to increase the potential for successful commercialization in the health IT field. PMID:29503756

  9. Analysis of behavioral intention on ABC system adoption: Model of information systems technology and success acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiq Nensi Veni Indipenrian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of individual behavioral change on the adoption of activity- based costing (ABC system and its usage, using Unified Theory of Accep-tance and Use of Technology (UTAUT and Information System Success Model. The sample involves 78 respondents who have positions as financial manager, controller manager, accounting manager, and production manager in mid-sized manufacturing companies in East java. The data were collected by survey method. This study used a Partial Least Square (PLS as the data analysis method. It was found that not all of the main UTAUT models were supported, because performance expectancy and effort expectancy have no effect on behavioral intention and use behavior to adopt ABC system. Whereas, social factors, information quality and facilitating conditions had a positive effect on behavioral intention and use behavior to adopt ABC system. The different results of this study with several previous studies are probably caused by the differences in the context of system, culture and characteristics of the sample. The implication of this study is not only to propose a theoretical framework for researches in future, but also useful for companies to optimize the use of ABC system that should be supported by top level and mid-level management and the readiness of the individu-als to accept the adoption of the ABC system.

  10. Strategies for Successful Information Technology Adoption in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghobakhloo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology (IT adoption is an important field of study in a number of areas, which include small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. Due to the numerous advantages of IT, SMEs are trying to adopt IT applications to support their businesses. IT adoption by SMEs differs from larger organizations because of their specific characteristics, such as resources constraints. Therefore, this research aims to provide a better and clearer understanding of IT adoption within SMEs by reviewing and analyzing current IT literature. In this research, the review of literature includes theories, perspectives, empirical research and case studies related to IT adoption, in particular within SMEs from various databases such as Business Premier, Science Direct, JStor, Emerald Insight and Springer Link. The proposed model of effective IT adoption is believed to provide managers, vendors, consultants and governments with a practical synopsis of the IT adoption process in SMEs, which will in turn assist them to be successful with IT institutionalization within these businesses.

  11. Customer Discovery as the First Essential Step for Successful Health Information Technology System Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamjamrassri, Punyotai; Song, YuJin; Tak, JaeHyun; Kang, HoYong; Kong, Hyoun-Joong; Hong, Jeeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Customer discovery (CD) is a method to determine if there are actual customers for a product/service and what they would want before actually developing the product/service. This concept, however, is rather new to health information technology (IT) systems. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to demonstrate how to use the CD method in developing a comprehensive health IT service for patients with knee/leg pain. We participated in a 6-week I-Corps program to perform CD, in which we interviewed 55 people in person, by phone, or by video conference within 6 weeks: 4 weeks in the United States and 2 weeks in Korea. The interviewees included orthopedic doctors, physical therapists, physical trainers, physicians, researchers, pharmacists, vendors, and patients. By analyzing the interview data, the aim was to revise our business model accordingly. Using the CD approach enabled us to understand the customer segments and identify value propositions. We concluded that a facilitating tele-rehabilitation system is needed the most and that the most suitable customer segment is early stage arthritis patients. We identified a new design concept for the customer segment. Furthermore, CD is required to identify value propositions in detail. CD is crucial to determine a more desirable direction in developing health IT systems, and it can be a powerful tool to increase the potential for successful commercialization in the health IT field.

  12. Telling Successes of Japanese Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    Stakeholders of two success story events negotiated an idea of development as individual entrepreneurship. The sixty-five-year-old Japanese Foreign Aid history includes stories of successes told by professionals from developing countries throughout the world. Their stories reflect the cultural an...... sector training programs partly financed by Japanese Official development Assistance (ODA)....

  13. Telling Successes of Japanese Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    Stakeholders of two success story events negotiated an idea of development as individual entrepreneurship. The sixty-five-year-old Japanese Foreign Aid history includes stories of successes told by professionals from developing countries throughout the world. Their stories reflect the cultural...... sector training programs partly financed by Japanese Official development Assistance (ODA)....

  14. A success story of regional projects implemented for the management of marine environment. Turkish experience related to the black sea and the mediterranean sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goktepe, B.G.; Gungor, N.; Gungor, E.; Karakelle, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A wide scope Regional Technical Co-operation Project RER/2/003 'Marine Environmental Assessment of the Black Sea Region' is implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the period 1995-2001. This project was initiated in response to the needs of participating Member States - the six Black Sea coastal countries (Bulgaria, Romania, Ukraine, Russian Federation, Georgia and Turkey) to establish capabilities for reliably assessing radionuclides in the Black Sea environment and applying tracer techniques to marine pollution studies The project has various important aspects: Scientifically; one of the major environmental issue radioactivity pollution is addressed. Technically; laboratory capability for transuranic analysis is being developed. Economically; the reversing the ecological deterioration and developing sustainable uses of the Black Sea and its natural resources is one of the major interests. Politically; responsibility of pollution control and rehabilitation plans of six Black Sea countries are addressed through various convention and declarations. Socio-economically, fisheries and tourism sectors are expected to benefit. Highlights from the joint radioactivity-monitoring program of the project among six Black Sea countries are outlined. Examples from the Turkish monitoring work consist of the routine sampling of seawater, algae, mussels, fish samples and beach sand from the selected stations along the Black Sea coast are presented for illustration. The success of the Black Sea regional project has given rise to a new regional project 'Marine Environmental Assessment of the Mediterranean Region' based on the request of the member countries, which will be initiated in 2005 by the IAEA. The initial phase the project, its objectives and the schedule will be summarized. Key words: marine radioactivity, environmental management, Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea, regional cooperation

  15. Technology roadmapping for strategy and innovation charting the route to success

    CERN Document Server

    Isenmann, Ralf; Phaal, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technology roadmapping is a core method to help companies and other organisations gain orientation for future opportunities and changes. This book is a key resource for technology roadmapping – it provides expert knowledge in four areas: To frame/embed technology roadmapping To structure the process and tasks of technology roadmapping To implement technology roadmapping into corporate strategies To link technology roadmapping to further instruments of strategic planning and corporate foresight This comprehensive survey of technology roadmapping includes papers from leading European, American and Asian experts: It provides an overview of different methods of technology roadmapping and the interactions between them It familiarises readers with the most important sub-methods It embeds/links technology roadmapping to the overall framework of management research and business studies This book, the first of a series, is unique: it aims to become the leading compendium for technology roadmapping knowledge and prac...

  16. Enhancing children's health through digital story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tami H; Hauenstein, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Stories in all of their many forms, including books, plays, skits, movies, poems, and songs, appeal to individuals of all ages but especially the young. Children are easily engaged in stories, and today's generation of children, the millennium generation, demands interactive, multimedia-rich environments. Story as a teaching and learning technique is pervasive in the classroom but is infrequently used to promote health. Because of advancing technology, it is possible to create interactive digital storytelling programs that teach children health topics. Using digital storytelling in an interactive environment to promote health has not been tested, but there is empirical support for using story in health education and interactive technology to promote health. This article briefly reviews the literature and discusses how technology and storytelling can be joined to promote positive health outcomes.

  17. Using technology for E and P success - the practices of leader companies in Western Canada Sedimentary Basin strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynon, G.

    1997-01-01

    The technologies that create a competitive advantage for the leaders in various exploration and production (E and P) strategies were demonstrated. The western Canadian E and P industry has evolved since the oil price shock of 1986 and the gas price shock of 1990-92. Performance of the leaders in broadly defined E and P strategy areas in the western Canada Sedimentary Basin are compared. Success of the industry as a whole was evaluated based on measurement of one of the most critical success factors, technology utilization

  18. Story and Recall in First-Person Shooters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Pinchbeck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Story has traditionally been seen as something separate to gameplay—frequently relegated to an afterthought or epiphenomenon. Nevertheless, in the FPS genre there has been something of a renaissance in the notion of the story-driven title. Partially, this is due to advances in technology enabling a greater capacity for distributed storytelling and a better integration of story and gameplay. However, what has been underrecognised is the dynamic, epistemological, and psychological impact of story and story elements upon player behaviour. It is argued here that there is evidence that story may have a direct influence upon cognitive operations. Specifically, evidence is presented that it appears to demonstrate that games with highly visible, detailed stories may assist players in recalling and ordering their experiences. If story does, indeed, have a more direct influence, then it is clearly a more powerful and immediate tool in game design than either simply reward system or golden thread.

  19. Examining national and district-level trends in neonatal health in Peru through an equity lens: a success story driven by political will and societal advocacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Huicho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peru has impressively reduced its neonatal mortality rate (NMR. We aimed, for the period 2000–2013, to: (a describe national and district NMR variations over time; (b assess NMR trends by wealth quintile and place of residence; (c describe evolution of mortality causes; (d assess completeness of registered mortality; (e assess coverage and equity of NMR-related interventions; and (f explore underlying driving factors. Methods We compared national NMR time trends from different sources. To describe NMR trends by wealth quintiles, place of residence and districts, we pooled data on births and deaths by calendar year for neonates born to women interviewed in multiple surveys. We disaggregated coverage of NMR-related interventions by wealth quintiles and place of residence. To identify success factors, we ran regression analyses and combined desk reviews with qualitative interviews and group discussions. Results NMR fell by 51 % from 2000 to 2013, second only to Brazil in Latin America. Reduction was higher in rural and poorest segments (52 and 58 %. District NMR change varied by source. Regarding cause-specific NMRs, prematurity decreased from 7.0 to 3.2 per 1,000 live births, intra-partum related events from 2.9 to 1.2, congenital abnormalities from 2.4 to 1.8, sepsis from 1.9 to 0.8, pneumonia from 0.9 to 0.4, and other conditions from 1.2 to 0.7. Under-registration of neonatal deaths decreased recently, more in districts with higher development index and lower rural population. Coverage of family planning, antenatal care and skilled birth attendance increased more in rural areas and in the poorest quintile. Regressions did not show consistent associations between mortality and predictors. During the study period social determinants improved substantially, and dramatic out-of-health-sector and health-sector changes occurred. Rural areas and the poorest quintile experienced greater NMR reduction. This progress was driven

  20. TASK-TECHNOLOGY FIT AND PERSON-JOB FIT: A BEAUTY CONTEST TO IMPROVE THE SUCCESS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Suryani, Woro Dwi; Sumiyana, Sumiyana

    2015-01-01

    This study raises the issue that information system success could be enhanced by complementingother factors. This study investigates the success of information systems by inducing2the task-technology fit (TTF) and person-job fit (PJF) into the DeLone and McLean model. Thisstudy aims to examine, among the two induced factors, which one is able to explain andimprove the success of the information systems implementation.The results of this study indicate that the TTF explains the models’ goodnes...

  1. Introductory speech of 2003 annual meeting on nuclear technology 'Acceptance - key to success'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maichel, G.

    2003-01-01

    Acceptance and support are two basic preconditions for a successful implementation of projects. As a necessary prerequisite, the decisions to be taken must be based on established facts which are both transparent and understandable. Especially in technical projects, confidence in technology and in all parties involved is imperative. Nuclear power has lost acceptance when a small group of opponents, deliberately focusing on the improbable, but existing, risk gained support for this attitude in the public, and political circles began to share the same opinion. This makes it indispensable to regain broad-based acceptance by combining the dissemination of facts with instilling confidence. This includes the positive contribution of safe plant operation with a maximum of safety as the top priority, as an acknowledged and practiced approach. It also includes the dissemination of facts and the promotion of confidence on the part of all those engaged in nuclear power. Also energy policy in Germany should make decisions in a transparent, understandable fashion on the basis of proven facts. Opting out of the use of nuclear power, as well as the massive support granted to the expansion of renewable energies, are no adequate response to the challenges we are facing in energy policy. Irrespective of fundamental political opinions, nuclear competence in Germany must be preserved and supported. Moreover, the problems ahead, especially with respect to the management of nuclear waste, need to be addressed. International trends indicate a realistic assessment of nuclear power and interpretation of facts. Nuclear power is seen as an option for the future and either included as such in planning, or else is preserved as a building block in energy supply. (orig.) [de

  2. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  3. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Innovations Enabled by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-11

    This report published in October 2017 updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. Telling Stories through Sculpture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Describes an art activity that incorporates storytelling with sculpture. Intermediate-level sculpture students create a sculpture that represents a family story, memory, or event. Describes the process and provides four examples, including stories and sculptures. (CMK)

  5. When's a story not at story?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva

    . For example, as presented in this paper, a tourist guide tells the same story about a violent motorcycle gang, part of her ancetdotal reportoire, during two guided tours. The story is fixed in content and structure, but when brought into social interaction with tourists, it becomes part of a broader narrative...

  6. Story quality management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    This book is written to explain quality management using stories, which have each story about quality management. The titles of stories are way to tell the meaning in mind, mom, house wife's meal costs a great deal, good bye digestive medicine, beans cooked in soy sauce, wedding and space rocket, each story is used to give descriptions of quality management like procedure and decision for division of labor, quality guaranteed and histogram.

  7. Women in Technology: College Experiences That Are Correlated with Long-Term Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Melissa Gearhart

    2017-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in technology careers because they pursue technology degrees less frequently and leave technology careers at greater numbers than do men. By analyzing a representative dataset of college graduates with degrees in computer science, computer engineering, and management information systems, this study identified…

  8. International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology : The importance of career capital and organizational capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, R.; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, Marloes

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important

  9. Embracing change: practical and theoretical considerations for successful implementation of technology assisting upper limb training in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochstenbach-Waelen Ananda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rehabilitation technology for upper limb training of stroke patients may play an important role as therapy tool in future, in order to meet the increasing therapy demand. Currently, implementation of this technology in the clinic remains low. This study aimed at identifying criteria and conditions that people, involved in development of such technology, should take into account to achieve a (more successful implementation of the technology in the clinic. Methods A literature search was performed in PubMed and IEEE databases, and semi-structured interviews with therapists in stroke rehabilitation were held, to identify criteria and conditions technology should meet to facilitate (implementation of technology-assisted arm-hand skills training in rehabilitation therapy of stroke patients. In addition, an implementation strategy frequently applied in general health care was used to compose a stepwise guidance to facilitate successful implementation of this technology in therapy of stroke patients. Implementation-related criteria mentioned by therapists during the interviews were integrated in this guidance. Results Results indicate that, related to therapy content, technology should facilitate repetition of task-related movements, tailored to the patient and patient’s goals, in a meaningful context. Variability and increasing levels of difficulty in exercises should be on offer. Regarding hardware and software design of technology, the system should facilitate quick familiarisation and be easily adjustable to individual patients during therapy by therapists (and assistants. The system should facilitate adaptation to individual patients’ needs and their progression over time, should be adjustable as to various task-related variables, should be able to provide instructions and feedback, and should be able to document patient’s progression. The implementation process of technology in the clinic is provided as a stepwise

  10. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 1: Success of horizontal well technology, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume I of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA. and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA. and 88 in Canada. Operators responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  11. Story and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Waxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Why should we be concerned about the fate of literature as we move from a book culture to a screen culture in the digital age? Not primarily because we are losing our sense of story, but because we are losing our sense of the central importance of linguistic narrative. There is a difference. The technologies creating the digital revolution seem to devalue language and increasingly to do away with boundaries, celebrating instead speed and boundless exhilaration. The visual trumps the linguistic, the image and the screen trump the word and the book. As a result, we no longer seem to engage deeply with others or ourselves. We are beginning to move, in other words, from “a reading brain” to “a digital brain,” from a brain capable of deep reading and deep thinking to a brain increasingly addled by spectacle and surface sensation. We are losing our standing as “linguistic beings.”

  12. Viagra: : A success story for rationing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, R.; Sturm, H.

    2002-01-01

    The 1998 launch of Viagra prompted widespread fears about the budgetary consequences for insurers and governments, all the more so since Viagra was only the first of a new wave of so-called lifestyle drugs. The fears have turned out to be greatly exaggerated. This paper analyzes the rationing

  13. Gallup, NM, CARE Grant Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    A CARE Grant, Level II award, was made to Gallup, NM to focus on cleaning up the waste stream, reuse and recycling of materials, and reclaiming land for these purposes through outreach, education and organization.

