WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology review may june

  1. Science & Technology Review May/June 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2008-03-19

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Biomedical Technology Has a Home at Livermore--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) Shaping the Future of Aneurysm Treatments--Livermore foam devices may offer significant advantages for treating some forms of aneurysms; (3) Ring around a Stellar Shell: A Tale of Scientific Serendipity--Using a three-dimensional model, Livermore scientists have solved a long-standing puzzle of stellar evolution; and (4) On Assignment in Washington, DC--Livermore personnel in Washington, DC, support federal sponsors and become valuable assets to Laboratory programs.

  2. Energy and technology review, May--June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.C.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Highstone, H.; Kroopnick, H.; Sanford, N.M.; Spletter, M. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes two powerful analytical tools that use ion-beam techniques to make contributions to an astonishing range of fundamental problems. We characterize these techniques -- accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and ion microbeam analysis -- under the common rubric of accelerator microanalysis. Each of these tools is used in disciplines ranging from anthropology to zoology. The rich diversity of applications is reason enough to dedicate an entire issue to these impressive tools. Most of the applications are already under investigation here at LLNL. One section in this issue explains how the high sensitivity of AMS offers the possibility of one day tailoring drugs to the needs of individual patients. Other articles describe the broad potential of AMS in environmental monitoring, so critical to the well-being of the public, and explain how it offers a precise timepiece that can help us understand our prehistoric past and, perhaps, one day help make accurate predictions for future global climate changes. The ion microbeam facility at LLNL may give the United States a competitive edge in advanced production techniques for microdevices. An article on the economic impact of microanalytical tools explains that other industries, too, may benefit during this era when we are facing tough competition from international markets. This is also an article on the history, development, and key advantages of AMS and ion microbeam analysis. Of prime importance for research is that they are nondestructive of many samples, allowing valuable (or irreplaceable) materials to be analyzed. These techniques also make it possible to study unique, small-sample experiments and may allow the first-time imaging of some living materials or functioning systems.

  3. Science & Technology Review June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  4. Science & Technology Review June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-04-30

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on ensuring our nation's security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  5. Science& Technology Review June 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-06-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Livermore's Three-Pronged Strategy for High-Performance Computing, Commentary by Dona Crawford; (2) Riding the Waves of Supercomputing Technology--Livermore's Computation Directorate is exploiting multiple technologies to ensure high-performance, cost-effective computing; (3) Chromosome 19 and Lawrence Livermore Form a Long-Lasting Bond--Lawrence Livermore biomedical scientists have played an important role in the Human Genome Project through their long-term research on chromosome 19; (4) A New Way to Measure the Mass of Stars--For the first time, scientists have determined the mass of a star in isolation from other celestial bodies; and (5) Flexibly Fueled Storage Tank Brings Hydrogen-Powered Cars Closer to Reality--Livermore's cryogenic hydrogen fuel storage tank for passenger cars of the future can accommodate three forms of hydrogen fuel separately or in combination.

  6. Science & Technology Review June 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L A

    2012-04-20

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A New Era in Climate System Analysis - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Seeking Clues to Climate Change - By comparing past climate records with results from computer simulations, Livermore scientists can better understand why Earth's climate has changed and how it might change in the future; (3) Finding and Fixing a Supercomputer's Faults - Livermore experts have developed innovative methods to detect hardware faults in supercomputers and help applications recover from errors that do occur; (4) Targeting Ignition - Enhancements to the cryogenic targets for National Ignition Facility experiments are furthering work to achieve fusion ignition with energy gain; (5) Neural Implants Come of Age - A new generation of fully implantable, biocompatible neural prosthetics offers hope to patients with neurological impairment; and (6) Incubator Busy Growing Energy Technologies - Six collaborations with industrial partners are using the Laboratory's high-performance computing resources to find solutions to urgent energy-related problems.

  7. Science & Technology Review June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Safer and Even More Effective TATB - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Dissolving Molecules to Improve Their Performance - Computer scientists and chemists have teamed to develop a green method for recycling a valuable high explosive that is no longer manufactured; (3) Exceptional People Producing Great Science - Postdoctoral researchers lend their expertise to projects that support the Laboratory's missions; (4) Revealing the Identities and Functions of Microbes - A new imaging technique illuminates bacterial metabolic pathways and complex relationships; and (5) A Laser Look inside Planets - Laser-driven ramp compression may one day reveal the interior structure of Earth-like planets in other solar systems.

  8. Science& Technology Review May 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-05-01

    This May 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''Another Weapon in the Battle against Proliferation''; (2) ''Chemical Weapons Can't Evade This Lab'', Livermore's Forensic Science Center is certified to analyze samples collected during inspections conducted to monitor the Chemical Weapons Convention. (3) ''Bird's-Eye View Clarifies Research on the Ground'' Geobotanical remote sensing has applications in homeland security and energy resource development and provides new insights into complex ecologic systems. (4) ''Age Does Make a Difference'' Age-dating techniques and ultrasensitive technologies provide a comprehensive map of California's groundwater and indicate where it is most vulnerable to contaminants. (5) ''Reducing Aerodynamic Drag'' Simulations and experiments reveal ways to make heavy trucks more aerodynamic and fuel efficient.

  9. Military Review. Volume 91, Number 3, May-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    June 2011  MILITARY REVIEW Most Americans know very little about Korea: they do not know the major Korean brands (such as Hyundai, Samsung , and...skill sets need to be inventoried for each Army security cooperation position. Then the Army needs to wrestle with two questions. First, what

  10. Science and Technology Review June 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-06-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Fighting Bioterrorism, Fighting Cancer; (2) A Two-Pronged Attack on Bioterrorism--synthetic two-legged molecules will be excellent detectors of biowarfare agents and cancer cells; (3) Adaptive Optics Sharpen the View from Earth--astronomers are obtaining images with unprecedented resolution, thanks to telescopes equipped with adaptive optics developed at Livermore; (4) Experiments Re-create X Rays from Comets--Experiments using the Laboratory's electron beam ion trap and an x-ray spectrometer designed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are shedding light on how comets emit x rays as they pass the Sun; (5) Chemistry--50 Years of exploring the Material World--from isotopic analysis to atomic-level simulations of material behavior, Livermore's chemists and materials scientists apply their expertise to fulfill the Laboratory's mission.

  11. Science & Technology Review May 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M B

    2005-04-05

    Articles in this month's issue include: (1) Einstein's Legacy Alive at Livermore--Commentary by Michael R. Anastasio; (2) Applying Einstein's Theories of Relativity--In their efforts to understand the cosmos, Livermore physicists must account for the relativistic effects postulated by Albert Einstein; (3) Locked in Rock: Sequestering Carbon Dioxide Underground--Livermore scientists are examining technologies to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by burying it deep underground; (4) Modeling the Subsurface Movement of Radionuclides--Using data from past underground nuclear tests, a Livermore team is modeling radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site; and (5) Novel Materials from Solgel Chemistry--Livermore chemists are developing a method for fabricating solgels to better control the physical properties of the new materials.

  12. Science & Technology Review May 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2006-04-03

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Science and Technology Help the Nation Counter Terrorism--Commentary by Raymond J. Juzaitis; (2) Imagers Provide Eyes to See Gamma Rays--Gamma-ray imagers provide increased radiation detection capabilities and enhance the nation's arsenal for homeland security; (3) Protecting the Nation's Livestock--Foot-and-mouth disease could devastate America's livestock; a new assay provides a rapid means to detect it; (4) Measures for Measures--Laboratory physicists combine emissivity and reflectivity to achieve highly accurate temperature measurements of metal foils; and (5) Looping through the Lamb Shift--Livermore scientists measured a small perturbation in the spectra of highly ionized uranium--the first measurement of the two-loop Lamb shift in a bound state.

  13. Science and Technology Review May 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, A.A.

    2001-05-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Advanced Technology for Stockpile Stewardship''. (2) ''Uncovering Hidden Defects with Neutrons''--High-energy neutrons can effectively image heavily shielded objects that are essentially opaque to x rays. (3) ''The Human in the Mouse Mirror'' Comparative genomics may help us to better understand our genetic heritage and evolution, or why humans are human and mice are mice. (4) ''The NIF Target Chamber--Ready for the Challenge'' Good progress is being made on the construction of the world's largest laser. (5) ''Indoor Testing Begins Soon at Site 300'' The world's largest explosives chamber nears completion.

  14. Science and Technology Review May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D

    1999-05-01

    The following two abstracts are for the 2 feature stories in this issue of ''Science and Technology Review''. (1) ''Leveraging Science and Technology in the National Interest''--A sampling of current projects at Lawrence Livermore demonstrates the many ways in which the Laboratory's science and technology support Department of Defense missions. These projects range from engineering and fabricating munitions and explosives to developing the advanced computer codes that optimize warhead design or assess their hazards. The Penetration Augmented Munition is a portable, multistage weapon that not only provides offensive capability for diminishing adversaries' mobility and capability but also gives US soldiers an additional margin of security in a hostile encounter. Livermore's fiber-composite sabot makes weapons more lethal and is particularly effective in tank warfare. The GLO (global local optimizer) code optimizes the design of shaped-charge warheads, while the CHEETAH thermochemical code improves explosives formulation. CALE, a multiuse mechanical code, is used to help the Air Force assess missile launch site safety and in particular to predict hazards from propellant that falls to the ground when rockets misfire. ALE3D, now being upgraded, will increase the capability of codes to assess safety hazards. (2) ''Extracting Valuable Information from Acoustic Waves''--Lawrence Livermore researchers are developing advanced techniques for interpreting acoustic signals, focusing on complex algorithms that at times mimic the reasoning processes of the human brain. Three current acoustic signal-processing projects, involving heart valve classification, oil exploration, and large-structure analysis, demonstrate the wide range of acoustic signal usefulness. To determine whether an artificial heart valve is intact or needs replacing, a suite of Livermore algorithms sift through heart and body sounds to

  15. Science & Technology Review April/May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-03-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Leveraging the National Ignition Facility to Meet the Climate-Energy Challenge--Commentary by George H. Miller; (2) The Journey into a New Era of Scientific Discoveries--The world's largest laser is dedicated on May 29, 2009; (3) Safe and Sustainable Energy with LIFE--A revolutionary technology to generate electricity, modeled after the National Ignition Facility, could either be a pure fusion energy source or combine the best of fusion and fission energy; (4) A Simulated Rehearsal for Battle--Livermore's Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation is the most widely used tactical model in the world; (5) Improving Catalysis with a 'Noble' Material--By infusing carbon aerogels with platinum, researchers have produced a more affordable and efficient catalytic material; and (6) A Time Machine for Fast Neutrons--A new, robust time-projection chamber that provides directional detection of fast neutrons could greatly improve search methods for nuclear materials.

  16. Loglines. May - June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    warfighters are. 13Loglines l May - June 2011 Fueling the Warfighter Defense Logistics Agency Energy clay filtration pipes and vessels outside Nellis...as bread and cakes . The food they eat can’t have been in contact with non-kosher ingredients, so manufacturers go through a labor- intensive...dangerous and have special technol- ogy like our [Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles],” Arcocha said. “If we were to let that go on the

  17. Science and Technology Review April/May 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-03-03

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the focus is on science and technology research to ensure the nation's security. That expertise is also applied to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight time a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for April/May 2011, the features are 'Dealing with the Nonlinear Battlefield' and 'From Video to Knowledge.' Research highlights are 'Kinetic Models Predict Biofuel Efficiency,' Going Deep with MEGa-Rays' and 'Energy on Demand.'

  18. "small ACCELERATORS" 24 May - 2 June 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CERN Accelerator School and Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) Groningen, the Netherlands announce a course on "Small Accelerators", Hotel Golden Tulip Drenthe, Zeegse, the Netherlands, 24 May - 2 June 2005. This specialised course is dedicated to the physics and the main applications of small accelerators. The course will review the different accelerator types as well as their specificities in terms of accelerator physics.

  19. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  20. ID brief news May/June

    CERN Multimedia

    Stapnes, S

    The SCT group passed an important milestone at the end of May when the barrel system was reviewed. Test-results of irradiated barrel hybrids and modules, and of a system of modules were presented. The noise levels in the system remain at a level similar to those measured for single modules. The efficiencies measured on single modules remain high even after irradiation to 3 x 1014 protons/cm2 corresponding to ten years of operation at the LHC. The SCT barrel community is now moving towards production with the SCT Frond End ASIC Production Readiness Review early July as the remaining step before all barrel module components are into full production. The modules consist of 4 silicon p,n detectors with 80um pitch, a thermal baseplate and a wrap-around hybrid bridged across the front and back of the module. The upper set of detectors on each module is rotated by 40mrad to provide stereo information. The picture shows 15 modules in the systemtest at CERN, mounted on a barrel structure. The four barrel productio...

  1. Defense AT&L. May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    change of station move to the Air Force Logistics Management Agency at Gunter Air Force Base, Ala . As I researched AFLMA, I found its mission was to...with multiple users based on technology, manu- facturer, or function? This is already being done in the areas of common avionics and weapons, but I...metal 41 Defense AT&L: May-June 2010 type modifications work out just fine. That is not to say that an avionics or more complex modification is out

  2. A Review of New Technologies that may Become Useful for in vitro Production of Boar Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadella, B M; Ferraz, M A

    2015-07-01

    Making sperm cells outside the original testicular environment in a culture dish has been considered for a long time as impossible due to the very complicated process of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, which altogether, encompasses a 2-month period. However, new approaches in complex three-dimensional co-cell cultures, micro-perfusion and micro-fluidics technologies, new knowledge in the functioning, culturing and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and their precursor cells have revolutionized this field. Furthermore, the use of better molecular markers as well as stimulatory factors has led to successful in vitro culture of stem cells either derived from germ line stem cells, from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or from embryonic stem cells (ESC). These stem cells when placed into small seminiferous tubule fragments are able to become SSC. The SSC beyond self-renewal can also be induced into haploid sperm-like cells under in vitro conditions. In mouse, this in vitro produced sperm can be injected into a mature oocyte and allow post-fertilization development into an early embryo in vitro. After transferring such obtained embryos into the uterus of a recipient mouse, they can further develop into healthy offspring. Recently, a similar approach has been performed with combining selected cells from testicular cell suspensions followed by a complete in vitro culture of seminiferous cords producing sperm-like cells. However, most of the techniques developed are laborious, time-consuming and have low efficiency, placing questionable that it will become useful used for setting up an efficient in vitro sperm production system for the boar. The benefits and drawbacks as well as the likeliness of in vitro pig sperm production to become applied in assisted technologies for swine reproduction are critically discussed. In this contribution, also the process of sperm production in the testis and sperm maturation is reviewed.

  3. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer technology. Final report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1996-02-01

    Genetic manipulation of plants often involves the introduction of homologous or partly homologous genes. Ectropic introduction of homologous sequences into plant genomes may trigger epigenetic changes, making expression of the genes unpredictable. The main project objective was to examine the feasibility of using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer for homologous gene targeting in plants.

  4. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  5. Monthly energy review, June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-25

    The Monthly Energy Review provides an overview of the production, distribution, and consumption of energy derived from petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. It also discusses oil and gas resource development, energy prices, and issues relevant to international energy markets.

  6. Monthly energy review, June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-26

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  7. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 77, May - June 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    covered is May-June 1985, and includes all significant laser-related articles received by us in that interval. The bulk of the entries come from the...124. (RZRAB, 85/5Ye546). 578. Haubenreisser, W.; Lehmann, J.; Perthel, R.; Willsch, R. (). Study on fiberoptic refractometry . EXPPA, no. 6, 1984, 519

  8. New series of Oracle tutorials, May-June 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The IT DES Oracle Support team is pleased to announce the new series of Oracle tutorials with the proposed schedule: Thursday 11 May Tuning - Michal Kwiatek Thursday 1 June PL/SQL I - Eva Dafonte Perez Thursday 8 June PL/SQL II - Nilo Segura Thursday 15 June Oracle Tools and Bindings with languages - Eric Grancher, Nilo Segura These tutorials will take place in the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31/3-004) starting at 10:00. The average duration will be 1 hour plus time for questions. There is no need to register in advance. You can access the previous 2002-2003 sessions at http://it-des.web.cern.ch/IT-DES/DIS/oracle/tutorials.html If you need more information, please contact Catherine.Delamare@cern.ch

  9. Assessment of strength-limiting flaws in ceramic heat exchanger components INEL support: Fracture mechanics and nondestructive evaluation technology. Final report, June 1, 1986--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, W.R.; Reuter, W.G.

    1993-06-01

    An examination of a siliconized SiC material, CS101K, has been performed to determine if linear fracture mechanics concepts can be used to characterize and predict the behavior of this material. Phase II of this project showed that a value that appeared to represent the true fracture toughness could be measured using small specimens with a machined notch, if the notch root radius was less than 75 {mu}m. Methods to produce sharply cracked specimens were then investigated to verify this hypothesis. A new technique, called the {open_quotes}beam support{close_quotes} precracking method, was subsequently developed and used to make sharply cracked SE(B) specimens. Tests of these specimens showed a slightly rising R-curve-type of behavior, with elevated values of plane strain fracture toughness. Interference of the crack surfaces in the precrack wake was hypothesized as the most likely cause of these phenomena. Subsequent testing with various precrack lengths provided preliminary verification of the hypothesis. Test results show that, for fracture mechanics-based design and assessment, adequate values of fracture toughness can be obtained from EDM-notched specimens, instead of the more costly precracked specimens. These results imply that, for the Si-SiC material tested, caution is warranted when using any of the methods of assessing fracture toughness that use a sharp precrack. It is also reasoned that these results may generally be more applicable to the coarser-grained structural ceramics that exhibit a rougher fracture surface. Based on results of testing EDM-notched bend specimens in 1250{degrees}C air, no degradation of material properties were observed for exposures, under applied stress, up to 900 h. Instead, some increase in fracture toughness was measured for these conditions. These same tests indicated that the threshold stress intensity factor for stress corrosion cracking (static fatigue) in the hot air environment was the same as the fracture toughness.

  10. Monthly energy review, June 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  11. Science & Technology Review June 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K J

    2010-04-28

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Leader in High-Pressure Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Diamonds Put the Pressure on Materials--New experimental capabilities are helping Livermore scientists better understand how extreme pressure affects a material's structure; (3) Exploring the Unusual Behavior of Granular Materials--Livermore scientists are developing new techniques for predicting the response of granular materials under pressure; (4) A 1-Ton Device in a Briefcase--A new briefcase-sized tool for nuclear magnetic resonance is designed for onsite analysis of suspected chemical weapons; and (5) Targets Designed for Ignition--A series of experiments at the National Ignition Facility is helping scientists finalize the ignition target design.

  12. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY PERIODIC TECHNICAL REPORT MARCH, APRIL, MAY, JUNE 1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, B.; Cabell, C. P.

    1970-08-01

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT (45-1) -1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during March, April , May and June 1970.

  13. CERN Accelerator School | 26 May – 5 June 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School in collaboration with MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt, Austria is organising a specialised school on Accelerators for Medical Applications in the Eventhotel Pyramide, Vösendorf, Austria, from 26 May – 5 June 2015. Please note that the deadline for applications is 20 January 2015. More details can be found at the following sites: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Austria2015/Vienna-­‐advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/324187/ For further information please contact Barbara.strasser@cern.ch

  14. Pathfinder. Volume 9, Number 3, May/June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    banquet scheduled for May 11 at the DOD Procurement Con- ference and Training Symposium in Orlando, Fla. NGA has renamed its “Outstanding Women of...capture sensors and capabilities. www.pixim.com Signal Innovations Group: Video analytics and event detection technology. www.siginnovations.com

  15. Malaria--Great Exuma, Bahamas, May-June 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-22

    Malaria in humans is caused by four distinct protozoan species of the genus Plasmodium (P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae). These parasites are transmitted by the bite of an infective female Anopheles mosquito. In the Caribbean region, malaria has been eliminated from all islands except Hispaniola, the island consisting of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Elimination of malaria elsewhere resulted from a combination of integrated control measures, socioeconomic development, and close public health surveillance. However, even Caribbean islands where malaria is no longer endemic remain at constant risk for reintroduction of the disease because of their tropical climate, presence of competent malaria vectors, and proximity to other countries where malaria is endemic. This susceptibility was underscored by the recent outbreak of malaria on the island of Great Exuma in the Bahamas; during May-June 2006, a total of 19 malaria cases were identified. Four of the cases, in travelers from North America and Europe, are described in this report; such cases of imported malaria can signal the presence of a malaria problem in the country visited and thus assist local health authorities in their investigations. On September 19, after 3 months with no report of new cases, CDC rescinded its previous recommendation that U.S.-based travelers take preventive doses of the antimalarial drug chloroquine before, during, and after travel to Great Exuma.

