WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology social organization

  1. Social Technologies and Informal Knowledge Sharing within and across Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is focused on both empirical and conceptual contributions relative to the roles social technologies play in informal knowledge sharing practices, both within and across organizations. Social technologies include (a) traditional social technologies (e.g., email, phone and instant messengers), (b) emerging social…

  2. Social Media Mashups: The Ordering and Disordering Role of Social Media Technologies in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Etter, Michael

    This study explores how mashups (disconnected and mutable interactions from multiple locales to merge into communicative events) and social media (SM) exhibit interdependent agency across technologies, spaces and times. This study draws on communication constitutes organization (CCO), affordances...

  3. The Influence of Social Networking Technology in an Engineering Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepaske, Derrick Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Computer facilitated Social Networking (SN) is becoming more prevalent in our society, both in our personal and professional lives. As its use grows, there is a desire to determine how it will impact an organization. If it can positively impact an organization then it is an initiative that could be embraced and leveraged for any number of business…

  4. Enterprise Social Media: Definition, History, and Prospects for the Study of Social Technologies in Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leonardi, P.M.; Huysman, M.H.; Steinfield, C.

    2013-01-01

    Social media are increasingly implemented in work organizations as tools for communication among employees. It is important that we develop an understanding of how they enable and constrain the communicative activities through which work is accomplished because it is these very dynamics that

  5. Social Technologies in Shipbuilding Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1983-01-01

    Social technology refers to innovative organizations of work and human resource management practices employed in experimental or quasi-experimental settings for the purpose of improving performance...

  6. Social organization and the evolution of cumulative technology in apes and hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Gauri R; Tennie, Claudio; van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-07-01

    Culturally supported accumulation (or ratcheting) of technological complexity is widely seen as characterizing hominin technology relative to that of the extant great apes, and thus as representing a threshold in cultural evolution. To explain this divide, we modeled the process of cultural accumulation of technology, which we defined as adding new actions to existing ones to create new functional combinations, based on a model for great ape tool use. The model shows that intraspecific and interspecific variation in the presence of simple and cumulative technology among extant orangutans and chimpanzees is largely due to variation in sociability, and hence opportunities for social learning. The model also suggests that the adoption of extensive allomaternal care (cooperative breeding) in early Pleistocene Homo, which led to an increase in sociability and to teaching, and hence increased efficiency of social learning, was enough to facilitate technological ratcheting. Hence, socioecological changes, rather than advances in cognitive abilities, can account for the cumulative cultural changes seen until the origin of the Acheulean. The consequent increase in the reliance on technology could have served as the pacemaker for increased cognitive abilities. Our results also suggest that a more important watershed in cultural evolution was the rise of donated culture (technology or concepts), in which technology or concepts was transferred to naïve individuals, allowing them to skip many learning steps, and specialization arose, which allowed individuals to learn only a subset of the population's skills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rationalizing social technologies

    OpenAIRE

    V V Scherbina

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the problem of defining the specifics and types of social technologies (hereinafter ST). The author pursues the following objectives: first, to clarify the specific features of social technologies; second, to identify the grounds for classifying the existing types of social technologies; third, to describe the basic characteristics (functions, tasks, tools, the scope and limits of application, and ideological bases) of social technologies; fourth, to identify the basic f...

  8. Managing the Business of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeretta Horn Nord

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A greater number of consumers use social technologies-social media, social networking, and social relevance-than organizations. Economically, however, companies have much to gain by taking the plunge. Results show that organizations that have made the effort to increase their knowledge and build social technology platforms have experienced astounding results. The purpose of this article is to discuss social technology categories and present a strategy for knowledge management so that organizations may successfully implement these technologies. A huge growth is expected in the number of companies whose management will make a decision or have already made a decision to develop social technology platforms in the near future. This article provides a straight forward approach accompanied by examples of real companies who have used social technologies and experienced real returns–many in the millions of dollars. The intention is to provide a concise, up-to-date social technologies knowledge management guide.

  9. Millennials, Technology and Perceived Relevance of Community Service Organizations: Is Social Media Replacing Community Service Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, August John

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods qualitative study examined the relationship between perceptions of the importance of social media (i.e., Facebook, Twitter) with community service projects and volunteerism. Participants (n = 80) were interviewed and surveyed regarding their experiences in participating in a variety of community service work (CSW) projects…

  10. Design in nature how the constructal law governs evolution in biology, physics, technology, and social organization

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    In this groundbreaking book, Adrian Bejan takes the recurring patterns in nature—trees, tributaries, air passages, neural networks, and lightning bolts—and reveals how a single principle of physics, the constructal law, accounts for the evolution of these and many other designs in our world. Everything—from biological life to inanimate systems—generates shape and structure and evolves in a sequence of ever-improving designs in order to facilitate flow. River basins, cardiovascular systems, and bolts of lightning are very efficient flow systems to move a current—of water, blood, or electricity. Likewise, the more complex architecture of animals evolve to cover greater distance per unit of useful energy, or increase their flow across the land. Such designs also appear in human organizations, like the hierarchical “flowcharts” or reporting structures in corporations and political bodies. All are governed by the same principle, known as the constructal law, and configure and reconfigure themselves...

  11. Technologies in organic farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    (pollution) and consequences for human health. Broader ideas about ecosystems and the recycling of nutrients between the agricultural sector and the urban population are notably absent. On the basis of these findings the paper concludes by discussing the relationship between the consumers’ values that guide...... to phase out their use of conventional manure before 2021. This, however, raises a number of questions about consumers’ acceptance of the alternative technologies that have been proposed to close the nutrient gap. Drawing on qualitative interviews with Danish organic consumers, this paper first discusses...... what, from a consumers perspective, characterizes the technologies consumers associate with organic production. This part of the analysis shows that by and large consumers regard organic technologies as the opposite of conventional farming. Second, consumers’ perceptions of solutions suggested to close...

  12. Sport and Social Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Howard L., II

    Sport is examined in relation to a number of basic aspects of social organization. Each of the seven sections includes a brief clarification of the key sociological concepts used for analysis, a consideration of various applications of those concepts to sport, and a review and discussion of what is known about specific aspects of sport in relation…

  13. Science and Technology Parks in the Context of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Leichteris

    2013-08-01

    . Establishment of stronger interdisciplinary links of those different concepts has an impact on the effectiveness of the management of science and technology parks, competitiveness of regional and national economies. It allows definition of the areas for future research in a more detailed way, to make particular case studies and gather further evidence on the strength of established links, their main characteristics. It also allows design of new management models for science and technology parks, formulates the recommendations on the effectiveness of science and technology parks as institutions and as a part of innovation system, define new indicators for evaluation of performance and establish new work organization methods. The new concept of science and technology parks as an institutionalized form of social technology shall be elaborated in the future research.

  14. Science and Technology Parks in the Context of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Leichteris

    2011-08-01

    technologies. Establishment of stronger interdisciplinary links of those different concepts has an impact on the effectiveness of the management of science and technology parks, competitiveness of regional and national economies. It allows definition of the areas for future research in a more detailed way, to make particular case studies and gather further evidence on the strength of established links, their main characteristics. It also allows design of new management models for science and technology parks, formulates the recommendations on the effectiveness of science and technology parks as institutions and as a part of innovation system, define new indicators for evaluation of performance and establish new work organization methods. The new concept of science and technology parks as an institutionalized form of social technology shall be elaborated in the future research.

  15. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE ORGANIZATION OF BACHELORS’ E-LEARNING (USING THE EXAMPLE OF SPECIALITIES "TOURISM" AND "SOCIAL WORK"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia L. Dyshko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the state of implementation of information and communication technologies (ICT in the organization of e-learning in higher education (using the experience of specialities «Tourism» and «Social Work». The urgency of e-learning technologies application and related information and communication technologies is proved. Author determined the advantages and disadvantages of the popular platform Moodle e-learning. The results of research on active use of ICT, e-learning platforms, choice of ICT-based survey of the Ukrainian higher educational institutions that provide teaching training courses in specialities «Tourism» and» «Social work» are presented. It has been found that teachers prefer e-learning platforms, various Internet sites, multimedia presentations, video software Skype and Viber.

  16. Technology and social communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    For centuries advances in what we now term media have generated concerns about the effect these advances have on values and morality-books, stage drama, movies, TV, and now computer-based fantasy and Internet-based distribution. These media comprise some of the most powerful agents for developing our fundamental strategies for living. Computer-based fantasy can provide waves of sensations that everyday life does not prepare us for; they create a wow effect. The implications are especially, strong for adolescents. Wow effects come to seem ordinary. We can easily overdose on them with a subsequent dulling of sensibility that motivates one to seek the next level. As the wow effect is numbed, socializing restrictions break down. A psychological strategy of distancing is one defense against enhanced imagery - a strategy of cool as antidote. The wow-cool dipole can foster a role as spectator that inhibits empathy and a fundamental distancing from the self. Technology - the source of our concerns-can also help to counteract them. The most powerful drive in children is to learn mastery of the world. New input and output devices and especially properly designed software can enhance the capacity to learn and to be creative, i.e. to gain mastery over the world. These powerful new modes of communication not only give us great access to the world, they give the world great access to us. We must supplant what is now mostly a passive broadcast system with interactive exploration and two-way communication.

  17. Social Media in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin; Nabeth, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    By using social media, many companies try to exploit new forms of interaction, collaboration, and knowledge sharing through leveraging the social, collaborative dimension of social software. The traditional collective knowledge management model based on a top-down approach is now opening up new...... avenues for a bottom-up approach incorporating a more personal knowledge management dimension, which could be synergized into collective knowledge using the social-collaborative dimension of social media. This article addresses the following questions: (1) How can social media support the management...... of personal and collective knowledge using a synergetic approach? (2) Do the personal and collective dimensions compete with each other or can they reinforce each other in a more effective manner using social media? Our findings indicate that social media supports both the personal and collective dimensions...

  18. Social technologies and socialization of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Leijten

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether we like it or not, and how many difficulties this may pose, scientific research and technology are becoming the “property” of everybody and increasingly will become subject of public guidance and political decision making. Socialization happens because what people think, want and do has become central to the development of science and technology. Socialization of research is simply happening because it is the development characteristic of a society in which knowledge is becoming the main driving force. And just like in agricultural or industrial societies in the past it leads to (re-invent the institutions and mechanisms which allow the knowledge society to function properly.This note will further explore the developments contributing to the socialization of research and their impact on research and research institutes. It will focus more on technologies than on science per se, because applications and usage will become the main drivers.

  19. Social Media Across the Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth; Mohammadreza, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Social Media studies tend to focus on either internal (Friedl & Verčič, 2011; Huang et al, 2013) or external communication (Briones et al, 2011; Hanna et al, 2011; Saschi, 2012; Byrd, 2012; Kilgour et al, 2015) , rather than addressing social media across the organization. This is problematic...... because of the diversity in perspectives about how social media should be deployed among competing department perspectives in an organization are generally not explicitly considered when internal and external communication are dealt with separately. These diverse perspectives lead to tensions between...... differing needs and practices across the organization that affect the understanding of social media value and use, as well as how social media fits with overall communication strategy planning. To address this issue, we have conceptualized the “Online Reputation Chain” as a metaphor for understanding social...

  20. Transforming Organization into Social Business

    OpenAIRE

    Ončo, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Social networks like Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn offer the opportunity to communicate and collaborate with friends and family in our personal life through the social technology without seeing each other on daily bases. This different approach is already common to be used for the majority of people and brings new benefits to now-a-day global environment. The same users of these external social networks are working in companies with various internal collaboration and communication tools. This...

  1. Work and technological innovation in organic agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereso, M J A; Abrahão, R F; Gemma, S F B; Montedo, U B; Menegon, N L; Guarneti, J E; Ribeiro, I A V

    2012-01-01

    Organic agriculture is a sustainable cultivation ecologically, economically and socially. Several researches in organic agriculture have been made from technical perspectives, economic traits or related to ecological aspects. There are practically no investigations into the nature of the technology used in organic agriculture, especially from an ergonomic perspective. From the activity analysis, this study aimed to map the technology used in the production of organic vegetables. Properties producing organic vegetables were selected representing the State of São Paulo. It was applied an instrument (questionnaire and semi-structured interview) with their managers and it was made visual records to identify adaptations, innovations and technological demands that simultaneously minimize the workload and the difficulties in performing the tasks and increase work productivity. For some of the technological innovations a digital scanner was used to generate a virtual solid model to facilitate its redesign and virtual prototyping. The main results show that organic farmers have little technology in product form. The main innovations that enable competitive advantage or allow higher labor productivity occur in the form of processes, organization and marketing.

  2. Organic photovoltaics. Technology and market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabec, Christoph J.

    2004-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics has come into the international research focus during the past three years. Up to now main efforts have focused on the improvement of the solar conversion efficiency, and in recent efforts 5% white light efficiencies on the device level have been realized. Despite this in comparison to inorganic technologies low efficiency, organic photovoltaics is evaluated as one of the future key technologies opening up completely new applications and markets for photovoltaics. The key property which makes organic photovoltaics so attractive is the potential of reel to reel processing on low cost substrates with standard coating and printing processes. In this contribution we discuss the economical and technical production aspects for organic photovoltaics

  3. Technological Dynamics and Social Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Jan; Feldman, Maryann; Srholec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    for the sample as a whole between 1998 and 2008. The results indicate that social capabilities, such as well-developed public knowledge infrastructure, an egalitarian distribution of income, a participatory democracy and prevalence of public safety condition the growth of technological capabilities. Possible...... effects of other factors, such as agglomeration, urbanization, industrial specialization, migration and knowledge spillovers are also considered....

  4. Undergraduates, Technology, and Social Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Betsy; Boniek, Susan; Turner, Elena; Lovell, Elyse D'nn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the spectrum of undergraduate students' social interactions and related technological tools. Qualitative methods were used for this phenomenological study exploring 35 in-person interviews, with horizonalization in an open coding system secured by in-depth analysis which revealed nuanced themes and…

  5. The Social Shaping Approach to Technology Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Jørgensen, Ulrik; Clausen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    herein: structure versus contingency, actor-network approach, laboratory programmes, techno-economic networks, actor worlds, development arenas. Experiences based on a recent Danish green technology foresight project concerned with environmental risks and opportunities related to nano-, bio......The social shaping of technology (SST) approach has been developed as a response and extension to the ideas of techno-economic rationality and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. The SST approach seems especially promising in areas of technology where visions...... are manifold, societal interests conflicting, and applications and markets are non-existing or still under construction. The emerging high technology areas and several areas of more sustainable development like organic food production and renewable energy are examples of this kind, where techno...

  6. Organ trade using social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrogy, Waleed; Jawdat, Dunia; Alsemari, Muhannad; Alharbi, Abdulrahman; Alasaad, Abdullah; Hajeer, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation is recognized worldwide as an effective treatment for organ failure. However, due to the increase in the number of patients requiring a transplant, a shortage of suitable organs for transplantation has become a global problem. Human organ trade is an illegal practice of buying or selling organs and is universally sentenced. The aim of this study was to search social network for organ trade and offerings in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from June 22, 2015 to February 19, 2016. The search was conducted on Twitter, Google answers, and Facebook using the following terms: kidney for sale, kidneys for sale, liver for sale, kidney wanted, liver wanted, kidney donor, and liver donor. We found a total of 557 adverts on organ trade, 165 (30%) from donors or sellers, and 392 (70%) from recipients or buyers. On Twitter, we found 472 (85%) adverts, on Google answers 61 (11%), and on Facebook 24 (4%). Organ trade is a global problem, and yet it is increasingly seen in many countries. Although the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation by-laws specifically prohibits and monitors any form of commercial transplantation, it is still essential to enforce guidelines for medical professionals to detect and prevent such criminal acts.

  7. Organ trade using social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Alrogy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation is recognized worldwide as an effective treatment for organ failure. However, due to the increase in the number of patients requiring a transplant, a shortage of suitable organs for transplantation has become a global problem. Human organ trade is an illegal practice of buying or selling organs and is universally sentenced. The aim of this study was to search social network for organ trade and offerings in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from June 22, 2015 to February 19, 2016. The search was conducted on Twitter, Google answers, and Facebook using the following terms: kidney for sale, kidneys for sale, liver for sale, kidney wanted, liver wanted, kidney donor, and liver donor. We found a total of 557 adverts on organ trade, 165 (30% from donors or sellers, and 392 (70% from recipients or buyers. On Twitter, we found 472 (85% adverts, on Google answers 61 (11%, and on Facebook 24 (4%. Organ trade is a global problem, and yet it is increasingly seen in many countries. Although the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation by-laws specifically prohibits and monitors any form of commercial transplantation, it is still essential to enforce guidelines for medical professionals to detect and prevent such criminal acts.

  8. Technologies for Social Inclusion and Public Policies in Latin America

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Latin American governments, academics and nongovernmental organizations are paying increasing attention to poverty, inequality and social inclusion, and the role that technological change plays in these phenomenon. Rather than solving specific deficits, they are interested in how social technologies can generate ...

  9. Social organization of feral horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingel, H

    1982-01-01

    The basic social unit in feral horses is the family group consisting of one stallion, one to a few unrelated mares and their foals. Surplus stallions associate in bachelor groups. Stallions are instrumental in bringing mares together in a unit which then persists even without a stallion. The similarity of social organization in populations living in a variety of different habitats indicates that feral horses have reverted to the habits of their wild ancestors, and that domestication has had no influence on this basic behavioural feature.

  10. Wild about Social Media and Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santascoy, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    It's tempting to jump on the social media bandwagon and insist your organization needs Facebook, twitter, etc. But, when funds are limited, social media and related publicity must be carefully thought out. The NASA Night Sky Network, which is managed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, has developed widgets for websites and blogs, an iPhone app, and a Facebook presence. This is all to attract, inform, and reach the next generation of amateur astronomers, with no additional work needed from the amateur astronomy community who are members of the Night Sky Network. Outreach professionals will gain valuable insight from our experience, and may replicate this model to design their own social media and technology plan.

  11. Technological risks and social conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.; Krebsbach-Gnath, C.

    1980-12-01

    This volume of materials is part of the report on 'Technological risks and social conflicts. Political risk strategies in the field of nuclear power'. The interested reader who wants to deepen his knowledge on the results and reasoning of the main report, will here find detailed explanations and brief drafts of subprojects; fundamental aspects of problems are presented in detail, and theoretical-conceptional, methodological and scientific-political points of view are explained. Furthermore it contains general reflections on the application-oriented research by order, a review of the status of risk research, historical considerations on the nuclear energy conflict, and finally explanations are attempted for the nuclear energy conflict. (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Theorizing the Organization of Technology Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Heslop, Ben

    In this paper, we explore how, why and which structures are consequential to the organization of technology entrepreneurship. Technology entrepreneurship is a relatively unexplored field of research; yet body of research in this promising area of scholarly enquiry, both theoretically...... are presented as an integrative model of technology entrepreneurship. From the emergent model of technology entrepreneurship we move to a higher level of theorizing and develop a framework of the organization of technology entrepreneurship....

  13. Activism or "Slacktivism?": Digital Media and Organizing for Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Cerise L.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of social media and technological developments has changed how groups and organizations advocating for social change generate awareness and participation in their causes. In this single class activity students will (a) analyze notions of activism and "slacktivism" from scholarly and popular sources to apply these concepts…

  14. The Digital Economy: Social Interaction Technologies – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teófilo Redondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction technologies (SIT is a very broad field that encompasses a large list of topics: interactive and networked computing, mobile social services and the Social Web, social software and social media, marketing and advertising, various aspects and uses of blogs and podcasting, corporate value and web-based collaboration, e-government and online democracy, virtual volunteering, different aspects and uses of folksonomies, tagging and the social semantic cloud of tags, blog-based knowledge management systems, systems of online learning, with their ePortfolios, blogs and wikis in education and journalism, legal issues and social interaction technology, dataveillance and online fraud, neogeography, social software usability, social software in libraries and nonprofit organizations, and broadband visual communication technology for enhancing social interaction. The fact is that the daily activities of many businesses are being socialized, as is the case with Yammer (https://www.yammer.com/, the social enterprise social network. The leitmotivs of social software are: create, connect, contribute, and collaborate.

  15. The social function of technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of preserving the uneasy balance between a dynamic society and the equilibrium of man-environment society is discussed. Four sets of activities involved in technology assessment are considered: (1) Technology forecasting is necessary to warn of future dangers and opportunities, for effective timing, and to identify tradeoffs and alternatives. But forecasting is also chancy at best. (2) Social indicators need to be developed for the characterization of social status and measurement of social progress, as well as a better understanding of social needs. (3) With respect to technology assessment, the conflict between profitable directions of innovations and socially desirable directions is described, and a systematic way is needed to determine in advance what is technologically feasible to meet social needs. (4) National goals with respect to scientific and technological developments are also required.

  16. Influence of Information Technology on Organization Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Sibanda Mabutho; Ramrathan Durrel

    2017-01-01

    The exponential development of information technology has presented many opportunities to organizations; however, it has also presented several challenges. A key challenge is how do organizations effectively use information technology and incorporate it into their strategies to make full use of its capabilities as an enabler. The fast-changing nature of information technology has resulted in little empirical evidence on how it influences organization strategy. The Strategic Alignment Model wa...

  17. Information technology and mindfulness in organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Mikko Valorinta

    2009-01-01

    The concept of mindfulness has lately been applied to organizations that are increasingly attentive to their environment and adaptive to unanticipated events. This article analyzes how information technology impacts mindfulness in organizations. Information technology is proposed to promote mindfulness by engaging organizations in more extensive search processes and by fuelling organizational innovations with a repertoire of routines. However, information technology is also found to decrease ...

  18. Social Technologies to Jump Start Geoscience Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Martinez, Cynthia; Gonzales, Leila

    2010-05-01

    Collaborative and social technologies have been increasingly used to facilitate distributed data collection and observation in science. However, "Web 2.0" and basic social media are seeing limited coordinated use in building student and early-career geoscientists knowledge and understanding of the profession and career for which they have undertaken. The current generation of geology students and early career professionals are used to ready access to myriad of information and interaction opportunities, but they remain largely unaware about the geoscience profession, what the full scope of their opportunities are, and how to reach across institutional and subdisciplinary boundaries to build their own professional network. The American Geological Institute Workforce Program has tracked and supported the human resources of the geosciences since 1952. With the looming retirement of Baby Boomers, increasing demand for quality geoscientists, and a continued modest supply of students entering the geosciences, AGI is working to strengthen the human resource pipeline in the geosciences globally. One aspect of this effort is the GeoConnection Network, which is an integrated set of social networking, media sharing and communication Web 2.0 applications designed to engage students in thinking about careers in the geosciences and enabling them to build their own personal professional network. Developed by the American Geological Institute (AGI), GeoConnection links practicing and prospective geoscientists in an informal setting to share information about the geoscience profession, including student and career opportunities, current events, and future trends in the geosciences. The network includes a Facebook fan page, YouTube Channel, Twitter account and GeoSpectrum blog, with the goal of helping science organizations and departments recruit future talent to the geoscience workforce. On the social-networking platform, Facebook, the GeoConnection page is a forum for students and

  19. Social Movements and Their Technologies: Wiring Social Change. - Paperback edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Now in paperback for the first time, Social Movements and their Technologies explores the interplay between social movements and their 'liberated technologies'. It analyzes the rise of low-power radio stations and radical internet projects ('emancipatory communication practices') as a political

  20. India creates social marketing organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    India, in a major policy shift toward reversible birth controls methods, will form a new organization to promote private sector contraceptive sales. The government, through a recently signed agreement with the Agency for International Development (AID), plans to establish a private nonprofit Contraceptive Marketing Organization (CMO) in fiscal year 1984. This momentous move marks a full circle return to a 1969 proposal by AID and Ford Foundation consultants. Funded at about $500 million over a 7 year period, the CMO will function as a semi-autonomous entity run by a board of governors representing government and such public and public sectors as health, communications, management, manufacturing, marketing, advertising, and market research. According to the agreement called the India Family Planning Communications and Marketing Plan, the CMO's activities will cover procurement and distribution of condoms, oral contraceptives (OCs), and other yet to be determined contraceptive methods. Of the $500 million in funds, the government of India has pledged 2/3, AID roughly $50 million in grants and loans, with the balance expected from such sources as the UN Fund for Population Activities. The CMO's goal is a marked increase in contraceptive use by married couples of reproductive age from the current 6% rate to 20% by 1990. As of 1982, India has 122 million such couples, with 1% purchasing commercial products, 2% buying Nirodh Marketing Program condoms and 3% relying on free government contraceptives. Besides creating the CMO, the India/AID pact outlines intensified public sector family planning promotions and activities. Some Indian health experts believe the government's decision to expand social marketing's role rests with a significant decade long decline in the popularity of such permanent birth control measures as vasectomy and tubal ligation.

  1. Social and Technological Development in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1997-01-01

    This papers studies the processes developing technology and its social "sorroundings", the social networks. Positions in the debate on technological change is discussed. A central topic is the enterprise external development and decision processes and their interplay with the enterprise internal...

  2. Social Shaping in Danish Technology Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Grethe; Clausen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The term ‘social shaping of technology’ has been used broadly as a response to techno-economic deterministic understandings of the relations between technology and society. Social shaping has brought together analysts from different backgrounds who share a common interest in the role of social an...... in these projects contributed to new insights into the processes of technological change and thus to policy formulation. The social shaping perspective and technology assessment experiences are suggested as important guides to future technology strategies....... and political action for technology change. The authors of this article suggest that the social shaping perspective draws on lessons from technology assessments of earlier decades, lessons about the role of technology debate, participation and democratic control. We suggest that these are important......The term ‘social shaping of technology’ has been used broadly as a response to techno-economic deterministic understandings of the relations between technology and society. Social shaping has brought together analysts from different backgrounds who share a common interest in the role of social...

  3. Social Touch Technology: A Survey of Haptic Technology for Social Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This survey provides an overview of work on haptic technology for social touch. Social touch has been studied extensively in psychology and neuroscience. With the development of new technologies, it is now possible to engage in social touch at a distance or engage in social touch with artificial

  4. Social organization in Female Elephants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vidya

    Behaviour in Social Animals. Interaction between conspecifics in social animals. Ecological factors; Benefits from interacting with conspecifics; Conflict from conspecifics. Degrees of Sociality. Fission-Fusion Societies. Group sizes and compositions may vary but groups are not just random collections of individuals.

  5. Handbook of social network technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2010-01-01

    Social networking is a concept that has existed for a long time; however, with the explosion of the Internet, social networking has become a tool for people to connect and communicate in ways that were impossible in the past. The recent development of Web 2.0 has provided many new applications, such as Myspace, Facebook, and LinkedIn. The purpose of ""Handbook of Social Networks: Technologies and Applications"" is to provide comprehensive guidelines on the current and future trends in social network technologies and applications in the field of Web-based Social Networks. This handbook includes

  6. Social Touch Technology: A Survey of Haptic Technology for Social Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This survey provides an overview of work on haptic technology for social touch. Social touch has been studied extensively in psychology and neuroscience. With the development of new technologies, it is now possible to engage in social touch at a distance or engage in social touch with artificial social agents. Social touch research has inspired research into technology mediated social touch, and this line of research has found effects similar to actual social touch. The importance of haptic stimulus qualities, multimodal cues, and contextual factors in technology mediated social touch is discussed. This survey is concluded by reflecting on the current state of research into social touch technology, and providing suggestions for future research and applications.

  7. Organizational Application of Social Networking Information Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative research study using the Delphi method is to provide a framework for leaders to develop their own social networks. By exploring concerns in four areas, leaders may be able to better plan, implement, and manage social networking systems in organizations. The areas addressed are: (a) social networking using…

  8. Technological change as social proces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article distinguishes between different meanings that technology has as well as the different 'roles' that technologies play in society. udfoldes tre forståelser af teknologisk forandring. Der sigtes på at fremstille forskellige meningsdannelser, som i sit samspil konstituerer et samfunds opf...

  9. Organizing for Networked Information Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book provides seven practical examples of how Danish companies implemented new information technology in order to transform their internal and external business processes. The purpose is to share some of the companies' concerns and hopes during this implementation process, with each case...

  10. Organic consumption behavior : A social identification perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Shuili; Bartels, Jos; Reinders, Machiel; Sen, Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Consumer demand for organic food and non-food products has been growing dramatically. This study examines organic consumption behavior from a social identification perspective. Focusing on the central role of organic consumer identification (OCI), or the extent to which individuals categorize

  11. Social Media Technology Management in College of Technology in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Pillai, Sunil Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the constructs--utilitarian, hedonic and social value on the perceptions of the full-time instructors related to their social media technology (SMT) management for learning and teaching practices at workplace. Design/methodology/approach: A survey is used to gather the data from 180…

  12. Legal and social concerns to the development of bioremediation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilyard, G.R.; McCabe, G.H.; White, K.A.; Gajewski, S.W.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Jaksch, J.A.; Kirwan-Taylor, H.A.; McKinney, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    The social and legal framework within which bioremediation technologies must be researched, developed, and deployed in the US are discussed in this report. Discussions focus on policies, laws and regulations, intellectual property, technology transfer, and stakeholder concerns. These discussions are intended to help program managers, scientists and engineers understand the social and legal framework within which they work, and be cognizant of relevant issues that must be navigated during bioremediation technology research, development, and deployment activities. While this report focuses on the legal and social environment within which the DOE operates, the laws, regulations and social processes could apply to DoD and other sites nationwide. This report identifies specific issues related to bioremediation technologies, including those involving the use of plants; native, naturally occurring microbes; non-native, naturally occurring microbes; genetically engineered organisms; and microbial products (e.g., enzymes, surfactants, chelating compounds). It considers issues that fall within the following general categories: US biotechnology policy and the regulation of field releases of organisms; US environmental laws and waste cleanup regulations; intellectual property and patenting issues; technology transfer procedures for commercializing technology developed through government-funded research; stakeholder concerns about bioremediation proposals; and methods for assuring public involvement in technology development and deployment.

  13. Legal and social concerns to the development of bioremediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyard, G.R.; McCabe, G.H.; White, K.A.; Gajewski, S.W.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Jaksch, J.A.; Kirwan-Taylor, H.A.; McKinney, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    The social and legal framework within which bioremediation technologies must be researched, developed, and deployed in the US are discussed in this report. Discussions focus on policies, laws and regulations, intellectual property, technology transfer, and stakeholder concerns. These discussions are intended to help program managers, scientists and engineers understand the social and legal framework within which they work, and be cognizant of relevant issues that must be navigated during bioremediation technology research, development, and deployment activities. While this report focuses on the legal and social environment within which the DOE operates, the laws, regulations and social processes could apply to DoD and other sites nationwide. This report identifies specific issues related to bioremediation technologies, including those involving the use of plants; native, naturally occurring microbes; non-native, naturally occurring microbes; genetically engineered organisms; and microbial products (e.g., enzymes, surfactants, chelating compounds). It considers issues that fall within the following general categories: US biotechnology policy and the regulation of field releases of organisms; US environmental laws and waste cleanup regulations; intellectual property and patenting issues; technology transfer procedures for commercializing technology developed through government-funded research; stakeholder concerns about bioremediation proposals; and methods for assuring public involvement in technology development and deployment

  14. Influence of Information Technology on Organization Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibanda Mabutho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The exponential development of information technology has presented many opportunities to organizations; however, it has also presented several challenges. A key challenge is how do organizations effectively use information technology and incorporate it into their strategies to make full use of its capabilities as an enabler. The fast-changing nature of information technology has resulted in little empirical evidence on how it influences organization strategy. The Strategic Alignment Model was a popular model created to assist organizations to align their information technology and their business strategy; however, the growth of technology may have made this model irrelevant in this age. Therefore, organizations need to determine what factors drive this alignment. Using hermeneutic phenomenology, 12 in-depth interviews were conducted within IBM South Africa to determine real-life drivers that help create this alignment. The themes derived from the interview texts reveal that consumers are becoming more empowered; therefore, organizations need to be more flexible in their business models and strategies. Furthermore, the integration of cross-functional roles in the organization at the management level allow for improved alignment between information technology and strategy as better integrated roles bring a combination of these two elements.

  15. Technology Integration and Technology Leadership in Schools as Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate technology integration in primary schools from the perspective of leadership in learning organizations. To that end, the study examines two groups: school administrators who play effective roles in technology integration in schools and computer teachers who are mainly responsible for schools' technology…

  16. Social media processes in disasters: Implications of emergent technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Dhiraj; Gross, Alexander J

    2017-03-01

    This article seeks to extend social science scholarship on social media technology use during disruptive events. Though social media's role in times of crisis has been previously studied, much of this work tends to focus on first-responders and relief organizations. However, social media use during disasters tends to be decentralized and this organizational structure can promote different types of messages to top-down information systems. Using 142,786 geo-tagged tweets collected before and after Hurricane Sandy's US landfall as a case study, this article seeks to explore shifts in social media behavior during disruptive events and highlights that though Sandy disrupted routine life within Twitter, users responded to the disaster by employing humor, sharing photos, and checking into locations. We conclude that social media use during disruptive events is complex and understanding these nuanced behaviors is important across the social sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment technology for organic radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Shon, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In this report, various alternative technologies to the incineration for the treatment of radioactive organic wastes were described and reviewed, fallen into two groups of low temperature technologies and high temperature technologies. These technologies have the advantages of low volume gaseous emission, few or no dioxin generation, and operation at low enough temperature that radionuclides are not volatilized. Delphi chemical oxidation, mediated electrochemical oxidation, and photolytic ultraviolet oxidation appear to be the most promising low temperature oxidation process and steam reforming and supercritical water oxidation in the high temperature technologies. 52 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  18. THE ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN ORGANIZATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Bashir Khodaparasti

    2012-01-01

    Development of organization started in period with agriculture and industrial during the period came and information. Today in period of competition, information is very important needed. So competitive advantage in the information provided to achieve goals is necessary. Entrance of this technology in organizations conjectural attitude changed and evolved functions their managers. The purpose of this paper is to define the correct information and the role technology has in improving the situa...

  19. Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Moyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often unexpected ways in which medical technologies are appropriated by diverse actors in homes, clinics and communities. The authors highlight key

  20. Social media, new technologies and history education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees; Haydn, Terry; Carretero, Mario; Berger, Stefan; Grever, Maria

    This chapter explores the implications of recent developments in technology and social media, having a significant impact on the way in which young people learn history in schools and outside schools. New technology not only has a positive influence on education, it also has unintended negative

  1. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  2. Building social implications into technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeld, L.

    2006-01-01

    We are intuitively aware of the privacy issues involved in telemonitoring and telemedicine. The actual details, however, can only be determined by investigating the socio-legal aspects involved and the manner in which patients adopt the new technology. For Lynsey Dubbeld, it is vital to establish a

  3. Innovations: Scientific, Technological, and Social.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Dennis

    Dr. Gabor, the inventor of holography (lenseless photography), defines "innovation" as a methodical creation of the human spirit, a novelty that once created can be usefully and repeatedly applied. He describes and evaluates 100 important technological and biological inventions that can probably be expected within the next 50 years. He also…

  4. Plant gene technology: social considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    exogenous fertilizers. This process, in addition to increasing yield, may maintain the soil ecosystem undisturbed by chemical fertilizers. Modern ... money that was used to buy insecticidal chemicals, this technology is environmentally very friendly. Improving the quality of food products: It has become possible to delay the ...

  5. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus. Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake.

  6. Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christopher R; Calder, Catherine A; Soller, Brian; Jackson, Aubrey L; Dirlam, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Drawing on the social disorganization tradition and the social ecological perspective of Jane Jacobs, the authors hypothesize that neighborhoods composed of residents who intersect in space more frequently as a result of routine activities will exhibit higher levels of collective efficacy, intergenerational closure, and social network interaction and exchange. They develop this approach employing the concept of ecological networks-two-mode networks that indirectly link residents through spatial overlap in routine activities. Using data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, they find evidence that econetwork extensity (the average proportion of households in the neighborhood to which a given household is tied through any location) and intensity (the degree to which household dyads are characterized by ties through multiple locations) are positively related to changes in social organization between 2000-2001 and 2006-2008. These findings demonstrate the relevance of econetwork characteristics-heretofore neglected in research on urban neighborhoods-for consequential dimensions of neighborhood social organization.

  7. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Harry O.; Glass, Joseph E.; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  8. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Perron

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICTs are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  9. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E; Taylor, Harry O; Glass, Joseph E; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  10. Technological risks and social conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.; Krebsbach-Gnath, C.