  14. Legalized abortion: a public health success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M

    1999-06-01

    60% of more than 2000 women surveyed by the Picker Institute who underwent induced abortion procedures rated the quality of their care as excellent. Another third reported their care as being either very good or good. The survey also found that the quality of abortion care is comparable to other outpatient surgery. However, the high quality of care women receive from abortion providers is lost in the hostile anti-abortion climate created by threatening protesters outside of clinics and the murder of 7 clinic workers and physicians who performed abortions. Abortion opponents fail to acknowledge that legal abortion is a medical procedure which protects women's health and saves their lives. Before abortion was legalized in the US, countless women were either rendered unable to reproduce or died from abortion-related complications. Efforts to outlaw abortion persist despite it being widely recognized by medical experts as one of the most safe medical procedures currently performed in the US. When state legislatures target abortion providers with unduly strict regulations, abortion becomes prohibitively expensive and difficult to obtain.

  15. A Learning Success Story Using Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Promnitz-Hayashi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of Web 2.0 tools such as wikis and blogs is becoming more widespread in the language learning classroom, however social networking can also be an effective tool. Social networking is not only easy to use; it also helps encourage an autonomous learning within a social environment for students. Activities using a social networking site, such as Facebook, can put control for studying into the students’ hands. It can create not only motivation but also increase students’ social relationships outside of the classroom. This article discusses how simple activities in Facebook helped a lower language proficient class to become more comfortable participating in online discussions, giving their opinions and forging closer relationships with their fellow classmates.

  16. Coal: a South African success story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boers, R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the South African coal mining industry, including exports domestic use of coal, coal geology and mining methods, employment, labour relations, benefits and social amenities provided for workers, safety and environmental aspects including land reclamation. Also discusses the implications of sanctions on coal and the mining industry, and argues that sanctions have not achieved and cannot achieve the stated objective of the social and political emancipation of black South Africa. Concludes that in order to defeat apartheid, South Africa, needs economic growth and encouragement for those attempting reform.

  17. Initial crisis risk communications: A success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.B.; Traverso, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    Federal regulations require nuclear facilities to be prepared for the risk communication aspects of a catastrophic emergency. Thus, all nuclear plants have provisions for a Joint Public Information Center (JPIC). The JPICs are designed to handle more than 300 media for 24 hours a day; to coordinate information among utility, federal, state, and local agencies; to provide spokespersons; etc. For a large-scale emergency, JPICs can work very well. However, some utilities - indeed, most companies - appear to have only two modes of emergency communication response: normal staff and JPIC. Experience has shown that normal staffing is inadequate to handle the risk communication response for media-intensive low-level emergencies and for the initial stages of an escalating emergency. It is clear that initial response will determine how well a company fares in its overall emergency response and in its long-term relations with the media and public. A solution to this risk communication challenge was developed by Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company's Perry Nuclear Plant - the Public Information Response Team. Using existing facilities and staff - only one of whom works regularly with the media - the Perry plant proactively manages its initial risk communication response

  18. The Success Story: Seeing the Rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    services     Over  19  years  experience     DCAA  audited  and  approved  accounHng  system     ISO   9001  /  AS9100...Test & Evaluation Command (ATEC) •  Air Force Logistics •  Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) •  Department of Homeland Security...Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) •  Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) •  Department of Interior •  Navy Meteorology & Oceanography •  NASA

  19. The Success Story of LDL Cholesterol Lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Terje R

    2016-02-19

    We can look back at >100 years of cholesterol research that has brought medicine to a stage where people at risk of severe or fatal coronary heart disease have a much better prognosis than before. This progress has not come about without resistance. Perhaps one of the most debated topics in medicine, the cholesterol controversy, could only be brought to rest through the development of new clinical research methods that were capable of taking advantage of the amazing achievements in basic and pharmacological science after the second World War. It was only after understanding the biochemistry and physiology of cholesterol synthesis, transport and clearance from the blood that medicine could take advantage of drugs and diets to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic diseases. This review points to the highlights of the history of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol lowering, with the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and its physiology and not only the development of statins as the stellar moments but also the development of clinical trial methodology as an effective tool to provide scientifically convincing evidence. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Reaching women in Egypt: a success story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mousa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Women in Egypt are more likely than men to suffer from low vision or blindness from avoidable causes.1–3 This is, in large part, because women are not using eye care services as frequently as men, especially in rural areas.4–5 A 2002 community-based survey of 4,500 people in Al Minya Governorate, Upper Egypt showed that the prevalence of cataract in women was double that in men and that trachomatous trichiasis was four times as prevalent in women as in men

  1. Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-10-13

    Oct 13, 2009 ... Sena S. De Silva is Director General of the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia- Pacific and Honorary Professor of Aquaculture and Fisheries Biology at the School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia. F. Brian Davy is Senior Fellow at the International Institute for ...

  2. Story of a success: renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trittin, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    After having briefly outlined the importance of an actual protection of the environment when considering recent natural catastrophes (floods, hurricanes), the author notices that Germany is the first country in the world for the production of electric power from wind energy, and is about to overtake Japan in the field of photovoltaic energy. Then, he explains how Germany reached this leading position. The first research and development programmes started after the oil crisis of the 1970's. Then, the ecological movement emerged as a citizen movement in the 1980's and gave birth to a new party (Die Grunen, the Greens). As two thirds of German people refused the exploitation of nuclear energy, a new and modern policy of the environment emerged during the 1990's, Germany being then a leader in international negotiations on Agendas 21 and on the Kyoto protocol. This was followed by a law on renewable energies in 2000, and later the introduction of new programmes (notably for housing sanitation) and new instruments to finance them (ecotax). The author outlines that this policy of protection of the environment resulted in job creation and in investments. He comments efforts made by the Greens to promote investments in renewable energies, to develop clean transports, to give up oil through energy savings and improved performance for households and transports, and to ensure energy supply safety. It also appeared that this objective of giving up oil requires a world strategy, fairness at the world level, an opening of markets to competition, a new chemistry policy while still supporting an industrial policy

  3. Rotavirus vaccines: a story of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollaritsch, H; Kundi, M; Giaquinto, C; Paulke-Korinek, M

    2015-08-01

    By January 2015, rotavirus vaccination had been implemented in national vaccination programmes in 75 countries worldwide. Two live oral rotavirus vaccines are internationally available: human, monovalent vaccine and human-bovine pentavalent reassortant vaccine. Since January 2014, another live, oral human-bovine monovalent vaccine has been available in India. After implementation of rotavirus vaccines in childhood immunization programmes, there has been an over 90% reduction of rotavirus hospitalizations in industrialized and resource-deprived countries. Additionally, in Latin America, significant reduction of rotavirus-associated deaths has been recorded. Still, numerous countries do not recommend rotavirus mass vaccination because of assumed lack of cost-effectiveness and potential risk of intussusception, which is estimated at 1 per 50 000-70 000 doses of rotavirus vaccines. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination is affected in some countries by high price. Inclusion of herd protection and indirect costs in calculations for cost-effectiveness results in clear benefit: costs saved by health systems due to reduced rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations far exceed the costs for implementation of rotavirus vaccination. There have been objections that high rotavirus vaccination coverage could put selective pressure on certain rotavirus strains against which protection after vaccination is less distinct. However, data now strongly suggest that even if there might be a relative increase of some specific genotypes after the use of rotavirus vaccines, this is not an absolute increase in incidence from certain genotypes and does not affect the overall effectiveness of rotavirus mass vaccination, which resulted in a major decrease of severe cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis in both industrialized and resource deprived countries. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Brivaracetam: a rational drug discovery success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogawski, M A

    2008-01-01

    Levetiracetam, the α-ethyl analogue of the nootropic piracetam, is a widely used antiepileptic drug (AED) that provides protection against partial seizures and is also effective in the treatment of primary generalized seizure syndromes including juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Levetiracetam was discovered in 1992 through screening in audiogenic seizure susceptible mice and, 3 years later, was reported to exhibit saturable, stereospecific binding in brain to a ∼90 kDa protein, later identified as the ubiquitous synaptic vesicle glycoprotein SV2A. A large-scale screening effort to optimize binding affinity identified the 4-n-propyl analogue, brivaracetam, as having greater potency and a broadened spectrum of activity in animal seizure models. Recent phase II clinical trials demonstrating that brivaracetam is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of partial onset seizures have validated the strategy of the discovery programme. Brivaracetam is among the first clinically effective AEDs to be discovered by optimization of pharmacodynamic activity at a molecular target. PMID:18552880

  5. Defragmentation in the Netherlands: a success story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, van der E.A.

    2005-01-01

    In the Netherlands the problem of habitat fragmentation due to transport corridors is being addressed by a Long-Term Defragmentation Programme. Priority spots for defragmentation measures (i.e., locations where wildlife passages are most urgently required) were assessed by combining population

  6. Stories of Pasts and Futures in Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar Borges, Luciane

    2016-01-01

    Societies are constantly changing, facing new challenges and possibilities generated by innovative technologies, sociospatial re-structuring and mobilities. This research approaches these challenges by exploring the role that stories about pasts, presents and futures play in planning. It sees stories as interlinked spaces of struggle over meanings, legitimacies and powers through which “our” valuable pasts and “our” desirable futures become re-constructed, framed and projected. It argues that...

  7. Excavating and (Re)Presenting Stories: Narrative Inquiry as an Emergent Methodology in the Field of Adult Vocational Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Aaron Samuel; Kim, Jeong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Narrative inquiry has been a popular methodology in different disciplines for the last few decades. Using stories, narrative inquiry illuminates lived experience, serving as a valuable complement to research methodologies that are rooted in positivist epistemologies. In this article, we present a brief introduction to narrative inquiry including…

  8. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: A questionnaire survey of nurse-users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veer, A.J.E.; Fleuren, M A H; Bekkema, N; Francke, Anneke L

    2011-01-01

    Background: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better

  9. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better

  10. Moving beyond Cultural Barriers: Successful Strategies of Female Technology Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Raymond R.; Berger, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields of study and careers with a subset of STEM--Technology Education--possibly one of the least integrated fields for women as students and as professionals. What accounts for this situation and what are potential remedies? The purpose of this study was to learn…

  11. Examining Health Information Technology Implementation Success Factors in Critical Access Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Blake D.

    2016-01-01

    As the role of information technology increases throughout the world, healthcare providers in the United States face industry and governmental pressures to implement health information technology (HIT) as a tool to improve healthcare costs, quality, and safety. The problem addressed in this study was the relatively low HIT implementation success…

  12. Reconciling the Disconnect between Information Technology and Information Systems Using an Organizational Epistemology: A Framework to Improve Success with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    There is a disconnect between information technology (IT) and information systems (IS) that lies at the foundation of frequent failure in cost, schedule, and/or performance of IT/IS. This disconnect can perhaps be reconciled through a focus on the socially constructed and emergent nature of IT as it enters and is used by an organization. The…

  13. Knowledge from Research and Practice on the Barriers and Carriers to Successful Technology Transfer for Assistive Technology Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, James A.; Lane, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the assistive technology (AT) industry is made up of small to medium size companies serving relatively small markets with products characterized as "niche" or "orphan" products. Presenting opportunities to AT companies that are created by outside sources is difficult. Presenting such opportunities to companies serving larger markets…

  14. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Improving internal communication between marketing and technology functions for successful new food product development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, L.F.; Grunert, K.G.; Søndergaard, H.A.; Steenbekkers, B.; Dekker, M.; Lähteenmäki, L.

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the new product development (NPD) success for novel food products, it is crucial to understand how information can be optimally disseminated within companies. This systematic literature review concentrates on factors influencing internal communication between market and

  16. Designing a story database for use in automatic story generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, Katri; Theune, Mariët; Nijholt, Anton; Uijlings, Jasper; Harper, Richard; Rauterberg, Matthias; Combetto, Marco

    In this paper we propose a model for the representation of stories in a story database. The use of such a database will enable computational story generation systems to learn from previous stories and associated user feedback, in order to create believable stories with dramatic plots that invoke an

  17. SYNERGY OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND THE BANKING SYSTEM IN THE FUNCTIONING OF SUCCESSFUL BANKING OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Kovačević

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, modern banking cannot function without information and communications technology; hence banks heavily invest in the implementation of technology currently present on the market. Every aspect of the banking business includes information and communications technology, which points to the necessity of building an infrastructure for modern banking. Investing in development and implementation of new technologies simplifies everyday business activities and security, in addition to creating a competitive edge over rival businesses. It ensures fast and efficient customer service delivery by providing support to the distribution channels, as well as supporting bankers with making crucial decisions. The aim of this paper is to analyse trends in the use of information and communications technologies in the banking system, using publicly available business data, documentation and online bank information, as well as previously published findings of other researchers. Using the example of one of the largest banks in the Republic of Croatia, the possibilities provided by information and communications technology in the banking business sector are illustrated. Additionally, better economic efficiency and effectiveness, as well as the means of contemporary bank functioning are presented. Special attention is devoted to the security of ICT systems used in Internet Banking and the protection of banking service users’ data.

  18. Product Development in the Automotive Industry – Crucial Success Drivers for Technological Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhard, D.; Brem, Alexander; Voigt, K.-I.

    2008-01-01

    Developing new innovative products in the automotive industrymeans investing huge sums in advance, as one does not know if the productwill be successful on the market after launch. Hence, companies are interestedin knowing and measuring the critical success drivers within the developmentsteps......), an explorative study in the German automotive industry showsthat the findings are confirmed in practice as well. However, the results alsoindicate that there is still a gap between knowledge about practical relevance of those dimensions and the systematic assessment of these in the process. Thestudy shows...

  19. Identifying and prioritizing the factors influencing the success of science and technology foresight in the field of economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Raieninezhad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Promoting complex global environment, tremendous growth and increase of network communication technology in the world, strategic planning and foresight activities in science and technology have become very important. Gradually, organizations and businesses are realizing the importance of foresight; many organizations attempt to execute such activities. However, this concept is not still well known in our country and among our organizations. Therefore, recognizing the factors influencing the success of this concept is a kind of issues that the organizations and activists are faced. Thus, this research seeks to identify and to rank the factors, particularly in the areas of economy, and it has developed five hypotheses. In this paper, factors affecting the success of foresight are given in four groups of rational, structure, scope, and results. Data collection for this study is a questionnaire and the binomial tests, Pearson correlation and Friedman test have been used to prove the hypothesis. According to the analysis of data obtained from the questionnaire conducted by SPSS software, all research hypotheses were confirmed. It also became clear that the rational component had the greatest impact on the future success of science and technology in the field of economic.

  20. Lean Principles and Defense Information Technology Acquisition: An Investigation of the Determinants of Successful Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not there have been successful applications of lean manufacturing principles in highly variable defense IT environments. Specifically, the study assessed if implementation of the lean philosophies by a defense organization yielded repeatable, predictable results in software release schedules…

  1. Lean principles and defense information technology acquisition: An investigation of the determinants of successful application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not there have been successful applications of lean manufacturing principles in highly variable defense IT environments. Specifically, the study assessed if implementation of the lean philosophies by a defense organization yielded repeatable, predictable results in software release schedules reductions. Additionally, the study set out to determine what potential critical success factors (CSF's) were documented in the secondary data captured for each release, and extracted the variables used in the decision making for acceptability of fielding. In evaluating lean applicability to the high variability environment of USAF IT acquisitions, the research was conducted using non-experimental quantitative methods of archival secondary data. The sample for this case study was compiled from a USAF office that had implemented these techniques in pre-development, development and testing, and fielding phases. Based on the research data, acquisitionists and lean practitioners are inherently interconnected. Therefore, an understanding that critical success factors (CSFs) are integral to successful lean application in DoD IT acquisitions is crucial. Through a combination of synergistic alignments, plyometric CSFs were discovered to maximize the effects of each single CSF to produce rapid results in defense IT acquisitions. These include: (1) Enterprise Incorporation, (2) Team Trust, (3) Transformational Leadership, (4) Recursive Improvement, (5) Integrated Synergy, (6) Customer-Centric Culture and (7) Heuristic Communication.