  16. 2005 - 2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME From 1st of May to 30 June

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES Physics at the Tevatron by B. Heinemann Univ. of Liverpool - Fermilab 15, 16, 17, 18 May 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500, 18 May - Council Chamber Pulsed SC Magnets by M. Wilson, 29, 30, 31 May, 1, 2 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Exploring planets and moons in our solar system by H.O. Rucker / Academy of Sciences, Graz, A 6, 7, 8, 9 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC by R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T. Lefevre / CERN-AB, G. Arnau Izquiedo, H. Mainaud / CERN-TS 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry by A. Ferrari, CERN-AB, M. Silari, CERN-SC, F. Salvat, Facultat de Fisica, Univ. Barcelona, E. 26, 27, 28 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, room 3-006 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place ...

  17. LLE review: Quarterly report, April--June 1992. Volume 51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, R.W. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1992, contains articles on laser-plasma interaction experiments in long-scale-length plasmas and on the theory of a new form of the stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilitity. The advanced technology section includes reports on the optical response of superconducting films, the development of high-reflectance transport mirrors for the OMEGA Upgrade, and a new high-brightness mono-mode laser oscillator. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser systems are summarized.

  18. LLE Review quarterly report, April--June 1993. Volume 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, R.J. [ed.

    1993-10-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1993, contains articles on spectral features from argon-filled target implosions on OMEGA, and on the theory of an implicit difference scheme for the Fokker-Planck equation. The advanced technology section includes reports on a novel polymer liquid-crystal wave plate and a new scheme for phase conversion of the OMEGA Upgrade beams that results in greater, smoother energy deposition on fusion targets. Finally, reports on the as-designed configuration of the OMEGA newly configured glass development laser system are summarized.

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1987). Volume 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1987-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1987, contains a summary of the recent high-density campaign on the OMEGA laser system; a report on the absorption and radiation of energy from spherically irradiated targets; and a computer model describing the source of hot spots in the OMEGA laser. The section on advanced technology has reports on a method for accurately measuring the phase of a high power laser and the development of an extremely bright and compact laser. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  20. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1986). Volume 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaakobi, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1986-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1986, contains reports on GDL and OMEGA laser activities; analysis of neutron diagnostic methods of compressed laser targets; modeling of non-local heat flow in laser-heated plasmas; and development~ in advanced technology areas at LLE: protective polymeric coatings for nonlinear optical materials, time-resolved observation of electron-phonon relaxation in copper, and non-contact electro-optic sampling of high-speed electrical wave forms with a gallium-arsenide injection laser. Finally, the National Laser Users Facility activities for this period are summarized.

  1. FOR INFORMATION - A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. The topics and the dates are as follows: - Windows XP, une nouvelle experience (FR), Tuesday, 11th May 2004, 14.30 hrs. - Windows XP: a new experience (EN), Tuesday 8th of June, 14:30. - Lire votre email et plus avec Outlook 2003 (FR), Thursday 27th of May, 14:30. - Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003 (EN), Thursday 10th of June, 14:30. - Creer des documents Office avec Windows Word 2003 et Excel 2003 (FR), Thursday 3rd of June, 14:30. - Make Office documents with Windows Word 2003 and Excel 2003 (EN), Thursday 17th of June, 1...

  2. Idaho Operations Office: Technology summary, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Idaho Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more cost-effective technologies available for transfer to DOE environmental restoration and waste management end-users. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD`s technology development programs address three major problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

  3. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview - Peer Review Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, JoAnn [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-06

    This Geothermal Technologies Program presentation was delivered on June 6, 2011 at a Program Peer Review meeting. It contains annual budget, Recovery Act, funding opportunities, upcoming program activities, and more.

  4. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.

  5. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Quarterly report, Crescent Lake Refuge : May - June - July, 1938

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1938. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. INEL BNCT Research Program, May/June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylaianine (IBPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  16. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE ORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 26 MAY AND 2 JUNE 1999

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Original: FrenchThe meeting was devoted essentially to examining the various items listed below:TREF meeting on 28 May 1999The items on this meeting's agenda were: a status report on the voluntary programmes, the Forum's work planning and in particular preparation for the five-yearly review of financial conditions, and the scope of application of Article R IV 1.25 of the Staff Regulations concerning the reimbursement of taxes to certain categories of students and associates.At the SCC's meeting on 26 May, the Committee members finalised the documents to be submitted to TREF, in particular the Forum's work planning and preparation for the five-yearly review.At its meeting on 2 June, the SCC took note of the results of TREF's meeting and the preparations for the next Finance Committee meeting and Council session in June:Status report on the voluntary programmesThe Forum had regarded the results of these programmes as very positive, especially those of the RSL Programme, which had made it possible to open 36 pos...

  17. MUSC Environmental Biosciences Program First Quarter Report May - June, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr

    2002-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  18. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2008 - May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2010-03-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 16th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. We provide this annual report to review program activities from June 2008 through May 2009 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2008. Contents include: Welcome Letter Introduction The NGFP Team Program Management Highlights Class of 2008 Incoming Fellows Orientation Travel Career Development Management of the Fellows Performance Highlights Closing Ceremony Encore Performance Where They Are Now Alumnus Career Highlights: Christine Buzzard Class of 2009 Applicant Database Upgrades Fall Recruitment Activities Interviews Hiring and Clearances Introducing the Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Recruitment Strategy On the Horizon Appendix A: Class of 2009 Fellows

  19. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-04-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It’s all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies

  20. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1985). Volume 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skupsky, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1985-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the fully UV converted OMEGA laser system, mass-ablation rate experiments, reactor-size target designs, plasma processes in the target corona, degradation in optical performance of dielectric thin films, and the National Laser Users Facility activities for April-June 1985.

  1. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Annual report, June 1991--May 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Schultz, C.W. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Parekh, B.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States); Misra, M. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States); Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

  2. Science and Technology Review June 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2004-04-29

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) ''A New Era in Plutonium Research''--Commentary by William H. Goldstein. (2) ''Shocking Plutonium to Reveal Its Secrets''--Livermore scientists are using a new gas gun located at the Nevada Test Site for shocking plutonium to extreme pressures and temperatures. (3) ''Strategic Supercomputing Comes of Age''--As supercomputing settles into the terascale regime, simulations reveal pertinent insights about the physics of stockpile stewardship. (4) ''Seeing the Universe in a Grain of Dust''--Livermore scientists refine analysis techniques for studying the first dust particles collected from a comet. (5) ''A Bang-Up Job: Keeping Things Clean at the Contained Firing Facility''--A new cleanup program at Livermore's Contained Firing Facility keeps the environment clean and beryllium exposure to a minimum.

  3. Science and Technology Review June 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Pruneda, J.H.

    2000-06-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Accelerating on the ASCI Challenge''. (2) ''New Day Daws in Supercomputing'' When the ASCI White supercomputer comes online this summer, DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program will make another significant advanced toward helping to ensure the safety, reliability, and performance of the nation's nuclear weapons. (3) ''Uncovering the Secrets of Actinides'' Researchers are obtaining fundamental information about the actinides, a group of elements with a key role in nuclear weapons and fuels. (4) ''A Predictable Structure for Aerogels''. (5) ''Tibet--Where Continents Collide''.

  4. Science and Technology Review June 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H

    2006-04-20

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Maintaining Excellence through Intellectual Vitality--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers Tap Lab's Resources--University of California Ph.D. candidates work with Livermore scientists and engineers to conduct fundamental research as part of their theses; (3) Adaptive Optics Provide a Clearer View--The Center for Adaptive Optics is sharpening the view of celestial objects and retinal cells; (4) Wired on the Nanoscale--A Lawrence Fellow at Livermore is using genetically engineered viruses to create nanostructures such as tiny gold wires; and (5) Too Hot to Handle--Livermore scientists couple carbon-cycle and climate models to predict the global effects of depleting Earth's fossil-fuel supply.

  5. Science and technology review: June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1996-06-01

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE`s Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO{sub 2} mystery and osteoporosis are also included.

  6. Science and Technology Review June 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, A.A.

    2001-06-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Addressing the Energy-Environment Challenge''. (2) ''Turning Carbon Directly into Electricity'' A new electrochemical process converts carbon particles, derived from any fossil fuel, directly into electricity without traditional steam-reforming reactors, boilers, and turbines. (3) ''Environmental Research in California and Beyond'' Numerous environmental research projects at Livermore begin by addressing California concerns and, as they proceed, arrive at solutions and develop analytical tools of use far beyond state borders. (4) ''This Nitrogen Molecule Really Packs Heat'' A buckyball of nitrogen could become a powerful new fuel or propellant. (5) ''PEREGRINE Goes to Work'' The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new system, developed at Livermore, for better radiation treatment of tumors.

  7. Science and Technology Review June 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M

    2005-05-03

    This is the articles in this month's issue: (1) Close Collaborations Advance Progress in Genomic Research--Commentary by Elbert Branscomb; (2) Mining Genomes--Livermore computer programs help locate the stretches of DNA in gene deserts that regulate protein-making genes; (3) Shedding Light on Quantum Physics--Laboratory laser research builds from the foundation of Einstein's description of the quantization of light. (4) The Sharper Image for Surveillance--Speckle imaging-an image-processing technique used in astronomy is bringing long-distance surveillance into sharper focus. (5) Keeping Cool Close to the Sun--The specially coated gamma-ray spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft will help scientists determine the abundance of elements in Mercury's crust.

  8. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  9. Sscience & technology review; Science Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. This review for the month of July 1996 discusses: Frontiers of research in advanced computations, The multibeam Fabry-Perot velocimeter: Efficient measurement of high velocities, High-tech tools for the American textile industry, and Rock mechanics: can the Tuff take the stress.

  10. Inferno: June 1943 to May 1945. Book 5. Holocaust Series, First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayer, Eleanor H.

    There are eight volumes in this series on the Holocaust. Volumes 1-6 recount the history of the Jewish people in various year groupings: (1) "Ancient 1935"; (2) "September 1935 to December 1938"; (3) "January 1939 to December 1941"; (4) "January 1942 to June 1943"; (5) "July 1943 to April 1945"; (6) "May 1945 and After." Volumes 7 and 8 provide…

  11. Evaluation of Courses Taken by NUC Employees from June 1971 to May 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Betsy; Taylor, Pamela

    In August 1972, a survey was taken of 121 randomly selected Naval Undersea Center employees who had completed training courses between June 1971 and May 1972. The questionnaire was designed to determine how useful the employees felt the courses were in relation to their jobs. Supervisors of 55 of the employees were asked to evaluate the training…

  12. Monthly energy review, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This is an overview of the May energy statistics by the Energy Information Administration. The contents of the report include an energy overview, US energy production, trade stocks and prices for petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Energy production during February 1997 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu, a 1.9% decrease from the level of production during February 1996. Coal production increased 1.2%, natural gas production decreased 2.9%, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 2.1%. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.3% from the level of production during February 1996. Energy consumption during February 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.0% below the level of consumption during February 1996. Consumption of petroleum products decreased 4.4%, consumption of natural gas was down 3.5%, and consumption of coal fell 2.2%. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 6.7% from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during February 1997 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.1% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 12.7% and net imports of natural gas were up 7.4%. Net exports of coal fell 12.1% from the level in February 1996. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  13. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory publishes the Energy and Technology Review Monthly. This periodical reviews progress mode is selected programs at the laboratory. This issue includes articles on in-situ coal gasification, on chromosomal aberrations in human sperm, on high speed cell sorting and on supercomputers.

  14. LLE review. Quarterly report, April 1997--June 1997. Volume 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1997, includes an article discussing the results from recent experiments performed on OMEGA. These experiments used a new beam-smoothing device-distributed polarization rotators-in concert with existing techniques to improve the on-target uniformity of each beam. The result of this improved radiation uniformity was a substantive reduction in imprinting-the nonuniformity caused by the laser. A novel way to study the time dependence of this imprinting is also presented in this article.

  15. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1996). Volume 67

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeldon, Mark D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1996, contains articles detailing several nonlinear processes associated with lasers and their use, as well as an article describing the computer control systems necessary to maintain and operate a large laser system such as the 60-beam OMEGA laser. The specific topics discussed in this issue include stimulated scattering in laser plasmas, power exchange between interacting laser beams, charged particles interacting with a laser pulse, thermal equilibration of optically excited states, an overview of the laser control system software in OMEGA, and a technique for cancellation of the nonlinear phase accumulation in short-pulse lasers.

  16. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2005). Volume 103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myatt, Jason [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2005-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April-June 2005, features the following articles. ''High-Density and High ρR Fuel Assembly for Fast-Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion'' by R. Betti and C. Zhou. In this article (p. 117), the authors optimize implosion parameters for fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion and design fast-ignition targets relevant to direct-drive inertial fusion energy (IFE). It is shown that a 750-kJ laser can assemble fuel with VI = 1.7 X 107 cm/s, a = 0.7, t = 400 g/cc, tR = 3 g/cm2, and a hot-spot volume of less than 10% of the compressed core. If fully ignited, this fuel assembly can produce energy gains of 150. In the second article (p. 122), C. Stoeckl, T. R. Boehly, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu. Glebov, J. Miller, V. A. Smalyuk, W. Theobald, B. Yaakobi, and T. C. Sangster, along with J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Séguin (MIT), S. P. Hatchett (LLNL), and R. B. Stephens (GA) describe recent OMEGA experiments that have studied the fuel assembly of gas-filled, cone-in-shell, fast-ignition targets. Using both fusion products and backlit images, an areal density of ~60-70 mg/cm2 was inferred for the dense core assembly. The results are promising for successful integrated fast-ignition experiments on the OMEGA EP facility, scheduled to be completed in 2007. Other articles are titled ''Planar Cryogenic Target Hangling Capability for the OMEGA Laser-Fusion Facility''; "Fourier-Space, Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3-D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets''; ''Technologies for Mitigating Tritum Releases to the Environment''; ''All-Solid-State, Diode-Pumped, Multiharmonic Laser System for Timing Fiducial''; and ''EXAFS Measurement of Iron bcc-to-hcp Phase Transformation in Nanosecond-Laser Shocks''.

  17. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  18. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  19. Tree-ring reconstructed May-June precipitation in the Caucasus since 1752 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Benito, Dario; Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; Köse, Nesibe; Güner, Hüseyin Tuncay; Pederson, Neil

    2016-11-01

    The Caucasus region experiences recurrent droughts that affect natural vegetation and the agriculture-based economies of several countries. Because meteorological records are in general scarce and of short timespan, little is known about the magnitude and frequency of past climate variability. Despite the recent increase of climate reconstructions for parts of Eurasia, no study has focused on past hydroclimate variability in the Caucasus. Here, we use a multispecies network of tree-ring width chronologies from the Lesser Caucasus to develop the first precipitation reconstruction for the region back to 1752 CE. Despite the high annual precipitation in the region, our reconstruction accounted for 51.2 % of the variability in May-June precipitation from 1930 to 2001. In comparison with reconstructions in the eastern Mediterranean, our new reconstruction revealed important and distinct drought periods and pluvials. Previous winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and spring East Atlantic/Western Russia (EA/WR) and North Sea Caspian patterns are likely key drivers of May-June precipitation in the Caucasus and Anatolia. NAO appeared to negatively affect rainfall low-frequency variability while effects of EA/WR were more apparent at the interannual timescales. We also show a potential positive effect of Black Sea surface temperatures on May-June precipitation. In the Caucasus, May-June represents the period of major water supply in semi-arid areas and the period with the highest potential of water scarcity in mesic areas. It is also a period of potential catastrophic flood events. Thus, changes to the precipitation regime during this season will be critical to both human and natural systems of the Caucasus region.

  20. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  1. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  2. Geothermal Technologies Program 2011 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollett, Douglas [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Stillman, Greg [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-01

    On June 6-10, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP or the Program) conducted its annual program peer review in Bethesda, Maryland. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the program and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future program planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  3. Military Review. Volume 87, Number 3, May-June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    more than a commodity to be used for pleasure and reproduction . Less attention is paid to situations of this nature than to the less common occurrence...decision to capitulate was not a popular one with Japanese military leaders even after the second bomb. However, the emperor prevailed by agreeing to...1962 (london & New york: Penguin Books, 1979), 281-95. 15. Max Boot, Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power (New york: Basic

  4. Science & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document is the August, 1995 issue of the Science and Technology review, a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory publication. It contains two major articles, one on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - as applied to materials engineering studies, and one on risk assessment, in this case looking primarily at a health care problem. Separate articles will be indexed from this journal to the energy database.

  5. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  6. STUDY OF INTRACRANIAL ABSCESS IN GANDHI MEDICAL COLLEGE BHOPAL FROM JUNE 2010 TO MAY 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A prospective and retrospective study was conducted in Hamidia hospital and Gandhi medical college Bhopal from year June 2010 to May 2014. Study included patients having intracranial abscesses. The objective was to know the incidence and prevalen ce, clinical features and management as well as outcome. Radiological and microbiological investigations were done. Procedures performed were lumbar puncture and intracranial abscess drainage by aspiration or craniotomy in few patients. There were total 33 patients in five years out of which 17 patients were operated and 16 were treated conservatively. Most common complication was residual abscess, meningitis and persistent hemiplegic.

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1998). Volume 75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Reuben [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1998-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April–June 1998, includes a report on a recent series of experiments, performed by A. Babushkin, M. Guardalben, R. Keck, and W. Seka, that demonstrate a new scheme for converting the infrared light of OMEGA to the third harmonic in the ultraviolet over a bandwidth that is significantly wider than has been previously attainable. This innovative scheme, employing a second tripling crystal in addition to the doubler-tripler pair currently in use, was proposed by D. Eimerl at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and adapted to the OMEGA system by S. Craxton and S. Oskoui, a recent participant in LLE’s Summer High-School Research Program. Wider bandwidths on OMEGA will allow the use of broadband beam smoothing with faster smoothing times than have been employed until now.

  8. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2001). Volume 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterman, Thomas H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2001-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April–June 2001, features ''A Self-Calibrating, Multichannel Streak Camera for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications'' by Dr. W. R. Donaldson, R. Boni, R. L. Keck, and P. A. Jaanimagi. This article (p. 109) describes the 60-beam streak camera system used on OMEGA and focuses on the hardware and software calibration techniques that maximize its utility. The system can diagnose each of the beams on every target shot and can measure beam energies with 8% accuracy and timing at 7 ps rms. Beam-to-beam power variations of less than 5% can be detected. Other articles in this volume are: Evolution of Shell Nonuniformities Near Peak Compression of a Spherical Implosion; Multibeam Stimulated Brillouin Scattering from Hot Solid-Target Plasmas; Hot-Electron Effect in Superconductors and Is Applications for Radiation Sensors; and, Scaling Law for Marginal Ignition.

  9. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.S. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  10. Health hazards associated with laundry detergent pods - United States, May-June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    During May and early June 2012, the Carolinas Poison Center and the Poison Control Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia received four reports of children with vomiting, mental status changes, and respiratory distress after ingesting the contents of laundry detergent pods. Laundry detergent pods are single-load capsules that contain concentrated liquid detergent within a water-soluble membrane that dissolves when in contact with moisture. Laundry detergent pods were introduced in the U.S. market in 2010, and multiple manufacturers now sell laundry detergent packaged in pods (2-4). On May 17, 2012, CDC and the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) began tracking and characterizing reported exposures to laundry detergent from pods. During May 17-June 17, 2012, poison centers reported 1,008 laundry detergent exposures to the National Poison Data System (NPDS), of which 485 (48%) exposures involved laundry detergent pods. Age was recorded for 481 exposures, of which 454 (94%) exposures involved children aged ≤5 years. Among children aged ≤5 years, a significantly greater proportion of those exposed to laundry detergent from pods had gastrointestinal and respiratory adverse health effects and mental status changes compared with those with non-pod laundry detergent exposures. Parents and caregivers should keep laundry detergent pods, as well as other household cleaning products, out of reach and out of sight of children. Health-care providers should be aware that exposure to laundry detergent from pods might be associated with adverse health effects more often than exposure to non-pod laundry detergents.

  11. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    Three review articles are presented. The first describes the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory role in the research and development of oil-shale retorting technology through its studies of the relevant chemical and physical processes, mathematical models, and new retorting concepts. Second is a discussion of investigation of properties of dense molecular fluids at high pressures and temperatures to improve understanding of high-explosive behavior, giant-planet structure, and hydrodynamic shock interactions. Third, by totally computerizing the triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer system, the laboratory has produced a general-purpose instrument of unrivaled speed, selectivity, and adaptability for the analysis and identification of trace organic constituents in complex chemical mixtures. (GHT)

  12. Sscience & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This monthly science and technology review features a report about Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work on an awesome, inevitable, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous natural phenomenon, lightning. This feature article tells of the development of guidance by Laboratory engineers on how to deal with the effects of lightning on Department of Energy facilities, especially those where nuclear and high explosive materials are handled and stored. Other topics are Groundwater Modeling: More Cost Effective Cleanup by Design, Dual- Band Infrared Computed Tomography: Searching for Hidden Defects, and Plating Shop Moves to Finish Off Waste.

