WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology students drag

  1. Application and numerical simulation research on biomimetic drag-reducing technology for gas pipelining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Deyuan; Luo Yuehao; Chen Huawei [Beihang Univ., Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation

    2011-06-15

    For the purpose of increasing the transmission capacity of gas pipelines, the internal coating technology has been vastly put into application, and a remarkable benefit has been achieved so far. However, with the reduction of wall roughness, the small convex parts are all completely submerged in the viscous sublayer, the gas pipeline becomes a 'hydraulic smooth pipe', even by smoothing the coating surface further, it is difficult to reduce wall friction. Therefore, in order to increase the transportation capacity on the basis of internal coating, the new methods and technologies should be researched and investigated, and perhaps, the biomimetic drag-reducing technology is a good approach. In this paper, according to the planning parameters of the second pipeline of the West-to-East gas transmission project, the best drag reducing effect grooves are calculated and designed, and based on the characteristics and properties of internal coating (AW-01 epoxy resin), the Pre-Cured Micro- Rolling Technology (PCMRT) is discussed and presented, the rolling equipment is also designed and analyzed, the rolling process can be easily added on the available production line. Aiming at the field operating parameters of the gas pipeline in China, and the drag-reducing effect of the grooved surface is analyzed and discussed comprehensively. In addition, the economic benefit of adopting the biomimetic drag reduction technology is investigated. (orig.)

  2. How Dragging Changes Students' Awareness: Developing Meanings for Eigenvector and Eigenvalue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol Tabaghi, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    The complementary use of the theories of instrumental genesis and shifts of attention enabled me to obtain insights into students' understandings of the concepts of eigenvector and eigenvalue. My analysis suggests that the use of different dragging modalities can provide evidence of shifts in structure of a student's attention and consequently can…

  3. Drag-free Spacecraft Technologies: criticalities in the initialization of geodesic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Present and future space missions rely on systems of increasingly demanding performance for being successful. Drag-free technology is one of the technologies that is fundamental for LISA-Pathfinder, an ESA mission whose launch is planned for the end of September 2015. A purely drag-free object is defined by the absence of all external forces other than gravity. This is not a natural condition and thus requires a proper design of a spacecraft, whose core is an object in free-fall, called test mass (TM). The purity of the drag-free orbit depends on the spacecraft capability of protecting the TM from disturbances, which indeed has limitations. According to a NASA study, such a concept provides substantial economies for LEO satellites. At the same time, a drag-free motion is required in many missions of fundamental physics. eLISA is an ESA concept mission aimed at opening a new window to the universe, black holes, and massive binary systems by means of gravitational waves. LISA-Pathfinder is in charge of proving ...

  4. Electric Motorboat Drag Racing: A Hands-On Physics Project that Motivates Students from Start to Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Reno

    2008-01-01

    Electric Motorboat Drag Racing is a culminating high school physics project designed to apply and bring to life many content standards for physics. Students need to be given several weeks at home to design and build their model-sized electric motorboats for the 5-meter drag racing competition down rain gutters. In the process, they are discussing…

  5. Integrate Technology with Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Drew; Lindeman, Patrick; Wolf, Trent; Dunnerstick, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As information technology continues to progress, teaching mathematic with multimedia is becoming a new way of instruction. Integrating technology enables students to become more active in the learning process. When students feel more vested in actual learning, retention of the material tends to rise significantly. This article describes how tools…

  6. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  7. Effective removal of co-purified inhibitors from extracted DNA samples using synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah; Marshall, Pamela; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    Various types of biological samples present challenges for extraction of DNA suitable for subsequent molecular analyses. Commonly used extraction methods, such as silica membrane columns and phenol-chloroform, while highly successful may still fail to provide a sufficiently pure DNA extract with some samples. Synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA), implemented in Boreal Genomics' Aurora Nucleic Acid Extraction System (Boreal Genomics, Vancouver, BC), is a new technology that offers the potential to remove inhibitors effectively while simultaneously concentrating DNA. In this initial study, SCODA was tested for its ability to remove various concentrations of forensically and medically relevant polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors naturally found in tissue, hair, blood, plant, and soil samples. SCODA was used to purify and concentrate DNA from intentionally contaminated DNA samples containing known concentrations of hematin, humic acid, melanin, and tannic acid. The internal positive control (IPC) provided in the Quantifiler™ Human DNA Quantification Kit (Life Technologies, Foster City, CA) and short tandem repeat (STR) profiling (AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit; Life Technologies, Foster City, CA) were used to measure inhibition effects and hence purification. SCODA methodology yielded overall higher efficiency of purification of highly contaminated samples compared with the QIAquick® PCR Purification Kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). SCODA-purified DNA yielded no cycle shift of the IPC for each sample and yielded greater allele percentage recovery and relative fluorescence unit values compared with the QIAquick® purification method. The Aurora provided an automated, minimal-step approach to successfully remove inhibitors and concentrate DNA from challenged samples.

  8. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Technologies Testing of Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles and a Dry Van Trailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thornton, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on two accepted methods for quantifying the benefit of aerodynamic improvement technologies on vocational vehicles: the coastdown technique, and on-road constant speed fuel economy measurements. Both techniques have their advantages. Coastdown tests are conducted over a wide range in speed and allow the rolling resistance and aerodynamic components of road load force to be separated. This in turn allows for the change in road load and fuel economy to be estimated at any speed, as well as over transient cycles. The on-road fuel economy measurements only supply one lumped result, applicable at the specific test speed, but are a direct measurement of fuel usage and are therefore used in this study as a check on the observed coastdown results. Resulting coefficients were then used to populate a vehicle model and simulate expected annual fuel savings over real-world vocational drive cycles.

  9. Gastronomiske drags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    with Jennifer Parson and Clarissa Dickson Wright (1996-1999). I will argue that the two self-declared fat women can be read as “gastronomic drags” by their transgression of a “recognizable” feminine way of “doing food”. The article is theoretically informed by the reflections on drag as subversive practice...... of appearing either too radical or not radical enough. The article concludes with some reflections on the development of the cooking show as a site for gendered negotiation from the 90’s and today....

  10. Accurate computation of drag for a wing/body configuration using multi-block, structered-grid CFD technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, O.J.; Laban, M.; Beek, van C.M.; Leeden, van der R.

    2001-01-01

    In this report the contribution of the National Aerospace Laboratory NLR to the ’CFD Drag Pre- diction Workshop’ organized by the AIAA in Anaheim, CA, on June 9-10, 2001, is presented. This contribution consists of both the results of all test cases and a discussion on the accurate computation of dr

  11. Identifying Students with Gifts and Talents in Technology. Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2004-01-01

    Technology expertise often occurs in two types of technology activities. One area of expertise is computer programming and another is expertise as a technology consumer using hardware and software. In addition to demonstrating prowess, some students tend to exhibit passion toward one or both of these activities. Students who excel in either could…

  12. The Impact of Technology on Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Mata-Claflin, Guadalupe; Holland, Glenda; Castillo, Jose Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if elementary teachers use technology as a tool to enhance classroom strategies for improving student achievement among Hispanic students. The following research questions were utilized: a) Are computers available for classroom teachers and Hispanic students? b) Has the available technology contributed to…

  13. Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, J. Michael; Giapponi, Catherine C.; Golden, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology has proven a beguiling, some even venture addictive, presence in the lives of our 21st century (millennial) students. And while screen technology may offer select cognitive benefits, there is mounting evidence in the cognitive neuroscience literature that digital technology is restructuring the way our students read and think,…

  14. Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, J. Michael; Giapponi, Catherine C.; Golden, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology has proven a beguiling, some even venture addictive, presence in the lives of our 21st century (millennial) students. And while screen technology may offer select cognitive benefits, there is mounting evidence in the cognitive neuroscience literature that digital technology is restructuring the way our students read and think,…

  15. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu .... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals in ... and upper class) and the expressed willingness to care for.

  16. New Technology "Clouds" Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Keith R.; Moore, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As technology has leaped forward to provide valuable learning tools, parents and policy makers have begun raising concerns about the privacy of student data that schools and systems have. Federal laws are intended to protect students and their families but they have not and will never be able to keep up with rapidly evolving technology. School…

  17. Impact of School Technology on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the impact of school technology on elementary students in grades three through five attending public schools in Indiana. The investigation focused on the impact of various technologies on student achievement as measured on Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus (ISTEP+). Various comparisons were…

  18. New Technology "Clouds" Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Keith R.; Moore, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As technology has leaped forward to provide valuable learning tools, parents and policy makers have begun raising concerns about the privacy of student data that schools and systems have. Federal laws are intended to protect students and their families but they have not and will never be able to keep up with rapidly evolving technology. School…

  19. College Students' Attitude towards Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njagi, K. O.; Havice, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the contemporary world, especially in the area of computer technology, have heralded the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies and particularly with the Internet revolution. This study assessed students' attitude towards computer technology. Specifically, the study assessed differences in…

  20. Technology Use among College Students: Implications for Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Erin; Peterson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the extent to which technology disrupts and occupies the time of a college student and to determine the degree to which these disruptions contribute to perceived stress. A 71-item survey to assess perceived stress, technology use and disruptions, and social support was administered to 299 undergraduate …

  1. Graphical qualities of educational technology: Using drag-and-drop and text-based programs for introductory computer science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    To determine appropriate computer science curricula, educators sought to better understand the different affordances of teaching with a visual programming language (Alice) or a text-based language (Jython). Although students often preferred one language, that language wasn't necessarily the one from which they learned the most.

  2. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Marston, Jeremy O.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  3. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  4. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2017-02-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  5. Flow drag and heat transfer characteristics of drag-reducing nanofluids with CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A new kind of aqueous CuO nanofluid with drag-reducing performance was developed. The new working fluid was an aqueous CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) solution with CuO nanoparticles added and has both special effects of drag-reducing and heat transfer enhancement. An experiment was carried out to investigate the forced convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of conventional drag reducing fluid (aqueous CTAC solution) and the new drag-reducing nanofluid in a test tube with an inner diameter of 25.6 mm. Results indicated that there were no obvious differences of the drag-reducing characteristics between conventional drag reducing fluid and new drag-reducing nanofluid. However, their heat transfer characteristics were obvious different. The heat transfer characteristics of the new drag-reducing nanofluid significantly depend on the liquid temperature, the nanoparticle concentration and the CTAC concentration. The heat transfer enhancement technology of nanofluid could be applied to solve the problem of heat transfer deterioration for conventional drag-reducing fluids.

  6. Social Adjustment of At-Risk Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Moye, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual technology education students' subgroup dynamic informs progressions of research while apprising technology teacher educators and classroom technology education teachers of intricate differences between students. Recognition of these differences help educators realize that classroom structure, instruction, and activities must be…

  7. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  8. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  9. Food Science & Technology. Instructor Guide. Student Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Phillip

    This packet contains an instructor curriculum guide and a student reference book for a course in food science and technology. The 4-unit curriculum contains 23 lessons. The instructor's guide contains the following components of a unit of instruction: objectives, competencies, motivational techniques, teaching procedures, other activities,…

  10. Examining Engineering & Technology Students' Acceptance of Network Virtualization Technology Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    This causal and correlational study was designed to extend the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and to test its applicability to Valencia Community College (VCC) Engineering and Technology students as the target user group when investigating the factors influencing their decision to adopt and to utilize VMware as the target technology. In…

  11. Bionic Research on Bird Feather for Drag Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Feng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To reduce friction drag with bionic method in a more feasible way, the surface microstructure of bird feather was analyzed attempting to reveal the biologic features responding to skin friction drag reduction. Then comparative bionic surface mimicking bird feather was fabricated through hot-rolling technology for drag reduction. The microriblet film was formed on a PVC substrate through a self-developed hot-rolling equipment. The bionic surface with micron-scale riblets formed spontaneously due to the elastic-plastic deformation of PVC in high temperature and high pressure environment. Comparative experiments between micro-structured bionic surface and smooth surface were performed in a wind tunnel to evaluate the effect of bionic surface on drag reduction, and significant drag reduction efficiency was obtained. Numerical simulation results show that microvortex induced in the solid-gas interface of bionic surface has the effect of shear stress reduction and the small level of an additional pressure drag resulting from pressure distribution deviation on bird feather like surface, hence reducing the skin friction drag significantly. Therefore, with remarkable drag reduction performance and simple fabrication technology, the proposed drag reduction technique shows the promise for practical applications.

  12. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 3: Cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary, phase 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. A narrative summary of the cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary for both study phases is presented. Costs were estimated using the Grumman Space Programs Algorithm for Cost Estimating (SPACE) computer program and results are given for four AOTV configurations. The work breakdown structure follows the standard of the joint government/industry Space Systems Cost Analysis Group (SSCAG). A table is provided which shows cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  13. Science Student Teachers and Educational Technology: Experience, Intentions, and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine science student teachers' experience with educational technology, their intentions for their own use, their intentions for their students' use, and their beliefs in the value of educational technology in science instruction. Four hundred-forty-eight science student teachers of different disciplines…

  14. Using Web Technology to Teach Students about Their Digital World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braender, Lynn M.; Kapp, Craig M.; Yeras, Jeddel

    2009-01-01

    In the School of Business at The College of New Jersey, students are required to take two courses in Management Information Technology (MIT). All students enroll in the same first course. This course focuses on Emerging Technologies and intermediate level data analysis skills. Students are then free to choose their second course. Each MIT course…

  15. Physics students` conceptions of energy and technological development in energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zain, A.N.M. [University of Science Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia). School of Educational Studies; Sulaiman, F. [University of Science Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia). School of Physics

    1998-05-01

    This study was designed to find out students` conceptions of the relationship of energy use and technological development in energy. It was conducted by administering a questionnaire to 133 first year physics students at a University. The results were analyzed to identify students` conceptions on energy use and technological development in energy. Finally, implications on teaching of energy is discussed in this paper. (author)

  16. Technology Activities for Life Skills Support Students. [and] CNC for Lower-Achieving Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Michael J.; Smith, Clayton

    1995-01-01

    Ressel shows how providing technology education to special needs students can reaffirm belief in technology education and revitalize desire to teach. Smith suggests that breaking down processes into special steps allows these students to be successful. (JOW)

  17. Technology Activities for Life Skills Support Students. [and] CNC for Lower-Achieving Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Michael J.; Smith, Clayton

    1995-01-01

    Ressel shows how providing technology education to special needs students can reaffirm belief in technology education and revitalize desire to teach. Smith suggests that breaking down processes into special steps allows these students to be successful. (JOW)

  18. Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

    2013-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

  19. Student-Driven Classroom Technologies: Transmedia Navigation and Tranformative Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Leila A.; Knezek, Gerald A.; Wakefield, Jenny S.

    2013-01-01

    This research paper explores middle school student attitudes towards learning with technology and proposes a design-based approach to formulating instruction that includes innovative classroom technology use with computers and communications technologies placed in the hands of students. The intent of this research is to advance practice and theory…

  20. Using Technology-Nested Instructional Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela; Achen, Rebecca M.; Dodd, Regan K.

    2015-01-01

    Students today expect the use of technology in their classes, rather than have to listen to less-than-engaging lectures. College students are connected electronically and incessant technology consumers. As a result, they may prefer the infusion of technologies to help them learn and enjoy the process of learning, rather than having to listen…

  1. Digital Downsides: Exploring University Students' Negative Engagements with Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are now an integral feature of university study. As such, academic research has tended to concentrate on the potential of digital technologies to support, extend and even "enhance" student learning. This paper, in contrast, explores the rather more messy realities of students' engagements with digital technology. In…

  2. Roles of Technology in Student Learning of University Level Biostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weili; Zhang, Yuchen; Su, Cheng; Cui, Zhuang; Qi, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    This study explored threshold concepts and areas of troublesome knowledge among students enrolled in a basic biostatistics course at the university level. The main area of troublesome knowledge among students was targeted by using technology to improve student learning. A total of 102 undergraduate students who responded to structured…

  3. Roles of Technology in Student Learning of University Level Biostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weili; Zhang, Yuchen; Su, Cheng; Cui, Zhuang; Qi, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    This study explored threshold concepts and areas of troublesome knowledge among students enrolled in a basic biostatistics course at the university level. The main area of troublesome knowledge among students was targeted by using technology to improve student learning. A total of 102 undergraduate students who responded to structured…

  4. Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Astronautics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In...yaw axes and provide magnetic damping on both the pitch and yaw axes. The satellite resem- bles a shuttlecock used in badminton (see Figure 2.2). The...Control Using Atmospheric Drag Guettler, David B., Captain, USAF Air Force Institute of Technology Graduate School of Engineering and Management (AFIT

  5. Bionic Research on Fish Scales for Drag Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoliang Dou; Jiadao Wang; Darong Chen

    2012-01-01

    To reduce friction drag with bionic method in a more feasible way,the surface microstructure of fish scales was analyzed attempting to reveal the biologic features responding to skin friction drag reduction.Then comparable bionic surface mimicking fish scales was fabricated through coating technology for drag reduction.The paint mixture was coated on a substrate through a self-developed spray-painting apparatus.The bionic surface with micron-scale caves formed spontaneously due to the interfacial convection and deformation driven by interfacial tension gradient in the presence of solvent evaporation.Comparative experiments between bionic surface and smooth surface were performed in a water tunnel to evaluate the effect of bionic surface on drag reduction,and visible drag reduction efficiency was obtained.Numerical simulation results show that gas phase develops in solid-liquid interface of bionic surface with the effect of surface topography and partially replaces the solid-liquid shear force with gas-liquid shear force,hence reducing the skin friction drag effectively.Therefore,with remarkable drag reduction performance and simple fabrication technology,the proposed drag reduction technique shows the promise for practical applications.

  6. Usage of innovative technologies in physical education of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov N.P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Health influence of physical drills is considered on forming correct carriage for students. 40 students of task medical force took part in an experiment. The individual programs of making healthy are presented. Application of modern technologies allows students to get the picture of level of health, about susceptibility to the risk of diseases, about basic pathological syndromes. The prospects of the use of modern computer technologies are rotined in physical education of students with violation of locomotorium.

  7. Research for Application of Vibration Drag Reduction Technology to the Design of Soil Tillage Equipment%振动减阻技术应用于土壤耕作机具的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄凯; 郭志军

    2014-01-01

    近年来,振动理论作为减阻技术应用于土壤耕作愈来愈受到人们重视,如何有效地减小工作阻力和降低能源功耗是其亟需解决的两大难题。为此,以应用比较广泛的振动深松铲为重点,阐述了振动耕作方式二维切削的减阻机理。同时,介绍了目前国内外的研究现状,研究表明合理选择振动方式和性能参数是使机具达到最佳减阻效果的关键。通过对比分析强迫和自激两种主要振动型式的优缺点,列举了几种振动关键机构的设计及应用;指出了振动参数对工作阻力影响程度的研究有待于进一步完善等问题。最后展望了振动控制方式向人工智能化方向转变的前景。%As a new emerging technology applied to the field , the vibration theory of soil cultivation and mining has be-come increasingly important in recent years .However , how to reduce the drag and energy consumption remain to be two major problems .This paper elaborates the theory of how to reduce the drag of the mechanism of drag reduction of two -di-mensional by using the vibrating subsoiler which is widely used in vibration subsoil as an example , and presents the re-search status both here and abroad , in which shows that the reasonable selection of vibration mode and performance pa-rameters is the key to implement the best drag reduction effect .Also describes the design and application of key institu-tions of several vibrations through analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of two main types of forced and self -excited vibration , points out some issues such as the vibration parameters of traction force is not enough .And forecasts the future of vibration theory is applied in conjunction with the artificial intelligence technology .

  8. Exploring Students' Technology Acceptance in College Developmental Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Handan

    2012-01-01

    Technology has become a large component of teaching and learning in mathematics education. Gaining insight into students' technology acceptance factors is a crucial step in understanding instructional design and implementation of technology-based learning programs. Despite the widespread use of technology in education, few research efforts…

  9. Mobile Technology and the Unsettled Ocean of Student Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Tim; Black, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technology is one of several currents that upset the relatively placid world of admitting, enrolling, advising, serving, and graduating students. The authors have been involved with technology since they began in the profession. Technology is not really new to them. But with mobile technology, "so much" is new--indeed, foreign--to many…

  10. Students’ Voices about Learning with Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Geer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study argues for the inclusion of student voice as a valid means of identifying 21st century pedagogical approaches to learning. Today’s students are increasingly living and thriving in a digital world and have a new “digital vernacular” which leads to differences in the way students think about learning. Approach: In Australia many students are already immersed in technologies and have preconceived ideas of what technologies they can expect to use in the classroom and how they will learn. Our schools are slowly changing but are struggling to understand what a contemporary learning environment might look like. Current and emerging technologies are forcing teachers to rethink how best to prepare students for the demands and challenges of the 21st century. Results: Technology plays a key role in how students play, learn, gain information and interact with others. Teachers are challenged to find ways of tapping into the natural curiosities of students allowing them to do more learning on their own. This study explores the use of student voice in an Australian primary school as a valid method to inform teachers about what tools can best support students in their learning. Focus groups, questionnaires and drawings are used to identify technologies, strategies and settings that help students to learn. Conclusion: The findings indicate that students expect to use a variety of technologies in their learning as many students use technologies as a natural tool in their everyday life. This research attempts to clarify what a contemporary learning environment might look like and what teaching strategies and technologies can increase motivation and engagement thus improving student learning opportunities. The student data also includes suggestions to teachers on how they may provide rich learning experiences for students.

  11. Using Technology-Nested Instructional Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lumpkin, PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Students today expect the use of technology in their classes, rather than have to listen to less-than-engaging lectures. College students are connected electronically and incessant technology consumers. As a result, they may prefer the infusion of technologies to help them learn and enjoy the process of learning, rather than having to listen exclusively to lectures. To investigate this, the authors solicited student perceptions to assess the importance of learning through technology-nested instructional strategies. Student perceptions give direction to and affirm the benefits of instructional strategies that increase student motivation to engage more actively in their learning. Based on quantitative and qualitative responses through action research in multiple courses, students perceive their learning as more engaging and enjoyable when technology-nested instructional strategies are infused into their classes.

  12. The Research of Drag Reduction Anti-corrosion Coating Technology for Marine Natural Gas Condensed Liquid Pipeline%海洋天然气凝析液管道内壁减阻防腐涂层技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜宝银; 李京; 陆卫中; 张晓灵; 郭旭; 高英; 张立新; 吴文通; 杨加栋; 史杰智

    2013-01-01

    According to the service characteristics of marine condensate gas pipeline, determine the development of new two types solvent-free coatings of drag reduction, including technological performance index, test method and test standard of coatings. Through the formula optimization design and pilot-plant test, finally the two types of solvent-free epoxy modified coating are suitable for anti-drag natural gas pipeline at room temperature and for anticorrosion gas liquids pipeline at medium temperature. Coatings were tested by the third party inspection agency, its performance indicators meet the design requirements. And through the field production line applied, the anti-drag and anti-corrosion coatings quality and application had met the needs of the mass production.%根据输送海洋天然气管道凝析液的服役特点,确定了研制新型的无溶剂内减阻防腐涂料的涂层类型、性能指标、检验方法和测试标准。通过配方优化设计和工艺试验,最终研制出了适用于非腐蚀性气体管道输送的常温无溶剂改性环氧涂料以及适用于天然气凝析液管道输送的中温无溶剂改性环氧涂料内减阻涂料。涂料经第三方检测机构检测,其性能及指标符合设计的要求。并通过生产线涂覆工艺的现场实施,内减阻防腐涂层质量和施工工艺满足规模化生产的需要。

  13. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  14. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  15. Taking Part in Technology Education: Elements in Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi; Hietanoro, Jenni; Ruismaki, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elements motivating comprehensive school students to study technology education. In addition, we tried to discover how students' motivation towards technology education developed over the period leading up to their school experience and the effect this might have on their future involvement with…

  16. Students' Attitudes towards Craft and Technology in Iceland and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gísli; Ólafsson, Brynjar; Autio, Ossi

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in both Finland and Iceland originated over 140 years ago and was influenced by the Scandinavian Sloyd pedagogy. Since then, the subject has moved away from craft and towards technology, with the aim being to increase students' technological abilities. In the beginning, the subject largely focused on the students copying artefacts,…

  17. The Acceptance of Moodle Technology by Business Administration Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Monge-Lozano, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The advent of information technologies to Universities has improved the teaching-learning process. Students can increase their learning skills using information technology. Those using the Moodle platform regularly seem to get better grades than those who rarely or never use it. This paper analyzes students' intention to use Moodle platforms to…

  18. Students' Technology Use and the Impacts on Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, Shelia R.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter reviews technology use patterns and the social impacts of technology on well-being among college students. It provides empirical evidence delineating the processes through which Internet use affects well-being among college students, and provides suggestions for ways to advance future studies in this area and for higher education…

  19. What Do Students Want? Making Sense of Student Preferences in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechenkina, Ekaterina; Aeschliman, Carol

    2017-01-01

    This article, with its focus on university students as intended recipients and users of technological innovations in education, explores student preferences across three dimensions of technology-enhanced learning: mode of instruction; communication; and educational technology tools embedded in learning and teaching activities. The article draws on…

  20. Student attitudes toward teaching English with technology

    OpenAIRE

    Jenset, Gard B.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates attitudes among student teachers toward using electronic resources in teaching. Two groups of student teachers, one composed of students in their first semester and the other composed of students in their third or fourth year, were asked to assess their skills and attitudes, before being shown an example of how opensource, Web-based data and software can be used in teaching English culture and history. The results show that student teachers are positive toward u...

  1. Coulomb drag in quantum circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Levchenko, Alex; Kamenev, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We study drag effect in a system of two electrically isolated quantum point contacts (QPC), coupled by Coulomb interactions. Drag current exhibits maxima as a function of QPC gate voltages when the latter are tuned to the transitions between quantized conductance plateaus. In the linear regime this behavior is due to enhanced electron-hole asymmetry near an opening of a new conductance channel. In the non-linear regime the drag current is proportional to the shot noise of the driving circuit,...

  2. The Role of Technology in Gifted Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housand, Brian C.; Housand, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Although technology by itself may not be motivating, a relationship seems to exist between the opportunities that technology presents and motivation for gifted students. When technology use aligns with authentic or "real-world" applications, motivation can be enhanced. This article explores the overlap between factors that have historically been…

  3. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  4. Understanding Students' Use and Value of Technology for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Karley; Bennett, Sue; Lockyer, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant research in the field of educational technology, there is still much we do not fully understand about students' experiences with technology. This article proposes that research in the field of educational technology would benefit from a sociological framing that pays attention to the understandings and lives of learners. Within…

  5. University Student Perceptions of Technology Use in Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogheib, Bashar; Rabaa'i, Ahmad; Zogheib, Salah; Elsaheli, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Although most universities and educators are relying on implementing various technological tools in the curriculum, acceptance of such tools among students is still not sufficient. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) has been widely used by researchers to test user's acceptance of technology in business, education and other domains. This…

  6. Gravity Tunnel Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Concannon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to fall down a tunnel through the center of the Earth to the other side takes approximately 42 minutes, but only when given several simplifying assumptions: a uniform density Earth; a gravitational field that varies linearly with radial position; a non-rotating Earth; a tunnel evacuated of air; and zero friction along the sides of the tunnel. Though several papers have singularly relaxed the first three assumptions, in this paper we relax the final two assumptions and analyze the motion of a body experiencing these types of drag forces in the tunnel. Under such drag forces, we calculate the motion of a transport vehicle through a tunnel of the Earth under uniform density, under constant gravitational acceleration, and finally under the more realistic Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) density data. We find the density profile corresponding to a constant gravitational acceleration better models the motion through the tunnel compared to the PREM density profile, and the uniform density m...

  7. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  8. Boosting Technology Literacy in Deaf Students

    OpenAIRE

    Herbold, Blake

    2014-01-01

    Technology in education is a global phenomenon (Knezek, 2007). In an increasingly digital world, technology is rapidly changing the way we live. The advances of technology in society has created a demand for foundational technology skills in educational systems. Schools across the nation fall in line to revamp traditional curriculums with technology. A plethora of digital learning resources for educational use have surfaced, albeit none of the resources address the needs of a bilingual Deaf s...

  9. THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL STUDENT COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakovlev Boris Petrovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the stages and technology of professional student competence of students in higher vocational school. Method or the methodology of the work: Theoretical and methodological basis of the proposed technology of formation of professional student competence in higher education are: a synergetic approach, student-centered approach, social learning theory, the activity approach, the concept of humane education. Results: In the article the theoretical and methodological basis of the statement of technology, disclosed pedagogical conditions and principles of the technology of formation of professional student competence of higher educational institutions as a result of own personal readiness. Field of application of the results: the educational system of higher education institutions.

  10. 77 FR 22359 - Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program; Comment Request AGENCY: National...: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program. Evaluation for the National...: Initial clearance. Abstract: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) is a...