  2. My Story: Real Stories of People Living with Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Compartir Real Stories from People living with Thalassemia On this Page Rahul’s Story Aaron’s Story Rahul’s ... is Rahul Kapoor, and I was born with thalassemia, a blood disorder which requires transfusions every other ...

  3. Theralase Technologies uses Virginia Tech research to successfully destroy breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Compounds developed by researchers at Virginia Tech, have proven effective in destroying breast cancer cells when used with lasers developed by Theralase Technologies (TSX-V: TLT) out of Toronto. Theralase, an international manufacturer of laser medical devices, reports that its patented photodynamic compounds (PDCs) developed at the university, when used with its lasers, destroy breast cancer cells in pre-clinical trials.

  4. Start at the Top: Successfully Integrating Information and Communication Technologies in Schools by Training Principals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IsaBelle, Claire; Lapointe, Claire

    2003-01-01

    Surveys of 28 New Brunswick (Canada) principals and vice-principals from 23 elementary schools examined their perceptions of their ability to assist teachers in using information and communication technologies (ICTs). Correlational analyses show that the more principals used ICTs, the easier it was for them to support teachers in ICT integration.…

  5. The Interactions among Information Technology Organizational Learning, Project Learning, and Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Donald S., II

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge gained from completed information technology (IT) projects was not often shared with emerging project teams. Learning lessons from other project teams was not pursued because people lack time, do not see value in learning, fear a potentially painful process, and had concerns that sharing knowledge will hurt their career. Leaders could…

  6. Women of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: A Qualitative Exploration into Factors of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olund, Jeanine K.

    2012-01-01

    Although the number of women entering science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has increased in recent years, overall there are still more men than women completing four-year degrees in these fields, especially in physics, engineering, and computer science. At higher levels of education and within the workplace, the…

  7. Success Factors and Challenges of an Information Communication Technology Network in Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Maryke A.

    2017-01-01

    In April 2008, an interactive information communication technology (ICT) network was established in Mpumalanga, South Africa. the network involved the implementation of SMART board interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and collaboration between a leading school and several disadvantaged schools. the main purpose of the Mpumalanga IWB project was to reach…

  8. Selecting, Managing, and Marketing Technologies. The Practicing Administrator's Leadership Series. Roadmaps to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Jamieson A.

    This book argues for a comprehensive approach to planning for and managing the use of technology in schools. In the first four chapters, emphasis is placed on the importance of: (1) anticipating the future; (2) creating stakeholders' planning committees; (3) providing staff development and training for teachers and administrators; (4) winning…

  9. 20 Years of Success: Science, Technology, and the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-10-22

    On Oct. 22, 2015, NNSA celebrated the proven success of the Stockpile Stewardship Program at a half-day public event featuring remarks by Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. (retired) Frank G. Klotz. The event also featured remarks by Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall and NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon.

  10. What drives successful implementation of pollution prevention and cleaner technology strategy? The role of innovative capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupendra, Kumar Verma; Sangle, Shirish

    2015-05-15

    Firms that are dynamic and prepared to implement environmental strategies have a potential competitive advantage over their industry counterparts. Therefore, it is important to understand, what capabilities are required to implement proactive environmental strategies. The paper discusses the attributes of innovative capability required by firms in order to adopt pollution prevention and cleaner technology strategies. Empirical results show that process and behavioral innovativeness are required by firms to implement a pollution prevention strategy. In addition to process and behavioral innovativeness, firms need a top management with high risk-taking ability as well as market, product, and strategic innovativeness to implement a cleaner technology strategy. The paper proposes some important managerial implications on the basis of the above research findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Westinghouse Savannah River Site vendor forum: An innovative cooperative technology development success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, H.F. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Supplier Environmental and Waste Management Information Exchange Forum was held August 31 - September 1, 1993. The forum, which was planned and conducted in concert with the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SROO), was held to foster a technical exchange in which new, innovative technologies were proposed by suppliers, to identify more cost-effective methods to apply to future and on-going activities, to increase use of the private sector, and to promote partnerships with other industries. The two day forum provided the opportunity for WSRC and DOE-SR to review program activities and challenges in five major areas, Savannah River Technology Center, Solid Waste Facilities, Environmental Restoration, Environmental Monitoring, and Decontamination and Decommissioning through formal presentations. The second day was designed to provide suppliers the opportunity to talk about current and future activities and challenges with representatives of each of these areas at display booths, special high interest topic interactive sessions, and site tours. Each attendee was then invited to submit pre-proposals relative to the abstracts presented in The Special Consolidate Solicitation for Environmental and Waste Management Basic and Applied Research and Research-Related Development and/or Demonstration No. E10600-E1 document. Twenty-five contracts totaling $12 million were awarded. Twenty-four contracts have now been completed. This paper provides an overview of the pre forum activities, the forum, post-forum and proposal review process, and most importantly a description of the technologies demonstrated, the benefits and savings derived, and future use potential from a DOE perspective, as well as technology transfer and industrial partnership potential

  12. The Effect of Computer Use in Science and Technology Lesson on Success and Attitude Towards

    OpenAIRE

    Cem O. Guzeller; Mustafa Dogru

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Computer being indispensable in our daily lives came into use in all fields of education. Use of computer for education activities became mandatory. This research is an experimental research performed by use of computer in science and technology and is important in terms of serving science education. General purpose of this research is to reveal the effect of computer-assisted teaching practice for subject of heat and temperature in primary school grade ...

  13. The success factors of technology-sourcing through mergers & acquisitions : an intuitive meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Schön, Benjamin; Pyka, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    With mergers & acquisitions playing an increasingly important role in today's business world, academic research has strived to follow this trend by investigating their underlying causes and consequences. For a long time this research focused on the analysis of the financial effect of mergers & acquisitions as measured by market value or debt level. Thus, despite being a major vehicle of industry concentration and method of reallocation of resources, the technological impact of mergers & acqui...

  14. Towards successful bioaugmentation with entrapped cells as a soil remediation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Dechesne, Arnaud; Binning, Philip John

    2010-01-01

    Soil remediation technologies are proposed that rely on inoculation with degrading microorganisms entrapped in protective carriers. A mathematical model developed to model entrapped cell bioaugmentation describes the 3-D diffusion-driven mass transfer of benzoate, and its mineralization by Pseudo...... but is restricted in dry conditions, as confirmed by performing cell counts. This highlights the potential of entrapped cells when they act as seeds for soil colonization....

  15. Linking Effectively: Learning Lessons from Successful Collaboration in Science and Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, Caroline S

    2002-01-01

    .... It is presented in a format that draws lessons from the case studies and then presents key questions that emerged from the cases that can serve as a guide to others seeking to formulate similar collaborative programs. The first section discusses the growing role that international collaboration is playing in science and technology (S&T). Here we also discuss the case study methodology used for this study. The second section presents a framework of.

  16. Encouraging Young Learners to Learn English through Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, Cagri Tugrul

    2012-01-01

    Reading is an important part of successful language acquisition. Motivating young learners to learn English through stories at an early age provides them the opportunity to widen their horizons and stimulate their early enthusiasm and enhance their awareness of the rich use of English. Stories are unquestionably a significant part of children's…

  17. Everybody Has a Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book bears witness of Young peoples lived lives across Europe, Russia and Japan. It contains stories about love, loss of love and loss of loved ones, about dreams of future lives and wonders of lives as such. And it tells stories about bullying, mental illness and simple strives just to be able...... to survive and live on....

  18. A Story from Space

    OpenAIRE

    Tsavala, Argyro (Iro); Childs, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    An astronaut on the ISS tells his daughter on earth a bedtime story to give her courage on her first day of school. The story is a re-telling of the apollo11 moon landing, in a language reminiscent of children's storybooks. An animated short film, transitioning between two visual languages and parallel storylines.

  19. Survey of the situation of technology succession. Databases of articles including in industrial technology museums; Gijutsu keisho jokyo chosa. Sangyo gijutsu hakubutsukan shuzohin D.B. hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    To promote the succession of history of and the creative use of industrial science technologies, the paper made lists and databases of the articles of industrial technology museums and material halls in Japan. Record/preservation and collection/systematization of history of the industrial technology is useful for forming bases necessary for promotion of future research/development and international contribution. Museums and material halls are the fields for making comprehensive and practical activities. The data were made as one of the basic databases as the first step for promoting activities for examining the technical succession situation in a long term range continuously and systematically. In the classification of the data, the energy relation was divided into electric power, nuclear power, oil, coal, gas and energy in general. Others were classified into metal/mine, electricity/electronics/communication, chemistry/food, ship building/heavy machinery, printing/precision instrument, and textile/spinning. Moreover, the traffic relation was classified into railroad, automobiles/two-wheeled vehicles, airline/space, and ships. Items were also set of life relation, civil engineering/architecture, and general. The total number of the museums for the survey reached 208.

  20. A retrospective study of the effect of increasing age on success rates of assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Yvonne M; Ryan, Michael; Martyn, Fiona; Wingfield, Mary B

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the effect of increasing age on the outcome of assisted reproductive technology, particularly among women aged 40 years or older. A retrospective analysis was conducted using prospectively collected data for all in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles among women aged 30-35 years or 40-44 years conducted at Merrion Fertility Clinic, Dublin, Ireland, between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. The relationship between age and treatment outcome was assessed. Among women aged 30-35 years, 726 cycles led to 281 (38.7%) clinical pregnancies and 242 (33.3%) live births. By contrast, among women aged 40-44 years, 433 cycles led to 102 (23.6%) clinical pregnancies and 64 (14.8%) live births (both Ptechnology are decreased among women aged older than 40 years. Fertility clinics have a responsibility to fully inform this group about the limitations of assisted reproductive technology. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  1. Quality of information about success rates provided on assisted reproductive technology clinic websites in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarberg, Karin; Prentice, Tess; Purcell, Isabelle; Johnson, Louise

    2017-11-12

    Many factors influence the chance of having a baby with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). A 2016 Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) investigation concluded that ART clinics needed to improve the quality of information they provide about chance of ART success. To evaluate changes in the quality of information about success rates provided on the websites of ART clinics in Australia and New Zealand before and after the ACCC investigation. Desktop audits of websites of ART clinics in Australia and New Zealand were conducted in 2016 and 2017 and available information about success rates was scored using a matrix with eight variables and a possible range of scores of 0-9. Of the 54 clinic websites identified in 2016, 32 had unique information and were eligible to be audited. Of these, 29 were also eligible to be audited in 2017. While there was a slight improvement in the mean score from 2016 to 2017 (4.93-5.28), this was not statistically significantly different. Of the 29 clinics, 14 had the same score on both occasions, 10 had a higher and five a lower information quality score in 2017. To allow people who consider ART to make informed decisions about treatment they need comprehensive and accurate information about what treatment entails and what the likely outcomes are. As measured by a scoring matrix, most ART clinics had not improved the quality of the information about success rates following the ACCC investigation. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Integration of advances in social media and mHealth technology are pivotal to successful cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, D Peter; Zaheer, Amir; Redmond, H Paul; Corrigan, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The successful prevention and treatment of cancer is dependent upon efficient and reliable communication between healthcare workers and patients. Advances in social media and mHealth platforms have provided new ways in which to enhance the sharing of cancer related information. Other benefits of embracing this technology include utilising its analytic capabilities which can process the vast quantity of information generated from genome exploration in a highly efficient manner. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the rapidly evolving areas through which digital engagement is proving useful in the prevention and control of cancer.

  3. Advances in Gammalloy Materials-Processes-Application Technology: Successes, Dilemmas, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Won; Kim, Sang-Lan

    2018-04-01

    For the last several years, gamma titanium aluminide ( γ-TiAl)-based alloys, called "gammalloys," in specific alloy-microstructure forms began to be implemented in civil aero-engines as cast or wrought low-pressure turbine (LPT) blades and in select ground vehicle engines as cast turbocharger rotors and wrought exhaust valves. Their operation temperatures are approximately up to 750°C for LPT blades and around 1000°C for turbocharger rotors. This article critically assesses current engineering gammalloys and their limitations and introduces eight strengthening pathways that can be adopted immediately for the development of advanced, higher temperature gammalloys. Intelligent integration of the pathways into the emerging application-specific research and development processes is emphasized as the key to the advancement of the gammalloy technology to the next higher engineering performance levels.

  4. Advances in Gammalloy Materials-Processes-Application Technology: Successes, Dilemmas, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Won; Kim, Sang-Lan

    2018-02-01

    For the last several years, gamma titanium aluminide (γ-TiAl)-based alloys, called "gammalloys," in specific alloy-microstructure forms began to be implemented in civil aero-engines as cast or wrought low-pressure turbine (LPT) blades and in select ground vehicle engines as cast turbocharger rotors and wrought exhaust valves. Their operation temperatures are approximately up to 750°C for LPT blades and around 1000°C for turbocharger rotors. This article critically assesses current engineering gammalloys and their limitations and introduces eight strengthening pathways that can be adopted immediately for the development of advanced, higher temperature gammalloys. Intelligent integration of the pathways into the emerging application-specific research and development processes is emphasized as the key to the advancement of the gammalloy technology to the next higher engineering performance levels.

  5. Successful grant proposals in science, technology, and medicine a guide to writing the narrative

    CERN Document Server

    Oster, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    There are many resources on grant writing in science, technology and medicine, but most do not provide the practical advice needed to write the narratives of grant proposals. Designed to help novice and experienced investigators write compelling narratives and acquire research funding, this is a detailed guide to the content, organisation, layout, phrasing, and scientific argumentation of narratives. The authors draw on more than twenty years of research and analysis of grant proposals, having worked extensively with investigators at different levels, from pre-doctoral students to senior scientists. They have used this experience to design a framework for scientific writing that you can apply directly to narratives. The guidelines and advice offered are applicable across many funding agencies, including the NIH and NSF. Featuring many real-life examples, the book covers a range of topics, from organisational alternatives to best practices in grammar and editing, overview visuals, and working with contributors...

  6. Effect of Etanercept on the Success of Assisted Reproductive Technology in Patients with Endometrioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önalan, Göğşen; Tohma, Yusuf Aytaç; Zeyneloğlu, Hulusi Bülent

    2017-11-24

    To determine the effects of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (etanercept) on pregnancy outcomes in patients with endometrioma who were treated with assisted reproductive technology. Sixty-eight infertile patients who had endometrioma were included in our retrospective case-control study. We administered etanercept (Enbrel, 50 mg in 1 mL intramuscularly) to 19 patients on the second day of their previous menstrual cycle. All patients were treated with assisted reproductive technology. Pregnancy and live birth rates (LBR) were documented. When all other parameters (age, body mass index, infertility) are supposed to be constant, the clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in patients who used etanercept in an antagonist protocol than in patients who did not use etanercept (χ2 = 5.547; p = 0.019) but LBR did not reach a statistical significance (χ2 = 3.179; p = 0.075). The use of etanercept had an OR of 4.17 (95% CI 1.23-14.14) compared with not using etanercept for clinical pregnancy rate. The use of etanercept increased the rate of pregnancy (χ2 = 6.55; p = 0.01). The pregnancy rate with the use of etanercept had an OR of 4.23 (95% CI 1.35-13.25) compared with patients who did not use etanercept. In the same way, the use of etanercept increased LBR twofold, but it is not significant in the border line (χ2 = 3.771; p = 0.052). Etanercept may be a new non-hormonal therapy that may be an adjunct to treatment of infertile women with endometrioma. However, the safety of etanercept on embryos and fetuses has not been fully clarified. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The laser revolution. Story of a brilliant discovery. Multipurpose lasers. Other promises for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Xavier; Bourdet, Julien; Feve, Sylvain; Julien, Lucile; Delaporte, Philippe; Aspect, Alain; Belliard, Laurent; Decremps, Frederic; Espinasse, Loic; Exertier, Pierre; Godin Beekmann, Sophie; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Salamero, Jean; Amiranoff, Francois; Colombelli, Raffaele; Picque, Nathalie; Couderc, Vincent; Ducloy, Martial; Lozes, Francoise; Mora, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    In May 1960, American physicist Theodore Maiman described the first ruby laser in a scientific journal. Fifty years later, the laser has conquered the planet... and the world is now paying tribute to this champion of modern technology. The laser has undoubtedly become indispensable in everyday life, in the industrial and medical sectors and, last but not least, in the research field. Yet this fabulous success story is still in its infancy, as research laboratories across the world continue to improve laser technology, giving rise to often unexpected applications. Our feature explores an invention that is just as revolutionary today as it was 50 years ago

  8. Is technology assisted guided self-help successful in treating female adolescents with bulimia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gudrun; Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Nobis, Gerald; Mayerhofer, Anna; Schau, Johanna; Spitzer, Marion; Imgart, Hartmut; Karwautz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome of new technology assisted guided self-help in adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). One hundred and twenty-six patients with BN (29 adolescents and 97 adults) were randomly allocated to a cognitive behavioural therapy-based self-help program delivered by the Internet or bibliotherapy, both accompanied by e-mail guidance. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, 7 and 18 including remission rates and eating disorder associated psychopathology. In all, 44% of adolescents vs. 38.7% of adults were in remission at month 7, and 55% of adolescents vs. 62.5% of adults were in remission at follow-up. Objective binge eating and compensatory behaviour improved significantly over time in both groups, with the highest decrease during the first 4 months. A significant decrease over time and no group differences have been found in almost all EDI-2 subscales. E-mail guided self-help (delivered via the Internet or bibliotherapy) is equally effective for adolescents as for adults with BN, and can be recommended as an initial step of treatment for this younger age group.