  13. Activity report june 1998 - may 2000; Rapport d'activite juin 1998 - mai 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the scientific activity of the ''Service de Physique Theorique'' (SPhT), during the period june 1998-may 2000: activity in terms of structure, scientific research programs and results, publications, training and contracts. SPhT is one of the service of the ''Direction des Sciences de la Matiere'' (DSM), itself depending of the CEA Institution. The scientific domains covered by this report are: the quantum field theory and mathematical physics (phase transitions, integrable systems, random matrix, gravity and strings, quantum chaos and dynamical systems, correlation and super-correlation); nuclear physics, particle physics and astrophysics (quantum chromodynamics, physic beyond the standard model, the early Universe, from cosmic microwave background anisotropies to galaxies); statistical physics and condensed matter (statistical physics and models, spin glasses, quantum systems, soft condensed matter and biological physics). (A.L.B.)

  14. Summary Report for April, May and June, 1951, Chemistry Division, Section C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemistry Division; Osborne, D. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemistry Division

    1951-08-01

    This is a summary report for April, May and June, 1951, in the Chemistry Division, Section C-1 of Argonne National Laboratory. Topics include Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry with specifics about the following: 1) U238 (n,2n) Cross Section WIthin a Uranium Slug, and 2) Possible Occurrence of Si32 in Nature. Basic Chemistry is also covered, going into the following subjects: 1) Heats of Solution of Salts in Organic Solvents, 2) Effect of Coordination on Absorption Spectra of Anions, 3) Entropy, Enthalpy, and Heat Capacity of Thorium Dioxide from 10 to 300°K, 4) The Thermodynamics of Neptunium Ions, 5) Migration of Ions in Ion-Exchange Resins During Electrolysis, and 5) Mutual Separation of Lanthanides and Actinides by Solvent Extraction Techniques.

  15. Activity report june 1996 - may 1998; Rapport d'activite juin 1996 - mai 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the scientific activity of the ''Service de Physique Theorique'' (SPhT), during the period june 1996-may 1998: activity in terms of structure, scientific research programs and results, publications, training and contracts. SPhT is one of the service of the ''Direction des Sciences de la Matiere'' (DSM), itself depending of the CEA Institution. The scientific domains covered by this report are: the statistical physics (phase transition, biophysics, soft matter, quantum systems); mathematical physics and fields theory (strings theory, random matrix, quantum theory); astrophysics, nuclear physics and particles physics. (A.L.B.)

  16. Bulk Shielding Facility quarterly report, April, May, and June of 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, S.S. III; Lance, E.D.; Thomas, J.R.

    1976-12-01

    The BSR operated at an average power level of 1,756 kw for 31.49 percent of the time during April, May, and June. Water-quality control in both the reactor primary and secondary cooling systems was satisfactory. The reactor was shut down for approximately 16 days to repair a fault in the fiberglass lining of the pool. The BSR was operated at low and variable power during this quarter for 79.784 hours as part of the training programs for nuclear engineering students from the University of Tennessee and Mississippi State University. The PCA was also used in the above-mentioned training programs and was operated on six occasions when the University of Kentucky, Memphis State University, or Mississippi State University students actively participated in training laboratories.

  17. CTD and Water Chemistry data of the Eastern Pacific Redox Experiment of May - June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Eastern Pacific Redox Experiment (EPREX) took place 24 May to 28 June 2000 on the R/V Roger Revelle. The first station was at the Hawaii Ocean Time Series...

  18. Marine Mammal Sighting and Census data from Coastal Alaska from 05 May 1985 to 13 June 1985 (NODC Accession 8600633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Mammal Sighting and Census data were collected from Coastal Alaska. Data were collected by Alaska Department of Fish and Game from 05 May 1985 to 13 June...

  19. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from 10 May 1976 to 19 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7900071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 10 May 1976 to 19 June 1976. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service...

  20. Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from 25 May 1983 to 27 June 1983 (NODC Accession 8500141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service (NOS) from 25 May 1983 to 27 June...

  1. Field report for the walrus project at Savoonga, Alaska on Saint Lawrence Island, May to June 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report represents the work done at Savoonga from May 6 to June 6, 1980. Included is information regarding the walrus harvest, along with scattered bits of...

  2. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggio, A.J. (ed.)

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an x-ray microscope for biological research.

  3. Predictable patterns of the May-June rainfall anomaly over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wen; Wang, Bin; Yim, So-Young; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2017-02-01

    During early summer (May-June, MJ), East Asia (EA) subtropical front is a defining feature of Asian monsoon, which produces the most prominent precipitation band in the global subtropics. Here we show that dynamical prediction of early summer EA (20°N-45°N, 100°E-130°E) rainfall made by four coupled climate models' ensemble hindcast (1979-2010) yields only a moderate skill and cannot be used to estimate predictability. The present study uses an alternative, empirical orthogonal function (EOF)-based physical-empirical (P-E) model approach to predict rainfall anomaly pattern and estimate its potential predictability. The first three leading modes are physically meaningful and can be, respectively, attributed to (a) the interaction between the anomalous western North Pacific subtropical high and underlying Indo-Pacific warm ocean, (b) the forcing associated with North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly, and (c) the development of equatorial central Pacific SST anomalies. A suite of P-E models is established to forecast the first three leading principal components. All predictors are 0 month ahead of May, so the prediction here is named as a 0 month lead prediction. The cross-validated hindcast results demonstrate that these modes may be predicted with significant temporal correlation skills (0.48-0.72). Using the predicted principal components and the corresponding EOF patterns, the total MJ rainfall anomaly was hindcasted for the period of 1979-2015. The time-mean pattern correlation coefficient (PCC) score reaches 0.38, which is significantly higher than dynamical models' multimodel ensemble skill (0.21). The estimated potential maximum attainable PCC is around 0.65, suggesting that the dynamical prediction models may have large rooms to improve. Limitations and future work are discussed.

  4. Effects on the groundwater levels of the May-June 2012 Emilia seismic sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marcaccio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of phenomena were observed in the groundwaters in concomitance with the May-June 2012 seismic sequence that occurred in the Emilia Romagna area. In particular, phreatic wells close to the epicentral area were affected by a sudden increase in water level of up to 4 m. In some cases, the sands of aquifers were ejected outside wells, and >700 liquefaction phenomena were recorded [Bertolini and Fioroni 2012, this volume]. Some automatic stations of the regional well network recorded variations in well levels. These data can be considered useful to understand the relationships between seismic events and the local groundwaters [see also Italiano et al. 2012, this volume]. […] In 1976, a regional network composed of 330 wells was set up with the purpose of monitoring the groundwater levels using manual techniques. These data have been used for environmental purposes and for water management. In recent years, the monitoring network managed by Agenzia Regionale Prevenzione e Ambiente (ARPA has increased the number of wells (to about 600, and chemical analyses are also periodically carried out for environmental monitoring activities. In the past three years, an automatic monitoring network composed of 40 stations was set up and this has allowed the monitoring of the water levels and the temperatures, at a rate of one measure per hour, and to broadcast the data to the host center located in Bologna. […

  5. Herpes zoster in elderly adults in a community hospital in Buenos Aires. June 2013-May 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Rozenek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster (HZ is caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Its main risk factor is increasing age and comorbidities. There are limited data on the characteristics of HZ in South America, especially in the elderly. We analyzed epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 340 patients over 60 years assisted for HZ, between June 2013 and May 2014. The average age was 74 years (60-100, 62% (210 had thoracic location; 75% (255 of the initial consultations were held in guards; 68% (143 had pain and vesicles, and 4% (14 only pain at baseline. Pain persisted after finishing the episode in 41% (139. The diagnosis was made between 1 and 3 days from the beginning of the episode in 53% (180 patients. Average number of visits per episode was 3.6 (1-24. Antiviral treatment was supplied to 91% (309; however it was inadequate in dose or time in 49.1% (167 cases. Pain treatment was indicated in 66% (224. Most frequently used drugs (alone or in combination were non-steroidal painkillers (43%, 146, pregabalin (30%, 102, opiates (24%, 82, and steroids (12%, 41; 9% (31 presented comorbidities; 27% (126 experienced pain after the ending of the episode, with an average duration of 138.7 days. In general, diagnosis was done late, making it difficult to use antivirals correctly. The presence of pain was more frequent than reported in other publications, however there are few data in this age group

  6. Evaluation of Physical Composition and Municipal Solid Waste Generation Rate of Hamadan (June 1999 May 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Samadi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although municipal solid waste (MSW is generated every day , but with comparison to other municipal Environmental aspects such as Air pollution and Sewage, is not well considered. MSW management includes refuse production, storage, collection, transportation and disposal. Without adequate and reliable in formation and data about MSW generation rate and it’s physical components, optimun planning and management is not obtainable. In this research the physical composition of Hamadan MSW was studied . Samples were takan by Truck–Load sampling and portional random method from June 1999 untile May 2000 and analyzed for physical components and moisture percent age. The results showed that the average generation rate, density of wastes and its moisture percent were 252.33 Tons and 204.83 kg/m3 and 22.46% respectively. Average percents of physical componets were 77.72% , 5.75% , 5.42% , 3.15%, 2.11% , 1.04% and 4.92% for Biodegriable materials (garbage, papers, plastics, textiles, metals, glass and other materials respectively. Also maximum generation rate was 328 tons in March and minimum generation rate was 196 tons in December. In general, with planning of enforceable reuse and recycling programmes, could be avoid of 183, 14, 13 and 5 tons of biodegriable materials , paper, plastics and metals burial respectively everyday.

  7. Science & Technology Review March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2005-01-25

    This issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Enhanced National Security through International Research Collaborations--Commentary by Stephen G. Cochran; (2) Building Networks of Trust through Collaborative Science--Livermore scientists are leading collaborative science and technology projects with colleagues from Central and South Asia and the Middle East; (3) Tracing the Steps in Nuclear Material Trafficking--The Laboratory.s nuclear science expertise is helping to thwart the illicit trafficking of nuclear material; (4) Looking at Earth in Action--Geophysicists at Livermore are using laboratory experiments to examine such issues as how best to store nuclear wastes and how to mitigate the effects of greenhouse gases; and (5) Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals--Computer models indicate that gamma-ray bursts from dying stars may be important sources of elements such as iron, zinc, titanium, and copper.

  8. LFCM vitrification technology. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Jarrett, J.H.; Minor, J.E. (comps.)

    1986-01-01

    This report is compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to document progress on liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the third quarter of FY 1985 is discussed: pretreatment systems, melting process chemistry and glass development, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, off-gas systems, process/product modeling and control, and supporting studies.

  9. Modoc National Wildlife Refuge wildlife and habitat management review June 30 [ to ] July 3 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings and recommendations from an evaluation of the wildlife and habitat management program conducted by a review team during June 30...

  10. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  11. Inferno: June 1943 to May 1945. Book 5. Holocaust Series, First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayer, Eleanor H.

    There are eight volumes in this series on the Holocaust. Volumes 1-6 recount the history of the Jewish people in various year groupings: (1) "Ancient 1935"; (2) "September 1935 to December 1938"; (3) "January 1939 to December 1941"; (4) "January 1942 to June 1943"; (5) "July 1943 to April 1945";…

  12. International workshop on chromosome 6. Final report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes planning for and a brief description of the events concerning the First International Workshop in Human Chromosome 6 which took place June 7--9, 1992 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The complete publication of the workshop report is slated to appear in the Journal of Cytogenetica and Cell Genetics.

  13. Inferno: June 1943 to May 1945. Book 5. Holocaust Series, First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayer, Eleanor H.

    There are eight volumes in this series on the Holocaust. Volumes 1-6 recount the history of the Jewish people in various year groupings: (1) "Ancient 1935"; (2) "September 1935 to December 1938"; (3) "January 1939 to December 1941"; (4) "January 1942 to June 1943"; (5) "July 1943 to April 1945";…

  14. Military Review. Volume 73. June 1993, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    would be unlikely to drag his country into a Vietnam-type situation. Apart from protests, Carter contented himself with boycotting the Olympic Games ...subversive tinder Carter contented himself with boycotting alight. Brezhnev certainly did not want a the Olympic Games being held in Moscow. Balkanized...responsibe for th 46 June 106 * MUTAWr RVLW -ROUNDOUT ORAE ro;uAotuqItmut;be moreinvelvedin the moba ~liation site properly trained as sol- traitig 40d

  15. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report: June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Short summaries are given for 53 projects concerned with tritium, separations, environmental, waste management and general topics. Included in the general topics are the following: High-level waste integrated flowsheet model; Scoping thermal analysis of failed equipment storage vault thermal model; Decision support system for in-tank precipitation benzene stripper experiment; Development of a liquid level bubbler for Defense Waste Processing Facility canyon vessels; Thermal testing of 9973 and 9975 series packagings; and Technical review of CD-1 cask for first time use.

  16. Coal technology program. Progress report, May 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-07-01

    Two successful operability tests with sustained operation of the bench-scale hydrocarbonizer were achieved with Illinois No. 6 coal diluted with char. Several activities in the area of nondestructive testing of coatings are reviewed. Failure analysis activities included examination of several components from the solvent refined coal plants at Wilsonville, Alabama, and Tacoma, Washington. In the gas-fired potassium boiler project, all of the design work were completed except for several of the instrument and control drawings. In the design studies of a coal-fired alkali metal vapor topping cycle, the first phase of a cycle analysis and the design and analysis of a metal vapor turbine were completed. A report entitled ''Critical Component Test Facility--Advance Planning for Test Modules'' presents the planning study for the conceptual design of component test modules on a nonsite-specific basis. Engineering studies, project evaluation and process and program analysis of coal conversion processes were continued. A report on the landfill storage of solid wastes from coal conversion is being finalized. In the coal-fueled MIUS project, a series of successful tests of the coal feeding system and a report on the analysis of 500-hr fire-side corrosion tests in a fluidized bed combustor were completed.

  17. Accelerator Technology Program. Progress report, January-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (Comps.)

    1980-03-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the first six months of calendar 1980 are discussed. This report is organized around major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be located between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility, followed by a section on the gyrocon, a new type of high-power, high-efficiency radio-frequency (rf) amplifier. The third section discusses the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT Division and the National Bureau of Standards; the fourth section concerns the free-electron studies. The fifth section covers the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, a new concept for the acceleration of low-velocity particles; this section is followed by a section discussing heavy ion fusion accelerator development. The next section reports activities in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The final section deals first with development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, then with accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  18. Defense AT&L (Volume 35, Number 3, May-June 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Eighteenth International Defense Educational Arrangement (IDEA) Seminar June 19-23, 2006 To be held in Toledo , Spain The Eighteenth International...Defense Educational Arrangement (IDEA) Seminar will be held in Toledo , Spain. The seminar will be a theme-based format, to include an industry day, will...and Air Force Lt. Gen. Victor Ren- uart, Joint Staff director for Strategic Plans and Pol- icy. • Building Partnership Capacity, led by Eric Edel- man

  19. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 26, Number 3, May-June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    beyond. Although current capabilities are intended to be evolutionary , one should nevertheless pursue the analysis of operational interest of new...headquarters (SJFHQ)—in order to showcase the extent to which campaign design and planning have become epistemological , May–June 2012 Air & Space...elaborate epistemological networks, maps, and systems. Buzzwords like transformation and the knowledge battlefield reverberate in meeting rooms and

  20. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Rudd

    2005-08-30

    This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings, including a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. with particular emphasis on North American climates and construction.

  1. Science and Technology Review May 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2004-04-02

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) ''A Multidisciplinary Attack on Bioterrorism''--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia. (2) ''Life at the Nanoscale''--Livermore researchers are exploring the molecules of life at the nanoscale to fight bioterrorism, improve human health, and understand how proteins function. (3) ''Screening Cargo Containers to Remove a Terrorist Threat''--A detection system for cargo containers will search for hidden nuclear materials that terrorists might try to ship to U.S. seaports. (4) ''Improved Algorithms Speed It Up for Codes''--Recent changes to the algorithms used in Monte Carlo calculations are reducing the time needed to run the high-fidelity simulations being developed for the nation's supercomputers. (5) ''The Siren Call of the Seas: Sequestering Carbon Dioxide''--Scientists at Livermore evaluate possible methods for removing carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere and storing it in the planet's waters.

  2. Science & Technology Review April/May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K M

    2010-03-08

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Fifty Years of Stellar Laser Research - Commentary by Edward I. Moses; (2) A Stellar Performance - By combining computational models with test shot data, scientists at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated that the laser is spot-on for ignition; (3) Extracting More Power from the Wind - Researchers are investigating how atmospheric turbulence affects power production from wind turbines; (4) Date for a Heart Cell - Carbon-14 dating reveals that a significant number of heart muscle cells are regenerated over the course of our lives; and (5) Unique Marriage of Biology and Semiconductors - A new device featuring a layer of fat surrounding a thin silicon wire takes advantage of the communication properties of both biomolecules and semiconductors.

  3. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-26

    The 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 14-18, 2012 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 309 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 189 reviewers. A total of 1,473 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews.

  4. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O' Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P. (eds.)

    1982-07-01

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs. (GHT)

  5. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.A.; Quirk, W.J. [eds.

    1994-06-01

    This report discusses: The Clementine satellite, the first US satellite to the Moon in more than two decades, sent back more than 1.5 million images of the lunar surface using cameras designed and calibrated by LLNL. An LLNL-developed laser ranger provided information that will be used to construct a relief map of the Moon`s surface; and Uncertainty and the Federal Role in Science and Technology, Ralph E. Gomory was a recent participate in the Director`s Distinguished Lecturer Series at LLNL. In his lecture, he addressed some of the tensions, conflicts, and possible goals related to federal support for science and technology.

  6. 2015 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the FCTO and the VTO: 258 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by 170 reviewers. A total of 1,095 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE on the Office with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  7. 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. The review encompassed all of the work done by the FCTO and the VTO: a total of 295 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by a total of 179 reviewers. A total of 1,354 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE on the Office with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  8. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.A.; McElroy, L.; Wheatcraft, D.; Middleton, C.; Shang, S. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    Two articles are included: the industrial computing initiative, and artificial hip joints (applying weapons expertise to medical technology). Three research highlights (briefs) are included: KEN project (face recognition), modeling groundwater flow and chemical migration, and gas and oil national information infrastructure.

  9. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME - 3rd Term: From 1st of May to 30 June 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES QCD and high energy nuclear collisions D. Kharzeev / BNL, Upton, USA 7, 8, 9 May 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 9 May - Council Chamber Acceleration of particles in plasma J. Faure / Ecole Polytechnique ENSTA, Palaiseau, F. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 May 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Nanotechnologies by C. Bottani / Polytechnic of Milano, I., M. Ferrari, Univ. of Texas, Health Science Center, Houston, USA, A. Li Bassi, Polytechnic of Milano, I. 11, 12, 13 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 11 June - Council Chamber The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  10. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This is the first of two issues commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The early history of the laboratory is reviewed, including: the LLNL-Nevada organization; project Plowshare; the chemistry and materials science department; and development of computer systems. (GHT)

  11. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.B.; Bathgate, M.B.; Crawford, R.B.; McCaleb, C.S.; Prono, J.K. (eds.)

    1976-05-01

    The chief objective of LLL's biomedical and environmental research program is to enlarge mankind's understanding of the implications of energy-related chemical and radioactive effluents in the biosphere. The effluents are studied at their sources, during transport through the environment, and at impact on critical resources, important ecosystems, and man himself. We are pursuing several projects to acquire such knowledge in time to guide the development of energy technologies toward safe, reasonable, and optimal choices.

  12. Radioactive contamination in the environs of the Hanford Works for the period April, May, June 1949

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paas, H.J.; Singlevich, W.

    1950-04-03

    This report summarizes the measurements made for radioactive contamination in the environs of the Hanford Works for the quarter April through June 1949. This belated document is issued for the records to fill in the gap for the quarterly reports not issued in 1949 because of personnel shortage at that time. Although the data summarized in this report were already reported in the H. I. Evirons Reports for the months involved, it is still of value to study the data combining the three months of data which give better opportunity to evaluate the trends and patterns of the levels of radioactive contamination emanating from the various sources at the Hanford Works. This document discusses: meteorological data and radioactive contamination in vegetation, the atmosphere, rain, Hanford wastes, the Columbia River, and in drinking water and test wells.