  11. Factors Influencing Student Engagement and the Role of Technology in Student Engagement in Higher Education: Campus-Class-Technology Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Günüç

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine both the factors influencing student engagement and the role and influence of technology on student engagement. The study is important as it aimed at determining the views of students about student engagement and examining in detail the research data to be collected with two different data collection techniques. The present study was designed as a grounded theory study. The research sample included a total of 45 student teachers. Of all the participants, 25 of them participated in face-to-face Interviews, and 20 of them were asked to take part in written compositions. In conclusion, it was seen that the components constituting and influencing student engagement were found to be campus engagement and class engagement. It was found out that for most of the participating students, use of technology in class was not an indispensable factor for student engagement. In addition, an effective technology integration would not only contribute much to student engagement but also constitute an important way of increasing student engagement. Finally, it was seen that use of technology in instructional activities constituted an important factor for student engagement, when the findings obtained via the interviews and the written compositions were taken into consideration together

  12. Student Technology Competencies for School Counseling Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Peggy LaTurno

    2002-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the growth of technology and the development of standards related to technology in counseling, Pre-K-12 education, educator preparation programs, and the field of school counseling. The development of pre-admission and program outcome technology skills at Indiana State University is discussed along with the specific…

  13. Student pharmacists' use and perceived impact of educational technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, Scott K; Richard, Craig; Rahman, Ateequr; Kidd, Robert S

    2011-06-10

    To assess the frequency of use by and perceived impact of various educational technologies on student pharmacists. Data were obtained using a validated, Web-based survey instrument designed to evaluate the frequency of use and impact on learning of various technologies used in educating first-, second-, and third-year student pharmacists. Basic demographic data also were collected and analyzed. The majority (89.4%) of the 179 respondents were comfortable with the technology used in the academic program. The most frequently used technologies for educational purposes were in class electronic presentations, course materials posted on the school Web site, and e-mail. The technologies cited as having the most beneficial impact on learning were course materials posted on the Web site and in-class electronic presentations, and those cited as most detrimental were video-teleconferencing and online testing. Compared to the course textbook, students reported more frequent use of technologies such as electronic course materials, presentations, digital lecture recordings, e-mail, and hand-held devices. Because students' opinions of educational technologies varied, colleges and schools should incorporate educational technologies that students frequently use and that positively impact learning.

  14. Visible Parts, Invisible Whole: Swedish Technology Student Teachers' Conceptions about Technological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Jonas; Klasander, Claes

    2017-01-01

    Technological systems are included as a component of national technology curricula and standards for primary and secondary education as well as corresponding teacher education around the world. Little is known, however, of how pupils, students, and teachers conceive of technological systems. In this article we report on a study investigating…

  15. Professional Notes: Reaching All Students via Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Music teachers are often the Pied Pipers of their schools, attracting the interest of students by the nature of the subject they teach. Their students who excel are often the best and brightest, since music reading and music production demand higher-level thinking skills, motor ability, and in the case of ensemble performance, social skills. As…

  16. Multimedia Technology and Students' Achievement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Edmar Bernardes; Kvasnak, Robb Neil

    2012-01-01

    In this study done at a community college in South Florida, the achievements of students who spoke English as their second language who had attended their K-12 education outside the United States in their home countries, in a U.S. college course on world geography are compared with the achievements of students in the same classes who spoke English…

  17. Does Clicker Technology Improve Student Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David; Fike, Renea; Lucio, Krystal

    2012-01-01

    This prospective, intervention-based study was conducted to assess the impact of in-class review methods on student learning outcomes in a course preparing pre-service teachers for the Texas Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities teacher certification exam. Students were tested on midterm and end-of-term exams comprised of questions similar to…

  18. Using an Extended Dynamic Drag-and-Drop Assistive Program to Assist People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Control to Improve Computer Drag-and-Drop Ability through a Mouse Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Software technology is adopted by the current research to improve the Drag-and-Drop abilities of two people with multiple disabilities and minimal motor control. This goal was realized through a Dynamic Drag-and-Drop Assistive Program (DDnDAP) in which the complex dragging process is replaced by simply poking the mouse wheel and clicking. However,…

  19. Using an Extended Dynamic Drag-and-Drop Assistive Program to Assist People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Control to Improve Computer Drag-and-Drop Ability through a Mouse Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Software technology is adopted by the current research to improve the Drag-and-Drop abilities of two people with multiple disabilities and minimal motor control. This goal was realized through a Dynamic Drag-and-Drop Assistive Program (DDnDAP) in which the complex dragging process is replaced by simply poking the mouse wheel and clicking. However,…

  20. Collecting responses through Web page drag and drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, M Anne; Gabrys, Gareth

    2004-02-01

    This article describes how to collect responses from experimental participants using drag and drop on a Web page. In particular, we describe how drag and drop can be used in a text search task in which participants read a text and then locate and categorize certain elements of the text (e.g., to identify the main claim of a persuasive paragraph). Using this technique, participants respond by clicking on a text segment and dragging it to a screen field or icon. We have successfully used this technique in both the argument element identification experiment that we describe here and a tutoring system that we created to teach students to identify source characteristics while reading historical texts (Britt, Perfetti, Van Dyke, & Gabrys, 2000). The implementation described here exploits the capability of recent versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer Web browser to handle embedded XML documents and drag and drop events.

  1. How Does Using Technology Affect Student Attitudes about Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, David W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how a version of the Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF) was used to measure teachers'"personality" factors as perceived by students. The instrument included 28 sets of bipolar adjectives to use in describing the teacher. Findings revealed that the application of technology to instruction improved students' perceptions of…

  2. Technology Integration in Elementary Classrooms: Teaching Practices of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how and why student teachers integrated technology to enhance instruction in elementary classrooms. The participants were 31 student teachers who completed an assignment of eight weeks. Multiple data sets including observation notes of 347 lessons were obtained from three key groups for data triangulation. Results reveal that…

  3. Blending Student Technology Experiences in Formal and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, K.-W.; Khaddage, F.; Knezek, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the importance of recognizing students' technology-enhanced informal learning experiences and develop pedagogies to connect students' formal and informal learning experiences, in order to meet the demands of the knowledge society. The Mobile-Blended Collaborative Learning model is proposed as a framework to…

  4. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  5. Technological Education as a Means of Developing Students' Health Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Luchinina, Anastasia O.; Ulengov, Ruslan A.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the research is due to the fact that health of school-age children in Russia is deteriorating. The development of health culture has become an integral part of students' general cultural development. The purpose of this article is to reveal the potential of "Technology" as a school subject for the development of students'…

  6. Discovery Camp Excites Students about Engineering and Technology Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiha, G. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States and elsewhere, there is a dramatic shortage of engineers and technologists. And, unfortunately, these professions often suffer from a lack of awareness among K-12 students. Clearly, educators need to show students the very exciting and lucrative aspects of these fields. Engineering and technology are consistently listed by…

  7. Using Game Development to Engage Students in Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiacek, John

    2011-01-01

    Game design workshops, camps and activities engage K-12 students In STEM disciplines that use game engine and development tools. Game development will have students create games and simulations that Will inspire them to love technology while learning math, physics, and,logic. By using tools such as Gamemaker, Alice, Unity, Gamesalad and others, students will get a sense of confidence and accomplishment creating games and simulations.

  8. Automatization of Student Assessment Using Multimedia Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniar, David; Rahayu, Wenny

    Most use of multimedia technology in teaching and learning to date has emphasized the teaching aspect only. An application of multimedia in examinations has been neglected. This paper addresses how multimedia technology can be applied to the automatization of assessment, by proposing a prototype of a multimedia question bank, which is able to…

  9. Teaching Using New Technologies and Students Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrei, Smaranda Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Under the conditions of a digital age, new technologies undergo various interpretations, approaches and usages. Education reaches new dimensions at all its levels, by adopting new technologies in order to deeper support modern possibilities of learning that define the new generations: a high degree of digital capabilities, the capacity to…

  10. Gifted Students and Philosophy: Technology--Servant or Destroyer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The tenth in a series of articles designed to facilitate philosophical discussions with gifted students, this article explores whether technology is the savior of humanity or the tool of humanity's ultimate destruction. It draws from essays by Martin Heidegger to examine the benefits and disadvantages of technological advancement. (Contains 2…

  11. Technology-Mediated Supervision of Undergraduate Students' Dissertations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaldemark, Jimmy; Lindberg, J. Ola

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden, technology-mediated participation has increased in tertiary education, which has led to changing conditions for its delivery. However, one part has proven more resistant to change, technology-mediated or not: the supervision of students' undergraduate dissertation work. This article presents a study that analyses technological…

  12. The Nature of Primary Students' Conversation in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Turnbull, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom conversations are core to establishing successful learning for students. This research explores the nature of conversation in technology education in the primary classroom and the implications for teaching and learning. Over a year, two units of work in technology were taught in two primary classrooms. Most data was gathered in Round 2…

  13. Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derrick W.; Kelley, Pat; Maushak, Nancy J.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using the expert opinion of more than 30 professionals, this Delphi study set out to develop a set of assistive technology competencies for teachers of students with visual impairments. The result of the study was the development of a highly reliable and valid set of 111 assistive technology competencies. (Contains 2 tables.)

  14. The Effects of Assistive Technology on Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze assistive technology literature for students with disabilities. The literature search rendered N = 57 literature and n = 17 manuscripts were identified in the special education technology field studies. Each source was evaluated according to the following criteria: types of disability, learning objectives…

  15. Engaging Students Regarding Special Needs in Technology and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In 1984, James Buffer and Michael Scott produced the book "Special Needs Guide for Technology Education" (Buffer and Scott, 1984). This was a pivotal offering insofar as it set the stage for technology education educators, at the time, to think about and be provided with information regarding students with special needs in their…

  16. Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derrick W.; Kelley, Pat; Maushak, Nancy J.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using the expert opinion of more than 30 professionals, this Delphi study set out to develop a set of assistive technology competencies for teachers of students with visual impairments. The result of the study was the development of a highly reliable and valid set of 111 assistive technology competencies. (Contains 2 tables.)

  17. A Novel Technology to Investigate Students' Understandings of Enzyme Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    Digital pen-and-paper technology, although marketed commercially as a bridge between old and new note-taking capabilities, synchronizes the collection of both written and audio data. This manuscript describes how this technology was used to improve data collection in research regarding students' learning, specifically their understanding of…

  18. When superfluids are a drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  19. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Engaging Students with Cell Phone Technology in Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Students of organic chemistry traditionally make 3 x 5 in. flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flash cards to be viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use…

  20. The impact of new technologies on distance learning students

    OpenAIRE

    Keegan, Desmond

    2008-01-01

    This is a European Commission Leonardo da Vinci Reference Material project on the impact of new technology on distance learning students. It is known that all the Ministries of Education of the 27 European Union countries pay millions of Euros annually in the provision of educational technology for their schools, colleges and universities. A review of the literature of the impact of technology, however, showed that the research in this field was unacceptably fragile. What research there was f...

  1. Engaging Students in the Ethics of Engineering and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiko, Yasukawa

    This paper argues that education for engineers and technologists should focus on the ethics of technology and engineering, and not just ethics in technology and engineering projects. It argues that one's expression of their ethical position is linked closely to their identity formation, and is di......, and is different to other "competencies" that are emphasised in engineering and technology education. Principles of sustainable development are proposed as a framework for engaging students in reflecting on their ethical positions and practices....

  2. Innovative Flow Control Concepts for Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.; Whalen, Edward A.; Eppink, Jenna L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Alexander, Michael G.; Andino, Marlyn Y.

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the technology development of two flow control concepts for aircraft drag reduction. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project worked with Boeing to demonstrate these two concepts on a specially outfitted Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator during the spring of 2015. The first flow control concept used Active Flow Control (AFC) to delay flow separation on a highly deflected rudder and increase the side force that it generates. This may enable a smaller vertical tail to provide the control authority needed in the event of an engine failure during takeoff and landing, while still operating in a conventional manner over the rest of the flight envelope. Thirty-one sweeping jet AFC actuators were installed and successfully flight-tested on the vertical tail of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. Pilot feedback, flow cone visualization, and analysis of the flight test data confirmed that the AFC is effective, as a smoother flight and enhanced rudder control authority were reported. The second flow control concept is the Insect Accretion Mitigation (IAM) innovation where surfaces were engineered to mitigate insect residue adhesion on a wing's leading edge. This is necessary because something as small as an insect residue on the leading edge of a laminar flow wing design can cause turbulent wedges that interrupt laminar flow, resulting in an increase in drag and fuel use. Several non-stick coatings were developed by NASA and applied to panels that were mounted on the leading edge of the wing of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. The performance of the coated surfaces was measured and validated by the reduction in the number of bug adhesions relative to uncoated control panels flown simultaneously. Both flow control concepts (i.e., sweeping jet actuators and non-stick coatings) for drag reduction were the culmination of several years of development, from wind tunnel tests to flight tests, and produced valuable data for the advancement of modern aircraft designs

  3. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  4. Promoting Students' Autonomy in Learning with Information Technology%Promoting Students'Autonomy in Learning with Information Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪宇红

    2016-01-01

    The advance of information technologies has provided educational reform with favorable material conditions and means of support. This paper is an attempt to suggest some methods to promote students' autonomy in translation learning with the help of information technology and point out some aspects to be paid attention to while doing so.

  5. Exploring student engagement and transfer in technology mediated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Suparna

    Exploring student engagement and transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills in computer-supported learning environments by SUPARNA SINHA Dissertation Director: Cindy Hmelo-Silver Computer-supported environments designed on learning science principles aim to provide a rich learning experience for students. Students are given opportunities to collaborate, model their understanding, have access to real-time data and engage in hypotheses testing to solve authentic problems. That is to say that affordances of technologies make it possible for students to engage in mechanistic reasoning, a complex inquiry-oriented practice (Machamer, Craver & Darden, 2000; Russ et al., 2008). However, we have limited understanding of the quality of engagement fostered in these contexts. This calls for close observations of the activity systems that the students participate in. The situative perspective focuses on analyzing interactions of individuals (students) with other people, tools and materials within activity systems (Greeno, 2006). Importantly, as the central goal of education is to provide learning experiences that are useful beyond the specific conditions of initial learning, analysis of such interactions sheds light on key experiences that lead to transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills. This is made possible, as computer-supported contexts are activity systems that bring forth trends in students' engagement. From a curriculum design perspective, observing student engagement can be a useful tool to identify features of interactions (with technological tools, peers, curriculum materials) that lead to successful learning. Therefore, the purpose of the present studies is to explore the extent to which technological affordances influence students' engagement and subsequent transfer of reasoning skills. Specifically, the goal of this research is to address the following research questions: How do learners generalize understanding of mechanistic reasoning in computer

  6. Stokes’ and Lamb's viscous drag laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, I.; Klettner, C. A.

    2017-03-01

    Since Galileo used his pulse to measure the time period of a swinging chandelier in the 17th century, pendulums have fascinated scientists. It was not until Stokes' (1851 Camb. Phil. Soc. 9 8-106) (whose interest was spurred by the pendulur time pieces of the mid 19th century) treatise on viscous flow that a theoretical framework for the drag on a sphere at low Reynolds number was laid down. Stokes' famous drag law has been used to determine two fundamental physical constants—the charge on an electron and Avogadro's constant—and has been used in theories which have won three Nobel prizes. Considering its illustrious history it is then not surprising that the flow past a sphere and its two-dimensional analog, the flow past a cylinder, form the starting point of teaching flow past a rigid body in undergraduate level fluid mechanics courses. Usually starting with the two-dimensional potential flow past a cylinder, students progress to the three-dimensional potential flow past a sphere. However, when the viscous flow past rigid bodies is taught, the three-dimensional example of a sphere is first introduced, and followed by (but not often), the two-dimensional viscous flow past a cylinder. The reason why viscous flow past a cylinder is generally not taught is because it is usually explained from an asymptotic analysis perspective. In fact, this added mathematical complexity is why the drag on a cylinder was only solved in 1911, 60 years after the drag on a sphere. In this note, we show that the viscous flow past a cylinder can be explained without the need to introduce any asymptotic analysis while still capturing all the physical insight of this classic fluid mechanics problem.

  7. Towards Empowering Hearing Impaired Students' Skills in Computing and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Esam Abuzinadah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that deaf and hearing-impaired students have many difficulties in learning applied disciplines such as Medicine, Engineering, and Computer Programming. This study aims to investigate the readiness of deaf students to pursue higher education in applied sciences, more specifically in computer science. This involves investigating their capabilities in computer skills and applications. Computer programming is an integral component in the technological field that can facilitate the development of further scientific advances. Devising a manner of teaching the deaf and hearing-impaired population will give them an opportunity to contribute to the technology sector. This would allow these students to join the scientific world when otherwise; they are generally unable to participate because of the limitations they encounter. The study showed that deaf students in Jeddah are eager to continue their higher education and that a large percentage of these students are keen on studying computer science, particularly if they are provided with the right tools.

  8. ASM Student Technology and Career Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents a general overview of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for students who are perspective MSFC employees. The presentation includes an organizational chart and a summary of MSFC activities, as well as photographs and descriptions of some of the center's test facilities.

  9. Information Communication Technology and the African Student

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based framework that explains the challenge of the developing countries' students .... remote health delivery and connect rural communities to global markets. .... and India, the electrification rate rises to 82%, but 252 million people still lack .... radio and telephone-based services are making real contributions in areas such.

  10. Students' Attitudes Toward Gene Technology: Deconstructing a Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Grant E.; Troelstrup, Angelique

    2015-10-01

    Emergent technologies are commonly characterized as involving cutting-edge developments while lacking wide-scale public implementation. Although currently prevalent in many applications, gene technology is often considered emergent in that the science changes so rapidly. Science educators at all levels of formal education are faced with a unique challenge of facilitating student understanding of gene technology (in comparison with more established content) as well as integrating some of the more controversial socioscientific aspects of such content into the curricula. Much of the literature regarding student understanding of biotechnology has focused on development of student attitudes toward the field and the impact of this on their learning. However, there has, of yet, been no unifying framework in the literature regarding what is meant by attitudes toward gene technology. This article reviews the current scholarship (38 empirical studies published between 1990 and 2011) on the measurement of student attitudes toward biotechnology in order to highlight major themes present within the literature. Items from all reviewed studies were collected, coded, and sorted for construction of a comprehensive instrument representing the conceptualizations of attitudes toward gene technology in all 38 studies. Factor analytic techniques were used as a tool to reduce and categorize measurement items. Results provided a framework of five factors that help describe student attitudes toward biotechnology across all the studies. This emergent framework of factors is proposed as a useful means to standardize the discourse in future research.

  11. The effect of technology on student science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, June Kraft

    2003-10-01

    Prior research indicates that technology has had little effect on raising student achievement. Little empirical research exists, however, studying the effects of technology as a tool to improve student achievement through development of higher order thinking skills. Also, prior studies have not focused on the manner in which technology is being used in the classroom and at home to enhance teaching and learning. Empirical data from a secondary school representative of those in California were analyzed to determine the effects of technology on student science achievement. The quantitative analysis methods for the school data study included a multiple linear path analysis, using final course grade as the ultimate exogenous variable. In addition, empirical data from a nationwide survey on how Americans use the Internet were disaggregated by age and analyzed to determine the relationships between computer and Internet experience and (a) Internet use at home for school assignments and (b) more general computer use at home for school assignments for school age children. Analysis of data collected from the a "A Nation Online" Survey conducted by the United States Census Bureau assessed these relationships via correlations and cross-tabulations. Finally, results from these data analyses were assessed in conjunction with systemic reform efforts from 12 states designed to address improvements in science and mathematics education in light of the Third International Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS). Examination of the technology efforts in those states provided a more nuanced understanding of the impact technology has on student achievement. Key findings included evidence that technology training for teachers increased their use of the computer for instruction but students' final science course grade did not improve; school age children across the country did not use the computer at home for such higher-order cognitive activities as graphics and design or spreadsheets

  12. Enhancing Vocational Preparedness for At Risk Students through Technology Enhanced Learning Using Reading/Writing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Kevin; Parkins, Sherri

    The authors describe their experience over the last 4 years at Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology, enhancing the vocational opportunities for at risk students through the use of Reading and Writing Technology, primarily, Microsofts word processor, Word and WordQ, a word prediction and text to speech software designed to assist learning…

  13. Hidden Disruptions: Technology and Technological Literacy as Influences on Professional Writing Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to explore whether and in what ways individual students' technological literacies might impact collaborative teams. For the collaborative team discussed in this article, technological literacy--specifically, limited repertoires for solving technical problems, clashes between document management strategies,…

  14. Understanding Student Teachers' Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Osman, Rosma bt; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Rahmat, Mohd Khairezan

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers' integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation…

  15. Physical education of students from sports-oriented technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolinnyj U.A.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In theory grounded and experimentally tested the efficiency of employments on physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies. In experiment participated 30 students of 3 courses. The improvement of growth of most physical indexes rate is marked: speed qualities (at run on 100 m, power (bending, unbending of hands in support lying, speed-power (broad jump from a place, flexibility (inclination in before from position sitting on the floor. Recommendations are resulted on education of student youth a sense of collectivism; to the persistence, decision, purposefulness; attention and speed of thought; perfections of ability to manage the emotions, to development of physical qualities. It is proved that physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies positively influences on development of physical qualities, skills and abilities that is necessary for the future specialist.

  16. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk" questionnaire. METHODS: 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93 were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. RESULTS: 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p < 0.05, older students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p < 0.05 and students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. CONCLUSION: Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  17. Geodesy Students in Slovenia and Information & Communication Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Istenič Starčič, Andreja; Turk, Žiga

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of information and communication technologies (ICT) in university curricula is important for the development of graduates' competences and their preparation for the labour market. ICT use encourages the development of collaboration, creativity, leadership, and other generic and subject-specific competences. In this paper, the results of a survey among Slovene geodesy students conducted in 2009 are presented. The survey focuses on the modes in which students use ICT in learn...

  18. Teaching bioethics to medical technology students in pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rubina

    2009-01-01

    Incorporating ethics education in curriculum of medical technology students and highlighting the importance of teaching the subject to this particular population in this part of world are our aims. At SIUT we have a school with name of "Zain ul Abidin" school of Biomedical Technology, which is supposed to award B.S. degree in 5 sub-specialties that is hemodialysis, radiology, laboratory sciences, operation theater technology and intensive care technology. This school is affiliated by Karachi University. The students entering in school have done fellow in science (F.Sc.)with pre-medical group, thus have background knowledge of biology, physics, chemistry, languages, religion and Pakistan studies. Here for B.S. included in their curriculum are the subjects of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacology, pathology, Islamiat and English for all and then related sub-specialty topics to each group for example student in hemodialysis group more exposed to nephrology topics etc. I planned to add ethics with subjects, which are common to all specialties and designed curriculum. Curriculum was approved (after minor changes), from Karachi University and I started teaching ethics to these students. This paper highlights methods and tools of teaching and evaluation and results observed. This will be the first examination in bioethics from medical technologists, at university level in the history of country. This is a great achievement in country to start teaching bioethics to medical technologists. Karachi University has implemented the same curriculum to other medical technology schools affiliated with University.

  19. Perception of Science and Technology in Teenage Students from Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda Suárez, María José; Sánchez Balmaseda, Isabel; Pérez Sedeño, Eulalia; García Dauder, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the role played by Science and Technology in our daily lives. However, concerns have been raised by several studies about the gradual decrease in the scientific and technological choice of pupils during last years. It is interesting to note that in all these areas of secondary education, there is a fall of students. Specially, the single most striking observation to emerge from the data is the low reached by the scientific-technical, even the bi...

  20. Student Attitudes toward Technology Enhanced History Education: Comparison between Turkish and American Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Turan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Teacher and student attitudes towards the technology enhanced instruction plays a critical role in determining its effectiveness. The purpose of the study is to examine Turkish and American students’ attitudes and thoughts toward the use of educational technologies in history courses, and to compare the results to determine whether there are any differences between the attitudes of Turkish and American student. This study was conducted with 197 American students from Upper Saint Claire High school in Pittsburgh, PA, and 214 Turkish students from Konya High school who volutered for this study. The required data for this study were gathered by a 26-item technology questionnaire, which included 7 multiple-choice questions and 19 Likert scale questions. This questionnaire was developed to gather data on five different areas of interest: (1 demographic information, (2 participants’ computer- and Internet-usage skills, (3 the level of technology used in history classrooms, (4 participants’ attitudes toward technology-enhanced history education, and (5 participants’ attitudes toward history. Most of the Turkish and American students rated themselves as being very well experienced on the eight computer- and Internet-usage skills targeted in this study. But the comparison of the data indicated that American students have higher computer- and Internet-usage skills than Turkish students do, and this difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001. Most of the Turkish and American students showed positive attitudes on using educational technologies in history classrooms. A majority of the Turkish and American students stated that they would be able to focus and learn better if more technological materials were used in classroom activities, and this, in turn, would increase their academic achievements.

  1. Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft; definition of physical drag components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destarac, D. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France); Van der Vooren, J. [Senior research scientist, retired, Hoekse Waard (Netherlands)

    2004-09-01

    Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft on the basis of calculated viscous flow is discussed. Unique definitions for viscous drag plus wave drag and for induced drag are established. The concept of additive through flow drag is introduced. Drag/thrust bookkeeping is given attention. All drag components can be calculated in the flow region adjacent to the aircraft, where numerical accuracy is expectingly highest. Uniform handling of complex aircraft configurations is brought within reach. Near-field/far-field drag balances are exact. Computational aspects are discussed, in particular the elimination of spurious drag sources. Numerical examples are given for a wing-body and for a wing-body-pylon-nacelle configuration. In either case, the spurious drag sources are eliminated. Acceptable agreement is obtained for the total drag in the first case, and for the installation drag in the second case. Extension of the analysis presented to propeller-driven transport aircraft is straightforward. (author)

  2. Advancing information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme.

  3. Student Views of Technology-Mediated Written Corrective Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    and practices concerning the specific – and time-consuming – language-teacher activity of providing WCF and 2) potential changes in student attitudes when technology is used to mediate the feedback. At the core of the study is an eight-month intervention which was carried out with three teachers of English...... as a foreign language and their lower-secondary classes, requiring the teachers to make use of a specific program supportive of effective written corrective feedback in their provision of feedback to their students. The article will report on results pertaining to student attitudes to the changes brought about...... by the intervention, which changed both teacher and student practices. Data was collected through student questionnaires concerning their views of the roles of written corrective feedback for foreign language acquisition, and also their views of and attitudes to their teacher’s normal practice were addressed...

  4. Using a Student-Centered Model for Assessing Preservice Teachers' Use of Technology in Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, David; Stevenson, Heidi J.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a student-centered assessment model used at a large university to encourage preservice teachers' use of technology in the K-12 classroom. This model allows preservice teachers to have discretion over the content, form, and time period in which they complete technology proficiencies. More specifically, this article describes…

  5. Integrating Podcast Technology Effectively into Student Learning: A Reflexive Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jennifer; Nelson, Amanda; France, Derek; Woodland, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines undergraduate student perceptions of the learning utility of video podcasts. The perceived and actual effectiveness of the technology was assessed by written questionnaire, focus groups and assessment results. The podcasts were perceived as effective in supporting learning, largely by offering a flexible and visual learning…

  6. Industrial Maintenance Technology (IM-TEC). Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusch, Gene E.

    This student manual explains an innovative strategy through which Bellingham Technical College's (Washington) evening Industrial Electrician and Millwright Apprenticeships were aggregated with workforce upgrade course offerings to form the college's first evening degree program in Industrial Maintenance Technology (IM-TEC). Section 1 contains a…

  7. Ethics and Information Technology: Some Principles To Guide Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Sonia

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the ethical challenges of information technology, particularly electronic indexes and the Internet; considers principles to guide students; and discusses possible librarian responses. Topics include Kant's categorical imperative, ownership, right to privacy, social responsibility, self-respect, plagiarism and copyrights, and three…

  8. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  9. A Financial Technology Entrepreneurship Program for Computer Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Joseph, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Education in entrepreneurship is becoming a critical area of curricula for computer science students. Few schools of computer science have a concentration in entrepreneurship in the computing curricula. The paper presents Technology Entrepreneurship in the curricula at a leading school of computer science and information systems, in which students…

  10. Strike up Student Interest through Song: Technology and Westward Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Meg

    2014-01-01

    Sheet music, song lyrics, and audio recordings may not be the first primary sources that come to mind when considering ways to teach about changes brought about by technology during westward expansion, but these sources engage students in thought provoking ways. In this article the author presents a 1917 photograph of Mountain Chief, of the Piegan…

  11. The Relationship Between Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student and faculty attitudes toward computer technology in advanced arts classes at a southeastern university in the United States. This one semester study was focused on the traditional arts disciplines of art, dance, music, and theatre. This correlational analysis limited to faculty members and students…

  12. Ethics and Information Technology: Some Principles To Guide Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Sonia

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the ethical challenges of information technology, particularly electronic indexes and the Internet; considers principles to guide students; and discusses possible librarian responses. Topics include Kant's categorical imperative, ownership, right to privacy, social responsibility, self-respect, plagiarism and copyrights, and three…

  13. Integrating Podcast Technology Effectively into Student Learning: A Reflexive Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jennifer; Nelson, Amanda; France, Derek; Woodland, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines undergraduate student perceptions of the learning utility of video podcasts. The perceived and actual effectiveness of the technology was assessed by written questionnaire, focus groups and assessment results. The podcasts were perceived as effective in supporting learning, largely by offering a flexible and visual learning…

  14. Student Access to Technology and Its Impact on Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Jill

    2013-01-01

    One to One technology initiatives are a national trend, but something districts must weigh heavily as they are costly. The purpose of this study is to explore the One to One initiative in a middle school as it relates to student achievement and reducing economic disparity. Bourdieu's Cultural Capital Theory applies to this study as one would…

  15. Baccalaureate nursing students' information technology competence--agency perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    Baccalaureate nurses must meet information technology (IT) competencies expectations for employment and future professional development. Unfortunately, educational programs and accrediting groups have not identified specific outcomes, and IT is not integrated formally into many undergraduate program curricula. Meanwhile, nursing students and faculty are practicing in clinical agencies undergoing an informatics and technology revolution. Adding courses and content, hardware, software, and strategies such as distance learning and simulation have been recommended to improve competency development. However, little is known regarding nursing students' experiences with IT in clinical practice. Agencies used as sites for one undergraduate program were surveyed and asked to identify barriers and facilitators to students' IT competencies attainment. Ten agency, program, and policy factors affecting the quality of the learning experience in clinical agencies were identified. Results underscored that leadership to improve collaboration and communication between nursing practice, education, and policy groups is necessary to improve clinical environments for IT learning.