    1980-12-01

    Research on acceptance, perception and assessment of risks clearly shows that perception of risk by the public is based more on subjective assessments than on scientifically objective risk values. Risk perception by the public is influenced by a number of factors. Risk is still a central point in the conflict and always plays a major role in the opposition toward dangerous technologies. Risk forms the thematic focus for the controversy. The development of the actual conflict, the positions, interests, adaptation problems and processes of the various societal institutions, the conditions, prospects, and forms of antinuclear protest and the subjects and structures, symmetries and changes of argument in the public discussion on nuclear energy are analyzed and represented in detail in this report. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Organic electronics emerging concepts and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Santato, Clara

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the tremendous potential of organic electronics, concentrating on those emerging topics and technologies that will form the focus of research over the next five to ten years. The young and energetic team of editors with an excellent research track record has brought together internationally renowned authors to review up-and-coming topics, some for the first time, such as organic spintronics, iontronics, light emitting transistors, organic sensors and advanced structural analysis. As a result, this book serves the needs of experienced researchers in organic electronics, graduate

  12. Interactive Communication Technologies in Business Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; Allbritton, Marcel M.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the distinctive aspects of the new interactive communication technologies (electronic mail over the Internet) in business communication and their implications. Discusses the growth of interactive communication, the concept of interactivity, physical distance and social presence, getting to critical mass, and flexibility and control of…

  13. [Technology development as social process: prospects and frontiers of social scientific elucidation of technological advancement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierkes, M

    1990-05-01

    This article provides an overview of the new developments in social scientific technology research which have changed considerably as a result of public debate and reactions to the importance of advancements in technology. The shift in emphasis, away from the effects of technology to its shaping, is described and certain hypotheses and concepts of advancement in the study of the social conditions underlying technical development processes are presented.

  14. Political and social aspects of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    The political and social aspects of radiation technology are presented. The importance of radiation processing to economies dependent on the storage, transportation and sale of produce is emphasised. Efforts by pressure groups in Canada, to discredit food irradiation processes are discussed. Methods used to overcome objections to food irradiation and radiation technology by public information and education through the media are presented. (U.K.)

  15. Green technology foresight of high technology: a social shaping of technology approach to the analysis of hopes and hypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Jørgensen, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    High tech visions play an important part in public technology policy and are often promoted through technology foresights. The article presents and analyses results from a green technology foresight of nano-, bio- and information- and communication technologies initiated by the Danish Environmental...... Protection Agency with the purpose of acquiring knowledge about the environmental potentials and risks related to the three areas of technology. The foresight was organized with a social shaping of technology (SST) approach to the field in order to cater for the complex relationship between societal demands......, technology options, innovation dynamics and environmental impacts. The approach involved studying actor-networks, laboratory programs and technology trajectories as well as deconstructing different stakeholders’ high tech visions. The identified environmental potentials and risks related to the three areas...

  16. The Social Construction of Imported Technologies: Reflections on the Social History of Technology in Modern Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub

    2017-01-01

    Can imported technologies be socially constructed? Starting from this puzzling question, this essay reflects on the various methodologies with which one can narrate the stories of technology in modern Korea. A focus on technological innovations and how they have been shaped by their societal milieu forces one to leave out a large part of the technological experience, especially when the bulk of the technologies-in-use have been imported from abroad. This poses a serious problem for the history of technology in Korea, a nation that relied heavily on foreign technologies as it went through rapid economic growth in the latter twentieth century.

  17. Governance in Blockchain Technologies & Social Contract Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Reijers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is placed in the context of a growing number of social and political critiques of blockchain technologies. We focus on the supposed potential of blockchain technologies to transform political institutions that are central to contemporary human societies, such as money, property rights regimes, and systems of democratic governance. Our aim is to examine the way blockchain technologies canbring about - and justify - new models of governance. To do so, we draw on the philosophical works of Hobbes, Rousseau, and Rawls, analyzing blockchain governance in terms of contrasting social contract theories. We begin by comparing the justifications of blockchain governance offered by members of the blockchain developers’ community with the justifications of governance presented within social contract theories. We then examine the extent to which the model of governance offered by blockchain technologies reflects key governance themes and assumptions located within social contract theories, focusing on the notions of sovereignty, the initial situation, decentralization and distributive justice.

  18. Social Studies and the Language of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John K.; Bennett, Clifford

    1999-01-01

    Provides definitions of the following words and phrases that are related to technology and its use in the social sciences classroom: CD-ROM, database, discussion group, e-mail, hypertext and hypermedia, Internet, simulation, spreadsheets, virtual field trip, and World Wide Web. (AEF)

  19. Corporate Social Responsability and Organization Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta CRISTACHE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At a time when the world is interested in phenomena such as, ecology, environment, food safety, ozone layer depletion, famine and their effects on social responsibility initiatives are becoming increasingly well received. Even if you can not give a real dimension of the concept of social responsibility-taking as any guarantee of success, an organization must be aware that there is only a tool for maximizing the value of image design, but an essential element of long-term success in direct connection with social and environmental performance of the community. To work is to highlight the link between corporate social responsibility strategies and success in solving organizational policies company issues under restrictive conditions imposed by nouile economic, social and political.

  20. Circuit design in organic semiconductor technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heremans, P.; Dehaene, W.; Steyaert, M.; Myny, K.; Mariën, H.; Genoe, J.; Gelinck, G.H.; Veenendaal, E. van

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art of digital and analog circuits that have been shown in recent years in organic thin-film transistor technology on flexible plastic foil. The transistors are developed for backplanes of displays, and therefore have the characteristics to be unipolar and

  1. Technological status of organic photovoltaics (OPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Jon Eggert; Krebs, Frederik C

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a technological status of organic and polymer photovoltaics (OPV) for both single and tandem junctions. We list the current state-of-the-art at the laboratory level for very small rigid and mostly vacuum processed devices to larger area flexible and printed devices. In comparison...

  2. The conceptual model of organization social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    LUO, Lan; WEI, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    With the developing of the research of CSR, people more and more deeply noticethat the corporate should take responsibility. Whether other organizations besides corporatesshould not take responsibilities beyond their field? This paper puts forward theconcept of organization social responsibility on the basis of the concept of corporate socialresponsibility and other theories. And the conceptual models are built based on theconception, introducing the OSR from three angles: the types of organi...

  3. [Social tuberculosis controlling organizations in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilenko, V S

    2003-01-01

    In Russia, social tuberculosis-controlling organization have been existing and actively functioning just for about 120 years. In the organizational context, they have gone a long way--from single interim and standing commissions by setting up local societies of phthisiologists in large centers of Russia (Petersburg, Moscow, Voronezh, Kharkov, etc.), the All-Russian Tuberculosis-Controlling League before the establishment of All-Union and All-Russian research medical societies of phthisiologists. At present, the All-Union Research Medical Society of Phthisiologists was reorganized as the International Research Medical Society of Phthisiologists and the All-Russian Research Medical Society of Phthisiologists functions as the Russian social organization. "The Russian Society of Phthisiologists". Throughout their history, social tuberculosis-controlling organizations have been playing an important role in forming and developing phthisiological science, in improving the tuberculosis-controlling care system for Russia's population. At present, social tuberculosis-controlling organizations hold great promise for their multi-faceted activities for the welfare of the population of Russia.

  4. Social exchange and common agency in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein Roelfsema; Robert Dur

    2010-01-01

    We study the relation between formal incentives and social exchange in organizations where employees work for several managers and reciprocate a manager’s attention with higher effort. To this end we develop a common agency model with two-sided moral hazard. We show that when management attention is

  5. Technology assessment and social science research on technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thienen, V. von

    1983-01-01

    In a first step this bibliography wants to overcome the want of systematic scientific data compilations and evaluations of experiences in studies on technology assessment. It concentrates on the social and political aspects of the development of technologies and the decision on their utilization by presenting titles which have been published in English- and German-speaking countries in the past decade. The bibliography is divided into various chapters and subchapters. The index part contains authors' indexes and publishers' indexes, subject indexes, other bibliographies and selected periodicals. (orig.) With 1647 refs [de

  6. Alternative oxidation technologies for organic mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Fewell, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) is currently supporting the development and demonstration of several alternative oxidation technology (AOT) processes for treatment of combustible mixed low-level wastes. AOTs have been defined as technologies that destroy organic material without using open-flame reactions. AOTs include both thermal and nonthermal processes that oxidize organic wastes but operate under significantly different physical and chemical conditions than incinerators. Nonthermal processes currently being studied include Delphi DETOX and acid digestion at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and direct chemical oxidation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). All three technologies are at advanced stages of development or are entering the demonstration phase. Nonflame thermal processes include catalytic chemical oxidation, which is being developed and deployed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and steam reforming, a commercial process being supported by the Department of Energy (DOE). Although testing is complete on some AOT technologies, most require additional support to complete some or all of the identified development objectives. Brief descriptions, status, and planned paths forward for each of the technologies are presented

  7. Multi-dimensional technology-enabled social learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petreski, Hristijan; Tsekeridou, Sofia; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2013-01-01

    in learning while socializing within their learning communities. However, their “educational” usage is still limited to facilitation of online learning communities and to collaborative authoring of learning material complementary to existing formal (e-) learning services. If the educational system doesn......’t respond to this systemic and structural changes and/or challenges and retains its status quo than it is jeopardizing its own existence or the existence of the education, as we know it. This paper aims to precede one step further by proposing a multi-dimensional approach for technology-enabled social...... content on the Web, using social networks to keep in touch, express, distribute and publish their experiences, views and ideas. Although, since their birth, most of the social media tools were not intended for educational purposes, educational organizations have started to recognize their added value...

  8. Organic agriculture as socially responsible business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Mitar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the modern world is faced with the need for global, shared responsibility for development, which is in accordance with the needs of people and nature. Every day, the business community is challenged to be more responsible and sustainable. There is a need for continuous work on the integration of economic, social and environmental aspects. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is not an additional element of business activity, but it's essential and inseparable component, which will be shown in this paper. Organic agriculture in the world is seen as a good tool for the preservation of the environment, and the concept is coherent with CSR. The system of production of organic food must be in sync with the numerous qualitative and quantitative requirements of environmental protection. Organic agriculture can represent a decisive factor in the development of Serbia, but in this area, there is a necessity for more investment, especially in education and the development of existing capacities. Game theory with its models and conclusions ought to provide sustenance to this topic in business and academic research. In this paper, game theory and its models show that investment in organic production as a socially responsible business generates value. By combining producers and processors in the group, additional economic benefits can be achieved, not only for the group, but also for the entire business in which the group operates. The paper is based on the models of Arya and Mittendorf (2006 and Goering (2012, so it represents their combination and therefore the extended version.

  9. Social technologies : Cross-disciplinary reflections on technologies in and from the social sciences Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Vikkelso, Signe; Beaulieu, Anne

    In this introduction, we explore the relevance to critical psychology of the ideas about technology that have come from science and technology studies (STS), which we argue allow a new look at a classic theme in critical approaches in psychology. Rather than seeing psychical and social reality as

  10. Social technologies: Cross-disciplinary reflections on technologies in and from the social sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Vikkelsø, S.; Beaulieu, Julianie

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction, we explore the relevance to critical psychology of the ideas about technology that have come from science and technology studies (STS), which we argue allow a new look at a classic theme in critical approaches in psychology. Rather than seeing psychical and social reality as

  11. Science, Technology and Innovation Policy Research Organization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ce financement contribuera à renforcer le rôle de la Science, Technology and Innovation Policy Research Organization (STIPRO) en tant qu'organisme crédible de recherche sur les politiques publiques en Tanzanie, en améliorant sa capacité à fournir des recherches de qualité supérieure, influentes et utiles en matière de ...

  12. Health organizations providing and seeking social support: a Twitter-based content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Jian Raymond; Chen, Yixin; Damiano, Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Providing and seeking social support are important aspects of social exchange. New communication technologies, especially social network sites (SNSs), facilitate the process of support exchange. An increasing number of health organizations are using SNSs. However, how they provide and seek social support via SNSs has yet to garner academic attention. This study examined the types of social support provided and sought by health organizations on Twitter. A content analysis was conducted on 1,500 tweets sent by a random sample of 58 health organizations within 2 months. Findings indicate that providing informational and emotional support, as well as seeking instrumental support, were the main types of social support exchanged by health organizations through Twitter. This study provides a typology for studying social support exchanges by health organizations, and recommends strategies for health organizations regarding the effective use of Twitter.

  13. Social aspects of the innovation management in organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Neverov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The unstable economics as well as difficulties associated with lack and scarcity of human, financial and investment resources cause the tightening of requirements to the organizational management. The market economy demands a systematic approach to the management based on the strategic planning combined with an opportunity to make situational decisions. Such management models are difficult to use for they require a lot of resources the lack of which is usually a marker of a crisis situation. That is why at the moments of the so called ‘market turbulence’ and socio-economic reduction indicators, organizations have to reduce the costs of management and social development that helps in a short-term perspective, but in the future can destabilize the organization and make it more vulnerable to the new ‘wave of crisis’. One of possible ways to preserve organizational stability is to apply innovative methods of management. Currently, the problems of innovation management are widely reported in the scientific and business literature focusing on the creation and implementation of the management innovations technologies that promise the greatest dividends, while the authors rarely consider the impact of the innovative management on employees’ social well-being, social development and social capital focusing on the staff resistance to innovations despite the fact that any innovation produces profound changes in the system of social management. Thus, the article aims at the theoretical study of innovation management factors’ impact on the social aspects of organizational life and states that the implementation of innovations into the organization management without taking into consideration their possible consequences for the social state of the organization in the long run is totally unacceptable.

  14. Platform technologies for tubular organ regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Joydeep; Ludlow, John W

    2010-10-01

    As a result of recent successes in regenerative medicine approaches to engineering multiple disparate tubular organs, methodology commonalities are emerging. Principal themes include the importance of a biodegradable scaffold seeded with a population of smooth muscle cells. Such composites trigger a regenerative response following in vivo implantation, resulting in de novo organogenesis. In this review, we examine bladder regeneration as a foundational platform technology to highlight key principles applicable to the regeneration of any tubular organ, and illustrate how these general concepts underlie current strategies to regenerate components of gastrointestinal, vascular, pulmonary and genitourinary systems. We focus on identifying the elements of this platform that have facilitated the transition of tubular organ regeneration from academic proof-of-concept to commercial viability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discrete hierarchical organization of social group sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W-X; Sornette, D; Hill, R A; Dunbar, R I M

    2005-02-22

    The 'social brain hypothesis' for the evolution of large brains in primates has led to evidence for the coevolution of neocortical size and social group sizes, suggesting that there is a cognitive constraint on group size that depends, in some way, on the volume of neural material available for processing and synthesizing information on social relationships. More recently, work on both human and non-human primates has suggested that social groups are often hierarchically structured. We combine data on human grouping patterns in a comprehensive and systematic study. Using fractal analysis, we identify, with high statistical confidence, a discrete hierarchy of group sizes with a preferred scaling ratio close to three: rather than a single or a continuous spectrum of group sizes, humans spontaneously form groups of preferred sizes organized in a geometrical series approximating 3-5, 9-15, 30-45, etc. Such discrete scale invariance could be related to that identified in signatures of herding behaviour in financial markets and might reflect a hierarchical processing of social nearness by human brains.

  16. Democracy as a social technology on schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    " democracy. The democratic influence in schools thus spans from "big" parliamentary democracy to small participatoruy democracy - a dichotomy schooll leadership must maneuvre within using democratic procedures and leadership as social technologies. This article argues that a positive coinnectiion exists......On a formal level, the influence og "big" parlamentary democracy is enhanced because parliamentary control in individual schools has become stronger; and the formal democratic influence of parents has been strengthned by their membership on school boards, the latter being an example of "small...

  17. Social and technological aspects of disaster resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Revez, Alexandra; Sparf, Jorgen

    2016-01-01

    Large scale projects tasked with designing infrastructures and urban networks resilient to disasters face a common challenge, i.e. the need to address concomitant technological issues and social problems. What is more, conflicting technologies and the diverse philosophical underpinnings of distinct...... academic disciplines pose difficulties in the collaboration among experts of different fields. These difficulties and possible ways to tackle them have been highlighted by a questionnaire developed in the framework of an EU project named ANDROID (Academic Network for Disaster Resilience to Optimize...... Educational Development). More specifically, the project investigated the level of interdisciplinary work in current research and educational projects within the field of disaster resilience. Findings illustrate the number and types of disciplines involved in disaster resilience projects and suggest...

  18. Geothermal technology in Australia: Investigating social acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, Anne-Maree; Boughen, Naomi; Ashworth, Peta; Carr-Cornish, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Issues of social acceptance, such as lack of awareness and negative community perceptions and reactions, can affect low emission energy technology development, despite general support observed for reducing carbon emissions and mitigating climate change. Negative community reactions and lack of understanding have affected geothermal developments, as demonstrated by the fearful community reactions and negative media experienced in response to seismic disturbances caused by 'hot rock' geothermal energy generation in Switzerland and Germany. Focusing on geothermal energy, this paper presents the results of using a participatory action research methodology to engage diverse groups within the Australian public. A key finding is that the majority of the Australian public report limited the knowledge or understanding of geothermal technology and have various concerns including water usage and seismic activity instigated by geothermal drilling. However, geothermal energy receives general support due to a common trend to champion renewable energy sources in preference to traditional forms of energy generation and controversial technologies. This paper also demonstrates the effectiveness of using an engagement process to explore public understanding of energy technologies in the context of climate change, and suggests a way forward for governments and industry to allocate resources for greatest impact when communicating about geothermal technology. - Highlights: → Majority of Australians have limited knowledge or understanding of geothermal technology. → Various concerns, including water usage and seismic activity instigated by drilling, were raised. → Geothermal energy has general support due to a common trend to champion renewable energy sources. → Methodology shows the effectiveness of an engagement process to explore public understanding. → Participants expressed intention to change behaviours, which can be a catalyst for change.

  19. Seeking and Sharing Knowledge Using Social Media in an Organization: The Impact of Social Influence, Organization Structure and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    The prolific use of social media tools such as blogs and wikis is leading several organizations to adopt these tools. However, success of social media depends on its use by employees to share and seek knowledge. Based on a unique data set obtained from a large multi-national corporation, I examined three different aspects of knowledge seeking and…

  20. Theoretical Insights for Developing the Concept of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Skaržauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Social technologies continue to grow in popularity in society. Even though the term “social technology” is most commonly used to refer to new social media such as Twitter and Facebook, a redefinition of this concept based on the original definition is needed. Nowadays the concept of “social technology” has several aspects, which destabilize the dominant image of technology. It emphasizes the social sciences and the humanities as shapers of society, reconsiders the strength of “soft technologies.” The aim of this paper is to provide rich insight into the concept of social technologies’ and to develop the meaning of social technologies in information and knowledge society by analysing new needs and application forms of social technologies.Findings—the research contributed to the understanding of the concept of social technologies. Based on the analysis and synthesis of the scientific literature, a theoretical framework for defining social technologies was developed.Research limitations/implications—the research is limited in a few aspects. For a deeper understanding of social technologies and for developing technological perspectives in social sciences a broader theoretical, as well as empirical, research is necessary. In order to generalise the research findings, further research should include different dimensions from the perspective of other sciences.

  1. Theoretical Insights for Developing the Concept of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rūta Tamošiūnaitė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Social technologies continue to grow in popularity in society. Even though the term “social technology” is most commonly used to refer to new social media such as Twitter and Facebook, a redefinition of this concept based on the original definition is needed. Nowadays the concept of “social technology” has several aspects, which destabilize the dominant image of technology. It emphasizes the social sciences and the humanities as shapers of society, reconsiders the strength of “soft technologies.” The aim of this paper is to provide rich insight into the concept of social technologies’ and to develop the meaning of social technologies in information and knowledge society by analysing new needs and application forms of social technologies. Findings—the research contributed to the understanding of the concept of social technologies. Based on the analysis and synthesis of the scientific literature, a theoretical framework for defining social technologies was developed. Research limitations/implications—the research is limited in a few aspects. For a deeper understanding of social technologies and for developing technological perspectives in social sciences a broader theoretical, as well as empirical, research is necessary. In order to generalise the research findings, further research should include different dimensions from the perspective of other sciences. Article Type: conceptual paper.

  2. Social Media and Organizing – An Empirical Analysis of the Role of Wiki Affordances in Organizing Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansour, Osama; Askenäs, Linda; Ghazawneh, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of social media has introduced novel possibilities for work and interaction in organizations. The wiki technology is one important kind of social media technologies that is increasingly used to facilitate the creation and sharing of organizational knowledge within communities. Given...... the increasing use of social media in organizations and the lack of knowledge on their consequences for organizing, we use an affordance lens to explore the enactment of organizational wiki affordances. Using qualitative data obtained through interviews, field visits, and documents from two multinational...... in that they extend the notion of affordance by theorizing new concepts that describe relational dynamics, situated and contextual conditions, and social factors involved in enacting, perceiving, and exploiting affordances....

  3. Social capital of organizations : from social structure to the management of corporate social capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbay, Shaul M.; Leenders, Roger Th.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Social capital in general and the study of social capital in the context of organizations has gained considerable attention in recent years. Despite the promise in the potency of the concept, its useful application suffers from the plethora of different definitions and approaches—both theoretical

  4. Feminist critiques of new fertility technologies: implications for social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchin, A

    1996-10-01

    This essay aims to show how feminist theoretical and practical perspective have enriched and deepened debate about moral and social issues generated by the proliferation and commodification of new reproductive techniques. It evaluates alternative feminist appraisals beginning with the first group to organize a collective response to the medicalization of infertility and explores several weaknesses working within their assessment: objectification of infertile women, naturalizing constructions of motherhood, hostility to technology, and an overly simplistic conception of power relations. Next, it shows how subsequent feminists have reframed the issues to overcome these weaknesses, drawing on themes prominent in recent theoretical debates: the need to reclaim women's agency, to revalue mothering, and to reappraise power relations. Lastly, it weighs the prospects for a collaborative politics that is sensitive to the social marginalization of vulnerable women and suggests practical strategies for responding to mounting pressures to procreate at any price.

  5. Technological change as a trade-off between social construction and technological paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Engen, Ole Andreas; Olsen, Odd Einar

    2007-01-01

    Made available from Technology in Society, 29/4, Odd Einar Olsen, & Ole Andreas Engen, Technological change as a trade-off between social construction and technological paradigms, Pages No. 456-468, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0160791X The theory of social construction of technology (SCOT) and the theory of technological paradigms (TTP) are normally regarded as competing or even incompatible perspectives on technological ch...

  6. How Organizations Adapt Social Media Capabilities as a Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhofen, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of scholarly studies that examines how organizations enhance their ability to generate value through social media. It explores why some organizations are able to adopt and benefit from social media while others cannot. Specifically, it examines: (i) how "people" and social networks are essential to…

  7. Using Web 2.0 and social media technologies to foster proenvironmental action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew T. Ballew; Allen M. Omoto; Patricia L. Winter

    2015-01-01

    Research from a variety of disciplines suggests that online technologies (i.e., Web 2.0 and social media) have considerable potential for spurring proenvironmental action; however, relatively little work examines how to effectively capitalize on these communication and organization tools. This review paper describes the Technologies for Proenvironmental Action Model (...

  8. Pennsylvania Teachers' Perceptions and Use of Social Media Communication Technologies as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Brett C.

    2017-01-01

    A number of states and organizations have begun to add cross-content technology elements to their educational standards, providing teachers opportunities to use social media communication (SMC) technology in teaching and learning. Specifically, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the PA Core Standards, which are adapted from the national Common…

  9. [Organization and technology in the catering sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinarelli, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    The catering industry is a service characterized by a contract between customer and supplier. In institutional catering industry, the customer is represented by public administration; in private catering industry, the customer is represented by privates. The annual catering trades size is about 6.74 billions of euros, equally distributed between health sector (hospitals, nursing homes), school sector and business sector (ivorkplace food service), with the participation of nearly 1.200 firms and 70.000 workers. Major services include off-premises catering (food prepared away from the location where it's served) and on-premises catering (meals prepared and served at the same place). Several tools and machineries are used during both warehousing and food refrigerating operations, and during preparation, cooking, packaging and transport of meals. In this sector, injuries, rarely resulting serious or deadly, show a downward trend in the last years. On the contrary, the number of occupational diseases shows an upward trend. About the near future, the firms should become global outsourcer, able to provide other services as cleaning, transport and maintenance. In addition, they should invest in innovation: from tools and machineries technology to work organization; from factory lay-out to safely and health in the workplaces.

  10. Social shaping of technology in TA and HTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses how the social shaping of technology (SST) approach may be useful in understanding the role played by technology assessment within the context of technological development and change. It is proposed that an SST perspective on TA (or HTA) yields particular insight, regardless...... of whether or not the TA activity bases itself on a social shaping understanding of technology. This is because SST addresses the socially negotiated character of technological development, where TA itself may be construed as an element influencing the process of such negotiation. At the same time, TA...... is a construction, that is, itself a product of negotiations involving social actors. Thus, an understanding that TA is socially shaped, and is involved in the shaping of technology, opens up for a perspective on TA as both entailing constraints and enablements within the context of the particular agenda...

  11. The social comfort of wearable technology and gestural interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E; Profita, Halley; Zeagler, Clint; Clawson, James; Gilliland, Scott; Do, Ellen Yi-Luen; Budd, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The "wearability" of wearable technology addresses the factors that affect the degree of comfort the wearer experiences while wearing a device, including physical, psychological, and social aspects. While the physical and psychological aspects of wearing technology have been investigated since early in the development of the field of wearable computing, the social aspects of wearability have been less fully-explored. As wearable technology becomes increasingly common on the commercial market, social wearability is becoming an ever-more-important variable contributing to the success or failure of new products. Here we present an analysis of social aspects of wearability within the context of the greater understanding of wearability in wearable technology, and focus on selected theoretical frameworks for understanding how wearable products are perceived and evaluated in a social context. Qualitative results from a study of social acceptability of on-body interactions are presented as a case study of social wearability.

  12. MANAGING SOCIAL CAPITAL AND DIVERSITY FOR PERFORMANCE IN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compton, Mallory E.; Meier, Kenneth J.

    Managers concerned with the performance of their organizations will exploit available social, administrative, and human capital resources. However, extant theory and mixed empirical evidence leave the effect of social capital on performance unclear. The gains from these norms of reciprocity,

  13. Examining social media usage: Technology clusters and social network site membership

    OpenAIRE

    Schrock, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The popularization of “social media” has raised questions of how and why young people use these various technologies in their daily lives. This exploratory study proposes a classification system based on Rogers’ concept of technology clusters, which posits that likelihood of adoption is based around similar perceived characteristics of a technology or medium. Results from a survey administered to 401 undergraduates at a large southern university indicated that social and non-social technology...

  14. Technological Innovation Management and its Role in Performance of Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Diana Radu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the main benefits of technological innovation in organizations and how it should be managed to ensure economic efficiency. The current level of social and economic evolution was possible only through active involvement of individuals and organizations in the innovative process. Adoption of appropriate policies and strategies at institutional, national and international level has significant impact on both the innovation process and innovation results. At company level, involvement in an innovative process depends on the financial and human resources and on the availability and interest of management and employees. The main motivating factor in adoption of technological innovation is, most often, obtaining financial benefits. This reflects itself either as a direct increase in profits, or by obtaining competitive advantage which leads, in the long run, to profits increase and achieving a favorable position on the market. Should not be neglected other motivating factors of innovation, such as compliance with environmental standards, ensuring a secure position on the market with opportunities for further expansion, reducing the cost of raw materials and / or production process, improving company image, attitude and achievements of partners in the field (competitors, suppliers, customers etc. Managers need to carefully analyze these factors and decide the manner and degree of involvement in an innovative process.

  15. People in a Technology Driven Future: On the Social Relations of New Information Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.

    This keynote address examines the social relations of information technology in the future. Examples of the recent history of technology related to transportation, printing, and nuclear energy are presented. Some troubling examples of the social relations of new information technologies that are emerging on a global scale are then discussed,…

  16. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, W.E.; Hughes, Thomas P.; Pinch, Trevor J.

    2012-01-01

    This pioneering book, first published in 1987, launched the new field of social studies of technology. It introduced a method of inquiry--social construction of technology, or SCOT--that became a key part of the wider discipline of science and technology studies. The book helped the MIT Press shape

  17. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  18. Beyond individual-centric privacy : Information technology in social systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.

    2017-01-01

    In the public debate, social implications of information technology are mainly seen through the privacy lens. Impact assessments of information technology are also often limited to privacy impact assessments, which are focused on individual rights and well-being, as opposed to the social

  19. Technology and Disciplined Inquiry in the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Mark J.; Swan, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    More than 15 years ago, Martorella (1997) asked what has now become a seminal question in the field of social studies and technology; that is, "Which way to the sleeping giant?" (p. 511). He suggested a number of roles that technology can play in the social studies classroom. Although these roles are certainly relevant in 2014, the roles…

  20. Social Technologies for Online Learning: Theoretical and Contextual Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Karen; Jones, Allan; Holden, Georgina; Curcher, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Three exemplars are presented of social technologies deployed in educational contexts: wikis; a photo-sharing environment; and a social bookmarking tool. Students were found to engage with the technologies selectively, sometimes rejecting them, in the light of their prior conceptions of education. Some students (a minority in all the studies) were…

  1. Technology in Social Work Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wretman, Christopher J.; Macy, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing prevalence of technology-based instruction, social work faculty need a clear understanding of the strengths and limitations of these methods. We systematically examined the evidence for technology-based instruction in social work education. Using comprehensive and rigorous methods, 38 articles were included in the review. Of…

  2. Social network analysis of sustainable transportation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Studying how organizations communicate with each other can provide important insights into the influence, and policy success of different types of organizations. This study examines the communication networks of 121 organizations promoting sustainabl...

  3. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering. PMID:28773924

  4. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  5. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-09-27

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  6. Social Media and New Technology: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Marjorie; Strasburger, Victor C

    2018-04-01

    Social media and new media are becoming increasingly important in the lives of preteens and teens. This article reviews what is currently known about positive and negative effects of social media, social networking, and internet use and what safety measures should be considered.

  7. SOCIOLOGY OF INNOVATION: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF TECHNOLOGY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARA YOUSEFIKHAH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This theoretical paper describes the effect of social action on technological artifacts and explores how innovation may flourish or be diminished in society. Using the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT perspective, three main elements namely, flexibility of interpretation, relevant social groups and technological frame are described and their impact on innovation is discussed. The paper proposes that in developing societies, flexibility is hardly pressed by technological frames and concrete social norms do not allow the alternative designs and the useage of artifacts. This paper proposes that innovation might flourish in a society if technological frame change, and entrepreneurship become technological frames that can change the fixed meaning of artifacts and create a path for alternative designs and interpretations.

  8. Using Web 2.0 and Social Media Technologies to Foster Proenvironmental Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Ballew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research from a variety of disciplines suggests that online technologies (i.e., Web 2.0 and social media have considerable potential for spurring proenvironmental action; however, relatively little work examines how to effectively capitalize on these communication and organization tools. This review paper describes the Technologies for Proenvironmental Action Model (TPAM, a conceptual framework that explicates how different functions of Web 2.0 and social media (i.e., informational, relational, and experiential can generate and/or facilitate personal, social, and contextual pathways to environmentally responsible behaviors. As derived from the TPAM, the likelihood of achieving practical goals of increasing proenvironmental behaviors is enhanced when technological functions are matched to the different pathways to proenvironmental action. For example, the relational function of technologies, as exemplified by Social Networking Sites (SNSs, should be particularly effective in communicating social norms supportive of environmentally responsible behaviors. The TPAM is intended as a guide to develop novel approaches, research questions, and methodologies in leveraging Web 2.0 and social media technologies to promote proenvironmental action. Results will contribute to basic theory development and work in applied settings (e.g., local environmental organizations in order to effectively communicate and organize with different segments of the population to increase sustainable behaviors.

  9. Complete and Partial Organizing for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; de Bakker, Frank; Moon, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates different modes of organizing for corporate social responsibility (CSR). Based on insights from organization theory, we theorize two ways to organize for CSR. 'Complete' organization for CSR happens within businesses and depends on the availability of certain organizationa...

  10. Nonprofit Organizations Use of Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerstrøm, Asle; Sørum, Hanne; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    media survey1 within European Foundation of Drug Helplines members resulted in 16 responses (approximately 38 percentage response rate), representing 10 different European countries. Findings indicated that most drug helplines in the survey have some experience with social media. However, few...... of the drug helpline use social media based on purposeful planning and clear distribution of responsibility. Social media can be used for promoting an event or a sensitizing campaign to create positive value. Facebook is the social media that in general are most frequently used for purposes such as reaching...... a specific audience and promotion. Additionally, findings of the survey show that few drug helplines in the survey monitor social media frequently....

  11. Development of the destruction technology for radioactive organic solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Park, H.S.; Lee, K.W.

    1999-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Technology development for nuclear fuel cycle waste treatment'. 1. Organic waste decomposition technology development A. Destruction technology for organic wastes using Ag(2)-mediated electrochemical oxidation B. Recovery and regeneration technology for the spent chemicals used in the MEO process 2. Radioactive metal waste recycling technology A. Surface decontamination processes B. Decontamination waste treatment technology 3. Volume reduction technology nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) technology A. Estimation of the amount of radwastes and the optimum volume reduction methodology of domestic NFC B. Pretreatment of spent fuel cladding by electrochemical decontamination C. Hot cell process technology for the treatment of NFC wastes 4. Design and fabrication of the test equipment of volume reduction and reuse of alpha contaminated wastes 5. Evaluation on environmental compatibility of NFC A. Development of evaluation methodology on environmental friendliness of NFC B. Residual activity assessment of recycling wastes. (author). 321 refs., 54 tabs., 183 figs

  12. Development of the destruction technology for radioactive organic solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Park, H.S.; Lee, K.W. [and others

    1999-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Technology development for nuclear fuel cycle waste treatment'. 1. Organic waste decomposition technology development A. Destruction technology for organic wastes using Ag(2)-mediated electrochemical oxidation B. Recovery and regeneration technology for the spent chemicals used in the MEO process 2. Radioactive metal waste recycling technology A. Surface decontamination processes B. Decontamination waste treatment technology 3. Volume reduction technology nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) technology A. Estimation of the amount of radwastes and the optimum volume reduction methodology of domestic NFC B. Pretreatment of spent fuel cladding by electrochemical decontamination C. Hot cell process technology for the treatment of NFC wastes 4. Design and fabrication of the test equipment of volume reduction and reuse of alpha contaminated wastes 5. Evaluation on environmental compatibility of NFC A. Development of evaluation methodology on environmental friendliness of NFC B. Residual activity assessment of recycling wastes. (author). 321 refs., 54 tabs., 183 figs.

  13. Social Organization, Physical Environment, and Infant-Caretaker Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, R. H.; da Costa-Woodson, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    Relationships of infant/caretaker interaction with the social organization and the physical environment of the home were examined in rural Malay and Chinese families living in Malaysia. Findings are discussed in terms of the integration of behavioral characteristics, patterns of social organization, and arrangements of the physical environment…

  14. Review of Social and Organizational Issues in Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, Craig E

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews organizational and social issues (OSIs) in health information technology (HIT). A review and synthesis of the literature on OSIs in HIT was conducted. Five overarching themes with respect to OSIs in HIT were identified and discussed: scope and frameworks for defining OSIs in HIT, context matters, process immaturity and complexity, trade-offs will happen and need to be discussed openly, and means of studying OSIs in HIT. There is a wide body of literature that provides insight into OSIs in HIT, even if many of the studies are not explicitly labelled as such. The two biggest research needs are more explicit and theoretical studies of OSI in HITs and more research on integrating micro and macro perspectives of HIT use in organizations.

  15. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  16. Secondary Professional Socialization through Professional Organizations: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew; Eberline, Andrew D.; Templin, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary professional socialization is a phase of occupational socialization theory that focuses on graduate education in preparation for a career in academia. Due to the need to present and publish research and make professional contacts, professional organizations likely serve an important socializing function during graduate education. The…

  17. Global Value Chains, Labor Organization and Private Social Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Lone

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the opportunities and challenges that private social standards pose for labor organizations. It explores different labor responses to private social standards in East African cut flower industries. The analysis incorporates the concept of labor agency in global value chain a...... at production sites. However, labor organizations' ability to seriously challenge the prevailing governance structure of the cut flower value chain appears extremely limited.......This article examines the opportunities and challenges that private social standards pose for labor organizations. It explores different labor responses to private social standards in East African cut flower industries. The analysis incorporates the concept of labor agency in global value chain...... analysis and reveals how retailer-driven chains offer more room for labor organizations to exercise their agency than the traditional cut flower value chains. Labor organizations have been able to influence social standard setting and implementation, and to use standards to further labor representation...

  18. EXPLORING THE ROLE OF BUSINESS SOCIAL NETWORKING FOR ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjana Jerman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between communication, with the emphasis on public relations, and social network perspectives. What, then, does social networking for business mean in communication, particularly in public relations? This paper argues that business social networking play an important role in improving organizations communications. The goal of our paper is to identify the basic characteristics of social networks and its role for public relations for the effective implementation of social networking initiatives and tools in the workplace. Business social networking tools such as Facebook and LinkedIn are being used by organizations to reach the corporate objectives and to create a positive company image. Specific social networks, such the personalised networks of influence, are perceived to be one of the main strategic resources for organizations.