  13. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  14. Science & Technology Review: September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This is the September issue of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Science & Technology Review, which communicates, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. This month, there are features on "Laboratory Investments Drive Computational Advances" and "Laying the Groundwork for Extreme-Scale Computing." Research highlights include "Nuclear Data Moves into the 21st Century", "Peering into the Future of Lick Observatory", and "Facility Drives Hydrogen Vehicle Innovations."

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 3, May-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Art into School, Byte by Byte: Innovative Programs Use Technology to Expand Access to the Arts (Patti Hartigan); (2) Differentiated Instruction…

  16. The IMAGE III Conference Proceedings Held at Phoenix, Arizona on 30 May - 1 June 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    this entire terrain profile curve (Figure-7). A general panorama of hills and valleys is developed, and embellishments are added (Figure-8) to create...mission synergy places the AVTS at the forefront of visual simulation technology. The AVTS was originally specified as a 10 channel CIG, capable of

  17. NDA technology for uranium resource evaluation. Progress report, January 1--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.L. (comp.)

    1979-01-01

    Work performed during the time period from January 1, 1978 to June 30, 1978, on the contract for NDA Technology for Uranium Resource Evaluation in Group Q-1 is described. The work has focused on gamma-ray calculations and computer code modifications in support of borehole logging measurements and surface gamma-ray surveys. Experimental effort has concentrated on improvements in uranium fission neutron detection efficiency.

  18. High-temperature-turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Technical progress report, April 1, 1979-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Work performed on the High-Temperature-Turbine Technology Program, Phase II-Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from 1 April 1979 through 30 June 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems during this Phase II quarterly reporting period are presented. Planned progress during the next quarterly reporting period is also defined. Testing of the LP rig engine with hot gas stream particulates simulating operation on low Btu gas is described. Fabrication of components and preparation of facilities for future tests of the Turbine Spool Technology Rig are discussed together with analytical reviews. Preparation of the low Btu gas synthesizing facility is discussed. Supporting Materials and Process investigations are described.

  19. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  20. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  1. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. A narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1953: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  4. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  5. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1948 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  8. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  9. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  10. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  11. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  12. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  13. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  14. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  15. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  16. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  17. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  18. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  19. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  20. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  1. Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: Quarterly narrative report: May, June and July, 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1940. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  2. Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of 1957. The report begins with a summary of the...

  3. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August - 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Narrative report: Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Narrative report: Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. A narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1957: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  15. Narrative report: Tamarac Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: Period May, June, July 1938

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1938. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions during...

  16. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report - May, June, July, and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  17. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  18. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1947. The report begins by...

  19. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  20. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1949. The report begins by...

  1. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August - 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1946 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  5. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  6. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1958. The report begins by...

  7. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  9. Talcot Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Talcot Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  10. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge: May June July August 1955: [Narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May - August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Quarterly narrative report : May, June, and July, 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: May - June - July - August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May - June - July and August - 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  14. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  15. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1948. The report begins by...

  16. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  17. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May June July and August 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chincoteague NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  18. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May - June - July and August - 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  19. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Louisa-Keithsburg Unit: May, June, July, August - 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  1. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1944. The report begins by...

  2. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period May, June, July, and August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  5. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August [1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  6. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : May, June, July, and August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  9. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1957. The report begins by...

  11. Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: [May, June, July, August 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  12. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  14. Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959: Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Moosehorn NWR (including the Edmunds Unit) outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by...

  15. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Calhoun-Batchtown Unit: May, June, July, August - 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  17. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  18. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period May, June, July, and August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1949, Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  2. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  3. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  4. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August [1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  5. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  6. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions, water...

  7. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  8. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August [1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  9. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  10. Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  11. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuge) outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963....

  12. Quarterly report: Sabine National Wildlife Refuge: May, June and July 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sabine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and water...

  13. Sabine National Wildlife Refuge : Quarterly Narrative Report : May - June and July 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sabine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments May - July 1940. Topics include equipment, developments, waterfowl, grazing, fur harvesting, law...

  14. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Quarterly narrative report: May, June, July, and August 1951: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  19. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period May, June, July, and August, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  3. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for period: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1952 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  8. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  10. Quarterly report of Upper Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for May, June and July, 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1939. Wildlife- including migratory birds...

  11. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  12. [Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Quarterly narrative report: May, June, July, 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1940. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge (May, June, July, August, 1950)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Quarterly narrative report: May, June, July, 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  17. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  18. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report - May, June, July, and August 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Quarterly narrative report: May, June and July, 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions during...

  20. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  1. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Narrative report North Platte Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for North Platte National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions, water...

  14. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  15. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  16. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  17. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR and Mille Lacs NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Narrative report: May, June, and July, 1939 [Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1939. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, & August - 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Louisa-Keithsburg Unit: May, June, July, August - 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August - 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Medicine Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: Quarterly narrative report: May - June - July 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1939. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  3. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  4. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  5. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  6. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  7. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  8. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. The Coast Artillery Journal. Volume 77, Number 3, May-June 1934

    Science.gov (United States)

    1934-06-01

    the clothing, or of rubber, be procured for test. The ordinary blue denim hat (just as apt to be brown) is far from satisfactory in wet weather...34 "Red- Blue conflict ends Sector warfare," "All troops of the Isthmus Defend the Atlantic entrance," "Second Field Artillery starts march from Ocean to...Union may attempt or what China may plot." Minister of War Araki in a speech at Tokio , April 22, 1932. "International relations are quite unlike

  10. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome at patients with diabetus melitus tip 2, one year retrospective study May 2011-June 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nora Burda; Vilma Mema; Ejup Mahmudi Md; Brikena Selimi; Sulejman Zhugli; Basri Lenajni; Illaz Bunjaku

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To prescribe and analyze the correlation of Dry Eye and Diabetes Mellitus Tip II, at Polyclinic of Specialties Nr. 2 Ophthalmology service, between May 2011 and June 2012.Methods:A total number of 223 patients diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus Tip II underwent ocular examinations. 120 male and 103 female, aged from 24-73 years old. To confirm the presence of diabetes among these patients fasting blood glucose level was performed (normal limit < 110 mg/dL). History of disease, duration of diabetes, age, sex was obtained by reviewing the medical records and direct patient interview. Also the patients complains: tearing photophobia, red eye, itching ,foreign body sensation, blurred vision was recorded. From the study were excluded all conditions which affects the tear film stability and contact lens wearer.Results: 118 patients were diagnosed with Dry Eye Syndrome of varying degrees. 58 male/61 female. The diagnosis was made by heaving two or more positive tests performed as mentioned above, and referring to patients complains. Fourteen patients represent pinpoint corneal dye with fluorosceini, forty-six patients was positive to cotton swab test diminution of corneal sensitivity, eighty-nine patients was positive to Schirmmer test less than 10 mm, positive TBUT test less than 9 s was found to be the amount of seventy-one patients. Positive tear meniscus at inferior lid margin was found at fifty-six patients. Dry eye is a disorder of tear film because of tear deficiency or excessive tear evaporation which causes damage to the inter palpaberal ocular surface and is associated with symptoms of ocular discomfort. This ocular disorder is very common among general population with 28% of the adults having dry eye syndrome. Early diagnosis and timely treatment, complications as secondary microbial infection and corneal ulceration could be avoided. Conclusions: In our study the Dry Eye Syndrome showed to have a high correlation with Diabetes Mellitus Tip II (about 52

  11. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 8-12, 2015, Arlington, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The fiscal year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 6-10, 2016, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2016-10-01

    The fiscal year 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 6-10, 2015, in Washington, D.C.. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  14. Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

  15. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 28, Number 3, May-June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    possible choices or synthesis of a new option when none is satisfactory, and execution of the choice. Machine-learning algorithms address these tasks in...Research, accessed 18 January 2014, http://anthonylattanze.com/acdm . php . 18. Gulshan Luthra, “IAF Decides on 144 Fifth Generation Fighters,” India...Global Realities” (remarks at the 2011 AFRC Senior Leaders Conference, Washington, DC, 16 May 2011), http://european-security.com/n_index . php ?id

  16. Science & Technology Review October 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-08-21

    Livermore researchers won five R&D 100 awards in R&D Magazine's annual competition for the top 100 industrial innovations worldwide. This issue of Science & Technology Review highlights the award-winning technologies: noninvasive pneumothorax detector, microelectromechanical system-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, large-area imager, hyper library of linear solvers, and continuous-phase-plate optics system manufactured using magnetorheological finishing. Since 1978, Laboratory researchers have received 118 R&D 100 awards. The R&D 100 logo (on the cover and p 1) is reprinted courtesy of R&D Magazine.

  17. Daily earthquake forecasts during the May-June 2012 Emilia earthquake sequence (northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warner Marzocchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available On May 20, 2012, at 02:03 UTC, a magnitude Ml 5.9 earthquake hit part of the Po Plain area (latitude, 44.89 ˚N; longitude, 11.23 ˚E close to the village of Finale-Emilia in the Emilia-Romagna region (northern Italy. This caused a number of human losses and significant economic damage to buildings, and to local farms and industry. This earthquake was preceded by an increase in the seismicity the day before, with the largest shock of Ml 4.1 at 23:13 UTC (latitude, 44.90 ˚N; longitude, 11.26 ˚E. It was then followed by six other Ml 5.0 or greater events in the following weeks. The largest of these six earthquakes occurred on May 29, 2012, at 07:00 UTC (Ml 5.8, and was located 12 km southwest of the May 20, 2012, main event (latitude, 44.85 ˚N; longitude, 11.09 ˚E, resulting in the collapse of many buildings that had already been weakened, a greater number of victims, and most of the economic damage (see Figure 1. This sequence took place in one of the Italian regions that is considered to be at small-to-moderate seismic hazard [Gruppo di Lavoro MPS 2004]. Earthquakes of the M6 class have occurred in the past in this zone [Gruppo di Lavoro CPTI 2004], but with a much smaller time frequency with respect to the most seismically hazardous parts of Italy. […

  18. The Coast Artillery Journal. Volume 86, Number 3, May-June 1943

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-06-01

    FLYING MEN AND MEDICINE. By E. Osmun Barr, M.D. New York: Funk and Wagnalls Company, 1943. 243 Pages; Index. $2.50. Written for the prospective flyer...Standard Atlas of the World (Rand) 3.50 Reading I’ve Liked. Edited by Clifton Fadiman .. 3.00 Fun Encyclopedia 2.75 Bedside Esquire 1.69 The Mediterranean...they may be. The newer officer; the officer who cannot keep up with the regulations and new features of our rapidly expanding army; and the enlisted

  19. CERN takes part in the GE200.CH celebrations | 30 May - 1 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Come and discover the universe of CERN at the Mont Blanc rotunda during a weekend of celebrations marking the 200th anniversary of the arrival of the confederate troops at Geneva’s Port Noir.   CERN will also be taking part in the procession through the city centre from 2.30 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. on Saturday 31 May. Starting at the Parc des Bastions, the procession will pass through the Rues Basses and along the lake to the Port Noir. More information on this event here.  

  20. RE/SPEC Inc. technical support to the Repository Technology Program; Summary of activities for September 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report presents a summary of all RE/SPEC Inc. technical support activities to the Repository Technology Program (RTP) from September 1, 1988, through June 30, 1992. The RE/SPEC Inc. activities are grouped into the following categories: project management, project quality assurance (QA), performance assessment (PA), support of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) through technical reviews and general assistance, participation in the Department of Energy (DOE) International Program, and code evaluation and documentation.

  1. Report of Official Foreign Travel to Germany, May 16-June 1, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Mason

    2001-06-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and associated agencies have moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards over proprietary designs promoted as ''standards'' by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), to which DOE long ago made a commitment. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML: Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, Netscape, Oracle, and Sun, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During my May 2001 trip, I chaired the spring 2001 meeting of SC34 in Berlin, Germany. I also attended XML Europe 2001, a major conference on the use of SGML and XML sponsored by the Graphic Communications Association (GCA), and chaired a meeting

  2. Geothermal Technologies Office 2012 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-01

    On May 7-10, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office conducted its annual program peer review in Westminster, CO. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the office and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future office planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the office and to assess progress made against stated objectives. Project scoring results, expert reviewer comments, and key findings and recommendations are included in this report.

  3. User-Driven Workflow for Modeling, Monitoring, Product Development, and Flood Map Delivery Using Satellites for Daily Coverage Over Texas May-June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. S.; Frye, S. W.; Wells, G. L.; Adler, R. F.; Brakenridge, R.; Bolten, J. D.; Murray, J. J.; Slayback, D. A.; Kirschbaum, D.; Wu, H.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Schumann, G.; Howard, T.; Flamig, Z.; Clark, R. A.; Stough, T.; Chini, M.; Matgen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Intense rainfall during late April and early May 2015 in Texas and Oklahoma led to widespread flooding in several river basins in that region. Texas state agencies were activated for the May-June floods and severe weather event that ensued for six weeks from May 8 until June 19 following Tropical Storm Bill. This poster depicts a case study where modeling flood potential informed decision making authorities for user-driven high resolution satellite acquisitions over the most critical areas and how experimental flood mapping techniques provided the capability for daily on-going monitoring of these events through the use of increased automation. Recent improvements in flood models resulting from higher frequency updates, better spatial resolution, and increased accuracy of now cast and forecast precipitation products coupled with advanced technology to improve situational awareness for decision makers. These advances enabled satellites to be tasked, data products to be developed and distributed, and feedback loops between the emergency authorities, satellite operators, and mapping researchers to deliver a daily stream of relevant products that informed deployment of emergency resources and improved management of the large-scale event across the local, state, and national levels. This collaboration was made possible through inter-agency cooperation on an international scale through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Flood Pilot activity that is supported in the USA by NASA, NOAA, and USGS and includes numerous civilian space agency assets from the European Space Agency along with national agencies from Italy, France, Germany, Japan, and others. The poster describes the inter-linking technology infrastructure, the development and delivery of mapping products, and the lessons learned for product improvement in the future.

  4. Loglines. May - June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    history of supply support in Philadelphia weaves through several name and location changes during peace and war: equipping the Lewis and Clark...Troop Support Clothing and Textiles helps get blankets to those in need through the federal Homeless Support Program. Humanitarian Aid 12 DLA...more than $3 million, said Renee Fromberg, DLA Troop Support Clothing and Textiles program manager. “The blankets go to individuals Story by

  5. Geochemical features and effects on deep-seated fluids during the May-June 2012 southern Po Valley seismic sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Italiano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A periodic sampling of the groundwaters and dissolved and free gases in selected deep wells located in the area affected by the May-June 2012 southern Po Valley seismic sequence has provided insight into seismogenic-induced changes of the local aquifer systems. The results obtained show progressive changes in the fluid geochemistry, allowing it to be established that deep-seated fluids were mobilized during the seismic sequence and reached surface layers along faults and fractures, which generated significant geochemical anomalies. The May-June 2012 seismic swarm (mainshock on May 29, 2012, M 5.8; 7 shocks M >5, about 200 events 3 > M > 5 induced several modifications in the circulating fluids. This study reports the preliminary results obtained for the geochemical features of the waters and gases collected over the epicentral area from boreholes drilled at different depths, thus intercepting water and gases with different origins and circulation. The aim of the investigations was to improve our knowledge of the fluids circulating over the seismic area (e.g. origin, provenance, interactions, mixing of different components, temporal changes. This was achieved by collecting samples from both shallow and deep-drilled boreholes, and then, after the selection of the relevant sites, we looked for temporal changes with mid-to-long-term monitoring activity following a constant sampling rate. This allowed us to gain better insight into the relationships between the fluid circulation and the faulting activity. The sampling sites are listed in Table 1, along with the analytical results of the gas phase. […

  6. Temperature profile data from MBT casts from NAUKA and other platforms in a World-wide distribution from 18 June 1970 to 05 May 1989 (NODC Accession 0000229)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using MBT casts in a World-wide distribution from the NAUKA, AELITA, LESNOYE, and other platforms from 18 June 1970 to 05 May...

  7. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the DELAWARE from 10 May 1967 to 01 June 1967 (NODC Accession 7000769)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the DELAWARE from 10 May 1967 to 01 June 1967. Data were submitted by the National Marine...

  8. Current meter data from FIXED PLATFORMS as part of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) project from 15 May 1988 to 19 June 1989 (NODC Accession 9700014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 15 May 1988 to 19 June 1989. University of South Florida (USF) as part of the Tropical Ocean Global...

  9. Science & Technology Review September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-07-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Remembering the Laboratory's First Director - Commentary by Harold Brown; (2) Herbert F. York (1921-2009): A Life of Firsts, an Ambassador for Peace - The Laboratory's first director, who died on May 19, 2009, used his expertise in science and technology to advance arms control and prevent nuclear war; (3) Searching for Life in Extreme Environments - DNA will help researchers discover new marine species and prepare to search for life on other planets; (4) Energy Goes with the Flow - Lawrence Livermore is one of the few organizations that distills the big picture about energy resources and use into a concise diagram; and (5) The Radiant Side of Sound - An experimental method that converts sound waves into light may lead to new technologies for scientific and industrial applications.

  10. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    Effective September 26, 1991, Bechtel, with Amoco as the main subcontractor, initiated a study to develop a computer model and baseline design for advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology; prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design; and develop a process flow sheet simulation (PI-S) model. The baseline design, the economic analysis, and the computer model win be the major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide, and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction. for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. This report is Bechtel`s third quarterly technical progress report covering the period from March 16, 1992 through June 21, 1992. This report consists of seven sections: Section 1 - introduction; Section 2 - summary; Section 3 - carbon dioxide removal tradeoff study; Section 4 - preliminary plant designs for coal preparation; Section 5 - preliminary design for syngas production; Section 6 - Task 3 - engineering design criteria; and Section 7 - project management.

  11. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through May 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Johnson County is the fastest growing county in Kansas, with a population of about 560,000 people in 2012. Urban growth and development can have substantial effects on water quality, and streams in Johnson County are affected by nonpoint-source pollutants from stormwater runoff and point-source discharges such as municipal wastewater effluent. Understanding of current (2014) water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization is critical for the protection and remediation of aquatic resources in Johnson County, Kansas and downstream reaches located elsewhere. The Indian Creek Basin is 194 square kilometers and includes parts of Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. Approximately 86 percent of the Indian Creek Basin is located in Johnson County, Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, operated a series of six continuous real-time water-quality monitoring stations in the Indian Creek Basin during June 2011 through May 2013; one of these sites has been operating since February 2004. Five monitoring sites were located on Indian Creek and one site was located on Tomahawk Creek. The purpose of this report is to document regression models that establish relations between continuously measured water-quality properties and discretely collected water-quality constituents. Continuously measured water-quality properties include streamflow, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and nitrate. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during June 2011 through May 2013 at five new sites and June 2004 through May 2013 at a long-term site and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, bacteria, and other water-quality constituents. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physical properties to estimate concentrations of those constituents of interest that are not easily measured in real time

  12. Science & Technology Review November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K

    2002-09-25

    This months issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) High-Tech Help for Fighting Wildfires--Commentary by Leland W. Younker; (2) This Model Can Take the Heat--A physics-based simulation program to combat wildfires combines the capabilities and resources of Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories. (3) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory. (4) A view to Kill--Livermore sensors are aimed at the ''kill'' vehicle when it intercepts an incoming ballistic missile. (5) 50th Anniversary Highlight--Biological Research Evolves at Livermore--Livermore's biological research program keeps pace with emerging national issues, from studying the effects of ionizing radiation to detecting agents of biological warfare.

  13. Science& Technology Review November 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Science & Technology Review covers the following topics: (1) We Will Always Need Basic Science--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) When Semiconductors Go Nano--experiments and computer simulations reveal some surprising behavior of semiconductors at the nanoscale; (3) Retinal Prosthesis Provides Hope for Restoring Sight--A microelectrode array is being developed for a retinal prosthesis; (4) Maglev on the Development Track for Urban Transportation--Inductrack, a Livermore concept to levitate train cars using permanent magnets, will be demonstrated on a 120-meter-long test track; and (5) Power Plant on a Chip Moves Closer to Reality--Laboratory-designed fuel processor gives power boost to dime-size fuel cell.