  16. The Impact of Technology on Student Perceptions of Instructor Comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yearwood

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The lack of writing skill among college graduates is often blamed on poor teaching, or alternatively, failure on the part of schools and instructors to teach the basic grammar and punctuation skills that employers remember learning in their own school years. While it may be true that teaching techniques and course content have changed over the years, a far greater cause of student inability to write clearly may be students’ negative perceptions of instructor comments. If this is indeed the case, as borne out in some earlier studies by Bardine, then how might students who grew up in a digital era view electronic comments? The prevalence of technological tools to make electronic notations increases readability, but what impact might instructors’ use of technology in making comments have on tone, completeness, and length of comments when viewed through the lens of the student writer?

  17. Student Disengagement in Higher Education : Two Trends in Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Main

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available As internet-based technologies increasingly colonize learning environments in higher education, they allow purposes contrary to learning to have direct access to students. The internet as a governing metaphor for transparent connectivity and equal access is a red herring because the power relations across the connections are unequal. The internet also functions as a mechanism for the operant conditioning of students by commercial interests and for surveillance and control by political authorities, purposes which can, if not restrained, undermine the intentions of teachers using technology.Teachers should resist fully automating their course management, especially grading and assessment because too much mechanization can only produce reductive thinking.A related trend is the gradual replacement of liberal studies by vocational courses that feature technology as the subject. This cooperates with the aforementioned trend to effectively censor the creative and critical thinking that instructors strive to teach.

  18. An Examination of the Influence of Clicker Technology on College Student Involvement and Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaterlaus, J. Mitch; Beckert, Troy E.; Fauth, Elizabeth B.; Teemant, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    Educators in a variety of disciplines have used clicker technology to engage college students in the learning process. This study investigated the influence of clicker technology on student recall and student involvement in higher education. Student Involvement Theory was used to inform and guide this research. Student recall was evaluated using…

  19. Plasmon-mediated Coulomb drag between graphene waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shylau, Artsem A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    We analyze theoretically charge transport in Coulomb coupled graphene waveguides (GWGs). The GWGs are defined using antidot lattices, and the lateral geometry bypasses many technological challenges of earlier designs. The drag resistivity ρD, which is a measure of the many-particle interactions...

  20. Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya R

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relati...

  1. Student perceptions of secondary science: A performance technology application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Belinda Rusnak

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify influences blocking or promoting science performance from the lived K-12 classroom experience. Human Performance Technology protocols were used to understand factors promoting or hindering science performance. The goal was to gain information from the individual students' perspective to enhance opportunities for stakeholders to improve the current state of performance in science education. Individual perspectives of 10 secondary science students were examined using grounded theory protocols. Findings include students' science learning behaviors are influenced by two major themes, environmental supports and individual learning behaviors. The three environmental support factors identified include the methods students receive instruction, students' opportunities to access informal help apart from formal instruction, and students' feelings of teacher likability. Additionally, findings include three major factors causing individual learners to generate knowledge in science. Factors reported include personalizing information to transform data into knowledge, customizing learning opportunities to maximize peak performance, and tapping motivational opportunities to persevere through complex concepts. The emergent theory postulated is that if a performance problem exists in an educational setting, then integrating student perspectives into the cause analysis opens opportunity to align interventions for influencing student performance outcomes. An adapted version of Gilbert's Behavioral Engineering Model is presented as an organizational tool to display the findings. The boundaries of this Performance Technology application do not extend to the identification, selection, design, or implementation of solutions to improved science performance. However, as stakeholders begin to understand learner perspectives then aligned decisions may be created to support learners of science in a direct, cost effective manner.

  2. Supporting students' knowledge integration with technology-enhanced inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jennifer Lopseen

    Dynamic visualizations of scientific phenomena have the potential to transform how students learn and understand science. Dynamic visualizations enable interaction and experimentation with unobservable atomic-level phenomena. A series of studies clarify the conditions under which embedding dynamic visualizations in technology-enhanced inquiry instruction can help students develop robust and durable chemistry knowledge. Using the knowledge integration perspective, I designed Chemical Reactions, a technology-enhanced curriculum unit, with a partnership of teachers, educational researchers, and chemists. This unit guides students in an exploration of how energy and chemical reactions relate to climate change. It uses powerful dynamic visualizations to connect atomic level interactions to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The series of studies were conducted in typical classrooms in eleven high schools across the country. This dissertation describes four studies that contribute to understanding of how visualizations can be used to transform chemistry learning. The efficacy study investigated the impact of the Chemical Reactions unit compared to traditional instruction using pre-, post- and delayed posttest assessments. The self-monitoring study used self-ratings in combination with embedded assessments to explore how explanation prompts help students learn from dynamic visualizations. The self-regulation study used log files of students' interactions with the learning environment to investigate how external feedback and explanation prompts influence students' exploration of dynamic visualizations. The explanation study compared specific and general explanation prompts to explore the processes by which explanations benefit learning with dynamic visualizations. These studies delineate the conditions under which dynamic visualizations embedded in inquiry instruction can enhance student outcomes. The studies reveal that visualizations can be deceptively clear

  3. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ogata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechanical shear.

  4. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.A.; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  5. Analytical calculation of the drag force near drag crisis of a falling sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, Armando V D B; Branco, N S

    2010-01-01

    We obtain analitically the $v^2$ dependence of the drag force on a falling sphere close to the drag crisis, as well as the drag coefficient at the drag crisis, with excellent agreement with experiment. We take into account the effects of viscosity in creating a turbulent boundary layer and perform the calculations using the Navier-Stokes equation.

  6. 76 FR 4137 - Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program... Teachers (ITEST) is a National Science Foundation program that responds to current concerns and...

  7. Developing an instrument for assessing students' concepts of the nature of technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-05-01

    Background:The nature of technology has been rarely discussed despite the fact that technology plays an essential role in modern society. It is important to discuss students' concepts of the nature of technology, and further to advance their technological literacy and adaptation to modern society. There is a need to assess high school students' concepts of the nature of technology. Purpose:This study aims to engage in discourse on students' concepts of the nature of technology based on a proposed theoretical framework. Moreover, another goal is to develop an instrument for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology. Sample:Four hundred and fifty-five high school students' perceptions of technology were qualitatively analyzed. Furthermore, 530 students' responses to a newly developed questionnaire were quantitatively analyzed in the final test. Design and method:First, content analysis was utilized to discuss and categorize students' statements regarding technology and its related issues. The Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire was developed based on the proposed theoretical framework and was supported by the students' qualitative data. Finally, exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis were applied to determine the structure of the items and the internal consistency of each scale. Results:Through a process of instrument development, the Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire was shown to be a valid and reliable tool for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology. This newly developed questionnaire is composed of 29 items in six scales, namely 'technology as artifacts,' 'technology as an innovation change,' 'the current role of technology in society,' 'technology as a double-edged sword,' 'technology as a science-based form,' and 'history of technology.' Conclusions:The Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire has been confirmed as a reasonably valid and reliable

  8. Educational Technology Decision-Making: Technology Acquisition for 746,000 Ontario Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The author explores the technology procurement process in Ontario's publicly funded school districts to determine if it is aligned with relevant research, is grounded in best practices, and enhances student learning. Using a qualitative approach, 10 senior leaders (i.e., chief information officers, superintendents, etc.) were interviewed to reveal…

  9. Bringing Technology to Students' Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukama, Evode

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus group discussions and field…

  10. Integrated technologies instructional method to enhance bilingual undergraduate engineering students

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Abdul Majid

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Mathematics permeates almost every aspect of human life and it is a skill much needed by the increasingly complex technological world. It is necessary that this essential skill must be properly developed among students to prepare them for future academic and professional careers. An assessment of the research-based instructional strategies blending with old traditional methods with t...

  11. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Procter, Paula M.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their profes...

  12. Privacy and Student Data: An Overview of Federal Laws Impacting Student Information Collected Through Networked Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five years, schools have progressively been integrating the use of technology into the classroom, both to help students achieve their goals, and help teachers and administrators alike organize, categorize and track information about students. Specifically,“Networked Services” can be used in a variety of ways to improve school systems, including increasing efficiency in administrative operations to advancing individualized learning through online resources. Though these networked...

  13. Student Teachers' Intentions and Actions on Integrating Technology into Their Classrooms during Student Teaching: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Doris; Wong, Angela F. L.; Gao, Ping

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore student teachers' intentions and actions in technology integration in their classrooms. A postgraduate teacher education cohort of 118 Singapore student teachers participated in the study. The results suggested that student teachers in Singapore showed positive intentions to integrate technology to facilitate…

  14. What Factors Predict Undergraduate Students' Use of Technology for Learning? A Case from Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Wang, Qiu; Lei, Jing

    2012-01-01

    A sound understanding of technology use from the learners' perspective is crucial. This study intends to contribute to our understanding on student technology use by focusing on identifying the factors that influence students' adoption of technology for learning and the relationships between these factors. Students studying at a Hong Kong…

  15. Finding Space for Student Innovative Practices with Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the role students play in shaping the nature of the technologies they use in their classrooms and the role teachers play in supporting students' innovative practices. Drawing on research on the sociology of technological development from the field of Science and Technology Studies, the process by which one student's…

  16. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    , such as the random matrix theory, or by numerical simulations. We show that Coulomb drag is sensitive to localized states, which usual transport measurements do not probe. For chaotic 2D systems we find a vanishing average drag, with a nonzero variance. Disordered 1D wires show a finite drag, with a large variance......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  17. Vapor layers reduce drag without the crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Berry, Joseph; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    The drag of a solid sphere moving in fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number, Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re 3 ×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect, can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as 600. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length captures the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  18. Drag-shield drop tower residual acceleration optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, A.; Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Fernandez De Pierola, M.; Duran, J.

    2016-07-01

    Among the forces that appear in drop towers for microgravity experiments, aerodynamic drag plays a crucial role in the residual acceleration. Buoyancy can also be critical, especially at the first instances of the drop when the low speed of the experimental platform makes the aerodynamic drag small compared with buoyancy. In this paper the perturbation method is used to formulate an analytical model which has been validated experimentally. The experimental test was conduced by undergraduate students of aerospace engineering at the Institute of Microgravity ‘Ignacio Da Riva’ of the Technical University of Madrid (IDR/UPM) microgravity tower. The test helped students to understand the influence of the buoyancy on the residual acceleration of the experiment platform. The objective of the students was to understand the physical process during the drop, identify the main parameters involved in the residual acceleration and determine the most suitable configuration for the next drop tower proposed to be built at UPM.

  19. Information and communication technology among undergraduate dental students in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jorma I; Nieminen, Pentti

    2002-11-01

    Use of information and communication technology (ICT) is rapidly increasing in medical and dental education. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, skills and opinions of dental undergraduate students regarding ICT and to analyze possible shifts in the acquisition of these resources. For these purposes a survey of all undergraduate dental students at the University of Oulu, Finland, was conducted during the spring term 2000. All the students in the 5 years of study (n = 140) were asked to answer a questionnaire presented during a lecture or demonstration. An overall response rate of 95% was achieved. The frequencies and percentage distributions of the items were analyzed separately for each year (1-5). All the students in the faculty are provided with personal e-mail addresses at the beginning of their studies and special emphasis has been laid on the utilization of their ICT knowledge and skills. An overwhelming majority of the students, more than 95%, judged themselves to have good or satisfactory skills in word processing, but only a slight majority considered that they could manage some advanced operating system functions. Use of ICT services was high, as about 60% of the students used e-mail and one-third WWW services daily. Literature retrieval was widely employed, so that almost 80% of the students had used literature databases (including Ovid Medline and collections of electronic full-text articles), which were introduced and provided by the Medical Library when the students were in their second year. More than 50% had received educational material in electronic form often or sometimes, and almost 80% had communicated by e-mail with a faculty teacher. A clear trend (P skills, which presents a challenge for dental education in the future.

  20. Turbulent drag reduction by polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Daniel [Van der Waals-Zeeman Instituut, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65 1018, XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Amarouchene, Yacine [CPMOH, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence cedex (France); Wagner, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany); Douady, Stephane [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Cadot, Olivier [ENSTA, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2005-04-13

    The reduction of turbulent energy dissipation by addition of polymers is studied experimentally. We first address the question of where the action of the polymers is taking place. Subsequently, we show that there is a direct correlation of drag reduction with the elongational viscosity of the polymers. For this, the reduction of turbulent energy dissipation by addition of the biopolymer DNA is studied. These results open the way for a direct visualization study of the polymer conformation in a turbulent boundary layer.

  1. Drag Effects in Charm Photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Norrbin, E

    1999-01-01

    We have refined a model for charm fragmentation at hadron colliders. This model can also be applied to the photoproduction of charm. We investigate the effect of fragmentation on the distribution of produced charm quarks. The drag effect is seen to produce charm hadrons that are shifted in rapidity in the direction of the beam remnant. We also study the importance of different production mechanisms such as charm in the photon and from parton showers.

  2. Fix It with TAPE: Repurposing Technology to Be Assistive Technology for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Shurr, Jordan C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Bassette, Laura; Miller, Bridget; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how practitioners can repurpose technology--common and socially desirable technology in particular--to be assistive technology for students with high-incidence disabilities. The authors provide a framework for practitioners to consider technology for repurposing: TAPE (Transportable, Available, Practical, Engaging) and…

  3. Developing an Instrument for Assessing Students' Concepts of the Nature of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nature of technology has been rarely discussed despite the fact that technology plays an essential role in modern society. It is important to discuss students' concepts of the nature of technology, and further to advance their technological literacy and adaptation to modern society. There is a need to assess high school students'…

  4. Is Class Appreciation Just a Click Away?: Using Student Response System Technology to Enhance Shy Students' Introductory American Government Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbig, Stacy G.; Notman, Fondren

    2012-01-01

    Do individual-level student characteristics affect appreciation for, and benefit from, the use of student response system technology? We investigate the usefulness of in-class electronic student response systems ("classroom clickers") to understand if it benefits some college students more than others. Specifically, we investigate whether shyer…

  5. Is Class Appreciation Just a Click Away?: Using Student Response System Technology to Enhance Shy Students' Introductory American Government Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbig, Stacy G.; Notman, Fondren

    2012-01-01

    Do individual-level student characteristics affect appreciation for, and benefit from, the use of student response system technology? We investigate the usefulness of in-class electronic student response systems ("classroom clickers") to understand if it benefits some college students more than others. Specifically, we investigate…

  6. "Disruptive Technologies", "Pedagogical Innovation": What's New? Findings from an In-Depth Study of Students' Use and Perception of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conole, Grainne; de Laat, Maarten; Dillon, Teresa; Darby, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the findings from a study of students' use and experience of technologies. A series of in-depth case studies were carried out across four subject disciplines, with data collected via survey, audio logs and interviews. The findings suggest that students are immersed in a rich, technology-enhanced learning environment and that…

  7. "Disruptive Technologies", "Pedagogical Innovation": What's New? Findings from an In-Depth Study of Students' Use and Perception of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conole, Grainne; de Laat, Maarten; Dillon, Teresa; Darby, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the findings from a study of students' use and experience of technologies. A series of in-depth case studies were carried out across four subject disciplines, with data collected via survey, audio logs and interviews. The findings suggest that students are immersed in a rich, technology-enhanced learning environment and that…

  8. What is technology? A study of fifth and eighth grade student ideas about the Nature of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digironimo, Nicole

    Most, if not all, standards for science and technology education and curriculum indicate that knowledge of the Nature of Technology is an educational goal, yet the literature lacks an established definition for the Nature of Technology. Additionally, the research on student ideas about the Nature of Technology is insufficient. After reviewing the literature on science and technology education, the philosophy of technology, and the history of technology, this study presents an internally consistent definition for the Nature of Technology. This definition illustrates how the Nature of Technology includes five dimensions: Technology as Artifacts; Technology as a Creation Process; Technology as a Human Practice; The History of Technology; and The Current Role of Technology. Using an interview protocol developed for this study, a small group of 5th and 8th grade students were interviewed to ascertain their ideas about the Nature of Technology. The results indicate that there are a variety of ideas present in the thinking of young people. All of the participants expressed one of two ideas about technological artifacts: technological artifacts are electronic or technological artifacts are invented. All of the participants identified particular skills needed to invent technological artifacts; some of the participants included mobility and concluded that disabled people cannot be inventors. Despite their experiences with technological artifacts (including educational technology tools), a few of the participants were uncertain whether they would identify themselves as technological. More than half of the participants did not believe older artifacts can still be considered technology. Most of the participants were apprehensive about our technological future; the main issue expressed by the participants was the environment. Other than environmental concerns, most of the participants were unable to identify global issues regarding technological use and development. Overall

  9. Student Teachers of Technology and Design: Can Short Periods of STEM-Related Industrial Placement Change Student Perceptions of Engineering and Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Ken S.

    2012-01-01

    This is a report, on a small-scale case study, of a programme of short industrial placements (5 day block) for student teachers of technology and design in Northern Ireland. Such placements increase student awareness and understanding of the nature of Engineering and Technology and therefore better prepare them to teach these subjects, as integral…

  10. Understanding Student Teachers’ Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM Validation and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Teck, Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM in the context of Malaysian student teachers’ integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, and structural equation modelling (SEM was used for model comparison and hypotheses testing. The goodness-of-fit test of the analysis shows partial support of the applicability of the TAM in a Malaysian context. Overall, the TAM accounted for 37.3% of the variance in intention to use technology among student teachers and of the five hypotheses formulated, four are supported. Perceived usefulness is a significant influence on attitude towards computer use and behavioural intention. Perceived ease of use significantly influences perceived usefulness, and finally, behavioural intention is found to be influenced by attitude towards computer use. The findings of this research contribute to the literature by validating the TAM in the Malaysian context and provide several prominent implications for the research and practice of technology integration development.

  11. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drug between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  12. Transformance: reading the gospel in drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeffrey Q

    2004-01-01

    Despite the large body of scholarship on drag and its performance of misogyny, mimicry, and masculinity, little attention has been paid to the role of musical genres in Black drag performance and its reception. This essay explores drag performances of gospel music and its relationship with the spectator at the Biology Bar, a Black gay drag site in Chicago. By examining the shift from the club "space" to the church "place," this research locates several possibilities for queer gospel performances. Through the introduction of a theory of transformance, this essay highlights the contradictions, complications, and complexities of the relationship between the Black church and the Black gay community.

  13. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  14. Extensibility enables locomotion under isotropic drag

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, On Shun

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic viscous drag is usually believed to be a requirement for the low Reynolds number locomotion of slender bodies such as flagella and cilia. Here we show that locomotion under isotropic drag is possible for extensible slender bodies. After general considerations, a two-ring swimmer and a model dinoflagellate flagellum are studied analytically to illustrate how extensibility can be exploited for self-propulsion without drag anisotropy. This new degree of freedom could be useful for some complex swimmer geometries and locomotion in complex fluid environments where drag anisotropy is weak or even absent.

  15. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means, such as th......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  16. METASYSTEMIC TECHNOLOGY OF INSTRUCTION, STUDENT RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru BALANEL

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metasystemic technology of training, student research and innovation (D.Balanel – MTTRI is the development of educational technology J.F. Herbart by cybernetic, metasystem approach, feedbacks, diffusion of knowledges, com­petences in real time, intuition and with application in high education. “Metasystemic technology training, student research and innovation (D.Balanel” is introducing in science by author. Technology is based on metasystem, including pedagogy, psychology, management, cybernetics, mathematics.The paper discusses training, student-centered and competence-centered, the equation of training, equation of training with notes early, appropriate to Bologna Process, ways to educate interest and research capabilities, innovation of students; studying the factors that determine the student make transition to self-knowledge accumulation, learn with satisfaction the research and innovation, transition from apperception to intuition. The author relies on metasystemic training technology, skills to work in real time, using student thesaurus from computer science, informatics and history of cybernetics; learn experience and performance of the most eminent personalities in the development of computer science and cybernetics, Norbert Wiener and Alain Turing, William Ross Ashby and John von Neumann, others personalities, holding the Turing and Neumann and other Awards in cybernetics and informatics . Scientific education of students includes identifying scientific issues, enrollment of students in research. Identifying the scientific problems inherited as millennial problems in mathematics and computer science, current issues and future of science; incentives in applying forces young people to solve them. The enrollment of students in scientific work is done by conducting research with students on issues of university research in the scientific teams, scientific laboratories and simulators, training. The result of "IRI–triangle activity

  17. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  18. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  19. Are Digital Natives a Myth or Reality? University Students' Use of Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaryan, Anoush; Littlejohn, Allison; Vojt, Gabrielle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent and nature of university students' use of digital technologies for learning and socialising. The findings show that students use a limited range of mainly established technologies. Use of collaborative knowledge creation tools, virtual worlds, and social networking sites was low. "Digital natives" and students of…

  20. Assistive Technologies for Students with Disabilities: A Survey of Access and Use in Turkish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Ismahan Arslan; Inan, Fethi A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the assistive technology needs of university students with disabilities and the availability of these technologies. It also explored the attitudes of the students with disabilities toward computers and the extent to which these are used by students with disabilities. Data was collected through a questionnaire, from 22…

  1. Improving Undergraduate Student Satisfaction with the Consumer Behavior Course: Will Interactive Technology Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline K.; Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we measure the impact of interactive technology on student satisfaction and find support for the hypothesis that students who find a class is more interesting because of the use of interactive technology will be more satisfied with the course. The results also support the hypothesis that if students like the course, they will be…

  2. Predicting Acceptance of Mobile Technology for Aiding Student-Lecturer Interactions: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Chin Lay; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2017-01-01

    The current study sets out to identify determinants affecting tertiary students' behavioural intentions to use mobile technology in lectures. The study emphasises that the reason for using mobile technology in classrooms with large numbers of students is to facilitate interactions among students and lecturers. The proposed conceptual framework has…

  3. Improvements of evaporation drag model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; XU Ji-Jun

    2004-01-01

    A special visible experiment facility has been designed and built, and an observable experiment is performed by pouring one or several high-temperature particles into a water pool in the facility. The experiment result has verified Yang's evaporation drag model, which holds that the non-symmetric profile of the local evaporation rate and the local density of vapor would bring about a resultant force on the hot particle so as to resist its motion. However, in Yang's evaporation drag model, radiation heat transfer is taken as the only way to transfer heat from hot particle to the vapor-liquid interface, and all of the radiation energy is deposited on the vapor-liquid interface and contributed to the vaporization rate and mass balance of the vapor film. In improved model heat conduction and heat convection are taken into account. This paper presents calculations of the improved model, putting emphasis on the effect of hot particle's temperature on the radiation absorption behavior of water.

  4. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-05-13

    To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use. Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies. Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs. Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom.

  5. Effects of biofouling development on drag forces of hull coatings for ocean-going ships: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholdt, Asger; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Olsen, S. M.;

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a systematic overview of the literature and describes the experimental methods used to quantify the drag of hull coatings. It also summarizes the findings of hull coating's drag performance and identifies the main parameters impacting it. The advantages and disadvantages...... of the reported methods listed in this review provide an assessment of the most efficient methods to quantify the drag performance of hull coatings. This review determines that drag performance of hull coating technology varies depending on whether the coating condition is newly applied, after dynamic or static...

  6. Preferences and Practices among Students Who Read Braille and Use Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Frances Mary

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Students who read braille use assistive technology to engage in literacy tasks and to access the general curriculum. There is little research on the ways in which technology has changed the reading and writing practices and preferences of students who use braille, nor is there much research on how assistive technology is learned by…

  7. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  8. The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010. Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon D.; Caruso, Judith Borreson

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the key findings from "The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010". Since 2004, the annual ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) study of undergraduate students and information technology has sought to shed light on how information technology affects the college experience. We…

  9. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation towards Technology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose: The present study is to validate an…

  10. Assistive Technology Approaches for Large-Scale Assessment: Perceptions of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Christopher; Thurlow, Martha; Altman, Jason; Timmons, Joe; Kato, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Assistive technology approaches to aid students with visual impairments are becoming commonplace in schools. These approaches, however, present challenges for assessment because students' level of access to different technologies may vary by school district and state. To better understand what assistive technology tools are used in reading…

  11. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  12. Explaining the Intention to Use Technology among University Students: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Zhou, Mingming

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the factors that an influence higher education students' intention to use technology. Using an extended technology acceptance model as a research framework, a sample of 314 university students were surveyed on their responses to seven constructs hypothesized to explain their intention to use technology.…

  13. Departure of microscopic friction from macroscopic drag in molecular fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Fujiwara, Daiki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Friction coefficient of the Langevin equation and drag of spherical macroscopic objects in steady flow at low Reynolds numbers are usually regarded as equivalent. We show that the microscopic friction can be different from the macroscopic drag when the mass is taken into account for particles with comparable scale to the surrounding fluid molecules. We illustrate it numerically by molecular dynamics simulation of chloride ion in water. Friction variation by the atomistic mass effect beyond the Langevin regime can be of use in the drag reduction technology as well as the electro or thermophoresis.

  14. The influence of interactive technology on student performance in an Oklahoma secondary Biology I program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, Vallery

    Over the last decade growth in technologies available to teach students and enhance curriculum has become an important consideration in the educational system. The profile of today's secondary students have also been found to be quite different than those of the past. Their learning styles and preferences are issues that should be addressed by educators. With the growth and availability of new technologies students are increasingly expecting to use these as learning tools in their classrooms. This study investigates how interactive technology may impact student performance. This study specifically focuses on the use of the Apple Ipad in 4 Biology I classrooms. This study used an experimental mixed method design to examine how using Ipads for learning impacted student achievement, motivation to learn, and learning strategies. Qualitatively the study examined observed student behaviors and student perceptions regarding the use of interactive technologies. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, 2-way ANOVAs, and qualitative analysis. Quantitatively the results revealed no significant difference between students who used the interactive technology to learn and those who did not. Qualitative data revealed behaviors indicative of being highly engaged with the subject matter and the development of critical thinking skills which may improve student performance. Student perceptions also revealed overall positive experiences with using interactive technology in the classroom. It is recommended that further studies be done to look at using interactive technologies for a longer period of time using multiple subjects areas. This would provide a more in-depth exploration of interactive technologies on student achievement.

  15. Students' Ethical Decision-Making in an Information Technology Context: A Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Cynthia K.; Leonard, Lori N. K.; Manly, Tracy S.

    2011-01-01

    Business educators have increased the focus on ethics in the classroom. In order for students to become ethical professionals, they must first be held to an ethical standard as students. As information technology continues to permeate every aspect of students' lives, it becomes increasingly important to understand student decision-making in this…

  16. The Relevance of Career Aspirations for Transfer Students Persisting in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyote, Ruthann T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes data acquired from interviews with 18 community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors and 7 university staff people who work in direct student services with this student population. This study explores the experiences of transfer students in STEM majors regarding what…

  17. IEngage: Using Technology to Enhance Students' Engagement in a Large Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawang, Sukanlaya; O'Connor, Peter; Ali, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to answer how we can increase students' engagement in a large class. We hypothesised that the use of KeyPad, an interactive student response system, can lead to enhanced student engagement in a large classroom. We tested a model of classroom technology integration enhancing the students' engagement among first year undergraduate…

  18. Students' Ethical Decision-Making in an Information Technology Context: A Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Cynthia K.; Leonard, Lori N. K.; Manly, Tracy S.