  19. Social Innovation Policies with the Involvement of Social Economy Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassi, Andrea; Ecchia, Giulio; Guerra, Alice

    actors (social entrepreneurs). Nowadays we are facing a transition period nevertheless in the recent developments of the policy orientation at European level, there are some slight but significant clues of a move back towards a more ‘social’ concept. We will assume as operating definition of Social...

  20. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especial...

  1. Social Capital in Organizations - Beyond Structure and Metaphor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The importance and usefulness of social capital as a concept in the study of organizations have been established by a large body of research. The aim of this paper is to review the concept of social capital in an organizational context, and it identifies five main issues that need to be addressed...... in future research before social capital can move definitively beyond being merely a metaphor for advantage. First, the unresolved issue of causality is a barrier in the study of social structure and social capital alike, and hampers both measuring scales and implications drawn from empirical research...... a consistent, bridging theory. Finally, there is a lack of understanding on how social capital develops over time and the potential benefits of taking a life-cycle view of social capital. In conclusion, the field of social capital in organizations still needs a consistent and coordinated research effort...

  2. A Critical Review on the Concept of Social Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Leibetseder

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—A critical analysis of the term social technology from a social science point of view.Design/Methodology/Approach—Review of the term “social technology” from a social science point of perspective in connection to the study of governmentality and power in a Foucauldian way.Findings—The article covers the perspective that social technology provides social science knowledge for a purpose. Such a notion allows an in depth debate about the meaning of social order in modern societies. Establishing distinctive techniques now forms the basis of the modern state and governance. Social technology forms the basis of governmental decisions; it allows for a use of social theories and methods for a purpose in politics and introduces a specific conception of power between the individual and public powers. Therefore, it alters government in three ways: It provides expert power to define solutions for social problems based on social science knowledge. It transforms government. Social technology exemplifies a support system for an ordered method of the way of government, it allows for the conduct of others and self based on scientific expertise. It can define new areas of problems in need of a change of government.Research limitations/implications—Consequently, social technology requests a critical analysis using a governmental approach. Such an approach focuses on problems on the governed subject and how governing works and why it has evolved in that way towards the subject and what kind of ideas and thinking lies within the discourse.Research type—general review.

  3. Leveraging Digital Technology in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Sarah Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Today's K-12 classrooms are increasingly comprised of students who accomplish much of their informal learning through digital media and technology. In response, a growing number of educators are considering how they might draw upon these informal learning experiences to support student engagement and learning in the classroom through technology.…

  4. The Social Determinants of Organ Trafficking: A Reflection of Social Inequity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Budiani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organ trafficking has become evident in its global scope and consequences. Poverty, vulnerability, destitution and a system of exploitative transplant practices are social determinants for commercial living organ donation. Guided by the WHO resolution on organ transplants and the Istanbul Declaration, transplant practices can advanced standards of greater social equality rather than exploit social determinants of poverty, vulnerability and destitution by way of exploitative health systems.

  5. Is there a role for social technologies in collaborative healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2011-03-01

    The exponential growth, variety, and sophistication of the information communication technologies (ICTs) plus their growing accessibility are transforming how clinical practitioners, patients, and their families can work together. Social technologies are the ICTs tools that augment the ability of people to communicate and collaborate despite obstacles of geography and time. There is still little empirical research on the impact of social technologies in the case of collaborative health. Defining a set of social technologies with potential for developing, sustaining, and strengthening the collaborative health agenda should prove useful for practitioners and researchers. This paper is based on an extensive review of the literature focusing on emerging technologies and the experience of the author as a consultant to health care professionals learning about social technologies. A note of caution is required: the phenomenon is complex and hard to describe in writing (a medium very different from the technologies themselves). Hardware and software are in continuous development and the iterative adaptation of the emergent social technologies for new forms of virtual communication. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  6. Juvenile technologies as a system of organisation of social partnership of the state and society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portnyagina E.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of different approaches to the definition of "juvenile technologies", presented both in scientific publications and in the activities of institutions engaged in the work with minors, including those who have found themselves in difficult situations and/or in conflict with the law. The analysis of the organization of interdepartmental cooperation between governmental bodies of Omsk Region and social institutions, as well as educational organizations on the implementation of juvenile technologies in Omsk region has been conducted. The study allowed posing the problem of inconsistencies in the understanding of juvenile technologies, which does not allow establishing an effective juvenile system. The authors propose an alternative vision of the concepts. It is proposed to increase the efficiency of the use of juvenile technologies at the expense of the organization of continuous monitoring of the implementation of juvenile technologies in the region, where pedagogical, psychological, legal, financial valuation criteria would be presented.

  7. Social Capital in Organizations - Perspectives and Unresolved Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Christian

    . Secondly, it is necessary to determine whether social capital can or should be measured. Thirdly, the negative aspects of social capital should be explored and integrated into the existing research. Fourthly, the field between social capital of the individual and organizational social capital lacks......The importance and usefulness of social capital as a concept in the study of organizations have been established by a large body of research. The aim of this paper is to review the concept of social capital in an organizational context, and identifying five main issues that need to be addressed...... in future research before social capital can move definitively beyond being merely a metaphor for advantage. First, the unresolved issue of causality is a barrier in the study of social structure and social capital alike, and hampers both measuring scales and implications drawn from empirical research...

  8. Internationalization of the Entrepreneurial Activity of Social Purpose Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusa Rafał

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyse and identify patterns of international entrepreneurial activity of social purpose organizations. The article utilizes international social entrepreneurship literature to develop an understanding of the international activity of social entrepreneurs and to identify factors that differentiate their activity. A cluster analysis was conducted to identify patterns of international social entrepreneurial activity, which included: the subject of activity, the types of beneficiaries, the scope of activity, and the legal type of organization. As a result, a survey sample of 55 international social ventures was divided into 3 homogeneous groups. The groups were (1 solution providers, (2 entrepreneurial charities, and (3 intermediaries. The results of the analysis show the diversity of the international activities of social entrepreneurs, although only a portion of them operate internationally. These findings contribute to a greater understanding of social entrepreneurs’ motivation and the paths of their internationalization activity.

  9. Analysis of the Science and Technology Narrative within Organ Donation and Transplantation Coverage in Canadian Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cheung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organ failure is one cause of death. Advancements in scientific research and technological development made organ transplantation possible and continue to find better ways to substitute failed organs with other organs of biological origin or artificial organs. Media, including newspapers, are one source of information for the public. The purpose of this study was to examine to what extent and how science and technology research and development are covered in the organ transplantation and organ donation (ODOT coverage of n = 300 Canadian newspapers, including the two Canadian newspapers with national reach (The Globe and Mail, National Post. The study generated qualitative and quantitative data addressing the following issues: (1 which scientific and technological developments are mentioned in the ODOT coverage; and (2 what issues are mentioned in the coverage of scientific and technological advancements linked to ODOT. We found little to no coverage of many technological and scientific advancements evident in academic and grey literature covering ODOT, and we found little engagement with social and ethical issues already raised about these advancements in the literature. The only area we found to be covered to a broader extent was xenotransplantation, although the coverage stopped after 2002. We argue that the newspaper coverage of ODOT under reports scientific and technological advancements related to ODOT and the issues these advancements might raise.

  10. Identifying Opinion Leaders to Promote Organ Donation on Social Media: Network Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Charles T

    2018-01-01

    Background In the recent years, social networking sites (SNSs, also called social media) have been adopted in organ donation campaigns, and recruiting opinion leaders for such campaigns has been found effective in promoting behavioral changes. Objective The aim of this paper was to focus on the dissemination of organ donation tweets on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, and to examine the opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages using social network analysis. It also aimed to investigate how personal and social attributes contribute to a user’s opinion leadership on the topic of organ donation. Methods All messages about organ donation posted on Weibo from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 were extracted using Python Web crawler. A retweet network with 505,047 nodes and 545,312 edges of the popular messages (n=206) was constructed and analyzed. The local and global opinion leaderships were measured using network metrics, and the roles of personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions in obtaining the opinion leadership were examined using general linear model. Results The findings revealed that personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions predicted individual’s local opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages. Alternatively, personal attributes and social positions, but not professional knowledge, were significantly associated with global opinion leadership. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that health campaign designers may recruit peer leaders in SNS organ donation promotions to facilitate information sharing among the target audience. Users who are unverified, active, well connected, and experienced with information and communications technology (ICT) will accelerate the sharing of organ donation messages in the global environment. Medical professionals such as organ transplant surgeons who can wield a great amount of

  11. Identifying Opinion Leaders to Promote Organ Donation on Social Media: Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingyuan; Salmon, Charles T

    2018-01-09

    In the recent years, social networking sites (SNSs, also called social media) have been adopted in organ donation campaigns, and recruiting opinion leaders for such campaigns has been found effective in promoting behavioral changes. The aim of this paper was to focus on the dissemination of organ donation tweets on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, and to examine the opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages using social network analysis. It also aimed to investigate how personal and social attributes contribute to a user's opinion leadership on the topic of organ donation. All messages about organ donation posted on Weibo from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 were extracted using Python Web crawler. A retweet network with 505,047 nodes and 545,312 edges of the popular messages (n=206) was constructed and analyzed. The local and global opinion leaderships were measured using network metrics, and the roles of personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions in obtaining the opinion leadership were examined using general linear model. The findings revealed that personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions predicted individual's local opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages. Alternatively, personal attributes and social positions, but not professional knowledge, were significantly associated with global opinion leadership. The findings of this study indicate that health campaign designers may recruit peer leaders in SNS organ donation promotions to facilitate information sharing among the target audience. Users who are unverified, active, well connected, and experienced with information and communications technology (ICT) will accelerate the sharing of organ donation messages in the global environment. Medical professionals such as organ transplant surgeons who can wield a great amount of influence on their direct connections could also effectively

  12. Automated System Organizations Under Spatial Grasp Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This mode of high-level system vision based on holistic and gestalt principles [6-8] rather than cooperating parts or agents [1] has psychological ...M. Wertheimer, “ Gestalt Theory“, Erlangen. Berlin, 1925. [7] P. Sapaty, “ Gestalt -Based Ideology and Technology for Spatial Control of Distributed...Dynamic Systems”, International Gestalt Theory Congress, 16th Scientific Convention of the GTA, University of Osnabrück, Germany, March 26 - 29

  13. The influence of social networking technologies on female religious veil-wearing behavior in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D; Shakiba, Abbas; Kwok, Justin; Montazeri, Mohammad Sadegh

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Social networking technologies can influence attitudes, behaviors, and social norms. Research on this topic has been conducted primarily among early adopters of technology and within the United States. However, it is important to evaluate how social media might affect people's behaviors in international settings, especially among countries with longstanding, government recommended, cultural and religious traditions and behaviors, such as Iran. This study seeks to assess whether Iranian women who have been using social networking technologies for a longer time (compared to those who have recently joined) would be less likely to cover themselves with a veil and be more comfortable publicly displaying pictures of this behavior on Facebook. Iranian females (N=253) were selected through snowball sampling from nongovernmental organizations in November 2011 and asked to complete a survey assessing their use of Facebook, concerns about not wearing a veil in Facebook pictures, and their actual likelihood of wearing a veil. Items were combined to measure lack of interest in wearing a veil. Length of time as a Facebook user was significantly associated with not wearing a veil (b=0.16, pSocial networking technologies can affect attitudes and behaviors internationally. We discuss methods of using social media for self-presentation and expression, as well as the difficulties (and importance) of studying use of technologies, such as social media, internationally.

  14. Social Organization, Socialization and Cultural Mediation in Formal Learning Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.; Caesar, Patricia

    It is the intent of this research program to provide a comparative base of social relationship patterns out of which will grow preliminary generalizations about the regularities of behavior which characterize the high school and to make the base available to education decision-makers. While educational research focuses on the student as learner…

  15. The cooperative genome: organisms as social contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth M; Buchanan, Anne V

    2009-01-01

    A predominant theme in much of evolutionary biology is that organisms are the product of relentless and precise natural selection among them, and that life is about the competition of all-against-all for success. However, developmental genetics has rapidly been revealing a very different picture of the nature of life. The organizing principles by which organisms are made are thoroughly based on complex hierarchies of molecular interactions that require multiple factors to be relentlessly cooperating with each other. Reconciling these two points of view involves changing the scale of observation, and a different understanding of evolution, in which cooperation and tolerance are more important than competition and intolerance.

  16. Creating Social Technologies to Assist and Understand Social Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Rienks, R.J.; Whitworth, Brian; de Moor, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss a particular approach to the creation of Social Technical Systems for the meeting domain. Besides presenting a methodology this chapter will present applications that have been constructed on the basis of the method and applications that can be envisioned. Throughout the

  17. Which One Triggers the Other? Technological or Social Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Cagri; Eren, Hakan; Halac, Duygu Seckin

    2013-01-01

    The term "innovation" has sometimes been used as a synonym for technological innovation until the concept of "social innovation" attracted academic attention. Since then, these two types of innovation have been investigated individually. It can be claimed that, despite the great importance of social innovation studies,…

  18. Social Media as a Learning Technology for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Cakir, Ozlem; Candeger, Ümmügülsüm

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of social media as a learning technology for university students and highlights their problems associated with its use. The population of the study consisted of Masters' and Bachelor Studies students studying in their final semesters in the departments of Social Sciences at The Islamia University of Bahawalpur,…

  19. Marketing Social Service Programs Using Political Campaign Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Discusses how human services agencies can use strategies and information technologies similar to those used in political campaigns to identify needs and attitudes for social services campaigns. Marketing for social services programs is described, and the use of computers for a political campaign and for a teenage pregnancy program is compared.…

  20. Applying Social Capital Theory and the Technology Acceptance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying Social Capital Theory and the Technology Acceptance Model in information and knowledge sharing research. ... Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences ... The paper explains the components, relevance and practical applicability of the two theories to information and knowledge sharing research.

  1. Mobile Inverted Constructivism: Education of Interaction Technology in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jia-Xiang; Fan, Kuo-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    The combination of social media and invert teaching is a new path to inverting interation technology education and reconstructing the curriculum of context. In this paper, based on the theory of constructivism learning, a model named Mobile Inverted Constructivism (MIC) is provided. Moreover, in view of the functional quality of social media in…

  2. Influence of Social Reform Ideologies on Industrial/Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireh, Maduakolam

    2016-01-01

    The founding of industrial/technology education in Ameria represents the convergence of many influences dating back to the pre-industrial revolution era. Social reform movement, one of these influences, set out to change conditions considered to be causes of poverty and other social problems through active engagements in political, educational,…

  3. Social organization in the Minority Game model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanina, František

    2000-10-01

    We study the role of imitation within the Minority Game model of market. The players can exchange information locally, which leads to formation of groups which act as if they were single players. Coherent spatial areas of rich and poor agents result. We found that the global effectivity is optimized at certain value of the imitation probability, which decreases with increasing memory length. The social tensions are suppressed for large imitation probability, but generally the requirements of high global effectivity and low social tensions are in conflict.

  4. A Sample Application for Use of Biography in Social Studies; Science, Technology and Social Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Harun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opinions of social studies teacher candidates on use of biography in science, technology and social change course given in the undergraduate program of social studies education. In this regard, convergent parallel design as a mixed research pattern was used to make use of both qualitative and quantitative…

  5. Loosely Coupled Organizations, Misrecognition, and Social Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajak, Edward; Green, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Almost 25 years ago, Bourdieu and Passeron (1977) explained how educational systems foster a "misrecognition" of the part that schools play in social reproduction. They noted that it is to the advantage of the dominant elements of society and educators themselves to perpetuate a strong belief in the legitimacy of schools as institutions that…

  6. Social networks of professionals in health care organizations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasselli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of social network research in health care, with a focus on social interactions between professionals in organizations. We begin by introducing key concepts defining the social network approach, including network density, centrality, and brokerage. We then review past and current research on the antecedents of health care professionals' social networks-including demographic attributes, professional groups, and organizational arrangements-and their consequences-including satisfaction at work, leadership, behaviors, knowledge transfer, diffusion of innovation, and performance. Finally, we examine future directions for social network research in health care, focusing on micro-macro linkages and network dynamics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Social and political amplification of technological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibitayo, Olurominiyi O.; Mushkatel, Alvin; Pijawka, K. David

    2004-01-01

    Using an industrial explosion in Henderson, Nevada, as a case study, this paper examines three main issues: the efficacy of a technological hazard event in amplifying otherwise latent issues, the extent to which the hazard event can serve as a focusing event for substantive local and state policy initiatives, and the effect of fragmentation of political authority in managing technological hazards. The findings indicate that the explosion amplified several public safety issues and galvanized the public into pressing for major policy initiatives. However, notwithstanding the amplification of several otherwise latent issues, and the flurry of activities by the state and local governments, the hazard event did not seem to be an effective focusing event or trigger mechanism for substantive state and local policy initiatives. In addition, the study provides evidence of the need for a stronger nexus between political authority, land-use planning and technological hazard management

  8. Nuclear fission technology in Spain: History and social concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliende Urtasun, Ana; Luquin, Asunción; Garrido, Julián J

    2017-04-01

    This research examines the evolution of nuclear technology in Spain from the early years of the Franco dictatorship to the global financial crisis and technology's influence on Spanish culture. To this end, we take a sociological perspective, with science culture and social perceptions of risk in knowledge societies serving as the two elements of focus in this work. In this sense, this article analyses the transformation of social relationships in light of technological changes. We propose technology as a strategic place to observe the institutional and organisational dynamics of technologic-scientific risks, the expert role and Spain's science culture. In addition, more specifically, within the language of co-production, we 'follow the actor' and favour new forms of citizen participation that promote ethics to discuss technological issues.

  9. Emotional intelligence skills for maintaining social networks in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshman, Brenda; Rubino, Louis

    2004-01-01

    For healthcare organizations to survive in these increasingly challenging times, leadership and management must face mounting interpersonal concerns. The authors present the boundaries of internal and external social networks with respect to leadership and managerial functions: Social networks within the organization are stretched by reductions in available resources and structural ambiguity, whereas external social networks are stressed by interorganizational competitive pressures. The authors present the development of emotional intelligence skills in employees as a strategic training objective that can strengthen the internal and external social networks of healthcare organizations. The authors delineate the unique functions of leadership and management with respect to the application of emotional intelligence skills and discuss training and future research implications for emotional intelligence skill sets and social networks.

  10. Concise Review: Organ Engineering: Design, Technology, and Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Leijten, Jeroen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Engineering complex tissues and whole organs has the potential to dramatically impact translational medicine in several avenues. Organ engineering is a discipline that integrates biological knowledge of embryological development, anatomy, physiology, and cellular interactions with enabling technologies including biocompatible biomaterials and biofabrication platforms such as three-dimensional bioprinting. When engineering complex tissues and organs, core design principles must be taken into account, such as the structure-function relationship, biochemical signaling, mechanics, gradients, and spatial constraints. Technological advances in biomaterials, biofabrication, and biomedical imaging allow for in vitro control of these factors to recreate in vivo phenomena. Finally, organ engineering emerges as an integration of biological design and technical rigor. An overall workflow for organ engineering and guiding technology to advance biology as well as a perspective on necessary future iterations in the field is discussed. Stem Cells 2017;35:51-60. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Using Social Media Technologies to Enhance Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershey H. Friedman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Models of distance education have evolved over decades, just in time to collide with modern pedagogies in which communication, interaction, student engagement, and active learning are of critical importance. The number of college students taking online classes continues to grow. Today, nearly 30% of college students are taking at least one online class. The social media technologies encompass a wide variety of Web-based technologies such as blogs, wikis, online social networking, and virtual worlds. This paper examines the relevant published literature, looking at online learning activities through the prism of the defining characteristics of today’s new communication technologies.

  12. Three Essays on Information Technology Security Management in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish

    2011-01-01

    Increasing complexity and sophistication of ever evolving information technologies has spurred unique and unprecedented challenges for organizations to protect their information assets. Companies suffer significant financial and reputational damage due to ineffective information technology security management, which has extensively been shown to…

  13. A decade of 3C technologies: insights into nuclear organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, E.; de Laat, W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the development of chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology and the subsequent genomic variants thereof have enabled the analysis of nuclear organization at an unprecedented resolution and throughput. The technology relies on the original and, in hindsight, remarkably

  14. Technology Support for Self-Organized Learners (Guest Editorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Koper, Rob; Hornung-Prähauser, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Kalz, M., Koper, R., & Hornung-Prähauser, V. (2009). Technology Support for Self-Organized Learners (Guest Editorial) [Special issue]. In M. Kalz, R. Koper & V. Hornung-Prähauser (Eds.), Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(3), 1-3.

  15. Social and ethical analysis in health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantivess, Sripen

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a review of the domestic and international literature on the assessment of the social and ethical implications of health technologies. It gives an overview of the key concepts, principles, and approaches that should be taken into account when conducting a social and ethical analysis within health technology assessment (HTA). Although there is growing consensus among healthcare experts that the social and ethical ramifications of a given technology should be examined before its adoption, the demand for this kind of analysis among policy-makers around the world, including in Thailand, has so far been lacking. Currently decision-makers mainly base technology adoption decisions using evidence on clinical effectiveness, value for money, and budget impact, while social and ethical aspects have been neglected. Despite the recognized importance of considering equity, justice, and social issues when making decisions regarding health resource allocation, the absence of internationally-accepted principles and methodologies, among other factors, hinders research in these areas. Given that developing internationally agreed standards takes time, it has been recommended that priority be given to defining processes that are justifiable, transparent, and contestable. A discussion of the current situation in Thailand concerning social and ethical analysis of health technologies is also presented.

  16. Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility” THE PERCEPTION OF EMPLOYEES ON BUSINESS ETHICS IN AN ORGANIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwafisoye, Opeyemi; Akande, Olatunde

    2013-01-01

    Global organizations are fast-changing in technological, legal, economic, social, and political structures with competing stakeholders as well as power claims. They are embedded in and interact with multiple changing local, national, and international environments. These environments call for business ethics in many situations for proper interrelation and interactions among businesses and economies. Organizations are starting to adopt ethics programs as a response to the negative publicity as...

  17. Teaching about Faith-Based Organizations in the Social Work Curriculum: Perspectives of Social Work Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have an important presence in contemporary civil society and have gained further prominence through their repertoire of social welfare and services. This study engaged social work educators (n = 316) across nine countries to examine their perceptions of including discourses on faith and FBOs in the social work…

  18. Institutionalization of Technology Transfer Organizations in Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Han; Pinheiro, Rómulo

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of in-depth studies on how technology transfer organizations (TTOs) are organized and developed. This paper examines the evolution/institutionalization of TTOs in Tsinghua University (TU), as a microcosm of the development of TTOs in Chinese universities. It explores two issues in particular: what kinds of TTOs have been developed…

  19. Social organization of Platythyrea lamellosa (Roger) (Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-05-15

    May 15, 1990 ... Alternatively, the mechanisms underlying these patterns can be explored by understanding the additive effects of responses of individual workers. While one approach emphasizes the structure of labour in a colony, the other focuses on the organization of the work- force (Jeanne 1986). An understanding of ...

  20. SOCIAL FACTOR VERSUS UTILITARIAN TECHNOLOGY: SOCIAL MARKETING VERSUS UTILITARIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhilesh Dholakia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A expansão e a convergência tecnológica de serviços vêm ampliando e modificando a utilização de produtos e serviços no setor telecomunicações, criando um novo mercado e ampliando seu público alvo pelas diversas características de utilização. O artigo desenvolvido apresenta uma pesquisa qualitativa, pelo estudo netnográfico (uma nova estrutura de avaliação qualitativa, onde discussões temáticas são retiradas de websites de confiança para serem organizados dado às palavras chaves utilizadas, passando posteriormente por um processo de codificação e interpretação sobre os fatores pesquisados baseado no consumo e comportamento do uso do iPhone, aparelho móvel celular com diversas integrações de produtos e convergências de serviços. Nesta pesquisa, foram avaliados os fatores utilitários e sociais / hedônicos, apresentando que o mercado do setor possui uma nova gama de serviços, atraindo novos grupos de usuários ao seu contexto, deixando assim cada vez mais diversificado o tipo de marketing utilizado no setor. O fator social (imagem pessoal é apontado como fator primário na decisão de escolha e uso do dispositivo, onde a apresentação no mercado e marketing para estes produtos estimulam cada vez mais a utilidade como um valor social. Identificando o dispositivo celular como um produto utilitário dado o tipo de serviço e utilização a que este se propõe, acredita-se que este mercado utilitário muda seu sentido quando certa quantidade de integrações são hedônicas amplificando a diversificação de uso, os valores sociais e hedônicos. Os autores definem este uso de um produto tecnológico com diversas integrações hedônicas como um comportamento utilitário social, onde a utilidade do produto passa a ser social (apresentação pessoal ou diversão individual.

  1. The social organization of agricultural biogas production and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemling, Bettina; Mol, Arthur P.J.; Tu, Qin

    2013-01-01

    While for wind, solar energy or hydropower, energy supply happens directly from the source to the wind wheels, hydropower turbines or solar panels, in the case of biogas, energy production cannot directly take from the energy source, organic matter, but depends on the institutional structures and farmers′ practices involved for making energy available. With the production of bioenergy in rural areas, practices within agriculture are transformed, requiring new ways of organizing production processes. Research has left the question largely unanswered of how agricultural biogas production and use are – and can best be – organized within rural society. Which kinds of social organization exist, how are these embedded in existing agricultural institutions and practices, and how do these systems function? Under which conditions may the different kinds of social organization of biogas production and use work sustainably? This introduction article to the Special Issue “The social organization of agricultural biogas production and use” presents a framework for analysing the different kinds of social organization of biogas production and use presented hereafter. Analysis parameters are the supply network, distribution network, distribution of benefits, social boundaries of the system (accessibility) and scale. Using these parameters, the Special Issue articles are outlined. - Highlights: • Through agricultural institutions and farmers′ practices, biogas is made available. • Scale, supply and delivery network distinguish biogas infrastructural systems. • Access and benefit distribution are key for a biogas system′s sustainability

  2. Social work, technology, and ethical practices: a review and evaluation of the national association of social workers' technology standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Amy

    2014-10-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming essential to social work practice by providing increased treatment possibilities and reducing barriers to service. While recognizing the importance of ICTs in practice, social work practitioners have had concerns about ethical use. In response, NASW compiled the Standards for Technology and Social Work Practice. While the guidelines set the groundwork, they were not embedded in a process that would allow them to adapt to the swift pace of ICT changes. This article reviews the current Standards, evaluates how these have been implemented by practitioners, and offers suggestions for updates.

  3. Management and Information Technology Challenges for the Modern Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Ekman, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Information technology has come to play an important role in organizations over the last few decades. Though it began as an entity dealt with by specialists, IT has evolved to become an everyday tool with both operational and strategic impacts. Most modern organizations have adopted different forms of IT, and become dependent on their computer-based information systems and their peripherals for everyday operations. Information technology offers opportunities to increase efficiency, customer value, and competitiveness. Given the financial investment in IT required by organizations to remain com

  4. Fostering Rural Social Organizations: A Bottom-Up Paradigm In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rural and agricultural transformation has remained one of the main policy thrusts of successive governments in Nigeria for over the last three decades. Among the organizations and agencies serving as anchors to this drive, rural social organizations occupy the driver's seat in rural and agricultural transformation in Nigeria.

  5. Inappropriate Lessons: Elementary Schools and the Social Organization of Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Erica Misako

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation responds to the question: How is sexuality organized in elementary schools? I argue that despite the absence of overt discussions on sexuality in elementary schools, sexuality is "organized" through social processes that are recursively linked to ideology. Due to the widely held belief that "children" and…

  6. Analysis of some potential social effects of four coal technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.A.; Gould, L.C.

    1980-09-01

    This is an analysis of the potential social impacts of four coal technologies: conventional combustion, fluidized-bed combustion, liquifaction, and gasification. Because of their flexibility, and the abundance and relatively low costs of coal, the potential benefits of these technologies would seem to outweigh their potential social costs, both in the intermediate and long term. Nevertheless, the social costs of a coal industry are far more obscure and hard to quantify than the benefits. In general, however, it maybe expected that those technologies that can be deployed most quickly, that provide fuels that can substitute most easily for oil and natural gas, that are the cheapest, and that are the most thermally efficient will minimize social costs most in the intermediate term, while technologies that can guide energy infrastructure changes to become the most compatable with the fuels that will be most easily derived from inexhaustible sources (electricity and hydrogen) will minimize social costs most in the long run. An industry structured to favor eastern over western coal and plant sites in moderate sized communities, which could easily adapt to inexhaustible energy technologies (nuclear or solar) in the future, would be favored in either time period.

  7. Social media and organ donation: Ethically navigating the next frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M L; Clayville, K A; Fisher, J S; Kuntz, K K; Mysel, H; Purnell, T S; Schaffer, R L; Sherman, L A; Willock, E P; Gordon, E J

    2017-11-01

    As the organ shortage continues to grow, the creation of social media communities by transplant hospitals and the public is rapidly expanding to increase the number of living donors. Social media communities are arranged in myriad ways and without standardization, raising concerns about transplant candidates' and potential donors' autonomy and quality of care. Social media communities magnify and modify extant ethical issues in deceased and living donation related to privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and informed consent, and increase the potential for undue influence and coercion for potential donors and transplant candidates. Currently, no national ethical guidelines have been developed in the United States regarding the use of social media to foster organ transplantation. We provide an ethical framework to guide transplant stakeholders in using social media for public and patient communication about transplantation and living donation, and offer recommendations for transplant clinical practice and future research. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Resource-Based View (RBV of Unincorporated Social Economy Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunle Akingbola

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines three related questions about unincorporated social economy organizations (USEOs: What are the characteristics of these social economy organizations? What is the unique bundle of resources that gives rise to and sustains their operations? Is there evidence of bricolage in these organizations? The findings suggest that USEOs are driven foremost by a social mission. USEOs provide diverse services and products including economic and specialized social activities, which are integral to the social fabric of society. The results also show that they combine and leverage two core resources – social capital and human capital – to support the operations of their organizations. Moreover they appear to draw on whatever resources are at their disposal to support the activities of the organization. This suggests that USEOs are involved in bricolage activities, which could explain the longevity of many of the organizations.RÉSUMÉCet article répond à trois questions étroitement liées sur les organismes d’économie sociale non constitués en société : Quelles sont les caractéristiques de ces organismes? Quelles sont les ressources particulières qui leur permettent de fonctionner? Ces organismes ont-ils recours au bricolage (dans le sens que Claude Lévi-Strauss prête à ce mot? Les résultats indiquent qu’une mission sociale est ce qui motive les organismes d’économie sociale non enregistrés. Ces derniers fournissent une diversité de produits et services, y compris des activités économiques et sociales spécialisées qui sont essentielles pour la solidarité sociale. Les résultats montrent aussi que ces organismes combinent deux ressources clés – le capital social et le capital humain – afin d’appuyer le bon fonctionnement de leurs organisations. En outre, pour ce faire, ils ont apparemment recours à toute ressource qui soit à leur portée. Cette dernière pratique indique que les organismes d

  9. Privacy and technology challenges for ubiquitous social networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio; Seet, Boon-Chong

    2015-01-01

    towards important challenges such as social sensing, enabling social networking and privacy protection. In this paper we firstly investigate the methods and technologies for acquisition of the relevant context for promotion of sociability among inhabitants of USN environments. Afterwards, we review...... architectures and techniques for enabling social interactions between participants. Finally, we identify privacy as the major challenge for networking in USN environments. Consequently, we depict design guidelines and review privacy protection models for facilitating personal information disclosure.......Ubiquitous social networking (USN) can be seen as an evolution of ubiquitous computing supporting the social well–being of people in their everyday lives. The vision of USN focuses on enhancing social interactions among its participants during users' physical meetings. This target is leading...

  10. Social media as a tool for positioning of youth non-governmental organizations activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shvab

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the social media analysis, as an important tool of the mass media in the youth non-governmental organizations activity. The article is about special popularity of social media among youth because of the rapid information technologies development. The author emphasizes that social media is a main online channel of communication among young generation, that should be taken into the consideration during the external communication creation. Youth organizations often use social media for target audience involvement, information dissimilation and exchange, service promotion and online dialogue. The author analyses different social media tools, such as: blogs, microblogs (Twitter, social networking sites (Facebook, VKontakte, video-sharing websites (YouTube and others. All these tools are easy in use, do not need any special skills and resources, they are low-cost as well. The author considers that it would be useful to include the organization’s Internet addresses on all social media websites and in traditional media publications, to make it as easy as possible for customers to find the youth non-governmental organizations they are looking for among the broad range of social media communities and services.

  11. Digital Social Media: An Interactive Technology Incorporated as a Competitive Advantage for Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pereira Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a more transparent and dynamic world, in which consumers trust other consumers more for advice and recommendations on products and services, the continuity of organizations appears to be associated with socialization, the sharing of interests and the interaction with the audience. This is associated with the incorporation of digital technologies to business, specifically the use of social media. Consequently, it is timely and interesting to explore the phenomenon of virtual socialization, although it is a little-studied field and what is needed is an innovative and theoretical approach based upon theories of marketing and communication. Expertise in these areas is present in all organizations and their performance is important for appropriate development of them. This work is a qualitative analysis about the behavior, reactions and attitudes of individuals to organizations, in order to understand the social factors that contribute to sustainable competitive advantages of organizations which can support strategic and future actions. We conclude that relevant factors associated with the tacit knowledge of the organization, specifically to learning and social interaction of the organization and their knowledge of virtual communities. The higher the coexistence of factors, the more difficult is the replication and greater will be the hypothesis of sustainable competitive advantage.

  12. Health and social organization: towards a health policy for the twenty-first century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blane, David; Brunner, Eric

    1996-01-01

    ...: economic growth, income distribution, consumption, work organization, unemployment and job insecurity, social and family structure, education and deprivation, and they are all aspects of 'social organization...

  13. Extending Deacon’s Notion of Teleodynamics to Culture, Language, Organization, Science, Economics and Technology (CLOSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Logan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrence Deacon’s (2012 notion developed in his book Incomplete Nature (IN that living organisms are teleodynamic systems that are self-maintaining, self-correcting and self-reproducing is extended to human social systems. The hypothesis is developed that culture, language, organization, science, economics and technology (CLOSET can be construed as living organisms that evolve, maintain and reproduce themselves and are self-correcting, and hence are teleodynamic systems. The elements of CLOSET are to a certain degree autonomous, even though they are obligate symbionts dependent on their human hosts for the energy that sustains them.

  14. Technologies favorisant l'inclusion sociale et les politiques ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Technologies favorisant l'inclusion sociale et les politiques publiques en Amérique latine. Les universitaires, les organisations non gouvernementales et les gouvernements d'Amérique latine s'intéressent de plus en plus aux questions reliées à la pauvreté, aux inégalités et à l'inclusion sociale ainsi qu'au rôle que jouent ...

  15. Inventing Japan's 'robotics culture': the repeated assembly of science, technology, and culture in social robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanović, Selma

    2014-06-01

    Using interviews, participant observation, and published documents, this article analyzes the co-construction of robotics and culture in Japan through the technical discourse and practices of robotics researchers. Three cases from current robotics research--the seal-like robot PARO, the Humanoid Robotics Project HRP-2 humanoid, and 'kansei robotics' - show the different ways in which scientists invoke culture to provide epistemological grounding and possibilities for social acceptance of their work. These examples show how the production and consumption of social robotic technologies are associated with traditional crafts and values, how roboticists negotiate among social, technical, and cultural constraints while designing robots, and how humans and robots are constructed as cultural subjects in social robotics discourse. The conceptual focus is on the repeated assembly of cultural models of social behavior, organization, cognition, and technology through roboticists' narratives about the development of advanced robotic technologies. This article provides a picture of robotics as the dynamic construction of technology and culture and concludes with a discussion of the limits and possibilities of this vision in promoting a culturally situated understanding of technology and a multicultural view of science.

  16. Do social networks and technological capabilities help knowledge management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarnación García-Sánchez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic capabilities are currently becoming an important extension of the theory of resources and capabilities that enables companies to adapt better in the current competitive environment. This paper examines how knowledge management, a dynamic function related to management or administration of a set of knowledge flows, develops thanks to the greater dynamism of social networks. It then shows how this relationship is especially strengthened by different technological capabilities. To achieve these goals, the paper examines the main tools that permit companies to develop an ability to achieve competitive advantage relative to the technological capabilities of managers and workers, social networks and knowledge management.

  17. UK Health and Social Care Case Studies: Iterative Technology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Adie; Gilbert, Laura; Dawson, Tom

    2017-01-01

    As a result of increasing demand in the face of reducing resources, technology has been implemented in many social and health care services to improve service efficiency. This paper outlines the experiences of deploying a 'Software as a Service' application in the UK social and health care sectors. The case studies demonstrate that every implementation is different, and unique to each organisation. Technology design and integration can be facilitated by ongoing engagement and collaboration with all stakeholders, flexible design, and attention to interoperability to suit services and their workflows.