  14. Evidence review of technology and dietary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, JoAnn D; Littlefield, Laurel A; Estep, Gary; Martin, Hope; Rogers, Toby J; Boswell, Carol; Shriver, Brent J; Roman-Shriver, Carmen R

    2010-12-01

    Diets high in fruit and vegetable consumption are associated with a decrease in chronic diseases. Dietary factors are linked to 4 of the 10 leading noncommunicable causes of death: cardiovascular disease, some cancers, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Accurately measuring dietary patterns has many challenges. Dietary intake measurement has traditionally relied on self-report instruments such as 24-hour recall, food record, and food frequency questionnaires to record consumption history. These methods have inherent limitations in detecting small but important changes in fruit and vegetable consumption patterns. Promising advances in technology have made more sophisticated techniques for recording dietary intake possible. Computers and Web-based programs, handheld personal digital assistants with cameras and telephone cards, smart phones, cameras, and video recorders options may reduce the burden of recording what has been consumed. Furthermore, technology-based methods of dietary assessment may provide a higher degree of reliability and validity in visually determining fruit and vegetable consumption, and additional study is warranted. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the evidence on the effectiveness of technology-based methods for dietary assessment, which included fruit and vegetable consumption. One hundred and eighty-seven articles published between 1998 and 2008 were initially identified. Fifteen met the study inclusion criteria and were evaluated by an interdisciplinary team using the Stetler Strength of Evidence Scale. Six technology-based methods for dietary assessment were identified. Findings from validity and reliability testing of technology-based methods are encouraging and need replication. Clinically important features offered through technology may reduce reporting burden and offer behavioral feedback to users. Methodologically sound, empirical research into using technology-based application for dietary assessment in a variety of

  15. Science& Technology Review October 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K S

    2002-10-01

    The October 2002 issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Applied Science Is a Hallmark of This Laboratory--Commentary by Hal Graboske. (2) Sending Up Signals for Genetic Variation--In situ rolling circle amplification promises to advance the detection and treatment of cancer and other diseases. (3) SiMM Is Anything But Simple--Modules of silicon microchannels and microlenses result in the smallest, most powerful, and least expensive laser diode pumps ever. (4) World's Most Powerful Solid-State Laser--A new design allows tremendous scaling up of solid-state laser power. (5) Stepping Up to Extreme Lithography--The next generation of computer chips can now be produced on a commercial scale. (6) Relief for Acute and Chronic Pain--New technology turns an ancient pain management method into a modern medical tool. (7)50th Anniversary Highlight--14 Energy and Environment: Understanding Our World--The Laboratory's energy and environmental research is an important adjunct to its core national security mission.

  16. Science& Technology Review October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-10-01

    The October 2003 issue of Science & Technology Review consists of the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Technologies from Collaborative Efforts--Commentary by Hal Graboske; (2) BASIS Counters Airborne Bioterrorism--The Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System is the first integrated biodefense system; (3) In the Chips for the Coming Decade--A new system is the first full-field lithography tool for use at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths; (4) Smoothing the Way to Print the Next Generation of Computer Chips--With ion-beam thin-film planarization, the reticles and projection optics made for extreme ultraviolet lithography are nearly defect-free; (5) Eyes Can See Clearly Now--The MEMS-based adaptive optics phoropter improves the process of measuring and correcting eyesight aberrations; (6) This Switch Takes the Heat--A thermally compensated Q-switch reduces the light leakage on high-average-power lasers; (7) Laser Process Forms Thick, Curved Metal Parts--A new process shapes parts to exact specifications, improving their resistance to fatigue and corrosion cracking; and (8) Characterizing Tiny Objects without Damaging Them--Livermore researchers are developing nondestructive techniques to probe the Lilliputian world of mesoscale objects.

  17. Evaluation of moisture sources for the Central European summer flood of May/June 2013 based on regional climate model simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kelemen, Fanni D.; Ludwig, Patrick; Reyers, Mark; Ulbrich, Sven; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy precipitation affected Central Europe in May/June 2013, triggering damaging floods both on the Danube and the Elbe rivers. Based on a modelling approach with COSMO-CLM, moisture fluxes, backward trajectories, cyclone tracks and precipitation fields are evaluated for the relevant time period 30 May–2 June 2013. We identify potential moisture sources and quantify their contribution to the flood event focusing on the Danube basin through sensitivity experiments: Control simulations are per...

  18. Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, R.H.

    2003-07-21

    In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to

  19. Mercury Plumes in the Global Upper Troposphere Observed during Flights with the CARIBIC Observatory from May 2005 until June 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Slemr

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric sections of flights with the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrumented Container observatory from May 2005 until June 2013, are investigated for the occurrence of plumes with elevated Hg concentrations. Additional information on CO, CO2, CH4, NOy, O3, hydrocarbons, halocarbons, acetone and acetonitrile enable us to attribute the plumes to biomass burning, urban/industrial sources or a mixture of both. Altogether, 98 pollution plumes with elevated Hg concentrations and CO mixing ratios were encountered, and the Hg/CO emission ratios for 49 of them could be calculated. Most of the plumes were found over East Asia, in the African equatorial region, over South America and over Pakistan and India. The plumes encountered over equatorial Africa and over South America originate predominantly from biomass burning, as evidenced by the low Hg/CO emission ratios and elevated mixing ratios of acetonitrile, CH3Cl and particle concentrations. The backward trajectories point to the regions around the Rift Valley and the Amazon Basin, with its outskirts, as the source areas. The plumes encountered over East Asia and over Pakistan and India are predominantly of urban/industrial origin, sometimes mixed with products of biomass/biofuel burning. Backward trajectories point mostly to source areas in China and northern India. The Hg/CO2 and Hg/CH4 emission ratios for several plumes are also presented and discussed.

  20. Exceptional sequence of severe thunderstorms and related flash floods in May and June 2016 in Germany - Part 1: Meteorological background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David; Kunz, Michael; Ehmele, Florian; Mohr, Susanna; Mühr, Bernhard; Kron, Andreas; Daniell, James

    2016-12-01

    During a 15-day episode from 26 May to 9 June 2016, Germany was affected by an exceptionally large number of severe thunderstorms. Heavy rainfall, related flash floods and creek flooding, hail, and tornadoes caused substantial losses running into billions of euros (EUR). This paper analyzes the key features of the severe thunderstorm episode using extreme value statistics, an aggregated precipitation severity index, and two different objective weather-type classification schemes. It is shown that the thunderstorm episode was caused by the interaction of high moisture content, low thermal stability, weak wind speed, and large-scale lifting by surface lows, persisting over almost 2 weeks due to atmospheric blocking.For the long-term assessment of the recent thunderstorm episode, we draw comparisons to a 55-year period (1960-2014) regarding clusters of convective days with variable length (2-15 days) based on precipitation severity, convection-favoring weather patterns, and compound events with low stability and weak flow. It is found that clusters with more than 8 consecutive convective days are very rare. For example, a 10-day cluster with convective weather patterns prevailing during the recent thunderstorm episode has a probability of less than 1 %.

  1. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Weeks Bay, Alabama (June 1990 - May 2000) (NODC Accession 0116469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: This dataset contains ten years of physical, chemical, and biological data collected during shipboard surveys in Weeks Bay, Alabama, between June 1990 and...

  2. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  3. Cutting-edge technology may yield elephants in Orphan basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, W.

    2006-10-15

    Controlled source electromagnetic survey (CSEM) technology may soon supply vital information to oil companies about Newfoundland's offshore basins. The technology shoots low-frequency electromagnetic signals at the sea-floor to measure resistivity. Natural gas, crude oil and water each have a particular strength to resist the power of an electromagnetic signal, and leave a unique signature. To collect data, the electromagnetic pulse emitter is towed back and forth over an area of seabed potentially holding hydrocarbons. Connected to the ship by a long tether, the emitter hangs approximately 30 to 50 m above the ocean floor, and reaches depths of 2.4 km. The sea floor has 36 receivers anchored to it in a grid of concrete blocks that dissolve within 3 months of installation. The test blocks are first dropped overboard to verify current speed and strength in order to calculate exactly where on the water's surface the concrete blocks will be lowered. The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (CNLOPB) has deemed the technology environmentally safe. Eight land parcels have now been leased for exploration in the Orphan Basin and are expected to receive approval for seismic and electromagnetic surveys. Industry players have shown unusual optimism about the basin's potential, which is estimated to contain 4 oilfields containing a billion barrels of oil each. 2 figs.

  4. Science& Technology Review September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-09-01

    This September 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''The National Ignition Facility Is Born''; (2) ''The National Ignition Facility Comes to Life'' Over the last 15 years, thousands of Livermore engineers, scientists, and technicians as well as hundreds of industrial partners have worked to bring the National Ignition Facility into being. (3) ''Tracking the Activity of Bacteria Underground'' Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, researchers at Livermore are gaining knowledge on how bacteria work underground to break down compounds of environmental concern. (4) ''When Every Second Counts--Pathogen Identification in Less Than a Minute'' Livermore has developed a system that can quickly identify airborne pathogens such as anthrax. (5) ''Portable Radiation Detector Provides Laboratory-Scale Precision in the Field'' A team of Livermore physicists and engineers has developed a handheld, mechanically cooled germanium detector designed to identify radioisotopes.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2014 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 16-20, 2014, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2014 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 16-20, 2014, at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  6. Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1978--May 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, C.W.

    1979-03-01

    The following document is a third-year progress report for the period June 1, 1978 to May 31, 1979. The overall objective of the project is to study the effects of seeding techniques, species mixtures, fertilizer, ecotypes, improved plant materials, mycorrhizal fungi, and soil microorganisms on the initial and final stages of reclamation obtained through seeding and subsequent succession on disturbed oil shale lands. Plant growth medias that are being used in field-established test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Because of the long-term nature of successional and ecologically oriented studies the project is just beginning to generate significant publications. Several of the studies associated with the project have some phases being conducted principally in the laboratories and greenhouses at Colorado State Univerisity. The majority of the research, however, is being conducted on a 20 hectare Intensive Study Site located near the focal points of oil shale activity in the Piceance Basin. The site is at an elevation of 2,042 m, receives approximately 30 to 55 cm of precipitation annually, and encompasses the plant communities most typical of the Piceance Basin. Most of the information contained in this report originated from the monitoring and sampling of research plots established in either the fall of 1976 or 1977. Therefore, data that have been obtained from the Intensive Study Site represent only first- or second-year results. However, many trends have been identified in thesuccessional process and the soil microorganisms and mycorrhizal studies continue to contribute significant information to the overall results. The phytosociological study has progressed to a point where field sampling is complete and the application and publication of this materials will be forthcoming in 1979.

  7. Ms Naledi G. Pandor Minister of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa Wednesday 22nd June 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    During a visit to CERN on 22 June, Naledi G Pandor, minister of science and technology for the Republic of South Africa, looked round the ATLAS visitor centre with Peter Jenni, former spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment. She also toured the LHC superconducting magnet test hall and the ALICE visitor centre.

  8. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  9. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1. Final technical report, 1 May 1991--10 May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS ``Eureka`` facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the ``Eureka`` facility to Chronar`s ``batch`` plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  10. Mental Health In-Service Program for Employed Long-Term Care Personnel. Final Report for May and June 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhrada, Julie

    Since June 1973, Iowa Lakes Community College (Iowa) has been conducting an in-service training program for employees of local nursing homes. The program was designed to upgrade the participants' knowledge of the mental health aspects of care for the aged and to improve their abilities to provide physical health care. The specific objectives of…

  11. 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held May 13-17, 2013, in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the FCTO and the VTO: a total of 287 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by a total of 187 reviewers. A total of 1,382 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE on the Office with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  12. A Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Report for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: May 23, 2014 -- June 5, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States); O' Grady, M. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Renfrow, S. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-09-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in Golden, Colorado, focuses on renewable energy and energy efficiency research. Its portfolio includes advancing renewable energy technologies that can help meet the nation's energy and environmental goals. NREL seeks to better understand the potential effects of climate change on the laboratory--and therefore on its mission--to ensure its ongoing success. Planning today for a changing climate can reduce NREL's risks and improve its resiliency to climate-related vulnerabilities. This report presents a vulnerability assessment for NREL. The assessment was conducted in fall 2014 to identify NREL's climate change vulnerabilities and the aspects of NREL's mission or operations that may be affected by a changing climate.

  13. Effect of vertical stability and circulation on the depth of the chlorophyll maximum in the Bay of Bengal during May-June, 1996

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, B.P.; Jyothi, D.; Shastri, P.N.M.; Supraveena, Y.

    A two-gyre circulation system consisting of an anticyclonic gyre (ACG) in the northwestern Bay of Bengal and a cyclonic gyre (CG) west of the Andaman Islands is shown by the hydrographic data collected during May-June, prior to the southwest monsoon...

  14. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004 New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996 Series Information:

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field chirp subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 1 May - 9 June, 1996. The coverage is...

  15. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004 New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996 Series Information:

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field chirp subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 1 May - 9 June, 1996. The coverage is...

  16. A comprehensive review on proppant technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main function of traditional proppants is to provide and maintain conductive fractures during well production where proppants should meet closure stress requirement and show resistance to diagenesis under downhole conditions. Many different proppants have been developed in the oil & gas industry, with various types, sizes, shapes, and applications. While most proppants are simply made of silica or ceramics, advanced proppants like ultra-lightweight proppant is also desirable since it reduces proppant settling and requires low viscosity fluids to transport. Additionally, multifunctional proppants may be used as a crude way to detect hydraulic fracture geometry or as matrices to slowly release downhole chemical additives, besides their basic function of maintaining conductive hydraulic fractures. Different from the conventional approach where proppant is pumped downhole in frac fluids, a revolutionary way to generate in-situ spherical proppants has been reported recently. This paper presents a comprehensive review of over 100 papers published in the past several decades on the subject. The objectives of this review study are to provide an overview of current proppant technologies, including different types, compositions, and shapes of proppants, new technologies to pump and organize proppants downhole such as channel fracturing, and also in-situ proppant generation. Finally, the paper sheds light on the current challenges and emphasizes needs for new proppant development for unconventional resources.

  17. 2013 Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office's Peer Review meeting.

  18. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

  19. Energy technology review, July--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy Technology Review'' gives the annual review of the programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This State of the Laboratory issue includes discussions of all major programs: Defense Systems; Laser Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Energy and Earth Sciences; Environmental Technology Program; Biomedical and Environmental Science; Engineering; Physics; Chemistry and Materials Science; Computations; and Administrative and Institutional Services. An index is also given of the 1991 achievements with contact names and telephone number.

  20. Gesture Recognition Technology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALLAVI HALARNKAR

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gesture Recognition Technology has evolved greatly over the years. The past has seen the contemporary Human – Computer Interface techniques and their drawbacks, which limit the speed and naturalness of the human brain and body. As a result gesture recognition technology has developed since the early 1900s with a view to achieving ease and lessening the dependence on devices like keyboards, mice and touchscreens. Attempts have been made to combine natural gestures to operate with the technology around us to enable us to make optimum use of our body gestures making our work faster and more human friendly. The present has seen huge development in this field ranging from devices like virtual keyboards, video game controllers to advanced security systems which work on face, hand and body recognition techniques. The goal is to make full use of themovements of the body and every angle made by the parts of the body in order to supplement technology to become human friendly and understand natural human behavior and gestures. The future of this technology is very bright with prototypes of amazing devices in research and development to make the world equipped with digital information at hand whenever and wherever required.

  1. [Diesel emission control technologies: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong; Weng, Duan; Zi, Xin-Yun

    2007-06-01

    The authors reviewed the researches on diesel emission control for both new engine technologies and aftertreatment technologies. Emphases were focused on the recent advancements of the diesel particulate filter (DPF) and the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x). In addition, it was explored for the future development in this field.

  2. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. May-June 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Edition Lieutenant Colonel Carlos Mezzano Chilean Army, Hispano-American Edition Lieutenant Colonel Hernan Vazquez Argentine Army, Hispano-American...Special Forces soldier said the Tali- ban he encountered used “ spider holes”—well-camouflaged shallow caves stocked with machine guns— that provided

  3. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army, May-June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Muhammad), Muslim history and literature, mathematics , and science. Many of the Islamic world’s greatest contributions to learning originated in...extremist ideology, the results will be extraordinarily dangerous. hundreds of thousands of students are matriculating through “dens of terror...Peninsula, and today they continue to justify and rationalize the Hundreds of thousands of students are matriculating through “dens of terror

  4. Potential pharmacological uses of chalcones: a patent review (from June 2011 - 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Maria João; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Saleta; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes

    2015-03-01

    Chalcones are one of the major classes of naturally occurring compounds. A large number of synthetic routes have been reported for the synthesis of chalcones, the most classical and general being the Claisen-Schmidt condensation. Chalcones and their derivatives have a huge importance in medicinal chemistry, displaying a wide range of important pharmacological activities. The authors provide an overview of the recent scientific reports describing the obtention and study of new chalcones. The review emphasizes the rationale behind the natural sources, the discovery, the design, the synthesis, the biological activities and the study of structure-activity relationships of the new chalcone derivatives. The article is based on the literature published from June 2011 - 2014 related to the development of this family of compounds. The patents presented in this review have been collected from multiple electronic databases including Scifinder, Espacenet and Mendeley. Although a great number of extracts containing chalcones have been published in bibliographic sources, the potential of this scaffold could be deeply studied in many different areas in which almost nothing has been described. A lot of work should be done to reach the potency and safety requirements needed to develop new chemical entities as new drugs.

  5. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, April, May, June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The Retort No. 18 burn was terminated on May 11, 1980. A total of 5547 barrels of shale oil or 46 percent of in-place resource was recovered from the retort. The EPA-DOE/LETC post-burn core sampling program is underway on Retort No. 16. Eleven core holes (of 18 planned) have been completed to date. Preliminary results indicate excellent core recovery has been achieved. Recovery of 702 ft of core was accomplished. The Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit application was submitted to the EPA regional office in Denver for review by EPA and Utah air quality officials. The application for an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit to authorize GKI to inject retort wastewater into the Mesa Verde Formation is being processed by the State of Utah. A hearing before the Board of Oil, Gas and Mining is scheduled in Salt Lake City, Utah, for July 22, 1980. Re-entry drilling on Retort No. 24 is progressing and placement of surface equipment is underway. Retort No. 25 blasthole drilling was completed and blast preparations are ongoing. Retort No. 25 will be blasted on July 18, 1980. The retort will be similar to Retort No. 24, with improvements in blasthole loading and detonation. US Patent No. 4,205,610 was assigned to GKI for a shale oil recovery process. Rocky Mountain Energy Company (RME) is evaluating oil shale holdings in Wyoming for application of the GKI process there.

  6. MIRAGE emitter improvements & technology review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Steven L.; Irwin, Alan; Oleson, Jim; Sparkman, Kevin; Gallagher, Anthony M.; Lin, William; Pan, Jianmei

    2001-08-01

    With the increased demand for IR sensor and surveillance systems, there is a growing need for technologies to support their operational readiness. Measurement of sensor characteristics such as sensitivity, MRTD, and dynamic range should be standard in all mission critical systems. The Real-Time Infrared Test Set (RTIR) is a portable system designed to provide in-the-field calibration and testing of IR imaging systems and seekers. RTIR uses the high volume manufacturing processes of the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) and the Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology to produce a Thermal Pixel Array (TPA). State-of-the-art CMOS processes define all the necessary on-chip digital and analog electronics. When properly driven, this array generates variable temperature,synthetic IR scenes. A nonuniformity measurement of several TPAs is presented.

  7. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  8. Hydrography, phytoplankton biomass and photosynthesis in shelf and oceanic waters off southeastern Brazil during autumn (may/june, 1983

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Pereira Brandini

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial distribution of chlorophyll-a, phytoplankton photosynthesis and nutrients were studied in relation to the hydrographic environment of the southeastern Brazil from May 3 to June 31 of 1983 during an oceanographia cruise conducted by the R/V "Almirante Saldanha" of the Brazilian Navy. Temperature and salinity at 5 meters depth ranged from 21 to 25º C and from 33.00 to 37.11, respectively. The concentration of nutrients varied, nitrate + nitrite-N from 1.0-3.0 µg-at/l, phosphate-P 0.1-0.9 µg-at/l and silicate-Si 5-25 µg-at/l. The chlorophyll-a concentrations along the coast varied from 0.35 to 1.48 mg/m³ with maxima in front of Paranaguá Bay (PR and over the southern shelf of Santa Catarina State. Low concentrations around 0.20 mg/m³ of uniform distribution were observed in shelf and off-shelf areas. Comparatively high concentrations were measured over the shelf break zone in front of Paranaguá Bay indicationg the occurrence of shelf break upwelling of deep nutrient rich waters. The pattern of vertical distribution was stratified and irregular in coastal stations and uniform in shelf and oceanic waters although some subsurface peaks were sometimes detected. The integrated chlorophyll values within the euphotic layer varied between 2.70 and 28.06 mg/m². The surface photo synthetic capacity varied from 0.4 to 7.7 mgC/mgChl.a/hr with higher values obtained in coastal areas.. The vertical distributions were variable in coastal areas and more uniform in mid-shelf stations. Sub-surface maxima of photosynthesis were detected in both nearshore and off-shore stations, and surface inhibition was not observed.Os padrões de distribuição espacial de parâmetros hidrográficos, clorofila-a e fotossíntese do fitoplancton são estudados em relação ao regime oceanográfico da região sueste do Brasil nos meses de maio e junho de 1983. A região oceânica foi totalmente dominada pela Agua Tropical da Corrente do Brasil (AT com caracter

  9. Science & Technology Review October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2005-08-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Important Missions, Great Science, and Innovative Technology--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) NanoFoil{reg_sign} Solders with Less Heat--Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now possible without furnaces, torches, or lead; (3) Detecting Radiation on the Move--An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts of radioactive material in transit; (4) Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond--A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than a minute with no false positives; (5) Picture Perfect with VisIt--The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists visualize and analyze large data sets; (6) Revealing the Mysteries of Water--Scientists are using Livermore's Thunder supercomputer and new algorithms to understand the phases of water; and (7) Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X Rays--Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial confinement fusion experiments and radiation-effects testing.