  9. Ten key considerations for the successful optimization of large-scale health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Implementation and adoption of complex health information technology (HIT) is gaining momentum internationally. This is underpinned by the drive to improve the safety, quality, and efficiency of care. Although most of the benefits associated with HIT will only be realized through optimization of these systems, relatively few health care organizations currently have the expertise or experience needed to undertake this. It is extremely important to have systems working before embarking on HIT optimization, which, much like implementation, is an ongoing, difficult, and often expensive process. We discuss some key organization-level activities that are important in optimizing large-scale HIT systems. These include considerations relating to leadership, strategy, vision, and continuous cycles of improvement. Although these alone are not sufficient to fully optimize complex HIT, they provide a starting point for conceptualizing this important area. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Project WANT - Women's Access to Nuclear Technology, a successful industry/education partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.; Roth, G.L.; NIU)

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, the U.S. Congress issued the Carl D. Perkins Act, which charges vocational educators to increase their focus on two broad themes: (a) the elimination of sexual bias and sexual stereotyping in vocational education and (b) the provision of marketable skills to the economically deprived of the nation's work force. In response to this charter, an industry/education partnership was established among the Illinois State Board of Education, Norther Illinois University, and the Westinbghouse Nuclear Training Center. In essence, these partners established Project WANT - Women's Access to Nuclear Technology - with two premier goals: (a) to increase women's awareness regarding nuclear career opportunities and (b) to train and place women in technical professions within the nuclear industry. Feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics identifies that <2% of all technical positions within the nuclear power industry are held by women. Hence, one may conclude that there is a definite need to promote sexual equity in the nuclear industry and that Illinois represents a unique environment of opportunity to accomplish this

  11. 4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbockel, I.; Tietze, U.

    2007-01-01

    In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

  12. Measuring Goodness of Story Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Karen; Coelho, Carl; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate a new measure of story narrative performance: story completeness. It was hypothesized that by combining organizational (story grammar) and completeness measures, story "goodness" could be quantified. Method: Discourse samples from 46 typically developing adults were compared with those from 24…

  13. The successful management of programs for human factors certification of advanced aviation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Rod

    1994-01-01

    In recent years there have been immense pressures to enact changes on the air traffic control organizations of most states. In addition, many of these states are or have been subject to great political, sociological and economic changes. Consequently, any new schemes must be considered within the context of national or even international changes. Europe has its own special problems, and many of these are particularly pertinent when considering human factors certification programs. Although these problems must also be considered in the wider context of change, it is usually very difficult to identify which forces are pressing in support of human factors aspects and which forces are resisting change. There are a large number of aspects which must be taken into account if human factors certification programs are to be successfully implemented. Certification programs would be new ventures, and like many new ventures it will be essential to ensure that managers have the skills, commitment and experience to manage the programs effectively. However, they must always be aware of the content and the degree of certainty to which the human factors principles can be applied - as Debons and Horne have carefully described. It will be essential to avoid the well known pitfalls which occur in the implementation of performance appraisal schemes. While most appraisal schemes are usually extremely well thought out, they often do not produce good results because they are not implemented properly and staff therefore do not have faith in them. If the manager does not have the commitment and interest in his/her staff as human beings, then the schemes will not be effective. Thus, one aspect of considering human factors certification schemes is within the context of a managed organization. This paper outlines some of the management factors which need to be considered for the air traffic control services. Many of the points received attention during the plenary sessions while others were

  14. Individualised controlled ovarian stimulation (iCOS: maximising success rates for assisted reproductive technology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Ernesto

    2011-06-01

    patient's specific characteristics. As new objective endocrine, paracrine, functional and/or genetic biomarkers of response are developed, iCOS can be refined further still, and this will be a significant step towards a personalised approach for IVF. Conclusions A variety of COS protocols have been adopted, with mixed success, but no single approach is appropriate for all patients within a given population. We suggest that treatment protocols should be adapted for individual patients through iCOS; this approach promises to be one of the first steps towards implementing personalised medicine in reproductive science.

  15. Teaching Young Readers to Navigate a Digital Story When Rules Keep Changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorsky, Kristin; Trainin, Guy

    2014-01-01

    As mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones offer opportunities to view stories in digital format, young readers are faced with new challenges in the reading task. The authors conducted an exploratory study of digital story applications on a mobile reading device and found that digital story applications are capable of taking large…

  16. How authenticity, narrator, and plot of a story affect perceived brand image

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wen-yeh (Rene)

    2010-01-01

    Many successful brands have employed brand story to communicate with consumers. Brand story plays a part in helping consumers make sense of the brand. This study intended to investigate the relationship between brand story's demensions, including authenticity, narrator, plot, and consumers' perceptions of brand image. A 2x2x2 experimental design was employed to test the effect of abovementioned dimensions on perceived brand image. Findings suggested that brand story with high authenticity, cl...

  17. Critical Success Factors to Improve Perception of Information Technology Careers: A Specific Case in a Mexican Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Aldrette-Malacara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that fashion plays an important role to select a career, new options of careers from engineering are preferred by students instead of traditional options; for example, Mechatronics, Aeronautics, Automotive specializations, Bionics, Biomedical and others are so popular. Every day, new necessities are required in the world and it is necessary to find the way to solve them, for that reason these new majors are good options to students, however traditional areas are important too. Information Technology is not the exception because every enterprise, school, association and organization needs computers with systems that help to solve specific situations or to manage resources. In Mexico, Information Technology careers are been affected for low enrollment of students, of course private universities have suffered more this situation than public schools [1]. In this research work are shown the most important factors that have a real incidence to choose an Information Technology career. The methodology consisted in the design of a survey using seven points Likert´s scale where potential students could express more about their expectative, preferences and required abilities to study these majors. The mentioned survey had three versions and each one was validated through Cronbach’s Alpha. Data collected were analyzed using statistical software SPSS to obtain the critical success factors.

  18. The Story of Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Karen

    2017-01-01

    A teacher describes how a team of educators from two elementary schools in Massachusetts used the Next Generation Science Standards to create a social history curriculum focused on depth--and story--instead of isolated facts.

  19. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    , edited and performed by the storyteller in an ongoing process allowing tensions, discontinuities and editing between failures and achievements, between dreams and work realities and between home and work life. We argue that by including different types of fragmentation, we offer a new type......Following a strand of narrative studies pointing to the living conditions of storytelling and the micro-level implications of working within fragmented narrative perspectives, this article contributes to narrative research on work stories by focusing on how meaning is created from fragmented...... stories. We argue that meaning by story making is not always created by coherence and causality; meaning is created by different types of fragmentation: discontinuities, tensions and editing. The objective of this article is to develop and advance antenarrative practice analysis of work stories...

  20. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick ... Clinical Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For ...

  1. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  2. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  3. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Educational Resources Glossary of Common Terms If You Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering ... participation of research volunteers. If you stutter or have a family member who stutters, you could be ...

  4. The Wellenberg story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Untensperger, Marcel A.

    1995-01-01

    In June 1994 two-thirds of the voters present at a community meeting in Wolfenschiessen agreed to host a repository for short-lived low- and intermediate-level (LLW/ILW) waste in the nearby Wellenberg mountain. Wolfenschiessen, located in a farming region in central Switzerland, is a village of 1900 residents. Nagra, the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, was able to celebrate a breakthrough at last. Nuclear opponents criticised that the community had, essentially, been bought by Nagra. But agreements for free electricity, grants and annual payments only represented the culmination of a decade of intense effort by Nagra towards winning local public acceptance for its repository. The host community came to trust Nagra for what we are - a technical service organisation with a federal mandate but with no political power. As a matter of fact, Nagra has encountered much more opposition than acceptance over the years. Our scientists were greeted by residents carrying pitchforks and sticks when attempting to begin experimental field work at one site; due to exhaustive use of Swiss democratic rights, permission to drill at another site was delayed by opponents for eight years. What did Nagra learn from all these obstacles? On its way towards gaining public acceptance, Nagra was confronted with problems in three areas: Fear and safety, NIMBY-syndrome (not in my backyard); Manipulation of public anxiety for individual political gain and as a substratum for arguments against nuclear power. While we at Nagra concede that Wellenberg represents a 'green light', we also know that not all lights ahead will be green. Some will be amber. Is the Wellenberg story one of success? The future will tell us, but a few doors have been opened along the way towards realising a repository for short-lived LLW/ILW in Switzerland

  5. Measuring the Success of Library 2.0 Technologies in the African Context: The Suitability of the DeLone and McLean's Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwoga, Edda Tandi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the suitability of information systems (IS) success model in the adoption of library 2.0 technologies among undergraduate students in the African context, and focused at the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) of Tanzania. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the IS success model, the…

  6. Unstable identity compatibility: how gender rejection sensitivity undermines the success of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlqvist, Sheana; London, Bonita; Rosenthal, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    Although the perceived compatibility between one's gender and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) identities (gender-STEM compatibility) has been linked to women's success in STEM fields, no work to date has examined how the stability of identity over time contributes to subjective and objective STEM success. In the present study, 146 undergraduate female STEM majors rated their gender-STEM compatibility weekly during their freshman spring semester. STEM women higher in gender rejection sensitivity, or gender RS, a social-cognitive measure assessing the tendency to perceive social-identity threat, experienced larger fluctuations in gender-STEM compatibility across their second semester of college. Fluctuations in compatibility predicted impaired outcomes the following school year, including lower STEM engagement and lower academic performance in STEM (but not non-STEM) classes, and significantly mediated the relationship between gender RS and STEM engagement and achievement in the 2nd year of college. The week-to-week changes in gender-STEM compatibility occurred in response to negative academic (but not social) experiences.

  7. Stakeholder and Process Alignment in Navy Installation Technology Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    report : We have numerous technical success stories that are not fully integrated because of certain circumstances or conditions— some of which are totally...simultaneously integrate tech- nologies with existing systems, secure stakeholder support and integrate with shore planning and funding, program and...process requirements, the ARLs measure progress across three domains: technology integration , stakeholders and processes. Hurdles in any one of

  8. Living in a Smart World with Smart Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Baltimore is an American success story. Since the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor in the late 1970s, Baltimore has set the standard for urban renewal and is now rated as one of the top 10 summer destinations in the world. This year, the city will host the 68th Annual International Technology Education Association (ITEA) Conference. The…

  9. Polymer and organic solar cells viewed as thin film technologies: What it will take for them to become a success outside academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    when judging by the number of scientific publications whereas the application of polymer and organic solar cells in real products is completely lacking. This aspect is viewed as a sign of the polymer and organic solar cell field as being more complex and less mature and it raises the question......The polymer and organic solar cell technology is critically presented in the context of other thin film technologies with a specific focus on what it will take to make them a commercial success. The academic success of polymer and organic solar cells far outweigh any other solar cell technology...

  10. Partnerships and Opportunity: A Canadian Success Story Community engagement on uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan. Informing and Involving Stakeholders in the Context of the Finnish Decision-making Process. Stakeholder involvement and public debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Sharonne; Vanhatalo, Hanna; Thome-Jassaud, Pierre-Franck

    2017-01-01

    Session 5 featured case studies of stakeholder involvement in decisions related to new nuclear power and fuel cycle facilities. The chair highlighted that more than 30 countries either have nuclear power facilities or are considering developing them, and 15 countries are currently building new reactors. The topic of new nuclear facilities is quite broad, and the session covered three case studies that were quite different. Ms Katz of Natural Resources Canada Limited outlined stakeholder engagement commitments by a number of actors in Canada, including the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. She provided an overview on Cameco's behalf of their experience in engaging the local stakeholders of uranium mining activities. Ms Vanhatalo reviewed Fennovoima's activities related to the site selection and move towards construction of a new nuclear reactor. Mr Thome-Jassaud presented the experience of electricite de France on two proposed reactor projects with France's formalised public debate process. A central theme of the presentations was the importance of establishing and maintaining a good reputation, especially in the local community. Ms Katz relayed a story of Cameco inviting community leaders, near an Australian property that Cameco had acquired to visit a mining community in Saskatchewan. Instead of tightly controlling the interaction, Cameco left the Australian guests to stay with local families for several days to ask questions and hear directly from members of the Canadian community without any interference. This required confidence on the part of the company that it had built a strong and positive relationship with the Canadian host community. Ms Vanhatalo described how the success in siting nuclear power plant Hanhikivi 1 near Pyhaejoki was attributable not only to Fennovoima's commitment to engage the community, but also to the reputation that the company Teollisuuden Voima Oy had built with its Olkiluoto nuclear power plant and the

  11. A Data Sharing Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Crosas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the early days of modern science through this century of Big Data, data sharing has enabled some of the greatest advances in science. In the digital age, technology can facilitate more effective and efficient data sharing and preservation practices, and provide incentives for making data easily accessible among researchers. At the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, we have developed an open-source software to share, cite, preserve, discover and analyze data, named the Dataverse Network. We share here the project’s motivation, its growth and successes, and likely evolution.

  12. Gypsy stories: Narrative as a teaching stratagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čvorović Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the performance of narratives as adaptive cultural beha­viors among Gypsies in Mačva county, western Serbia. Storytelling is a universal activity and may well be oldest of the arts. It has always provided a vehicle for the expression of ideas, particularly in societies relying on oral tradition. Gypsies are present in Serbia since the Middle Ages, living within a larger Serbian culture as a minority group. Mačva, an agriculturally rich county in western Serbia, is a place where local Gypsy traditions are still alive and which help distinguish between Gypsy subgroups and the larger Serbian society. The stories analyzed are part of a collec­tion made from several different Gypsy groups exhibiting varying degrees of influence from Serbian culture. Gypsies in Serbia have no written literature, but possess a rich and varied storytelling tradition delivered by word of mouth through the generations. Their stories bear testimony to the evolutionarily important mecha­nisms employed by Gypsies to make their way in the world. Gypsy stories concern many aspects of the relationship between themselves and other social groups, both in the past and the present. At the same time, the stories deal with universal adaptive problems, such as origin/ethnicity, kinship and mate acquisition. By applying the concepts and folk knowledge from their own culture, Gypsies have managed to provide for themselves the guidelines to overcome these problems within a par­ticular environment. Thus it is that these stories reflect both human universals and cultural peculiarities - by utilization of localized cultural solutions to adaptive problems. The success Gypsies have achieved in surviving harassment, and their ability to sustain themselves and their cultures despite social rejection can be attributed, in part, to the power of the traditional stories to influence the behavior of those who hear them. For the Gypsies, telling and listening to the stories

  13. What Is a Short Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Marilyn

    2000-01-01

    Presents 12 brief answers by editors and authors to the question of what a short story is. Includes a 23-item annotated bibliography of the best new (published between 1997 and 2000) short story collections for young adults. (RS)

  14. Reading, Writing, and Mystery Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Sylvia M.

    1983-01-01

    Assesses students' responses to and production of story conventions in detective or mystery stories and explores students' responses to literature as potential connections between comprehending and composing text. (MM)

  15. From Story to Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stanley

    1986-01-01

    Presents a developmental taxonomy which promotes sequencing activities to enhance the potential of matching these activities with learner needs and readiness, suggesting that the order commonly found in the classroom needs to be inverted. The proposed taxonomy (story, skill, and algorithm) involves problem-solving emphasis in the classroom. (JN)

  16. Stories on the go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Hvidtfeldt

    2014-01-01

    and affective narratives. I argue that these videos and stories demonstrate the potential of mobile and digital cultural heritage sites; however, it requires strategic initiatives and long-term engagement from museums and cultural institutions to create and maintain the level of the dialogue and participation....