  18. Considerations for Public Health Organizations Attempting to Implement a Social Media Presence: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Mark; Stetten, Nichole; Castaneda, Gail

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, social media has become an integral part of our everyday lives, but research on how this tool is used by public health workers and organizations is still developing. Budget cuts and staff reduction in county departments have required employees to take on more responsibilities. These reductions have caused a reduction in the time for training or collaborating with others in the field. To make up for the loss, many employees are seeking collaboration through social media sites but are unable to do so because state departments block these Internet sites. This study sought to highlight the key considerations and decision-making process for a public health organization deciding whether to implement a social media presence for their organization. Using 3 structured interviews, 15 stakeholders were questioned on their personal experience with social media, experience within the context of public health, and their thoughts on implementation for their center. Interviews were coded using constant comparative qualitative methods. The following themes emerged from the interviews: (1) personal experience with technology and social networking sites, (2) use of social networking sites in public health, (3) use of social networking sites in work environments, (4) social networking sites access, (5) ways the Rural South Public Health Training Center could use social networking sites, and (6) perceived outcomes of social networking site usage for the Rural South Public Health Training Center (positive and negative). The collective voice of the center showed a positive perceived perception of social media implementation, with the benefits outweighing the risks. Despite the benefits, there is a cautious skepticism of the importance of social networking site use.

  19. The social shaping of nuclear energy technology in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rennkamp, Britta; Bhuyan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the question why the South African government intends to procure nuclear energy technology, despite affordable and accessible fossil and renewable energy alternatives. We analyse the social shaping of nuclear energy technology based on the statements of political actors in the public media. We combine a discourse network analysis with qualitative analysis to establish the coalitions in support and opposition of the programme. The central arguments in the debate are cost, s...

  20. Social Informatics: Beyond Technology, A Project in Schools of Social Work in the European Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. Dr. Jan Steyaert; Harmen Grebel

    1995-01-01

    The authors review the findings of a research project conducted throughout schools of social work in Europe on the level of attention paid to the vocational use of information technology in social work education. Provided is an outline of the research design and an overview of how information

  1. Social marketing: a behavior change technology for infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Manuel W; Deshpande, Sameer; Rothschild, Michael L

    2006-09-01

    Changing health care worker behaviors is a core function of infection control programs. The social change technologies of education and institutional policy are limited in their capacity to achieve desired behaviors on a sustained basis because they do not address the importance of opportunity and ability in practice enhancement. Social marketing addresses the health care worker's lack of opportunity and ability by offering a bundle of benefits at low cost with high accessibility and by doing this better than the behavioral status quo. This article introduces some social marketing concepts and explicates them in the context of hand hygiene promotion.

  2. PROCESS CONTROL IN THE EDUCATION OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Csontos, lstván; Department of Organic Chemical Technology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics; Marosi, György; Department of Organic Chemical Technology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics; Faigl, Ferenc; Department of Organic Chemical Technology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory practices for demonstrating the importance of advanced process control methods in the organic chemical technologies have been elaborated. It required the development of a system tha tintegrates the advantages of a reaction calorimeter and a model system of industrial controlled reactors. The hardware and software configuration support the transfer of elaborated control programs of reactions from laboratory level to the industrial technology. General control algorithms of diazotizat...

  3. NATO Conference on Work, Organizations, and Technological Change

    CERN Document Server

    Niehaus, Richard

    1982-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the Symposium entitled, "Work, Organizations and Technological Change" which was held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, West Germany, 14-19 June 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the Special Panel on Systems Sciences of the NATO Scientific Affairs Division. In proposing this meeting the Symposium Directors built upon several preceding NATO conferences in the general area of personnel systems, manpower modelling, and organization. The most recent NATO Conference, entitled "Manpower Planning and Organization Design," was held in Stresa, Italy in 1977. That meeting was organized to foster research on the interrelationships between programmatic approaches to personnel planning within organizations and behavioral science approachs to organization design. From that context of corporate planning the total internal organizational perspective was the MACRO view, and the selection, assignment, care and feeding of the people was the MICRO view. Conceptually, this meant that an integrated appr...

  4. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: COMMUNICATING IN PUBLIC SECTOR ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Йолита Ричардовна Вайнхардт

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine the details of declared activities of social responsibility in the public sector. To achieve the objective the following tasks are formulated: (1 to review the CSR research carried out inLithuania; (2 to analyse the communicative actions of public sector organizations concerning socially responsible activities. Method of work: the article is written using the methods of content analysis, analogy and reflection.  Results: Corporate social responsibility (CSR activities focused on external interest groups and their representation are analysed in the article. The survey covers state capital enterprises or enterprises, in which a larger part of the portfolio of shares is owned by the public sector, and educational organizations, the founder of which is the state. The research of CSR carried out in Lithuania in recent years is overviewed and analysis of the way the public sector organizations, which belong to United Nations Global Compact (hereafter GC network communicate their socially responsible activities is provided. It has been found that the membership of the majority of public sector organizations in the GC is rather formal, and insufficient attention is given for communicating socially responsible activities in information carriers, most easily accessible to the user.  Application of results: management in the public sector.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-10-32

  5. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  6. Using Action Research to Investigate Social Networking Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Lisa; Harris, Katy

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the first cycle of an Action Research (AR) investigation into why professional learners are not using the Social Networking Technologies (SNTs) of their bespoke website. It presents the rationale of how this study came about, the ontological and epistemological stance of the authors and how this led to the particular choice…

  7. Technological Revolutions: Some Implications for the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Paul W.

    1975-01-01

    The advantages of a social studies program, centered on the various technological revolutions -- human, agricultural, urban, industrial, and humanizing -- are a multi-disciplinary approach, the use of inquiry skills, wide coverage of history and nations through a framework of concepts, and discussion of ethnocentrism. (JH)

  8. Informal Language Learning Setting: Technology or Social Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2012-01-01

    Based on the informal language learning theory, language learning can occur outside the classroom setting unconsciously and incidentally through interaction with the native speakers or exposure to authentic language input through technology. However, an EFL context lacks the social interaction which naturally occurs in an ESL context. To explore…

  9. Traditional Music as a Sustainable Social Technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Music is a social technology of enormous potential for improving community health. This paper reports on a series of applied ethnomusicological interventions, enacted as a participatory action research project in northern Ghana, for health promotion. Initial interventions, performed by local professional urban artists, proved ...

  10. Adversarial risks in social experiments with new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter; Dechesne, Francien; van der Poel, Ibo; Asveld, Lotte; Mehos, Donna C.

    2017-01-01

    Studies that approach the deployment of new technologies as social experiments have mostly focused on unintentional effects, notably safety. We argue for the inclusion of adversarial risks or security aspects that are the result of intentional, strategic behavior of actors, who aim at using the

  11. Conditions for Successful Use of Technology in Social Studies Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, Meskerem; Plevyak, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the authors in this review is to examine how teacher-related, context-related, and project-related conditions interact in successful cases of technology integration projects in social studies classrooms. A close examination of different dimensions of these conditions in the implementation of 33 successful cases of…

  12. Technological dynamics and social capability: US states and European nations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fagerberg, J.; Feldman, M.; Srholec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2014), s. 313-337 ISSN 1468-2702 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/10/2310 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : innovation * technological capability * social capability Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.494, year: 2014

  13. The Power of Associations Social Media and Social Movements: Facebook in the Interactions of Social Movement Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    There are many indications that social mobilization and political participation have been transformed by Information Communication Technologies (ICT), and, more recently, by Social Media. In spite of many studies which have attempted to grapple with their interrelationship, we still know little about the degree and complexity of those…

  14. Engaging with diversity of social units : a social identity perspective on diversity in organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Stegmann, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The construct diversity describes the collective amount of differences among members within a social unit. The present dissertation is based on the assumption that, through engagement with diversity, people acquire an understanding of what role diversity plays in the societies, organizations, work groups, or other social units they are part of. This understanding of the role diversity plays in a given social unit provides a vantage point from which people will engage with diversity in the fut...

  15. The Security of Organizations and Individuals in Online Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Elyashar, Aviad

    2016-01-01

    The serious privacy and security problems related to online social networks (OSNs) are what fueled two complementary studies as part of this thesis. In the first study, we developed a general algorithm for the mining of data of targeted organizations by using Facebook (currently the most popular OSN) and socialbots. By friending employees in a targeted organization, our active socialbots were able to find new employees and informal organizational links that we could not find by crawling with ...

  16. Climate change dilemma: technology, social change or both?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, Sudhir Chella

    2006-01-01

    Time is fast running out for formulating a viable global climate policy regime even as it seems obvious that the major initiative will have to come from the United States, which currently appears indisposed to take any meaningful action at all. This paper reviews the prospects for emissions reductions in the US passenger transport sector and the technical, economic, social, and political barriers to developing policies that focus solely on technology or pricing. Using scenarios it shows that, in order to meet stringent emissions targets over the coming half-century, technology and pricing policies may have to be supplemented by strategies to change life-styles and land uses in ways that effectively reduce car dependence. In the medium to long term, bold initiatives that treat vehicle users as citizens capable of shifting their interests and behaviour could form kernels of social change that in turn provide opportunities for removing many of the social and political constraints

  17. New information technologies in social studies: postnonclassical paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Ya. Menshikova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses topical issues of virtual reality technologies in social research, particularly when studying the processes of ethnic cultural identity, development of ethnic and racial attitudes using «virtual avatars» for managing ethnic conflicts, development of communication skills in representatives of different cultures using virtual collaboration and video conferencing. One of the key issues of the paper to discuss the necessity of post-non-classical paradigm as a conceptual framework for social research. Contemporary social studies require developing new methods, technologies and techniques at all levels of the research: from task setting to the development of new methods and result analysis. One of the most promising methods rapidly developed in recent years is virtual reality technology. The paper presents the analysis of more than 40 experimental studies performed using CAVE and HMD virtual reality systems. Their application is considered hereunder for the studies of verbal and nonverbal cues in communication, social skills training, treatment of social anxiety disorders and the development of new methods of cognitive behavioural therapy. Studies on interpersonal communication with virtual partners (i.e. «avatars» are considered. Factors affecting the communication quality of avatars, its visual and behavioural realism, problems of seeing virtual human as real partners for social interaction are discussed. Special attention is paid to the studies of racial and ethnic attitudes performed using virtual reality systems. The possibilities of practical applications of the VR technologies for shaping positive attitudes and development of communication skills in a sociocultural context are emphasized.

  18. Technology management of intellectual capital in the organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Бех, Юлія Володимирівна

    2014-01-01

    The article defined the totality of organizational tools methodological knowledge management, consisting of technologies, systems and methods. Revealed knowledge management software, formal and informal tools of intellectual capital management organization. By formal tools include expert control systems, artificial intelligence, automated decision-making systems, decision support systems and support systems work with clients. Informal tools (training, cross-functional project teams and intra)...

  19. Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation: Demonstration Bulletin: Organic Extraction Utilizing Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technology utilizes liquified gases as the extracting solvent to remove organics, such as hydrocarbons, oil and grease, from wastewater or contaminated sludges and soils. Carbon dioxide is generally used for aqueous solutions, and propane is used for sediment, sludges and ...

  20. The Economics of New Health Technologies Incentives, Organization, and Financing

    CERN Document Server

    Costa-Font, Joan; McGuire, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    Technological change in healthcare has led to huge improvements in health services and the health status of populations. It is also pinpointed as the main driver of healthcare expenditure. Although offering remarkable benefits, changes in technology are not free and often entail significant financial, as well as physical or social risks. These need to be balanced out in the setting of government regulations, insurance contracts, and individuals' decisions to use and consume certaintechnologies. With this in mind, this book addresses the following important objectives: to provide a detailed ana

  1. Technological Solutions to Social and Citizen Problems. The Case of Civic and Public Challenges in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Adalberto TENA-ESPINOZA-DE-LOS-MONTEROS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of civic innovation that, based on technological solutions and open initiatives, the civic society’s organization Codeando México suggests for the attention and solution of social and civic problems in Mexico. The Retos Cívicos (Civic Challenges and Retos Públicos (Public Challenges initiatives are addressed and described as experiences of innovation in the implementation of technological strategies for the solution of social and civic problems. A reflection is made on the civic appropriation of the ICTs and its irruption in the processes of innovation, as well as on the impact that the ICTs have in the conformation of a new civic ecosystem. Last, the strategies of Hacking cívico (Civic Hacking and Comunidades Cívicas (Civic Communities that the Codeando México organization promotes as a model for the linkage and civic participation within the frame of civic innovation, are mentioned.

  2. The ethics of pharmaceutical research funding: a social organization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Garry C

    2013-01-01

    This paper advances a social organization approach to examining unethical behavior. While unethical behaviors may stem in part from failures in individual morality or psychological blind spots, they are both generated and performed through social interactions among individuals and groups. To illustrate the value of a social organization approach, a case study of a medical school professor's first experience with pharmaceutical-company-sponsored research is provided in order to examine how funding arrangements can constrain research integrity. The case illustrates three significant ways that institutional corruption can occur in the research process. First, conflicts of norms between pharmaceutical companies, universities, and affiliated teaching hospitals can result in compromises and self-censorship. Second, normal behavior is shaped through routine interactions. Unethical behaviors can be (or can become) normal behaviors when they are produced and reproduced through a network of social interactions. Third, funding arrangements can create networks of dependency that structurally distort the independence of the academic researcher in favor of the funder's interests. More broadly, the case study demonstrates how the social organization approach deepens our understanding of the practice of ethics. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  3. School Violence and the Social Organization of High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter, based on the findings of an indepth study of the social organization of the American high school, provides a new, school-specific way of examining the problem of school crime and violence. The study, which made use of field methodology, addressed two basic…

  4. Organic Delights: Examining the Challenges of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Organic Delights is an experiential exercise designed to help undergraduate business students learn about corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this exercise, students assume the role of a senior manager of a fictional restaurant and caterer. The challenge for the managers is to evaluate and choose among six proposals to promote the company's…

  5. Invisible Social Infrastructures to Facilitate Time-pressed Distributed Organizing

    OpenAIRE

    Van Fenema, Paul C.; Räisänen, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Abstract How do complex societal demands and time constraints posed by distributed temporary organizing affect organizational communication? Extending Bowker and Star?s (2002) work on infrastructures, we introduce two context-specific `invisible?, social infrastructures: organizational and relational. We empirically assess their role in an international, multi-site ERP-software implementa...

  6. History of Oromo Social Organization: Gadaa Grades Based Roles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major purpose of this manuscript is to depict how membership to gadaa grades determined the social-political and economic roles and responsibilities of individuals in the Oromo society and show the viability of values of Gadaa in democratic culture. The Gadaa system is a special socio-political organization of the ...

  7. Social Science Paradigms and the Study of Complex Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, J. Victor

    This paper for educational administrators and researchers, and theorists begins with a discussion of the role of intellectual paradigms in the development of science, and outlines some of the general social science paradigms that have been dominant in organization theory. A classification scheme is constructed, based on Udy's organizational…

  8. Emergent patterns of social organization in captive Cercocebus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-07-18

    Jul 18, 2012 ... Emergent patterns of social organization in captive Cercocebus torquatus: Testing the GrooFiWorld agent-based model. R DOLADO. 1,* and FS BELTRAN. 2. 1Department of Behavioral Sciences Methods, 2Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior (IR3C), Adaptive Behavior and Interaction Research ...

  9. Social-Identity Functions of Attraction to Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highhouse, Scott; Thornbury, Erin E.; Little, Ian S.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the self-presentation goals that underlie attraction to organizations. Expanding on Lievens and Highhouse's (2003) instrumental vs. symbolic classification of corporate attributes, a theory of symbolic attraction is presented that posits social-identity consciousness as a moderator of the relation between symbolic inferences…

  10. Social organization of the golden brown mouse lemur (Microcebus ravelobensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidt, A.; Hagenah, N.; Randrianambinina, B.; Radespiel, U.

    2004-01-01

    Our study provides the first data on the social organization of the golden brown mouse lemur, a nocturnal primate discovered in northwestern Madagascar in 1994. The study was carried out in two 6-month field periods during the dry season, covering time before and during the mating season. The

  11. Reflections on the social epidemiologic dimension of health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanjian, Arminée

    2004-01-01

    Certain key parameters such as safety, efficacy, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness have long been established as key in HTA analysis. Equally important, however, are sociolegal and epidemiologic perspectives. A comprehensive analytic framework will consider the implications of using a technology in the context of societal norms, cultural values, and social institutions and relations. The methodology in which this expanded framework has been developed is termed 'Strategic HTA' to denote its power for the decision-making process. In addition to systematic reviews of published evidence, it incorporates analyses of the influence of dominant social relations on technological development and diffusion. This essay discusses the social epidemiologic aspects of health technology assessment, which includes factors such as sex and gender. It seeks to show how it is possible to bring data from wide-ranging disciplinary perspectives within the parameters of a single scientific inquiry; to draw from them scientifically defensible conclusions; and thereby to realize a deeper understanding of technology impact within a health care system. Armed with such an understanding, policy officials will be better prepared to resolve the competitive clamor of stakeholder voices, and to make the most "equitable" use of the available resources.

  12. Social Media and Mobile Technology for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Coughlin, Steven S.; Lyons, Elizabeth J.

    2018-01-01

    OVERVIEW Given the number of lives affected by cancer and the great potential for optimizing well-being via lifestyle changes, patients, providers, health care systems, advocacy groups, and entrepreneurs are looking to digital solutions to enhance patient care and broaden prevention efforts. Thousands of health-oriented mobile websites and apps have been developed, with a majority focused upon lifestyle behaviors (e.g., exercise, diet, smoking). In this review, we consider the use and potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention, cancer treatment, and survivorship. We identify key principles in research and practice, summarize prior reviews, and highlight notable case studies and patient resources. Further, with the potential for scaled delivery and broad reach, we consider application of social media and mHealth technologies in low-resource settings. With clear advantages for reach, social media and mHealth technologies offer the ability to scale and engage entire populations at low cost, develop supportive social networks, connect patients and providers, encourage adherence with cancer care, and collect vast quantities of data for advancing cancer research. Development efforts have been rapid and numerous, yet evaluation of intervention effects on behavior change and health outcomes are sorely needed, and regulation around data security issues is notably lacking. Attention to broader audiences is also needed, with targeted development for culturally diverse groups and non-English speakers. Further investment in research to build the evidence base and identify best practices will help delineate and actualize the potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:28561647

  13. Social Media and Mobile Technology for Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J; Coughlin, Steven S; Lyons, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Given the number of lives affected by cancer and the great potential for optimizing well-being via lifestyle changes, patients, providers, health care systems, advocacy groups, and entrepreneurs are looking to digital solutions to enhance patient care and broaden prevention efforts. Thousands of health-oriented mobile websites and apps have been developed, with a majority focused upon lifestyle behaviors (e.g., exercise, diet, smoking). In this review, we consider the use and potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention, cancer treatment, and survivorship. We identify key principles in research and practice, summarize prior reviews, and highlight notable case studies and patient resources. Further, with the potential for scaled delivery and broad reach, we consider application of social media and mHealth technologies in low-resource settings. With clear advantages for reach, social media and mHealth technologies offer the ability to scale and engage entire populations at low cost, develop supportive social networks, connect patients and providers, encourage adherence with cancer care, and collect vast quantities of data for advancing cancer research. Development efforts have been rapid and numerous, yet evaluation of intervention effects on behavior change and health outcomes are sorely needed, and regulation around data security issues is notably lacking. Attention to broader audiences is also needed, with targeted development for culturally diverse groups and non-English speakers. Further investment in research to build the evidence base and identify best practices will help delineate and actualize the potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention and treatment.

  14. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT APPROACHES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATIONS USING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Mehedintu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Performance management includes activities that ensure that goals are consistently being met inan effective and efficient manner. Performance management can focus on the performance of an organization, adepartment, employee, or even the processes to build a product or service, as well as many other areas.In these days of globalization and intensive use of information technology, the organizations must defineand implement an appropriate strategy that would support their medium-term development, stability andcompetitiveness. This is achieved through a coherent and interrelated set of activities for understanding thecustomer expectations and the level at which the offer of organization add value to customers and satisfy theirneeds, define their internal organization to allow timely response to market demands without losing focus on client,tracking strategy and business model for the accomplishment of the organization mission, aligning the existing ITproject management or under development implementation in organization with the strategic management oforganization etc. Strategic Management determines the improvement of processes, effective use of resources, focuson critical areas in terms of finance, creating opportunities for innovation and technological progress, improvementof the supply mechanism and the duty to promote personal interaction and negotiation at all levels, continuousassessment of organization and its technological trends, analyze the market potential and competence field etc.Strategic management system will not give good results if the strategy is not defined by a set of operationalobjectives clearly at all levels.Business performance is based on a set of analytical processes of business, supported by informationtechnology that defines the strategic goals that can be measured by performance indicators. EnterprisePerformance Management creates a powerful and precise environment, characterized by data consistency,efficiency analysis

  15. Effective surveillance for homeland security balancing technology and social issues

    CERN Document Server

    Flammini, Francesco; Franceschetti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Effective Surveillance for Homeland Security: Balancing Technology and Social Issues provides a comprehensive survey of state-of-the-art methods and tools for the surveillance and protection of citizens and critical infrastructures against natural and deliberate threats. Focusing on current technological challenges involving multi-disciplinary problem analysis and systems engineering approaches, it provides an overview of the most relevant aspects of surveillance systems in the framework of homeland security. Addressing both advanced surveillance technologies and the related socio-ethical issues, the book consists of 21 chapters written by international experts from the various sectors of homeland security. Part I, Surveillance and Society, focuses on the societal dimension of surveillance-stressing the importance of societal acceptability as a precondition to any surveillance system. Part II, Physical and Cyber Surveillance, presents advanced technologies for surveillance. It considers developing technologie...

  16. The Social Shaping of Technology: A New Space for Politics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshinaka, Yutaka; Clausen, Christian; Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2003-01-01

    effects, which are non-neutral and distributed, as the processes of shaping themselves have been. The chapter develops the notion of SST through socio-technical spaces. Here a heterogeneous set of elements, comprising of techniques, social actors, attribution of meanings, and problem definitions, etc...... on the socio-technical processes entailed in technology development and change. Our perspective is based on the understanding that technological development unfolds through processes with political implications, involving actors, their occasions and strategies that help bring about transitions in technological...... change. We identify a new perspective on political processes, with a broader focus on the political dimensions of technological decision-making, and a broader treatment of socio-technical space, maintaining a focus on inclusion and exclusion of actors, salient issues and how they are dealt...

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility And Islamic Business Organizations: A Proposed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusnah Muhamad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR has been of growing concern among business communities in recent years. Various corporate leaders maintain that business is considered to contribute fully to the society if it is effi cient, profi table and socially responsible. Islam is considered as addin (a way of life, thus, providing comprehensive guidelines in every aspects of the believers’ life. It is the aim of this paper to propose an Islamic model of corporate social responsibility based on human relationships with the God (hablun min’Allah; with other fellow human being (hablun min’an-nas and with the environment.Keywords : Corporate Social Responsibility, Islamic Business Organization

  18. Technological and life cycle assessment of organics processing odour control technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindra, Navin; Dubey, Brajesh; Dutta, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    As more municipalities and communities across developed world look towards implementing organic waste management programmes or upgrading existing ones, composting facilities are emerging as a popular choice. However, odour from these facilities continues to be one of the most important concerns in terms of cost & effective mitigation. This paper provides a technological and life cycle assessment of some of the different odour control technologies and treatment methods that can be implemented in organics processing facilities. The technological assessment compared biofilters, packed tower wet scrubbers, fine mist wet scrubbers, activated carbon adsorption, thermal oxidization, oxidization chemicals and masking agents. The technologies/treatment methods were evaluated and compared based on a variety of operational, usage and cost parameters. Based on the technological assessment it was found that, biofilters and packed bed wet scrubbers are the most applicable odour control technologies for use in organics processing faculties. A life cycle assessment was then done to compare the environmental impacts of the packed-bed wet scrubber system, organic (wood-chip media) bio-filter and inorganic (synthetic media) bio-filter systems. Twelve impact categories were assessed; cumulative energy demand (CED), climate change, human toxicity, photochemical oxidant formation, metal depletion, fossil depletion, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, terrestrial eco-toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity and marine eco-toxicity. The results showed that for all impact categories the synthetic media biofilter had the highest environmental impact, followed by the wood chip media bio-filter system. The packed-bed system had the lowest environmental impact for all categories. - Highlights: • Assessment of odour control technologies for organics processing facilities. • Comparative life cycle assessment of three odour control technologies was conducted

  19. Technological and life cycle assessment of organics processing odour control technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindra, Navin [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); Dubey, Brajesh, E-mail: bkdubey@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Dutta, Animesh [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    As more municipalities and communities across developed world look towards implementing organic waste management programmes or upgrading existing ones, composting facilities are emerging as a popular choice. However, odour from these facilities continues to be one of the most important concerns in terms of cost & effective mitigation. This paper provides a technological and life cycle assessment of some of the different odour control technologies and treatment methods that can be implemented in organics processing facilities. The technological assessment compared biofilters, packed tower wet scrubbers, fine mist wet scrubbers, activated carbon adsorption, thermal oxidization, oxidization chemicals and masking agents. The technologies/treatment methods were evaluated and compared based on a variety of operational, usage and cost parameters. Based on the technological assessment it was found that, biofilters and packed bed wet scrubbers are the most applicable odour control technologies for use in organics processing faculties. A life cycle assessment was then done to compare the environmental impacts of the packed-bed wet scrubber system, organic (wood-chip media) bio-filter and inorganic (synthetic media) bio-filter systems. Twelve impact categories were assessed; cumulative energy demand (CED), climate change, human toxicity, photochemical oxidant formation, metal depletion, fossil depletion, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, terrestrial eco-toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity and marine eco-toxicity. The results showed that for all impact categories the synthetic media biofilter had the highest environmental impact, followed by the wood chip media bio-filter system. The packed-bed system had the lowest environmental impact for all categories. - Highlights: • Assessment of odour control technologies for organics processing facilities. • Comparative life cycle assessment of three odour control technologies was conducted

  20. Teachers' Organization of Participation Structures for Teaching Science with Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study that investigated the nature of the participation structures and how the participation structures were organized by four science teachers when they constructed and communicated science content in their classrooms with computer technology. Participation structures focus on the activity structures and processes in social settings like classrooms thereby providing glimpses into the complex dynamics of teacher-students interactions, configurations, and conventions during collective meaning making and knowledge creation. Data included observations, interviews, and focus group interviews. Analysis revealed that the dominant participation structure evident within participants' instruction with computer technology was ( Teacher) initiation-( Student and Teacher) response sequences-( Teacher) evaluate participation structure. Three key events characterized the how participants organized this participation structure in their classrooms: setting the stage for interactive instruction, the joint activity, and maintaining accountability. Implications include the following: (1) teacher educators need to tap into the knowledge base that underscores science teachers' learning to teach philosophies when computer technology is used in instruction. (2) Teacher educators need to emphasize the essential idea that learning and cognition is not situated within the computer technology but within the pedagogical practices, specifically the participation structures. (3) The pedagogical practices developed with the integration or with the use of computer technology underscored by the teachers' own knowledge of classroom contexts and curriculum needs to be the focus for how students learn science content with computer technology instead of just focusing on how computer technology solely supports students learning of science content.

  1. Exploring Social Learning through Upstream Engagement in Science and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jonas Egmose

    This discussion paper deliberates on how the concept of social learning can be used for evaluating upstream engagement initiatives in science and technology.  The paper briefly introduces to the concept of upstream engagement and a concrete case, the UK Citizen Science for Sustainability project...... (SuScit), as an outset for discussing how the concept of social learning can be used for analysing and understanding relations between citizen participation, Science and research, and sustainability. A number of relevant research questions and methodological considerations are distilled...

  2. Technology Innovation Of Organic Waste Decomposition In Providing Feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prawirodigdo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations in Indonesia indicated that an inactive ovary was a chronically reproduction problem in ruminants. There was a tendency that nutrition deficiency inhibited ovulation, oestrus occurrence, and conception in ruminants. Obviously, there is a correlation between sufficient nutrient consumption and reproduction performance of such animals. Thus, application of the production/reproduction technology innovation for improving ruminant’s productivity in the villages needs to be supported by the availability of sufficient feed. Whilst, there is a competition among ruminants in fulfilling feed requirement. On the other hand, there are large amounts of organic waste of food and plantation estate industries which are potential for non-traditional feedstuffs. The examples of such organic wastes are: 4,817,630 ton dry matter (DM of cacao pod, 314,042.51 ton DM of coffee pulp and hulls, and 29,700,000 ton DM of palm frond, leaves and trunks. Unfortunately, such materials contain anti-nutritive substance. Nevertheless, technology innovation for decomposing organic waste is available and its validity has been proven to be satisfactory and appropriate. Regarding the limitation of feedstuffs, introduction of technology innovation for organic waste decomposition to provide feed for improving livestock productivity is promising to be applied.

  3. USAGE OF SOCIAL SERVICES IN THE PROCESS OF ORGANIZATION OF COMMUNICATION FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myloslava M. Chernii

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Today especially urgent problem is communication and the development of communication skills of future teachers as well as communicative culture is the main structural component of his professionalism. Schools and classes, both conventional and virtual, must have teachers, armed with technology resources and skills, and able to effectively teach the subject using information and communication technologies. It all comes down to the fact that the modern teacher has to be aware of the latest technologies that can help him to organize trainings and communication. Therefore, a special role is given to the training of future teachers and vector of application of social services in the organization of communication in the learning process.

  4. Renewables portfolio, individual preferences and social values towards RES technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontogianni, Areti; Tourkolias, Christos; Skourtos, Michalis

    2013-01-01

    The massive deployment of renewable energy sources represents a high priority for Greece in order to comply with the Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources by 2020. In this perspective, Aegean islands especially Lesvos, are endowed with a considerable potential of a portfolio of renewables, a fact that the entrepreneurial interest has already been targeted. However, regulatory attempts for a massive penetration of renewables do not take seriously into account preferences and risk perceptions of local communities where the proposed projects are to be installed. The aim of this study is to investigate individual preferences and social values towards specific technologies of renewables in Lesvos island. We apply an open-ended contingent valuation survey in order to analyze factors shaping public attitudes towards a portfolio of renewable technologies and estimate the economic welfare (Willingness To Pay) of the preferred technologies. We argue that such information is relevant for energy policy design and the establishment of effective measures for the promotion of renewable energy sources. - Highlights: ► We investigate individual preferences and attitudes towards a portfolio of RES technologies. ► We elicit public acceptance for investing in specific RES technologies. ► We analyze factors shaping public preferences of the preferred technologies. ► We estimate the economic welfare of the preferred technologies

  5. Do social networks and technological capabilities help knowledge management?

    OpenAIRE

    Encarnación García-Sánchez; Víctor Jesús García-Morales; Rodrigo Martín-Rojas

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic capabilities are currently becoming an important extension of the theory of resources and capabilities that enables companies to adapt better in the current competitive environment. This paper examines how knowledge management, a dynamic function related to management or administration of a set of knowledge flows, develops thanks to the greater dynamism of social networks. It then shows how this relationship is especially strengthened by different technological capabilities. To achiev...

  6. On Social and Material Aspects of Technological Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfel, William E.

    This commentary on Hugh Lacey's paper emphasises the material aspects of the social structure within which technological control takes place. It is suggested here that when the example of the Green Revolution is examined in detail a clear-cut distinction between material and social constraints/possibilities is misleading. I propose a material analysis of the control situation. This analysis is placed within the material framework of the social structure within which the control system is employed. By widening of the analysis even further it is hoped that the environmental issues of the Green Revolution that concern Vandana Shiva can be addressed. I provide a glimpse of how such an account should proceed.

  7. A Kind of Energy Storage Technology: Metal Organic Frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, Zeynel; Kose, D. A.; Asan, A.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    For last fifteen years energy has been transferred by using electricity and as an energy carrier media electricity has some disadvantages like its wire need for transportation and its being non-storable for large amounts. To store more energy safely and for transportation it easily, new storing medias and devices are needed. For easy and safe energy transport there are many technologies and some of these contain hydrogen energy. Metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, metal organic frameworks (MOFs...

  8. Potential Partnerships: Progressive Criminology, Grassroots Organizations and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Goddard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Criminologists around the globe are writing about the disproportionate criminalization of minority groups and – in the US in particular – about racial disproportionality in all aspects of the criminal justice system. This wealth of knowledge in progressive criminology rarely animates reform efforts: it has had little impact on formal policymaking, and has failed to animate the work of grassroots activists engaged in the fight for justice system reform. Yet given the increased criminalization of young people in poor communities – and the possibilities for change at this very moment – progressive criminological ideas have never been more important. We need to think about ways to make them public. Toward this end, this paper discusses possible partnerships between progressive criminology and social justice organizations struggling to transform the criminal justice system. While describing nine such groups, we detail a set of recommendations for bridging the gap between progressive criminology and social justice organizations.

  9. The intellectual and social organization of the sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Whitley, Richard

    2000-01-01

    In a rapidly changing and inter-disciplinary world it is important to understand the nature and generation of knowledge, and its social organization. Increasing attention is paid in the social sciences and management studies to the constitution and claims of different theories, perspectives, and 'paradigms'. This book is one of the most respected and robust analyses of these issues. For this new paperback edition Richard Whitley - a leading figure in European business education - has written a new introduction which addresses the particular epistemological issues presented by management and business studies. He approaches the sciences as differently organized systems for the production and validation of knowledge - systems which become established in particular contexts and which generate different sorts of knowledge. He identifies seven major types of scientific field and discusses the establishment and growth of these sciences, including the major consequences of the nineteenth-century expansion of employme...

  10. Innovations in technology: social media and mobile technology in the care of adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Andrew; Dimov, Vesselin

    2012-12-01

    This literature review analyzed technological interventions in the adolescent asthmatic population. A PubMed search was performed with terms of asthma, adolescents, social media, Internet, website, mobile phone, text messaging, SMS, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and Technology during a 2.5-year period and identified 64 abstracts. Three studies fulfilled the criteria for adolescent intervention using Internet-based sites but did not provide evidence for effectiveness. Two studies focused on mobile technology. One study included text message reminders for controller medication use in asthma patients. Perceived usefulness, satisfaction, and ease of use of text messages were high, but there was no improvement in asthma control. The literature search did not find any studies exploring the use of smartphone applications or social media services. Current studies of technology use in adolescents with asthma do not provide consistent evidence of effectiveness. The positive attitude toward use of social media or mobile technology opens the possibility for future studies to further explore the potential benefits of such interventions.

  11. Treatment of organic waste using thermal plasma pyrolysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Tang, L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the principles of thermal plasma pyrolysis processes and discusses recent research activities about organic waste treatment using thermal plasma pyrolysis technology. Different kinds of organic wastes, varying from plastic and used tires to agricultural residue and medical waste, have been subjected to thermal plasma pyrolysis tests in laboratory and pilot scale projects. Plasma pyrolysis of organic waste usually gives two product streams: a combustible gas having a calorific value in the range of 4-9 MJ/Nm 3 and a carbonaceous residue. Pyrolysis conditions as well as some technical measures such as the quenching process and steam reforming have significant influences on the properties of these pyrolysis products. Research results indicated that thermal plasma pyrolysis may be a useful way of waste management for energy and material recovery

  12. Where sociality and relatedness diverge: the genetic basis for hierarchical social organization in African elephants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittemyer, George; Okello, John B. A.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.

    2009-01-01

    Hierarchical properties characterize elephant fission-fusion social organization whereby stable groups of individuals coalesce into higher order groups or split in a predictable manner. This hierarchical complexity is rare among animals and, as such, an examination of the factors driving its...... relations in the study population. These results suggest that inclusive fitness benefits may crystallize elephant hierarchical social structuring along genetic lines when populations are undisturbed. However, indirect benefits are not critical to the formation and maintenance of second-, third- or fourth......-tier level bonds, indicating the importance of direct benefits in the emergence of complex, hierarchical social relations among elephants. Future directions and conservation implications are discussed....

  13. The Science and Social Necessity of Deceased Organ Donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis L. Delmonico

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful deceased organ donation requires a reproducible – consistent (scientific system that evaluates the potential for organ donation and determines objectively whether the national system is achieving its goals. The science of organ donation also pertains to the determination of death. We are a common humanity that dies similarly – a humanity whose ultimate criterion of life resides in the function of the human brain. The recent brain death law of Israel encouragingly enables a determination of death by the loss of neurologic function, but it has become complicated by a practice that may perpetuate societal misperceptions. As a result opportunities for deceased organ donation – to provide for Israelis in need of organ transplants – are being lost. A statured task force of society could be assembled to convey its support for deceased donation to influence society and resolve these misperceptions. The World Health Organization is now calling for each member state to achieve a self-sufficiency in organ donation and transplantation “equitably meeting the transplantation needs of a given population using resources from within that population”. Patients should not be compelled to go to foreign countries for their organs. Israel has been a leader in the development of a model program intended to address transplant tourism. Insurance companies are no longer permitted to provide resources for Israelis to undergo illegal transplants in foreign destinations. The social necessity of a scientifically and medically applied system of deceased organ donation is now evident so that a sufficient number of organs can be available for patients from within the country where they reside.