    2011-01-01

    Business educators have increased the focus on ethics in the classroom. In order for students to become ethical professionals, they must first be held to an ethical standard as students. As information technology continues to permeate every aspect of students' lives, it becomes increasingly important to understand student decision-making in this…

  19. The Relevance of Career Aspirations for Transfer Students Persisting in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyote, Ruthann T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes data acquired from interviews with 18 community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors and 7 university staff people who work in direct student services with this student population. This study explores the experiences of transfer students in STEM majors regarding what…

  20. A Technological Primrose Path? ESL Students and Computer-Assisted Writing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Donald E; and Gregory, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Describes what happened when students, unsupervised, used a style-checking computer program to check their essays. The feedback (considered somewhat misleading) suggested that teachers need to guide students along the technological path. (seven references) (GLR)

  1. Science Technology Society Simulations: Engaging Students with Issues-based Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Mamlok, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Describes Science Technology and Society (STS) simulations that teach students about human experiences involving controversial issues. When students are taught using controversial and authentic issues, science instruction becomes current and engaging. (SAH)

  2. Drag Coefficient of Thin Flexible Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara; Gurram, Harika

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of drag coefficients of thin flexible cylindrical wires are described for the Reynolds number range between 250 - 1000. Results indicate that the coefficient values are about 20 to 30 percent lower than the reported laminar flow values for rigid cylinders. Possible fluid dynamics mechanism causing the reduction in drag will be discussed.

  3. Determination of the surface drag coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Sun, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the dependence of the surface drag coefficient on stability, wind speed, mesoscale modulation of the turbulent flux and method of calculation of the drag coefficient. Data sets over grassland, sparse grass, heather and two forest sites are analyzed. For significantly unstable ...

  4. Polymer flexibility and turbulent drag reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer-induced drag reduction is the phenomenon by which the friction factor of a turbulent flow is reduced by the addition of small amounts of high-molecular-weight linear polymers, which conformation in solution at rest can vary between randomly coiled and rodlike. It is well known that drag redu

  5. Drag-free Small Satellite Platforms for Future Geodesy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. W.; Hong, S.; Nguyen, A.; Serra, P.; Balakrishnan, K.; Buchman, S.; De Bra, D. B.; Hultgren, E.; Zoellner, A.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous satellite geodesy measurements lasting into the foreseeable future are critical for the understanding of our changing planet. It is therefore imperative that we explore ways to reduce costs, while maintaining science return. Small satellite platforms represent a promising path forward if ways can be found to reduce the size, weight, and power of the necessary instrumentation. One key enabling technology is a precision small-scale drag-free system under development at the University of Florida and Stanford University. A drag-free satellite (a) contains and shields a free-floating test mass from all non-gravitational forces, and (b) precisely measures the position of the test mass inside the satellite. A feedback control system commands thrusters to fly the 'tender' spacecraft with respect to the test mass. Thus, both test mass and spacecraft follow a pure geodesic in spacetime. By tracking the relative positions of low Earth orbiting drag-free satellites, using laser interferometry for example, the detailed shape of geodesics, and through analysis, the higher order harmonics of the Earth's geopotential can be determined. Drag-free systems can be orders of magnitude more accurate that accelerometer-based systems because they fundamentally operate at extremely low acceleration levels, and are therefore not limited by dynamic range like accelerometers. Since no test mass suspension force is required, larger gaps between the test mass and satellite are possible, which reduces the level of unwanted disturbing forces produced by the satellite itself. The small satellite platform also enables cost-effective constellations, which can increase the temporal resolution of gravity field maps by more-frequently observing given locations on the Earth. Mixed-orbit constellations can also markedly enhance observational strength, decorrelate gravity coefficient estimates, and help address the fundamental aliasing problem that exists with previous missions. The

  6. DRAG ON SUBMICRON NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.; Einar; Kruis

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure was developed for estimating the effective collision diameter of an aggregate composed of primary particles of any size. The coagulation coefficient of two oppositely charged particles was measured experimentally and compared with classic Fuchs theory, including a new method to account for particle non-sphericity. A second set of experiments were performed on well-defined nanoparticle aggregates at different stages of sintering, i.e. from the aggregate to the fully sintered stage. Here, electrical mobility was used to characterize the particle drag. The aggregates are being built from two different size-fractionated nanoparticle aerosols, the non-aggregated particles are discarded by an electrofilter and then they are passed through a furnace at concentrations low enough not to induce coagulation.

  7. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings -or- Thinking Outside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  8. Ultrafast photon drag detector for intersubband spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigg, Hans; Graf, Stephan; Kwakernaak, Martin H.; Margotte, Bernd; Erni, Daniel; Van Son, Peter; Köhler, Klaus

    1996-03-01

    The photon drag effect of a 2D electron gas is measured using the ps infrared pulses of the wavelength-tunable free electron laser source FELIX. The pulsed photon drag response is found to depend critically on the coupling characteristics of the electrical circuit. We therefore developed an impedance and velocity matched photon drag detector. It consists of a GaAs/AlGaAs multi quantum well sample which forms an integral part of a microstrip line. A Ge-prism enables incoupling at the critical total reflection angle. This novel transmission line integrated photon drag detector (TIP-detector) generates signal transients below 10 ps rise and fall times. Its continuous spectral response through the intersubband resonance is investigated at room temperature and at T=100 K. An analysis of the spectral lineshape of the photon drag current response yields information about the momentum relaxation times of the electrons in the ground and excited subbands.

  9. Turbulent drag in a rotating frame

    CERN Document Server

    Campagne, Antoine; Gallet, Basile; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Moisy, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    What is the turbulent drag force experienced by an object moving in a rotating fluid? This open and fundamental question can be addressed by measuring the torque needed to drive an impeller at constant angular velocity $\\omega$ in a water tank mounted on a platform rotating at a rate $\\Omega$. We report a dramatic reduction in drag as $\\Omega$ increases, down to values as low as $12$\\% of the non-rotating drag. At small Rossby number $Ro = \\omega/\\Omega$, the decrease in drag coefficient $K$ follows the approximate scaling law $K \\sim Ro$, which is predicted in the framework of nonlinear inertial wave interactions and weak-turbulence theory. However, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements indicate that this drag reduction rather originates from a weakening of the turbulence intensity in line with the two-dimensionalization of the large-scale flow.

  10. Drag Reduction by Microvortexes in Transverse Microgrooves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A transverse microgrooved surface was employed here to reduce the surface drag force by creating a slippage in bottom layer in turbulent boundary layer. A detailed simulation and experimental investigation on drag reduction by transverse microgrooves were given. The computational fluid dynamics simulation, using RNG k-ε turbulent model, showed that the vortexes were formed in the grooves and they were a main reason for the drag reduction. On the upside of the vortex, the revolving direction was consistent with the main flow, which decreased the flow shear stress by declining the velocity gradient. The experiments were carried out in a high-speed water tunnel with flow velocity varying from 17 to 19 m/s. The experimental results showed that the drag reduction was about 13%. Therefore, the computational and experimental results were cross-checked and consistent with each other to prove that the presented approach achieved effective drag reduction underwater.

  11. Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team member with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) Students a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team member with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) Students and Faculty in the Control Room of the Simulated Lunar Operations (SLOPE) Laboratory for the Modular Mobility Technology Demonstrator (MMTD)

  12. Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team members and Students and Faculty from Case Western Reserve Un

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team members and Students and Faculty from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) with the Modular Mobility Technology Demonstrator (MMTD) in the Simulated Lunar Operations (SLOPE) Laboratory

  13. Understanding student participation and choice in science and technology education

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Justin; Ryder, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by the EU’s Interests and Recruitment in Science (IRIS) project, this volume examines the issue of young people’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. With an especial focus on female participation, the chapters offer analysis deploying varied theoretical frameworks, including sociology, social psychology and gender studies. The material also includes reviews of relevant research in science education and summaries of empirical data concerning student choices in STEM disciplines in five European countries. Featuring both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the book makes a substantial contribution to the developing theoretical agenda in STEM education. It augments available empirical data and identifies strategies in policy-making that could lead to improved participation—and gender balance—in STEM disciplines. The majority of the chapter authors are IRIS project members, with additional chapters written by specially invited contribu...

  14. The effectiveness of Family Science and Technology Workshops on parental involvement, student achievement, and student curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Lora Bechard

    The literature suggests that parental involvement in schools results in positive changes in students and that schools need to provide opportunities for parents to share in the learning process. Workshops are an effective method of engaging parents in the education of their children. This dissertation studies the effects of voluntary Family Science and Technology Workshops on elementary children's science interest and achievement, as well as on parents' collaboration in their child's education. The study involved 35 second and third-grade students and their parents who volunteered to participate. The parental volunteers were randomly assigned to either the control group (children attending the workshops without a parent) or the treatment group (children attending the workshops with a parent). The study was conducted in the Fall of 1995 over a four-week period. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to determine the effects of the workshops on children's science achievement and science curiosity, as well as on parents' involvement with their child's education. The study revealed that there was no significant statistical difference at the.05 level between the treatment/control groups in children's science achievement or science curiosity, or in parent's involvement with their children's education. However, the study did focus parental attention on effective education and points the way to more extensive research in this critical learning area. This dual study, that is, the effects of teaching basic technology to young students with the support of their parents, reflects the focus of the Salve Regina University Ph.D. program in which technology is examined in its effects on humans. In essence, this program investigates what it means to be human in an age of advanced technology.

  15. Enhancing teaching and learning with technology through collaborative research with students

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing awareness that technological developments should enhance student learning experience and compliment traditional teaching methodologies (McGugan and Peakcock, 2005). The recently published JISC inquiry into the implications of Web 2.0 technology for higher education (2009), highlighted how learners make effective use of Web 2.0 technology in social contexts. However, at present our knowledge of how university students and staff engage with and use technologies, including We...

  16. Photon drag enhancement by a slow-light moving medium via electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Azmat; Khan, Naveed; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Rahman, Amin Ur; Ahmad, Afaq

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a considerable enhancement has been observed in the celebrated Fresnel-Fizeau light drag by innovative experimental and theoretical approaches because of its fundamental and practical interest in the emerging technology of quantum optics and photonics. We present a semiclassical density matrix approach on the demonstration of light drag in a slow-light moving medium comprising five-level single tripod atomic configuration. To accomplish this, we introduce Kerr-type nonlinearity that leads to electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification under resonance conditions. By switching ON Kerr-type nonlinearity effect, we observe a prominent transparency window in probe field's absorption spectrum whose width and amplitude can be controlled further by the intensity of Kerr field and control field. The incorporation of Kerr field also switches light propagation from superluminal to subluminal domain. We predict a significant enhancement both in the lateral and the rotary photon drag owing to drag of light linear polarization state subjected to translation and rotation of the host medium, respectively. Consistent with earlier results, light drag considerably depends on both transverse and angular velocity of the host medium. In regime of subluminal propagation, light polarization state drags along the medium motion while in the superluminal propagation region it drags opposite to the medium motion.

  17. Teacher Verbal Aggressiveness and Credibility Mediate the Relationship between Teacher Technology Policies and Perceived Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Amber N.; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we extend previous work on teacher technology policies by refining the teacher technology policies instrument to account for the technology purpose (social, academic) and type (cell phone, laptop/tablet), and examine a model of teacher technology policies and perceived learning. We found that students are more sensitive to policies…

  18. Technology's Role in Learning at a Commuter Campus: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckenmeyer, Janet A.; Barczyk, Casimir; Hixon, Emily; Zamojski, Heather; Tomory, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of technology ownership and usage, as well as skills with and preferences for various technologies, affect the college experience (Educause 2012). Students at a commuter campus of a large Midwestern public university were surveyed about technology and the learning process: 94% of the respondents believed that technology had the potential…

  19. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T ) lower than ˜10 K , we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T , and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T =1.5 K . At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag.

  20. Predicting Middle School Students' Use of Web 2.0 Technologies out of School Using Home and School Technological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joan E.; Read, Michelle F.; Jones, Sara; Mahometa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study used multiple regression to identify predictors of middle school students' Web 2.0 activities out of school, a construct composed of 15 technology activities. Three middle schools participated, where sixth- and seventh-grade students completed a questionnaire. Independent predictor variables included three demographic and five computer…

  1. Enhancing Teachers' Technological Knowledge and Assessment Practices to Enhance Student Learning in Technology: A Two-year Classroom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Judy; Jones, Alister; Northover, Ann

    2001-02-01

    This paper reports on a two-year classroom investigation of primary school (Years 1-8) technology education. The first year of the project explored emerging classroom practices in technology. In the second year intervention strategies were developed to enhance teaching, learning and assessment practices. Findings from the first year revealed that assessment was often seen in terms of social and managerial aspects, such as teamwork, turn taking and co-operative skills, rather than procedural and conceptual technological aspects. Existing formative interactions with students distorted the learning away from the procedural and conceptual aspects of the subject. The second year explored the development of teachers' technological knowledge in order to enhance formative assessment practices in technology, to inform classroom practice in technology, and to enhance student learning. Intervention strategies were designed to enhance the development of procedural, conceptual, societal and technical aspects of technology for teachers and students. The results from this intervention were very positive. This paper highlights the importance of developing teacher expertise pertaining to broad concepts of technology, detailed concepts in different technological areas and general pedagogical knowledge. The findings from this research therefore have implications for thinking about teaching, learning and assessment in technology.

  2. The role of drag in insect hovering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Jane

    2004-11-01

    Studies of insect flight have focused on aerodynamic lift, both in quasi-steady and unsteady regimes. This is partly influenced by the choice of hovering motions along a horizontal stroke plane, where aerodynamic drag makes no contribution to the vertical force. In contrast, some of the best hoverers--dragonflies and hoverflies--employ inclined stroke planes, where the drag in the down- and upstrokes does not cancel each other. Here, computation of an idealized dragonfly wing motion shows that a dragonfly uses drag to support about three quarters of its weight. This can explain an anomalous factor of four in previous estimates of dragonfly lift coefficients, where drag was assumed to be small. To investigate force generation and energy cost of hovering flight using different combination of lift and drag, I study a family of wing motion parameterized by the inclined angle of the stroke plane. The lift-to-drag ratio is no longer a measure of efficiency, except in the case of horizontal stroke plane. In addition, because the flow is highly stalled, lift and drag are of comparable magnitude, and the aerodynamic efficiency is roughly the same up to an inclined angle about 60 degrees , which curiously agrees with the angle observed in dragonfly flight. Finally, the lessons from this special family of wing motion suggests a strategy for improving efficiency of normal hovering, and a unifying view of different wing motions employed by insects.

  3. Coulomb drag between helical Luttinger liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainaris, N.; Gornyi, I. V.; Levchenko, A.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study Coulomb drag between two helical edges with broken spin-rotational symmetry, such as would occur in two capacitively coupled quantum spin Hall insulators. For the helical edges, Coulomb drag is particularly interesting because it specifically probes the inelastic interactions that break the conductance quantization for a single edge. Using the kinetic equation formalism, supplemented by bosonization, we find that the drag resistivity ρD exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the temperature T . In the limit of low T ,ρD vanishes with decreasing T as a power law if intraedge interactions are not too strong. This is in stark contrast to Coulomb drag in conventional quantum wires, where ρD diverges at T →0 irrespective of the strength of repulsive interactions. Another unusual property of Coulomb drag between the helical edges concerns higher T for which, unlike in the Luttinger liquid model, drag is mediated by plasmons. The special type of plasmon-mediated drag can be viewed as a distinguishing feature of the helical liquid—because it requires peculiar umklapp scattering only available in the presence of a Dirac point in the electron spectrum.

  4. Orographic drag uncertainties impact forecast skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Irina; Zadra, Ayrton; Wedi, Nils; Bacmeister, Julio

    2017-04-01

    Despite their importance for the large-scale circulation, to date the representation of drag processes remains a major source of uncertainty in global models. Among the different drag processes the representation of orographic drag is particularly challenging. This has been recently highlighted by the WMO Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE) 'Drag project' which demonstrated that the main NWP and climate models differ significantly in representation of the total parameterized surface stress and in the partitioning of surface stress among various physical processes, particularly in regions with orography. Here we discuss how uncertain is the representation of orographic drag in models, and we illustrate how this uncertainty affects the skill of medium range weather forecasts. Namely we show how different is the representation of the resolved orography even in models with similar headline horizontal resolution. We also use the results of the WGNE 'Drag project' to illustrate how much models differ in terms of the total parameterized surface stress and its partition among various processes. Finally, we use the Integrated Forecasting System of ECMWF to demonstrate how much these intermodel differences either in the resolved orography or the representation subgrid drag affect the forecast skill.

  5. Teaching with Technology: An Examination of Literacy Instruction and the Use of Technology with Teacher Candidates and Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas-York, Keli; Wiedemann, Chantal; Bennett, Joelle

    2008-01-01

    The article describes teacher candidates' perceptions of the instructional effectiveness of integrating literacy and technology during the field experience component of a literacy methods course. An examination of the impact of the inclusion of technology with literacy instruction on student engagement was also conducted but no significant…

  6. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over a heavy vehicle with drag reduction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangseung; Kim, Myeongkyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic drag contributes to a considerable amount of energy loss of heavy vehicles. To reduce the energy loss, drag reduction devices such as side skirts and boat tails, are often installed to the side and the rear of a heavy vehicle. In the present study, turbulent flow around a heavy vehicle with realistic geometric details is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES), which is capable of providing unsteady flow physics responsible for aerodynamic in sufficient detail. Flow over a heavy vehicle with and without a boat tail and side skirts as drag reduction devices is simulated. The simulation results are validated against accompanying in-house experimental measurements. Effects of a boat tail and side skirts on drag reduction are discussed in detail. Supported by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Grant NTIS 1615007940.

  7. Compliant Materials for Drag Reduction of High-speed Submerged Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bane Jee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly discusses the possibility of employing the compliant materials on underwater bodies for the drag reduction. Recent studies in the area of hydrobionics all-over the world have drawn the attention of hydrodynamicists for using the compliant materials on underwater body surfaces, similar to that found in fast aquatic animals like dolphins, towards achieving drag reduction and increased speeds of underwater vehicles and weapons'. Some basic principles of hydrohionics in drag reduction have been presented with special emphasis on the control of turbulent boundary layer characteristics of flow over the compliant material surfaces and induce delay in transition. Various researchers have estimated that the use of such compliantmaterial surfaces can lead to an overall drag reductton of the order of 10-12 per cent over drag of the rigid surface. This is a considerable drag reduction and should arouse keen interest among the underwater weapon and vehicle designers as the next stage of technological advancement in underwater hydrodynamic technology.

  8. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  9. Frame-Dragging from Charged Rotating Body

    CERN Document Server

    Dubey, Anuj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we have considered the three parameters: mass, charge and rotation to discuss their combined effect on frame dragging for a charged rotating body. If we consider the ray of light which is emitted radially outward from a rotating body then the frame dragging shows a periodic nature with respect to coordinate $\\phi$ (azimuthal angle). It has been found that the value of frame dragging obtains a maximum at, $ \\phi =\\frac{\\pi}{2}$ and a minimum at $ \\phi =\\frac{3 \\pi}{2}$.

  10. Socio-Pedagogical Complex as a Pedagogical Support Technology of Students' Social Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovaya, Victoriya V.; Simonova, Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the need of developing technological approaches to pedagogical support of students' social adaptation. The purpose of this paper is to position the technological sequence of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation in the activities of the socio-pedagogical complex. The…

  11. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daramola, Florence Olutunu; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Oyelekan, Oloyede Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the information and communication technology literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers out of which 360…

  12. Students' Technology Use and Its Effects on Peer Relationships, Academic Involvement, and Healthy Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jan M.; Dean, Laura A.; Cooper, Diane L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' technology use and its relationship with their psychosocial development. Previous research explored students' computer use in conjunction with their cognitive development. This study examined the effects of computer use and other technologies, such as instant messaging, handheld gaming devices,…

  13. A Quantitative Examination of User Experience as an Antecedent to Student Perception in Technology Acceptance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rory

    2013-01-01

    Internet-enabled mobile devices have increased the accessibility of learning content for students. Given the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing technology, a thorough understanding of the acceptance factors that impact a learner's intention to use mobile technology as an augment to their studies is warranted. Student acceptance of mobile…

  14. SERVQUAL-Based Measurement of Student Satisfaction with Classroom Instructional Technologies: A 2001 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleen, Betty; Shell, L. Wayne

    The researchers, using a variation of the SERVQUAL instrument, repeated a 1999 study to measure students' satisfaction with instructional technology tools used in their classrooms. Student satisfaction varied by course discipline, by instructional technology, by anticipated grade, and by frequency of use. Female respondents were less satisfied…

  15. Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies as a Predictor of Educational Stress on Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicumali, Ahmet; Arslan, Serhat; Demirtas, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between utilization of information and communication technologies and educational stress. Participants were 411 secondary school students. Educational Stress Scale and Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies Scale were used as measures. The relationships between students'…

  16. What Can Students Learn in an Extended Role-Play Simulation on Technology and Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In a small course on technology and society, students participated in an extended role-play simulation for two weeks. Each student played a different adult character in a fictional community, which faces technological decisions in three scenarios set in the near future. The three scenarios involved stem cell research, nanotechnology, and privacy.…

  17. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  18. Love in the Time of Facebook: How Technology Now Shapes Romantic Attachments in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    College counseling clinicians need to understand how students use technology to form, sustain, and end romantic attachments. Students now frequently incorporate aspects of these technologically based interactions, or mediated communications, into counseling sessions and often make important attributions based on them. Heavy daily use of a growing…

  19. Counseling Student Computer Competency Skills: Effects of Technology Course in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Yolanda V.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Bethea, James

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this article is to assess counseling student computer competency level as an effect of a one-credit hour introductory course in computer technology. Results indicate student computer competencies increased after completing the computer technology course in the following areas: ethics, assisting clients with internet searches,…

  20. The Relationship between Students' Exposure to Technology and Their Achievement in Science and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Erhan; Bulut, Okan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of information and communication technologies (ICT) on students' math and science achievement. Recently, ICT has been widely used in classrooms for teaching and learning purposes. Therefore, it is important to investigate how these technological developments affect students' performance at…

  1. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: Resources and Challenges Encountered by Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Dawn LaRae

    2012-01-01

    Assistive technology may be a solution for students with disabilities who are struggling to achieve academic growth; however, the consideration for assistive technology process is not prevalent in schools. The purpose of this qualitative study was to take an in-depth look at the processes and factors that teachers of students with disabilities…

  2. Use of Assistive Technology by Students with Visual Impairments: Findings from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stacy M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the use of assistive technology by students in the United States who are visually impaired through a secondary analysis of a nationally representative database. It found that the majority of students were not using assistive technology. Implications for interventions and potential changes in policy or practice are…

  3. Special Education Teachers' Use of Assistive Technology with Students Who Have Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Cynthia; Snell, Martha; Gansneder, Bruce; Dexter, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' integration of computer-based assistive technology has been linked to positive educational outcomes for students with disabilities. This study was conducted to identify factors that are predictive of integrating assistive technology into teaching practices among general and special education teachers of students with severe disabilities.…

  4. Technological Support and Problem-Based Learning as a Means of Formation of Student's Creative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakula, Sarma

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning and technology support for students in higher education investigates the new perspectives of education in connection with the change of life paradigm. The present research seeks to find out what study methods and technology support can be used for developing students' creative experience in the context of education for…

  5. A Phenomenographic Study of Greek Primary School Students' Representations Concerning Technology in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Christina; Tassios, Athanassios

    2007-01-01

    The present research investigated and studied students' representations about daily life technologies, in a prospect of studying technology in Greek primary education. In the research participated 60 Greek primary school students aged 9 to 12 years old. Research data were collected through semi-structured, personal, clinical-type interviews. Each…

  6. Student Perceptions of How Technology Impacts the Quality of Instruction and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Thomas L.; Lavin, Angeline M.; Korte, Leon

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a survey administered to students enrolled in selected business courses at a Midwestern university pertaining to technology use in the classroom. Students were asked how the moderate or extensive use of technology (such as PowerPoint) would impact the overall quality of a "hypothetical course with the same…

  7. Technology Enhanced Learning Environments for Closing the Gap in Student Achievement between Regions: Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Hasan; Delialioglu, Omer; Dennis, Alan; Duffy, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Student achievement gap between urban and suburban regions are a major issue in U.S. schools. Technology enhanced learning environments that support teaching and learning process with advanced technology may close this achievement gap. This paper examines the impact of student and school factors with an emphasis on schools' geographic location on…

  8. Enhancing Students' Interest in Science and Technology through Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Active Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Donna M.; Malloy, Alisha D.; Hollowell, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-nine rising high school 12th grade students participated in a 4-week summer program designed to increase their interest in science and technology. The program was a blend of hands-on biology, chemistry, and technology modules that addressed the global issue of obesity. Student groups developed websites to address obesity in one of five…

  9. Designing a Technology-Based Science Lesson: Student Teachers Grapple with an Authentic Problem of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Susan McAleenan; Wiebe, Eric N.

    2003-01-01

    This project used techniques from problem-based learning to aid students in developing a technology-based science lesson. In this case, the "problem" students were asked to solve, was that of combining curriculum knowledge and pedagogical skills to incorporate computer graphics animation technology within a science lesson and then teach the lesson…

  10. Exploring How Digital Media Technology Can Foster Saudi EFL Students' English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawil, Abdulmohsin

    2016-01-01

    Digital media technology has become an integral part of daily life for almost all young students, and for the majority of Saudi EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students. Digital media technology may not be limited to one or two kinds; it has various types such as software and programs, devices, application, websites, social media tools, etc.…

  11. Students' Age Difference of Confidence in Using Technology for Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2012-01-01

    Some past studies find that older students have more confidence in using technology for learning than younger students but some other studies find the opposite result. However, it is found that there are a few researches studying on the age difference in the perception of using technology for learning in Hong Kong. Therefore, the aim of the study…

  12. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  13. An active attitude control system for a drag sail satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Willem Herman; Jordaan, Hendrik Willem

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the development and simulation results of a full ADCS subsystem for the deOrbitSail drag sail mission. The deOrbitSail satellite was developed as part of an European FP7 collaboration research project. The satellite was launched and commissioning started on 10th July 2015. Various new actuators and sensors designed for this mission will be presented. The deOrbitSail satellite is a 3U CubeSat to deploy a 4 by 4 m drag sail from an initial 650 km circular polar low earth orbit. With an active attitude control system it will be shown that by maximising the drag force, the expected de-orbiting period from the initial altitude will be less than 50 days. A future application of this technology will be the use of small drag sails as low-cost devices to de-orbit LEO satellites, when they have reached their end of life, without having to use expensive propulsion systems. Simulation and Hardware-in-Loop experiments proved the feasibility of the proposed attitude control system. A magnetic-only control approach using a Y-Thomson spin, is used to detumble the 3U Cubesat with stowed sail and subsequently to 3-axis stabilise the satellite to be ready for the final deployment phase. Minituarised torquer rods, a nano-sized momentum wheel, attitude sensor hardware (magnetometer, sun, earth) developed for this phase will be presented. The final phase will be to deploy and 3-axis stabilise the drag sail normal to the satellite's velocity vector, using a combined Y-momentum wheel and magnetic controller. The design and performance improvements when using a 2-axis translation stage to adjust the sail centre-of-pressure to satellite centre-of-mass offset, will also be discussed, although for launch risk reasons this stage was not included in the final flight configuration. To accurately determine the drag sail's attitude during the sunlit part of the orbit, an accurate wide field of view dual sensor to measure both the sun and nadir vector direction was developed for

  14. Drag bias feedback for the analytic drag control entry guidance system. [for the space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The Analytic Drag Control (ADC) entry guidance has been developed and baselined for the space shuttle orbiter entry. A method is presented which corrects the orbiter entry guidance commanded bank angle for biases between navigated drag and guidance computed reference drag. This is accomplished by an integral feedback technique, which uses the drag bias information to adjust the difference between navigated and reference altitude rate used by the ADC guidance. The method improves the capability of the ADC guidance system by compensating for any error source which causes a bias between the navigated drag and reference drag profile. These errors include navigated altitude rate errors, atmosphere dispersions, and roll attitude deadband effects. A discussion of the method and results of digital computer entry simulations is presented.

  15. Student motivation in a high school science laboratory: The impact of computers and other technologies on young adolescent physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen Allan

    The impact of technology (including computers and probes, low friction carts, video camera, VCR's and electronic balances) on the motivation of adolescent science students was investigated using a naturalistic case study of college preparatory ninth grade physics classes at a comprehensive high school in the southeastern United States. The students were positively affected by the use of computer technology as compared to other "low tech" labs. The non-computer technologies had little motivational effect on the students. The most important motivational effect was the belief among the students that they could successfully operate the equipment and gather meaningful results. At times, the students spent more cognitive energy on performing the experiment than on learning the physics. This was especially true when microcomputer-based labs were used. When the technology led to results that were clear to the students and displayed in a manner that could be easily interpreted, they were generally receptive and motivated to persist at the task. Many students reported being especially motivated when a computer was used to gather the data because they "just liked computers." Furthermore, qualitative evidence suggested that they had learned the physics concept they were working on. This is in close agreement with the conceptual change model of learning in that students are most likely to change their prior conceptions when the new idea is plausible (the technology makes it so), intelligible (real time graphing, actual light rays), and fruitful (the new idea explains what they actually see). However, many of the microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) activities and "high tech" labs were too unstructured, leaving students bewildered, confused and unmotivated. To achieve maximum motivational effects from the technology, it was necessary to reduce the cognitive demand on the students so they could concentrate on the data gathered rather than the operation of the equipment.