  10. Interconnects for nanoscale MOSFET technology: a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Chaudhry

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,a review of Cu/low-k,carbon nanotube (CNT),graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and optical based interconnect technologies has been done.Interconnect models,challenges and solutions have also been discussed.Of all the four technologies,CNT interconnects satisfy most of the challenges and they are most suited for nanometer scale technologies,despite some minor drawbacks.It is concluded that beyond 32 nm technology,a paradigm shift in the interconnect material is required as Cu/low-k interconnects are approaching fundamental limits.

  11. Interconnects for nanoscale MOSFET technology: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Amit

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a review of Cu/low-k, carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and optical based interconnect technologies has been done. Interconnect models, challenges and solutions have also been discussed. Of all the four technologies, CNT interconnects satisfy most of the challenges and they are most suited for nanometer scale technologies, despite some minor drawbacks. It is concluded that beyond 32 nm technology, a paradigm shift in the interconnect material is required as Cu/low-k interconnects are approaching fundamental limits.

  12. Exploring CHP: What It Is and How It Is Used (Webinar) – May 20 and June 17, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a two-part webinar. Part 1 provides information about the benefits of CHP systems and the state and federal policies and incentives that support their development. Part 2 describes the various CHP technologies and their applications.

  13. Fiber-optic technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A history of fiber technology is presented. The advantages of fiber optics are discussed (bandwidth, cost, weight and size, nonmetallic construction and isolation). Some aspects of the disadvantages of fiber systems briefly discussed are fiber and cable availability, fiber components, radiation effects, receivers and transmitters, and material dispersion. Particular emphasis over the next several years will involve development of fibers and systems optimized for use at wavelengths near 1.3 ..mu..m and development of wavelengths multiplexers for simultaneous system operation at several wavelengths.

  14. Science& Technology Review March 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2004-01-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) ''Rethinking Atoms for Peace and the Future of Nuclear Technology'' a commentary by Ronald F. Lehman II; (2) ''Rich Legacy from Atoms for Peace'' In 1953, President Eisenhower encouraged world leaders to pursue peaceful uses of nuclear technology. Many of Livermore's contributions in the spirit of this initiative continue to benefit society today. (3) ''Tropopause Height Becomes Another Climate-Change Fingerprint'' Simulations and observational data show that human activities are largely responsible for the steady elevation of the tropopause, the boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere. (4) ''A Better Method for Certifying the Nuclear Stockpile'' Livermore and Los Alamos are developing a common framework for evaluating the reliability and safety of nuclear weapons. (5) ''Observing How Proteins Loop the Loop'' A new experimental method developed at Livermore allows scientists to monitor the folding processes of proteins, one molecule at a time.

  15. 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geothermal Technologies Office

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal Technologies Office conducted its annual program peer review in April of 2013. The review provided an independent, expert evaluation of the technical progress and merit of GTO-funded projects. Further, the review was a forum for feedback and recommendations on future GTO strategic planning. During the course of the peer review, DOE-funded projects were evaluated for 1) their contribution to the mission and goals of the GTO and 2) their progress against stated project objectives. Principal Investigators (PIs) came together in sessions organized by topic “tracks” to disseminate information, progress, and results to a panel of independent experts as well as attendees.

  16. Energy & Technology Review, March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.; Van Dyke, P. [eds.

    1994-03-01

    This monthly report of research activities at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory highlights three different research programs. First, the Forensic Science Center supports a broad range of analytical techniques that focus on detecting and analyzing chemical, biological, and nuclear species. Analyses are useful in the areas of nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and law enforcement. Second, starting in 1977, the laboratory initiated a series of studies to understand a high incidence of melanoma among employees. Continued study shows that mortality from this disease has decreased from the levels seen in the 1980`s. Third, to help coordinate the laboratory`s diverse research projects that can provide better healthcare tools to the public, the lab is creating the new Center for Healthcare Technologies.

  17. Science & Technology Review December 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-10-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Homeland Security Begins Abroad--Commentary by John C. Doesburg; (2) Out of Harm's Way--New physical protection and accountability systems, together with a focus on security, safeguard nuclear materials in the Russian Federation; (3) A Calculated Journey to the Center of the Earth--Determining the permeability of partially melted metals in a mineral matrix unlocks secrets about the formation of Earth's core; (4) Wireless That Works--Communication technologies using ultrawideband radar are improving national security; and (5) Power to the People--Edward Teller envisioned safe and plentiful nuclear power for peaceful applications.

  18. Science & Technology Review March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2010-01-29

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Countering the Growing Chem-Bio Threat -- Commentary by Penrose (Parney) C. Albright; (2) Responding to a Terrorist Attack Involving Chemical Warfare Agents -- Livermore scientists are helping the nation strengthen plans to swiftly respond to an incident involving chemical warfare agents; (3) Revealing the Secrets of a Deadly Disease -- A Livermore-developed system helps scientists better understand how plague bacteria infect healthy host cells; (4) A New Application for a Weapons Code -- Simulations reveal for the first time how blast waves cause traumatic brain injuries; (5) Testing Valuable National Assets for X-Ray Damage -- Experiments at the National Ignition Facility are measuring the effects of radiation on critical systems; and (6) An Efficient Way to Harness the Sun's Power -- New solar thermal technology is designed to supply residential electric power at nearly half of the current retail price.

  19. Advanced space propulsion study - antiproton and beamed-power propulsion. Final report, 1 May 1986-30 June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forward, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    The contract objective was to monitor the research at the forefront of physics and engineering to discover new spacecraft-propulsion concepts. The major topics covered were antiproton-annihilation propulsion, laser thermal propulsion, laser-pushed lightsails, tether transportation systems, solar sails, and metallic hydrogen. Five papers were prepared and are included as appendices. They covered 1) pellet, microwave, and laser-beamed power systems for interstellar transport; 2) a design for a near-relativistic laser-pushed lightsail using near-term laser technology; 3) a survey of laser thermal propulsion, tether transportation systems, antiproton annihilation propulsion, exotic applications of solar sails, and laser-pushed interstellar lightsails; 4) the status of antiproton annihilation propulsion as of 1986, and 5) the prospects for obtaining antimatter ions heavier than antiprotons. Two additional appendices contain the first seven issues of the Mirror Matter Newsletter concerning the science and technology of antimatter, and an annotated bibliography of antiproton science and technology.

  20. Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, P.L.

    1977-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards implementing all of the prescribed studies and satisfying the stated objectives since the Oil Shale Rehabilitation Project was actively initiated in June 1976. Concurrent with implementation, research objectives were substantively defined and supplemented without distracting or departing from the original purpose. Current studies are designed to fill voids in the present status of knowledge regarding lands disturbed by an impending oil shale industry in Colorado. The efforts of all contributing investigators have therefore been integrated and directed toward the goal of developing methodologies requisite for restoring diverse and complex ecosystems which will require only a minimal amount of maintenance or input of scarce resources. An intensive study site southeast of the Oil Shale Tract C-a has been obtained through a Cooperative Agreement with the Bureau of Land Management. Following this agreement, most subprojects were initiated at the intensive site. Additional programs will be implemented as spent shale becomes available this summer. Studies conducted principally in the laboratory and greenhouse, such as the microbiological and plant genetic studies, have achieved significant results.

  1. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF PAEDIATRIC HEAD INJURY IN GANDHI MEDICAL COLLEGE BHOPAL FROM MAY 2011 TO JUNE 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinic pathological study of paediatric head injury was conducted in patients admitted in Gandhi medical college Bhopal during a period of 23 months from June 2011 to M ay 2013. This was done to assess various epidemiological parameters that influence that causation to trauma as well as the consequent morbidity and mortality in the paediatric age group. The study also included analysis of the paediatric age group head injury in relation to the age, sex, mode and type of injury. We also estimated differences in the incidence of recorded traumatic head injury by geographic area. Computerized tomography was done to diagnose the degree of the severity. Patients were classified by Glasgow coma scale and Scandinavian neurotrauma committee classification. It was found that 6 - 9 years of aged male patient with history of fall from height followed by RTA was the most common group. Closed injuries are more common and mostly associated with the orthopedic injuries. Chest infection is most common complication. Prognosis of open injury is better than closed

  2. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  3. IUTAM Symposium on Inelastic Deformation of Composite Materials Held in Troy, New York on 29 May - 1 June 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Applied Mechanics, Vol. 49, pp. 327-335. Frknond, M., and Fria &, A. , 1978. Analyse limite. Ccmparaison des mfthodes statique et cin&natique, C.R. Ac. Sc...Technology, C. Monra Branco and L Guerra Rosa, Eds., pp.659-676. Choo,V.K.S. and Hull,D.,1983,"Influence of Radial Compressive Stress Owing to

  4. Monitoring the natural attenuation of petroleum in ground water at the former naval complex, Operable Unit A, Adak Island, Alaska, May and June 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, R.S.; Simonds, F.W.; Defawe, Rose

    2005-01-01

    During May and June 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey installed monitoring wells and collected data to characterize the effectiveness of natural attenuation processes for remediating petroleum-contaminated ground water at Operable Unit A of the former Naval complex on Adak Island, Alaska. In addition, the evidence for petroleum biodegradation in ground water was evaluated at selected petroleum sites, plans for future natural attenuation monitoring were suggested for the selected petroleum sites, and the natural attenuation monitoring strategy for the Downtown area of Adak Island was reviewed and refinements were suggested. U.S. Geological Survey personnel measured water levels and collected ground-water samples from about 100 temporary boreholes and 50 monitoring wells. Most samples were analyzed on-site for concentrations of selected petroleum compounds and natural attenuation parameters such as dissolved oxygen, ferrous iron, and carbon dioxide. The U.S. Geological Survey evaluated the data on-site, selected new monitoring well locations, and installed, developed, and sampled 10 monitoring wells. The review and suggestions for the natural attenuation monitoring strategy focused on how to better achieve monitoring objectives specified in the Record of Decision for Adak Island petroleum sites. To achieve the monitoring objective of verifying that natural attenuation is occurring, the monitoring plans for each monitored natural attenuation site need to include sampling of at least one strategically placed well at the downgradient margin of the contaminant plume margin, preferably where contaminant concentrations are detectable but less than the cleanup level. Collection of natural attenuation parameter data and sampling background wells is no longer needed to achieve the monitoring objective of demonstrating the occurrence of natural attenuation. To achieve the objective of monitoring locations where chemical concentrations exceed specified cleanup levels, at least

  5. Science & Technology Review March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-01-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Seismic Science and Nonproliferation--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Sleuthing Seismic Signals--Supercomputer simulations improve the accuracy of models used to distinguish nuclear explosions from earthquakes and pinpoint their location; (3) Wind and the Grid--The Laboratory lends technical expertise to government and industry to more effectively integrate wind energy into the nation's electrical infrastructure; (4) Searching for Tiny Signals from Dark Matter--Powerful amplifiers may for the first time allow researchers to detect axions, hypothesized particles that may constitute 'dark matter', and (5) A Better Method for Self-Decontamination--A prototype decontamination system could one day allow military personnel and civilians to better treat themselves for exposure to toxic chemicals.

  6. A Review of Optical NDT Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang(Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 Korea); Rong-Sheng Lu; Gui-Yun Tian; Yong-Kai Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Optical non-destructive testing (NDT) has gained more and more attention in recent years, mainly because of its non-destructive imaging characteristics with high precision and sensitivity. This paper provides a review of the main optical NDT technologies, including fibre optics, electronic speckle, infrared thermography, endoscopic and terahertz technology. Among them, fibre optics features easy integration and embedding, electronic speckle focuses on whole-field high precision detection, inf...

  7. Advanced converter technology. Technical progress report, May 23, 1979-May 22, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banic, C. V.; Eckhouse, S. A.; Kornbrust, F. J.; Lipman, K.; Peterson, J. L.; Rosati, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to define an advanced converter system employing 1980's technology in all subsystem and component areas for use in electrochemical energy storage systems. Additional experimental effort will validate elements of the advanced commutation circuitry on a full-scale breadboard basis. Improved models of battery electrical characteristics are beng defined and experimental apparatus is being designed to measure these characteristics and to enable better definition of the battery-power conditioner interface. Improvement of energy-storage system performance through modification of battery converter characteristics will also be investigated. During this first year of the contract, a new more advanced concept for power conditioning based on a concept defined by United Technologies Corporation for fuel cell use was evaluated. This high switching frequency concept has the potential for significantly reducing the size and cost of battery plant power conditioners. As a result, the Department of Energy authorized redirection of the program to first evaluate this new concept and then to reorient the program to adopt this concept as the primary one. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  8. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Systems Management College, Volume 23, Number 3, DSMC 120, May-June 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The Medium is the Message; is planned in the near future to hide 769. Marshall McLuhan . (1 st Edition) New the technology when not in use. 4...Henry Marshall , Brenda Lawter and Debbie Laforme in front of the successfully initiated reuse activities Army Reuse Center exhibit. that have taken...observes that, his- torically, when a society’s stylized S// Similarly, Marshall McLuhan’s The behavior patterns become subject to S Medium is the Message

  9. Science and Technology Review, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1998-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on assuring our nationÕs security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the LaboratoryÕs scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publicationÕs goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  10. Science & Technology Review October/November 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  11. Science & Technology Review January/February 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  12. Science & Technology Review January/February 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  13. Science and Technology Review, December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1998-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on assuring our nationÕs security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the LaboratoryÕs scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publicationÕs goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  14. A Review of Optical NDT Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Optical non-destructive testing (NDT has gained more and more attention in recent years, mainly because of its non-destructive imaging characteristics with high precision and sensitivity. This paper provides a review of the main optical NDT technologies, including fibre optics, electronic speckle, infrared thermography, endoscopic and terahertz technology. Among them, fibre optics features easy integration and embedding, electronic speckle focuses on whole-field high precision detection, infrared thermography has unique advantages for tests of combined materials, endoscopic technology provides images of the internal surface of the object directly, and terahertz technology opens a new direction of internal NDT because of its excellent penetration capability to most of non-metallic materials. Typical engineering applications of these technologies are illustrated, with a brief introduction of the history and discussion of recent progress.

  15. Science & Technology Review September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2006-07-18

    This month's article has the following articles: (1) Simulations Help Plan for Large Earthquakes--Commentary by Jane C. S. Long; (2) Re-creating the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake--Supercomputer simulations of Bay Area earthquakes are providing insight into the great 1906 quake and future temblors along several faults; (3) Decoding the Origin of a Bioagent--The microstructure of a bacterial organism can be linked to the methods used to formulate the pathogen; (4) A New Look at How Aging Bones Fracture--Livermore scientists find that the increased risk of fracture from osteoporosis may be due to a change in the physical structure of trabecular bone; and (5) Fusion Targets on the Double--Advances in precision manufacturing allow the production of double-shell fusion targets with submicrometer tolerances.

  16. Science & Technology Review April 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-27

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Shaking the Foundations of Solar-System Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention--The first samples retrieved from a comet are a treasure trove of surprises to Laboratory researchers; (3) Fire in the Hole--Underground coal gasification may help to meet future energy supply challenges with a production process from the past; (4) Big Physics in Small Spaces--A newly developed computer model successfully simulates particle-laden fluids flowing through complex microfluidic systems; (5) A New Block on the Periodic Table--Livermore and Russian scientists add a new block to the periodic table with the creation of element 118; and (6) A Search for Patterns and Connections--Throughout his career, Edward Teller searched for mathematical solutions to explain the physical world.

  17. Arsenic accumulation in maize crop (Zea mays): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Garza-González, M T; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid that may represent a serious environmental threat, due to its wide abundance and the high toxicity particularly of its inorganic forms. The use of arsenic-contaminated groundwater for irrigation purposes in crop fields elevates the arsenic concentration in topsoil and its phytoavailability for crops. The transfer of arsenic through the crops-soil-water system is one of the more important pathways of human exposure. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, maize (Zea mays L.) is the most cultivated cereal in the world. This cereal constitutes a staple food for humans in the most of the developing countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Thus, this review summarizes the existing literature concerning the conditions involved in agricultural soil that leads to As influx into maize crops and the uptake mechanisms, metabolism and phytotoxicity of As in corn plants. Additionally, the studies of the As accumulation in raw corn grain and corn food are summarized, and the As biotransfer into the human diet is highlighted. Due to high As levels found in editable plant part for livestock and humans, the As uptake by corn crop through water-soil-maize system may represent an important pathway of As exposure in countries with high maize consumption.

  18. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation.

  19. Science & Technology Review March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Partnering to Enhance Americans Health--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Advancing the Frontiers in Cancer Research--Researchers at the University of California Davis Cancer Center and Lawrence Livermore are teaming up to fight cancer; (3) On the Leading Edge of Atmospheric Predictions--Continual research and development at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center help mitigate the consequences of toxic airborne hazards; (4) Climate and Agriculture: Change Begets Change--A Livermore researcher is using computer models to explore how a warmer climate may affect crop yields in California; (5) New Routes to High Temperatures and Pressures--With functionally graded density impactors composed of thin metal and polyethylene films, researchers can explore new areas of experimental physics; and (6) From Sound Waves to Stars: Teller's Contributions to Shock Physics--Edward Teller's interest in shock physics led to significant developments in both basic and applied science.

  20. A Literature Review of Spreadsheet Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    number of people from different backgrounds. This literature review presents an overview of research on spreadsheet technology, its challenges and its solutions. We also attempt to identify why software developers generally frown upon spreadsheets and how spreadsheet research can help alter this view....

  1. Refuge narrative report for May, June, July & August, 1949. Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge and Zahl, Clearlake, & Shell Lake Easements.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1944 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July & August, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period May - June - July - August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period May - June - July - August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July & August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1945 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuge in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July & August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1946 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1948 & Lake Zahl, Clearlake, & Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Narrative report for May, June, July and August 1944 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Narrative report May, June, July and August, 1962 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Waterfowl production areas - District IVA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on national/regional energy-environmental modeling concepts, May 30-June 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschard, R.L.; Haven, K.F.; Ruderman, H.; Sathaye, J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to identify and evaluate approaches to regional economic and energy supply/demand forecasting that are best suited to assisting DOE in the assessment of environmental impacts of national energy policies. Specifically the DOE Office of Technology Impacts uses models to assess the impacts of technology change; to analyze differential impacts of various energy policies; and to provide an early-warning system of possible environmental constraints to energy development. Currently, OTI employs both a top-down model system to analyze national scenarios and a bottom-up assessment conducted from a regional perspective. A central theme of the workshop was to address the problem of how OTI should integrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches. The workshop was structured to use the experience of many fields of regional analysis toward resolving that problem. For the short-term, recommendations were suggested for improving the current OTI models, but most of the comments were directed toward the development of a new methodology. It was recommended that a core set of related models be developed that are modular, dynamic and consistent: they would require an inter-industry accounting framework; inter-regional linkages; and adequate documentation. Further, it was suggested that an advisory group be formed to establish the appropriate methodological framework of the model system. With regard to data used in any policy analysis model, it was recommended that OTI develop and maintain an integrated system of economic, environmental, and energy accounts that is coordinated with the statistical agencies that collect the data.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on fusion reactor technology, April 1976 - June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-07-01

    This quarterly report consists of progress summaries of research conducted by the staff of Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). This reporting period includes progress made from April 1, 1976 through June 30, 1976. The summaries are presented in four major categories of: (1) fusion systems engineering, (2) material research and radiation environment simulation, (3) environmental effects of fusion concepts, and (4) manpower development. At the beginning of each section is a brief summary of the reports making up the section. The reports themselves have been kept relatively short and include preliminary results which ultimately are expected to be published elsewhere.