  14. Sensible organizations: technology and methodology for automatically measuring organizational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguin Olguin, Daniel; Waber, Benjamin N; Kim, Taemie; Mohan, Akshay; Ara, Koji; Pentland, Alex

    2009-02-01

    We present the design, implementation, and deployment of a wearable computing platform for measuring and analyzing human behavior in organizational settings. We propose the use of wearable electronic badges capable of automatically measuring the amount of face-to-face interaction, conversational time, physical proximity to other people, and physical activity levels in order to capture individual and collective patterns of behavior. Our goal is to be able to understand how patterns of behavior shape individuals and organizations. By using on-body sensors in large groups of people for extended periods of time in naturalistic settings, we have been able to identify, measure, and quantify social interactions, group behavior, and organizational dynamics. We deployed this wearable computing platform in a group of 22 employees working in a real organization over a period of one month. Using these automatic measurements, we were able to predict employees' self-assessments of job satisfaction and their own perceptions of group interaction quality by combining data collected with our platform and e-mail communication data. In particular, the total amount of communication was predictive of both of these assessments, and betweenness in the social network exhibited a high negative correlation with group interaction satisfaction. We also found that physical proximity and e-mail exchange had a negative correlation of r = -0.55 (p 0.01), which has far-reaching implications for past and future research on social networks.

  15. Technology Addiction: How Social Network Sites Impact our Lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Gerhart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The media and research have made significant noise about young people’s addictions to technology, however the American Psychological Association (APA has reserved judgment on the clinical diagnosis of technology addiction. Research to understand technology addiction is important to the future of information systems development and behavioral usage understanding. Background: Addiction implies that there is a problem from which an IS client needs to try to recover, further implying a negative impact on life. Multiple defini-tions and outcomes of addictions have been studied in the information systems discipline, with virtually no focus on quality of life of the IS client. Methodology: This research employs a survey of students at a large southwestern United States university. Measures were adopted from previously validated sources. The final sample includes 413 usable responses analyzed using PLS. Contribution: This research broadens theoretical and practical understanding of SNS IS client perceptions by relating technology addiction to a broader impact on an individual’s life. By doing so, it provides guidance on society’s understanding of frequent technology use, as well as the development of new systems that are highly used. Findings: This research indicates diminished impulse control, distraction, social influence and satisfaction are all highly correlated with technology addiction; specifically, 55% of the variance in addiction is explained by these four indicators. However, the model further shows addiction has no significant relationship with overall satisfaction of life, indicating that IS clients do not correlate the two ideas. Recommendations for Practitioners: Heavy technology use may indicate a paradigm shift in how people inter-act, instead of a concern to be addressed by the APA. Recommendation for Researchers: Research needs to clearly define technology dependence, addiction, and overuse so that there is a strong

  16. The Social Construction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Social Media Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Dennis Owen

    2016-11-01

    Many people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sometimes lacking adequate face-to-face sources of support, turn to online communities to meet others with the disease. These online communities are places of support and education, but through the use of social media communication technologies, people with IBD are redefining what it means to live with the disease. This ethnographic study followed 14 online communities to understand how people with IBD used social media technologies to construct their own meanings about living with the disease. The following redefinitions were observed: the refiguring of the body is beautiful; inflammatory bowel disease is serious and deadly; inflammatory bowel disease is humorous; the disease makes one stronger; and the disease is invisible, but needs to be made visible. This study will help health communication scholars understand how technology is appropriated by patients, and will help practitioners understand how their patients conceptualize their disease.

  17. New Electronic Technology Applied in Flexible Organic Optical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and application of new organic materials, nanostructured, for developing technology based on organic devices, have been the main focus of the scientific community. In recent years, the first polymeric electronics products have entered the market (organic semiconductor materials and there are some electrochromic devices among them that have been called smart windows, once they control the passage of light or heat through a closed environment as an ordinary window. The main functional aspect of electrochromic devices, when being used in architectural and automotive industry, is to control the passage of light and temperature with thermal and visual comfort. These devices can be flexible and very thin, not containing heavy metals, and formed by layers of organic material deposited in several architectures. In this study, the electro-deposition of organic materials in the Polyaniline, PANI case, which provide stability in optical and electrical parameters, was utilized with the means of developing prototypes of organic electrochromic devices. These materials were characterized by: ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy absorption (UV-Vis, measurement of thickness (MT and electrical measurements (EM. This study aims to establish the relationship between the thickness of the active layer and the value of the electrical resistivity of the layer deposited through an electro-deposition technique. The experimental results enabled the equating of the electrical resistivity related to the thickness of the deposited layer. The linear fit of these results has expressed the thickness of the conducting layer, α, and the lowest value of the electrical resistivity, β, associated with the gap between the valence band and the conduction band. Thus, the results have demonstrated that, when the layer of organic material is completely conductive, we may obtain the thickness of the organic material deposited on the substrate.

  18. Sustainable Organic Farming For Environmental Health A Social Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijun Rijwan Susanto

    2015-05-01

    consider the loss that may be experienced by others as the principles for profit has become very prominent. As a result the development of organic agriculture simply stuck into a commercial activity which would be a criticism of the founders One of the factors that led to the involvement of the government regulated organic farming is because of the bickering about what is called organic agricultural products and because many nonorganic products sold as organic products Organic farmers have difficulty in finding locally based seed for organic farming certification of organic farming has changed it is not just the assurance processes into a tradable commodity 3 The Benefits of Organic Farming in Support for Environmental Health organic farming gives a positive impact on public health because it does not cause environmental pollution water air soil by the residues of chemical fertilizers and synthetic chemical pesticides. Besides organic farming also healthy communities through the provision of agricultural products that are free of pesticides and chemical fertilizer residues 4 The Social Development Model of Sustainable Organic Farming Sustainable agriculture organic farming seeks acre balance of three long-term goals namely a Social-cultural to create quality of life to satisfy personal and community needs for health food safety and happines b Environment to Enhance utilization of soil water air and other resourches limited c Economics to be profitable market forces. These objectives can be achieved if supported by organizational-oriented good governance principles of sustainable agriculture. Sustainable agriculture is the implementation of the principles of sustainable development. Sustainable development will be achieved if conducted prior social development within the broad scope of stakeholders 5 The Policy Recomendation for Organic Farming a National Strategic Agenda The Program Go Organic must be forwarded with the 2010 program Go Organic 2020 where the formulation of

  19. Socialization of scientific and technological research: further comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Research systems are increasingly required to be more practically oriented and to address issues which appear more promising in economic and social results, with special reference to trans-disciplinary research fields, such as nanotechnology or ICTs; policy makers show a sharp tendency to establish research priorities and to drive research systems; universities and research institutions are asked to be more transparent and open to dialogue with social actors on contents, impacts, ethical implications and practical applications of scientific and technological research. These transformations affecting both the ways in which science and technology are produced and their relationships with society pose new challenges to European research. All the aspects of research activities are concerned, including the life of the research groups, the approaches to scientific evaluation, the development of European research policies and the interaction between researchers with their social environment. Continuing a reflection started in the last issue of JCOM, Luisa Prista, Evanthia Kalpazidou-Schmidt, Brigida Blasi, Sandra Romagnosi and Miguel Martínez López offered their contribution in identifying some of the key implications and risks which these changes are bringing about, mainly in the perspective of the construction of the European Research Area.

  20. Which Factors Influence the Adoption of Social Software? An Exploratory Study of Indian Information Technology Consultancy Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Alivelu Manga; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    The rationale behind traditional knowledge management initiatives is to create, capture, share, organize, and use intangible assets such as organizational knowledge. Information systems have been playing a vital role in the implementation of knowledge management practices and systems. Recently......, organizations are adopting new forms of information and communication technologies such as social software to encourage employees to create and share knowledge. This article explores the adoption of social software tools by Indian knowledge workers working for information technology consul- tancy firms. A mixed...... method approach has been applied, and drawing on social dilemma theory and Hofstede’s cultural theory, this study discusses the factors affecting the adoption of social software by knowledge workers. A quantitative descriptive-explanatory study and a qualitative exploratory study have been employed...

  1. The Ecological Behaviour Related to Green Information and Communication Technology in Romanian Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Diana Radu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An increased focus on environmental issues and the fulminant development of information and communication technologies led to the appearance and increased interest in the green characteristics of the available products and services. The ecological behaviour related to these technologies used by organizations, has become a widely studied and applied topic nowadays. In this context, this paper aims to analyse the perception of managers and employees of the Romanian companies in relation to the green information and communication technologies in the attempt to offer a genuine image of their attitude and see if their views are close to the international vision on environment protection. Starting from the literature regarding information and communication technologies and the available empirical studies, we have made an analysis on two categories of organizations: the ones that apply environment policies supported by the institutions and the ones that do not apply any policies, including comparisons between them. The conclusions of the study pointed out the presence of environmental concerns, not always clearly drawn or applied, but they could form the basis for the future actions and initiatives of consumers of information and communication technologies products and services in the wider context and will to fall into line with the Western level of economic and social development.

  2. Affective and Social Factors Influencing the Continuance Intention of Using Social Technology for the Case-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriporn Srisawas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of social technology poses both a threat and an opportunityfor the delivery of traditional case method learning in business schools.This paper extends the expectation confirmation model (ECM to examine thepossibility of delivering the case method learning via social technology. Ourregression analysis shows that, in addition to affective factors, the socialfactor of information and knowledge sharing can help improve the accuracyof predicting a student’s continuance intention of using social technology incase method learning. The analysis result leads to theoretical and empiricalfindings for business schools to consider adopting social technology as thenext-generation tool for case method teaching.

  3. The Social Construction of Educational Technology through the Use of Authentic Software Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allan; Bissell, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A major strand of science and technology studies in recent decades has related to the social construction of technology (SCOT) movement, whose adherents maintain that technological systems are determined just as much by social forces as by technological ones. Taking this SCOT notion as a starting point, and putting a focus on the user, this paper…

  4. Tecnologias sociais: interface com as políticas públicas e o Serviço Social Social technologies: interface with public policy and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Suárez Maciel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O artigo aborda a temática das Tecnologias Sociais - TS, tendo como parâmetro a experiência das autoras como articuladoras de uma rede de organizações que atuam com TS no estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Para tanto, apresenta uma breve contextualização histórica e conceitual das TS, relacionando-as com a atual política de ciência e tecnologia vigente no Brasil e, também, sinalizando-as como uma demanda para a atuação e investigação dos assistentes sociais, tendo em vista a potencialidade das TS se constituírem como uma política pública e de inovação social.The article talks about the Social Technologies (TS, using as the experience of the authors articulate how a network of organizations working with TS in the state of Rio Grande do Sul It presents a brief historical background and the conceptual TS, relating them to the current policy of science and technology law in Brazil and also signaling to them as a demand for action and research of social workers, in view of the potential of TS to be constituted as a public policy and social innovation.

  5. Cross-Sector Social Partnerships for Social Change: The Roles of Non-Governmental Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinya Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex social and environmental issues call for broader collaboration across different sectors so as to instigate transformative social change. While previous scholars have emphasized the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs in facilitating social change, they have not provided a nuanced assessment of NGOs’ different roles. We use the Poverty and Employment Precarity in Southern Ontario (PEPSO research partnership as a study case and explore NGO partners’ different roles in a large cross-sector social partnership (CSSP. By interviewing 12 NGO partners and 4 non-NGO partners involved in the PEPSO research partnership, our research results show that NGOs primarily have 10 roles in a CSSP. They include enabling roles such as consultant, capacity builder, analyst, and funder; coordinating roles such as broker and communicator; and facilitating roles such as initiator, leader, advocate, and monitor. These roles allow NGOs to fulfil their duties to make substantial contributions to a CSSP.

  6. Organic light emission structures — XXI century technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin V. M.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The given review allows to believe, that the decision of a complex technological, materialstechnological, technical problems at creation modern OLED- and PLED-devices in nearest 5—10 years will result in creation of devices with power efficiency more than 100 lm/W and service life till 100 000 hours. The realization of such parameters will allow to expand area of application of the considered systems and to create in the future unique flat powereffective organic lighting systems of new generation — light sources XXI of century.

  7. Smart home technologies for health and social care support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Kelly, Greg; Kernohan, W George; McCreight, Bernadette; Nugent, Christopher

    2008-10-08

    The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. To explore the effectiveness of smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home, and to consider the impact on the individual's health status and on the financial resources of health care. We searched the following databases for primary studies: (a) the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Register, (b) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, issue 1, 2007), and (c) bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2007). We also searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched the electronic databases using a strategy developed by the EPOC Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series analyses (ITS). Participants included adults over the age of 18, living in their home in a community setting. Participants with a physical disability, dementia or a learning disability were included. The included interventions were social alarms, electronic assistive devices, telecare social alert platforms, environmental control systems, automated home environments and 'ubiquitous homes'. Outcome measures included any objective measure that records an impact on a participant's quality of life, healthcare professional workload, economic outcomes, costs to healthcare provider or costs to participant. We included measures of service satisfaction

  8. CLUSTERISATION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN ADVANCED TRAINING OF THE HEADS OF NETWORK EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoriia Stoikova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The creation of strong basic schools with the network of branches and other networked educational organizations in the Ukrainian education system requires from leading cadres the possession of the basics of network management. The article deals with the questions of the process of forming professional competencies of heads of networked educational entities in conditions of postgraduate pedagogical education. The features of learning model which based on the active use of information and communication technologies are revealed have been disclosed; components of the open educational environment (cognitive, social and educational and their influence on the process of training leading cadres; advantages of using Internet technologies for educational purposes. The article describes the experience of organizing a continuous educational process by using the funds of information and communication technologies: websites, distance learning courses, social communities, and other Internet services. At the same time, heads of educational institutions are united in cluster formations by type of educational institutions, the level of providing educational services, the direction of professional interests, preferences, and also for the joint development of managerial algorithms in certain typical situations and for solving typical professional problems. In such a model of learning, knowledge is produced by participants independently during active activity by joint search, processing, and analysis of information, solving problem situations, discussions, debates, etc.

  9. Results-Based Organization Design for Technology Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris McPhee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Faced with considerable uncertainty, entrepreneurs would benefit from clearly defined objectives, a plan to achieve these objectives (including a reasonable expectation that this plan will work, as well as a means to measure progress and make requisite course corrections. In this article, the author combines the benefits of results-based management with the benefits of organization design to describe a practical approach that technology entrepreneurs can use to design their organizations so that they deliver desired outcomes. This approach links insights from theory and practice, builds logical connections between entrepreneurial activities and desired outcomes, and measures progress toward those outcomes. This approach also provides a mechanism for entrepreneurs to make continual adjustments and improvements to their design and direction in response to data, customer and stakeholder feedback, and changes in their business environment.

  10. Social Perception of Science and Technology Governance. Experts vs. Public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Estévez Cedeño

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Science and technology governance has been a recurrent topic for debate in the recent years, both in the academic and the government areas. The perception of the governance of science from an expert’s point of view is a result of the empirical work carried out among the different players who design the science and technology regional policies in Spain. This analysis is completed with the Spanish citizen's appreciation on this subject, gotten from the national survey of social perception of science and technology carried out by the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT. The study shows that experts and the public consider a dialog among them as appropriate to build the governance of science. The public’s interest in these issues may causes that its responsibility is transferred to the experts. Furthermore, there is an ambivalent vision regarding the role citizens must play in this sort of actions. The lack of spaces and put into practice the appropriate methods so that a dialog between experts and stakeholders is still an unresolved matter in order to build up some good governance.

  11. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Possibilities of an STS approach, as an articulating axis of higher technological education and the social environment in local communities

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Valenzuela Méndez; Ramón Villa Medina; Abel Leyva Castellanos; Enrique Farfán Mejía

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the changes imposed by the current transformation of society on technological education centers and on the organization of knowledge in specific community settings. It also analyzes the intervention polices that arise from both Mexican and international institutions. It explores possibilities for articulating the STS approach with education, scientific, technological and social development in a border mining community located in the north of Mexico

  13. Possibilities of an STS approach, as an articulating axis of higher technological education and the social environment in local communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Valenzuela Méndez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of the changes imposed by the current transformation of society on technological education centers and on the organization of knowledge in specific community settings. It also analyzes the intervention polices that arise from both Mexican and international institutions. It explores possibilities for articulating the STS approach with education, scientific, technological and social development in a border mining community located in the north of Mexico

  14. Citation analysis: A social and dynamic approach to knowledge organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2013-01-01

    other and thereby indicating kinds of relatedness and semantic distance. It is therefore important to view bibliometric techniques as a family of approaches to KO in order to illustrate their relative strengths and weaknesses. The subfield of bibliometrics concerned with citation analysis forms...... a distinct approach to KO which is characterized by its social, historical and dynamic nature, its close dependence on scholarly literature and its explicit kind of literary warrant. The two main methods, co-citation analysis and bibliographic coupling represent different things and thus neither can...... be considered superior for all purposes. The main difference between traditional knowledge organization systems (KOSs) and maps based on citation analysis is that the first group represents intellectual KOSs, whereas the second represents social KOSs. For this reason bibliometric maps cannot be expected ever...

  15. Bureaucracy friend or foe? - organizing for social capital in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2015-01-01

    management and hierarchy structures. (2) Collective incentive structures. (3) Develop role structures with a focus on coordination and transparency. (4) Team organization grouped by product (e.g., care pathways) and/or shared multidisciplinary tasks (the day’s surgery). (5) Collective competences, focusing......INTRODUCTION: A strong criticism of bureaucracy in hospitals has emerged during the last years. It is related to standard procedures, quality control systems, patient safety and performance management. The critique claims that professional judgement is getting jeopardized, limited resources...... how people interact and managers have the ability to change it. This knowledge is important to hospitals as social capital is associated with, for instance, organizational performance and employee wellbeing. THEORY: Organizational social capital is the collective resource that enables employees...

  16. The Human Performance Technology Model as a Framework for Implementation of Social Media in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszlo, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Social media are ubiquitous and used by millions of people every day. Existing research on social media is primarily descriptive, survey based, and focused on who is using social media and how people and organizations are using the tools. Although many organizations have shown interest in using social media, they often demonstrate uncertainty…

  17. Effect of encapsulation technology on organic light emitting diode lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Gao, Zhuo; Gao, Juan; Dai, Ke; Chen, Jiule

    2012-03-01

    A kind of green organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) was prepared via vacuum thermal evaporation, of which the multilayer structure was indium-tin oxide (ITO)/copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) (200 Å)/ N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)- N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine ( α-NPD) (600 Å)/ N'-diphenyl- N,N'-tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3) (400 Å):10-(2-benzothiazolyl)-1,1,7,7-tetramethyl-2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1 H,5 H,11 H-(l)benzopyropyrano(6,7,8- i, j)quinolizin-11-one (C545T) (2%)/Alq3 (200 Å)/LiF (10 Å)/Al (1000 Å). And we used both traditional glass encapsulation and thin film encapsulation (TFE) technologies to protect the device, reducing impact of vapor and oxygen. Organic film offered an excellent surface morphology, while inorganic film was nearly a perfect barrier to vapor and oxygen. Both of them constituted the encapsulation unit of TFE. According to the results of acceleration life test, the operation lifetime of device using TFE was 22% less than that of device using traditional glass cap encapsulation. So, the technology of TFE should be optimized further, and the quality of TFE needs a great improvement. There is a long way to go and a lot of hard work before realizing flexible display with OLED, but the dream will be true one day.

  18. Symposium | Science, technology, innovation & social responsibility | 11 November

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognised that science, technology and innovation are among the most powerful forces driving social change and development today. Their impact on the progress of humanity will be discussed at this symposium.   Wednesday, 11 November, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Council Chamber This symposium, organised by CERN and the World Academy of Art & Science (WAAS) under the auspices of United Nations Office at Geneva, will survey the potential impact of scientific and technological innovation in different fields on the progress of humanity in the 21st century and the alternative mechanisms available to ensure socially responsible management of these activities by the research community, business and governments. The introduction will be given by Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, Michael Møller, UNOG Director-General, and Heitor Gurgulino de Souza, WAAS President. Registration is mandatory for people who do not hold a CERN access card. The talks will be i...

  19. Which Factors Influence the Adoption of Social Software? An Exploratory Study of Indian Information Technology Consultancy Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Mukkamala, Alivelu Manga; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    The rationale behind traditional knowledge management initiatives is to create, capture, share, organize, and use intangible assets such as organizational knowledge. Information systems have been playing a vital role in the implementation of knowledge management practices and systems. Recently, organizations are adopting new forms of information and communication technologies such as social software to encourage employees to create and share knowledge. This article explores the adoption of so...

  20. History of Family Psychiatry: From the Social Reform Era to the Primate Social Organ System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Douglas A

    2015-07-01

    From early twentieth century social reform movements emerged the ingredients for both child and family psychiatry. Both psychiatries that involve children, parents, and families began in child guidance clinics. Post-World War II intellectual creativity provided the epistemological framework for treating families. Eleven founders (1950-1969) led the development of family psychiatry. Child and family psychiatrists disagreed over the issues of individual and family group dynamics. Over the past 25 years the emerging sciences of interaction, in the context of the Primate Social Organ System (PSOS), have produced the evidence for the family being the entity of treatment in psychiatry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Organization of science and technology and the atomic energy program in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innas, M.; Islam, N.

    1977-01-01

    Bangladesh has developed an indigenous scientific community and a scientific and technological infrastructure. She is now making earnest endeavors to develop her scientific and technological capabilities to permit her to assimilate, adopt, and put to better social use the science of the advanced countries and, at the same time, establish a base for local production of science and technology geared to her own necessities with the ultimate object of achieving self-reliance. The National Council for Science and Technology (NCST) is the policy making and planning organ, which is attached to the Head of the State. The charters, functions, and mode of operation of these organs are discussed briefly. The Government established the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) in May 1973 and entrusted it with the task of promoting the peaceful uses of atomic energy in Bangladesh. Bangladesh stands on the Non-Proliferation Treaty and we will discuss the IAEA's safeguards system. In this context, the country's views on a Regional Fuel Cycle Center are also discussed. The paper finally reviews international, regional, and multilateral cooperation in the nuclear field

  2. Organ-on-a-Chip Technology for Reproducing Multiorgan Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Sung, Jong Hwan

    2018-01-01

    In the drug development process, the accurate prediction of drug efficacy and toxicity is important in order to reduce the cost, labor, and effort involved. For this purpose, conventional 2D cell culture models are used in the early phase of drug development. However, the differences between the in vitro and the in vivo systems have caused the failure of drugs in the later phase of the drug-development process. Therefore, there is a need for a novel in vitro model system that can provide accurate information for evaluating the drug efficacy and toxicity through a closer recapitulation of the in vivo system. Recently, the idea of using microtechnology for mimicking the microscale tissue environment has become widespread, leading to the development of "organ-on-a-chip." Furthermore, the system is further developed for realizing a multiorgan model for mimicking interactions between multiple organs. These advancements are still ongoing and are aimed at ultimately developing "body-on-a-chip" or "human-on-a-chip" devices for predicting the response of the whole body. This review summarizes recently developed organ-on-a-chip technologies, and their applications for reproducing multiorgan functions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. New Optoelectronic Technology Simplified for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The OLED are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis, Optical Parameters (OP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In addition, the thin film obtained by the deposition of PANI, prepared in perchloric acid solution, was identified through PANI-X1. The result obtained by UV-Vis has demonstrated that the Quartz/ITO/PEDOT/PANI-X1 layer does not have displacement of absorption for wavelengths greaters after spin-coating and electrodeposition. Thus, the spectral irradiance of the OLED informed the irradiance of 100 W/m2, and this result, compared with the standard Light Emitting Diode (LED, has indicated that the OLED has higher irradiance. After 1000 hours of electrical OLED tests, the appearance of nanoparticles visible for images by SEM, to the migration process of organic semiconductor materials, was present, then. Still, similar to the phenomenon of electromigration observed in connections and interconnections of microelectronic devices, the results have revealed a new mechanism of migration, which raises the passage of electric current in OLED.

  4. Demoralization in mental health organizations: leadership and social support help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    Demoralization is a commonly observed feeling state that is characterized by a sense of loss of or threat to one's personal values or goals and a perceived inability to overcome obstacles toward achieving these goals. Demoralization has features in common with burnout and may precede or accompany it. Psychiatrists working in many mental health care organizational settings, be they in the public or private sectors, may be at particular risk for demoralization. This is due partly to stressors that threaten their own professional values because of factors such as programmatic cut backs, budgetary reductions and changing social emphases on the value of mental health treatments. They also may be at risk for demoralization because of the effects on them of the governance styles of the agencies in which they are employed. The leadership or governance style in large organizational settings often is authoritarian, hierarchical and bureaucratic, approaches that are antithetical to the more participative leadership styles favored by many mental health professionals in their clinical activities. Clinical leaders in mental health organizations must exhibit various competencies to successfully address demoralization in clinical staff and to provide a counterbalance to the effects of the governance style of many agencies in which they are employed. Appropriate leadership skills, sometimes too simplistically termed "social support", have been found to reduce burnout in various populations and are likely to lessen demoralization as well. This paper reviews these important leadership issues and the relationship of social support to recognized leadership competencies.

  5. SOCIAL TECHNOLOGIES: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS OF THE BOTTOM LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Makarov

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The work concerns to that section of the economic science which calls "the social economy". This section is organized enough, there is international association of "social economy", created in 1940, that is before many other things professional associations in sphere of economy. The association lets out magazine with the same name. The term "municipal economy" with the meaning of the economy of the municipal property is meant, that is only one of sectors of economy, is often used last time. Actually the economy of the lower level which further calls "municipal", is a special economy in which there are a lot of the features essentially distinguishing it from that we name classical economy. In municipal economy defining economic agents do not aspire to a maximum of profit. In this sense it is similar to archaic economy of the past, on patriarchal economy of Russia up to Peter I or on economy of nomads − cattlemen. Municipality as jurisdiction of the lower level of management represents a certain new formation which should be defined as social corporation.

  6. Social organization and social ties: their effects on sexual harassment victimization in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jamie A; Scherer, Heidi L; Fisher, Bonnie S

    2012-01-01

    Despite work organizations' attempts to reduce sexual harassment, it continues to be a salient issue for employers across all occupations. Extending social disorganization theory to the work environment, this study examines the relationship between workplace organization, social ties, and sexual harassment victimization. Survey responses to the 2002 and 2006 Quality of Working Life module from the General Social Survey by a sample of 3,530 adult men and women employees in the United States were used. Logistic regression models were estimated for men and women separately to estimate the effect of workplace characteristics on the risk of sexual harassment victimization. Employees who reported poor workplace relations between management and employees and lower coworker social ties were more likely to experience sexual harassment in their work environments. Specific workplace characteristics such as low productivity, poor time management, and inadequate administrative support were significantly related to increased sexual harassment risk. No significant gender differences were found across models suggesting that the predictors of sexual harassment are similar for men and women. This study demonstrates that workplace characteristics are related to sexual harassment risk in the workplace. Suggestions for sexual harassment prevention, including management and organizational strategies, are discussed.

  7. iGeneration: The Social Cognitive Effects of Digital Technology on Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Eugenia A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and better understand the social cognitive effects of digital technology on teenagers' brains and their socialization processes, as well as to learn best practices with regard to digital technology consumption. An extensive literature review was conducted on the social cognitive effects of digital…

  8. Managing social impact in design: tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Jantine

    2013-01-01

    The use of email communication, mobile phones and cars has had wide-ranging social consequences. What is more, designers are plainly not always aware of all social consequences of technology, despite practicing user-centred design. Modern technology creates possibilities to influence social

  9. [White organic light-emitting diodes applied for lighting technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing-Yu; Zhao, Su-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Fan, Xing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Qian-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Lighting accounts for approximately 22 percent of the electricity consumed in buildings in the United States, with 40 percent of that amount consumed by inefficient incandescent lamps. This has generated increased interest in the use of white electroluminescent organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDS) as the next generation solid-state lighting source, owing to their potential for significantly improved efficiency over incandescent sources, combined with low-cost, high-throughput manufacturability. The research and application of the devices have witnessed great progress. WOLEDS have incomparable advantages for its special characteristics. This progress report sketched the principle of WOLEDS and provided some common structures, and further investigation of the mechanism of different structures was made. Meanwhile, the key technologies of WOLEDS were summarized. Finally, the latest research progress of WOLEDS was reviewed.

  10. Internal Communication and Social Dialogue in Knowledge-Based Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Maria CISMARU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge-based organizations are constructed on intangible assets, such as the expertise and the values of the employees. As a consequence, motivation and professional excellence of employees are the main objectives of management teams. For this type of organizations, considered as true “knowledge systems”, the employees represent the most valuable resource that is not motivated only through financial means, but also through internal communication, autonomy or social rewards. The research of Eurofound shows that knowledge-based organizations have a low number of trade unions, while professional associations are more relevant for them. There is no tradition to defend through negotiation the working conditions of employees, thus it is important for managers to use the best practices, in order to increase the employees’ loyalty. We conducted a qualitative research concerning the quality of professional life of employees in five sectors of knowledge-based services: advertising-marketing, IT, banking and finance, research and development, and higher education; 15-20 employees from each sector were interviewed. Some of the questions referred directly to trade unions and affiliation, and also to internal communication. Although the results showed a different situation in each of the five sectors, there are few common characteristics: descendant communication is more frequent than ascendant communication, trade unions were reported as missing, unrepresentative or not very active, and the greatest part of employees in this sector are not affiliated, facts that limits the possibility of maintaining employees’ motivation on long term.

  11. Promoting the Use of Online Social Technology as a Case-Based Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ractham, Peter; Chen, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Social technology is proliferating and influencing different aspects of society. However, very few studies have examined the use of such a technology for a case-based learning pedagogy. This preliminary study investigates the use of social technology as a case-based learning tool to improve the effectiveness of case-based learning in the…

  12. Energy and nuclear technology: environmental and social, ethical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro Campos, Mario; Vargas Elizondo, Celso

    2005-01-01

    This work has importance for the educators and public in general, interested in the knowledge of aspects related to history, policy, ethic and the diverse social implications of the development of the nuclear energy and the associated technologies, which have had an important impact in the society from the first half of century XX and to the present. In addition it constitutes a valuable contribution like material of support for the students who attend to compatible courses with the topic treated here. The authors who participate in this book approach thematic located in different periods and fields from the nuclear development. Therefore it is important to define a clear characterization of the concept of nuclear energy and to propose some type of periodization of the nuclear development, that shows the main tendencies in the area [es

  13. The social media cocktail party : A qualitative study of how companies and organizations communicate online

    OpenAIRE

    Ryrhagen, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Due to the development of, and the opportunities that social media provides for different groups in society, companies and organizations are encouraged to be present on, and be a part of the new social media landscape. This research examines how five companies and five organizations use social media as a tool to create relationships with individuals, and what role social media plays in the daily communication work. The social media platforms discussed in this research companies and organizati...

  14. Globalization of bioethics as an intercultural social tuning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hyakudai

    2005-01-01

    Now, in the beginning of the 21st century, bioethics must be urgently globalized into a Global Bioethics which combines the ongoing Bioethics based on the modern European humanism with the newly arising Environmental Ethics based on the rather communitarian (or Asian) ways of thinking. This does not always mean that the new global bioethics is necessarily universalistic, for we should stand on the recognition of the wide spread variety of value systems in the world, north and south, east and west. However, it is not particularistic either, for in order to establish a post-modern global ethics, we have to accept and harmonize every kind of antagonistic values on the Globe. For this purpose we have to cultivate a new social technology of tuning social disorder of not only international but also inter-ethnic and inter-cultural level of ideology beyond the modern European humanism. Here the concept of "human rights" or the concept of "human dignity" may lose its significance as it has held in the past bioethical thinking in the western world.

  15. Use of social media and college student organizations to increase support for organ donation and advocacy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Anthony M; Peltier, James W; Dahl, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    This report focuses on the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics organ procurement organization's efforts to increase deceased organ and tissue donation by using social media and personalized messages targeting members of university student organizations, their families, and their friends. A grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services funded a 2-year study to (1) identify barriers/opportunities for increasing awareness, attitudes, and behaviors related to organ and tissue donation; (2) implement an intervention using social media and personalized message to increase knowledge, support, and donor registrations; (3) measure impact on awareness and attitudinal and behavioral changes within the organization; and (4) assess behavioral measures across a host of social media analytics and organ donor registrations. The results show increases in knowledge about and support for organ donation, including a 20% increase in donor registration. As a result, funding was secured to continue the project for an additional 2 years.

  16. Information technology strategy and alignment issues in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveroth, Einar; Fryk, Pontus; Rapp, Birger

    2013-01-01

    Information technology (IT) plays a key role in public health care management because it could improve quality, efficiency, and patient care. Researchers and practitioners repeatedly contend that a health care organization's information systems strategy should be aligned with its objectives and strategies, a notion commonly known as IT alignment. Actor-related IT alignment issues in health care institutions were explored in this study. More specifically, it explores the possibility of moving beyond the current IT alignment perspective and, in so doing, explores whether IT alignment-as currently conceptualized in the dominant body of research-is sufficient for attaining improved quality, efficiency, and patient care in health care organizations. The findings are based on a qualitative and longitudinal study of six health care organizations in the Stockholm metropolitan area. The empirical data were gathered over the 2005-2011 period from interviews, a focus group, observations, and archival material. The data suggest recurrent misalignments between IT strategy and organizational strategy and operations due to the failure to deconstruct the IT artifact and to the existence of various levels of IT maturity. A more complex picture of IT alignment in health care that goes beyond the current perspective is being offered by this study. It argues that the previously common way of handling IT as a single artifact and applying one IT strategy to the entire organizational system is obsolete. MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The article suggests that considerable benefits can be gained by assessing IT maturity and its impact on IT alignment. The article also shows that there are different kinds of IT in medical care that requires diverse decisions, investments, prioritizations, and implementation approaches.

  17. Location-aware mobile technologies: historical, social and spatial approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Souza e Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With the popularization of smartphones, location-based services are increasingly part of everyday live. People use their cell phones to find nearby restaurants, friends in the vicinity, and track their children. Although location-based services have received sparse attention from mobile communications cholars to date, the ability of locating people and things with one’s cell phone is not new. Since the removal of GPS signal degradation in 2000, artists and researchers have been exploring how location-awareness influences mobility, spatiality and sociability. Besides exploring the historical antecedents of today’s location-based services, this paper focuses on the main social issues that emerge when location-aware technologies leave the strict domain of art and research and become part of everyday life: locational privacy, sociability, and spatiality. Finally, this paper addresses two main topics that future mobile communication research that focus on location-awareness should take into consideration: a shift in the meaning of location, and the adoption and appropriation of location-aware technologies in the global south.

  18. Collective Influence on Information Technology in Virtual Organizations-Emancipatory Management of Technology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2000-01-01

    This contribution addresses the question of how to create an agency for emancipatory management of technology. Unions are suggested as a collective actor, since steps towards democratization and micro emancipation have few chances if they rely on management practitioners alone. Instead, unions......, shop stewards and employees should acquire and demand elements of emancipatory management of technology on the basis of collective power rather than waiting for managers to change their praxis. The article looks at union activities related to virtual organizations in manufacturing companies....... It is argued that although virtualization is modest, it still challenges traditional union strategies. Based on case material stemming from action-oriented research, a number of levels of possible influence and politicization are discussed ranging from the workplace to the national level, which unions can...

  19. Collective Influence on Information Technology in Virtual Organizations-Emancipatory Management of Technology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2000-01-01

    , shop stewards and employees should acquire and demand elements of emancipatory management of technology on the basis of collective power rather than waiting for managers to change their praxis. The article looks at union activities related to virtual organizations in manufacturing companies......This contribution addresses the question of how to create an agency for emancipatory management of technology. Unions are suggested as a collective actor, since steps towards democratization and micro emancipation have few chances if they rely on management practitioners alone. Instead, unions....... It is argued that although virtualization is modest, it still challenges traditional union strategies. Based on case material stemming from action-oriented research, a number of levels of possible influence and politicization are discussed ranging from the workplace to the national level, which unions can...

  20. Social organization in deer: Implications for localized management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William F.; Mathews, Nancy E.; Underwood, H. Brian; Sage, Richard W.; Behrend, Donald F.

    1991-11-01

    Populations of white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) inhabiting many state and national parks and suburban areas have grown to the point that they conflict with human activities. Conflicts range from destruction of vegetation through browsing to public perception that diseases carried by deer pose threats to human health. Traditional modes of hunting to control populations are inappropriate in many of these areas because of intense human development and activity. This article explores an alternative approach for population reduction based on deer social organization. Female white-tailed deer are highly philopatric and female offspring remain near their dams for life. This suggests that a population expands slowly as a series of overlapping home ranges in a form analogous to the petals on a rose. Incorporating the rose petal concept into a model of population growth shows that removal of deer by family unit can potentially alleviate conflicts in localized areas for as many as 10 15 yr.