  17. Story of Fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Story of Fission: Unlocking Power of the Nucleus. Amit Roy. General Article Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 247-258. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/03/0247-0258 ...

  18. " The Story of Spin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 11. The Story of Spin - From Spectroscopy to Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. N Mukunda. Book Review Volume 3 Issue 11 November 1998 pp 89-90. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Postcolonial Entanglements: Unruling Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I use Donna Haraway's philosophy to think about postcolonial encounters between different species. I follow entangled stories of the deer/settler-child figure to trouble colonialisms and untangle the histories and trajectories that we inhabit with other species through colonial histories. I shy away from generalizations and…

  20. Elizabeth Belle's Birth Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boro, Jessica; Boro, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Jessica and Samuel Boro share the story of the birth of their daughter, Elizabeth Belle. With the physical and emotional support of her husband and her doula, this mother was able to cope with a long labor and have the natural birth she wanted. Her husband describes how important the doula was for him.

  1. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and ... recorded speech sample. For more information about this clinical trial, see Protocol NCT00001604 on ClinicalTrials.gov , or contact ...

  2. News Story Quotes: Verbatim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Lucinda

    A study determined what beginning journalists and news reporting students have learned is acceptable to quote, verbatim, in a news story, and where they learned about these guidelines. Results of a questionnaire given to journalism students indicated that most would change direct quotes by adjusting blasphemies, correcting faulty grammar, cleaning…

  3. When do Stories Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelman, Andrew; Basbøll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Storytelling has long been recognized as central to human cognition and communication. Here we explore a more active role of stories in social science research, not merely to illustrate concepts but also to develop new ideas and evaluate hypotheses, for example, in deciding that a research method...

  4. Beyond the Single Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Yekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Teachers of world literature have the opportunity to help students explore the more complex reality behind the stereotypes that they often see in the media. If we don't encourage students to challenge one-dimensional "single stories" that characterize an entire people--whether Muslims, Russians, Mexicans, African Americans, Chinese,…

  5. The Story of Iyal

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-24

    In this podcast, a mother tells her compelling story about a family living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.  Created: 8/24/2009 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 8/24/2009.

  6. New Suburban Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dines, M.; Vermeulen, T.J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Exploring fiction, film and art from across the USA, South America, Asia, Europe and Australia, New Suburban Stories brings together new research from leading international scholars to examine cultural representations of the suburbs, home to a rapidly increasing proportion of the world's population.

  7. Factors Influencing the Learning Management System (LMS Success Among Undergraduate Students in Limkokwing University of Creative Technology, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suha Fouad Salem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of e-learning systems being added into the educational processes. One of them is the Learning management system (LMS, an educational program that is based on web technology. The programs in this system provide support to instructors to achieve their pedagogical goals, organize course contents that in turn support students’ learning process. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that have brought success to the learning management system. The study examines the relationship between students’ outcomes (Perceived Usefulness and information quality, for online learning through system use and user satisfaction. The respondents chosen for this study are undergraduate students from Limkokwing University in Malaysia. The number of respondents selected as sample of this study is based on the number of students in each faculty. The quantitative data are obtained from a survey using questionnaires. The analysis of the available data indicated that all relationships from independent variables to mediating variables and from mediating variables to dependent variable are significant, the most influential path was information quality user satisfaction perceived usefulness.

  8. Health information technology success and the art of being mindful: preliminary insights from a comparative case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Marie-Claude; Paré, Guy; Laflamme, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Information technologies (ITs) represent an important lever for improving performance in health care systems. In recent years, most industrialized countries have made substantial investments in this area. Nevertheless, the sad truth is that far too many of these IT projects have failed. The primary goals of this study were to explore the notion of mindfulness proposed by E. B. Swanson and N. C. Ramiller (2004) and to assess the extent to which, and how, innovating mindfully influences health IT project success. Two in-depth case studies were conducted in comparable health care organizations that adopted the same clinical information system. Observation, semistructured interviews, informal discussions, and documentation were the primary data collection methods. Data analyses were performed following recognized guidelines. Throughout the unfolding of the two projects, the actions and decisions of key stakeholders reflected different levels of mindfulness. The cross-case comparison was particularly relevant given that project circumstances led to contrasting outcomes. Taking action and making decisions in light of the particular context of each particular health IT project, that is, innovating mindfully, favor innovation acceptance and positive outcomes, whereas acting and deciding following fads, fashion, or best practices without paying attention to the specifics of the project context, that is, innovating mindlessly, increase the risk of human resistance and limited added value.

  9. Core story creation: analysing narratives to construct stories for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia; Jarvis, Joy; Thomas, Rebecca

    2018-03-16

    Educational research uses narrative enquiry to gain and interpret people's experiences. Narrative analysis is used to organise and make sense of acquired narrative. 'Core story creation' is a way of managing raw data obtained from narrative interviews to construct stories for learning. To explain how core story creation can be used to construct stories from raw narratives obtained by interviewing parents about their neonatal experiences and then use these stories to educate learners. Core story creation involves reconfiguration of raw narratives. Reconfiguration includes listening to and rereading transcribed narratives, identifying elements of 'emplotment' and reordering these to form a constructed story. Thematic analysis is then performed on the story to draw out learning themes informed by the participants. Core story creation using emplotment is a strategy of narrative reconfiguration that produces stories which can be used to develop resources relating to person-centred education about the patient experience. Stories constructed from raw narratives in the context of constructivism can provide a medium or an 'end product' for use in learning resource development. This can then contribute to educating students or health professionals about patients' experiences. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  10. Contextual Factors Related to Stereotype Threat and Student Success in Science Technology Engineering Mathematics Education: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leker, Lindsey Beth

    Stereotype threat is a widely researched phenomenon shown to impact performance in testing and evaluation situations (Katz, Roberts, & Robinson, 1965; Steele & Aronson, 1995). When related to gender, stereotype threat can lead women to score lower than men on standardized math exams (Spencer, Steele, & Quinn, 1999). Stereotype threat may be one reason women have lower enrollment in most science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors, hold a smaller number of STEM careers than men, and have a higher attrition rate in STEM professions (Hill, Corbet, & Rose, 2010; Picho & Brown 2011; Sorby & Baartmans, 2000). Most research has investigated stereotype threat using experiments yielding mixed results (Stoet & Geary, 2012). Thus, there is a need to explore stereotype threat using quantitative surveys and qualitative methods to examine other contextual factors that contribute to gender difference in STEM fields. This dissertation outlined a mixed methods study designed to, first, qualitatively explore stereotype threat and contextual factors related to high achieving women in STEM fields, as well as women who have failed and/or avoided STEM fields. Then, the quantitative portion of the study used the themes from the qualitative phase to create a survey that measured stereotype threat and other contextual variables related to STEM success and failure/avoidance. Fifteen participants were interviewed for the qualitative phase of the study and six themes emerged. The quantitative survey was completed 242 undergraduate participants. T-tests, correlations, regressions, and mediation analyses were used to analyze the data. There were significant relationships between stereotype threat and STEM confidence, STEM anxiety, giving up in STEM, and STEM achievement. Overall, this mixed methods study advanced qualitative research on stereotype threat, developed a much-needed scale for the measurement of stereotype threat, and tested the developed scale.

  11. Reviews Equipment: Vibration detector Equipment: SPARK Science Learning System PS-2008 Equipment: Pelton wheel water turbine Book: Atomic: The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 Book: Outliers: The Story of Success Book: T-Minus: The Race to the Moon Equipment: Fridge Rover Equipment: Red Tide School Spectrophotometer Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Vibration detector SEP equipment measures minor tremors in the classroom SPARK Science Learning System PS-2008 Datalogger is easy to use and has lots of added possibilities Atomic: The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 Book is crammed with the latest on the atom bomb T-Minus: The Race to the Moon Graphic novel depicts the politics as well as the science Fridge Rover Toy car can teach magnetics and energy, and is great fun Red Tide School Spectrophotometer Professional standard equipment for the classroom WORTH A LOOK Pelton wheel water turbine Classroom-sized version of the classic has advantages Outliers: The Story of Success Study of why maths is unpopular is relevant to physics teaching WEB WATCH IOP webcasts are improving but are still not as impressive as Jodrell Bank's Chromoscope website

  12. Lighting up the Brain with Songs and Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Shelly

    2010-01-01

    Songs and stories have a strong relationship to each other and have the capacity to boost brain development, increase vocabulary, and promote future academic success. The sounds and foundational structures of reading and singing provide young children with successful pathways for advancing language skills, increasing memory, and promoting emerging…

  13. Improving Knowledge Management in the Health Service: Re-Engineering Approach Towards Successful Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyampoh-Vidogah, Regina; Moreton, Robert

    Changes to business practices involve risks. There has always been an attempt to develop various concepts for successful restructuring of business processes to enable technology adoption. This is due to the fact that the success of any business depends as much on how it is structured, as well as its ability to adopt new technology. As a consequence, the great success stories of the global economy emanate from those organisations most capable of adopting new technology, which invariably includes information technology (IT). This chapter examines how business process re-engineering (BPR) can be used to improve knowledge management (KM) in health services by (i) assessing the effectiveness and usefulness of BPR; (ii) present a critical review of approaches to BPR; and (iii) describe a framework for using BPR for KM based on empirical research. The aim is to provide a sound strategic and tactical management approach for successful implementation of knowledge management systems (KMS) to improve health-care service project administration.

  14. Telling Stories about the Changing Landscape: One Center's Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. L., Jr.; Wilson, E. H.; Chadwick, C.; Dickson, D.

    2016-12-01

    Since its inception, the Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) at the University of Connecticut has had a strong applied research and public outreach focus. As a center that focuses on topics that virtually all have a geographic component, the intersection of Web and mapping technologies over the past decade has been an invaluable tool for communicating information. The primary target audience of this information is land use decision makers, who in New England are almost exclusively at the local (municipal) level and are often unpaid volunteers with little or no science background. Data-driven science communication focusing on this very worthy - and very needy - sector of the populace poses problems different from communicating with academic peers at one end of the spectrum, or the general public on the other end. The information must be understandable and accessible to non-technical users, yet specific and authoritative enough to inform decisions. CLEAR's approach to reaching this audience has evolved over the years in response to new internet and GIS technologies on the one hand, and internal deliberations on the other. A critical point was the 2004 public debut of the Center's Changing Landscape project, comprised of complex remotely-sensed land cover data: CLEAR principals decided to make the data publicly available via the Center website, but also to design a website to make the information accessible in as many ways, and for as many different audiences, as possible. This approach has had considerable success, as evidenced in the widespread use of the land cover information by communities, NGOs, federal and state agencies, and academia. Over the past several years, CLEAR has embraced the ESRI story map as a technological tool that embodies the Center's goal of "democratization" of science-based information through multifaceted accessibility. CLEAR's Story Map Gallery currently has six maps, covering a wide range of topics including the Changing

  15. Stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Julie; Pokhrel, Kabi

    2011-11-01

    "Stories From the Field" is a series of short profiles of tobacco control programs and their leaders, showcasing promising technical assistance and training models in Louisiana, Puerto Rico, the Cherokee Nation, West Virginia, the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands. The series illuminates key themes of collaboration with diverse stakeholders, elimination of health disparities, building tobacco control coalitions, engaging youth to reduce commercial tobacco use, sustaining tobacco control efforts, and the use of the media to raise public awareness that are highlighted in the Health Promotion Practice Supplement Theme Issue, Training and Technical Assistance: Lessons Learned to Sustain Social Norm Changes in Tobacco Control. Common tobacco control strategies bind the stories together. Local knowledge, coalition building, community involvement, innovative partnerships, and educational outreach are at the core of all of these tobacco control projects.

  16. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... about their childhood teddy bears, and children's accounts of what they do with teddy bears, both written for school and told 'out of school', The chapter sees teddy bears as artefacts that provide a cultural channeling for the child's need of a transitional object and argues that the meanings of teddy...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  17. The Transfer of Energy Technologies in a Developing Country Context Towards Improved Practice from Past Successes and Failures

    OpenAIRE

    Lindiwe O. K. Mabuza; Alan C. Brent; Maxwell Mapako

    2007-01-01

    Technology transfer of renewable energy technologies is very often unsuccessful in the developing world. Aside from challenges that have social, economic, financial, institutional and environmental dimensions, technology transfer has generally been misunderstood, and largely seen as mere delivery of high tech equipment from developed to developing countries or within the developing world from R&D institutions to society. Technology transfer entails much more, including, but not limited to: en...

  18. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency: Key Factors Drive Transition of Technologies, but Better Training and Data Dissemination Can Increase Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    would permit military computing systems to provide critical functionality at all times, despite damage caused by unintentional software errors or...operations. However, in the other two cases, an immediate military need for the technology was not as prevalent . A fifth program that transitioned...included several technological components, including volume bragg grating (VBG) technology. VBG is a transparent device made of refractive glass

  19. Combat stories map: a historical repository and after action tool for capturing, storing, and analyzing georeferenced individual combat narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Despite the proliferation of technology and near-global Internet accessibility, a web-based program incorporating interactive maps to record personal combat experiences does not exist. The Combat Stories Map addresses this deficiency. The Combat Stories Map is a web-based Geographic Information System specifically designed to collect and store U.S. service members' georeferenced combat stories. The stories are immediately available for...

  20. Factors That Female Higher Education Faculty in Select Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Fields Perceive as Being Influential to Their Success and Persistence in Their Chosen Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opare, Phyllis Bernice

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine factors female higher education faculty in select science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields perceived as influential to their success and persistence in their chosen professions. Females are underrepresented in STEM professions including academia, despite the fact that female…

  1. The Effect of Online Learning Environment Based on Caricature Animation Used in Science and Technology Course on the Success and Attitude of the Student for Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarmak, Ugur; Mahiroglu, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose in this study is to examine the effect of "Online Learning Environment based of Caricature Animation" which is prepared for "Human and Environment" and "Sun and Space" units in the secondary school 7th Grade Science and Technology course, on the success and attitude of the students for humor. The…

  2. The role of technology transfer for the development of a local wind component industry in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Pueyo Velasco, Ana; Garcia, Rodrigo; Mendiluce, Maria; Morales, Dario

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to the debate about climate change technology transfer by analysing barriers and enablers for a Chilean company starting up the production of wind blades. Literature on the role of technology transfer for the development and deployment of local renewable energy technologies in developing countries often refers to success stories in Brazil, India and China. Instead, this case study highlights the different challenges faced by smaller emerging economies. The paper argues ...

  3. Success, Failure or “No Significant Difference”? The Arguments For and Against Technology as a Learning Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Burns

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether computers have positively or negatively impacted student learning is still hotly contested in educational technology circles, particularly in the area of international development, by proponents and critics of technology in education. Overall, research still provides conflicting answers to this question. Nonetheless, the abundant research on effective school change and innovation implementation points to practices which those who promote technology in schools should tap. This paper outlines the long-term structural conditions that can lead to the deep change technology initiatives seek to promote.