  19. Data Validation Package May and June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, August 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dick [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsosie, Bernadette [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from monitoring wells at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site to monitor groundwater contaminants as specified in the 1997 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Bluewater (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site Near Grants, New Mexico (LTSP). Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations 14(SG) and 21(M). Sampling originally scheduled for the week of May 11, 2015 was interrupted by heavy rainfall and later completed in June.

  20. Energy and Technology Review, August--September

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefcik, J A [ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review focuses on cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs)-one of the Laboratory's most effective means of technology transfer. The first article chronicles the legislative evolution of these agreements. The second article examines the potential beneficial effects of CRADAs on the national economy and discusses their role in the development and marketing of Laboratory technologies. The third article provides information on how to initiate and develop CRADAs at LLNL, and the fourth and fifth articles describe the Laboratory's two most prominent technology transfer projects. One is a 30-month CRADA with General Motors to develop advanced lasers for cutting, welding, and heat-treating operations. The cover photograph shows this laser cutting through a piece of steel 1/16 of an inch thick. The other project is a three-year CRADA with Amoco, Chevron-Conoco, and Unocal to refine our oil shale retorting process.

  1. Valve Technology Arrangement of Cryopump: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Y. Rajput

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A cryopump or a "cryogenic pump" is a vacuum pump that pumps the trap gases and vapours by condensing them on a cold surface. Helium gas which is very light can only be pumped by Cryopump. Cryopump cannot be used when working for continuous operation as it pumps the effluent till the saturation state is achieved. Then the absorbed gases are to be collected through other mechanical pump through regeneration process. Hence, valve technology arrangement is incorporated with the cryopump in order to achieve the continuous pumping when two cryopump are used in alternate processes (i.e. absorption and regeneration. Various design of Valve technology arrangement is proposed by different researcher all over the world. This review paper focuses on the different proposed valve technology arrangement and elaborately explains the various components of valve technology and concludes the best possible arrangement that can be used in Cryopump.

  2. Science & Technology Review July/August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for the months of July and August 2016, there are two features: one on Science and Technology in Support of Nuclear Nonproliferation, and another on Seeking Out Hidden Radioactive Materials. Then there are highlights are three research projects--on optics, plasma science, and the nature of neutrinos--along with a news section and patents and awards.

  3. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  4. Do Travellers Accept m-Health Technologies? A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallos, Parisis; Kolokathi, Aikaterini; Minou, Ioannis; Mantas, John

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to present if travellers accept the mobile healthcare (m-Health) technologies. The research was run on international scientific databases using certain keywords to cover the content of the review. From the online search results, 21 publications were selected which combine the "m-Health", "travellers" and "technology acceptance" topics. The majority of the papers are using the Technology Acceptance Model (or a variation of it) on their methodology. Only few papers discuss about the above three topics simultaneously. All of the publications highlight the acceptance of the mobile technologies by their users. Based on this, it can be assumed that travellers may accept the m-Health applications. Further investigation is needed on this subject to give more accurate results.

  5. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  6. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath. Final report, 8 May 1991-7 June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  7. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the Laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled multi-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CPAM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections), as follows. Theme 1: Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the Laboratory. Theme 2: Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution

  8. Medium energy nuclear physics research. Progress report for the period June 1, 1992 through May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Nuclear Physics Program continues to concentrate upon the use of the electromagnetic interaction in a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the study of nucleon and nuclear properties. During the past year the activities of the group involved data analysis, design and construction of equipment, planning for new experiments, completion of papers and review articles for publication, writing of proposals for experiments, but very little actual data acquisition. Section II.A. described experiments at Bates Linear Accelerator Center. They include the following: electrodisintegration of deuteron; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of {sup 3}He; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e{prime}p) cross section; transverse form factors of {sup 117}Sn; ground state magnetization density of {sup 89}Y; and measurement of the 5th structure function in deuterium and {sup 12}C. Section II.B. includes the following experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; separation of charge and magnetic form factors of the neutron and proton; measurement of the X-, Q{sup 2}, and A-dependence of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}; and analysis of 14.5 GeV electrons and positions scattered from gases in the PEP Storage Ring. Section III.C. includes the following experiments at NIKHEF and Lund: complementary studies of single-nucleon knockout and single-nucleon wave functions using electromagnetic interactions and single-particle densities of sd-shell nuclei. Section II.D. discusses preparations for future work at CEBAF: electronics for the CLAS region 1 drift chamber Section III. includes theoretical work on parity-violating electron scattering and nuclear structure.

  9. Medium energy nuclear physics research. Progress report for the period June 1, 1992 through May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Nuclear Physics Program continues to concentrate upon the use of the electromagnetic interaction in a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the study of nucleon and nuclear properties. During the past year the activities of the group involved data analysis, design and construction of equipment, planning for new experiments, completion of papers and review articles for publication, writing of proposals for experiments, but very little actual data acquisition. Section II.A. described experiments at Bates Linear Accelerator Center. They include the following: electrodisintegration of deuteron; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of {sup 3}He; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e{prime}p) cross section; transverse form factors of {sup 117}Sn; ground state magnetization density of {sup 89}Y; and measurement of the 5th structure function in deuterium and {sup 12}C. Section II.B. includes the following experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; separation of charge and magnetic form factors of the neutron and proton; measurement of the X-, Q{sup 2}, and A-dependence of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}; and analysis of 14.5 GeV electrons and positions scattered from gases in the PEP Storage Ring. Section III.C. includes the following experiments at NIKHEF and Lund: complementary studies of single-nucleon knockout and single-nucleon wave functions using electromagnetic interactions and single-particle densities of sd-shell nuclei. Section II.D. discusses preparations for future work at CEBAF: electronics for the CLAS region 1 drift chamber Section III. includes theoretical work on parity-violating electron scattering and nuclear structure.

  10. Health effects of synfuels technology: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanathanan, L.P.; Reilly, C.A.; Marshall, S.A.; Wilzbach, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    This document contains annotated synopses of available information pertinent to health impacts of synthetic fuel technologies under development, and identifies needs for further information. The report focuses on carcinogenesis, which appears to be a special problem with coal conversion technologies. This review is intended to serve as a reference for the NEPA Affairs Division of DOE in its evaluation of the overall synthetic fuel program and specific projects in the program. Updated versions of this document are expected to be prepared annually or semiannually as new information becomes available.

  11. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoniette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen

  12. Evaluation of moisture sources for the Central European summer flood of May/June 2013 based on regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Fanni Dora; Ludwig, Patrick; Reyers, Mark; Ulbrich, Sven; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy precipitation affected Central Europe in May/June 2013, triggering damaging floods both on the Danube and the Elbe rivers. A modelling approach with COSMO-CLM is used for a detailed analysis of the evolution of the event. Moisture flux, backward trajectories, evaporation and cyclone track analysis are evaluated for the relevant time period 30 May to 2 June 2013. The aim is to identify potential moisture sources and to quantify their contribution to the flood event in the Danube basin. Control simulations with undisturbed ERA-Interim boundary conditions and sensitivity experiments with modified evaporation characteristics are performed to estimate the role of moisture evaporated from different marine and land areas. The simulated cyclone tracks and upper level flow are compared against reanalysis. Simulated precipitation amounts are validated against E-OBS precipitation data. Two relevant cyclones are identified, which moved counterclockwise in a retrograde path from Southeastern Europe over Eastern Europe towards the northern slopes of the Alps. The control simulations represent the cyclone characteristics and tracks reasonably well. The evolution of the precipitation event in the simulations shows some minor differences to the Reanalysis in terms of its spatial and temporal characteristics. Our sensitivity experiment results provide evidence that the two main sources contributing to the event were the continental evapotranspiration (moisture recycling) and the North Atlantic Ocean. The Mediterranean Sea played only a minor role as a moisture source. This study confirms the importance of continental moisture recycling for heavy precipitation events over Central Europe during the summer half year.

  13. USGS field activities 11BHM01 and 11BHM02 on the west Florida shelf, Gulf of Mexico, May and June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, Paul O.; Daly, Kendra L.; Taylor, Carl A.; Barrera, Kira E.

    2014-01-01

    During May and June 2011 the (USGS), in cooperation with (USF), conducted geochemical surveys on the west Florida Shelf to investigate the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the northern Gulf of Mexico, specifically, the effect of ocean acidification on marine organisms and habitats. The first cruise was conducted from May 3 to 9 (11BHM01) and the second was from June 25 to 30 (11BHM02). To view each cruise's survey lines, please see the Trackline page. Each cruise took place aboard the Research Vessel (R/V) Weatherbird II, a ship of opportunity led by Dr. Kendra Daly (USF), which departed from and returned to Saint Petersburg, Florida. Data collection included sampling of the surface and water column with lab analysis of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) or total carbon dioxide (TCO2), and total alkalinity (TA). lLb analysis was augmented with a continuous flow-through system (referred to as sonde data) with a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor, which also recorded salinity and pH. Corroborating the USGS data are the vertical CTD profiles (referred to as station samples) collected by USF. The CTD casts measured continuous vertical profiles of oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence and optical backscatter. Discrete samples for nutrients, chlorophyll, and particulate organic carbon/nitrogen were also collected during the CTD casts. Two autonomous flow-through (AFT) instruments recorded pH and CO2 every 3-5 minutes on each cruise (referred to as AFT data).

  14. INGV strong-motion data web-portal: a focus on the Emilia seismic sequence of May-June 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Massa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available […] Recently, an INGV working group developed the first version of a web portal with the aim of archiving, processing and distributing accelerometric data recorded by permanent and temporary INGV stations. This web portal (www.mi.ingv.it/ISMD/ is composed of two main modules: the former is known as the INGV Strong Motion Data (ISMD, www.mi.ingv.it/ISMD/ismd.html/ and has as its main scope the analyse and distribution in quasi-real time (a few hours after event occurrence of the uncorrected accelerometric data, and the related metadata obtained after an automatic processing procedure. This latter, known as the Dynamic Archive (DYNA, http://dyna.mi.ingv.it/DYNA-archive/ is a dynamic database where manually post-processed accelerometric waveforms are provided, together with their metadata. Both of these archives are designed and structured in such a way that their compilations and updating will be almost completely automatic. At the end of May 2012, a first prototype of the ISMD module was published, providing the uncorrected strong-motion data recorded by the INGV stations for the main events of the Emilia seismic sequence. […

  15. Emerging Technologies Landscape on Education. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis de la Fuente Valentin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a desk research that analysed available recent studies in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning. The desk research is focused on work produced in the frame of FP6 and FP7 European programs, in the area of Information and Communication Technologies. It concentrates in technologies that support existing forms of learning, and also in technologies that enhance new learning paradigms. This approach includes already adopted and successfully piloted technologies. The elaboration of the desk research had three main parts: firstly, the collection of documents from CORDIS and other institutions related to TEL research; secondly, the identification of relevant terms appearing in those documents and the elaboration of a thesaurus; and thirdly, a quantitative analysis of each term occurrences. Many of the identified technologies belong to the fields of interactive multimedia, Human-computer Interaction and-or related to recommendation and learning analytics. This study becomes a thorough review of the current state of these fields through the actual development of R&D European projects. This research, will be used as a basis to better understand the evolution of the sector, and to focus future research efforts on these sectors and their application to education.

  16. Caustic waterflooding demonstration project: Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Third annual report, June 1978-May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, E.H.

    1979-12-01

    A caustic-enhanced waterflooding pilot test is being conducted in the Ranger Reservoir of the Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Evaluation of entrapment and entrainment caustic flooding in Ranger Zone cores was continued. The caustic-only (entrapment) core floods failed to demonstrate improved behavior. Based on the unfavorable results of all tests of the entrapment mechanism, further laboratory work and flooding in the pilot with caustic alone have been eliminated from the project's plans. Some of the year's caustic-salt (entrainment) core floods in contrast showed both substantial recovery and WOR improvement. The poorer overall entrainment core flood results obtained in the year may be due to the core material, a smaller preflush volume used or the crude oil employed. Core flood testing where sodium silicate is substituted for some of the sodium hydroxide, was continued. The primary set of caustic water-oil dehydration tests was completed. The test softening of produced waters was completed and the results evaluated; produced water softening was found to be an economically feasible alternative to the use of fresh water. The preflush injection facilities became operational in January 1979 with the pilot's preflush officially begun April 15, 1979. The alkaline injection facility was expanded in scope to permit use of both sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide; its completion in late 1979 is anticipated with the alkaline-salt injection scheduled to begin at that time. The base case reservoir simulator prediction of the pilot under continued waterflooding was completed. This prediction provided the base line from which incremental alkaline flood production will be determined, as the test has now been declared a qualified tertiary enhanced recovery project by DOE's Economic Regulatory Administration. Major well repair/redrill work continued to be necessary exceeding earlier increased cost estimates.

  17. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  18. Science and Technology Review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-08-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. Topics discussed in this August 1996 issue are: Keeping the nuclear stockpile safe, secure, and reliable; Molten salt takes the bang out of high explosives; Security clearances meet the electronic age; and Exploring oil fields with crosshole electromagnetic induction.

  19. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  20. Review: Security in Wireless Technologies in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarova, F. Y.; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    Wireless technology seems to be everywhere now - but it is still relatively in its infancy. New standards and protocols continue to emerge and problems and bugs are discovered. Nevertheless, wireless networks make many things much more convenient and it appears that wireless networks are here to stay. The differences and similarities of wireless and wired security, the new threats brought by mobility, the security of networks and devices and effects of security, or lack of it are shortly discussed in this review paper.

  1. Science and Technology Review April/May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L A

    2012-03-07

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Lawrence Livermore as the 'Go-To' National Security Laboratory - Commentary by Penrose (Parney) C. Albright; (2) Launching Traffic Cameras into Space - The Space-Based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris project is designing nanosatellites to more accurately determine the trajectory of space objects orbiting Earth; (3)An Improved Tool for Nuclear Forensics - Resonance ionization mass spectrometry provides rapid isotopic analysis for studying materials derived from nuclear events; (4) A Simple Way to Better Protect Soldiers against Head Trauma - A modest increase in the foam padding used in Army helmets could significantly reduce brain injuries; and (5) Shocking Aluminum for Greater Understanding - Experiments using a laser beam to hit a thin film of aluminum provide an unprecedented look into the physics of shock waves traveling through a metal.

  2. CERN Technical Training 2006: 'Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design' and 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE' course sessions, May-June 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Learning for the LHC! The next session of the course 'Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design' given in English by Doulos Ltd (UK) will take place at CERN from May 29 through June 2nd (5 days), for a maximum of 14 participants. It will be preceded by an optional, refresher session of the two-day course 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE', given on 23-24 May, in French, by Serge Brobecker of IT/DES. For more information, please visit the Technical Training CTA website, http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300, to consult the detailed course descriptions and to apply via EDH. Organiser: Davide Vitè / HR-PMD / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING technical.training@cern.ch

  3. Technical training: Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design' and 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE' course sessions, May-June 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    The next session of the course 'Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design'given in English by Doulos Ltd (UK) will take place at CERN from May 29 through June 2nd (5 days), for a maximum of 14 participants. It will be preceded by an optional, refresher session of the two-day course 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE', given on 23-24 May, in French, by Serge Brobecker of IT/DES. For more information, please visit the Technical Training CTA website, http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300, to consult the detailed course descriptions and to apply via EDH. Organiser: Davide Vitè / HR-PMD / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING technical.training@cern.ch

  4. Gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review. [US DOE supported

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The US Department of Energy gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review was held June 24 to 26, 1981, at Germantown, Maryland. Forty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  5. Evaluation of moisture sources for the Central European summer flood of May/June 2013 based on regional climate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanni D. Kelemen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Heavy precipitation affected Central Europe in May/June 2013, triggering damaging floods both on the Danube and the Elbe rivers. Based on a modelling approach with COSMO-CLM, moisture fluxes, backward trajectories, cyclone tracks and precipitation fields are evaluated for the relevant time period 30 May–2 June 2013. We identify potential moisture sources and quantify their contribution to the flood event focusing on the Danube basin through sensitivity experiments: Control simulations are performed with undisturbed ERA-Interim boundary conditions, while multiple sensitivity experiments are driven with modified evaporation characteristics over selected marine and land areas. Two relevant cyclones are identified both in reanalysis and in our simulations, which moved counter-clockwise in a retrograde path from Southeastern Europe over Eastern Europe towards the northern slopes of the Alps. The control simulations represent the synoptic evolution of the event reasonably well. The evolution of the precipitation event in the control simulations shows some differences in terms of its spatial and temporal characteristics compared to observations. The main precipitation event can be separated into two phases concerning the moisture sources. Our modelling results provide evidence that the two main sources contributing to the event were the continental evapotranspiration (moisture recycling; both phases and the North Atlantic Ocean (first phase only. The Mediterranean Sea played only a minor role as a moisture source. This study confirms the importance of continental moisture recycling for heavy precipitation events over Central Europe during the summer half year.

  6. Preservation technologies for fresh meat - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G H; Xu, X L; Liu, Y

    2010-09-01

    Fresh meat is a highly perishable product due to its biological composition. Many interrelated factors influence the shelf life and freshness of meat such as holding temperature, atmospheric oxygen (O(2)), endogenous enzymes, moisture, light and most importantly, micro-organisms. With the increased demand for high quality, convenience, safety, fresh appearance and an extended shelf life in fresh meat products, alternative non-thermal preservation technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure, superchilling, natural biopreservatives and active packaging have been proposed and investigated. Whilst some of these technologies are efficient at inactivating the micro-organisms most commonly related to food-borne diseases, they are not effective against spores. To increase their efficacy against vegetative cells, a combination of several preservation technologies under the so-called hurdle concept has also been investigated. The objective of this review is to describe current methods and developing technologies for preserving fresh meat. The benefits of some new technologies and their industrial limitations is presented and discussed.

  7. Loglines. May-June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    temporary shelters. Fighting Ebola 17 combat the Ebola virus in West Africa, providing building materials, personal protective equipment, maps...and Africa. As a regional environ- mental engineer, Delp helps write DoD’s hybrid of U.S. and host nation regulations that are unique to each...ways to acquire supplies and decide which is best time- and money-wise. “It’s not actually about writing contracts, although we can do that, but

  8. Loglines. May-June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    life cycle course, Contingency Operations, is delivered by DLA Training instructors Susan Guerrero and Kathleen Schulz at the DLA Disposition...or discuss how best to partner with the agency, they start at Susan Witek’s desk. “[We want] to provide our allies an opportunity to come and learn...They’ll see if the truck starts and look under the hood . From there, they’ll decide which ones they want.” In the past, DLA took a more passive

  9. Loglines. May-June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    effective logistics leader around the world, we prove that not only is our commitment firm in our long-standing warfighter support, but we are...DLA Energy awarded the contract to a Greek firm that supplied the fuels. Fuel pumping at the origin finished Dec. 28 as DLA Energy Europe and Africa...Magazine’s Unit of the Year award in recognition of the JLOC’s efforts during and after Hurricane Sandy “The retrograde from Afghanistan is one of the

  10. Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linville, B. (ed.)

    1982-10-01

    This report primarily covers in-house oil, gas, and synfuel research and lists the contracted research. The report is broken into the following areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction, processing, utilization, and project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are listed. (DLC)

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Radiation Protection Technician. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary radiation protection technician program is designed for use with courses 17-22 of thirty-five included in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians, and operators; and to assist planners,…

  12. Technology Review for Mobile Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliaras, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the technological advancement in mobile devices has made possible the development of hypermedia applications that exploit their features. A potential application domain for mobile devices is multimedia educational applications and modules. Such modules may be shared, commented and further reused under other circumstances through the…

  13. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical

  14. MHD air heater development technology. Technical progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Technology development for the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described. Work is being done under three tasks as described in the following. (1) materials selection, evaluation, and development: The objective of this task is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. The scope of the work will include compilation of materials data, materials selection for testing and design studies, materials property determination, liaison with refractory manufacturers and other organizations to encourage development of materials and fabrication technology, establishment of preliminary HTAH material specifications, analyses of test materials, and development of criteria for thermal stress limits for crack-tolerant refractory materials. (2) operability, performance, and materials testing: The objectives of this task are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. (3) full-scale design concepts: The objectives of this task are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. Progress is described. (WHK)

  15. Development and application of a permit information system for shale oil (PERMISSO). Final report appendix: summary sheets of regulations required for oil shale development, June 1978--May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This appendix is comprised of summaries of various governmental permits, licenses and other approvals required for oil shale development. The summaries were completed during the period June--October 1978, and are current as of July 1, 1978, although more recent authority was cited in some cases. One of the major purposes of Phase II of the project will be to update these summaries as statutes and regulations are added, changed or eliminated. This updating will be particularly important in the case of environmental permits and approvals. Many legislative and regulatory changes affecting environmental requirements are pending at this time and will alter many of the summaries herein. In addition, many regulatory proposals have been or likely will be challenged in the courts. When such conflicts are resolved further changes may be in order.