  16. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  17. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  18. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A C Teixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  19. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  20. Drag sails for space debris mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Lourens; Lappas, Vaios; Erb, Sven

    2015-04-01

    The prudence for satellites to have a mitigation or deorbiting strategy has been brought about by the ever increasing amount of debris in Earth orbit. Drag augmentation is a potentially passive method for de-orbiting in LEO but its collision risk mitigation efficiency is sometimes underestimated by not taking all the relevant factors into account. This paper shows that using drag augmentation from a deployable drag-sail to de-orbit a satellite in LEO will lead to a reduction in collision risk. In order to support this finding, the models that are needed in order to evaluate the collision risk of a decaying object under drag conditions are presented. A comparison is performed between the simpler Area-Time-Product (ATP) and more precise collision risk analysis, and the effects that are overlooked in the simple ATP calculation are explained.

  1. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Using Cell Phone Technology in Undergraduate Science Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Pennington; Julia Paredes; Mai Yin Tsoi; Candace Timpte; Deborah Sauder; David Pursell

    2010-01-01

    Students of science traditionally make 3x5 flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flashcards viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback opportunities for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use computers, but they use their cell phones 24 hours a day. This report outlines these trends and an even more recent educational technology initiative, that of using...

  2. Teaching foreign languages to technical students by means of educational online technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia V.; Fibikh, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals new methods of effectiveness increase in teaching foreign languages to technical students using information and communication technologies and their practical implementation at the premises of the Foreign Languages Resource Center of Siberian State Aerospace University. Adoption of information and communication technologies to the educational process is based on students' independent language learning that encourages more productive development of language competences mastered by students and future specialists in a special area of technical knowledge as a whole.

  3. Can a Tablet Device Alter Undergraduate Science Students' Study Behavior and Use of Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P.; Ramsay, Luke; Chauhan, Vikesh

    2012-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating undergraduate biological sciences students' use of technology and computer devices for learning and the effect of providing students with a tablet device. A controlled study was conducted to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of a tablet device on students' use of…

  4. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Final Evaluation Report for 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    A study evaluated The Boeing Company's Student Internship Program for students enrolled in a manufacturing technology program. The programs in the Seattle (Washington) and Portland (Oregon) areas provided students with three progressive internship levels offered in the summers of grades 11, 12, and 13 (the first year of community college). The…

  5. Engineering Outreach: A Successful Initiative with Gifted Students in Science and Technology in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuen-Yan; Hui, Diane; Dickinson, Anthony R.; Chu, Dennis; Cheng, David Ki-Wai; Cheung, Edward; Ki, Wing-Hung; Lau, Wing-Hong; Wong, Jasper; Lo, Edward W. C.; Luk, Kwai-Man

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of engineering outreach is to attract prospective students to engineering education and the engineering profession. Gifted students, especially those identified as possessing unusually high abilities in science and technology, are especially promising students to attract to careers in engineering. It is critical to cultivate these…

  6. Technology: Student Animation Projects: An Avenue to Promote Creativity and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2014-01-01

    Using readily available technology, students of all ages can easily create impressive animated products. Animation allows educators to capitalize on the natural desire that students of all ages hold to tell stories and share their understanding of the world. In the course of planning their animations, students conduct research on topics, organize…

  7. Using Technology-Enhanced, Cooperative, Group-Project Learning for Student Comprehension and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Suhre, Cor; Hofman, Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning may improve students' motivation, understanding of course concepts, and academic performance. This study therefore enhanced a cooperative, group-project learning technique with technology resources to determine whether doing so improved students' deep learning and performance. A sample of 118 engineering students, randomly…

  8. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: A Legal Analysis of Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etscheidt, Susan Larson

    2016-01-01

    Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams are required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider a student's need for assistive technology (AT). Despite this legal requirement, AT supports are often not available to students with disabilities. Many students with disabilities and their families have addressed the…

  9. Assistive Technology Competencies of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: A Comparison of Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Smith, Derrick W.; Parker, Amy T.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas on their perceptions of a set of assistive technology competencies developed for teachers of students with visual impairments by Smith and colleagues (2009). Differences in opinion between practicing teachers of students with visual impairments and Smith's group of…

  10. The Scope of Assistive Technology in Learning Process of Students with Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Saira; Sajjad, Shahida

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the scope of assistive technology in learning process of students with blindness. The sample of this study included 56 students with blindness between the ages of 11-22 years from secondary level of education. These students were selected through convenient sampling from five special schools located in…

  11. Use of Reading Pen Assistive Technology to Accommodate Post-Secondary Students with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; McCallum, Elizabeth; Hennessey, Jenna; Lovelace, Temple; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2012-01-01

    Reading pens are a form of assistive technology that may be used to bypass weak word decoding and vocabulary skills of students with reading disabilities. Only two known studies have examined the effects of reading pens on the comprehension of school-aged students, and no known studies have been published regarding post-secondary students. The…

  12. Students Taking Charge: Inside the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulla, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Teachers and administrators who recognize the needs of today's society and students, and their impact on teaching and learning, can use this book to create student-centered classrooms that make technology a vital part of their lessons. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step guidelines, "Students Taking Charge" will help educators design…

  13. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  14. Assistive Technology Use by Students with LD in Postsecondary Education: A Case of Application before Investigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alana; Silvestri, Robert

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of students with Learning Disabilities (LD) are enrolling in postsecondary education (PSE). Assistive technology (AT) is often provided to these students to circumvent academic deficits. This article will focus on research at the PSE level and students with LD to (a) identify AT service delivery practices, (b) describe the…

  15. Technology: Student Animation Projects: An Avenue to Promote Creativity and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2014-01-01

    Using readily available technology, students of all ages can easily create impressive animated products. Animation allows educators to capitalize on the natural desire that students of all ages hold to tell stories and share their understanding of the world. In the course of planning their animations, students conduct research on topics, organize…

  16. Student Reactions to Classroom Management Technology: Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Moodle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Christina; Ackerman, David

    2015-01-01

    The authors look at student perceptions regarding the adoption and usage of Moodle. Self-efficacy theory and the Technology Acceptance Model were applied to understand student reactions to instructor implementation of classroom management software Moodle. They also looked at how the learning styles of students impacted their reactions to Moodle.…

  17. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  18. Assistive Technology for Students with Visual Impairments: In-Service Teacher Training and Its Relationship to Student Access and Usage across Academic Subject Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    Technology is used in almost every school and classroom today and motivates and intrigues students with vision. This same technology is often not accessible to students with visual impairments and blindness. Assistive technology must be used by students with visual impairments and blindness in order to access a computer, the Internet, and print…

  19. Integrated lift/drag controller for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, J. W.; Seckel, E.; Ellis, D. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for altering the lift/drag characteristics of powered aircraft to provide a safe means of glide path control includes a control device integrated for coordination action with the aircraft throttle. Such lift/drag alteration devices as spoilers, dive brakes, and the like are actuated by manual operation of a single lever coupled with the throttle for integrating, blending or coordinating power control. Improper operation of the controller is inhibited by safety mechanisms.

  20. Student Engagement and Completion in Precalculus Precalculus Mega Section: Efficiently Assisting Student Engagement and Completion with Communications and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusi, Rima; Portnoy, Arturo; Toro, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    The Precalculus Mega Section project was developed with the main purpose of improving the overall performance of the student body in Precalculus, an important gatekeeper course that affects student engagement and completion, with typical drop/failure rates of over 50 percent. Strategies such as integration of technology and additional practice…

  1. Student Engagement and Completion in Precalculus Precalculus Mega Section: Efficiently Assisting Student Engagement and Completion with Communications and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusi, Rima; Portnoy, Arturo; Toro, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    The Precalculus Mega Section project was developed with the main purpose of improving the overall performance of the student body in Precalculus, an important gatekeeper course that affects student engagement and completion, with typical drop/failure rates of over 50 percent. Strategies such as integration of technology and additional practice…

  2. Perceptions of the Effects of Clicker Technology on Student Learning and Engagement: A Study of Freshmen Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrion, Jenepher Lennox; Aceti, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    While technology--in the form of laptops and cellphones--may be the cause of much of the distraction in university and college classrooms, some, including the personal or classroom response system (PRS/CRS) or clicker, also present pedagogical opportunities to enhance student engagement. The current study explored the reactions of students to…

  3. Thermal lift generation and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekardan, Cem; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of the new technologies in low pressure environments such as Hyperloop and helicopters designed for Martian applications, understanding the aerodynamic behavior of airfoils in rarefied environments are becoming more crucial. In this paper, verification of rarefied ES-BGK solver and ideas such as prediction of the thermally induced lift and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics are investigated. Validation of the rarefied ES-BGK solver with Runge-Kutta discontinous Galerkin method with experiments in transonic regime with a Reynolds number of 73 showed that ES-BGK solver is the most suitable solver in near slip transonic regime. For the quantification of lift generation, A NACA 0012 airfoil is studied with a high temperature surface on the bottom for the lift creation for different Knudsen numbers. It was seen that for lower velocities, continuum solver under predicts the lift generation when the Knudsen number is 0.00129 due to local velocity gradients reaching slip regime although lift coefficient is higher with the Boltzmann ES-BGK solutions. In the second part, the feasibility of using thermal transpiration for drag reduction is studied. Initial study in drag reduction includes an application of a thermal gradient at the upper surface of a NACA 0012 airfoil near trailing edge at a 12-degree angle of attack and 5 Pa pressure. It was seen that drag is reduced by 4 percent and vortex shedding frequency is reduced due to asymmetry introduced in the flow due to temperature gradient causing reverse flow due to thermal transpiration phenomena.

  4. Bioinspired surfaces for turbulent drag reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Kevin B; Gose, James W; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-08-06

    In this review, we discuss how superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) can provide friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. Whereas biomimetic SHSs are known to reduce drag in laminar flow, turbulence adds many new challenges. We first provide an overview on designing SHSs, and how these surfaces can cause slip in the laminar regime. We then discuss recent studies evaluating drag on SHSs in turbulent flow, both computationally and experimentally. The effects of streamwise and spanwise slip for canonical, structured surfaces are well characterized by direct numerical simulations, and several experimental studies have validated these results. However, the complex and hierarchical textures of scalable SHSs that can be applied over large areas generate additional complications. Many studies on such surfaces have measured no drag reduction, or even a drag increase in turbulent flow. We discuss how surface wettability, roughness effects and some newly found scaling laws can help explain these varied results. Overall, we discuss how, to effectively reduce drag in turbulent flow, an SHS should have: preferentially streamwise-aligned features to enhance favourable slip, a capillary resistance of the order of megapascals, and a roughness no larger than 0.5, when non-dimensionalized by the viscous length scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  5. Educational technology for millennial dental hygiene students: a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Catherine R R; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that today's learners have changed and education must change as well since Millennial generation students expect technology to be used in their coursework. This study sought to determine what educational technology is being used in U.S. dental hygiene programs, what student and faculty perceptions are of the effectiveness of technology, and what barriers exist to implementing educational technology. A stratified random sample of 120 entry-level dental hygiene programs nationwide were invited to participate in a survey. Fourteen programs participated, yielding a pool of 415 potential individual participants; out of those, eighty-four student and thirty-eight faculty respondents were included in the analysis, a total of 122. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.05). Faculty and student respondents agreed on the effectiveness of educational technology in all areas except clickers and wikis. The faculty members tended to rate the effectiveness of educational technology higher than did the students. The greatest perceived barrier to implementing technology was technical difficulties. This study suggests that support services should be available to faculty and students to ensure successful implementation of technology. Dental hygiene educators have adopted many types of educational technology, but more data are needed to determine best practices.

  6. Examining Student Digital Artifacts during a Year-Long Technology Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Prisca M.; Frey, Chris; Dawson, Kara; Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    This study was situated within a year-long, statewide technology integration initiative designed to support technology integration within science, technology, engineering, and math classrooms. It examined the elements used in student artifacts in an attempt to investigate trends in digital artifact creation. Among several conclusions, this…

  7. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Student Use of Technology in K-12 Classrooms Using Path Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Dawson, Kara; Cavanaugh, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of teachers' characteristics, school characteristics, and contextual characteristics on classroom technology integration and teacher use of technology as mediators of student use of technology. A research-based path model was designed and tested based on data gathered from 732 teachers from…

  8. Mobile Learning as Alternative to Assistive Technology Devices for Special Needs Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaili, Jalal; Ibrahimi, El Houcine Ouazzani

    2017-01-01

    Assistive Technology (AT) revolutionized the process of learning for special needs students during the past three decades. Thanks to this technology, accessibility and educational inclusion became attainable more than any time in the history of special education. Meanwhile, assistive technology devices remain unreachable for a large number of…

  9. PhD Year 1 Students' Experience with the Educational Technology and Innovation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Moses Kumi; Mackin, Eva Esi

    2016-01-01

    The advent of information, communication and new technologies, globalisation and rising costs has prompted rethinking what we teach, how we teach and even where teaching and learning take place. The Educational Technology and Innovation Course (Adlt704) was designed to enable students to create, use and manage appropriate technological processes…

  10. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Student Use of Technology in K-12 Classrooms Using Path Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Dawson, Kara; Cavanaugh, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of teachers' characteristics, school characteristics, and contextual characteristics on classroom technology integration and teacher use of technology as mediators of student use of technology. A research-based path model was designed and tested based on data gathered from 732 teachers from…

  11. Faculty and Student Use of Technologies, User Productivity, and User Preference in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Alexander, Melody W.; Perreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila; Truell, Allen D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors surveyed faculty and students in Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited U.S. business colleges on their use of information technologies in distance education and their perceptions of the technologies' effect on productivity and technology preference. The authors collected data from 140 professors across the…

  12. Assessment of the Impact of Smart Board Technology System Use on Student Learning, Satisfaction, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Stuart H.; Boykin, Nancy J.; Tung, Wei Chih

    2011-01-01

    Literature on educational technology touts its potential for enhancing student outcomes such as learning, satisfaction, and performance. But are these benefits universal and do they apply to all applications and/or forms of educational technology? This study focuses on one such system, the Smart Board Technology System (SBTS) and the impact its…

  13. PhD Year 1 Students' Experience with the Educational Technology and Innovation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Moses Kumi; Mackin, Eva Esi

    2016-01-01

    The advent of information, communication and new technologies, globalisation and rising costs has prompted rethinking what we teach, how we teach and even where teaching and learning take place. The Educational Technology and Innovation Course (Adlt704) was designed to enable students to create, use and manage appropriate technological processes…

  14. Factors Influencing Agricultural Leadership Students' Behavioral Intentions: Examining the Potential Use of Mobile Technology in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Robert; Irby, Travis L.; Dooley, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is pervasive at institutions across the U.S. The study was framed with self-efficacy theory, self-directed learning theory, and the unified theory for acceptance and use of technology. The purpose of this study was to assess undergraduate students' behavioral intention towards mobile technology acceptance in agricultural…

  15. E-Book Acceptance among Undergraduate Students: A Look at the Moderating Role of Technology Innovativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngafeeson, Madison N.; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This paper utilizes the technology acceptance model (TAM) to uncover the moderating roles of technology innovativeness. A study of 158 undergraduate students revealed that the original TAM constructs and relationships were reliable, supported, and applicable in the measurement of e-book acceptance. Interestingly, personal technology innovativeness…

  16. Bio-replicated forming of the biomimetic drag-reducing surfaces in large area based on shark skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xin; ZHANG DeYuan; LI Xiang; LI YuanYue

    2008-01-01

    On the investigation of biomimetic drag-reducing surface, direct replication of the firm scarfskins on low-resistance creatures to form biomimetic drag-reducing surfaces with relatively vivid morphology relative to the living prototype is a new attempt of the bio-replicated forming technology. Taking shark skin as the bio-replication template, the hot embossing method was applied to the micro-replication of its outward morphology. Furthermore, the skins were jointed together to form the drag-reducing sur-face in large area. The results of the resistance measurements in a water tunnel according to the flat-plate sample pieces have shown that the biomimetic shark-skin coating fabricated by the bio-replicated forming method has significant drag reduction effect, and that the drag reduction effi-ciency reached 8.25% in the test conditions.

  17. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 104 and 106, spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  18. TECHNOLOGIES OF INITIATING STUDENTS INTO INDEPENDENT (SELF-GUIDED ACTIVITY IN SUPPLEMENTARY DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Abakumova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research in question investigates the technologies of initiating independent activity within the framework of distance learning and their psychological aspects. The authors’ classification of educational technologies of initiating students into independent cognitive activity is presented. Such technologies utilize various psychological mechanisms of exciting students’ cognitive interest, intensifying cognitive processes, developing independent activity skills, and, as a result, increase motivation for independent activity and learning on the whole. These include such types of technologies as developmental technologies, interactive technologies, technologies of information transfer, technologies of meaning-making initiation. The research of the attitude of distance learning educators to independent activity of students and the content of the academic courses were done at Moodle-based education programs. The findings show the differences in retention rate among distance learning educators whose competence in terms of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity varies. It’s emphasized that interactive lectures, videoconferences, audio-visual aids, interactive seminars, glossaries, interactive tests are considered the most efficient technologies in initiating students into independent (self-guided activity. The obtained results have made it possible to stress the developmental effect of distance learning technologies and the technologies of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity in various psychic spheres of students: cognitive, individual, emotional. We mention the changes in motivational sphere of students and their meaning-making activity. In the course of correct development of distance learning we notice the development of voluntary and nonvoluntary cognitive activity. A student starts actively participating in educational process, he becomes the creator of his own world.

  19. Validation of an instrument to measure students' motivation and self-regulation towards technology learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-05-01

    Background:Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose:The present study is to validate an instrument for assessing senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation towards technology learning. Sample:A total of 1822 Taiwanese senior high school students (1020 males and 802 females) responded to the newly developed instrument. Design and method:The Motivation and Self-regulation towards Technology Learning (MSRTL) instrument was developed based on the previous instruments measuring students' motivation and self-regulation towards science learning. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were utilized to investigate the structure of the items. Cronbach's alpha was applied for measuring the internal consistency of each scale. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of variance was used to examine gender differences. Results:Seven scales, including 'Technology learning self-efficacy,' 'Technology learning value,' 'Technology active learning strategies,' 'Technology learning environment stimulation,' 'Technology learning goal-orientation,' 'Technology learning self-regulation-triggering,' and 'Technology learning self-regulation-implementing' were confirmed for the MSRTL instrument. Moreover, the results also showed that male and female students did not present the same degree of preference in all of the scales. Conclusions:The MSRTL instrument composed of seven scales corresponding to 39 items was shown to be valid based on validity and reliability analyses. While male students tended to express more positive and active performance in the motivation scales, no gender differences were found in the self-regulation scales.

  20. Exploration and Remote Instrumentation by Students (ERIS): Video Documentation in Undergraduate Ocean Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, M.

    2016-12-01

    Success in the future ability to conduct global ocean research relies on our strategies to teach and train the next generation of ocean scientists. The mission of the Exploration and Remote Instrumentation by Students (ERIS) program at the University of Washington is to enhance undergraduate learning in the design and build process of advanced technologies. The ERIS program introduces the science of applied technology in oceanography through a series of courses that link the design, build, and maintenance of a student implemented underwater cabled observatory. We present a suggested template for a production method of how-to videos focused on capturing and communicating the design and build experience in ocean technology makerspaces. The application of this production method of videos produced by students, for students, creates structured learning opportunities and becomes an archive of online resources for future ocean technologists. Furthermore, video documentation enables students to link their participation in active learning experiences with skills in ocean science, technology and communication.

  1. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education.

  2. E-Learning Interactions, Information Technology Self Efficacy and Student Achievement at the University of Sharjah, UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulibdeh, Enas Said; Hassan, Sharifah Sariah Syed

    2011-01-01

    The purpose for this study is to validate a model of student interactions (student-content, student-instructor and student-student interactions and vicarious interaction), information technology self efficacy and student achievement. Investigation of the relationships was undertaken with structural equation modeling analyses, in a study with 250…

  3. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  4. Occupational therapy students' technological skills: Are 'generation Y' ready for 21st century practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Smith, Derek R; Warren-Forward, Helen; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of clients. 'Generation Y' are purported to be naturally technologically skilled as they have grown up in the digital age. The aim of this study was to explore one cohort of 'Generation Y' occupational therapy students' skills and confidence in the use of technologies relevant to contemporary practice. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a cohort of 274 students enrolled in an Australian undergraduate occupational therapy programme. A total of 173 (63%) students returned the survey. Those born prior to 1982 were removed from the data. This left 155 (56%) 'Generation Y' participants. Not all participants reported to be skilled in everyday technologies although most reported to be skilled in word, Internet and mobile technologies. Many reported a lack of skills in Web 2.0 (collaboration and sharing) technologies, creating and using media and gaming, as well as a lack of confidence in technologies relevant to practice, including assistive technology, specialist devices, specialist software and gaming. Overall, the results suggested that this group of 'Generation Y' students were not universally skilled in all areas of technology relevant to practice but appear to be skilled in technologies they use regularly. Recommendations are therefore made with view to integrating social networking, gaming, media sharing and assistive technology into undergraduate programmes to ensure that graduates have the requisite skills and confidence required for current and future practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. Exploring the technology readiness of nursing and medical students at a Canadian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caison, Amy L; Bulman, Donna; Pai, Shweta; Neville, Doreen

    2008-06-01

    Technology readiness is a well-established construct that refers to individuals' ability to embrace and adopt new technology. Given the increasing use of advanced technologies in the delivery of health care, this study uses the Technology Readiness Index (Parasuraman, 2000) to explore the technology readiness of nursing and medical students from the fall 2006 cohort at Memorial University of Newfoundland. The three major findings from this study are that (i) rural nursing students are more insecure with technology than their urban counterparts, (ii) male medical students score higher on innovation than their female counterparts and have a higher overall technology readiness attitude than female medical students, and (iii) medical students who are older than 25 have a negative technology readiness score whereas those under 25 had a positive score. These findings suggest health care professional schools would be well served to implement curricular changes designed to support the needs of rural students, women, and those entering school at a non-traditional age. In addition, patterns such as those observed in this study highlight areas of emphasis for current practitioners as health care organizations develop continuing education offerings for staff.

  6. Optoelectronic technology profiles: motivating and developing research skills in undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D. M.

    2009-06-01

    A case study is described of the redesign of an assessment task - the writing of an Optoelectronic Technology profile - to achieve improved outcomes in student education and capability development, in particular, research skills. Attention is drawn to the value of a formally scheduled discussion between teacher and student around controlling the scope of the profile via an appropriately constructed "brief", and the selection and evaluation of the reference resources to be used in completing the task. Student motivation is improved through "student publishing" and encouraging students to regard their technology profile as an example of their work that can be shown to potential employers, possibly as part of a portfolio. Students have the choice as to whether they will also use the technology profile task as a vehicle to develop teamwork experience and skills.

  7. Using Technology To Prepare All Students for Success in Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin

    This paper discusses uses of TI-73 graphing calculators for middle school mathematics students. It indicates that with the appropriate use of the TI-73, students can develop understanding about variables and basic concepts of algebra, and explore mathematical topics. Background on middle school students' difficulties with those subjects is…

  8. Fostering Students' Development of the Concept of Angles Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sue Ellen; Koyunkaya, Melike Yigit

    2017-01-01

    We have used "GeoGebra," a dynamic geometry software environment, to explore how Year 4 students understand definitions of angles. Seven students defined angle and then completed several activities adapted for the dynamic environment. Afterward, students again shared their definitions of angles. We found that even a short investigation…

  9. Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning: Technology for Improving Student Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stozhko, Natalia; Bortnik, Boris; Mironova, Ludmila; Tchernysheva, Albina; Podshivalova, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    The article studies a way of enhancing student cognition by using interdisciplinary project-based learning (IPBL) in a higher education institution. IPBL is a creative pedagogic approach allowing students of one area of specialisation to develop projects for students with different academic profiles. The application of this approach in the Ural…

  10. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  11. Millennial generation student nurses' perceptions of the impact of multiple technologies on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenery, Susan M; Walker, Marjorie; Sorensen, Elizabeth; Thompson, Rhonda; Kirklin, Dena; White, Robin; Ross, Carl

    2013-01-01

    To determine how millennial nursing students perceive the effects of instructional technology on their attentiveness, knowledge, critical thinking, and satisfaction. BACKGROUND Millennial learners develop critical thinking through experimentation, active participation, and multitasking with rapid shifts between technological devices. They desire immediate feedback. METHOD; A descriptive, longitudinal, anonymous survey design was used with a convenience sample of 108 sophomore, junior, and senior baccalaureate nursing students (participation rates 95 percent, winter, 85 percent, spring). Audience response, virtual learning, simulation, and computerized testing technologies were used. An investigator-designed instrument measured attentiveness, knowledge, critical thinking, and satisfaction (Cronbach's alphas 0.73, winter; 0.84, spring). Participants positively rated the audience response, virtual learning, and simulation instructional technologies on their class participation, learning, attention, and satisfaction. They strongly preferred computerized testing. Consistent with other studies, these students engaged positively with new teaching strategies using contemporary instructional technology. Faculty should consider using instructional technologies.

  12. Understanding technology use and constructivist strategies when addressing Saudi primary students' mathematics difficulties.

    OpenAIRE

    Alabdulaziz, M.; Higgins, S

    2017-01-01

    This paper will investigate the relationship between technology use and the use of constructivist strategies when addressing Saudi primary students' mathematics difficulties. Semi-structured interviews and observations were used for the purpose of this research, which were undertaken with three mathematics teachers from school A which used technology, and the other three from school B, which did not use technology. We found that technology can support constructivist approach when teaching and...

  13. NEEDS AND PROBLEMS OF THE SECOND YEAR ACCOUNTANCY STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURIAL TECHNOLOGY RIZAL TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia M. Arganda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the College of Business and Entrepreneurial Technology of the Rizal Technological University, so many student applicants would like to take the Accountancy course. Of those who were given the chance, however, only about forty percent (40% were able to qualify, reached the fifth level, and allowed to take the Certified Public Accountant Examinations, At the start, that is, during their first and second year, these students have good academic performance. Along the way, however, they failed to make it due to some problems they met and affected their studies. It is in this regard that this study was undertaken. It aimed to identify the problems met by the students which affect their studies and tried to identify the measures which may solve or minimize the problems and eventually helping them to graduate with the course Bachelor of Science in Accountancy, take the CPA Board Examinations and become Certified Public Accountant. The study which made use of the descriptive research method is very significant to the students, Rizal Technological University Administration, College of Business and Entrepreneurial Technology Professors, parents as well as to the community. It was undertaken in both Mandaluyong City and Pasig City campuses. The subjects of the study were the second year accountancy students majority of whom are female, 17 to 18 years of age with family income of P10, 000 and below per month and most of the respondents belonged to family of four (4 to six (6 members.

  14. Using technology-enhanced, cooperative, group-project learning for student comprehension and academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Suhre, Cor; Hofman, Adriaan

    2016-05-01

    Cooperative learning may improve students' motivation, understanding of course concepts, and academic performance. This study therefore enhanced a cooperative, group-project learning technique with technology resources to determine whether doing so improved students' deep learning and performance. A sample of 118 engineering students, randomly divided into two groups, participated in this study and provided data through questionnaires issued before and after the experiment. The results, obtained through analyses of variance and structural equation modelling, reveal that technology-enhanced, cooperative, group-project learning improves students' comprehension and academic performance.

  15. Using digital technologies to enhance chemistry students' understanding and representational skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette

    and reported on two laboratory based inquiry tasks using digital technologies. Data were collected using pre- and post-tests, student texts and interviews and classroom video-recording. Content analysis of student texts indicated that students were able to generate new knowledge and use multiple...... representations to make explanations on the molecular level. Student interviews and classroom video-recordings suggested that using digital resources to create multimodal texts promoted knowledge transformation and hence deeper reflection on the meaning of data and representations. The study has implications...... for inquiry learning and using digital technologies to enhance students’ understanding of chemistry on multiple levels....