  4. Strategies for successful evaluation and policy-making toward health care technology on the move : The case of medical lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.; Vondeling, H.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluating new health care technology that is rapidly diffusing is one of the greatest challenges to researchers and policy-makers. If no evaluation is done until the technology is mature, evaluation will not influence processes of diffusion. If evaluation is done early, it may be irrelevant when it

  5. The Influence of Organizational Subculture on Information Technology Project Success in the Healthcare Sector: A Qualitative, Multi-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Richard Kofi

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers face high demands for technology based healthcare services due to global population increases and adapting information technology (IT) to achieve quality patient care. IT has become center stage in the operations and management of healthcare organizations. IT requirements emerge from the visions, values, and beliefs of…

  6. Stories From the Field: The Use of Information and Communication Technologies to Address the Health Needs of Underserved Populations in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faba, Gladys; Julian, Soroya; Mejía, Felipe; Cabieses, Báltica; D'Agostino, Marcelo; Cortinois, Andrea A

    2015-01-01

    Background As their availability grew exponentially in the last 20 years, the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in health has been widely espoused, with many emphasizing their potential to decrease health inequities. Nonetheless, there is scarce availability of information regarding ICT as tools to further equity in health, specifically in Latin American and Caribbean settings. Objective Our aim was to identify initiatives that used ICT to address the health needs of underserved populations in Latin America and Caribbean. Among these projects, explore the rationale behind the selection of ICT as a key component, probe perceptions regarding contributions to health equity, and describe the challenges faced during implementation. Methods We conducted an exploratory qualitative study. Interviews were completed via Skype or face-to-face meetings using a semistructured interview guide. Following participant consent, interviews were audio recorded and verbatim transcriptions were developed. All transcriptions were coded using ATLASti7 software. The text was analyzed for patterns, shared themes, and diverging opinions. Emerging findings were reviewed by all interviewers and shared with participants for feedback. Results We interviewed representatives from eight organizations in six Latin American and Caribbean countries that prominently employed ICT in health communication, advocacy, or surveillance projects. ICT expanded project's geographic coverage, increased their reach into marginalized or hard-to-reach groups, and allowed real-time data collection. Perceptions of contributions to health equity resided mainly in the provision of health information and linkage to health services to members of groups experiencing greater morbidity because of poverty, remote place of residence, lack of relevant public programs, and/or stigma and discrimination, and in more timely responses by authorities to the health needs of these groups as a result of the

  7. U.S. EPA Water Technology Innovation Cluster Leaders Meeting - "Successfully Supporting Early-Stage Companies: The Role of Technology Testing" Meeting Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of this workshop were to: (1) increase the cluster leaders’ level of knowledge regarding past and current water technology testing programs, facilities and requirements; (2) learn from the experiences of technology vendors in getting innovative, commercial-ready product...

  8. Humidifier disinfectants, unfinished stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeyong Choi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Once released into the air, humidifier disinfectants became tiny nano-size particles, and resulted in chemical bronchoalveolitis. Families had lost their most beloved members, and even some of them became broken. Based on an estimate of two million potential victims who had experienced adverse effects from the use of humidifier disinfectants, we can say that what we have observed was only the tip of the iceberg. Problems of entire airways, as well as other systemic effects, should be examined, as we know these nano-size particles can irritate cell membranes and migrate into systemic circulation. The story of humidifier disinfectant is not finished yet.

  9. Learning the Patient's Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Sandra L; Kanter, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    To provide a brief history on narrative medicine and highlight its importance in providing quality patient care. Explains narrative medicine using published, peer-reviewed literature and highlights some of the literary, medical, sociological, and communication perspectives that contributed to the narrative medicine movement. A commitment to the patient-provider relationship and knowing the patient's story is a critical aspect in providing quality cancer care. Teaching oncology nurses skills that are grounded in narrative medicine will improve health care by increasing the nurses' knowledge of their patients and strengthening the nurse-patient relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  11. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  12. Telling better stories: strengthening the story in story and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2012-12-01

    information available at that time, based on statements that appear in the SRES itself. The CIB method is a technique for constructing internally consistent qualitative scenarios. Global-scale scenario exercises, in particular climate scenarios, typically include both qualitative (narrative) and quantitative (model) elements. As noted by Schweizer and Kriegler, the dominant method for such studies, which Alcamo (2001, 2008) formalized and named the 'story and simulation' (SAS) approach, relies at least in part on quantitative modeling to ensure consistency. Schweizer and Kriegler rightly criticize the idea that models alone can ensure consistency of a scenario narrative. By itself, this critique is not new. Indeed, if asked, both Alcamo and Raskin et al (Raskin et al 2005), whom Schweizer and Kriegler (2012) cite, would probably agree with them; both sources emphasize the need for qualitative storylines that go beyond what models can provide. However, Schweizer and Kriegler correctly point out that these sources provide little or no guidance to those responsible for the narratives beyond a dialog with the model outputs. The CIB method addresses this problem, and Schweizer and Kriegler's application of the method shows that even the best narrative-writing teams can benefit from this guidance. While the paper of Schweizer and Kriegler makes a compelling argument for using CIB in global scenarios, it should be used in combination with other methods. A scenario exercise has several aims, of which consistency is one. Another important goal is diversity: given a set of internally consistent scenarios, a diverse set covers the space of possibilities, and thereby helps users of the scenarios avoid underestimating or overestimating the potential for change in one or another key factor (e.g., see (Carlsen 2009)). From this point of view, the SRES authors could legitimately respond to Schweizer and Kriegler's finding that the SRES scenarios excluded interesting variants on coal

  13. A Follow-up Study of a Successful Assistive Technology for Children with ADHD and Their Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Tobias; Marshall, Paul; Müller, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Little research on assistive technologies for families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has investigated the long-term impact, after the assistive technology is returned to the researchers. In this paper, we report the outcomes of a follow-up study, conducted four......-weeks after a field study of 13 children with ADHD and their families who used an assistive technology designed to help establish and change family practices. We show that some of the positive effects on parent frustration level and conflict level around morning and bedtime routines that we observed...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  16. Technology transfer 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  17. Examining the functionality of the DeLone and McLean information system success model as a framework for synthesis in nursing information and communication technology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard G

    2012-06-01

    In this review, studies examining information and communication technology used by nurses in clinical practice were examined. Overall, a total of 39 studies were assessed spanning a time period from 1995 to 2008. The impacts of the various health information and communication technology evaluated by individual studies were synthesized using the DeLone and McLean's six-dimensional framework for evaluating information systems success (ie, System Quality, Information Quality, Service Quality, Use, User Satisfaction, and Net Benefits). Overall, the majority of researchers reported results related to the overall Net Benefits (positive, negative, and indifferent) of the health information and communication technology used by nurses. Attitudes and user satisfaction with technology were also commonly measured attributes. The current iteration of DeLone and McLean model is effective at synthesizing basic elements of health information and communication technology use by nurses. Regardless, the current model lacks the sociotechnical sensitivity to capture deeper nurse-technology relationalities. Limitations and recommendations are provided for researchers considering using the DeLone and McLean model for evaluating health information and communication technology used by nurses.

  18. Telling Feminist Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Hemmings

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies and analyses the dominant stories that academics tell about the development of Western second wave feminist theory. Through an examination of recent production of interdisciplinary feminist and cultural theory journals, I suggest that despite a rhetorical insistence on multiple feminisms, Western feminist trajectories emerge as startlingly singular. In particular, I am critical of an insistent narrative that sees the development of feminist thought as a relentless march of progress or loss. This dominant approach oversimplifies the complex history of Western feminisms, fixes writers and perspectives within a particular decade, and repeatedly (and erroneously positions poststructuralist feminists as ‘the first’ to challenge the category ‘woman’ as the subject and object of feminist knowledge. Rather than provide a corrective history of Western feminist theory, the article interrogates the techniques through which this dominant story is secured, despite the fact that we (feminist theorists know better. My focus, therefore, is on citation patterns, discursive framings and some of their textual, theoretical and political effects. As an alternative, I suggest a realignment of key theorists purported to provide a critical break in feminist theory with their feminist citational traces, to force a concomitant re-imagining of our historical legacy and our place within it.

  19. Disruptive technology: new medical advances are troublesome for even the most successful health systems and innovator health companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Lawrence; Vaul, Joanne; Chumer, Kathleen; Faul, Maureen; Sheehan, Lisa; DeCerce, Jack

    2004-01-01

    An independent expert panel conducted a multi-year research/education/advocacy initiative on the impact of the new drug-eluting stent technology. They conclude that this technology represents a "tipping point" in a series of transformative drugs and medical devices, often used in combination, and recommend that healthcare decision makers develop careful, data-based strategies to avoid the disruptiveness of these medical advances.

  20. The StorySpinner Sculptural Reader

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, Clare; Weal, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This demo is of a hypertext reading system called StorySpinner. It follows the sculptural hypertext methodology and has been used as a test bed for experimenting with the authoring of narrative flow in automatically generated stories. Readers are able to select and read one of two available stories. Reading a story involves selecting tarot cards which are mapped to chunks of story text based on possible interpretations of the cards and information concerning current story state.

  1. What Went Well, What Went Wrong: A Review of Renewable Energy Technology Transfer Successes and Failures in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The growing demand for energy through urban and industrial development in Asia means greater opportunity for Europe to promote the transfer and exchange of renewable technology as a viable alternative for energy supply. In general, transfer and exchange of technology for renewables in Asia has been very encouraging. This may be attributable to a significant amount of renewable energy potential in Asia and strong support from governments to introduce foreign technologies that potentially serve for economic development. In addition, it has been agreed that modern use of renewable energy resources can produce both economic and development-related benefits. This opens multiple doors of opportunity for renewable technology suppliers if their business strategy for the Asian market can incorporate the end results of economic development: creation of wealth, employment, foreign investment, developing the local industry, research and development. However, a number of barriers are hindering the process of renewable energy technology transfer between Asia and Europe, such as mismatched technologies, affordability and short-term business strategies

  2. The Struggle To Be Strong: True Stories by Teens about Overcoming Tough Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desetta, Al, Ed.; Wolin, Sybil, Ed.

    This book presents 30 first-person accounts by teenagers that tell how they overcame major life obstacles. Many aren't the everyday problems most kids encounter, which makes their stories especially compelling-and their successes especially inspiring. The young writers wrote their stories to help teenagers with similar problems and stresses. The…

  3. How Early Intervention Services Became Available in South Florida: A Story for the Silver Screen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin, Jane N.

    2013-01-01

    Have you ever imagined yourself as a movie producer who could tell the stories of the remarkable successes in the field of visual impairment and blindness? With the right buildup music and the careful selection of a popular actor or a promising young ingenue (ideally, someone with a visual impairment), any one of these real-life stories could be a…

  4. Body, Mind, Spirit: Twelve Juicy Stories of Transformation from Yoga Practice in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this inquiry is to explore university students' stories of transformation from the practice of integral yoga in an undergraduate course exploring human biology, health, and spirituality. The stories of participants give evidence for successful educational performance when yoga and meditation are combined with academic learning in…

  5. Enhancing Discussion through Short Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sybil

    A teacher of English in a college-level intensive English language program describes a method for stimulating speech in high-intermediate and advanced students, using short stories. It is argued that in short stories, the themes are universal, and even shy students are willing to discuss this form of literature in class. Criteria for selecting…

  6. Iconic Prosody in Story Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Marcus; Clark, Nathaniel; Falck, Marlene Johansson

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance (e.g., Shintel et al., 2006). This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that…

  7. Healing the Past through Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullet, Judy H.; Akerson, Nels M. K.; Turman, Allison

    2013-01-01

    Stories matter, and the stories we tell ourselves matter most. Truth has many layers and narrative helps us makes senses of our multilayered reality. We live a personal narrative that is grounded in our past experience, but embodied in our present. As such, it filters what we see and how we interpret events. Attachment theorists tell us our early…

  8. Magical Landscapes: Two Love Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John Noell

    2002-01-01

    Introduces two books about magic, one a collection of essays "Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader," which describes the author's inherited lifelong passion for books and reading; and the other a novel, "Mangos, Bananas and Coconuts: A Cuban Love Story," which tells a story of love and magic that seems both real and…

  9. Digital Media Stories for Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Digital media story-telling (which enhances traditional oral story-telling with images, music, and text) has been a focus of recent scholarship for its potential to produce numerous educational benefits. Through digital media storytelling, students' imagination, creativity, critical thinking, writing, public speaking, and organizational or…

  10. Making the market right for environmentally sound energy-efficient technologies: US buildings sector successes that might work in developing countries and Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-12-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, when energy prices were high, all Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries improved their E/GNP by about 2.5% annually. Increased energy efficiency accounted for 2/3rds of this improvement; the remaining portion was due to structural changes in the economy. In the US, analytic and policy tools that have successfully promoted energy efficiency include integrated resource planning, energy use labels, energy use standards, ``Golden Carrot`` incentive programs, and revenue-neutral ``feebates.`` In addition, a number of low cost, environmentally sound, energy-efficient technologies, such as electronic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows, have recently been developed. We discuss how many of these policies and technologies are probably exportable to developing countries and Eastern Europe, giving examples of successful starts in India, the ASEAN countries, and Brazil.

  11. Survey of history/succession of industrial technology. Book of survey of the domestic industrial technology which contributed greatly to the industrial development; Sangyo gijutsu rekishi keisho chosa. Sangyo no hatten ni okiku kiyoshita kokunai sangyo gijutsu no chosahen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper surveyed a history of the industrial technology development which contributed to the innovation of technology in Japan for contribution to the future selection of technical themes and decision on developmental methods. In accordance with the increasing contribution of the Japanese industrial technology to scientific and economic activities in Japan and abroad, it is important to clarify a historical significance of the industrial technology and to make the most of results of the survey for the future succession/development of industrial technology. The survey focused on chemical processes brought up as the Japanese industrial technology which is regarded as world-famous and on the systematical study of the history of the Japanese scientific technology. Hereafter, this becomes a guiding principle for engineers. The paper arranged the survey results of production processes of 2-ethylhexanol, acrylic acid, acrylamide, and cresol/resorcinol, optical resolution process of amino acids, and flue gas desulfurization process. The paper also surveyed technologies of ammonia synthesis, coal liquefaction, high polymer film production and synthesis of medical raw materials. The results were obtained which are suggestive for developing creative/original technology. 210 refs., 93 figs., 49 tabs.

  12. Styles of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Corporate success stories tend to emphasize the "great men" theory of history. But now a European research project established the managerial attributes that can turn an ordinary leader into one ideal for the pursuit of business excellence. The emergence of five leadership styles as crucial drivers...... of business excellence points to a clear agenda for success. Setting clear strategic goals and the ability to take a long-term view of an organization's direction, combined with other leadership attributes such as creativity, teambuilding and learning, are principal keys to creating an excellent organization...

  13. Come ti leggo un palinsesto, e altre storie dal passato

    OpenAIRE

    Salerno, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    This lecture tells the story of an important medieval palimpsest containing several treatises by Archimedes of Syracuse, hidden under a XIII-century liturgical text. A private project succeeded in the physical restoration of this document and in its study through noninvasive technologies. This is an example of how technology can be exploited for the study and safeguard of our cultural heritage, and gives us the opportunity to show how physical and information technologies can both improve the...

  14. Short Stories via Computers in EFL Classrooms: An Empirical Study for Reading and Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    The present empirical study scrutinizes the use of short stories via computer technologies in teaching and learning English language. The objective of the study is two-fold: to examine how short stories could be used through computer programs in teaching and learning English and to collect data about students' perceptions of this technique via…

  15. Stories in Motion: Inviting Immersive Possibilities through the Chimera of Transmedia and Chameleon of Mediatecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciencia Bamrungpong, Silvina G.