  1. Can Digital Technology Enhance Social Connectedness Among Older Adults? A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Neves, Barbara; Franz, Rachel; Judges, Rebecca; Beermann, Christian; Baecker, Ron

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a novel communication technology to enhance social connectedness among older adults in residential care. Research suggests that technology can create opportunities for social connectedness, helping alleviate social isolation and loneliness. Studies on implementation and feasibility of such technological interventions, particularly among frail and institutionalized older adults, are scant. Data were gathered in a 3-month deployment with 12 older adults, including semistructured interviews with participants and relatives/friends, psychometric scales, field observations, and usability tests. Data were analyzed with qualitative profiling, thematic analysis, and Friedman tests. The technology was a feasible communication tool, although requiring an adaptation period. Use increased perceived social interaction with ties, but increased social connectedness (meaningful social interaction) was only reported by participants with geographically distant relatives. Sense of well-being and confidence with technology was enhanced, but negative effects were also observed. Findings are useful for researchers and practitioners interested in technological interventions.

  2. Social Media in School Emergency Management: Using New Media Technology to Improve Emergency Management Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Social Media is the use of social networking sites, messaging sites, texting, and other web-based or mobile technologies to support social interaction. Facebook is by far the most widely used social networking site. Twitter is by far the most widely used messaging site. The goals of this presentation are: (1) To provide an understanding of the…

  3. Social Networks As Internet-technologies in Electoral Campaigns: the International View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Александр Александрович Свинин

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Social networks as internet-technologies became a useful instrument for politicians during the electoral campaigns. The main reason for that is the fact that social networks today are the next step in development of communications between people. In the article the author investigates the history of social networks, different cases of application of social networks in electoral campaigns.

  4. City building from the social organizations in eastern periphery of Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Fernanda RODRÍGUEZ CORTÉS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of Mexico City has led to a social and political space marked by the strong presence of social organizations which are connected with clientelistic forms of exchange. This article explores these interwoven relationships from the study of two social organizations that develop in the east of the city. It is argued that social organizations have adapted to social changes of the last twenty years, but remain as central actor into the political relationships, as well as in the configuration of social space in the eastern periphery of Mexico City.

  5. Visions for a sustainable world: A conference on science, technology and social responsibility. Conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes the organization, activities, and outcomes of Student Pugwash USA`s 1992 International Conference, Visions for a Sustainable World: A Conference on Science, Technology and Social Responsibility. The conference was held June 14--20, 1992 at Emory University, and brought together 94 students and over 65 experts from industry, academe, and government. The conference addressed issues ranging from global environmental cooperation to the social impacts of the Human Genome Project to minority concerns in the sciences. It provided a valuable forum for talented students and professionals to engage in critical dialogue on many interdisciplinary issues at the juncture of science, technology and society. The conference challenged students -- the world`s future scientists, engineers, and political leaders -- to think broadly about global problems and to devise policy options that are viable and innovative. The success of the conference in stimulating interest, understanding, and enthusiasm about interdisciplinary global issues is clearly evident from both the participants` feedback and their continued involvement in Student Pugwash USA programs. Six working groups met each morning. The working group themes included: environmental challenges for developing countries; energy options: their social and environmental impact; health care in developing countries; changing dynamics of peace and global security; educating for the socially responsible use of technology; ethics and the use of genetic information. The conference was specifically designed to include mechanisms for ensuring its long-term impact. Participants were encouraged to focus on their individual role in helping resolve global issues. This was achieved through each participant`s development of a Personal Plan of Action, a plan which mapped out activities the student could undertake after the conference to continue the dialogue and work towards the resolution of global and local problems.

  6. Are Key Principles for improved health technology assessment supported and used by health technology assessment organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Peter J; Drummond, Michael F; Jönsson, Bengt; Luce, Bryan R; Schwartz, J Sanford; Siebert, Uwe; Sullivan, Sean D

    2010-01-01

    Previously, our group-the International Working Group for HTA Advancement-proposed a set of fifteen Key Principles that could be applied to health technology assessment (HTA) programs in different jurisdictions and across a range of organizations and perspectives. In this commentary, we investigate the extent to which these principles are supported and used by fourteen selected HTA organizations worldwide. We find that some principles are broadly supported: examples include being explicit about HTA goals and scope; considering a wide range of evidence and outcomes; and being unbiased and transparent. Other principles receive less widespread support: examples are addressing issues of generalizability and transferability; being transparent on the link between HTA findings and decision-making processes; considering a full societal perspective; and monitoring the implementation of HTA findings. The analysis also suggests a lack of consensus in the field about some principles--for example, considering a societal perspective. Our study highlights differences in the uptake of key principles for HTA and indicates considerable room for improvement for HTA organizations to adopt principles identified to reflect good HTA practices. Most HTA organizations espouse certain general concepts of good practice--for example, assessments should be unbiased and transparent. However, principles that require more intensive follow-up--for example, monitoring the implementation of HTA findings--have received little support and execution.

  7. Aktøranalytisk tilgang til designprocessen: Social Construction of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Hanne; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    Introduktion til den konstruktivistiske tilgang til teknologianalyse og socioteknisk design "Social Construction of Technology" (SCOT) ved Wiebe Bijker, mhp. design og innovation uddannelsen. Dækker over SCOT begreberne Relevante Sociale Grupper, Fortolkningsmæssig Fleksibilitet, Betydningstilord......Introduktion til den konstruktivistiske tilgang til teknologianalyse og socioteknisk design "Social Construction of Technology" (SCOT) ved Wiebe Bijker, mhp. design og innovation uddannelsen. Dækker over SCOT begreberne Relevante Sociale Grupper, Fortolkningsmæssig Fleksibilitet...

  8. Variation in social organization influences the opportunity for sexual selection in a social lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    While, Geoffrey M; Uller, Tobias; Wapstra, Erik

    2011-02-01

    Social monogamy has traditionally been suggested to be maintained because of weak sexual selection on male partner acquisition. However, the ubiquitous incidence of extra-pair paternity suggests that sexual selection can be strong in monogamous systems, although studies partitioning variance in male reproductive success have come to mixed conclusions. Here, we use detailed field data to examine variance in male reproductive success and its implications for the maintenance of sociality in a population of the socially monogamous lizard Egernia whitii. We show that both within-pair and, to a lesser extent, extra-pair partner acquisition contribute to the variance in male reproductive success, resulting in considerable opportunity for sexual selection. Despite this, levels of multiple mating are lower in Egernia compared to other reptiles, suggesting that male partner acquisition is constrained. We suggest that this constraint may be a result of strong territoriality combined with sexual conflict over multiple mating generated by costs of extra-pair paternity to females as a result of facultative male care. This has the potential to limit sexual selection by reducing variance in male reproductive success and therefore contribute to the maintenance of complex social organization. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Technology and the Social Studies--Where We Were; Where We Are, Where We Are Going...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead-Mezzetta, Shirley

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the goals of the California State Department of Education's Technology in Curriculum (TIC) projects. Provides several examples of technology use and identifies several pieces of software which are being successfully used in high school social studies classes. (JDH)

  10. ORGANIZATION OF LABORATORY REASERCHESIN THE DISCIPLINE “SOCIAL ASPECTS OF INFORMATIZATION OF EDUCATION”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А Е Павлова

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In article methodical aspects of the organization of laboratory researches for masters of higher educational organizations on discipline “Social aspects of informatization of education” are described. The author considers a question of why this discipline is actual for future teachers and what competences it helps them to develop. Laboratory researches on this rate are considered as the main form of work, and it is offered to organize them so that trainees independently got necessary theoretical knowledge and purchased practical skills within this discipline. In article the question of that, as well as what information and communication technologies is considered to use in training in order that undergraduates not only have gained an impression how to apply ICT in teaching and educational process, but also have gained practical experience in using these technologies.The author offers a certain sequence of training master undergraduates, where laboratory researches are grouped in several cycles and consider which knowledge and skills the students will gain at each stage.

  11. Social Adjustment of At-Risk Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Moye, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual technology education students' subgroup dynamic informs progressions of research while apprising technology teacher educators and classroom technology education teachers of intricate differences between students. Recognition of these differences help educators realize that classroom structure, instruction, and activities must be…

  12. Conceptions of authority within contemporary social work practice in managed mental health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransford, Cassandra L

    2005-07-01

    This article examines how social workers may use their authority to create managed mental health care organizations that support the principles and values of professional social work practice. By exploring research and theoretical contributions from a multidisciplinary perspective, the author suggests ways that social workers may incorporate empowerment strategies into their organizational practices to create more socially responsible and humane mental health organizations. (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. N-REL: A comprehensive framework of social media marketing strategic actions for marketing organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artha Sejati Ananda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing and ubiquitous use of social media for business activities, scholar research on social media marketing strategy is scant and companies deploy their social media marketing strategies guided by intuition or trial and error. This study proposes a comprehensive framework that identifies and classifies social media marketing strategic actions. The conceptual framework covers actions that support both transactional and relationship marketing. This research also positions social media marketing strategy and strategic actions in the context of the marketing organization theory, and discusses the impact of the incorporation of social media on the concept of marketing organization. The study offers valuable theoretical insight on social media marketing actions and the deployment of social media marketing strategies in companies. The investigation also provides hints about how to maximize the benefits from social media marketing for customer-oriented, market-driven organizations.

  14. Theory and Practice: Implications for the Implementation of Communication Technology in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Sandra L.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that scientific management principles result in an implementation of technology which fails to take full advantage of organization members and of the technology itself, while in a sociotechnical systems approach, technology is designed and implemented in ways enhancing the potential of both individuals and the technology itself, in…

  15. Exploring Social Networking Technologies as Tools for HIV Prevention for Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallo, Jorge; Kidder, Thomas; Albritton, Tashuna; Blick, Gary; Pachankis, John; Grandelski, Valen; Grandeleski, Valen; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-08-01

    Social networking technologies are influential among men who have sex with men (MSM) and may be an important strategy for HIV prevention. We conducted focus groups with HIV positive and negative participants. Almost all participants used social networking sites to meet new friends and sexual partners. The main obstacle to effective HIV prevention campaigns in social networking platforms was stigmatization based on homosexuality as well as HIV status. Persistent stigma associated with HIV status and disclosure was cited as a top reason for avoiding HIV-related conversations while meeting new partners using social technologies. Further, social networking sites have different social etiquettes and rules that may increase HIV risk by discouraging HIV status disclosure. Overall, successful interventions for MSM using social networking technologies must consider aspects of privacy, stigma, and social norms in order to enact HIV reduction among MSM.

  16. Data, Technology & Social Media: Their Invasive Role in Contemporary Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Prakash Vel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marketers have paid a huge price for their inability to decipher which trend has come to stay and which one is a fad. Such a challenge has jeopardized the survival of blue-chip brands, as marketers anticipated in vain the end of existing red ocean strategies. Essentially, the traditional marketing strategies associated with the success of well-known brands in the past are losing their relevance in the current context. There is the need to identify and understand modern trends and their implications to marketing strategy development. In light of this, this study examines fourteen (14 fundamental ‘game changing’ trends that are poised to impact the traditional practices and perceptions associated with marketing at the operational and strategic levels. The study presents the trends under three categories, the invasive role of technology, data, and social media, alongside looking at their impact on contemporary marketing. Each trend has been identified and analyzed based on in-depth interviews with industry experts as the primary source of data. Relevant data has also been given to present a holistic perspective on each trend. 

  17. Apoc Social: A Mobile Interactive and Social Learning Platform for Collaborative Solving of Advanced Problems in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievertsen, Niels; Carreira, Erick M

    2018-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are carried in the pockets of university students around the globe and are increasingly cheap to come by. These portable devices have evolved into powerful and interconnected handheld computers, which, among other applications, can be used as advanced learning tools and providers of targeted, curated content. Herein, we describe Apoc Social (Advanced Problems in Organic Chemistry Social), a mobile application that assists both learning and teaching college-level organic chemistry both in the classroom and on the go. With more than 750 chemistry exercises available, Apoc Social facilitates collaborative learning through discussion boards and fosters enthusiasm for complex organic chemistry.

  18. Rethinking the Harmonious Family: Processes of social organization in a Korean Corporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    harmony as a stabile entity in East Asian organizations is too static for analyzing the social organization. Rather, the dynamics of the continuous production and reproduction of social structures have to be taken into account in order to understand working life in Korean organizations.......  Social harmony and stability have been described as almost inborn aspects of Korean corporations dating far back in history. After the East Asian economic crisis in 1997 most Korean organizations, however faced new demands for productivity and competitiveness. The fragile balance between social...

  19. Technology Experience of Solid Organ Transplant Patients and Their Overall Willingness to Use Interactive Health Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoof, Jasper M M; Vandenberghe, Bert; Geerts, David; Philippaerts, Pieter; De Mazière, Patrick; DeVito Dabbs, Annette; De Geest, Sabina; Dobbels, Fabienne

    2018-03-01

    The use of interactive health technology (IHT) is a promising pathway to tackle self-management problems experienced by many chronically ill patients, including solid organ transplant (Tx) patients. Yet, to ensure that the IHT is accepted and used, a human-centered design process is needed, actively involving end users in all steps of the development process. A first critical, predevelopment step involves understanding end users' characteristics. This study therefore aims to (a) select an IHT platform to deliver a self-management support intervention most closely related to Tx patients' current use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), (b) understand Tx patients' overall willingness to use IHT for self-management support, and investigate associations with relevant technology acceptance variables, and (c) explore Tx patients' views on potential IHT features. We performed a cross-sectional, descriptive study between October and December 2013, enrolling a convenience sample of adult heart, lung, liver, and kidney Tx patients from the University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium. Broad inclusion criteria were applied to ensure a representative patient sample. We used a 35-item newly designed interview questionnaire to measure Tx patients' use of ICTs, their overall willingness to use IHT, and their views on potential IHT features, as well as relevant technology acceptance variables derived from the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology and a literature review. Descriptive statistics were used as appropriate, and an ordinal logistic regression model was built to determine the association between Tx patients' overall willingness to use IHT, the selected technology acceptance variables, and patient characteristics. Out of 139 patients, 122 agreed to participate (32 heart, 30 lung, 30 liver, and 30 kidney Tx patients; participation rate: 88%). Most patients were male (57.4%), married or living together (68%), and had a mean age of 55.9 ± 13.4 years

  20. Integrating Social Capital Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore a Behavioral Model of Telehealth Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hung Tsai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory, technological factors (TAM, and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively, which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities.

  1. Integrating Social Capital Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore a Behavioral Model of Telehealth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory), technological factors (TAM), and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory) in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation) significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively), which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities. PMID:24810577

  2. Integrating social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model to explore a behavioral model of telehealth systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2014-05-07

    Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory), technological factors (TAM), and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory) in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation) significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively), which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities.

  3. Socio-Pedagogical Complex as a Pedagogical Support Technology of Students' Social Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovaya, Victoriya V.; Simonova, Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the need of developing technological approaches to pedagogical support of students' social adaptation. The purpose of this paper is to position the technological sequence of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation in the activities of the socio-pedagogical complex. The…

  4. Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Vladlena, Ed.; Morgan, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of social media in higher education has transformed the way instructors teach and students learn. In order to effectively reach their students in this networked world, teachers must learn to utilize the latest technologies in their classrooms. "Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education" brings…

  5. Self-organization of social hierarchy on interaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujie, Ryo; Odagaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of interaction network structures on the self-organization of social hierarchy, we introduce the agent-based model: each individual as on a node of a network has its own power and its internal state changes by fighting with its neighbors and relaxation. We adopt three different networks: regular lattice, small-world network and scale-free network. For the regular lattice, we find the emergence of classes distinguished by the internal state. The transition points where each class emerges are determined analytically, and we show that each class is characterized by the local ranking relative to their neighbors. We also find that the antiferromagnetic-like configuration emerges just above the critical point. For the heterogeneous networks, individuals become winners (or losers) in descending order of the number of their links. By using mean-field analysis, we reveal that the transition point is determined by the maximum degree and the degree distribution in its neighbors

  6. When the technological “transfers” “fail”. Learnings and limitations on the building of Technologies for Social Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Fressoli, Mariano; Investigador CONICET / Instituto de Estudios sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología Universidad Nacional de Quilmes (IESCT-UNQ) Buenos Aires, Argentina; Garrido, Santiago; Investigador CONICET / Instituto de Estudios sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología Universidad Nacional de Quilmes (IESCT-UNQ) Buenos Aires, Argentina; Picabea, Facundo; Becario posdoctoral CONICET / Instituto de Estudios sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Quilmes (IESCT-UNQ) Buenos Aires, Argentina; Lalouf, Alberto; Investigador del Instituto de Estudios sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología Universidad Nacional de Quilmes (IESCT-UNQ) Buenos Aires, Argentina; Fenoglio, Valeria; Becaria Doctoral CONICET / Centro de Investigaciones y Estudio sobre Cultura y Sociedad (CIECS-CONICET) Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade discussions about the way in which the development of technologies can (or should) promote social inclusion processes have been revived in the academic debate, in some cases these have also been reflected in the design and implementation of public policies. However, among the groups of R & D engaged in activities of technological development and extension the deterministic approaches and adherence to the technology transfer models persist and, therefore, they often ...

  7. LANDMARKS IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF ORGANIZATIONS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SORIN-GEORGE TOMA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The social responsibility of organizations concept has become the subject of considerable researches, debates and commentaries especially in the second half of the last century. According to ethical principles organizations and individuals have the obligation to act in the benefit of society at large. Consequently, the social responsibility of a business is related to its duties and obligations directed towards the social welfare. The role of corporations in society and the issue of corporate social responsibility have been increasingly debated in the last century. Based on a literature review our paper seeks to describe and summarize some of the main contributions to the development of the social responsibility of organizations. The aims of our paper are to explore the evolution of the social responsibility of organization concept in the last century and to emphasize its various approaches, mostly in the business field. This historical trace identifies both similarities and differences related to social responsibility themes.

  8. Technology-based interventions in social work practice: a systematic review of mental health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex T; Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions.

  9. Concise Review: Organ Engineering: Design, Technology, and Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaushik, G.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Khademhosseini, A.

    Engineering complex tissues and whole organs has the potential to dramatically impact translational medicine in several avenues. Organ engineering is a discipline that integrates biological knowledge of embryological development, anatomy, physiology, and cellular interactions with enabling

  10. Social customer relationship management: taking advantage of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Orenga-Rogl?, Sergio; Chalmeta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies has allowed a new customer relationship strategy based on interactivity and collaboration called Social Customer Relationship Management (Social CRM) to be created. This enhances customer engagement and satisfaction. The implementation of Social CRM is a complex task that involves different organisational, human and technological aspects. However, there is a lack of methodologies to assist companies in these processes. This paper shows a nove...

  11. Dynamic effects of social influence and direct marketing on the adoption of high-technology products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H.; Verhoef, P.C.; Bijmolt, T.H.A.

    Many firms capitalize on their customers' social networks to improve the success rate of their new products. In this article, the authors analyze the dynamic effects of social influence and direct marketing on the adoption of a new high-technology product. Social influence is likely to play a role

  12. Feminist HCI for Real: Designing Technology in Support of a Social Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    How are technologies are designed and used tactically by activists? As the HCI community starts to contend with social inequalities, there has been debate about how HCI researchers should address approach this type of research. However, there is little research examining practitioners such as social justice activists who confront social problems,…

  13. A screenplay approach to simuate social impacts of technology in health care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jantine Bouma

    2015-01-01

    Designers have grown increasingly interested in social consequences of new technologies. As social impacts become increasingly important it might be fruitful to understand how social impacts develop and how a designer can anticipate these consequences. In health care practices, for instance, it is

  14. Understanding Women's Underrepresentation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: The Role of Social Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, Valerie J.; Jones, Meghan P.; Major, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors is disproportionately small and declining. This study examines social coping to explain the gender gap. Women undergraduates reported using significantly more social coping than did men. Multiple regression analyses revealed that social coping was a stronger…

  15. Shared Values and Socio-Cultural Norms: E-Learning Technologies from a Social Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patti; Velan, Gary M.; Shulruf, Boaz

    2017-01-01

    From a perspective of social practice, learning is a socially constituted practice that is imbued with socio-culturally significant meanings and shaped by the values and norms shared within a community of learners. This focus group study examines the role of e-learning technologies in mediating the social practice of learning among coursework…

  16. New technologies stuck in old hierarchies. An analysis of diffusion of geo-information technologies in Dutch public organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, G.; Geertman, S.; Schot, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Some 25 years after the introduction of the first geo-information technologies in public organizations, strategies to manage their diffusion are still inadequate. This is problematic in light of the new generation of geo-information technologies that has become available and aims to invest in these

  17. Social identification, social representations, and consumer innovativeness in an organic food context: A cross-national comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, J.; Reinders, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the role of (1) demographic characteristics, (2) domain-specific innovativeness, (3) social representation of new foods, and (4) social identification on the adoption of new organic food products. Three studies in the United States (N = 1001), the United Kingdom

  18. Community stress and social and technological change: a framework for interpreting the behavior of social movements and community action groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, R.W.; Schuller, C.R.; Lindell, M.K.; Greene, M.R.; Walsh, J.T.; Earle, T.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive examination of existing research on community organizations and community political systems. These findings will be integrated into a framework for understanding the variety of social and political responses which may be manifest in small communities facing the prospect of hosting a major nuclear facility. The principal focus is on the formation and behavior of social groups in communities, particularly politically oriented social movements or community action groups. This analysis is set on the context of a community experiencing social stress. Most of the discussion which follows is based on an extrapolation from the large body of reseach literature on the topics in sociology, political science, and psychology. Chapter I examines the community political systems which are the arena in which local action groups will operate. Chapter II focuses on the internal conditions necessary for the formation and maintenance of community action groups. Chapter III reviews the research literature on the social environment of organizations in communities and the external conditions which are necessary to maintain organizations over time. Chapter IV develops a logic whereby the community consensus model can be adopted to particular social movement organizations and community actions groups. Chapter V examines changes in aspects of the environment which can be a function of the operation of movement organizations, and changes in the structure and tactics of movement organizations which appear to be a response to the environment.

  19. Predicting Cloud Computing Technology Adoption by Organizations: An Empirical Integration of Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekufu, ThankGod K.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are finding it difficult in today's economy to implement the vast information technology infrastructure required to effectively conduct their business operations. Despite the fact that some of these organizations are leveraging on the computational powers and the cost-saving benefits of computing on the Internet cloud, others…

  20. Using Video Modeling and Mobile Technology to Teach Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Todd; Musti-Rao, Shobana; McCune, Ashley; Clouse, Diane E.; McCoy, Dacia M.; Kalra, Hilary D.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2017-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the field of education regarding the use of technology in classrooms to improve student outcomes. Specifically, researchers have demonstrated positive outcomes for using mobile technology with students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Fewer studies have used mobile technology with students with emotional and…

  1. Strategies for Preparing Preservice Social Studies Teachers to Integrate Technology Effectively: Models and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, Thomas; Saye, John W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes strategies used by the authors to assist preservice social studies teachers with understanding and applying models and practices for effectively integrating technology into their future classrooms--thus, strengthening the link between technology and pedagogy (or technological pedagogical content knowledge). Efforts with…

  2. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  3. Intimate Technology: A Tool for Teaching Anti-Racism in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Anne C.; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce a new conceptual tool, intimate technology, to mobilize social work students' commitment to anti-racism. Intimate technology is marked by its emotional intensity and accessibility, and its effect of de-centering knowledge and authority. This teaching strategy integrates the modality of intimate technology via…

  4. The emerging Web 2.0 social software: an enabling suite of sociable technologies in health and health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Wheeler, Steve

    2007-03-01

    Web 2.0 sociable technologies and social software are presented as enablers in health and health care, for organizations, clinicians, patients and laypersons. They include social networking services, collaborative filtering, social bookmarking, folksonomies, social search engines, file sharing and tagging, mashups, instant messaging, and online multi-player games. The more popular Web 2.0 applications in education, namely wikis, blogs and podcasts, are but the tip of the social software iceberg. Web 2.0 technologies represent a quite revolutionary way of managing and repurposing/remixing online information and knowledge repositories, including clinical and research information, in comparison with the traditional Web 1.0 model. The paper also offers a glimpse of future software, touching on Web 3.0 (the Semantic Web) and how it could be combined with Web 2.0 to produce the ultimate architecture of participation. Although the tools presented in this review look very promising and potentially fit for purpose in many health care applications and scenarios, careful thinking, testing and evaluation research are still needed in order to establish 'best practice models' for leveraging these emerging technologies to boost our teaching and learning productivity, foster stronger 'communities of practice', and support continuing medical education/professional development (CME/CPD) and patient education.

  5. Cacophony or Empowerment? Analysing the Impact of New Information Communication Technologies and New Social Media in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Abbott

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities, tools and websites we associate with new information communication technologies and social media are now ubiquitous. Moreover tools that were designed to facilitate innocuous conversation and social interaction have had unforeseen political impacts. Nowhere was this more visible than during the 2011 uprisings across the Arab World. From Tunis to Cairo, and Tripoli to Damascus protest movements against authoritarian rule openly utilized social networking and file sharing tools to publicize and organize demonstrations and to catalogue human rights abuses. The Arab Spring, or Jasmine Revolution, was an event that was both witnessed and played out in real time online. This article explores the impacts and effects of these technologies on regimes in East Asia, in particular exploring the extent to which they proffer new capabilities upon activists and reformers in the region’s semi-democratic and authoritarian regimes. Drawing on data on Internet and smartphone use, as well as case studies that explore the role of these technologies on the 2008 and 2011 general elections in Malaysia and Singapore respectively, this article suggests that the Internet and social networking platforms do present unique opportunities for activists, citizens and social movements.

  6. Social customer relationship management: taking advantage of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenga-Roglá, Sergio; Chalmeta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Web 2.0 and Big Data technologies has allowed a new customer relationship strategy based on interactivity and collaboration called Social Customer Relationship Management (Social CRM) to be created. This enhances customer engagement and satisfaction. The implementation of Social CRM is a complex task that involves different organisational, human and technological aspects. However, there is a lack of methodologies to assist companies in these processes. This paper shows a novel methodology that helps companies to implement Social CRM, taking into account different aspects such as social customer strategy, the Social CRM performance measurement system, the Social CRM business processes, or the Social CRM computer system. The methodology was applied to one company in order to validate and refine it.

  7. Using social science to understand and improve wildland fire organizations: an annotated reading list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory Larson; Vita Wright; Cade Spaulding; Kelly Rossetto; Georgi Rausch; Andrea Richards; Stephanie Durnford

    2007-01-01

    The wildland fire community has spent the past decade trying to understand and account for the role of human factors in wildland fire organizations. Social research that is relevant to managing fire organizations can be found in disciplines such as social psychology, management, and communication. However, such research has been published primarily for scientific and...

  8. Expatriate support and success : A systematic review of organization-based sources of social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laken, P.A.; van Engen, M.L.; van Veldhoven, M.J.P.M.; Paauwe, J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review empirical research on the relationship between organization-based social support and the success of international assignments (IAs). Design/methodology/approach Four search engines were used to obtain empirical studies relating organization-based social

  9. Looking at the Others : Studies on (un)ethical behavior and social relationships in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.B. Zuber (Franziska)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis dissertation asks how social relationships matter for a person’s ethical or unethical behavior in an organization. Two observations motivate this question. First, in organizations, the network of formally prescribed and informally emerging social relationships with others

  10. Modern technologies of adaptation young specialists in the organization

    OpenAIRE

    Кузьминых, Николай Юрьевич

    2016-01-01

    In this article the main directions and technologies of adaptation of young specialists are considered. The author has revealed new technology of adaptation of young specialists which will allow new employees to feel more comfortably on a new workplace, to join collective, and also will lead to reduction of a dissatisfaction and turnover of staff at an initial stage of adaptation.

  11. Social Consequences of Nomadic Working: A Case Study in an Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramanjit; Wood-Harper, Trevor

    This research study identified social challenges that knowledge workers in the Swedish organization TeliaSonera (Telia) face when utilizing wireless technologies to conduct work on the move. Upon collecting the relevant research data, five problem areas were identified: work and life balance, addiction, organizational involvement, nomadic work and control, and individual productivity. Each problem area was examined with the philosophical underpinning of socio-technical design principles. The results confirm that better role boundary management, self-discipline, work negotiation, and e-mail communication skills may be required for the knowledge workers to manage the demands of nomadic working. Similarly, rewarding nomadic work performance, building employee supervisor trust relations, and designing jobs that enhance work and life balance can be imperative.

  12. The Benefits of Social Technology Use Among Older Adults Are Mediated by Reduced Loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopik, William J

    2016-09-01

    Technology has the ability to enhance and enrich the lives of older adults by facilitating better interpersonal relationships. However, few studies have directly examined associations between technology use for social reasons and physical and psychological health among older adults. The current study examines the benefits of technology use in 591 older adults from the 2012 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (Mage = 68.18, SD = 10.75; 55.5% female). Social technology use was assessed through five technology-based behaviors (i.e., using e-mail, social networking sites, online video/phone calls, online chatting/instant messaging, using a smartphone). Attitudes toward the usability and benefits of technology use were also assessed. Older adults had generally positive attitudes toward technology. Higher social technology use was associated with better self-rated health, fewer chronic illnesses, higher subjective well-being, and fewer depressive symptoms. Furthermore, each of the links between social technology use and physical and psychological health was mediated by reduced loneliness. Close relationships are a large determinant of physical health and well-being, and technology has the potential to cultivate successful relationships among older adults.

  13. Therapists’ Perceptions of Social Media and Video Game Technologies in Upper Limb Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzad, Navid; Lohse, Keith R; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Hoens, Alison M; Holsti, Liisa; Li, Linda C; Miller, Kimberly J; Lam, Melanie Y; Van der Loos, HF Machiel

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of technologies, such as video gaming and social media for rehabilitation, is garnering interest in the medical field. However, little research has examined clinicians’ perspectives regarding technology adoption by their clients. Objective The objective of our study was to explore therapists’ perceptions of how young people and adults with hemiplegia use gaming and social media technologies in daily life and in rehabilitation, and to identify barriers to using these technologies in rehabilitation. Methods We conducted two focus groups comprised of ten occupational therapists/physiotherapists who provide neurorehabilitation to individuals with hemiplegia secondary to stroke or cerebral palsy. Data was analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. The diffusion of innovations theory provided a framework to interpret emerging themes. Results Therapists were using technology in a limited capacity. They identified barriers to using social media and gaming technology with their clients, including a lack of age appropriateness, privacy issues with social media, limited transfer of training, and a lack of accessibility of current systems. Therapists also questioned their role in the context of technology-based interventions. The opportunity for social interaction was perceived as a major benefit of integrated gaming and social media. Conclusions This study reveals the complexities associated with adopting new technologies in clinical practice, including the need to consider both client and clinician factors. Despite reporting several challenges with applying gaming and social media technology with clinical populations, therapists identified opportunities for increased social interactions and were willing to help shape the development of an upper limb training system that could more readily meet the needs of clients with hemiplegia. By considering the needs of both therapists and clients, technology developers may increase the likelihood that

  14. Therapists' perceptions of social media and video game technologies in upper limb rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatla, Sandy K; Shirzad, Navid; Lohse, Keith R; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Hoens, Alison M; Holsti, Liisa; Li, Linda C; Miller, Kimberly J; Lam, Melanie Y; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2015-03-10

    The application of technologies, such as video gaming and social media for rehabilitation, is garnering interest in the medical field. However, little research has examined clinicians' perspectives regarding technology adoption by their clients. The objective of our study was to explore therapists' perceptions of how young people and adults with hemiplegia use gaming and social media technologies in daily life and in rehabilitation, and to identify barriers to using these technologies in rehabilitation. We conducted two focus groups comprised of ten occupational therapists/physiotherapists who provide neurorehabilitation to individuals with hemiplegia secondary to stroke or cerebral palsy. Data was analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. The diffusion of innovations theory provided a framework to interpret emerging themes. Therapists were using technology in a limited capacity. They identified barriers to using social media and gaming technology with their clients, including a lack of age appropriateness, privacy issues with social media, limited transfer of training, and a lack of accessibility of current systems. Therapists also questioned their role in the context of technology-based interventions. The opportunity for social interaction was perceived as a major benefit of integrated gaming and social media. This study reveals the complexities associated with adopting new technologies in clinical practice, including the need to consider both client and clinician factors. Despite reporting several challenges with applying gaming and social media technology with clinical populations, therapists identified opportunities for increased social interactions and were willing to help shape the development of an upper limb training system that could more readily meet the needs of clients with hemiplegia. By considering the needs of both therapists and clients, technology developers may increase the likelihood that clinicians will adopt innovative technologies.

  15. Supporting Self-Organized Learning with Personal Webpublishing Technologies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priya; Fiedler, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest that self-organized learning can be supported through emergent and informal Web technologies and propose that these technologies can be used to encourage similar practices in higher education. Self-organized learning aims at increasing individual control over instructional functions through a process that involves…

  16. Self-organization in the movement activity of social insects (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Felipe Marcel; Pie, Marcio Roberto; Viana, Ricardo Luiz

    2012-09-01

    Social insects present behavioral, morphologic and social variation, which bring ideal situations to study emergent temporal-spatial patterns. In this study, we observe the self-organization in the movement activity of social insects in different species and densities. In our preliminary results, all the species observed present a pattern more complex in higher densities and with structural differences between them.

  17. Taming Big Data: Using App Technology to Study Organizational Behavior on Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Social media websites such as Facebook and Twitter provide an unprecedented amount of qualitative data about organizations and collective behavior. Yet these new data sources lack critical information about the broader social context of collective behavior--or protect it behind strict privacy barriers. In this article, I introduce social media…

  18. Using social media technologies for teaching and research

    OpenAIRE

    Minocha, Shailey

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this workshop is to examine and discuss how educators and researchers can adopt and use social media tools such as blogs, wikis, micro-blogging (e.g. Twitter), social bookmarking tools, photo-sharing sites (e.g. Flickr), or social networking tools (e.g. Facebook) in the service of their teaching and research, and, particularly, in engaging with students and other researchers. \\ud \\ud We will cover the following topics in the workshop:\\ud a. A catalogue of social media tools that c...

  19. Role of a national research organization in the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear technology holds great promise for developing countries because it can contribute to national development. The developing countries, however, lack the resources and expertise to develop nuclear technology through their own efforts. A national research organization devoted to the promotion and utilization of nucler technology can provide an effective channel for the transfer of nuclear technology. The problems which the national research organization is likely to face in executing its tasks as an agent for the transfer of technology are discussed. An appreciation of these problems would enable the organization to restructure its priorities so as to achieve maximum effectiveness. The various ways by which the national research organization can speed up the task of transfer of technology are also discussed

  20. Health and research organization to meet complex needs of developing energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a unique safety technology organization has been established that is especially geared to respond to interdisciplinary health and safety questions in response to rapidly growing energy technology problems. This concept can be adopted by smaller organizations at a more modest cost, and still maintains the efficiency, flexibility, and technical rigor that are needed more and more in support of any industry health and safety problem. The separation of the technology development role from the operation safety organization allows the operational safety specialists to spend more time upgrading the occupational health and safety program but yet provides the opportunity for interchange with health and safety technology development specialists. In fact, a personnel assignment flow between an operational health and safety organization and a special technology development organization provides a mechanism for upgrading the overall safety capability and program provided by a given industrial or major laboratory

  1. Smart technologies to enhance social connectedness in older people who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Kurowski, William; Miller, Kimberly J; Pearce, Alan J; Santamaria, Nick; Long, Maureen; Ventura, Cameron; Said, Catherine M

    2014-09-01

    To examine the effectiveness of smart technologies in improving or maintaining the social connectedness of older people living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of research articles published between 2000 and 2013. Article screening, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Downs and Black checklist) were conducted by two independent researchers. Eighteen publications were identified that evaluated the effect of smart technologies on dimensions of social connectedness. Fourteen studies reported positive outcomes in aspects such as social support, isolation and loneliness. There was emerging evidence that some technologies augmented the beneficial effects of more traditional aged-care services. Smart technologies, such as tailored internet programs, may help older people better manage and understand various health conditions, resulting in subsequent improvements in aspects of social connectedness. Further research is required regarding how technological innovations could be promoted, marketed and implemented to benefit older people. © 2014 ACOTA.

  2. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Towards Organ Weaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, pore size and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important role in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26924450

  3. Evaluating Outsourcing Information Technology and Assurance Expertise by Small Non-Profit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Fillmore

    2013-01-01

    Small non-profit organizations outsource at least one information technology or information assurance process. Outsourcing information technology and information assurance processes has increased every year. The study was to determine the key reasons behind the choice to outsource information technology and information assurance processes. Using…

  4. Implications of Graphic Organizers in an Age of Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The term graphic organizer has become so commonplace in teaching that the meaning of the term, as well as the rationale for why the strategy works, has become lost. Revisiting the general concept of an advance organizer is an opportunity to consider the essential teaching act. There is a difference between "using a graphic organizer" in…

  5. Principles and application of transgenic technology in marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine organisms into which a foreign gene or noncoding DNA fragment is artificially introduced and stably integrated in their genomes are termed transgenic marine organisms. Since the first report in 1985, a wide range of transgenic fish and marine bivalve mollusks have been produced by microinjec...