  16. The Positive Effects of Technology on Teaching and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Technology is such a big part of the world of which we live. Many of the jobs that did not require technology use in years past do require the use of technology today. Many more homes have computers than in years past and increasing numbers of people know how to use them. Technology is being used by children and adults on a daily basis by way of…

  17. Adopting Technology: Using Student Qualitative Data and Gartner's Hype Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmeyer, Trent

    2014-01-01

    Technology is changing education. School leaders are charged with purchasing and leveraging technology to maximize an ever-changing landscape of teaching and learning. They have many factors to consider as they make decisions about what specific technologies to purchase for their schools. Gartner's Hype Cycle is an annually published report that…

  18. LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES FOR STUDENTS IN THE CLOUD ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana G. Lytvynova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the «flipped» learning and «Web Quest» technologies. The features of the «flipped» learning technology are generalized, as well as compared with traditional learning, clarified the benefits of the technology for teachers and students, described the features of the technology used by teacher and students, developed a teacher’s and student’s flow chart for preparation to the lesson, generalized control and motivation components for activating learning activities of students, found out that a component of cloud oriented learning environment (COLE – Lync (Skype Pro can be used to develop video clips and support «flipped» learning technology. The author defines the concept of «Web Quest» technology, generalizes the «Web Quest» structure components. In the article the functions, features of this technology, the types of problems that can be solved with the help of this technology, as well as «Web Quest» classification are presented. It has been found out that the cloud oriented learning environment gives all the possibilities for «Web Quest» technology implementation in teaching of different subjects of all branches of science. With the help of «flipped» technology training and «Web Quest» a number of important problems of education can be solved – providing the continuous communication intensive training beyond general educational establishment and activation of learning activities of students.

  19. The Effects of Technology Innovativeness and System Exposure on Student Acceptance of E-textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison N. Ngafeeson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efforts of educators in the last three decades have, among other things, focused on the use of information technology (IT in education. It has become commonplace to view information systems both as an effective carrier of course content as well as a cost-effective tool to improve student learning outcomes. One of such technologies is the e-book. Decision-makers in the education field need make sense of this technological transformation. However, despite the growing popularity of e-books in higher education, its adoption by students is yet to be crystalized. This study exploits the technology acceptance model (TAM framework to examine student acceptance of e-textbooks as “internally” impacted by technology innovativeness and “externally” influenced by system exposure. The results showed that students’ technology innovativeness is associated with student acceptance of e-textbooks and that system exposure was a strong moderator of the TAM relationships. The findings suggest that students’ openness to new technology, in general, is likely to positively affect the adoption of a specific new instructional technology. Additionally, system exposure was found to be a significant moderator of the TAM relationships. It is concluded that students’ technology innovativeness and system exposure must therefore be factored into instructional technology usage decision-making models.

  20. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  1. Drag Coefficient and Foam in Hurricane Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbraikh, E.; Shtemler, Y.

    2016-12-01

    he present study is motivated by recent findings of saturation and even decrease in the drag coefficient (capping) in hurricane conditions, which is accompanied by the production of a foam layer on the ocean surface. As it is difficult to expect at present a comprehensive numerical modeling of the drag coefficient saturation that is followed by wave breaking and foam production, there is no complete confidence and understanding of the saturation phenomenon. Our semi-empirical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, Cd , with the reference wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. The proposed model treats the efficient air-sea aerodynamic roughness length as a sum of two weighted aerodynamic roughness lengths for the foam-free and foam-covered conditions. On the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage,αf, combined with direct wind speed measurements in hurricane conditions, which provide the minimum of the effective drag coefficient, Cd for the sea covered with foam. The present model yields Cd10 versus U10 in fair agreement with that evaluated from both open-ocean and laboratory measurements of the vertical variation of mean wind speed in the range of U10 from low to hurricane speeds. The present approach opens opportunities for drag coefficient modeling in hurricane conditions and hurricane intensity estimation by the foam-coverage value using optical and radiometric measurements.

  2. INTELLIGENCE MOBILE AND DIGITAL BROADCASTING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT LEARNING FOR DISABILITIES STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settachai Chaisanit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Usage of mobile digital broadcasting technologies in education is the most important of required technologies to provide main goals in distance education. It offers learning and data accession opportunities to learners notwithstanding time and place. In academic education, it was found that one of the critical problem is the appreciate education tool for disabilities students. Students with special education have difficulties to develop cognitive abilities and acquire new knowledge. They could also need to improve their behavior, communication and relationships with their environment. The development of customizable and adaptable applications tailored to them provides many benefits as it helps mold the learning process to different cognitive, sensorial or mobility impairments. This reviewed paper defines mobile technologies universally designed devices and technology for learning, presents examples of how designed technology hardware and software applications promote increased learning to school and university settings to enhance learning outcomes of all students, including those with disabilities. The reviewed results found that application of the instrumental enrichment of mobile technologies universally designed devices and technology can have an effect in terms of anticipated effects and thus have a positive influence on both learning skills and results in school and university students with a learning disability. The students mainly appreciated the mobile devices and technology and optimistic approach to the learner and to possibilities of modification of their own learning style. The mobile device and technology provide students with options to access the content multiple times in different settings while using a variety of technology applications. The concluded results also challenged educators to rethink the nature of the disability students’ curriculum and empower them with the flexibility to serve a diverse population of learners.

  3. School, Family and Other Influences on Assistive Technology Use: Access and Challenges for Students with Visual Impairment in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Meng Ee; Cohen, Libby

    2011-01-01

    Assistive technologies are essential enablers for individuals with visual impairments, but although Singapore is technologically advanced, students with visual impairments are not yet full participants in this technological society. This study investigates the barriers and challenges to the use of assistive technologies by students with visual…

  4. Exploring assistive technology and post-school outcomes for students with severe disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C; Flanagan, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to understand the extent to which students with severe disabilities receive assistive technology in school and out-of-school, and the relationship between receipt of assistive technology in school and post-school outcomes for these students. This study was a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) from the USA. To analyze the data in this correlational study, researchers conducted frequency distributions, Chi Square Tests of Associations, significance tests and logistic regressions. The main results suggest (a) receipt of assistive technology in school varied greatly by disability identification; (b) receipt of assistive technology post-school also varied by disability identification, but receipt was generally lower; and (c) few statistically significant post-school outcome differences existed between students who received assistive technology and those who did not. An under-utilization of assistive technology exists in practice in the USA for students with severe disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation An under-utilization of assistive technology for secondary students and adults with severe disabilities likely exists. A need exists for improved collaboration between professionals in rehabilitation and professionals in schools to ensure continuation of needed services or aids, such as assistive technology. Additional research is needed to better understand the adult life (or post-school) outcomes of individuals with severe disabilities, factors from PK-12 schooling or post-school services that positively and negative impact those outcomes.

  5. Principlesand technology competence approach to formation of professional career students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Biskup

    2016-03-01

    In general, the article features acquired theoretical justification of career development of students in conjunction with practical mechanisms for achieving the appropriate level of career competence.

  6. Perceptions of the effects of clicker technology on student learning and engagement: a study of freshmen Chemistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenepher Lennox Terrion

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available While technology – in the form of laptops and cellphones – may be the cause of much of the distraction in university and college classrooms, some, including the personal or classroom response system (PRS/CRS or clicker, also present pedagogical opportunities to enhance student engagement. The current study explored the reactions of students to clicker implementation in a large, introductory chemistry class. During the final class of the semester, 200 students in an introductory chemistry class responded to an attitudinal and informational student survey using both Likert-type and non-Likert type questions to evaluate their perception of the implementation of the clickers and their impact on student learning and engagement. The results demonstrated that, when implemented effectively, clickers contribute to greater student engagement and, ultimately, an opportunity for professors to enact best practices in higher education pedagogy. This study points to the importance of effective pedagogy in making clickers worthwhile.

  7. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks...

  8. iPads: Intuitive Technology for 21st-Century Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for using iPad technology with young students. Various inexpensive apps are described that parents and educators will find useful. (Contains 9 figures.)

  9. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-01-01

    .... Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom...

  10. Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies.

  11. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Utilization of Information Technology (IT by Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rezaei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the aim of investigating factors affecting utilization of information technology by students of agriculture. A survey approach was used in this study and a questionnaire was developed to gather the data. The study population was postgraduate students (MS and PhD of economic and agricultural development faculty in Tehran University who were selected by applying random sampling technique. Sample size for students was 61 persons. Data was analyzed by using SPSS/WIN software. The results of the research indicated that there was a positive significant relationship between using of information technology by students and their age, average, prior experience, information technology skills, innovativeness, perceived ease of use, attitude and self-efficacy. The relationship between computer anxiety and using of IT was negative. Stepwise Regression Analysis showed that innovativeness and attitude predict 53.2 percent of variations of IT use by students.

  12. Lift and Drag Measurements of Superhydrophobic Hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Samrat; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    For several years, superhydrophobic surfaces which are chemically hydrophobic with micron or nanometer scale surface features have been considered for their ability to reduce drag and produce slip in microfluidic devices. More recently it has been demonstrated that superhydrophobic surfaces reduce friction coefficient in turbulent flows as well. In this talk, we will consider that modifying a hydrofoil's surface to make it superhydrophobic has on the resulting lift and drag measurements over a wide range of angles of attack. Experiments are conducted over the range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000hydrofoil is made superhydrophobic. The hydrofoils are coated Teflon that has been hot embossed with a 325grit stainless steel woven mesh to produce a regular pattern of microposts. In addition to fully superhydrophobic hydrofoils, selectively coated symmetrical hydrofoils will also be examined to study the effect that asymmetries in the surface properties can have on lift and drag. Partially funded by NSF CBET-1334962.

  13. Induce Drag Reduction of an Airplane Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Fazle Rabbi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the aerodynamic characteristics for aircraft wing model with and without slotted winglet. When an aircraft moves forward with a high speed then a small circulatory motion of air is created at the wingtip due to the pressure difference between the upper and lower surface of the wing is called vortices. This circulatory fluid tends to leak from lower to upper surface of wing which causes downward motion is called “downwash” and generates a component of the local lift force in the direction of the free stream called induced drag. Downwash causes reduction of lift and contribute induced drag to the total drag. Drag reduction for aerial vehicles has a range of positive ramifications: reduced fuel consumption, larger operational range, greater endurance and higher achievable speeds. An experimental study is conducted to examine the potentiality of slotted winglet for the reduction of induced drag, and for the improvement of lift coefficient without increasing the span of aircraft wing. The model composed of a swept wing built from NACA 0012 airfoil. The test conducted in subsonic wind tunnel of 1m×1m rectangular test section at flow speed 25m/s placing the wing without winglet, wing with winglet at 30° inclination, wing with winglet at 60° inclination, and wing with winglet at 70° inclination at angle of attack ranging from 0 to 16 degree. The test result shows 20- 25% reduction in drag coefficient and 10-20% increase in lift coefficient by using slotted winglet.

  14. Experimental Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient of Water Rockets by a Simple Free-Fall Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E. Arguelles-Diaz, K.; Fernandez-Oro, J.

    2009-01-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag…

  15. Blended Learning with Everyday Technologies to Activate Students' Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesisenaho, Mikko; Valtonen, Teemu; Kukkonen, Jari; Havu-Nuutinen, Sari; Hartikainen, Anu; Karkkainen, Sirpa

    2010-01-01

    Schools are facing challenges to meet the demands of the information society and the student generation of today. Not only are students carrying their mobile phones everywhere, they are also familiar with different online environments, especially social software. This situation can be seen both a challenge and a chance for schools, as mobile…

  16. Using Technology to Enhance Feedback to Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lenwood; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2016-01-01

    The importance of effective and efficient feedback is paramount during the student teaching experience. This experience is a vital component of many teacher preparation programs. During these limited experiences, supervisors deliver performance feedback that is designed to improve the way student teachers implement evidence-based practices and/or…

  17. EFL Students Use of Technology in the Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özad, Bahire Efe; Kutoglu, Ülfet

    2004-01-01

    English for Mass Communication is a course offered by the Faculty of Communication and Media Studies to the students studying at the Departments of Journalism, Radio, Television and Film, and Public Relations and Advertising in their sophomore year. Students taking this course are required to make a presentation at the end of the semester. In…

  18. Scientific Inquiry with Information Technologies: High School Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, Jazlin; Kaya, Osman Nafiz

    2007-01-01

    This initial study focused on high school students' experiences about their understanding of, and abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry, two foci emphasized by the National Science Education Standards in the strand on "science as inquiry". The research method consisted of Likert-scale survey with space provided for students' comments about…

  19. School Partnerships: Technology Rich Classrooms and the Student Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti; Hogan, Molly; Waffle, Julene; Samplaski, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Building upon an established relationship between a college and a local school district, this project formally designated a Partnership School, at which education students conduct field experience. In addition to providing these participating pre-service teachers (students) with a clinically rich experience through closer supervision by and…

  20. Student Use of Technology in Class: Engaged or Unplugged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Roche, Claire R.; Flanigan, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of discussion about the need for student engagement and a meaningful connection in the classroom. With the advent of cell phones, computers and the Internet, students are more connected to, and, at the same time, more disconnected from each other than ever before. We are living in the age of exponential…

  1. Minority Students Severely Underrepresented in Science, Technology Engineering and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovacek, Simeon P.; Whittinghill, Jonathan C.; Tucker, Susan; Rath, Kenneth A.; Peterfreund, Alan R.; Kuehn, Glenn D.; Reinke, Yvonne G.

    2011-01-01

    This study documents the system of funded interventions employed at three public universities to support minority students studying science and examines targeted students' career paths to discern the general efficacy of these interventions and other factors influencing success toward earning Ph.D.s. Interventions, including supplemental…

  2. Use of the Technological University Library by International Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marama, Ishaya D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of questionnaires and interviews for a study on the use of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Library (Nigeria) by international students. Problems faced by students are highlighted, including the language barrier, new services, and unfamiliar library terminology. (Author/LRW)

  3. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  4. Balancing acts: drag queens, gender and faith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Blum, Constance R

    2004-01-01

    While engaged in research on the same-sex marriage debate in mainline denominations, I interviewed 23 LGBT Christians, four of whom were drag queens. While it is not possible to generalize from such a small sample, the drag queens in this study insist on maintaining their identity as Christians despite the hegemonic discourse that renders faith and LGBT identities mutually exclusive. They developed innovative approaches to reconciling their gender and sexual identities with their spirituality. Their innovations are potentially liberating not just for them personally, but for LGBT people generally because they challenge Christianity's rigid dichotomies of gender and sexuality.

  5. New drag laws for flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Classical aerodynamic theory predicts that a steadily-moving wing experiences fluid forces proportional to the square of its speed. For bird and insect flight, however, there is currently no model for how drag is affected by flapping motions of the wings. By considering simple wings driven to oscillate while progressing through the air, we discover that flapping significantly changes the magnitude of drag and fundamentally alters its scaling with speed. These measurements motivate a new aerodynamic force law that could help to understand the free-flight dynamics, control, and stability of insects and flapping-wing robots.

  6. Nursing students' attitudes towards information and communication technology: an exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jae; Clarke, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a shortened version of the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health, in the investigation of nursing students with clinical placement experiences. Nurses and nursing students need to develop high levels of competency in information and communication technology. However, they encounter statistically significant barriers in the use of the technology. Although some instruments have been developed to measure factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards technology, the validity is questionable and few studies have been developed to test the attitudes of nursing students, in particular. A cross-sectional survey design was performed. The Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health was used to collect data from October 2012-December 2012. A panel of experts reviewed the content of the instrument and a pilot study was conducted. Following this, a total of 508 nursing students, who were engaged in clinical placements, were recruited from six universities in South Korea. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed and reliability and construct validity were assessed. The resulting instrument consisted of 19 items across four factors. Reliability of the four factors was acceptable and the validity was supported. The instrument was shown to be both valid and reliable for measuring nursing students' attitudes towards technology, thus aiding in the current understandings of this aspect. Through these measurements and understandings, nursing educators and students are able to be more reflexive of their attitudes and can thus seek to develop them positively. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. College students' use of communication technology with parents: comparisons between two cohorts in 2009 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Meagan A; Gentzler, Amy L; Morey, Jennifer N; Oberhauser, Ann M; Westerman, David

    2013-10-01

    Although communication technology is beneficial to maintain important close relationships, not all findings suggest that communication technology use between college students and their parents is indicative of positive adjustment or relational qualities. A study in 2009 found that only 24.2% of college students used a social networking site (SNS) to communicate with a parent, yet those students reported more loneliness, anxious attachment, and conflict with their parent (Gentzler et al., 2011 ). Because technology and trends in use change rapidly, we investigated a new cohort of college students 2 years later to determine if rates of using communication technology with parents and their links to student adjustment have changed. Comparisons between 2009 and 2011 samples indicated that in-person contact and telephone use did not vary across cohorts. However, texting and SNS use with parents became more common, and using e-mail with parents declined. Consistent with the 2009 data, students' phone use with parents was related to positive relationship qualities (satisfaction, intimacy, support, instrumental aid). In the new 2011 sample, e-mail was linked to aid. However, the present findings indicate students' SNS use with parents is no longer linked to maladaptive outcomes. The study highlights how quickly the use and implications of communication technology changes, and suggests that communication patterns may reflect broader psychosocial adjustment and parent-child dynamics.

  8. Effect of Middle School Students' Motivation to Learn Technology on Their Attitudes toward Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksoo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of motivation to learn technology, as perceived by South Korean middle school students, on their attitudes toward engineering. Using the instruments of Glynn et al. (2011) and Lee (2008), the study focused on eighth and ninth grade students in four middle schools located in South Korea's…

  9. Technologies and Second Language: Nigerian Students' Adaptive Strategies to Cope with Language Barrier in Northern Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elega, Adeola Abdulateef; Özad, Bahire Efe

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to investigate how Nigerian students in Northern Cyprus cope with language barrier and increase interactions with people of the host community beyond the classroom via utilizing technological adaptive strategies. In order to complete this study, a descriptive design based on a survey conducted among 238 Nigerian students studying…

  10. ICT Use: Educational Technology and Library and Information Science Students' Perspectives--An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Noa; Shonfeld, Miri

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to explore what factors influence students' ICT use and web technology competence. The objectives of this study are the following: (a) To what extent do certain elements of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory (DOI) explain students' ICT use, (b) To what extent do personality characteristics derived from the Big Five…

  11. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzler, John A.; Bensoy, Kevin D.; Siders, James. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study measured artistically gifted students' attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS) to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7-12) for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female,…

  12. Using Text Mining to Uncover Students' Technology-Related Problems in Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Because of their capacity to sift through large amounts of data, text mining and data mining are enabling higher education institutions to reveal valuable patterns in students' learning behaviours without having to resort to traditional survey methods. In an effort to uncover live video streaming (LVS) students' technology related-problems and to…

  13. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  14. A Low-Technology Strategy for Increasing Engagement of Students with Autism and Significant Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Christi; Basham, James; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2009-01-01

    Active engagement is critical to promote learning for students with autism. Although evidence-based strategies exist for promoting engagement for individual students with autism, there are few strategies designed for use with small groups. This study used an ABCAC design to assess the effects of a low-technology use strategy, namely interactive…

  15. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Evaluation Report (1994-95).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhua; Owens, Thomas R.

    An evaluation was conducted of the Boeing Company's summer internship program for students enrolled in a manufacturing technology program after grades 11, 12, and 13 (first year of community college). The evaluation included the following activities: a review of documents describing the internship structure, student selection process, and…

  16. Mathematics for Gifted Students in an Arts- and Technology-Rich Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George; Hughes, Janette; Cordy, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on a study of a short-term mathematics program for grade 7-8 gifted students that integrated open-ended mathematics tasks with the arts (poetry and drama) and with technology. The program was offered partially online and partially in a classroom setting. The study sought to investigate (a) students' perceptions of their…

  17. Information and Communication Technology Related Needs of College and University Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Asuncion, Jennison V.; Wolforth, Joan; Barile, Maria; Budd, Jillian; Martiniello, Natalie; Amsel, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore variables related to how well the information and communication technologies (ICTs) related needs of students with different disabilities are being met on campus at institutions of higher education, at home and in e-learning contexts. We also explore the disciplines and programmes pursued by students with different disabilities…

  18. Pedagogical Technology of Improving the Students' Viability Levels in the Process of Mastering Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Nadezhda; Ershova, Svetlana; Konovalenko, Tatiana; Kutsova, Elvira; Yurina, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The article points out that the process of mastering foreign language stimulates students' personal, professional and cultural growth, improving linguistic, communicative competences and viability levels. A proposed pedagogical technology of modeling different communicative situations has a serious synergetic potential for students' self organized…

  19. Students' Use of Personal Technologies in the University Classroom: Analysing the Perceptions of the Digital Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Debra; Schott, Nicole; Wykes, Timothy; Szeto, Justin; Kolpin, Samantha; Lopez, Carla; Smith, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Faculty frequently express concerns about students' personal use of information and communication technologies in today's university classrooms. As a requirement of a graduate research methodology course in a university in Ontario, Canada, the authors conducted qualitative research to gain an in-depth understanding of students' perceptions of this…

  20. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. Working Paper 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? The authors use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that…

  1. Tertiary Students' Perceptions and Use of Information Computer Technology for Language Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on some factors that influence a student's choice, perception and motivation to use computer technology for a speaking and a writing consultation service, based on interviews and student-teacher online discourse patterns. It also discusses the motivation behind the choices with reference to Deci and Ryan's self-determination…

  2. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 16078

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? We use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that document broad…

  3. Students' Use of Personal Technologies in the University Classroom: Analysing the Perceptions of the Digital Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Debra; Schott, Nicole; Wykes, Timothy; Szeto, Justin; Kolpin, Samantha; Lopez, Carla; Smith, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Faculty frequently express concerns about students' personal use of information and communication technologies in today's university classrooms. As a requirement of a graduate research methodology course in a university in Ontario, Canada, the authors conducted qualitative research to gain an in-depth understanding of students' perceptions of this…

  4. Technology Acceptance of Healthcare E-Learning Modules: A Study of Korean and Malaysian Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Mai; Park, Heykyung; Lee, Min-Jae; Soh, Jian-Yuan; Oh, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Educators today are moving towards transforming their teaching and learning methods from conventional teacher-centered approaches to student-centered learning approaches with the support of technology so as to better motivate students to participate and engage in their learning process. This study was developed as a joint collaborative effort…

  5. Effects of Multimedia Information Technology Integrated Multi-Sensory Instruction on Students' Learning Motivation and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung-Ju; Tai, Yu-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Under the waves of the Internet and the trend of era, information technology is a door connecting to the world to generate the multiplier effect of learning. Students' learning should not be regarded as the tool to cope with school examinations. The frequent contact with computers, networks, and relevant information allow students enjoying the…

  6. Students' Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported by Dynamic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Erhan; Çakir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and to examine students' views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. Some 36 students who took an Object Oriented Programming I-II course at the department of computer…

  7. Using Interactive Technology to Support Students' Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Keisha; Linn, Marcia C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we examine middle school students' understanding of the greenhouse effect and global warming. We designed and refined a technology-enhanced curriculum module called "Global Warming: Virtual Earth". In the module activities, students conduct virtual experiments with a visualization of the greenhouse effect. They analyze data and draw…

  8. Emerging Technologies Acceptance in Online Tutorials: Tutors' and Students' Behavior Intentions in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Adhi

    2014-01-01

    Tutors' and students' intentions to use emerging technologies (ETs) in e-learning systems in higher education institutions are a central concern of researchers, academicians, and practitioners. However, tutors' and students' intentions to use ETs in e-learning systems in distance learning are relatively low. The goal of the study, developed in…

  9. Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: A National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Ajuwon, Paul M.; Smith, Derrick W.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Parker, Amy T.; Okungu, Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: For practicing teachers of students with visual impairments, assistive technology has assumed an important role in the education of their students' assessment and learning of content. Little research has addressed this area; therefore, the purpose of the study presented here was to identify the teachers' self-reported possession of…

  10. Students' Satisfaction and Valuation of Web-Based Lecture Recording Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplin, Ross H.; Low, Lee Hun; Brown, Alistair M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores students' satisfaction and valuation of web-based lecture recording technologies (WBLT) that enable students to download recordings of lectures they could not attend or wish to review for revision purposes. The study was undertaken among undergraduates and postgraduates in accounting at an Australian university. In addition to…

  11. Capitalizing on Mobile Technology to Support Healthy Eating in Ethnic Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F.; Pernal, Wendy; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shiyko, Mariya; Intille, Stephen; Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Participants: Forty-three African American and Hispanic female students participated in a 3-week intervention between January and May 2013. Methods: Participants photographed their meals using their smart…

  12. Comparison of Digital Technology Competencies among Mexican and Spanish Secondary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Salazar, Omar; Angulo-Armenta, Joel; García-López, Imelda; Navarro-Ibarra, Lizzeth

    2016-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are tools to be used to support educational processes and students have access to them more and more every day. However this does not assure the appropriate use of these tools. That is why the objective of the present study is to identify the level of competency in the use of ICT of students in…

  13. Effects of Mathematics Innovation and Technology on Students Performance in Open and Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Oginni 'Niyi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of mathematics innovation and technology on students' academic performance in open and distance learning. Quasi -- experimental research design was adopted for the study. The population for the study consisted of all the 200 level primary education students at the National Open University of Nigeria (Ekiti and…

  14. Using Interactive Technology to Support Students' Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Keisha; Linn, Marcia C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we examine middle school students' understanding of the greenhouse effect and global warming. We designed and refined a technology-enhanced curriculum module called "Global Warming: Virtual Earth". In the module activities, students conduct virtual experiments with a visualization of the greenhouse effect. They analyze data and draw…

  15. Using Mobile Apps to Entice General Education Students into Technology Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2013-01-01

    It is of national importance to increase the number of college students pursuing degrees in information systems/information technology (IT/IS) subjects. The primary focus at many institutions is renovating or enhancing existing IT/IS programs and the target audience is the students who have selected to major in IT/IS subjects. This paper looks at…

  16. Using Text Mining to Uncover Students' Technology-Related Problems in Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Because of their capacity to sift through large amounts of data, text mining and data mining are enabling higher education institutions to reveal valuable patterns in students' learning behaviours without having to resort to traditional survey methods. In an effort to uncover live video streaming (LVS) students' technology related-problems and to…

  17. A Needs Assessment of the Medical Laboratory Technology Students at New York City Technical College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Ranjani

    A study examined the needs of medical laboratory technology students at New York City Technical College. The nominal group technique (which involves silent generation of ideas in writing, round-robin feedback, and individual voting on priority ideas) was used to assess the academic and personal needs of 20 students. The following seven significant…

  18. Business Students' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Satisfaction with Interactive Technology: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline Kilsheimer; Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors modeled the relationships between students' perceptions of interactive technology in terms of whether it helps them pay more attention and be better prepared in a Consumer Behavior course and their attitude toward and satisfaction with it. The results suggest that students who feel they pay more attention due to the use of Interactive…

  19. Enhancing Self-Directed Learning through Educational Technology: When Students Resist the Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlind, Gerlese S.; Trevitt, A. Chris

    1999-01-01

    Discusses why the introduction of new technologies (or other educational innovations) as a means to greater learner autonomy is likely to produce some student resistance. Considers factors involved in determining the strength of resistance, and ways teachers can assist students to recognize and overcome associated problems. Presents the authors'…

  20. Characteristics of the Creative Development Technologies Applying during the Work with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinitsyna, Anastasiya Vyacheslavovna; Nikitin, Oleg Denisovich; Boyakova, Ekaterina Vyacheslavovna

    2016-01-01

    Present article explores the characteristics of the influence of creative influence technologies for school and college students on their professional and personal self-identification. The aim of the study is students' creative development, which represents the process of integration of mental, emotional and physical personality components, which…

  1. Technology and Student Learning: Toward a Learner-Centered Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Onchwari, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    There is need to reform teacher education programs through the creation of active learning environments that support and improve the depth and scope of student learning. Specifically, teachers should provide intellectually powerful, learner-centered, and technology-rich environments for students without undermining sound pedagogical practices.…

  2. Seventh Grade Students' Perceptions of Using Concept Cartoons in Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ören, Fatma Sasmaz; Meriç, Gülçin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficiency of use of concept cartoons in elementary school 7th grade students Science and Technology course according to students' perceptions. In terms of this aim, the unit of "Force and Motion" has been taught by concept cartoons and at the end of this period, semi-structured interviews were…

  3. Technology and the Unseen World of Gifted Students: Social Emotional Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.

    2004-01-01

    The social and emotional development of gifted students can be influenced by many factors. Genetics, experiences, learning, family values, perceptions, and interactions all contribute to the development of gifted children. Under the heading of experiences is students? use of computers. The potential effects of using these technologies is…

  4. Capitalizing on Mobile Technology to Support Healthy Eating in Ethnic Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F.; Pernal, Wendy; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shiyko, Mariya; Intille, Stephen; Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Participants: Forty-three African American and Hispanic female students participated in a 3-week intervention between January and May 2013. Methods: Participants photographed their meals using their smart…

  5. Connecting Points: Teacher Decision-Making About Student Data-Collection Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuger, Alice; Rawls, Greg

    1998-09-01

    For today's classroom teacher, faced with the prospect of selecting and using data collection technology, a number of questions are emerging, including: 1) Why should my students use this technology? 2) Is the use of this technology appropriate both pedagogically and developmentally? 3) Will the technology persist? 4) Is the use of technology justifiable, given the investment of time (and money) to prepare for its use? 5) How do I choose the type of data-collection technology to use with my students? The article illustrates issues to be considered when addressing these questions. A learner-centered rationale for the use of technology in the science classroom is given. Appropriateness is discussed in terms of standards-driven curricula. Regarding the `persistence' of the technology, a `reciprocal evolution' is suggested, with educator use dictating in part the actual development of new technology. Justifiable and proper use are contrasted. Finally, a comparison is made between various types of data-collection technologies. Teachers and school staff are encouraged to not consider one as `superior' to another, but rather to select carefully based on the educational needs of their students.