    2012-01-01

    Narratives are part of human culture; they provide a fundamental epistemological structure that assists us in making sense of the world. Narratives are the connection between discourse and story that have extended through various media. With the advancements made in technology, stories can be archived easily, accessed quickly, transferred among…

  16. THE ULTRACAM STORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Leberl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The UltraCam-project created a novel Large Format Digital Aerial Camera. It was inspired by the ISPRS Congress 2000 in Amsterdam. The search for a promising imaging idea succeeded in May 2001, defining a tiling approach with multiple lenses and multiple area CCD arrays to assemble a seamless and geometrically stable monolithic photogrammetric aerial large format image. First resources were spent on the project in September 2011. The initial UltraCam-D was announced and demonstrated in May 2003. By now the imaging principle has resulted in a 4th generation UltraCam Eagle, increasing the original swath width from 11,500 pixels to beyond 20,000. Inspired by the original imaging principle, alternatives have been investigated, and the UltraCam-G carries the swath width even further, namely to a frame image with nearly 30,000 pixels, however, with a modified tiling concept and optimized for orthophoto production. We explain the advent of digital aerial large format imaging and how it benefits from improvements in computing technology to cope with data flows at a rate of 3 Gigabits per second and a need to deal with Terabytes of imagery within a single aerial sortie. We also address the many benefits of a transition to a fully digital workflow with a paradigm shift away from minimizing a project's number of aerial photographs and towards maximizing the automation of photogrammetric workflows by means of high redundancy imaging strategies. The instant gratification from near-real-time aerial triangulations and dense image matching has led to a reassessment of the value of photogrammetric point clouds to successfully compete with direct point cloud measurements by LiDAR.

  17. StoryTrek: Experiencing Stories in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaled, Rilla; Barr, Pippin James; Greenspan, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce StoryTrek, a locative hypernarrative system developed to generate stories based on a reader’s location and specific movements in the real world. This creates, for readers, an interplay between navigation, narrative, and agency, as well as between the fictional and real...... world experience. In early tests we observed the emergence of a number of recurrent themes in participants’ experiences which are characteristic of the StoryTrek system, but which also help us to understand locative media storytelling affordances more generally. In this paper we present the system...

  18. The Singapore research story

    CERN Document Server

    Teck Seng, Low; Thampuran, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Singapore became independent in 1965, its leaders have invested tremendous efforts and resources to develop its economy in order to create jobs for its people and to support national development. This book describes the challenging journey of Singapore in developing a knowledge-based economy driven by research and innovation and the roles played by research institutes, universities, research manpower and appropriate collaboration between research institutes and industry. The book traces the foundations of Singapore's research story from the time of its independence in 1965 to the present day. Through interviews with the key players and research into the records, the establishment of the key institutes and the roles of a global cast of researchers, scientists and engineers in setting up the R&D infrastructure are outlined. The impact that the concerted efforts of the last 25 years to build up a credible and world-class research capability in Singapore is discussed, as are the tremendous challeng...

  19. Digital Story Mapping to Advance Educational Atlas Design and Enable Student Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margo E. Berendsen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling is recognized as a valid and important method of communicating information and knowledge gleaned from volumes of ever-accumulating data. Practices of data-driven storytelling in journalism and geovisual analytics have contributed to the development of geovisual stories; also called story maps. The benefits of student-focused multi-thematic atlases and digital storytelling methods in education can also be realized in story maps. An online, interactive version of the original paper version of the Wyoming Student Atlas was developed using story mapping technology. Studies on best practices for data-driven storytelling and web map interaction were used to inform the transition of the atlas from a traditional paper format to a collection of story maps. Evaluation of the atlas story maps for educational purposes was conducted by observing students from multiple classrooms as they used the story maps in a lesson. The students and educators responded to a survey after using the story maps. Results of the survey show positive responses to the atlas story maps, including ease of use and preference over a traditional paper atlas. However, certain types of interaction with the map resulted in increased negative or uncertain responses from students concerning their perception of the atlas story maps.

  20. Online, Blended and Technology-Enhanced Learning: Tools to Facilitate Community College Student Success in the Digitally-Driven Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    Community colleges have embraced distance education as a means to provide increased flexibility and access to their large numbers of non-traditional students. Retention rates and student achievement measures alone may not reflect all of the benefits and opportunities that online learning, blended or hybrid learning, and technology enhanced…

  1. Life Stories and Interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toldi Éva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two short stories: Teréz Müller’s Igaz történet [A True Story] and József Bálint senior’s Imádkozzál és dolgozzál [Pray and Work]. The argument explores the way the texts reflect on shifts in power in the Hungarian region of Vojvodina, and the way power structures define the relationship between majority and minority in a society that undergoes constant and radical changes. Contemporary historical events of the twentieth century, changes, faultlines, traumatic life events and identity shifts emerge as the contexts for these narratives of the daily experiences of a Jewish merchant family and a farmer family respectively. Thus, the two texts analysed are representative works rooted in two fundamentally different social backgrounds. The discourse about the I is always also about the other; the construction of identity is already in itself a dialogic, intercultural act, which makes it an ideal topic for the exploration of the changes and shifts in one’s own and the other’s cultural identity. Translational processes of transmission are also required for the narration of traumatic experiences. Teréz Müller was the grandmother of the Serbian writer Aleksandar Tišma. Her book is not primarily a document of their relationship; however, it does throw light on diverse background events of the writer’s life and oeuvre. Comparing the experiences of identity in the autobiographical novel of Aleksandar Tišma and the recollections of his grandmother reveals geocultural characteristics of their intercultural life experiences.

  2. Buildings for the 21st Century, Winter 2000 Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    2000-02-24

    A quarterly update published by the Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs on new policies and procedures; upcoming events, highlighted research and success stories, and new partnership projects within the buildings programs at DOE/EERE and its contracting laboratories.

  3. Ndal Tsukdu Gheldzay Tsukdu (Crane Story and Moon Story).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolie, Katherine

    These traditional stories in the Tanaina Athapaskan language (Talkeetna dialect) are intended for competent speakers of the Alaskan language who have knowledge of the writing system. An interlinear English translation is included as well as a free English translation. (NCR)

  4. A Human-Needs-Based Dynamics to Simulate Technology Policy and Its Effects on Both Business Success and Human Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yeon Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how human needs are reflected in the market and how several technological and political policies affect the market share of government-supported industries, as well as the satisfaction of human desires and consequent happiness. In this paper, we seek to understand the dynamics of consumer decision-making processes in relation to technology products in the market. In this study, we present a new marketing model based on human needs, wants, and demands, and focus on both holistic and social perspectives. We have shown that human-based policy dynamics and sustainable human happiness can be realized by stimulating national policies for consumer happiness in the human-needs-based sector, e.g., the healthcare industry.

  5. The secret to health information technology's success within the diabetes patient population: a comprehensive privacy and security framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sheel M

    2010-05-01

    Congress made an unprecedented investment in health information technology (IT) when it passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in February 2009. Health IT provides enormous opportunities to improve health care quality, reduce costs, and engage patients in their own care. But the potential payoff for use of health IT for diabetes care is magnified given the prevalence, cost, and complexity of the disease. However, without proper privacy and security protections in place, diabetes patient data are at risk of misuse, and patient trust in the system is undermined. We need a comprehensive privacy and security framework that articulates clear parameters for access, use, and disclosure of diabetes patient data for all entities storing and exchanging electronic data. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Digital Story Creation: Its Impact towards Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Charito G.

    2017-01-01

    When students are engaged in the process of creating a digital story, they synthesize a variety of literacy skills for the authentic product: researching, writing, organizing, presenting, interviewing, problem-solving, assessing, as well as employing interpersonal and technology skills (Baggett, 2007). With all these skills to be developed among…

  7. A true case story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Bjørg Walker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism is not generally recognized as a condition which can be bio-medically influenced. As of today, there are no biomarkers for autism that are recognized by traditional medicine. Treating autism medically is a difficult and hopeless task according to official guidelines (even though it is seldom written in official documents. Parents of many children who have or had an ASD diagnosis have witnessed significant improvements in their children after dietary interventions as well as after interventions with vitamins, minerals and biogene substances which can be bought over the counter. The parents of individual children are their best observers. With a high degree of certainty, they are able to see which substances improve or weaken their children. Their observations are usually accurate, but their rationale for why is often wrong. Observations from parents can often be of greater importance for the child than advice from so called experts. This is a true story about a girl whose parents lost contact with her when she was only 6 months old. In her first 14 days she lost her ability to roll over, to babble and make sounds. She did not look at her parents any more – just stared up at the roof. At 9 months she did not respond to words such as, ‘look at mommy’. Through the parents own experiences with her older siblings and 4 months of frantic searching for a diet that would agree with the child, she made a remarkable journey from 10 months of age to 18 months. There is one thing worth mentioning – she refused to eat solid food throughout this time. The story does not end there. Today she is 12 years old and has had to be regulated with diet and biogene substances every day since she was 4 years old. During the last 5 months she has shown more stability and can even go a day or two without biogene substances as long as she keeps to her dietary plan. If you had just met her and spent a day with her, you would never know.

  8. A true case story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Hanne Bjørg

    2012-01-01

    Autism is not generally recognized as a condition which can be bio-medically influenced. As of today, there are no biomarkers for autism that are recognized by traditional medicine. Treating autism medically is a difficult and hopeless task according to official guidelines (even though it is seldom written in official documents). Parents of many children who have or had an ASD diagnosis have witnessed significant improvements in their children after dietary interventions as well as after interventions with vitamins, minerals and biogene substances which can be bought over the counter. The parents of individual children are their best observers. With a high degree of certainty, they are able to see which substances improve or weaken their children. Their observations are usually accurate, but their rationale for why is often wrong. Observations from parents can often be of greater importance for the child than advice from so called experts. This is a true story about a girl whose parents lost contact with her when she was only 6 months old. In her first 14 days she lost her ability to roll over, to babble and make sounds. She did not look at her parents any more - just stared up at the roof. At 9 months she did not respond to words such as, 'look at mommy'. Through the parents own experiences with her older siblings and 4 months of frantic searching for a diet that would agree with the child, she made a remarkable journey from 10 months of age to 18 months. There is one thing worth mentioning - she refused to eat solid food throughout this time. The story does not end there. Today she is 12 years old and has had to be regulated with diet and biogene substances every day since she was 4 years old. During the last 5 months she has shown more stability and can even go a day or two without biogene substances as long as she keeps to her dietary plan. If you had just met her and spent a day with her, you would never know.

  9. Transmedia storytelling on travel stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Baltar Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travel stories form part of a great tradition inside Western Culture which has served historically to describe, to understand and to imagine other cul - tures and communities, far or near, being constituted into a real narra - tive genre. This type of story has been and is a reflection of the perception of the world based on the imaginary worlds created by the travelling narrators. How do modern authors of travel stories take advantage of the opportunities offered by transmedia storytelling? The present article explores the potential of these types of stories as a privileged object of study for transmedia storytelling studies, from the analysis of a sample of 80 narrative productions based on experiences of travel and presented in diverse editions of the Festival Le Grand Bivouac (France. It also shows the existence of a new contemporary trend inside this narrative form that transcends its literary nature.

  10. NIB Commentary on Oncofertility Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremmels, Becket

    2017-01-01

    The authors of these stories describe tales of struggle with cancer and secondary infertility. Yet, they each have a different response to similar circumstances. Their stories touch on a lack of informed consent regarding infertility, spiritual discussions of the problem of evil, the need for improved collaboration among physicians to further care of the whole person, societal norms regarding reproduction and gender roles, the injustice of cancer in young people, and other topics. Of note, no stories mention prominent ethical concerns of in-vitro fertilization like how couples should deal with "extra" frozen embryos or concerns about the potential for commodification of children. This shows a disconnect between the concerns of bioethicists and the concerns of real patients facing actual problems. Both cancer patients and providers can learn something from these stories that directly apply to their lives.

  11. The aspirin story - from willow to wonder drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael J R; Keeling, David M

    2017-06-01

    The story of the discovery of aspirin stretches back more than 3500 years to when bark from the willow tree was used as a pain reliever and antipyretic. It involves an Oxfordshire clergyman, scientists at a German dye manufacturer, a Nobel Prize-winning discovery and a series of pivotal clinical trials. Aspirin is now the most commonly used drug in the world. Its role in preventing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease has been revolutionary and one of the biggest pharmaceutical success stories of the last century. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nurses' Satisfaction With Using Nursing Information Systems From Technology Acceptance Model and Information Systems Success Model Perspectives: A Reductionist Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Nursing information systems can enhance nursing practice and the efficiency and quality of administrative affairs within the nursing department and thus have been widely considered for implementation. Close alignment of human-computer interaction can advance optimal clinical performance with the use of information systems. However, a lack of introduction of the concept of alignment between users' perceptions and technological functionality has caused dissatisfaction, as shown in the existing literature. This study provides insight into the alignment between nurses' perceptions and how technological functionality affects their satisfaction with Nursing Information System use through a reductionist perspective of alignment. This cross-sectional study collected data from 531 registered nurses in Taiwan. The results indicated that "perceived usefulness in system quality alignment," "perceived usefulness in information quality alignment," "perceived ease of use in system quality alignment," "perceived ease of use in information quality alignment," and "perceived ease of use in service quality alignment" have significantly affected nurses' satisfaction with Nursing Information System use. However, "perceived usefulness in service quality alignment" had no significant effect on nurses' satisfaction. This study also provides some meaningful implications for theoretical and practical aspects of design.

  13. Blood, sweat, tears and success of technology transfer long-term controlled-release of herbicides: Root-growth-inhibiting biobarrier technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Voris, P.; Cataldo, D.A.; Burton, F.G.; Skeins, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Through the unique combination of polymers with a herbicidally active dinitroaniline, a cylinderical pellet (9mm long and 9mm in diameter) was developed that continuously releases a herbicide for a period of up to 100 years. Equilibrium concentration of the herbicide in soil adjacent to the pellet and the bioactive lifetime of the device cam be adjusted by changing the size of the pellet; the type of polymer; the type, quality, and quantity of carrier; and/or the concentration and type of dinitroaniline used. Commercial products that have been developed under a Federal Technology Transfer Program that utilize this technology include: (1) ROOT-SHIELD, a root repelling sewer gasket for concrete, clay, and PVC sewer lines, (2) BIOBARRIER, a spun-bonded polypropylene geotextile fabric developed to prevent root growth from invading septic tanks; penetrating under roadways, and along the edge of sidewalks, airport runways, and tennis courts, and for landscaped areas; and (3) ROOT-GUARD, a plastic drip irrigation emitter designed to protect buried drip irrigation systems from being plugged by roots. 17 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  14. The story of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Mankiewicz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Questioning how mathematics has evolved over the centuries and for what reasons; how human endeavour and changes in the way we live have been dependent on mathematics, this book tells the story of the impact this intellectual activity has had across cultures and civilizations. It shows how, far from being just the obsession of an elite group of philosophers, priests and scientists, mathematics has in some shape or other entered every area of human activity. The mysterious tally sticks of prehistoric peoples and the terrestial maps used for trade, exploration and warfare; the perennial fascination with the motions of heavenly bodies and changing perspectives on the art and science of vision; all are testament to a mathematics at the heart of history. The path of this changing discipline is marked by a wealth of images, from medieval manuscripts to the unsettling art of Dali or Duchamp, from the austere beauty of Babylonian clay tablets to the delicate complexity of computer-generated images. The text encompass...