  6. Defining death: organ transplants, tradition and technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, E A

    1988-01-01

    This article explores Japanese attitudes about brain death and organ transplantation. First, ancient burial customs and death-related rituals associated with Shinto and Buddhism are examined. Next, contemporary attitudes towards the dead are discussed in the context of current controversies surrounding brain death and organ transplantation. Finally, an attempt is made to link the traditional Japanese views of death with modern medical dilemmas.

  7. New technology in everyday life - social processes and environmental impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2001-01-01

    aspect both of changes in everyday life and of the environmental impact of everyday-life activities. Technological change is often seen as an important part of the solutions to environmental problems, however, when technological change is seen from the perspective of everyday life, this image becomes...... more complex. In this paper technological changes are explored from the perspective of consumption and everyday life, and it is argued that environmental impacts arise through the interplay of technology, consumption and everyday life. Firstly, because technological renewals form integral parts......In the environmental debate it is increasingly acknowledged that our way of life has profound environmental consequences. Therefore, it becomes ever more important to focus on and to understand how everyday life is formed and how it changes over time. Changing technology constitutes an important...

  8. New technology in everyday life - social processes and environmental impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2001-01-01

    aspect both of changes in everyday life and of the environmental impact of everyday-life activities. Technological change is often seen as an important part of the solutions to environmental problems, however, when technological change is seen from the perspective of everyday life, this image becomes...... more complex. In this paper technological changes are explored from the perspective of consumption and everyday life, and it is argued that environmental impacts arise through the interplay of technology, consumption and everyday life. Firstly, because technological renewals form integral parts...... influence the environment in the long run. The paper points to the need for further studies of the long term interplay between new technologies, everyday life and the environment....

  9. Hierarchical Organizations and Information Age Technologies: A Strategic Mismatch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roman, Charlette

    1999-01-01

    ... if this model remains a viable and relevant organizational framework for the future. It proposes that there is a critical strategic link between organizational structure and information technology enablers...

  10. MODERN TECHNOLOGIES IN THE AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Marasanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Work is devoted to the development of information management system for maintenance and repair, using telecommunication technologies to ensure the completeness, accuracy, continuity and timeliness required in the maintenance and repair information.

  11. Managing quality inside a high-technology project organization

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, T. (Tauno)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This action research addresses the deployment of Total Quality Management (TQM) principles in a high-technology new product development organisation. During the period of study, the organisation grew fast. High-technology product development and hypergrowth provided a unique combination of extreme conditions for the study. The existing concepts of TQM are presented as an organised map enabling strategic analysis for an implementation plan. The history of TQM dates back to the ...

  12. The Uneven Diffusion of Collaborative Technology in a Large Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarulaitis, Gasparas

    This paper investigates the large-scale diffusion of a collaborative technology in a range of different business contexts. The empirical data used in the article were obtained from a longitudinal (2007-2009) case study of a global oil and gas company (OGC). Our study reports on ongoing efforts to deploy an inte grated collaborative system that uses Microsoft SharePoint (MSP) technology. We assess MSP as a configurational technology and analyze the diffusion of a metadata standard developed in-house, which forms an embedded component of MSP. We focus on two different organizational contexts, namely research and development (R&D) and oil and gas production (OGP), and illustrate the key differences between the ways in which configurational technology is managed and used in these contexts, which results in an uneven diffusion. In contrast with previous studies, we unravel the organizational and technological complexity involved, and thus empirically illustrate the flexibility of large-scale technology and show how the trajectories of the various components are influenced by multiple modes of ordering.

  13. Research on Corporate Social Responsibility of Supply Chain System Based on the Self-organization Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Baoying Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of supply chain system are analyzed based on the Self-organization theory from the angle of view of supply chain system. The mathematical models when the system fulfilling social responsibility including self-organization evolution model and self-organization function model are developed to discuss the formation and function of self-organization in supply chain system and coordination. Some basic conditions and tactics about self-organization establishment a...

  14. An Extended Technology Acceptance Model for Mobile Social Gaming Service Popularity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The games industry has been growing prosperously with the development of information technology. Recently, with further advances in social networks and mobile services, playing mobile social gaming has gradually changed our daily life in terms of social connection and leisure time spending. What are the determinant factors which affect users intention to play such games? Therefore in this research we present an empirical study on WeChat, China’s most popular mobile social network, and apply a technology acceptance model (TAM to study the reasons beneath the popularity of games in mobile social networks. Furthermore, factors from social and mobile perspective are incorporated into the conventional TAM and their influence and relationships are studied. Experimental study on accumulated online survey data reveals several interesting findings and it is believed that this research offers the researchers in the community further insight in analysing the current popularity and future potential of mobile social games.

  15. Schizotypy as An Organizing Framework for Social and Affective Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alex S.; Mohr, Christine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Park, Sohee

    2015-01-01

    Schizotypy, defined in terms of commonly occurring personality traits related to the schizophrenia spectrum, has been an important construct for understanding the neurodevelopment and stress-diathesis of schizophrenia. However, as schizotypy nears its sixth decade of application, it is important to acknowledge its impressively rich literature accumulating outside of schizophrenia research. In this article, we make the case that schizotypy has considerable potential as a conceptual framework for understanding individual differences in affective and social functions beyond those directly involved in schizophrenia spectrum pathology. This case is predicated on (a) a burgeoning literature noting anomalies in a wide range of social functioning, affiliative, positive and negative emotional, expressive, and social cognitive systems, (b) practical and methodological features associated with schizotypy research that help facilitate empirical investigation, and (c) close ties to theoretical constructs of central importance to affective and social science (eg, stress diathesis, neural compensation). We highlight recent schizotypy research, ie providing insight into the nature of affective and social systems more generally. This includes current efforts to clarify the neurodevelopmental, neurobiological, and psychological underpinnings of affiliative drives, hedonic capacity, social cognition, and stress responsivity systems. Additionally, we discuss neural compensatory and resilience factors that may mitigate the expression of stress-diathesis and functional outcome, and highlight schizotypy’s potential role for understanding cultural determinants of social and affective functions. PMID:25810057

  16. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Bourov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With due account for the coming new (VI-th world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technological environment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th technological structure level basic technologies are shown for industrial and household waste processing techniques as an example.

  17. Motivation and Knowledge Sharing through Social Media within Danish Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pia; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Based on an empirical quantitative study, this article investigates employee motivation in Danish companies and aims at determining which factors affect employees’ knowledge sharing through social media in a working environment. Our findings pinpoint towards the potential social media have......, but it is the influence from the combination of individual and organizational factors, which affect the adoption of the platforms. A key finding in the study is that knowledge sharing is not a ‘social dilemma’ as previous studies have found. The study shows a positive development in employees’ willingness to share...

  18. Do Accounting Students Have Realistic Expectations of Information Technology Usage in Nonprofit Organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Karen M.; Kleen, Betty A.; Shell, L. Wayne

    Not-for-profit organizations employ 11% of all U.S. workers; these organizations are often the recipients of hand-me-down hardware and software. This study investigates accounting students expectations of the information technology available to and used by not-for-profit organizations. In this descriptive study, based on two different surveys,…

  19. Intended and Unintended Consequences of Educational Technology on Social Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Andrew A.; Reeves, Todd D.; Stich, Amy

    2016-01-01

    While much has been written in the field of educational technology regarding educational excellence and efficiency, less attention has been paid to issues of equity. Along these lines, the field of educational technology often does not address key equity problems such as academic achievement and attainment gaps, and inequality of educational…

  20. Initial Model of Social Acceptability for Human Augmentation Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eghtebas, Chloe; Pay, Yun Suen; Väänänen, Kaisa; Pfeiffer, Ties; Meyer, Joachim; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Academia and industry engage in major efforts to develop technologies for augmenting human senses and activities. Many of these technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) head mounted displays (HMD), haptic augmentation systems, and exoskeletons can be applied in numerous

  1. INFLUENCE OF GLOBAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY ON THE SOCIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRAB INTERNATIONAL VENTURES

    and telecommunications, have acted as catalysts for e-commerce. This has been made possible as a result of the opening up of global markets in telecommunication services and information technology products that are building blocks for electronic commerce. Lessons to be Learnt from Technology use in Countries of the ...

  2. Intra-specific variation in social organization of gorillas: implications for their social evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, Juichi; Kahekwa, John; Basabose, Augustin Kanyunyi

    2003-10-01

    We analysed intra-specific variation in the social organization of gorillas and ecological and social factors influencing them, based on recent data on diet, day journey length, home range size, group size and proportion of multi-male groups in three subspecies [western lowland gorillas (WLG); eastern lowland gorillas (ELG); mountain gorillas (MG)]. Median group size was similar across subspecies and across habitats, but the extraordinarily large group including >30 gorillas was only found in habitat with dense terrestrial herbaceous vegetation. Within-group competition may determine the upper limit of group size in frugivorous WLGs and ELGs in lowland habitats with scarce undergrowth. A frugivorous diet may be a causal factor of subgrouping in multi-male groups of WLGs and ELGs, while a folivorous diet may prevent subgrouping in multi-male groups of MGs. Social factors, rather than ecological factors, may play an important role in the formation of multi-male groups and their cohesiveness in MGs. High gregariousness of female gorillas and their prolonged association with a protector male are explained by their vulnerability to both infanticide (MGs) and predators (ELGs). Comparison of long-term changes in group composition and individual movements between ELGs in Kahuzi and MGs in the Virungas suggest that the occurrence of infanticide may promote kin-male association within a group. Threat of infanticide may stimulate MG females to transfer into multi-male groups to seek reliable protection and maturing MG males to stay in their natal groups after maturity. By contrast, the absence of infanticide may facilitate ELG females to associate with infants and other females at transfer and ELG males to establish large groups in a short period by taking females from their natal groups, by luring females from neighbouring groups, or by takeover of a widow group after the death of its leading male. These conditions may prevent ELG and WLG maturing males from remaining to

  3. Social media and the networked organization, Twitter and intra-police communications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Albert; Torenvlied, René; Fictorie, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Do social media in the transform government organizations into post-bureaucratic organizations? Key features of post-bureaucratic organizations (1) horizontal coordination (with a focus on informal interaction patterns) and (2) fluid and permeable borders with its environment. To explore whether the

  4. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  5. William Foote Whyte, Street Corner Society and social organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Social scientists have mostly taken it for granted that William Foote Whyte's sociological classic Street Corner Society (SCS, 1943) belongs to the Chicago school of sociology's research tradition or that it is a relatively independent study which cannot be placed in any specific research tradition. Social science research has usually overlooked the fact that William Foote Whyte was educated in social anthropology at Harvard University, and was mainly influenced by Conrad M. Arensberg and W. Lloyd Warner. What I want to show, based on archival research, is that SCS cannot easily be said either to belong to the Chicago school's urban sociology or to be an independent study in departmental and idea-historical terms. Instead, the work should be seen as part of A. R. Radcliffe-Brown's and W. Lloyd Warner's comparative research projects in social anthropology. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Social Networking and Smart Technology: Viable Environmental Communication Tools…?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montain, J.; Byrne, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    To what extent do popular social networking channels represent a viable means for disseminating information regarding environmental change to the general public? Are new forms of communication such as YouTube™, Facebook™, MySpace™ and Twitter™ and smart devices such as iPhone™ and BlackBerry™ useful and effective in terms motivating people into social action and behavioural modification; or do they simply pay ‘lip service’ to these pressing environmental issues? This project will explore the background connections between social networking and environmental communication and education; and outline why such tools might be an appropriate way to connect to a broad audience in an efficient and unconventional manner. Further, research will survey the current prevalence of reliable environmental change information on social networking Internet-based media; and finally, suggestions for improved strategies and new directions will be provided.

  7. Understanding the Link between Social Organization and Crime in Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilenski, Sarah M; Syvertsen, Amy K; Greenberg, Mark T

    Rural communities make up much of America's heartland, yet we know little about their social organization, and how elements of their social organization relate to crime rates. The current study sought to remedy this gap by examining the associations between two measures of social organization - collective efficacy and social trust - with a number of structural community characteristics, local crime rates, and perceptions of safety in a sample of 27 rural and small town communities in two states. Measures of collective efficacy, social trust, and perceived safety, were gathered from key community members in 2006; other measures were drawn from the 2000 Census and FBI Uniform Crime Reporting system. A series of competing hypotheses were tested to examine the relative importance of social trust and collective efficacy in predicting local crime rates. Results do not support the full generalization of the social disorganization model. Correlational analyses showed that neither collective efficacy nor social trust had a direct association with community crime, nor did they mediate the associations between community structural characteristics and crime. However, perceived safety mediated the association between community crime and both measures of social organization. Analyses suggest that social trust may be more important than collective efficacy when understanding the effect of crime on a community's culture in rural areas. Understanding these associations in rural settings can aid decision makers in shaping policies to reduce crime and juvenile delinquency.

  8. "Happy and Excited": Perceptions of Using Digital Technology and Social Media by Young People Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynan, Amanda; Murray, Janice; Goldbart, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    Young people are using digital technology and online social media within their everyday lives to enrich their social relationships. The UK government believes that using digital technology can improve social inclusion. One well-recognized outcome measure for establishing social inclusion is to examine opportunities for self-determination.…

  9. Postnonclassical methodology and application of virtual reality technologies in social research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko, Yu.P.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The postnonclassical paradigm has increasingly become a conceptual basis for social research in various fields in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical and non-classical approaches. Subjects of social research activities require changes in the paradigm at all levels of research: from the statement of the problem to the elaboration of the appropriate methods and the analysis of the research data. The search for new research methods, technologies and techniques plays a crucial role in this process. One of the most promising methods that has rapidly developed in recent years is the technology of virtual reality (VR. This technology is being widely applied to both natural science and social science research. In this article, we examine the possibilities of using VR technology for the resolution of current tasks in social research from the perspective of the postnonclassical approach.

  10. Research of corporate social responsibility in an energy efficient technologies development section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyashenko O.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considered the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR and its components. The Jevons paradox is examined, the mechanism of rebound effect on the example of energy efficient technologies is analyzed.

  11. Impacts of nuclear and hydroelectric great projects: economical, technological, environmental and social aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.; Sigaud, L.; Mielnik, O.

    1988-01-01

    Some studies about the Great Impacts of Energy Sources, mainly nuclear power plant and hydroelectric power plant, in Brazil are presented. The technological, economical, social and environmental aspects are described [pt

  12. Using social knowledge networking technology to enable meaningful use of electronic health record technology in hospitals and health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani

    2014-12-01

    Despite the federal policy momentum towards "meaningful use" of Electronic Health Records, the healthcare organizational literature remains replete with reports of unintended adverse consequences of implementing Electronic Health Records, including: increased work for clinicians, unfavorable workflow changes, and unexpected changes in communication patterns & practices. In addition to being costly and unsafe, these unintended adverse consequences may pose a formidable barrier to "meaningful use" of Electronic Health Records. Correspondingly, it is essential for hospital administrators to understand and detect the causes of unintended adverse consequences, to ensure successful implementation of Electronic Health Records. The longstanding Technology-in-Practice framework emphasizes the role of human agency in enacting structures of technology use or "technologies-in-practice." Given a set of unintended adverse consequences from health information technology implementation, this framework could help trace them back to specific actions (types of technology-in-practice) and institutional conditions (social structures). On the other hand, the more recent Knowledge-in-Practice framework helps understand how information and communication technologies ( e.g. , social knowledge networking systems) could be implemented alongside existing technology systems, to create new social structures, generate new knowledge-in-practice, and transform technology-in-practice. Therefore, integrating the two literature streams could serve the dual purpose of understanding and overcoming unintended adverse consequences of Electronic Health Record implementation. This paper seeks to: (1) review the theoretical literatures on technology use & implementation, and identify a framework for understanding & overcoming unintended adverse consequences of implementing Electronic Health Records; (2) outline a broad project proposal to test the applicability of the framework in enabling "meaningful use

  13. LABS, cells and organs on chip : Technologies and biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades both micro/ nanofabrication and microfluidics technologies have been crucial for the rapid development of Lab on a Chip systems. Here we present a few examples of this. Firstly, a capillary electrophoresis system on chip for blood analysis will be presented. Secondly, we

  14. Information Technology and Value Creation in the Public Sector Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Min-Seok

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, I study the performance impact of information technology (IT) investments in the public sector. IT has been one of the key assets in public administration since the early MIS era. Even though the information systems (IS) discipline has witnessed a considerable amount of research efforts on the subject of IT business value for…

  15. Successful Implementation of Technological Innovations in Health Care Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Weijers; T.L. Finch; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2015-01-01

    In order to accept and implement technology in a successful manner, not only determinants (acceptance barriers or facilitators) related to individual persons, for instance, health care providers as well as health care recipients, are important. Also interpersonal relationships on the work floor as

  16. Effect of Leadership Styles, Social Capital, and Social Entrepreneurship on Organizational Effectiveness of Social Welfare Organization in Malaysia: Data Screening and Preliminary Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Ng Chun; Wan, Chong Yen; Sharif, Mohmad Yazam

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of screening, editing and preparation of initial data before any further multivariate analysis of the study concerning effect of leadership styles, social capital and social entrepreneurship on organizational effectiveness of social welfare organization in Malaysia. It is vital to conduct data screening to identify any potential violation of the basic assumptions related to the application of multivariate techniques. Moreover, initial data e...

  17. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Bourov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With due account for the coming new (VI-th world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technologicalenvironment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th technological structure level basic technologies are shown for industrial and household waste processing techniques as an example.

  18. A widening gap? The political and social organization of childcare in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faur, Eleonor

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how social policies and programmes implemented in Argentina shape the political and social organization of childcare. The author seeks to analyse how welfare institutions are currently responding to emerging needs, and to what extent they facilitate the defamilialization of childcare for different social classes. Because Argentina lacks a truly unified ‘care policy’, four different kinds of facilities and programmes are examined: employment-based childcare services; pre-school schemes; social assistance care services; and poverty reduction strategies. It is argued that far from offering equal rights and services with a universalist cast, these ‘caring’ institutions reflect the ethos of the current welfare model in Argentina: a fragmented set of social policies based on different assumptions for different social groups, which in turn filter down to the social organization of childcare.

  19. The social nature of chronic noncommunicable diseases and how to tackle them through communication technology, training, and outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moreno, Jose M; Apfel, Franklin; Sanchez, Jose Luis Alfonso; Galea, Gauden; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2011-08-01

    As world leaders prepare for the United Nations High Level Meeting on Noncommunicable Diseases, to take place in September 2011, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and economic and business fora have created new alliances and initiatives to accelerate research, advocacy, and political commitment. This article argues that the time is propitious to reflect on the social nature of the most common behavioral noncommunicable disease determinants, including tobacco and alcohol use, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet. Evidence is presented related to the fact that these diseases are profoundly rooted in social and community ties and points to the need for a modern communication strategy to serve as a linchpin of any successful action to address these public health threats. Several proposals, aimed at promoting health literacy, strengthening health workforce skills, capturing the power of new media and technologies, and targeting vulnerable groups, are discussed.

  20. Integrating cell phones and mobile technologies into public health practice: a social marketing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Mobile communications are being used for many purposes, from instant messaging (IM), mobile or microblogging (Twitter), social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace), e-mail to basic voicemail. A brief background on cell phone and mobile technology use in public health is reviewed. The focus of the article is framing the use of mobile technologies in public health from a social marketer's perspective--using the 4 Ps marketing mix as a guide.

  1. Usability and use reference in the social network facebook: a netnographic analysis of technological users

    OpenAIRE

    Naiara Silva Ferreira; Emílio José Montero Arruda Filho

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a study about the preference of use in virtual social networks, using Facebook as object of study, to identify the motivational factors for the usability of this technology platform. The social network Facebook has been chosen to present a technological scenario of high sociability and virtual interaction. The methodology used was the netnography, being made through the collection of discussions in North American sites of news and forums online, where there is a large cr...

  2. "Inventing Hysteria" An Investigation on How Social Constructivism Uses Technology to Define Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Doris

    2016-01-01

    In my paper I want to focus on the social constructivists and their approach of using technology to define (constructed) reality. Based on this, constructivists argue that technology can be a means to define social roles. Furthermore, I want to analyze this theory on the practical example of the photographs of women in different phases of hysteria, based on Georges Didi-Huberman’s book Invention of Hysteria (1982)

  3. Managing social impact in design: Tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bouma, Jantine

    2013-01-01

    Proefschrift Universiteit Twente, Enschede, ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor. We need look no further than the use of email communication, mobile phones and cars to understand that technology has wide-ranging social consequences. What is more, designers are plainly not always aware of the social consequences of technology, despite practicing user-centred design. Email, for instance, was developed as an efficient mode of communication between two actors. As we all know, the introduction...

  4. History of Oromo Social Organization: Gadaa Grades Based Roles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 3 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Beyond participation -Social Influence on Information Technology and Work Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1997-01-01

    The contribution examines the organisation as framework for participation with focus on employees possibilities to impact the development of integrative information technology. These IT systems integrate across functions inside and outside the traditional organisation. Case studies carried out...

  6. The Impact of Information Technology on Organizations: Implications for Organizational Integration and the Management of Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    United States by the year 2000." (Set in 1979) "To become the first truly great biopharmaceutical company." (Set in 1990) The common enemy is...technology is defined in the following way, The specific technology of the organization is, then, the collection of plant , machines, tools and recipes...continuous process production firms use mechanized systems for the entire process. Examples include chemical and nuclear plants . From these groups

  7. On Study of Teaching Reform of Organic Chemistry Course in Applied Chemical Industry Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2017-11-01

    with the implementation of new curriculum reform, the education sees great changes in teaching methods. Teaching reform is profound in organic chemistry course in applied chemical industry technology. However, many problems which have never been noticed before occur when reform programs are implemented which harm students’ ability for learning and enthusiasm in side face. This paper proposes reform measures like combining theory and practice, improving professional quality, supplementing professional needs and integrating teaching into life after analyzing organic chemistry course teaching in applied chemical industry technology currently, hoping to play a role of reference for organic chemistry course teaching reform in applied chemical industry technology.

  8. INTERMEDIARIES, USERS AND SOCIAL LEARNING IN TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

    OpenAIRE

    JAMES STEWART; SAMPSA HYYSALO

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the role of intermediaries in the development and appropriation of new technologies. We focus on intermediaries that facilitate user innovation, and the linking of user innovation into supply side activities. We review findings on intermediaries in some of our studies and other available literature to build a framework to explore of how intermediaries work in making innovation happen. We make sense of these processes by taking a long-term view of the dynamics of technology...

  9. The impact of social, cognitive and attitudinal dimensions on college students' support for organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, A M; Peltier, J W; Dahl, A J

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how college students can be social support catalysts for organ donation and how social, cognitive and attitudinal dimensions impact organ donor registration. A total of 317 people participated in the exploratory portion of the project and a total of 1800 responses were obtained from an online survey to members of a national student organization. The findings show that perceptions of the benefits of organ donation and altruistic motives had the greatest impact on the support for organ donation while respondents' knowledge about how to register to be an organ donor was the dominant dimension for donor registration status. Social-based communications had the next greatest impact for both support and donor registration. Based on the findings, an 18-month social media campaign was launched with the student organization that had 20 421 website visitors, 4473 Facebook members, 1189 YouTube video submissions with 164 000 views, motivated 19 623 people to go to a state's organ donor registration page, and had 9000 documented organ donor registrations. Within the student organization, organ donor registration increased by 28%. On the basis of these project results, Donate Life America and other sponsors have provided funding for two additional years. ©Copyright 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  10. An agent-based model of centralized institutions, social network technology, and revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowsky, Michael D; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    This paper sheds light on the general mechanisms underlying large-scale social and institutional change. We employ an agent-based model to test the impact of authority centralization and social network technology on preference falsification and institutional change. We find that preference falsification is increasing with centralization and decreasing with social network range. This leads to greater cascades of preference revelation and thus more institutional change in highly centralized societies and this effect is exacerbated at greater social network ranges. An empirical analysis confirms the connections that we find between institutional centralization, social radius, preference falsification, and institutional change.

  11. Development and analysis of educational technologies for a blended organic chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael James

    Blended courses incorporate elements of both face-to-face and online instruction. The extent to which blended courses are conducted online, and the proper role of the online components of blended courses, have been debated and may vary. What can be said in general, however, is that online tools for blended courses are typically culled together from a variety of sources, are often very large scale, and may present distractions for students that decrease their utility as teaching tools. Furthermore, large-scale educational technologies may not be amenable to rigorous, detailed study, limiting evaluation of their effectiveness. Small-scale educational technologies run from the instructor's own server have the potential to mitigate many of these issues. Such tools give the instructor or researcher direct access to all available data, facilitating detailed analysis of student use. Code modification is simple and rapid if errors arise, since code is stored where the instructor can easily access it. Finally, the design of a small-scale tool can target a very specific application. With these ideas in mind, this work describes several projects aimed at exploring the use of small-scale, web-based software in a blended organic chemistry course. A number of activities were developed and evaluated using the Student Assessment of Learning Gains survey, and data from the activities were analyzed using quantitative methods of statistics and social network analysis methods. Findings from this work suggest that small-scale educational technologies provide significant learning benefits for students of organic chemistry---with the important caveat that instructors must offer appropriate levels of technical and pedagogical support for students. Most notably, students reported significant learning gains from activities that included collaborative learning supported by novel online tools. For the particular context of organic chemistry, which has a unique semantic language (Lewis

  12. An updated assessment of social media usage by dermatology journals and organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi R; Hill, Mary K; Smith, Mallory K; Seeker, Paige; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2018-02-15

    Despite the increasing prevalence of social media usage, the activity of dermatology journals and professional and patient-centered organizations on top social media platforms has not been investigated since 2012. We investigated a total of 124 dermatology journals, 242 professional organizations, and 78 patient-centered organizations to assess their presence and popularity on social media. Searches were conducted to identify journals and organizations on Facebook and Twitter. Similar searches were done for organizations on LinkedIn. The number of Facebook likes, Twitter followers, and LinkedIn followers of the dermatological entities were quantified. There were 22 (17.7%) dermatology journals active on Facebook and 21 (16.9%) on Twitter. Amongst the professional organizations, 114 (47.1%) were on Facebook, 69 (28.5%) on Twitter, and 50 (20.7%) on LinkedIn. In comparison, 68 (87.2%) patient-centered organizations were on Facebook, 56 (71.8%) on Twitter, and 56 (71.8%) on LinkedIn. Our results demonstrate that the popularity of dermatology journals and professional and patient-centered organizations on top social networking sites has grown markedly since 2012. Although the number of dermatology journals on social media has increased since 2012, their presence continues to trail behind professional and patient-centered dermatological organizations, suggesting underutilization of a valuable resource.

  13. Application of technology to social communication impairment in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckowski, Andrea Trubanova; White, Susan W

    2017-03-01

    Social communication impairment has been implicated in various mental health disorders. The primary aim of this review paper is to summarize the extant research on the development and application of technologies to address social communication deficits, conceptualized according to the four constructs outlined by the NIMH's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), transdiagnostically in children and adolescents. An exhaustive and systematic search yielded 69 peer-reviewed articles meeting all inclusion criteria (i.e., used technology, applied the technology to target impairment in at least one of four constructs of social communication, included a child or adolescent samples). We found limited use of technology for exploration of impairment in reception of non-facial communication, compared to the other social communication constructs. In addition, there has been an overwhelming focus on social communication impairment in children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), with relatively few studies evaluating technology application in other clinical populations. Implications for future directions for technological interventions to treat social communication impairments transdiagnostically are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recycling and social technologies for sustainability: The Brazilian experience of wastepickers' inclusion in selective collection programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Francisco de Paula Antunes; de Oliveira, Fabiana Goulart

    2017-01-01

    Alternatives are being developed for waste treatment all over the world. Solidary selective collection is a recognized social technology for taking millions of people out of absolute poverty. However, this technology raises crucial questions regarding its nature and development perspective. What can be said of the legitimacy of a social technology that is born from misery and maintains wastepickers in precarious work conditions? This article approaches issues based on the analysis of the wastepickers' work process, highlighting the difficulties and interpersonal conflicts, the strong social bonds and creativity that reveal the potential of efficiency and solidarity of this social technology. The analyses are founded on empirical descriptions of work situations and organizational arrangements that the wastepickers themselves have developed. The observations were made during the work, followed by interviews focused on significant events and behaviors. The contradiction between efficiency and solidarity, which excludes workers from the formal labor market, finds in the associations a solution for people with different capacities. This social technology offers much more than simple survival or exoticism. The wastepickers create a sustainable mode of production, putting together economic, social and environmental criteria in an innovative and fair production technology.

  15. After the Biomedical Technology Revolution: Where to Now for a Bio-Psycho-Social Approach to Social Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Karen

    2016-07-01

    In the late twentieth century, the bio-psycho-social framework emerged as a powerful influence on the conceptualisation and delivery of health and rehabilitation services including social work services in these fields. The bio-psycho-social framework is built on a systems view of health and well-being ( Garland and Howard, 2009). The systems perspective encourages medical and allied health professions, including social work, to recognise and to respond to the multiple systems impacting on individual health and well-being ( Engel, 2003). This paper analyses how advances in biomedical technology, particularly in the fields of neuroscience and human genomics, are challenging the bio-psycho-social approach to practice. The paper examines the pressures on the social work profession to embrace biomedical science and points to the problems in doing so. The conclusion points to some tentative ways forward for social workers to engage critically with biomedical advances and to strengthen the bio-psycho-social framework in the interests of holistic and ethical approaches to social work practice.

  16. REBUILDING THE SOCIAL DIALOGUE AND PROMOTING INCLUSIVE ORGANIZATIONS. A TOOL FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION IN TIMES OF CRISIS

    OpenAIRE

    Lourdes Munduate; Donatella Di Marco; Ines Martínez-Corts; Alicia Arenas; Nuria Gamero

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the developing research agenda in the context of the difficulties of the socio-economic environment and its impact on equality policies in the employment context. We present four studies developed in the framework of improving the social dialogue and the promotion of inclusive organizations, highlighting the status of the issue in Spain and its meaning for professional practice. The studies focus on a) the need to train and empower social actors - especially work...

  17. Business Agility and Information Technology in Service Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.A. van Oosterhout (Marcel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractService organizations have to deal with highly uncertain events, both in the internal and external environment. In the academic literature and in practice there is not much knowledge about how to deal with this uncertainty. This PhD dissertation investigates the role and impact of

  18. Information Technology and the Organization Chart of Public Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zouridis, S.; Snellen, I.Th.M.; van de Donk, W.B.H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To a certain extent the organization chart of public administration is inspired by the doctrines which are offered by public administration science. Some of these doctrines relate to policy implementation and the design of implementing agencies. In this chapter three of these main doctrines are

  19. Functional interactivity in social media: an examination of Chinese health care organizations' microblog profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohai

    2017-09-08

    Social media hold enormous potentials as a communication tool for health care due to its interactive nature. However, prior research mainly focused on contingency interactivity of social media, by examining messages sent from health care organizations to audiences, while little is known about functional interactivity, which refers to social media's presence of functions for facilitating communication between users and its interface. That is, how health care organizations use interactive features on social media to communicate with the public. Thus, with a general basis of the functional interactivity framework proposed by Waters et al. (Engaging stakeholders through social networking: how nonprofit organizations are using Facebook. Pub Relat Rev 2009;35:102-106), the current study investigated three aspects of functional interactivity in microblogging, and its subsequent effects. Specifically, this study analyzed 500 Chinese hospitals' profiles on Sina Weibo, the most popular microblogging platform in China. The results showed that the most common functional interactivity feature was organization disclosure, followed by information dissemination, and audience involvement. These interactive features all positively predicted the number of followers. Also, Chinese private hospitals scored significantly higher than public hospitals to use interactive features offered by social media. The findings of this study provide important implications for health care organizations to understand new communicative functions available on social media, incorporate more functions into their profiles and thus provide audiences with greater opportunity to interact with them via social media. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Understanding social collaboration between actors and technology in an automated and digitised deep mining environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, M-A; Johansson, J; Johansson, B; Abrahamsson, L

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop knowledge and learning on the best way to automate organisational activities in deep mines that could lead to the creation of harmony between the human, technical and the social system, towards increased productivity. The findings showed that though the introduction of high-level technological tools in the work environment disrupted the social relations developed over time amongst the employees in most situations, the technological tools themselves became substitute social collaborative partners to the employees. It is concluded that, in developing a digitised mining production system, knowledge of the social collaboration between the humans (miners) and the technology they use for their work must be developed. By implication, knowledge of the human's subject-oriented and object-oriented activities should be considered as an important integral resource for developing a better technological, organisational and human interactive subsystem when designing the intelligent automation and digitisation systems for deep mines. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study focused on understanding the social collaboration between humans and the technologies they use to work in underground mines. The learning provides an added knowledge in designing technologies and work organisations that could better enhance the human-technology interactive and collaborative system in the automation and digitisation of underground mines.

  1. Technologies That Support Marketing and Market Development in SMEs—Evidence from Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggers, Fabian; Hatak, Isabella; Kraus, Sascha; Niemand, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This study builds on previous research on information technology implementation and usage in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and applies a special focus on social networks. Specifically, this research investigates antecedents of social network usage in SMEs and respective performance

  2. A Review of Information and Communication Technology Enhanced Social Work Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chitat; Holosko, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Information and communications technology (ICT) has impacted almost all human service disciplines and currently is evolving in social work. This study provides a systematic review of ICT-enhanced social work interventions, with particular reference to their intervention fidelity (IF), validity, and the role of ICT in the helping…

  3. Technological Utopia, Dystopia and Ambivalence: Teaching with Social Media at a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambe, Patient; Nel, Liezel

    2015-01-01

    The discourse of social media adoption in higher education has often been funnelled through utopian and dystopian perspectives, which are polarised but determinist theorisations of human engagement with educational technologies. Consequently, these determinist approaches have obscured a broadened grasp of the situated, socially constructed nature…

  4. An Educational and Entrepreneurial Ecosystem to Actualize Technology-Based Social Ventures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Khanjan; Zappe, Sarah; Brannon, Mary Lynn; Zhao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) Program engages students and faculty across Penn State in the rigorous research, design, field-testing, and launch of technology-based social enterprises that address global development challenges. HESE ventures are embedded in a series of five courses that integrate learning,…

  5. An Empirical Study of Lecturers' Appropriation of Social Technologies for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Suraya; Waycott, Jenny; Kurnia, Sherah; Chang, Shanton

    2014-01-01

    The use of Online Social Networking (OSN) educational activities has become commonplace in today's higher education. OSN enables lecturers and students to generate and share content, interact, and collaborate in the knowledge construction process. The pedagogical benefits of social technologies have been widely discussed. However, less is known…

  6. Technology as Human Social Tradition : Cultural Transmission among Hunter-Gatherers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Technology as Human Social Tradition outlines a novel approach to studying variability and cumulative change in human technology—a research theme that spans both archaeology and anthropology. Peter Jordan argues that human material culture is best understood as an expression of social tradition.

  7. The Impact of Modern Information and Communication Technologies on Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have empowered non-state social actors, notably, social movements. They were quick to seize ICTs in the past (printing presses, television, fax machines), which was a major factor in their successes. Mass email campaigns, blogs, their audio- and video- variants (the podcasts and the videocasts),…

  8. Examining Social Studies and Science and Technology Preservice Teachers' Epistemological Beliefs Regarding Different Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, Yavuz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine epistemological beliefs of pre-service teachers who attend social studies and science and technology teaching programs; and to investigate how these beliefs varies regarding grade level, gender and departments. The sample of the study is composed of 300 social studies, 260 science and technology…

  9. "Tech"nically Speaking: Social Technology Cyberbullying among Middle and High School Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nicole L.

    2012-01-01

    Being a teenager is not easy, but most of us live through it. Cyberbullying suicide victims will not have this luxury. Advancements in and access to social technologies (social networking sites, instant messaging systems, cell phone texting) are rewriting interaction patterns as they provide a majority of our nation's students with 24-hour-a-day,…

  10. New Technology Tools: Using Social Media for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to using social media technology for alcohol, drug abuse, and violence prevention, Thomas Workman, at Baylor College of Medicine's John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science, points out that social media is interactive. This means that a person is entering a conversation rather than a declaration, and…

  11. North American Technology and Industrial Base Organization. 2009 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Bionic Power, a company that has developed the Bionic Energy Harvester, a wearable technology that unobtrusively generates electricity from the...ultraminiaturize the teclmology for incorporation into a small arm weapon sight in combination with electronic ignition for small arms . Canada has been...reduced to near zero. This work is complementary (and not duplicated) to U.S . work on small arms , therefore there should be ample "ammunition" to

  12. [THE ORGANIZATION OF REHABILITATION CARE OF POPULATION USING INNOVATIVE MEDICAL ORGANIZATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES AND PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totskaia, E G; Sheliakina, O W; Sadovoii, M A; Netchaev, V S

    2015-01-01

    The article considers actual problems of actual stage of development of health care related to using innovative approaches to organization and management of rehabilitation care ofpopulation. The rehabilitation is most important direction of medical sector supporting complex of services in closed cycle of rendering medical care to population and significant social economic effects. The capacity and extreme unprofitability of rehabilitation services determine necessity of searching alternative forms of organization of this type of care and financing including mechanisms of public-private partnership. The experience is presented related to involvement of resources of non-public medical organizations for implementing public commitments on rendering qualitative rehabilitation services to population using innovative medical organizational technologies.