  6. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  7. Effects of turbulence on the drag force on a golf ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the drag force on a golf ball dropped vertically into a tank of water. As observed previously in air, the drag coefficient drops sharply when the flow becomes turbulent. The experiment would be suitable for undergraduate students since it can be undertaken at low ball speeds and since the effects of turbulence are easily observed on video film. A modified golf ball was used to show how a ball with a smooth and a rough side, such as a cricket ball, is subject to a side force when the ball surface itself is asymmetrical in the transverse direction.

  8. Exploring Teachers' Use of Technology in Classrooms of Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Mayra C.; Cowan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results of an investigation that documents teachers' perceptions of the contribution of technology use in classrooms of bilingual learners. Study questions asked how teachers perceive teacher-made digital movies impact learning, and what situational factors delimit technology infusion. Data gathered in focus groups and…

  9. Using Technology in Undergraduate Admission: A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbeck, Robin; Fodrey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The relationship that currently exists between undergraduate admission, technology and the Millennial generation continues to be an area of constant change. As technology trends come-and-go and resources continue to be limited, what are colleges and universities doing to ensure they are being as effective and efficient as possible when it comes to…

  10. Use of information and communication technology among dental students at the University of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Lamis D; Baqain, Zaid H

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current knowledge, skills, and opinions of undergraduate dental students at the University of Jordan with respect to information communication technology (ICT). Dental students from the second, third, fourth, and fifth years were asked to complete a questionnaire presented in a lecture at the end of the second semester in the 2002-03 academic year. The response rate was 81 percent. Besides free and unlimited access to computers at the school of dentistry, 74 percent of the students had access to computers at home. However, 44 percent did not use a computer regularly. Male students were more regular and longer users of computers than females (pinformation technology (IT) skills. More males felt competent in basic IT skills than did females (psources other than at the university. The main educational use of computers was accessing the Internet, word processing, multimedia, presentations, Medline search, and data management. More clinical students felt competent in word-processing skills (pinformation obtained from the Internet. Most students (90 percent) used email. Most students (83 percent) supported the idea of placing lectures on the web, and 61.2 percent indicated that this would not influence lecture attendance. Students used the Internet more for personal reasons than for the study of dentistry. More clinical students used the Internet for dentistry than preclinical students (pICT among Jordanian students remains low.

  11. Teaching Engineering Statistics with Technology, Group Learning, Contextual Projects, Simulation Models and Student Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses our teaching approach in graduate level Engineering Statistics. It is based on the use of modern technology, learning groups, contextual projects, simulation models, and statistical and simulation software to entice student motivation. The use of technology to facilitate group projects and presentations, and to generate,…

  12. Technology Use in ESL: An Investigation of Students' Experiences and the Implications for Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Ekaterina

    2010-01-01

    In Australia, information and communication technologies (ICT) are a significant element of a multicultural and multilingual society. However, some people (in particular, international students, immigrants, refugees) may experience many challenges because they use technology in English as their second language (ESL) and in a new sociocultural…

  13. Hybrid Spaces and Hyphenated Musicians: Secondary Students' Musical Engagement in a Songwriting and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    This case study investigates how secondary students (three individuals and three groups) engaged with music and acted as musicians in a Songwriting and Technology Class (STC), a course involving the creation, performance, recording and production of original music with instruments and music technology. The following research question guided the…

  14. The Attitudes of Physical Education and Sport Students towards Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Zekeriya

    2012-01-01

    Studies that examine the attitudes toward information and communication technologies (ICT) among physical education and sport students, pre-service teachers and teachers are fairly limited, even though the investments in information and communication technologies at schools and universities have reached an efficient level. This study investigates…

  15. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  16. The impact of a technology-rich intervention on grade 7 students' skills in initial algebra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel - Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a classroom experiment on the use of digital technology in initial algebra. Indonesian grade seven students of 12-13 year-old took part in a four session teaching sequence on beginning algebra enriched with digital technology, and in particular applets embedded in the Digital Ma

  17. Technology Integration: Mobile Devices (iPods), Constructivist Pedagogy, and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Pearson, Donna; Smart, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Although mobile technology is still evolving with most mobile devices supporting numerous communications and technology standards, there are currently very few applications of these devices to support teaching and learning activities. Integrated appropriately, mobile devices could help students acquire the skills needed to survive in a complex,…

  18. Real-Time Assessment of Problem-Solving of Physics Students Using Computer-Based Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Tolga

    2012-01-01

    The change in students' problem solving ability in upper-level course through the application of a technological interactive environment--Tablet PC running InkSurvey--was investigated in present study. Tablet PC/InkSurvey interactive technology allowing the instructor to receive real-time formative assessment as the class works through the problem…

  19. How Are Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges Putting Technology to Work for Their Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, A. Robert; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In these four technology-related articles, Robert DeHart examines uses of satellite technology; Jack Pirkey describes televised instruction at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas); Baxter Hood focuses on occupational curriculum development at York Technical College (South Carolina); and Richard Schinoff considers computer-based student services…

  20. Improving Science Student Teachers' Self-Perceptions of Fluency with Innovative Technologies and Scientific Inquiry Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Özsevgeç, Tuncay; Küçük, Zeynel; Artun, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of "Environmental Chemistry" elective course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry (TESI) model on senior science student teachers' (SSSTs) self-perceptions of fluency with innovative technologies (InT) and scientific inquiry abilities. The study was conducted with 117 SSSTs (68…

  1. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  2. The Impact of a Geospatial Technology-Supported Energy Curriculum on Middle School Students' Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulo, Violet; Bodzin, Alec

    2013-01-01

    Geospatial technologies are increasingly being integrated in science classrooms to foster learning. This study examined whether a Web-enhanced science inquiry curriculum supported by geospatial technologies promoted urban middle school students' understanding of energy concepts. The participants included one science teacher and 108 eighth-grade…

  3. Improving Science Student Teachers' Self-Perceptions of Fluency with Innovative Technologies and Scientific Inquiry Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Özsevgeç, Tuncay; Küçük, Zeynel; Artun, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of "Environmental Chemistry" elective course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry (TESI) model on senior science student teachers' (SSSTs) self-perceptions of fluency with innovative technologies (InT) and scientific inquiry abilities. The study was conducted with 117 SSSTs (68…

  4. Expanding Horizons for Students with Dyslexia in the 21st Century: Universal Design and Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gavin; Strnadova, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of mobile technology in supporting people with dyslexia within the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning. The authors discuss how students with dyslexia can use mobile technology to address a diverse range of academic needs (such as reading, composing text, notetaking, metacognition and studying…

  5. Community Colleges in the Information Age: Gains Associated with Students' Use of Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bodi; Horn, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Computer literacy is increasingly important in higher education, and many educational technology experts propose a more prominent integration of technology into pedagogy. Empirical evidence is needed to support these theories. This study examined community college students planning to transfer to 4-year universities and estimated the relationship…

  6. Lecture Capture Technology and Student Performance in an Operations Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Thomas W.; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Lecture capture technologies (LCT) such as Echo360, Mediasite, and Tegrity have become very popular in recent years. Many studies have shown that students favor the use of such technology, but relatively little research has studied the impact of LCT on learning. This article examines two research questions: (1) whether the use of LCT actually…

  7. The Effect of Technology on Students' Opinions about Authentic Learning Activities in Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Hilal; Dogan, Alev; Uluay, Gulsah

    2017-01-01

    Today, most of the researchers have agreed on the importance of classroom environment where students responsible of their own learning. It is important to use modern learning methods with technology to reach this aim in courses. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of using Technology in science courses to investigate 7th…

  8. Urban Adolescent Students and Technology: Access, Use and Interest in Learning Language and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents today have vastly different opportunities to learn and process information via pervasive digital technologies and social media. However, there is scant literature on the impact of these technologies on urban adolescents with lower socioeconomic status. This study of 531 urban students in grades 6-8 used a self-reported survey to…

  9. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmeo, Marilyn L.; Nimo, Erika Mae A.; Pagal, Aubrey M.; Puga, Stephanie C.; ArisDafQuiño; Sanwen, Jaleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study's focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53…

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  11. Technology Readiness, Internet Self-Efficacy and Computing Experience of Professional Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to assess the state of technology readiness of professional accounting students in Malaysia, to examine their level of internet self-efficacy, to assess their prior computing experience, and to explore if they are satisfied with the professional course that they are pursuing in improving their technology skills.…

  12. Assistive Technology for Students with Visual Impairments: Challenges and Needs in Teachers' Preparation Programs and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Parker, Amy T.; Smith, Derrick W.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of 165 teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas to examine their perceptions of their knowledge of assistive technology. The results showed that they had significant deficits in knowledge in 55 (74.32%) of the 74 assistive technology competencies that were examined and that 57.5% of them lacked…

  13. Introduction of 3D Printing Technology in the Classroom for Visually Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Wonjin; I, Jang Hee; Harianto, Rachel Ananda; So, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hyebin; Lee, Heon Ju; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigate how 3D printing technology could be utilized for instructional materials that allow visually impaired students to have full access to high-quality instruction in history class. Researchers from the 3D Printing Group of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) provided the Seoul National School for the Blind with…

  14. Lecture Capture Technology and Student Performance in an Operations Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Thomas W.; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Lecture capture technologies (LCT) such as Echo360, Mediasite, and Tegrity have become very popular in recent years. Many studies have shown that students favor the use of such technology, but relatively little research has studied the impact of LCT on learning. This article examines two research questions: (1) whether the use of LCT actually…

  15. Teaching Engineering Statistics with Technology, Group Learning, Contextual Projects, Simulation Models and Student Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses our teaching approach in graduate level Engineering Statistics. It is based on the use of modern technology, learning groups, contextual projects, simulation models, and statistical and simulation software to entice student motivation. The use of technology to facilitate group projects and presentations, and to generate,…

  16. The Attitudes of Physical Education and Sport Students towards Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Zekeriya

    2012-01-01

    Studies that examine the attitudes toward information and communication technologies (ICT) among physical education and sport students, pre-service teachers and teachers are fairly limited, even though the investments in information and communication technologies at schools and universities have reached an efficient level. This study investigates…

  17. Expanding Horizons for Students with Dyslexia in the 21st Century: Universal Design and Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gavin; Strnadova, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of mobile technology in supporting people with dyslexia within the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning. The authors discuss how students with dyslexia can use mobile technology to address a diverse range of academic needs (such as reading, composing text, notetaking, metacognition and studying…

  18. The Effects of Technology Innovativeness and System Exposure on Student Acceptance of E-Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngafeeson, Madison N.; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of educators in the last three decades have, among other things, focused on the use of information technology (IT) in education. It has become commonplace to view information systems both as an effective carrier of course content as well as a cost-effective tool to improve student learning outcomes. One of such technologies is the…

  19. Measuring Student Attitude and Knowledge in Technology-Rich Biology Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incantalupo, Lisa; Treagust, David F.; Koul, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    The use of technology in schools is now ubiquitous, but the effectiveness on the learning environment has mixed results. This paper describes the development and validation of an instrument to measure students' attitudes toward and knowledge of technology with the aim of investigating any differences based on gender after a course where the…

  20. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  1. When Education, Media, and Technology Converge, What Do Latino/a Students Gain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Dolores Valencia

    2003-01-01

    Research suggests that Latino students' success in college is closely linked to the interpersonal relationships they experience with faculty and staff. However, the convergence of technology, media, and education promises less rather than more of these types of interactions. Relevant research is reviewed on the growth of technology-based…

  2. Experience of Integrating Various Technological Tools into the Study and Future Teaching of Mathematics Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Dvora; Gurevich-Leibman, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents our experience of integrating technological tools into our mathematics teaching (in both disciplinary and didactic courses) for student-teachers. In the first cycle of our study, a variety of technological tools were used (e.g., dynamic software, hypertexts, video and applets) in teaching two disciplinary mathematics courses.…

  3. Modeling Computer Usage Intentions of Tertiary Students in a Developing Country through the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afari-Kumah, Eben; Achampong, Akwasi Kyere

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to examine the computer usage intentions of Ghanaian Tertiary Students. The Technology Acceptance Model was adopted as the theoretical framework to ascertain whether it could help explain behavioral intentions of individuals to accept and use technology. Factor analysis was used to assess the construct validity of the initial…

  4. Exploring Student Students’ Attitudes and Beliefs Towards E-Portfolios and Technology in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma TUR

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on student teachers’ attitude towards technology in education and e-portfolio processes. Attitude is closely related to teachers’ beliefs and the later have been defined as second-order barriers. While an important effort has been made to overcome first-order barrier such as resources, training and support, it cannot be observed that technology has been successfully introduced in education. Therefore, second-order barriers such as attitudes and beliefs are being considered nowadays in order to address the lack of innovative use of technology by teachers. It has been argued that the introduction of technology has to be directed towards the empowerment of cognitive and high-level thinking skills and has to be used based on student-centred approaches. Building e-portfolios and helping students which grow and curate their own Personal Learning Environments (PLE are two approaches to go beyond technology-centered models. E-Portfolios are viewed as part of students’ PLE so social media are used to enhance both e-portfolio processes and students’ PLEs. The research is based on a survey in four groups of students at the local branch in Ibiza of the University of the Balearic Islands. The participants have previously built their e-portfolios with Web 2.0 tools during one semester. Students are asked to document their learning weekly and reflect on the change experienced in the way they think about educational issues. Students are also asked to use new tools and social media services to give evidence of their own learning. The survey is based on a Likert scale so as to be able to analyse the students’ attitude and beliefs towards their e-portfolio and technology in education. The results show that a generally positive attitude is developed by students. Conclusions highlight the slight difference in student teachers’ attitude between technology and specific e-portfolio processes.

  5. Physics Learning Achievement Study: Projectile, using Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students

    OpenAIRE

    hutem, Artit -

    2013-01-01

    The propose of this study is to study Physics Learning Achievement, projectile motion, using the Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students, comparing with Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students who study the projectile motion experiment set. The samples are Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University Technology students, studying in the first semester of academic year 2011, consistin...

  6. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn L. Balmeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study’s focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53 teachers employed in the special education schools in Baguio City, who were to determine the availability and effectiveness of technology in their schools and the problems encountered in the integration of technologies. Results indicate that availability and effectiveness of technologies are at limited level and that there are problems encountered in technology integration. This is significant for the achievement of the aim of students with special learning needs for they would be guided appropriately in the development of their skills with the challenges of educational attainment and life itself

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of personal response system technology on millennial student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Mary K; Hunter Revell, Susan M

    2011-08-01

    As nurse educators, we must explore new technologies that capitalize on the characteristics of millennial learners. One such technology, the personal response system (PRS), is an effective way to promote active learning and increase comprehension. Few nursing studies have examined the benefits of PRS technology on student outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PRS technology on learning outcomes in two sections of an undergraduate nursing research course. A crossover design compared class quiz averages between and within groups. Findings related to between and within class quiz scores were mixed, whereas the effectiveness of in-class PRS questions on paper-and-pencil quiz scores and PRS-targeted quiz items was significant. Knowledge gained from this study can be used to enhance our ability to actively engage our technologically savvy undergraduate students. By threading technology into the undergraduate curriculum, learning outcomes may be improved. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Offset of a Drag-Free Sensor from the Center of Gravity of Its Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott R.

    2003-01-01

    The drag-free satellite is one that encloses a proof mass, shielding it from atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure (SRP). By sensing the location of the proof mass in the body and using thrusters to force the spacecraft to follow the proof mass in a closed-loop fashion, the effects of drag and SRP may be eliminated from the spacecraft orbit. Thus, several benefits may be gained, including improved ephemeris propagation and reduced operational costs. The package including the proof mass and the location sensing equipment may be considered as a single sensor; if generalized, such a sensor could be manufactured and used more easily in satellite designs, similar to how current missions use, for example, rate gyros and magnetometers. The flight heritage of the technology has been such that the proof mass sensor is a primary facet of the mission, allowing it to dominate design considerations. In particular, this paper discusses the effects that may be expected if a generalized drag-free sensor is placed some distance away from the spacecraft center of gravity. The proof mass will follow a given gravitational orbit, and a separation from the spacecraft center of gravity places the spacecraft itself in a different orbit from the proof mass, requiring additional fuel just to maintain function of the drag- free sensor. Conclusions include some guiding principles for determining whether certain mission characteristics may restrict or preclude the use of drag-free sensors for that mission. These principles may be used both by mission planners considering drag-free missions and by hardware designers considering or pursuing the development of such generalized sensors.

  9. Judicial civil procedure dragging out in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rrustem Qehaja

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article tends to deal with one of the most worrying issues in the judicial system of Kosovo the problem of judicial civil procedure dragging out. The article analyses the reasons of these dragging outs of the judicial civil procedure focusing on the context of one of the basic procedural principles in civil procedure-the principle of economy or efficiency in the courts. Dragging out of civil procedure in Kosovo has put in question not only the basic principles of civil procedure, but it also challenges the general principles related to human rights and freedoms sanctioned not only by the highest legal act of the country, but also with international treaties. The article tends to give a reflection to the most important reasons that effect and influence in these dragging outs of civil procedure, as well as, at the same time aims to give the necessary alternatives to pass through them by identifying dilemmas within the judicial practice. As a result, the motives of this scientific paper are exactly focused at the same time on identifying the dilemmas, as well as presenting ideas, to overstep them, including the judicial practice of the European Court of Human Rights on Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, by which it is given the possibility to offering people efficient and within a reasonable time legal protection of their rights before national courts. For these reasons, the paper elaborates this issue based on both, the legal theory and judicial practice.

  10. ABM Drag_Pass Report Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    dragREPORT software was developed in parallel with abmREPORT, which is described in the preceding article. Both programs were built on the capabilities created during that process. This tool generates a drag_pass report that summarizes vital information from the MRO aerobreaking drag_pass build process to facilitate both sequence reviews and provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management. The script extracts information from the ENV, SSF, FRF, SCMFmax, and OPTG files, presenting them in a single, easy-to-check report providing the majority of parameters needed for cross check and verification as part of the sequence review process. Prior to dragReport, all the needed information was spread across a number of different files, each in a different format. This software is a Perl script that extracts vital summarization information and build-process details from a number of source files into a single, concise report format used to aid the MPST sequence review process and to provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management reference. This software could be adapted for future aerobraking missions to provide similar reports, review and summarization information.

  11. Turbulent drag reduction in dilute polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, K. R.; White, Christopher M.

    1998-11-01

    It is well known that the addition of small amounts of flexible polymers reduces drag in turbulent pipe flows. However, the underlying physics is still poorly understood. This paper will consider two aspects: The dependence of the onset of drag reduction on polymer concentration, and the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote. The latter defines the maximum drag reduction possible for any polymer at a given Reynolds number, independent of the polymer concentration and detailed polymeric structure [1]. It is shown tentatively that a modest reworking of de Gennes' theory [2] is compatible with available experimental data. The principal element of the theory is that the polymers do not get stretched fully, but that the partially extended polymers store elastic energy and interfere with cascade mechanisms in turbulence. A conclusive understanding requires experiments in which the polymer properties that go into the theory are directly measured. [1] P.S. Virk, AIChE J., 21, 625 (1975) [2] P.G. de Gennes, Introduction to Polymer Dynamics, University of Cambridge (1990)

  12. Wind speed scaling and the drag coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Wind speed scaling in similarity law in wind-generated waves and the drag coefficient are studied. In analyzing the data in the wind wave channel, it is found that the u. scaling greatly reduces the scatter in the U10 scaling. The u. scaling has much less scatter than the scaling using other wind speeds. The friction velocity seems to play a distinctive role in wave growth. The result is important in the applications of the similarity law and in wave modeling. In theory it gives an insight into the mechanism of wind wave interaction. It is found that wave steepness is important in influencing the drag coefficient. The variability of the coefficients in the currently widely used drag form can be explained by the differences in wave steepness in the observations. A drag coefficient model with wind speed and wave steepness as parameters is proposed. An explanation for Kahma' s result that the u. scaling does not reduce the scatter in the U10 scaling is given.

  13. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  14. Study on Pipeline Transport Drag Reduction Technology of CPB based on the Fuller Grading Theory%基于Fuller级配理论的膏体管道输送减阻技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓辉; 苏先锋; 黄明清; 谭伟

    2016-01-01

    针对膏体充填的物料配比问题,通过分析膏体内部结构的物质组成,提出物料密实度越大膏体流动性越好;采用Fuller理论对某铜矿充填物料的级配特性进行分析,考察了级配指数n随物料配比的变化规律;开展膏体塌落度、流变特性实验,采用白金汉公式对膏体管流阻力进行理论计算。结果表明:该铜矿膏体中全尾砂∶水淬渣=3∶2时,物料密实度较大,最利于其管道输送;质量分数72%,管径150 mm,流量60 m3/h的工况条件下,水淬渣掺量40%时的管流阻力为2.46 MPa/km,与全尾砂膏体管流阻力3.65 MPa/km相比,减阻率达32.6%,说明级配优化后膏体管流阻力明显降低。%Aimed at the question of material ratio of cement paste backfilling (CPB),through analyzing the material composition of the internal structure in CPB,it was proposed that the larger aggregate packing degree is,the better paste flow;The Fuller theory was used to analyze the filling material gradation characteristics of a certain copper mine,and explore the rule of grading index n changing with material ratio. The slump test and rheological experiments of CPB were carried out, and Buckingham formula was adopted to calculate the pipe flow resistance. The results showed that the aggregate packing degree is larger and is most favorable for pipeline transport,when the material ratio with unclassified tailings of water quenching slag as 3of 2. The pipe flow resistance was 2. 46 MPa/km under the conditions of mass fraction 72%,pipe diameter of 150 mm,flow rate of 60m3/h and water quenching slag content 40%. By contrast with the pipe flow resistance of unclassified tailings 3. 65 MPa/km,its drag reduction efficiency reached 32. 6% in pipeline transport. That illustrated that the paste pipe flow resistance is reduced obviously after gradation optimization.

  15. Health of students in modern environmental conditions and innovative technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Losik T. N.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is shown the row of the phenomena which negatively influence not only on a health man but also on his professional capacity: detraining of an organism through the lack of motive activity, tense emotional state of man in the process of his everyday work, negative influencing of environment and innovative technologies. The analysis of publications which examine influence of environment and innovative technologies on the state of health of man is presented. The system of organism is certain, feel like negative influence of environment and innovative technologies. It is set that an environment is indissolubly related to the man, which is the active object of nature.

  16. Technological Usage Prediction among Public School Students: Case Study over Netbook’s Usability and Acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Marcelo Souza da Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work contemplates an analysis of period prior to delivery of the netbook, students from a public school in Belém-Pa. The objective is to verify the usability expectations of this technology for the same. The Technical chosen the purpose of this research was a survey, with online data collection and quantitative analysis, whose variables come from the marketing literature. Finally, let us reason together that students predict accept technological equipment, if it has similar technology to known by them, within hedonic values with utilitarian justifications of use.

  17. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals.

  18. Critical thinking instruction and technology enhanced learning from the student perspective: A mixed methods research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    Critical thinking is acclaimed as a valuable asset for graduates from higher education programs. Technology has advanced in quantity and quality; recognized as a requirement of 21st century learners. A mixed methods research study was undertaken, examining undergraduate nursing student engagement with critical thinking instruction, platformed on two technology-enhanced learning environments: a classroom response system face-to-face in-class and an online discussion forum out-of-class. The Community of Inquiry framed the study capturing constructivist collaborative inquiry to support learning, and facilitate critical thinking capability. Inclusion of quantitative and qualitative data sources aimed to gather a comprehensive understanding of students' development of critical thinking and engagement with technology-enhanced learning. The findings from the students' perspectives were positive toward the inclusion of technology-enhanced learning, and use in supporting their development of critical thinking. Students considered the use of two forms of technology beneficial in meeting different needs and preferences, offering varied means to actively participate in learning. They valued critical thinking instruction being intentionally aligned with subject-specific content facilitating understanding, application, and relevance of course material. While the findings are limited to student participants, the instructional strategies and technology-enhanced learning identified as beneficial can inform course design for the development of critical thinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of Science, Technology, and Engineering Curriculum on Rural Midwestern High School Student Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, John

    Low degree completion in technical and engineering degrees is a growing concern for policymakers and educators in the United States. This study was an examination of the behaviors of adolescents specific to career decisions related to technology and engineering. The central research question for this study was: do rural, Midwestern high school technical and engineering curricula serve to engage students sufficiently to encourage them to persist through high school while sustaining their interests in technology and engineering careers? Engaging students in technology and engineering fields is the challenge for educators throughout the country and the Midwest. Rural schools have the additional challenge of meeting those issues because of resource limitations. Students in three Midwestern schools were surveyed to determine the level of interest in technology and engineering. The generalized likelihood ratio test was used to overcome concerns for small sample sizes. Accounting for dependent variables, multiple independent variables are examined using descriptive statistics to determine which have greater influence on career decisions, specifically those related to technology and engineering. A typical science curriculum is defined for rural Midwestern high schools. This study concludes that such curriculum achieves the goal of maintaining or increasing student interest and engagement in STEM careers. Furthermore, those schools that incorporate contextual and experiential learning activities into the curriculum demonstrate increased results in influencing student career choices toward technology and engineering careers. Implications for parents, educators, and industry professionals are discussed.

  20. Can a tablet device alter undergraduate science students' study behavior and use of technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P; Ramsay, Luke; Chauhan, Vikesh

    2012-06-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating undergraduate biological sciences students' use of technology and computer devices for learning and the effect of providing students with a tablet device. A controlled study was conducted to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of a tablet device on students' use of devices and technology for learning. Overall, we found that students made extensive use of the tablet device for learning, using it in preference to laptop computers to retrieve information, record lectures, and access learning resources. In line with other studies, we found that undergraduate students only use familiar Web 2.0 technologies and that the tablet device did not alter this behavior for the majority of tools. We conclude that undergraduate science students can make extensive use of a tablet device to enhance their learning opportunities without institutions changing their teaching methods or computer systems, but that institutional intervention may be needed to drive changes in student behavior toward the use of novel Web 2.0 technologies.

  1. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRIMARY STUDENTS' SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS AND LEVELS OF USING INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ESRA AÇIKGÜL FIRAT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s technology provides accessing almost all kinds of information. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT can be located in all the steps of the process of scientific research. Therefore, it is considered that technology has major contribution to the development of scientific process skills. Our study aims at determining the relationship between primary students' science process skills and levels of using ICT. The study group consisted of 487 primary students attending to 5 randomly selected schools at urban of the province of Adiyaman in 2009–2010 academic year. "Science Process Skills Test" and "Use of Information Communication Technologies Scale" were used in order to collect the data. The research, is a quantitative study carried out by using a correlational survey method. It was found that a significant relationship between students' science process skills and levels of using ICT according to the Pearson correlation coefficient.

  3. Saudi high school students' attitudes and barriers toward the use of computer technologies in learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabti, Ahmed Abdulateef; Chaichan, Rasha Sami

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Saudi Arabian high school students toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. The study also discusses the possible barriers that affect and limit the actual usage of computers. Quantitative approach is applied in this research, which involved 30 Saudi Arabia students of a high school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The respondents comprised 15 males and 15 females with ages between 16 years and 18 years. Two instruments, namely, Scale of Attitude toward Computer Technologies (SACT) and Barriers affecting Students' Attitudes and Use (BSAU) were used to collect data. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) of Davis (1989) was utilized. The analysis of the study revealed gender differences in attitudes toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. Female students showed high and positive attitudes towards the use of computer technologies in learning English than males. Both male and female participants demonstrated high and positive perception of Usefulness and perceived Ease of Use of computer technologies in learning English. Three barriers that affected and limited the use of computer technologies in learning English were identified by the participants. These barriers are skill, equipment, and motivation. Among these barriers, skill had the highest effect, whereas motivation showed the least effect.

  4. Fostering Sustainable Energy Entrepreneurship among Students: The Business Oriented Technological System Analysis (BOTSA Program at Eindhoven University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Wijnker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Business Oriented Technological System Analysis (BOTSA program is a new teaching and learning concept developed by Eindhoven University of Technology (the Netherlands with participation from innovative companies in renewable energy. It is designed to stimulate sustainable entrepreneurship among engineering students in this field. The program combines the placement of students in companies to study and contribute to the development and incubation of sustainable energy innovations, with a curriculum at the university designed to support these internships from a scientific perspective. The teaching method assists students in developing a broad system view that enables them to analyze the potential of, and bottlenecks to promising innovations from a realistic business perspective. This empowers students to identify those techno-economic aspects that are critical to innovation success, and advise the entrepreneurs about these aspects. Experience indicates that teachers, students, and entrepreneurs find BOTSA a valuable way of coaching, learning and working. Theoretical support for this method is found in system analysis originating in evolutionary innovation theory in combination with concepts of entrepreneurship, business model generation and sustainable/green innovation.