  15. Utilization and success rates of unstimulated in vitro fertilization in the United States: an analysis of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John David; DiMattina, Michael; Reh, Andrea; Botes, Awie; Celia, Gerard; Payson, Mark

    2013-08-01

    To examine the utilization and outcomes of natural cycle (unstimulated) IVF as reported to the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) in 2006 and 2007. Retrospective analysis. Dataset analysis from the SART Clinical Outcome Reporting System national database. All patients undergoing IVF as reported to SART in 2006 and 2007. None. Utilization of unstimulated IVF; description of patient demographics; and comparison of implantation and pregnancy rates between unstimulated and stimulated IVF cycles. During 2006 and 2007 a total of 795 unstimulated IVF cycles were initiated. Success rates were age dependent, with patients Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An exploratory examination of the predictors of success for a science education program enhanced by communication technologies: Contributions from qualitative and quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Curtis Clinton

    New hybrid educational programs are evolving to challenge traditional definitions of distance education. One such program is the Integrated Science (IS) program of The University of Alabama's Center for Communication and Educational Technology (CCET), which was developed to address concerns about scientific illiteracy in middle school education. IS relies on a multilayered use of communication technologies (primarily videotape and e-mail) for delivery of student instruction, as a delivery vehicle for curriculum materials, and as a feedback mechanism. The IS program serves to enhance classroom science instruction by providing professionally developed videotaped educational lectures and curriculum materials used by classroom science teachers. To date, such hybrid forms of distance education have seldom been examined. Using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, this study examines 64 IS classrooms visited from October 1992 to April 1995 by researchers at the Institute for Communication Research at The University of Alabama. Detailed qualitative information was gathered from each classroom by student, teacher, and administrator interviews; focus groups; questionnaires; and recording observations of classroom activity. From the reports of the site visits, key components of the IS classroom experience thought to be predictors of the success of the program for individual classrooms are identified. Exemplars of both positive and negative components are provided in narrative form. A model is posited to describe the potential relationships between the various components and their impact on the overall success of the IS program in an individual classroom. Quantitative assessments were made of the 21 key variables identified in the qualitative data that appeared to enhance the likelihood of success for the IS program in an individual classroom. Accounting for 90% of the variance in the regression model, the factor with the greatest predictive potential for success

  17. Using stories to teach ICT ages 9 to 11+

    CERN Document Server

    Loughrey, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Using stories to teach ICT is a new, excellent series of four books that will make the teaching of ICT a more exciting and creative cross-curricular experience.The aim of the series is for ICT to be presented in a format that shows how information technology is used in our everyday lives and demonstrates ways how ICT skills can be taught and extended while linking to a wide variety of other subject areas of the curriculum.Ages 9-11 contains: 6 fun and original stories, detailed lesson plans, up to 4 worksheets with each lesson, activities to develop a range of ICT skills.

  18. Phenix: a story of core and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Phenix is the name of a legendary bird which could have several successive lives thanks to a rebirth from its ashes. It is by analogy the name given to an original sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor capable to generate new quantities of energy using the by products of its core burnup. This book tells the story of this reactor: construction (1968-1974), first years of operation (1974-1980), success era (1980-1986), first problems (1986-1992), safety re-evaluation (1992-1998), renovation of the core (1998-2003), re-start up of operation (2003-2009). A description of the power plant is given in appendix: core, reactor vessel, circuits, handling, instrumentation and control, safety, buildings, operation. (J.S.)

  19. New Technologies Provide Quantum Changes in the Scale, Speed, and Success of SELEX Methods and Aptamer Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded oligonucleotide aptamers have attracted great attention in the past decade because of their diagnostic and therapeutic potential. These versatile, high affinity and specificity reagents are selected by an iterative in vitro process called SELEX, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment. Numerous SELEX methods have been developed for aptamer selections; some that are simple and straightforward, and some that are specialized and complicated. The method of SELEX is crucial for selection of an aptamer with desired properties; however, success also depends on the starting aptamer library, the target molecule, aptamer enrichment monitoring assays, and finally, the analysis and characterization of selected aptamers. Here, we summarize key recent developments in aptamer selection methods, as well as other aspects of aptamer selection that have significant impact on the outcome. We discuss potential pitfalls and limitations in the selection process with an eye to aid researchers in the choice of a proper SELEX strategy, and we highlight areas where further developments and improvements are desired. We believe carefully designed multiplexed selection methods, when complemented with high-throughput downstream analysis and characterization assays, will yield numerous high-affinity aptamers to protein and small molecule targets, and thereby generate a vast array of reagents for probing basic biological mechanisms and implementing new diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the near future.

  20. Reading Pictures for Story Comprehension Requires Mental Imagery Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Inouk E; Mol, Suzanne E; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10- to 12-year-olds), when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads). A parallel group design was used, in which we compared our experimental book version, in which pictures were used to replace parts of the corresponding text, to two control versions, i.e., a text-only version and a version with the full story text and all pictures. Analyses showed an interaction between mental imagery and book version: children with higher mental imagery skills outperformed children with lower mental imagery skills on story comprehension after reading the experimental narrative. This was not the case for both control conditions. This suggests that children's mental imagery skills significantly contributed to the mental representation of the story that they created, by successfully integrating information from both words and pictures. The results emphasize the importance of mental imagery skills for explaining individual variability in reading development. Implications for educational practice are that we should find effective ways to instruct children how to "read" pictures and how to develop and use their mental imagery skills. This will probably contribute to their mental models and therefore their story comprehension.

  1. The Power of Story in an Animation Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Satria Adidharma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available After the founding of the Walt Disney Company, animation becomes something necessary in our everyday life. The real power why the animation bigger is the storytelling. Story is the main key why animation is loveable by audiences. This writing will be focusing on the behind reason why the story is important in animation and will be giving some examples the success story of some animation which have a great story to tell. The design methodology focuses on data research, market research and literature book. This writing is a preliminary research because from the author concern, there are not many writings debating whether which part in the development will be focused on to developing some animation projects. This writing hopefully will help people who want to build some animation projects and will guide them to make decision because in order to build some animation project there will be a massive effort to be conducted. Hopefully, in the future, there will be more animation produced from Indonesian. To be an unforgettable work, it must have a great story.

  2. [Factors of success in the implementation of the technologies of the information and the communication in the health systems. The human factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Viñas, Ramón

    2010-02-01

    In this work some of the fundamentals of change management techniques to ensure the introduction of information and communication technologies in health organizations are analized. Managing change is aimed at redirecting the impact of any transformation process in the organizations towards a positive attitude and enthusiasm of those involved. That is, this paper analyzes the most important of all factors that must be managed in any project for change: the human factor. If a proper change management is a critical success factor in implementing new processes and systems of information and communication technologies (ICT) in an organization, when we faced with the introduction of new processes and interoperability systems between different organizations, cooperation, leadership and motivation of individuals focused on a common goal is absolutely imperative. This is the case of the new ICT systems being introduced in the Catalan Health System. Indeed, by definition of the model itself, in Catalonia, continuity of care, increased efficiency and effectiveness and quality improvement of projects as the clinical history shared, electronic prescriptions, or scanning medical imaging, require necessarily the definition of processes in which a large number of different health organizations, different in their law status, and whose own interests should converge towards the ICT systems and processes of health care so that the contribution of all parties can make a whole. The success of these projects, a reality nowadays, is due largely to the management of the human factor conducted continuously since its inception. 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Successful application of monolithic innovative technology using a carbonyldiimidazole disk to purify supercoiled plasmid DNA suitable for pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A; Tomaz, C T; Sousa, F; Queiroz, J A

    2011-11-18

    The growing demand on plasmid DNA (pDNA) manufacture for therapeutic applications requires a final product with higher quality and quantity, spending the least time. Most of the current processes for pDNA production use at least one chromatographic step, which often constitutes a key-step in the purification sequence. Monolithic stationary phases are new alternatives to the conventional matrices, which offer fast separation of pDNA due to their excellent mass transfer properties and their high binding capacity for large molecules, as pDNA. However, the efficient recovery of pure pDNA focuses on a suitable balance of the feedstock, adsorbent and mobile phase properties. To satisfy the increasing demand for pharmaceutical grade plasmids, we developed a novel downstream process which overcomes the bottlenecks of common lab-scale techniques while complying with all regulatory requirements. This work reports an integrative approach using the carbonyldiimidazole monolith to efficiently purify the supercoiled (sc) pDNA active conformation from other plasmid topologies and Escherichia coli impurities present in a clarified lysate. The monolith specificity and selectivity was also assessed by performing experiments with plasmids of several sizes of 2.7, 6.05 and 7.4 kilo base pairs (kbp), verifying the applicability to purify different plasmids. Hence, the process yield of the pDNA purification step using the CDI monolith was 89%, with an extremely reduced level of impurities (endotoxins and gDNA), which was reflected in good transfection experiments of the sc plasmid DNA sample. Overall, the analytical results and transfection studies performed with the pDNA sample purified with this monolithic enabling technology, confirmed the suitability of this pDNA to be used in pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neste E and P a success story in the making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The driving force behind the good results and value creation of Neste's Exploration and Production (E and P) can be found in its no-nonsense approach to the upstream oil business. Within less than five years, the division has doubled its production, and today's commercial reserves of 268 million barrels of oil equivalent will carry Neste into the next millennium. The heart of Neste's E and P's strategy is a focus on profitable growth in its current areas, and on generating growth and creating value in the long term. E and P's aim is to increase its current annual oil and gas production of 1.7 million oil equivalent tonnes to some 3 million tonnes by the beginning of the next millennium. Within the framework of the current portfolio, the bulk of this growth will be derived from the fields in the Aasgard venture. These oil and gas reserves account for more than half of Neste's reserves. The division is also actively exploring synergies with Neste's Oil Chain and Energy Division

  5. A Success Story of Philippine Counterinsurgency: A Study of Bohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    the Philippines which serves as the organizational brain of the revolution. It provides the political leadership to the entire revolutionary...China) sisterhood agreement, the Chocolate Hills membership in the Association of World Famous Mountains, and the sisterhood memorandum of

  6. Air Force Research Laboratory Success Stories : A Review of 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Phase IV performed a waveform characterization of the entire radar system. U Gain in the Electrico i Laboratory System Work sponsored by the AFRL...permanent disability, or death in recreational and professional activities that incorporate speed and agility, like auto racing, motorcycling, and skiing

  7. F-22 cockpit avionics: a systems integration success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Kevin W.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2000-08-01

    The F-22 'Raptor' is being developed and manufactured as multi-role fighter aircraft for the 'air dominance' mission. The F-22 team is led by Lockheed Martin, with Boeing and Pratt & Whitney as partners. The F-22 weapons system combines supersonic cruise, maneuverability, stealth, and an extensive suite of tightly integrated sensors to achieve a high level of lethality and invulnerability against current and projected threat systems such as fighter aircraft and surface to air missiles. Despite high automation of the complex systems installed in the F-22, the pilot is heavily tasked for air battle management. Response timelines are compressed due to supersonic cruise velocities. These factors challenge the Pilot Vehicle Interface (PVI) design. This paper discusses the team's response to these challenges, describing the physical cockpit layout, its controls and displays, and the hardware architecture, software tools, and development process used to mature the F-22 'Raptor' weapons system, including a review of Human Factors design considerations for F-22 displays.

  8. Individualized Self-Pacing (ISP)--A Success Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Melvin R.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Fullerton College's individualized self-pacing (ISP) program. Reviews twelve ISP objectives including provision of enrollment/scheduling flexibility; lists twenty-two class offerings, including basic business math, business English, and business machines. Compares costs, learning, and course completion in ISP and traditional programs.…

  9. E3 Success Story - Accelerating Adoption of E3 Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The state of Michigan, along with numerous local and state partners, formed E3 Michigan in 2010. This partnership will allow for up to 10 E3 assessments in southeast Michigan and 10 E3 assessments in western Michigan.

  10. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-01-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs

  11. Randfontein estates - success story as an old timer fights back

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In 1965 Randfontein Estates gave notice of intent to discontinue mining operations and was destined for the 'In Memoriam' column of the mining industry. Looking at Randfontein Estates today it is hard to believe that this gold and uranium producer was a dying mine only a few years ago. As this article (and the sharemarket) show, 90 years old Randfontein Estates is as active today as it has ever been. Mining and production at the Randfontein section are discussed, as well as hoists, ventilation and slimes treatment

  12. Back injury prevention: a lift team success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Kelly S; Farnham, Richard J; Docken, Lisa; Bentaas, Ruth; Bossman, Sharon; Schaefer, Jill

    2003-06-01

    Work related back injuries among hospital personnel account for high volume, high cost workers' compensation claims. These injuries can be life altering experiences, affecting both the personal and professional lives of injured workers. Lifting must be viewed as a skill involving specialized training and mandated use of mechanical equipment, rather than as a random task performed by numerous health care providers. The use of a lift team specially trained in body mechanics, lifting techniques, and the use of mandated mechanical equipment can significantly affect injury data, financial outcomes, and employee satisfaction. The benefits of a lift team extend beyond the effect on injury and financial outcomes--they can be used for recruitment and retention strategies, and team members serve as mentors to others by demonstrating safe lifting techniques. Ultimately, a lift team helps protect a valuable resource--the health care worker.

  13. THE STORY OF AMISOM'S SUCCESSFUL WAR AGAINST SOMALI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    following the Ethiopian invasion, morphed into the Al Qaeda-aligned Harakat al-. Shabaab al-Mujahideen or commonly referred to as Al Shabaab (The Youth). The author's incisive analysis regarding the future of Al Shabaab is best demonstrated in him quoting the words of Somali Professor Ibrahim Mohammud Abyan, who.

  14. Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    -Pacific de même que professeur honoraire d'aquaculture et de biologie halieutique à la School of Life and Environmental Sciences de l'Université Deakin, qui se trouve dans l'État de Victoria, en Australie. Membre honoraire ...

  15. Translational Success Stories Development of Direct Thrombin Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, Michiel; Eikelboom, John W.; Gustafsson, David; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Hirsh, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulants are the cornerstone of therapy for conditions associated with arterial and venous thrombosis. Direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) are anticoagulants that bind to thrombin and block its enzymatic activity. The bivalent parenteral DTIs hirudin and bivalirudin were based on the observation

  16. Media portrayals of older employees: a success story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Selm, Martine; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of how portrayals of older employees in mass media messages can help combating stereotypical beliefs on their employability. Design/methodology/approach – The authors conducted a systematic review of empirical studies on mass media

  17. The Spanish Nuclear Group for Cooperation: A Story of Success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, C.

    2013-01-01

    The SNGC (Spanish Nuclear Group for Cooperation) is an alliance founded in 2006 for commercial cooperation between Spanish nuclear companies in order to joint efforts for the commercial promotion in the chinese market. This alliance was originally formed by ENUSA Industrial Avanzadas S. A. (ENUSA). Tecnatom S. A. and Equipos Nucleares, S. A. (ENSA). In 2008 Ringo Valvulas S. L. Joined the alliance, and July 2008 the Nuclear Group for China AIE was incorporated with each of the four companies holding a 25% share. Subsequently, as explained below, the legal name was changed to Spanish Nuclear Group for Cooperation AIE and the trade name of Spanish Nuclear Group/China was maintained as a brand for activities in this country. (Author)

  18. Sustainable Development in Sweden - a success story. Discourse analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlberg, Malin

    2009-01-01

    In Sweden the term 'Sustainable Development' is very well known and is often used as leitmotivs in many parts of the society. Since the UN Conference on Environment and Development took place in Rio de Janeiro 1992 SD has become more and more indispensable in political debates and it has even become a crucial argument in management decisions in the business sector. Due to the tradition of consensus policy and the strong involvement of different interest group in policy decision-making processes, the idea of SD as a holistic policy concept fell in Sweden on a fruitful ground

  19. Literacy and Women's Empowerment: Stories of Success and Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Janine

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how literacy learning can support women's empowerment and the development of greater equality, benefitting not only individual women, but families, communities and economies too. It describes and reflects upon some of the most promising approaches to developing literacy and learning for women, who form the majority of the…

  20. Caffeine for apnea of prematurity: a neonatal success story

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzer, K; Bassler, D

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine, a methylxanthine and nonspecific inhibitor of adenosine receptors, is an example of a drug that has been in use for more than 40 years. It is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in neonatal medicine. However, until 2006, it had only a few relatively small and short-term studies supporting its use. It is thanks to the efforts of Barbara Schmidt and the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) Trial Group that we now have high-quality and reliable data not only on short-term but ...