  13. Generating social impact scenarios, a key step in making technology assessment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. V.

    1972-01-01

    The social impact scenario, a method used to trace the effects of new technological applications, is discussed. The research seeks to anticipate the secondary social impacts that arise from: (1) government or private programs that cope with major social problems like poverty, environmental pollution, or public safety; and (2) a concerted national effort to achieve a widely supported specific goal like landing a man on the moon or finding a cure for cancer.

  14. Political Minimalism and Social Debates: The Case of Human-Enhancement Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Alcázar, Javier

    2017-09-01

    A faulty understanding of the relationship between morality and politics encumbers many contemporary debates on human enhancement. As a result, some ethical reflections on enhancement undervalue its social dimensions, while some social approaches to the topic lack normative import. In this essay, I use my own conception of the relationship between ethics and politics, which I call "political minimalism," in order to support and strengthen the existing social perspectives on human-enhancement technologies.

  15. Modelling the Impact of Network Social Capital on Business and Technological Innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan K. Chou

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a macroeconomic growth model where social capital embedded in collaborative networks of firms (such as corporate partnerships and research consortia) increase the rate of technological and business innovations in high-tech industries. Social capital is created via network-building activities and through “learning-by-doing”. We derive the optimal quantity of resources that should be channelled away from pure production into activities that build network social capit...

  16. Social organization and transportation energy: an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, W. W.

    1974-07-01

    This annotated bibliography lists items organized according to the following themes: (1) fuel consumption and modal split, (2) economics, (3) public decision-making, (4) transportation planning, and (5) effectiveness of municipal services.

  17. CONDITIONS AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRANSITION TO BASIC TECHNOLOGIES OF A NEW TECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE

    OpenAIRE

    B. L. Bourov; E. S. Dashut; N. I. Komkov

    2011-01-01

    With due account for the coming new (VI-th) world technological structure, future creation of new types of industrial production is both possible and necessary. Economic environment conditions favorable for such development are designated. In reference to Russian technologicalenvironment particulars, self-developing economic-technological microenvironment of a new quality level should be created in zones where controlled «technological chains» function. Possibilities of creation of the VI-th ...

  18. Giving up Technology and Social Media: Why University Lecturers Stop Using Technology in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Chris

    2017-01-01

    University lecturers use a wide range of technologies when teaching and there has been much research into how particular technologies are adopted. However, there are also many technologies that, despite early promise, are no longer being used in university teaching and have been abandoned by institutions or individuals. This article presents the…

  19. The Impact of Integrating Technology and Social Experience in the College Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been used widely in the field of education for a long period of time. It is a useful tool which could be a mediation to help language learners to learn the target language. In order to investigate how technology and social experience can be integrated into courses to promote language learners' desire to learn English, the researcher…

  20. Overcoming Pedagogical, Social/Cultural, and Attitudinal Barriers to Technology Integration in K-5 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durff, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Technology engages and increases academic achievement for K-5 students, but teachers face attitudinal, social/cultural, and pedagogical barriers when they integrate technology for student learning. Although some teachers overcome these barriers, it remains unclear how they do so. The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to analyze…

  1. Social network influences on technology acceptance : A matter of tie strength, centrality and density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Kate, Stephan; Haverkamp, Sophie; Mahmood, Fariha; Feldberg, Frans

    2010-01-01

    This study examines social network influences on the individual technology acceptance. Since it is believed that individuals' trust, opinions and behavior are influenced by their network, an analysis of that network may help to provide some explanations on technology acceptance. However, since

  2. Examining Technology Perception of Social Studies Teachers with Rogers' Diffusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Özkan; Koçoglu, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Mobile learning has started to take place in education literature with the developing technology, and this technology started to have an increasing spread along with its advantages. This study examines the responses of social studies teachers to the innovations in the field of mobile learning. The study was designed within the framework of theory…

  3. Technology Acceptance in Social Work Education: Implications for the Field Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Alex Don; Bullock, Angela N.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth and sophistication of new information and computer technology (ICT) have greatly influenced human interactions and provided new metaphors for understanding the world. The acceptance and integration of ICT into social work field education are examined here using the technological acceptance model. This article also explores…

  4. Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Am, Trond Grønli

    2011-04-01

    Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions and controversies, it easily fails to do so with emerging technologies, where there are no shared questions, a lack of public familiarity with the technology in question, and a restricted understanding amongst social researchers as to where distrust is likely to arise and how and under which form the technology will actually be implemented. Rather contrary, 'trust' might sometimes even direct social research into fixed structures that makes it even more difficult for social research to provide socially robust knowledge. This article therefore suggests that if trust is to maintain its important role in evaluating emerging technologies, the approach has to be widened and initially focus not on people's motivations for trust, but rather the object of trust it self, as to predicting how and where distrust might appear, how the object is established as an object of trust, and how it is established in relation with the public.

  5. Enterprise Social Networking: Technology Acceptance Related to Personality, Age, and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    In this dissertation, the researcher examined and added to the body of knowledge within the project change management field of technology implementation. The rationale behind the study was to evaluate technology acceptance of Enterprise Social Networking (ESN), which has been widely implemented across over 90% of the "Fortune" 500…

  6. Good Communication: The Other Social Network for Successful IT Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitt, Lisa; Overholtzer, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Social networks of the electronic variety have become thoroughly embedded in contemporary culture. People have woven these networks into their daily routines, using Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, online gaming environments, and other tools to build and maintain complex webs of professional and personal relationships. Chief Information Officers…

  7. The Social Organization of Boasting in the Neoliberal University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    This article unpacks the social construction of the “ideal academic” in the context of major shifts in the global and national governance of academia that have introduced managerial practices, standardised notions of excellence and accounting logics with the aim of increasing the efficiency and q...

  8. Social Policy Commitment in South America. The Effect of Organized Labor on Social Spending from 1980 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Niedzwiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of organized labor on social policy commitment in Latin America. Contrary to the idea that unions are not expected to be major promoters of social state development due to being weakened by dictatorship and structural adjustment, I argue for the incorporation of this variable in statistical analysis of social spending. Through pooled time-series regressions of 10 South American countries from 1980 to 2010, this paper finds that union strength has a statistically significant and positive effect on social spending. This analysis also confirms that democracy and the concentration of power in the executive all have a significant effect with regard to predicting changes in the levels of social spending.

  9. Adoption of Social Networking Technology in Teaching and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of social Networking media in teaching would also help sharpen the students' skills in publication. Some top most militating factors against this adoption include epileptic power supply, high tariff on internet access and unwilling of lecturers to adopt changes. Some recommendations made were suggestions for ...

  10. Social Experience in "World of Warcraft": Technological and Ideological Mediations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Nicole Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    As society shifts towards spending more time online for business and leisure, examining human behavior in virtual environments is crucial. To better understand the role that games play in our society, I analyze social experience in World of Warcraft (WoW), one of the longest running massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMO). Since its…

  11. The Adoption of Social Media in Nonprofit Organizations : The Case Study of the United Nations Country Team in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Panyam, Sinta

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the role of social media in non-profit organizations using the case study from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Thailand Country office. As Social media become a significant channel to raise the visibility and promote the work of the organization. The focus of this research examines what drives organizations adopting social media through a model built round four key factors, 1.) The importance of social media, 2.) The impact to image of the organization, 3...

  12. Personalized Development of Human Organs using 3D Printing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of o...

  13. Technology for safe treatment of radioisotope organic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Park, Chong Mook; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. Y.; Kim, B. T.; Park, S. C

    1999-12-01

    An examination of chemical and radiological characteristics of RI organic liquid waste, wet oxidation by Fenton reaction and decomposition liquid waste treatment process were studied. These items will be applied to develop the equipment of wet oxidation and decomposition liquid waste treatment mixed processes for the safe treatment of RI organic liquid waste which is consisted of organic solvents such as toluene, alcohol and acetone. Two types of toluene solutions were selected as a candidate decomposition material. As for the first type, the concentration of toluene was above 20 vol percent. As for the second type, the solubility of toluene was considered. The decomposition ration by Fenton reaction was above 95 percent for both of them. From the adsorption equilibrium tests, a -Na{sup +} substituted/acid treated activated carbon and Zeocarbon mixed adsorbent was selected for the fixed adsorption column. This mixed adsorbent will be used to obtain the basic design data of liquid waste purification equipment for the treatment of decomposition liquid waste arising from the wet oxidation process. Solidification and degree of strength tests were performed with the simulated sludge/spent adsorbent of MgO as an oxide type and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. From the test results, the design and fabrication of wet oxidation and liquid waste purification process equipment was made, and a performance test was carried out. (author)

  14. Technology for safe treatment of radioisotope organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Jin; Park, Chong Mook; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. Y.; Kim, B. T.; Park, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    An examination of chemical and radiological characteristics of RI organic liquid waste, wet oxidation by Fenton reaction and decomposition liquid waste treatment process were studied. These items will be applied to develop the equipment of wet oxidation and decomposition liquid waste treatment mixed processes for the safe treatment of RI organic liquid waste which is consisted of organic solvents such as toluene, alcohol and acetone. Two types of toluene solutions were selected as a candidate decomposition material. As for the first type, the concentration of toluene was above 20 vol percent. As for the second type, the solubility of toluene was considered. The decomposition ration by Fenton reaction was above 95 percent for both of them. From the adsorption equilibrium tests, a -Na + substituted/acid treated activated carbon and Zeocarbon mixed adsorbent was selected for the fixed adsorption column. This mixed adsorbent will be used to obtain the basic design data of liquid waste purification equipment for the treatment of decomposition liquid waste arising from the wet oxidation process. Solidification and degree of strength tests were performed with the simulated sludge/spent adsorbent of MgO as an oxide type and KH 2 PO 4 . From the test results, the design and fabrication of wet oxidation and liquid waste purification process equipment was made, and a performance test was carried out. (author)

  15. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova Y.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with coronary heart disease based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  16. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev A.R.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  17. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev A.R.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with chronic heart failure based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  18. Does Social Capital Explain Community-Level Differences in Organ Donor Designation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladin, Keren; Wang, Rui; Fleishman, Aaron; Boger, Matthew; Rodrigue, James R

    2015-09-01

    The growing shortage of life-saving organs has reached unprecedented levels, with more than 120,000 Americans waiting for them. Despite national attempts to increase organ donation and federal laws mandating the equitable allocation of organs, geographic disparities remain. A better understanding of the contextual determinants of organ donor designation, including social capital, may enhance efforts to increase organ donation by raising the probability of collective action and fostering norms of reciprocity and cooperation while increasing costs to defectors. Because community-level factors, including social capital, predict more than half the variation in donor designation, future interventions should tailor strategies to specific communities as the unit of intervention. The growing shortage of organs has reached unprecedented levels. Despite national attempts to increase donation and federal laws mandating the equitable allocation of organs, their availability and waiting times vary significantly nationwide. Organ donor designation is a collective action problem in public health, in which the regional organ supply and average waiting times are determined by the willingness of individuals to be listed as organ donors. Social capital increases the probability of collective action by fostering norms of reciprocity and cooperation while increasing costs to defectors. We examine whether social capital and other community-level factors explain geographic variation in organ donor designation rates in Massachusetts. We obtained a sample of 3,281,532 registered drivers in 2010 from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Registry of Motor Vehicles (MassDOT RMV). We then geocoded the registry data, matched them to 4,466 census blocks, and linked them to the 2010 US Census, the American Community Survey (ACS), and other sources to obtain community-level sociodemographic, social capital (residential segregation, voter registration and participation, residential

  19. The Social Organization of the High School: School-Specific Aspects of School Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a study of three New York high schools (rural, suburban, and urban) that developed a model of high school social organization in order to provide a school-specific focus for examining school violence and crime. (JG)

  20. The socialization of students in the process of art activity in a mixed-age organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khomenko N.Yu.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the article analyzes the experience of pedagogical research of students’ socialization in the process of their art activity in a mixed-age organization. It also provides the characteristic of some results, obtained in the research.

  1. Social Support, Family Organizations, and Adolescent Adjustment in Low-Income Puerto Rican Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ronald D.; Seaton, Elenor; Jacobson, Leanne; Rodriguez, Antoinette U.; Dominguez, Antonio

    Social support from kin has been discussed as an important feature of family life among Puerto Rican families. This study examines the association between kinship support, family organization, and adolescent adjustment in Puerto Rican families. (Author)

  2. Music technology, gender, and class: Digitization, educational and social change in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Born, Georgina; Devine, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Music technology undergraduate degree programmes are a relatively new phenomenon in British higher education, situated at the intersection of music, digital technologies, and sound art. Such degrees have exploded in popularity over the past fifteen years. Yet the social and cultural ramifications of this development have not yet been analysed. In looking comparatively at the demographics of both traditional music and music technology degrees, we highlight a striking bifurcation: traditional m...

  3. Information Technology in project-organized electronic and computer technology engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the integration of IT in the education of electronic and computer technology engineers at Institute of Electronic Systems, Aalborg Uni-versity, Denmark. At the Institute Information Technology is an important tool in the aspects of the education as well as for communication...

  4. Integrating Corporate Social Responsability Programs into the Ethical Dimension of the Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrian CARAMIDARU; Sabina IRIMIE

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to indicate the need to integrate corporate social responsibility programs into the global ethical vision of organizations. Such an approach requires the definition of the corporation in relation to the moral values it assumes and the ways in which moral values occur within the organization. On this foundation, the authors examined the various implications that moral values have on the initiation and conduct of corporate social responsibility programs.

  5. The Factors Influencing Young Children's Social Interaction in Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Mee

    2015-01-01

    When technology integration is accomplished successfully in early childhood education settings, children tend to interact more with one another and exchange information related to computer tasks as well as the overall classroom on-going curriculum themes. Therefore, to explore how young children are interacting in computer areas when using…

  6. Learning Technologies: Tweeting in a High School Social Studies Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Prince Hycy; Adams, Shayla

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the perceptions of 46 high school students on the integration of Twitter as a learning technology. Twitter was introduced and used to supplement instruction in the course for the first six weeks of the 2010/2011 academic year. The integration included designing twitter pages, communication, reflections, use of twitpics…

  7. Bridging Divides through Technology Use: Transnationalism and Digital Literacy Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueron, Silvia Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigate the digital literacy practices of adult immigrants, and their relationship with transnational processes and practices. Specifically, I focus on their conditions of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their life trajectories, their conditions of learning in a community center, and their…

  8. Children of the new reproductive technologies: social and genetic parenthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.; van Balen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To review empirical studies on families created by new reproductive technologies (NRT) in which only one parent has a genetic link to the child. Methodology: Literature search was conducted among computerized databases. Inclusion criteria were that studies should focus on childrearing or

  9. Technology's Covert Socialization of Children: High-Tech Toys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritt, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Child's play may be at risk in today's technologically-oriented society. The limited interactive capacities of high-tech toys constrain the possibilities for cognitive development, interpersonal learning, and the quality of relationships that can be formed. Current high-tech toys change the nature of play, so that the object, rather than the…

  10. Beyond the technological chain: Neolithic potters in social networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květina, Petr; Gomart, L.; Thér, R.; Neumannová, Klára

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 2 (2017), s. 163-171 ISSN 0323-1267 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07062S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : technology of pottery * chaînes opératoires * Neolithic Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology OBOR OECD: Archaeology

  11. How New Technology Resources Are Changing Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author points out that there are important national efforts to upgrade and transform the use of technology in schools. Last year, the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy released its report: "Informing Communities; Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age." In late 2010, the U.S.…

  12. Using basic technology – and corporate social responsibility – to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While South Africa (SA) will almost certainly fail to meet next year's Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of reducing deaths of children under 5 by two-thirds and the maternal mortality rate by three-quarters, one brilliantly simple technological innovation is accelerating progress.

  13. Voices Project: Technological Innovations in Social Inclusion of People with Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Cazini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze how technological innovations are contributing to inclusion of people with disabilities in society and at work, from the study of social innovations, assistive technology and digital inclusion presented in a case study on the Voices Project. The project, developed in partnership with the Association of Parents and Friends of the Blind and the Federal Technological University of Paraná, in the years 2008/2009, made a computer course for people with visual impairments. The theoretical survey and project data confirmed that social innovations really are essential tools for digital inclusion of people with disabilities contributing thus to their inclusion in the workplace.

  14. Innovative technologies and social inequalities in health: A scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Rydland, Håvard T; Øversveen, Emil; Jensen, Magnus Rom; Solhaug, Solvor; Krokstad, Steinar

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the range, nature, and extent of current research activity exploring the influence of innovative health-related technologies on social inequalities in health, with specific focus on a deeper understanding of the variables used to measure this connection and the pathways leading to the (re)production of inequalities. A review process was conducted, based on scoping review techniques, searching literature published from January 1, 1996 to November 25, 2016 using MEDLINE, Scopus, and ISI web of science. Search, sorting, and data extraction processes were conducted by a team of researchers and experts using a dynamic, reflexive examination process. Of 4139 studies collected from the search process, a total of 33 were included in the final analysis. Results of this study include the classification of technologies based on how these technologies are accessed and used by end users. In addition to the factors and mechanisms that influence unequal access to technologies, the results of this study highlight the importance of variations in use that importantly shape social inequalities in health. Additionally, focus on health care services technologies must be accompanied by investigating emerging technologies influencing healthy lifestyle, genomics, and personalized devices in health. Findings also suggest that choosing one measure of social position over another has important implications for the interpretation of research results. Furthermore, understanding the pathways through which various innovative health technologies reduce or (re)produce social inequalities in health is context dependent. In order to better understand social inequalities in health, these contextual variations draw attention to the need for critical distinctions between technologies based on how these various technologies are accessed and used. The results of this study provide a comprehensive starting point for future research to further investigate

  15. Review paper: Organ transplants: ethical, social, and religious issues in a multicultural society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Noor Zurani Md Haris; Razack, Azad Hassan; Dublin, Norman

    2010-07-01

    Recent advances in the fields of organ donation and organ transplant have introduced new hope for the treatment of serious diseases. However, this promise has been accompanied by several issues. The most common issue raised is ethical implications, but in a multicultural society like Malaysia, additional concerns arise pertaining to social and religious issues. These concerns needs to be addressed as attitudes toward and acceptability of organ donation varies according to social, culture, and religion. The diverse cultural, religious, and traditional concepts pertaining to organ donation may hamper its acceptability and cause a lack of willingness to donate organs. The purpose of this article is to briefly explore the ethical issues involved in organ transplant and the various religious opinions on organ donation. It is hoped that this knowledge and understanding may benefit both health care providers and patients in a multicultural society like Malaysia.

  16. Engineering Philosophy: Theories of Technology, German Idealism, and Social Order in High-Industrial Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuhl, Adelheid

    During the so-called "Second Industrial Revolution," engineers were constituting themselves as a new social and professional group, and found themselves in often fierce competition with existing elites-the military, the nobility, and educated bourgeois mandarins-whose roots went back to medieval and early modern pre-industrial social orders. During that same time, engineers also discovered the discipline of philosophy: as a means to express their intellectual and social agendas, and to theorize technology and its relationship to art, history, culture, philosophy, and the state. This article analyzes engineers' own philosophical writings about technology as well as the institutions in which they composed them in 1910s and 1920s Germany. It emphasizes engineers' contributions to well-known discourses founded by canonical philosophers, the role of preindustrial economies and their imagination in such philosophies, and the role of both the history and the philosophy of technology in engineers' desire for upward social mobility.

  17. Social acceptance of renewable energy innovations: The role of technology cooperation in urban Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Much discussion of technology transfer and the adoption of renewable energy innovations overlooks the importance of social acceptance. Using mainly qualitative analytical techniques, empirical evidence was obtained from the experiences of those involved in solar water heaters in Mexico City (e.g. technicians, industry representatives, local government officials, community representatives/end users) in order to explain social acceptance of these renewable energy innovations. In particular, this paper evaluates Rogers' [2005. Diffusion of Innovations. Free Press, New York.] technology adoption model (using an 'active' definition of social acceptance), which claims that adoption comes about through a decision-making process occurring in stages-knowledge, persuasion, implementation and confirmation and can be traced to a number of factors such as relative advantage, complexity, and triability. This paper argues that while Rogers' technology adoption model is a useful tool to explain social acceptance, this approach needs to be revised to adequately reflect the effects of technology cooperation, an integral part of technology adoption. Furthermore, this paper asserts that those forms of technology cooperation in which active participants are from various sectors and interact continuously throughout the process is most effective in eliciting social acceptance of renewable energy innovations

  18. The role of gender in social network organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psylla, Ioanna; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Mones, Enys

    2017-01-01

    are similar in a number of aspects, there are robust deviations that include multiple facets of social interactions, suggesting the existence of inherent behavioral differences. Finally, we quantify how aspects of an individual's characteristics and social behavior reveals their gender by posing......The digital traces we leave behind when engaging with the modern world offer an interesting lens through which we study behavioral patterns as expression of gender. Although gender differentiation has been observed in a number of settings, the majority of studies focus on a single data stream...... in isolation. Here we use a dataset of high resolution data collected using mobile phones, as well as detailed questionnaires, to study gender differences in a large cohort. We consider mobility behavior and individual personality traits among a group of more than 800 university students. We also investigate...

  19. Social Organization of Crop Genetic Diversity. The G × E × S Interaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geo Coppens d’Eeckenbrugge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of factors organizing crop genetic diversity in situ increases the efficiency of diversity analyses and conservation strategies, and requires collaboration between social and biological disciplines. Four areas of anthropology may contribute to our understanding of the impact of social factors on crop diversity: ethnobotany, cultural, cognitive and social anthropology. So far, most collaborative studies have been based on ethnobotanical methods, focusing on farmers’ individual motivations and actions, and overlooking the effects of farmer’s social organization per se. After reviewing common shortcomings in studies on sorghum and maize, this article analyzes how social anthropology, through the analysis of intermarriage, residence and seed inheritance practices, can contribute to studies on crop genetic diversity in situ. Crop varieties are thus considered social objects and socially based sampling strategies can be developed. Such an approach is justified because seed exchange is built upon trust and as such seed systems are embedded in a pre-existing social structure and centripetally oriented as a function of farmers’ social identity. The strong analogy between farmers’ cultural differentiation and crop genetic differentiation, both submitted to the same vertical transmission processes, allows proposing a common methodological framework for social anthropology and crop population genetics, where the classical interaction between genetic and environmental factors, G × E, is replaced by a three-way interaction G × E × S, where “S” stands for the social differentiation factors.

  20. Does Social Capital Explain Community-Level Differences in Organ Donor Designation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladin, Keren; Wang, Rui; Fleishman, Aaron; Boger, Matthew; Rodrigue, James R

    2015-01-01

    Context The growing shortage of organs has reached unprecedented levels. Despite national attempts to increase donation and federal laws mandating the equitable allocation of organs, their availability and waiting times vary significantly nationwide. Organ donor designation is a collective action problem in public health, in which the regional organ supply and average waiting times are determined by the willingness of individuals to be listed as organ donors. Social capital increases the probability of collective action by fostering norms of reciprocity and cooperation while increasing costs to defectors. We examine whether social capital and other community-level factors explain geographic variation in organ donor designation rates in Massachusetts. Methods We obtained a sample of 3,281,532 registered drivers in 2010 from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Registry of Motor Vehicles (MassDOT RMV). We then geocoded the registry data, matched them to 4,466 census blocks, and linked them to the 2010 US Census, the American Community Survey (ACS), and other sources to obtain community-level sociodemographic, social capital (residential segregation, voter registration and participation, residential mobility, violent-death rate), and religious characteristics. We used spatial modeling, including lagged variables to account for the effect of adjacent block groups, and multivariate regression analysis to examine the relationship of social capital and community-level characteristics with organ donor designation rates. Findings Block groups with higher levels of social capital, racial homogeneity, income, workforce participation, owner-occupied housing, native-born residents, and white residents had higher rates of organ donor designation (p organ donor designation (R2 = 0.52). Conclusions The findings suggest that community-level factors, including social capital, predict more than half the variation in donor designation. Future interventions should target the

  1. Chinese and Taiwanese International College Students' Participation in Social Organizations: Implications for College Counseling Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chun; Wong, Y. Joel

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative focus group study explored the meaning of Chinese and Taiwanese international students' lived experiences in social organizations. Participants were 9 Chinese and Taiwanese international college students in a midwestern U.S. university. The analyses uncovered 7 themes: social support, recreation, emotional support, practical…

  2. Planning and Social Systems: Organizations as a Special Case. A CRUSK-ISR Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowfoot, James E.

    This paper attempts to provide a broad theoretical framework for understanding planning in organizations and other social systems; and it identifies the key conditions, processes, and structures of social systems in the planning concept. While other frameworks exist that detail singular aspects of planning as it actually occurs and describe…

  3. Organizational socialization: A new theoretical model and recommendations for future research and HRM practices in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper-Thomas, H.D.; Anderson, N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is threefold: to provide an overview of organizational socialization (OS) research; to present a new model of OS focusing on successful outcomes; and finally to draw from both of these to suggest practical steps for both organizations aiming to socialize newcomers,

  4. Silica scale prevention technology using organic additive, Geogard SX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltazar, Almario; Garcia, Serafin; Solis, Ramonito; Fragata, Jimmy; Ellseworth, Lucero; Llenarizas, Leonardo; Tabuena, Joseph Erwin (PNOC Energy Development Corporation, Makati City (Philippines))

    1998-09-15

    A field trial on the application of an organic additive, phosphino carboxylic acid copolymer, was conducted in a geothermal system to evaluate its effectiveness in preventing silica deposition from brine containing ultra high silica concentration (1000-1300 ppm). Low polymer concentration was applied for about five months, and treatment efficiency based on silica concentrations in various sampling points ranged from 64 to 98%. Treatment efficiency improved as a function of time. Massive silica scaling in the fluid collection and disposal system was minimized.

  5. Design of New Food Technology: Social Shaping of Working Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2000-01-01

    A five-year design process of a continuous process wok has been studied with the aim of elucidating the conditions for integrating working environment aspects. The design process is seen as a network building activity and as a social shaping process of the artefact. A working environment log...... is suggested as a tool designers can use to integrate considerations of future operators' working environment....

  6. Pre-service Social Studies Teachers’ Views about Reflection of Technology on Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Özlem YİĞİT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Differentatition of the tools has been effecting human life in every area since they first formed a blade from a piece of flint. Technology extends human potential by allowing them to do things they couldn’t otherwise do. As time passed, they became more sophisticated at making tools and learned to put different parts together to improve existings and to create new technologies. To understand technology better, it must be put into a broad context and be interpreted together with social, cultural and environmental issues. Technology effects the society and the society effects technology, and they go hand in hand. Over the course of time, technology has become and increasingly larger part of people’s lives. People live in apartments, work and shop in large buildings, eat prepared foods, use television and Internet for communication and travel by vehicles, so we can say that people occupy a technological world and the world has become a virtual platform(ITEA, 2007. Technology’s effects are widely regarded as desirable but sometimes it has negative effects both on physical and social environment. Traditional ways of life have been displaced by technological development and as the pace of technological change continues to increase, questions arise as to whether society can effectively keep up with the changes (ITEA, 2007. People take the advantages of technology with rapid changes in production systems, but criticism is also voiced against the monotony of human life, people’s emotional deprivation and the extensive loss in the viability of valuable things in societal life (Çelikcan, 2011, p.168. Technological development also tends to magnify the inequalities among people and among societies by creating a situation in which a minority of people control and use a majority of the world’s resources (ITEA, 2007. Such factors make it important that desicions be made by individuals and societies with care about any technology.There are lots of

  7. Noise-margin analysis for organic thin-film complementary technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, D.; Rolin, C.; Schols, S.; Debucquoy, M.; Steudel, S.; Gelinck, G.H.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2010-01-01

    Parameter variation in organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) technology is known to limit the yield of digital circuits. It is expected that complementary OTFT technology (C-TFT) will reduce the sensitivity to parameter variations. In this paper, we quantify the dependence of yield on transistor

  8. Impact of Enterprise Resource Planning on Organizational Productivity in an Information Technology Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Negative consequences follow when an expensive technological implementation fails to accomplish expected benefits and results instead in interrupted business, lost revenues, and dissatisfied and demoralized users. The problem researched in this study was how an organization should introduce advanced technology to system users to optimize…

  9. University-Industry Entrepreneurship: The Organization and Management of American University Technology Transfer Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 289 university technology transfer units investigated their organization, management, and perceived performance effectiveness. Unit types studied included licensing and patent offices, small business development centers, research and technology centers, business facility incubators, and entrepreneurial investment/endowment offices.…

  10. [Competency requirements for executives in healthcare and social services organizations: Results of a Delphi study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielach, Martin; Schubert, Hans-Joachim

    2018-02-07

    Leadership in social services and healthcare organizations is marked by high levels of complexity and contradiction, which cannot be fully explained by politically, economically, and socially induced changes. Rather, it is the particularities of service provision in healthcare and social services that confront executives with specific demands. This study aimed to capture and prioritize required leadership competencies in healthcare and social services organizations. A three-step Delphi study was conducted with executives and managerial staff, who are job holders and thus experts on their occupation. For the first step, an explorative qualitative approach was chosen to record general opinion without prior assumptions. The following two steps weighted and selected the competency requirements in step one using rating- and ranking procedures. Results of the Delphi inquiry imply high relevance of social and personal competencies. Approximately 66 % of the competencies assessed in round three were social and personal competencies. 12 out of the 15 highest rated competencies in Delphi step three can be assigned to these two competency categories. In contrast, the importance of professional as well as methodical competencies was rated as less important. Only two methodical competencies and one professional competency were rated as very important by the panel. Nevertheless, the importance of executive professional and methodical competencies in healthcare and social services organizations is emphasized by high ratings of the competencies "Sector-specific expertise" and "Analytical skills". The methodical competency "Analytical skills" was identified by the Delphi respondents as the most important competency requirement. Social and personal requirements are of primary importance for leadership in healthcare and social services organizations. These results mostly correspond to leadership requirements posited in the literature on leadership skills. Emphasis should be on the

  11. The social organization of agricultural biogas production and use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluemling, B.; Mol, A.P.J.; Tu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    While for wind, solar energy or hydropower, energy supply happens directly from the source to the wind wheels, hydropower turbines or solar panels, in the case of biogas, energy production cannot directly take from the energy source, organic matter, but depends on the institutional structures and

  12. The draft genome of a termite illuminates alternative social organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termites have substantial economic and ecological impact worldwide. They are also the oldest organisms living in complex societies, having evolved a caste system independent of that of eusocial Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). Here we provide the first genome sequence for a termite, Zootermopsis ...

  13. Social psychological determinants of mobile communication technology use and adoption. A comparison of three models to explain and predict mobile communication technology behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, O.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the social psychological determinants of mobile communication technology use and adoption in an attempt to better understand people’s behavior for adopting and using innovative information and communication technologies. In particular, this study emphasizes the

  14. Sunlight technologies for photochemical deactivation of organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, A.; Fischer, E.; Tornheim, R. [The Volcani Center, Inst. of Soils and Water, Bet Dagan (Israel); Manor, Y. [Sheba Medical Center, Central Virology Lab., Ramat Gan (Israel)

    1997-12-31

    Sensitized-photochemical oxidation methods aimed at use in water treatment technologies for deactivation of biotic (microorganisms) and/or of xenobiotic (pesticides) pollutants in water were developed using global solar radiation or concentrated sunlight (up to 250 suns). The solar global radiation was used either for detoxification of industrial waste water from a pesticide factory to allow their discharge into the urban sewer, or for disinfection of domestric effluents to be used in crop irrigation. The disinfection process was eventually carried out in an experimental pilot-scale plant, capable of disinfection up to 50 m{sup 3}/h of effluent supplied by an activated sludge sewage treatment plant located in Tel-Aviv area. The treated effluents did not show any regrowth of the microorganisms during 7 days. The solar concentrated radiation experiments performed using facilities of the Sun Tower of The Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot. The concentrated sunlight was provided by different combination of several computer controlled heliostates, up to 8, that track the sun and focus the received sunlight onto the target situated on the roof of the sun-tower. The sunlight intensities measured on the target reached up to 200 kW/m{sup 2}. The experiments were performed either batch- or continuous-wise. The water-samples exposed to disinfection were the above effluent, filtered and supplemented with vaccine strain poliovirus or with different concentrations of an industrial potential pollutant (bromacil), MB 2 mg/L and two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (8.0 or 40.0 mg O{sub 2}/L). An exposure time of 2-3 seconds at 150 kW/m{sup 2} was decreased the microorganisms alive (counts) by five orders of magnitude. A comparison between the two above water treatment technologies is presented. (orig./SR)

  15. Organ/body-on-a-chip based on microfluidic technology for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Teruo

    2018-02-01

    Although animal experiments are indispensable for preclinical screening in the drug discovery process, various issues such as ethical considerations and species differences remain. To solve these issues, cell-based assays using human-derived cells have been actively pursued. However, it remains difficult to accurately predict drug efficacy, toxicity, and organs interactions, because cultivated cells often do not retain their original organ functions and morphologies in conventional in vitro cell culture systems. In the μTAS research field, which is a part of biochemical engineering, the technologies of organ-on-a-chip, based on microfluidic devices built using microfabrication, have been widely studied recently as a novel in vitro organ model. Since it is possible to physically and chemically mimic the in vitro environment by using microfluidic device technology, maintenance of cellular function and morphology, and replication of organ interactions can be realized using organ-on-a-chip devices. So far, functions of various organs and tissues, such as the lung, liver, kidney, and gut have been reproduced as in vitro models. Furthermore, a body-on-a-chip, integrating multi organ functions on a microfluidic device, has also been proposed for prediction of organ interactions. We herein provide a background of microfluidic systems, organ-on-a-chip, Body-on-a-chip technologies, and their challenges in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. REBUILDING THE SOCIAL DIALOGUE AND PROMOTING INCLUSIVE ORGANIZATIONS. A TOOL FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION IN TIMES OF CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Munduate

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the developing research agenda in the context of the difficulties of the socio-economic environment and its impact on equality policies in the employment context. We present four studies developed in the framework of improving the social dialogue and the promotion of inclusive organizations, highlighting the status of the issue in Spain and its meaning for professional practice. The studies focus on a the need to train and empower social actors - especially workers’ representatives - to lead social innovation and promote inclusive organizations, b proceedings for the current manifestations of what is known as “modern discrimination” in the work context, c labor integration of persons with disabilities, and d supporting policies to balance work and personal life.

  17. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  18. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  19. Social media use by community-based organizations conducting health promotion: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Mendez, Samuel R; Rao, Megan; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2013-12-05

    Community-based organizations (CBOs) are critical channels for the delivery of health promotion programs. Much of their influence comes from the relationships they have with community members and other key stakeholders and they may be able to harness the power of social media tools to develop and maintain these relationships. There are limited data describing if and how CBOs are using social media. This study assesses the extent to which CBOs engaged in health promotion use popular social media channels, the types of content typically shared, and the extent to which the interactive aspects of social media tools are utilized. We assessed the social media presence and patterns of usage of CBOs engaged in health promotion in Boston, Lawrence, and Worcester, Massachusetts. We coded content on three popular channels: Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. We used content analysis techniques to quantitatively summarize posts, tweets, and videos on these channels, respectively. For each organization, we coded all content put forth by the CBO on the three channels in a 30-day window. Two coders were trained and conducted the coding. Data were collected between November 2011 and January 2012. A total of 166 organizations were included in our census. We found that 42% of organizations used at least one of the channels of interest. Across the three channels, organization promotion was the most common theme for content (66% of posts, 63% of tweets, and 93% of videos included this content). Most organizations updated Facebook and Twitter content at rates close to recommended frequencies. We found limited interaction/engagement with audience members. Much of the use of social media tools appeared to be uni-directional, a flow of information from the organization to the audience. By better leveraging opportunities for interaction and user engagement, these organizations can reap greater benefits from the non-trivial investment required to use social media well. Future research should

  20. Do metaphors evolve? The case of the social organism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.

    2013-01-01

    complex manifestations in the modern social sciences, I hope to show that there are good reasons to reconsider both Lakoff’s decree that metaphors “should not be thought of as processes”, and his declaration that they should instead be seen as consisting of “a fixed pattern of ontological correspondences...... across domains” (Lakoff, 1993:210, emphasis added). Building on ideas about metaphor that emerged during the nineteenth century, I argue that what may initially appear to be a fixed pattern of projections is often better understood as a temporary station in a fluid process....