  5. Heavy Class Helicopter Fuselage Model Drag Reduction by Active Flow Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, F.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of helicopter blunt fuselage drag reduction using active flow control is being carried out within the European Clean Sky program. The objective is to demonstrate the capability of several active flow technologies to decrease fuselage drag by alleviating the flow separation occurring in the rear area of some helicopters. The work is performed on a simplified blunt fuselage at model-scale. Two different flow control actuators are considered for evaluation: steady blowing, unsteady blowing (or pulsed jets). Laboratory tests of each individual actuator are first performed to assess their performance and properties. The fuselage model is then equipped with these actuators distributed in 3 slots located on the ramp bottom edge. This paper addresses the promising results obtained during the wind-tunnel campaign, since significant drag reductions are achieved for a wide range of fuselage angles of attack and yaw angles without detriment of the other aerodynamic characteristics.

  6. Nacelle drag reduction: An analytically-guided experimental program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications are proposed to standard estimating procedures, as well as the BODY computer program, which predict that the drag of two nacelles will equal the drag of the fuselage. A preliminary computer analysis that considers increased dimensions for the nacelle forebody so that the noise is relatively less blunt indicates a reduction in form drag much greater than the increase in skin friction drag attributable to increased surface area.

  7. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapour layers

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Joseph D; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapour layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number shows substantial deviation from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Results obtained with liqiuds of different viscosities show that onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. The key feature o...

  8. Investigation into the Mechanism of Polymer Thread Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    drag reducers than polyacrylamides of equal molecular weight. The drag reduction increases as the Re or Cm increases. The concentrations of polymer...wall region, 10 < y’ < 100, for drag reduction to occur. The normalized distance from the wall is defined as y* = yut/v; u, is the friction velocity...AP 30, a polyacrylamide solution, with a 5000 ppm concentration on the centerline of a water flow in a glass tube, they achieved drag reduction up to

  9. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Using Cell Phone Technology in Undergraduate Science Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pennington

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Students of science traditionally make 3x5 flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flashcards viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback opportunities for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use computers, but they use their cell phones 24 hours a day. This report outlines these trends and an even more recent educational technology initiative, that of using cell phone flash cards to help students learn biology and chemistry nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Students responded positively to cell phone flash cards in a pilot study and a more detailed study is planned for the coming year.

  10. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Using Cell Phone Technology in Undergraduate Science Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pennington

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Students of science traditionally make 3x5 flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flashcards viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback opportunities for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use computers, but they use their cell phones 24 hours a day. This report outlines these trends and an even more recent educational technology initiative, that of using cell phone flash cards to help students learn biology and chemistry nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Students responded positively to cell phone flash cards in a pilot study and a more detailed study is planned for the coming year.

  11. Comparison of Principles of Technology and Traditional Physics Secondary Students' Scores on a Physics Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Beacher Bert

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate comparatively the performance of students enrolled in principles of technology and traditional physics classes in Alabama on a physics examination. The subjects included 226 students enrolled in the first year of the principles of technology course at eight pilot school systems in Alabama during the 1988 -89 year as well as 251 students enrolled in randomly selected, intact physics classes from the same school systems. Data were collected utilizing demographic questionnaires developed by the researcher and a physics examination developed by a jury of Auburn University physics professors. Six graduate assistants, including the researcher, administered the examination and the demographic questionnaires in the school systems. Data pertaining to the students' standardized scores were obtained from school counselors. The data were statistically analyzed by a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) test and by a multivariate analysis of partial variance model. Results from the statistical analyses indicate that no significant difference in the two groups of students exist after adjustment for pre-existing differences and selected student and teacher variables. Significant interactions between course and both mathematics and science scores exists. While the physics students' scores were above the grand mean for both mathematics and science and the principles of technology students' scores were below the mean in both cases, the interactions indicate that the relationship between the scores on mathematics and science and course vary more than would be expected by chance for the two groups of students. The most significant conclusion was that the principles of technology course appears to be academically sound and may be the kind of course to successfully bridge the gap between academics and vocational education for a large segment of students.

  12. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by an...

  13. 14 CFR 25.699 - Lift and drag device indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag device indicator. 25.699....699 Lift and drag device indicator. (a) There must be means to indicate to the pilots the position of each lift or drag device having a separate control in the cockpit to adjust its position. In addition...

  14. Katz and Aakhus' Theory of Apparatgeist: Students' Perceptions of Normative and Non-Normative Behaviors for Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever-Mazzuto, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Today's students live in a mobile society beset with technologies that allow them to communicate through a wide variety of mediums. Mobile phones, for example, have become the fastest growing technology in history. Students have traditionally been at the forefront of most societal changes and this recent technological influx is certainly no…

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  16. Nagging, Noobs and New Tricks--Students' Perceptions of School as a Context for Digital Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfin, Scott; Johnson, Nicola; Nemorin, Selena; Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    While digital technology is an integral feature of contemporary education, schools are often presumed to constrain and compromise students' uses of technology. This paper investigates students' experiences of school as a context for digital technology use. Drawing upon survey data from three Australian secondary schools (n = 1174), this paper…

  17. Research Students' Conceptions of the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskaite, Lina; Wardak, Dewa

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "big data," "digital scholarship" and "eResearch" raises the question of how these digital developments in research methods and practices affect research students. This paper presents findings from a phenomenographic study that investigated postgraduate students' conceptions of the role of information…

  18. Research Students' Conceptions of the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskaite, Lina; Wardak, Dewa

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "big data," "digital scholarship" and "eResearch" raises the question of how these digital developments in research methods and practices affect research students. This paper presents findings from a phenomenographic study that investigated postgraduate students' conceptions of the role of information…

  19. College Students' Use of Electronic Communication Technologies: Introverts versus Extraverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackin, Taryn; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Skelly, Brian; Chambliss, Catherine

    This paper discusses a study that examines the responses of introverted and extraverted college students (N=72) to the use of e-mail. Results show that extraverts use e-mail as a form of procrastination more than introverts and that extraverts find e-mail more disruptive to their work than introverts. No significant differences were found in terms…

  20. Technology Helps Students Transcend Part-Whole Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Anderson; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Evans, Michael A.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Balci, Osman; Chang, Mido

    2014-01-01

    The authors introduce an educational video game (application, or "app"), "CandyFactory Educational Game," designed to promote students' development of partitive understanding of fractions while demonstrating the critical need to promote that development. The app includes essential game features of immediate feedback,…

  1. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Thomas R.

    The Boeing Company contracted with the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory to evaluate its student internship program, part of a "school-to-work" effort modeled after the nationally recognized Tech Prep initiative. The company's involvement in the Tech Prep Program has been implemented in three phases: (1) the initial phase helped…

  2. Take a Byte: Technology for 2e Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Linda E.

    2016-01-01

    "Twice-exceptional," also referred to as "2e," is a term used to describe gifted children who have the characteristics of gifted students and give evidence of one or more disabilities as defined by federal or state eligibility criteria. These disabilities may include specific learning disabilities (SpLD), speech and language…

  3. Edification of Multimedia Resources: Aligning Technology for Student Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamarasseri, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia offers exciting possibilities for meeting the needs of 21st century learners. Multimedia learning can be defined in a number of ways. Multimedia learning is the delivery of instructional content using multiple modes that include visual and auditory information and students' use of this information to construct knowledge. Today's…

  4. Net Generation Students: Agency and Choice and the New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C.; Healing, G.

    2010-01-01

    Based on research investigating English first-year university students, this paper examined the case made for a new generation of young learners often described as the Net Generation or Digital Natives in terms of agency and choice. Generational arguments set out a case that links young people's attitudes and orientations to their lifelong…

  5. Net Generation Students: Agency and Choice and the New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C.; Healing, G.

    2010-01-01

    Based on research investigating English first-year university students, this paper examined the case made for a new generation of young learners often described as the Net Generation or Digital Natives in terms of agency and choice. Generational arguments set out a case that links young people's attitudes and orientations to their lifelong…

  6. What Are Students Doing during Lecture? Evidence from New Technologies to Capture Student Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, Adam V.; Danish, Joshua A.; Bouldin, Ryan M.; Harsh, Joseph A.; Bryan, Branden

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students in class is paramount if they are to gain a deep understanding of class content. Student engagement is manifested by attention to the various components of instruction. However, there is little research at the tertiary level focusing on what aspects of instruction are related to changes in student attention during class. To…

  7. Keeping up with the Technologically Savvy Student: Student Perceptions of Audio Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. Joey; Davis, Phillip; Liu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The current generation of college students is so adapted to the digital world that they have been labeled the multi-tasking generation (Foehr, 2006; Wallis, 2006). College students routinely use digital playback devices in their lives for entertainment and communication to the point that students being "plugged in" is a ubiquitous image.…

  8. Introduction to microsystem technology a guide for students

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlach, Gerald; Müller, Dörte

    2008-01-01

    Over half a century after the discovery of the piezoresistive effect, microsystem technology has experienced considerable developments. Expanding the opportunities of microelectronics to non-electronic systems, its number of application fields continues to increase. Microsensors are one of the most important fields, used in medical applications and micromechanics. Microfluidic systems are also a significant area, most commonly used in ink-jet printer heads. This textbook focuses on the essentials of microsystems technology, providing a knowledgeable grounding and a clear path through this we

  9. Student Readiness for Technology Enhanced History Education in Turkish High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Turan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether the Turkish high school social sciences major students would feel adequate and fit in atechnology-enhanced educational environment, particularly in history classrooms. To this extent, this study investigated highschool students’ level of proficiency in technology-use and their attitudes toward the use of educational technologies inclassrooms. The data for this study was collected using Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (LSI Version-3 and a 27-item TechnologyQuestionnaire. The results revealed that from the point of proficiency and attitude Turkish high school social sciences majorstudents have the essential technology skills and knowledge to feel adequate in a technology-enhanced learning environment.They also have positive attitudes toward use of educational technologies in history classrooms. Therefore they seem to beready for technology-enhanced instruction.

  10. Alcohol Assessment Among College Students Using Wireless Mobile Technology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jay M.; Usdan, Stuart; Mays, Darren; Martin, Ryan; Cremeens, Jennifer; Arriola, Kimberly Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study used a two-group randomized design to assess the validity of measuring self-reported alcohol consumption among college students using the Handheld Assisted Network Diary (HAND), a daily diary assessment administered using wireless mobile devices. Method: A convenience sample of college students was recruited at a large, public university in the southeastern United States and randomized into two groups. A randomly assigned group of 86 students completed the daily HAND assessment during the 30-day study and a Timeline Followback (TLFB) at 30-day follow-up. A randomly assigned group of 82 students completed the paper-and-pencil Daily Social Diary (DSD) over the same study period. Data from the daily HAND assessment were compared with the TLFB completed at follow-up by participants who completed the HAND using 95% limits of agreement analysis. Furthermore, individual growth models were used to examine differences between the HAND and DSD by comparing the total drinks, drinking days, and drinks per drinking day captured by the two assessments over the study period. Results: Results suggest that the HAND captured similar levels of alcohol use compared with the TLFB completed at follow-up by the same participants. In addition, comparisons of the two study groups suggest that, controlling for baseline alcohol use and demographics, the HAND assessment captured similar levels of total drinks, drinking days, and drinks per drinking day as the paper-and-pencil DSD. Conclusions: The study findings support the validity of wireless mobile devices as a daily assessment of alcohol use among college students. PMID:19737502

  11. Self-reported oral health behavior and attitudes of dental and technology students in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacauskiene, Ingrida M; Smailiene, Dalia; Siudikienė, Jolanta; Savanevskyte, Julija; Nedzelskiene, Irena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess self-reported oral health habits, attitudes, lifestyle between the sample groups of preclinical and clinical dental and technology students in Lithuania using the Hiroshima University Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI), and to evaluate the impact of education on their behavior and self-reported oral health. A sample of 183 dental and 75 technology students at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Medical Academy, Faculty of Odontology, and Kaunas University of Technology completed the Lithuanian version the HU-DBI questionnaire with 11 additional items. The data were analyzed using the "SPSS 19.0 for Windows" software package. The mean HU-DBI score of clinical final-year dentistry students was significantly higher (p=0.001) than the score of the preclinical group (6.81 (1.2) and 5.96 (1.5), respectively). The mean scores of both groups of dental students were significantly (p<0.05) higher than that of the technology group (5.37 (1.8)). Oral health behaviors and knowledge were superior in dental students. Dental education had a significant positive impact on the oral health and behavior improvement. The attitudes of the Lithuanian dental students should be further improved by initiating a comprehensive program that would emphasize the importance of oral hygiene before the clinical program starts.

  12. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dantzler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study measured artistically gifted students’ attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7 – 12 for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female, 41 male. Analyses revealed no multivariate difference between arts concentrations; however, there was a statistically significant multivariate difference between math/science students and arts students. Further univariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences in all areas except in the gender differences subscale. Math/science students had lower M-FSAS scores, which equate to stronger attitudes surrounding technology. Results suggest that artistically gifted students do not perceive technology as being as relevant to their lives as their math/science gifted peers. For this artistically gifted sample, these results potentially represent fewer career opportunities and creative outlets. Based on these results, educators should imbed into the curriculum opportunities for artistically gifted students to utilize technology for career-oriented purposes. Key Words:

  13. Student collaboration, investigation problems, and technology use in an innovative university mechanics class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuech, Robert K.

    This study investigated the learning of a selected group of students within a calculus based, university physics course organized to incorporate strategies of effective learning and instruction including: collaborative grouping, authentic investigations, and easy access to technology tools. More than half the students' class time was spent engaged in the investigations with less than one-quarter of the time in lecture. A complementary study has shown that students had high conceptual gains during the course and this study reports similar gains for students in the selected group. This research examined student interactions during group investigations and the roles that may have been played by the problem types, the computer tools, and the behaviors of other students and instructors on conceptual learning. Data were collected from video tapes throughout all sessions of the class while the students worked together on the investigations. Field notes, pre and post-test data, and investigation reports provided contextual and assessment information. A detailed descriptive study was conducted and grounded theory guided the research methodology throughout the study. The research analyses focused especially on student-student student instructor; student-technology and student-problem interactions. Within these interactions the students in the group were observed to engage in important cognitive processes including: recall of previous knowledge that promoted familiarity, reflection on data and hypotheses that promoted intersubjectivity, and elaboration that promoted questioning. These processes appeared to be linked to modifications in the students' conceptual understanding. The instructors generally intended to act as facilitators and helped to guide the students through the investigations. Technology may have provided a means for the students to critically reflect on data collected or test and retest hypotheses, either by ``real time'' plotting of data or the rapid

  14. Invasive Technologies: How Administrators, Teachers, and Students Negotiate the Use of Students’ Mobile Technologies in the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The rise in popularity of mobile technologies, particularly with respect to youth, has created new challenges and opportunities for districts, schools, and classrooms. As more students come to own these devices they have increasingly sought to use them in their schools and classrooms, with or without their schools’ official support. Districts and schools have responded to this encroachment in a variety of ways ranging from establishing policies that dictate common practices across all classro...

  15. Screen Capture Technology: A Digital Window into Students' Writing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Jeremie

    2013-01-01

    Technological innovations and the prevalence of the computer as a means of producing and engaging with texts have dramatically transformed how literacy is defined and developed in modern society. This rise in digital writing practices has led to a growing number of tools and methods that can be used to explore second language (L2) writing…

  16. Preparing Students to Adapt with the New Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Coll. of Education.

    The new technology is forcing vocational education decision makers to establish policies that will influence the direction and focus of vocational education during the next decade. This task is further complicated by the difficulties associated with forecasting the types of skills that will be required by future workers. While many educational…

  17. Technological Literacy: The Proper Focus to Educate All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Thomas; Love, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    As technology and engineering (T&E) education seeks to survive a shortage of teachers and funding, among other factors, it must proceed with caution. The field should remain true to its hands-on, design-based roots but must also provide rigorous instruction that applies STEM skills and situates it as a valuable stakeholder among the core…

  18. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  19. Student Attitudes toward Technology-Mediated Advising Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamkarian, Hoori Santikian; Karp, Melinda Mechur

    2017-01-01

    The literature on broad-access colleges suggests that low persistence and completion rates may be improved through better advising that employs a teaching-as-advising approach. While resource constraints have traditionally limited the ability of colleges to reform advising practices, technological advances have made it possible to implement…

  20. Student and Teacher Use of Technology at the University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobel, Peter; Kano, Makimi

    2013-01-01

    "Digital Native" and "Digital Immigrant" are terms, popularized by Prensky (2001), to describe those born either before, or in the digital era (i.e. after 1980). In recent years, this dichotomy has been used to raise awareness of differences in technology usage and what these differences may mean for education. The present…

  1. Improving University Students' Science-Technology-Society-Environment Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalaki, Yalçin

    2016-01-01

    Science, Technology, Society, Environment (STSE) is an education movement that started and developed from 70s through early 2000s. Although this movement had lost emphasis in recent years, it is one of the most important educational reform attempts in science education history. Today, concepts like Socio Scientific Issues (SSI) or Science,…

  2. Have Technology and Multitasking Rewired How Students Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field of researchers from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, philosophy, computer science, and anthropology who seek to understand the mind. In this article, the author considers findings from this field that are strong and clear enough to merit classroom application. He examines how technology has…

  3. Effective Assistive Technology Consideration and Implications for Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Vita L.; Hinesmon-Matthews, Lezlee J.

    2014-01-01

    Often the consideration of assistive technology devices and services during the individualized education program (IEP) process is overlooked. Because the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) authorized this consideration, IEP team members must be keenly aware of the importance they hold in providing this valuable input. Thus, IEP…

  4. Mobile Technology: Students Perceived Benefits of Apps for Learning Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N.P.; Lambe, J.; Ciccone, J.; Swinnerton, B.

    2016-01-01

    Technology-enhanced learning is expanding rapidly because of research showing the benefits for learners in terms of engagement, convenience, attainment and enjoyment. Mobile learning approaches are also gaining in popularity, particularly during practical classes and clinical settings. However, there are few systematic studies evaluating the…

  5. Modern technology of physical education of disabled students in conditions of inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyrkhaev S.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem of physical education of disabled students during period of their study in higher educational establishments. Insufficiency of this problem’s studying conditioned fulfillment of research of perfection of physical education and sports system. Purpose: substantiation of physical education pedagogic technology for disabled students. Material: in experiment students with following nosologies participated: hearing, eyesight, muscular-skeletal apparatus, after effects of cerebral palsy, somatic diseases and diabetes. In total 664 students of 18-24 years’ age took part in experiment. They were 337 boys and 307 girls. Results: we have worked out organizational-methodic algorithm, which permits to combine theoretical, scientific-methodic and practical training. Its basis is current information about students’ psychic-physiological condition. We determined levels of health and physical condition, physical workability and physical fitness as well as psychic state of students. Demand in optimization of students’ motor functioning during all period of study was substantiated as well as effective means of physical education and pulse regimes, considering peculiarities of nosologies. Students’ orientation on sport style of life was formed. Conclusions: implementation of physical education pedagogic technology for students with different nosologies in the process of their studying stipulates solution of training, health-related and educational tasks. It is possible through creation of conditions for motor actions’ training and intensification of motor functioning during all period of study. Practical application of the technology and received results points at integration of disabled students in students’ medium.

  6. The Technological Knowledge Used by Technology Education Students in Capability Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Since technology education is, compared to subjects such as mathematics and science, still a fairly new subject both nationally and internationally, it does not have an established subject philosophy. In the absence of an established subject philosophy for technology education, one can draw on other disciplines in the field, such as engineering…

  7. Perceived Convenience in an Extended Technology Acceptance Model: Mobile Technology and English Learning for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Yan, Chi-Fang; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Since convenience is one of the features for mobile learning, does it affect attitude and intention of using mobile technology? The technology acceptance model (TAM), proposed by David (1989), was extended with perceived convenience in the present study. With regard to English language mobile learning, the variables in the extended TAM and its…

  8. Research on Drag Torque Prediction Model for the Wet Clutches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the surface tension effect and centrifugal effect, a mathematical model based on Reynolds equation for predicting the drag torque of disengage wet clutches is presented. The model indicates that the equivalent radius is a function of clutch speed and flow rate. The drag torque achieves its peak at a critical speed. Above this speed, drag torque drops due to the shrinking of the oil film. The model also points out that viscosity and flow rate effects on drag torque. Experimental results indicate that the model is reasonable and it performs well for predicting the drag torque peak.

  9. Digital technology use by the students and english teachers and self-directed language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Sert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The digital era is a new challenge for teachers. While children get acquainted with the digital technology before the age of six, teachers, who have encountered with the digital world at a later time in their lives, struggle with it. Self-directed learning, which is crucial for lifelong learning, can be enhanced by the use technology particularly beyond the classroom settings. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between the perceptions of 5-8 graders in low and high income groups about their technology use skills and their English teachers’ technology use skills. It also tested the correlation between their perceptions of their self-directed language learning behaviors and their technology use skills as well as their English teachers’ technology use skills. The population of the study consisted of 145 students. Inter group comparisons and correlational research methods were adopted. The results indicated that the low and high income students’ perceptions did not differ regarding their own technology use skills, and similarly their English teachers’ technology use skills. There was no correlation between the perceptions of the low/high income group combination regarding their technology use skills and their English teachers’ technology use skills. And lastly, their perceptions on their self-directed learning behaviors did not correlate with their perceptions on their technology use skills and their English teachers’ technology use skills. The educational implications of these results were discussed and suggestions were put forward so as to produce more effective learning environments.

  10. The Correlation between Temperament, Technology Preference and Proficiency in Middle School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina J Sterling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between middle school students’ personality type and their academic performance in the technology courses in which they participated. It also explored the differences in technology use by personality. Most participants identified games as a favorite pastime. However, there were some noted temperamental differences. Students with the analytical personality reported the most varied use of computers, and rated their technology skills significantly higher on the self-perception scales and performed at a higher proficiency level than their peers. The study also investigated the effectiveness of the two computer courses offered at the schools in the study. Students who completed the Computer Literacy course during the school year performed significantly higher than those who took the Explorations Technology course, both courses, or no technology course at all. However, those with the analytical temperament performed better in the Explorations Technology course. Results suggest personality can predict technology use in students. Findings are consistent with similar research in the computing industry.

  11. Computer Technologies for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities. Adaptech Project = Technologies Informatiques pour les Etudiants ayant des Incapacites au Postsecondaire. Project Adaptech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Myrtis-Eirene; Fichten, Catherine S.; Barile, Maria; Asuncion, Jennison V.

    In 1999, a survey was conducted of almost 800 university students with different disabilities across Canada to investigate what computer equipment students used and wanted, how they financed their computer technologies, and why they failed to take advantage of government subsidy programs. Results from the survey indicate many students did not know…

  12. The other optimal Stokes drag profile

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    The lowest drag shape of fixed volume in Stokes flow has been known for some 40 years. It is front-back symmetric and similar to an American football with ends tangent to a cone of 60 degrees. The analogous convex axisymmetric shape of fixed surface area, which may be of interest for particle design in chemistry and colloidal science, is characterized in this paper. This "other" optimal shape has a surface vorticity proportional to the mean surface curvature, which is used with a local analysis of the flow near the tip to show that the front and rear ends are tangent to a cone of angle 30.8 degrees. Using the boundary element method, we numerically represent the shape by expanding its tangent angle in terms decaying odd Legendre modes, and show that it has 11.3% lower drag than a sphere of equal surface area, significantly more pronounced than for the fixed-volume optimal.

  13. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang;

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21) is eval......A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21......) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well...

  14. Drag Reduction by Polymeric and Nonpolymeric Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1997-11-01

    To investigate the ``self-healing'' property of drag reducing surfactant micelles we have conducted a comparative study between high polymers and surfactants in six turbulent pipe flows (Reynolds numbers between 2000 and 90,000) with varying intensities o f secondary flow. Friction factor values are measured in a straight pipe of 185 diameters; three pipes, each turning through four 90 degree elbows, of lengths 1085 diameters, 875 diameters, and 600 diameters; and a twice-turned coiled pipe, radius of curv ature of 24 diameters and length of 290 diameters. All the flows are gravity driven to prevent degradation effects caused by pump impellers. The large stresses set up by the secondary flows degrade the fragile polymers, thus reducing their effectivness as a drag reducer. The ``self-healing'' of the micelles enables the surfactant to maintain its effectivness. We will present the ``self-healing'' characteristics of the surfactant micelles using the polymer data as the datum.

  15. Investigation on Drag Reduction of Trucks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiao-ni; LIU Zhen-yan

    2008-01-01

    A study of the mechanism of fences was given to reduce drag by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental research. A 3D mathematical model has been developed based on computational fluid dynamics software Phoenics that was capable of handling steady state, 3D flow to simulate the flow field around the truck. The experiment made in a low speed wind tunnel is used as references for validation. By analyzing the results of calculation and experiment, the flowing mechanism of the flow field around the container truck and the drag-reducing mechanism of #-shaped fences on the truck are unveiled, which provides theoretical guidance to the aerodynamic formation designing and amelioration.

  16. Where Students Get Their Information about Science and Technology and Assessment of That Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Llull, J.; Impey, C. D.; Tijerino, K.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS)

    2013-06-01

    The changing landscape of where people get information has created challenges and opportunities for undergraduate science instructors. The perception that students are relying less on their textbooks and more on online content has created questions about how to engage with students in science courses. We report on our work investigating where undergraduate non-major astronomy students report getting their information about science as well as their general interest in science and technology. Through pilot surveys and in-depth interviews, we have refined a survey that asks students about their general interest in science, where they get their information about science, and what it means to study something scientifically. Our work shows that our students report getting a lot of information about science from in-class presentations but turn first to the internet when they want to learn something new about science. Overall, students rate their knowledge of science higher than their knowledge of technology due to coursework that covers science but not technology. Students who are more interested in science in general also self-report higher knowledge in science and are rated higher in their understanding about how to study something scientifically. Students who are less interested in science and rate themselves less knowledgeable about science turn first to online sources when learning something new related to science. Our work has implications for instructors who engage non-science major students and those working to improve science literacy of those students. This work is supported in part through an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate Research Internship. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the

  17. The Attitudes of Social Programs Students in Vocational High Schools Towards the Use of Information Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel BAHAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation and internalization of innovations in science and technology, business processes and education system in an easy way depend on the attitudes of individuals. In the study, it is intended to determine whether there is a relationship between the arguments such as the subject, college, department, gender, computer usage, internet access facilities of the students' enrolled in social programs of vocational high school and their attitudes towards information technology, or not. The data were obtained by applying questionnaires to 884 students studying in business administration, logistics, marketing, tourism, accounting, Office management and executive assistance programs at Çukurova, Mersin, Kırıkkale and Abant İzzet Baysal Universities. As a result of the research, statistically significant relationships were determined between the attitudes of the students of social sciences toward information technology and their subject, college, department and gender.

  18. Teaching Mathematics to Electrical Engineering Students by Electrical Engineering Staff in College of Technology in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Fujimoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical engineering staff (reorganized to Electrical and Computer engineering in 2004 has taught electrical engineering students for mathematics classes in Wakayama National College of Technology (WNCT in Japan from 2007. Effects of the mathematics classes by the electrical engineering staff were evaluated by using the results of the mathematics placement tests. The results of the tests are compared with averages of other National Colleges of Technology in Japan and other divisions of WNCT. As a result, an ability of electrical engineering students for mathematics improved dramatically with increasing the ratio of mathematics classes by the electrical engineering staff. It should seem that these good results were achieved by eagerness and strong motivation of the staff with electrical specialty for improving the ability of their division's students. The reasons for the improvement are discussed and the unique class of mathematics for college of technology is also introduced.

  19. The Impact of a Geospatial Technology-Supported Energy Curriculum on Middle School Students' Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulo, Violet; Bodzin, Alec

    2013-02-01

    Geospatial technologies are increasingly being integrated in science classrooms to foster learning. This study examined whether a Web-enhanced science inquiry curriculum supported by geospatial technologies promoted urban middle school students' understanding of energy concepts. The participants included one science teacher and 108 eighth-grade students classified in three ability level tracks. Data were gathered through pre/posttest content knowledge assessments, daily classroom observations, and daily reflective meetings with the teacher. Findings indicated a significant increase in the energy content knowledge for all the students. Effect sizes were large for all three ability level tracks, with the middle and low track classes having larger effect sizes than the upper track class. Learners in all three tracks were highly engaged with the curriculum. Curriculum effectiveness and practical issues involved with using geospatial technologies to support science learning are discussed.

  20. A Note on Disk Drag Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gunther, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    The electrical power consumed by typical magnetic hard disk drives (HDD) not only increases linearly with the number of spindles but, more significantly, it increases as very fast power-laws of speed (RPM) and diameter. Since the theoretical basis for this relationship is neither well-known nor readily accessible in the literature, we show how these exponents arise from aerodynamic disk drag and discuss their import for green storage capacity planning.