  16. Statistics of environmental events in China during period from May to June in 2012%2012年5-6月国内环境事件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安莹; 李生才

    2012-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the major environmental events in China during the period from May to June in the year 2012. These events are classified into six categories, i.e. dust weather, pollution accidents, earthquake, landslide and debris flow, draught, as well as other disasters. Total 8, 22, 45, 18, 6, and 47 major events are reported with their detailed statistics on the loss, places, and the nature of the events respectively. Causes are also listed which actually led to the 146 events.%简要统计了2012年5-6月国内发生的各种环境事件146起,包括沙尘天气8起,污染事件22起,地震45起,山体滑坡和泥石流18起,旱灾6起以及其他自然灾害47起.

  17. Synoptic water-level measurements of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Water levels for the Upper Floridan aquifer were measured throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama in May-June 2010. These measurements were compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study and conducted as part of the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Data were collected by personnel from the USGS Florida Water Science Center, Georgia Water Science Center, South Carolina Water Science Center and several state and county agencies in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama using standard techniques. Data collected by USGS personnel are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site-Inventory System (GWSI). Furnished records from cooperators are stored in NWIS/GWSI when possible, but are available from the source agency.

  18. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay;

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during the past decades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Various techniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packed bed, dividing-wall columns...... and reactive distillation were studied and reported in literature. All these techniques employ the conventional continuous counter-current contact of vapor and liquid phases. Cyclic distillation technology is based on an alternative operating mode using separate phase movement which leads to key practical...... advantages in both chemical and biochemical processes. This article provides a mini-review of cyclic distillation technology. The topics covered include the working principle, design and control methods, main benefits and limitations as well as current industrial applications. Cyclic distillation can...

  19. Science and Technology Review, September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Upadhye, R.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The feature articles are `Taking Lasers beyond the National Ignition Facility` and `Jumpin` Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen`. The first article describes the ultimate goal of laser fusion as the production of electricity by inertial confinement fusion. Advances in diode-laser technology promise to take another step closer to that goal. The latter article discusses a Laboratory team`s efforts to provide evidence for the metallization of hydrogen based on the team`s expertise in shock compression. A commentary on `The Next Frontiers of Advanced Lasers Research is provided, and a research highlight is given on `Modeling Human Joints and Prosthetic Implants.

  20. Conflict and fear over the impacts of science and technology may retard, or may hasten, societal progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Rapidly changing societal and individual values impact the course of man's future with accompanying conflict, tension and alienation. Conflict and fear over the impacts of science and technology may retard, or may hasten, societal progress. The broadening of the concept of equality of opportunity to an equality of outcome manifests itself by distributing the rewards of society based not on performance but simply on membership in the society. It is concluded that institutional failure caused by organizational and bureaucratic ineffectiveness inhibits change necessary for the solution of societal problems.

  1. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from the KNORR as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) from 18 May 1972 to 03 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7200809)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from the KNORR from 18 May 1972 to 03 June 1972. Data were collected by the Woods Hole Oceanographic...

  2. Zooplankton densities and other data from pump casts in the Atlantic Ocean (Georges Bank) from the OCEANUS and SEWARD JOHNSON from 11 June 1995 to 23 May 1997 (NODC Accession 0000515)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from the OCEANUS and SEWARD JOHNSON from 11 June 1995 to 23 May 1997. Data were submitted by the Bigelow Laboratory for...

  3. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit -40 W) as part of the Ocean Dumping project, 24 May 1990 - 17 June 1991 (NODC Accession 9300112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit -40 W) from May 24, 1990 to June 17, 1991. Data were...

  4. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 28 May 1982 - 04 June 1982 (NODC Accession 8300008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from May 28, 1982 to June 4, 1982. Data...

  5. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net and otter trawls from the BIG VALLEY as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 May 1976 to 30 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net and otter trawls from the BIG VALLEY from 20 May 1976 to 30 June 1976. Data were collected by...

  6. Physical and biological data collected with CDT, fluorometer, and SeaSoar aboard the ship WECOMA as part of Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) in the North Pacific Ocean from May 30 to June 16 2000 (NODC Accession 0000986)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and biological data collected with CDT, fluorometer, and SeaSoar aboard the ship WECOMA in the North Pacific Ocean from May 30 to June 16 2000. These data...

  7. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 May 1985 to 14 June 1985 (NODC Accession 8600336)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 20 May 1985 to 14 June 1985. Data were collected by the Battelle Marine Research Laboratory...

  8. MHD heat and seed recovery technology project. Tenth quarterly report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrick, M.; Johnson, T. R.

    1980-12-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the steam plant downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser, and of the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The primary effort of the HSR Technology Project at Argonne is directed toward experimental investigations of critical problem areas, such as (1) corrosion and erosion of refractories and metal alloys; (2) NO/sub x/ behavior in the radiant boiler and secondary combustor; (3) radiant boiler design to meet the multiple requirements of steam generation, NO/sub x/ decomposition, and seed-slag separation; (4) effects of solid or liquid seed deposits on heat transfer and gas flow in the steam and air heaters; (5) formation, growth, and deposition of seed-slag particles; and (6) character of the combustion gas effluents. These investigations are performed primarily in a 2-MW test facility, the Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL). Other project activities are related to studies of the thermochemistry of the seed-slag combustion gas system, and evaluation of seed regeneration processes. Progress is reported.

  9. Laser radar technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Quebec, Canada, June 3-5, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, James M.; Harney, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on laser radar technology and applications are presented. The topics considered include: eye-safe solid lasers for lidar applications, practical DF laser for ranging applications, ultrafast surface barrier photodetectors, performance analyses for peak-detecting laser radars, multiple scattering for laser beams propagating in a layered atmosphere, laser radar cross section of objects immersed in the earth's atmosphere, measurements of pulse coherence in mode-locked TEA-CO2 lasers, and single longitudinal mode operation of a continuously tunable high pressure TE-CO2. Also discussed are: amplitude-modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement, minilaser rangefinder, laser docking system radar flight experiment, improved optical resonator for laser radars, design of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers, HgCdTe photodiodes for heterodyne applications, acoustooptic spectrum analyzer for laser radar applications, laser cloud mapper and its applications, scanning lidar bathymeter for water depth measurement, and fluorescence lidar for land and sea remote sensing.

  10. A Review of Ultrasonic Nano Manipulation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhui Hu∗

    2016-01-01

    Nano manipulation technology has great potential applications in the assembly, measurement and fabrication of nano materials, actuating and high-sensitivity sensing of biological samples, manufacture of nano sensors, decontamination of air and water, etc. As an actuating technology which is far from being mature, the nano manipulation still faces lots of challenges in the device principles, design, scaling up, sample safety, etc. The ultrasonic nano manipulation, in which nanoscale objects are handled and actuated by controlled ultrasound, is an emerging technology to meet some of challenges in nano manipulations. The author’ s research team and other groups have proposed and realized a series of nano manipulation functions such as trapping, transfer, rotation and concentration since 2012, by controlled ultrasound. Compared with other nano manipulating techniques, the ultrasonic method has the merits such as very low temperature rise at the manipulation area, little selectivity to the material properties of manipulated samples, capability of being implemented on the substrates without MENS or NEMS structure, etc. This paper reviews the progresses in principles, functions, structures and characteristics of the ultrasonic devices for nano manipulations.

  11. Science & Technology Review October/November 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-11

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. The Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNS is a partnership involving Bechtel National, University of California, Babcock & Wilcox, Washington Division of URS Corporation, and Battelle in affiliation with Texas A&M University. More information about LLNS is available online at www.llnsllc.com. Please address any correspondence (including name and address changes) to S&TR, Mail Stop L-664, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551, or telephone (925) 423-3893. Our e-mail address is str-mail@llnl.gov. S&TR is available on the Web at str.llnl.gov.

  12. Survey of technology for hybrid vehicle auxiliary power units. Interim report, April 1994-June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, S.K.

    1995-10-01

    The state-of-the-art of heat engines for use as auxiliary power units in hybrid vehicles is surveyed. The study considers reciprocating or rotary heat engines, excluding gas turbines and fuel cells. The relative merits of various engine-generator concepts are compared. The concepts are ranked according to criteria tailored for a series-type hybrid drive. The two top APU concepts were the free-piston engine/linear generator (FPELG) and the Wankel rotary` engine. The FPELG is highly ranked primarily because of thermal efficiency cost, producibility. reliability, and transient response advantages; it is a high risk concept because of unproven technology. The Wankel engine is proven. with high power density, low cost and low noise. Four additional competitive concepts include two-stroke spark-ignition engine. two-stroke gas generator with turboalternator, free-piston engine gas generator with turboalternator, and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine. This study recommends additional work, including cycle simulation development and preliminary design to better quantify thermal efficiency and power density. Auxiliary concepts were also considered, including two which warrant further study: electrically actuated valves, and lean turndown of a normally stoichiometric engine. These concepts should be evaluated by retrofitting to existing engines.

  13. Heat Source Technology Programs. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.G. [comp.

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  14. 9 Waste Rubber Technologies Passed the Review on Advanced Applicable Technologies by MIIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiart Bozhang

    2012-01-01

    To promote the development of integrative utilization technologies of industrial solid wastes and to enhance the level of integrative utilization, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) held Reviewing Meeting of Advanced Applicable Technologies for the Integrative Utilization of Industrial Solid Wastes on April 27. 9 integrative utilization technologies of waste rubber passed this review.

  15. 78 FR 11902 - Review of Gun Safety Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... of Justice Programs Review of Gun Safety Technologies AGENCY: National Institute of Justice, JPO, DOJ...) is conducting a review of existing and emerging gun safety technologies and plans to issue a report... to help inform its technology assessment and market research of existing and emerging gun...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories corporate mentor program : program review, May 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibbetts, Tiffany; Tarro, Talitha; Dudeck, William; Bristol, Colette; Stephens, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Mentor Program provides a mechanism for the development and retention of Sandia's people and knowledge. The relationships formed among staff members at different stages in their careers offer benefits to all. These relationships can provide experienced employees with new ideas and insight and give less experienced employees knowledge of Sandia's culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. The program volunteer coordinators are dedicated to the satisfaction of the participants, who come from every area of Sandia. Since its inception in 1995, the program has sustained steady growth and excellent customer satisfaction. This report summarizes the accomplishments, activities, enhancements, and evaluation data for the Corporate Mentor Program for the 2003/2004 program year ending May 1, 2004.

  17. 76 FR 24065 - Board Workshop: June 6-7, 2011-Arlington, Virginia; the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD Board Workshop: June 6-7, 2011--Arlington, Virginia; the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Will Hold a Workshop on Methods for Evaluating Nuclear Waste Streams Pursuant to its...

  18. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, Ling [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markham, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yanan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Batan, Liaw [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.

  19. Viral shedding duration of pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus during an elementary school outbreak--Pennsylvania, May-June 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Achuyt; Villanueva, Julie; Palekar, Rakhee S; Fagan, Ryan; Sessions, Wendy; Winter, Jörn; Berman, Lashondra; Lute, James; Leap, Rebecca; Marchbanks, Tiffany; Sodha, Samir V; Moll, Mària; Xu, Xiyan; Fry, Alicia; Fiore, Anthony; Ostroff, Stephen; Swerdlow, David L

    2011-01-01

    We report shedding duration of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) virus from a school-associated outbreak in Pennsylvania during May through June 2009. Outbreak-associated students or household contacts with influenza-like illness (ILI) onset within 7 days of interview were recruited. Nasopharyngeal specimens, collected every 48 hours until 2 consecutive nonpositive tests, underwent real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and culture for pH1N1 virus. Culture-positive specimens underwent virus titrations. Twenty-six (median age, 8 years) rRT-PCR-positive persons, for pH1N1 virus, were included in analysis. Median shedding duration from fever onset by rRT-PCR was 6 days (range, 1-13) and 5 days (range, 1-7) by culture. Following fever resolution virus was isolated for a median of 2 days (range, 0-5). Highest and lowest virus titers detected, 2 and 5 days following fever onset, were 3.2 and 1.2 log(10) TCID(50)/mL respectively. Overall, shedding duration in children and adults were similar to seasonal influenza viruses.

  20. Theoretical physics department, june 96-may 98 status report; Service de physique theorique, rapport d`activite juin 1996 - mai 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-31

    This status report presents the work done at SPhT (service de physique theorique, CEA) from june 96 to may 98. The topics have been classified into 3 themes: - statistical physics, - mathematical physics and field theory, - astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. In the first theme relevant contributions have been made to phase transitions, correlated electronic systems, polymers, membranes, proteins, disordered systems and out of equilibrium processes. The second theme collects various works, some works dedicated to aleatory matrices and quantum chaos aim at developing investigation methods, other works like cord theories use these methods. As for the third theme, the recent discovery of the fluctuations of background cosmological radiation has fomented a great activity at SPhT. Mean field approximation and effective strength have been the starting point of research in the field of nuclear structure. High energy quantum chromodynamics has been applied to deep inelastic scattering where the proton structure is studied through electron-proton collisions. A list of all the publications made by SPhT is given. (A.C.)

  1. WHAT ARE USER PERSPECTIVES OF EXOSKELETON TECHNOLOGY? A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Deborah; Holloway, Catherine Sarah; Morgado Ramirez, Dafne Zuleima; Smitham, Peter; Pappas, Yannis

    2017-01-01

    Exoskeletons are electromechanical devices that are worn by a human operator to increase their physical performance. Several exoskeletons have been developed to restore functional movements, such as walking, for those with paralysis due to neurological impairment. However, existing exoskeletons have limitations with respect to affordability, size, weight, speed, and efficiency, which may reduce their functional application. Therefore, the aim of this scoping review is to collect and narratively synthesize the perspectives of users of exoskeleton technology. A systematic literature search was conducted across several healthcare related online databases. A total of 4,619 articles were identified, of which 51 were selected for full review. Only three studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, one showed an incongruence between users' expectations and experiences of device use; another reported perspectives on potential rather than actual device use, ranking design features in order of perceived importance; and the other reported ratings of ease of device use in training. The heterogeneity of studies included within this review, leave the authors unable to suggest consensus as to user perspectives of exoskeleton technology. However, it is apparent that users are able to suggest priorities for exoskeleton design and that users' perspectives of exoskeleton technology might change in response to experience of use. The authors, therefore, suggest that exoskeleton design should be an iterative process, whereby user perspectives are sought, incorporated and refined by tangible experience, to ensure that devices developed are acceptable to and usable by the populations they seek to re-enable.

  2. REVIEW OF EXISTING LCA STUDIES ON WASTE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    The EU research project “NEPTUNE” is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and focused on the development of new waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) for municipal waste water. The sustainability of these WWTTs is going to be assessed by the use of life cycle assessment (LCA). New life...... cycle impact assessment methods on pathogens, whole effluent toxicity and micropollutants will be developed within the project. As part of this work a review of more than 20 previous LCA studies on WWTTs has been done and the findings are summarised on this poster. The review is focused on the relative...... even more treatment trains/scenarios) have already been the subject of more or less detailed LCAs. All life cycle stages may be important and all impact categories (except stratospheric ozone depletion) typically included in LCAs may show significance depending on the actual scenario. Potential impacts...

  3. 76 FR 73595 - Healthcare Technology, Policy & Trade Mission: Mexico City, Mexico, May 13-16, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... trade media, direct mail, industry trade associations and other multiplier groups, and publicity at... International Trade Administration Healthcare Technology, Policy & Trade Mission: Mexico City, Mexico, May 13-16, 2012 AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. Mission...

  4. Testing Technology, June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getsch, B; Floyd, H L; Parrott, L; Van Arsdall, A

    1992-01-01

    This report highlights the following topics: Photon Correlation Spectroscopy--a new application in jet fuel analysis, Testing news in brief; Solar test facility supports space station research; Shock isolation technique developed for piezoresistive accelerometer; High-speed photography captures Distant Image measurements; and, Radiation effects test revised for CMOS electronics.

  5. Review of Economic Submissions to NICE Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshreef, Abualbishr; Jenks, Michelle; Green, William; Dixon, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The economic evaluation of medical devices is increasingly used to inform decision making on adopting new or novel technologies; however, challenges are inevitable due to the unique characteristics of devices. Cost-consequence analyses are recommended and employed by the English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme (MTEP) to help address these challenges. The aim of this work was to review the critiques raised for previous MTEP submissions and explore if there were common problems across submissions. We reviewed a sample of 12 economic submissions to MTEP representing 50 % of 24 sets of guidance issued to July 2015. For each submission, we reviewed the External Assessment Centre's (EAC) report and the guidance document produced by NICE. We identified the main problems raised by the EAC's assessments and the committee's considerations for each submission, and explored strategies for improvement. We found that the identification and measurement of costs and consequences are the main shortcomings within economic submissions to MTEP. Together, these shortcomings accounted for 42 % of criticisms by the EACs among the reviewed submissions. In certain circumstances problems with these shortcomings may be unavoidable, for example, if there is a limited evidence base for the device being appraised. Nevertheless, strategies can often be adopted to improve submissions, including the use of more appropriate time horizons, whilst cost and resource use information should be taken, where possible, from nationally representative sources.

  6. Trends in and contributions to entrepreneurship research: a broad review of literature from 1996 to June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luor, Tainyi; Lu, Hsi-Peng; Yu, Hueiju; Chang, Kuoliang

    2014-01-01

    This article, which began as an effort to gauge trends in and contributions to the broad field of "entrepreneur/entrepreneurship," reviews 5,476 academic articles on entrepreneurship that were published in 522 Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index journals from 1996 to June 2012. This survey identifies keywords and conducts a review to search for and identify related articles in the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science database. We then present our findings, including the number of publications by year, categorization of article types, main academic journals, authors, and most-cited articles. The citation counts for authors, journals, and articles are also analyzed. This study indicates that the number of articles related to the keyword entrepreneur increased from 1996 to the end of 2011, which is a sign of an upward trend in the influence of entrepreneurs. Entrepreneur research fascinated numerous scholars during the study period covering 16.5 years. In particular, researchers from the USA, England, Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands have made the most contributions to this field. This literature review provides evidence that the concept of entrepreneur attracted academic researchers, resulting in significant contributions to the field of entrepreneur research.

  7. A review of the use of information and communication technologies for dietary assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngo, J.; Engelen, A.; Molag, M.L.; Roesle, J.; Serra-Majem, L.

    2009-01-01

    Presently used dietary-assessment methods often present difficulties for researchers and respondents, and misreporting errors are common. Methods using information and communication technologies (ICT) may improve quality and accuracy. The present paper presents a systematic literature review describ

  8. A review of the use of information and communication technologies for dietary assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngo, J.; Engelen, A.; Molag, M.L.; Roesle, J.; Serra-Majem, L.

    2009-01-01

    Presently used dietary-assessment methods often present difficulties for researchers and respondents, and misreporting errors are common. Methods using information and communication technologies (ICT) may improve quality and accuracy. The present paper presents a systematic literature review

  9. Technologies for Foreign Language Learning: A Review of Technology Types and Their Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golonka, Ewa M.; Bowles, Anita R.; Frank, Victor M.; Richardson, Dorna L.; Freynik, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes evidence for the effectiveness of technology use in foreign language (FL) learning and teaching, with a focus on empirical studies that compare the use of newer technologies with more traditional methods or materials. The review of over 350 studies (including classroom-based technologies, individual study tools,…

  10. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Cindy; Rishworth, Josephine R; Brown, Julie; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2015-07-15

    As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex, and each ART cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step of the ART cycle is supported by good evidence from well-designed studies. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on procedures and treatment options available to couples with subfertility undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Published Cochrane systematic reviews of couples undergoing ART (in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation, for future inclusion.The outcomes of the overview were live birth (primary outcome), clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (secondary outcomes). Studies of intrauterine insemination and ovulation induction were excluded.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed by using the AMSTAR tool. Reviews were organised by their relevance to specific stages in the ART cycle. Their findings were summarised in the text and data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Fifty-nine systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library up to July 2015 were included. All were high quality. Thirty-two reviews identified interventions that were effective (n = 19) or promising (n = 13), 14 reviews identified interventions that were either ineffective (n = 2) or possibly ineffective (n = 12), and 13 reviews were unable to

  11. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Space Biology & Aerospace Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 3, May-June 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    in the opinion of a number of scientists [1, 4], ethical elements of personality are conceived at the early stages in life and remain virtually...manuscript received 28 Jul 86) pp 63-66 [Article by L. V. Serova] [English abstract from source] The place of embryological in- vestigations in...in preparing and conducting the first embryological experiment with mammals during a spaceflight aboard Cosmos-1514 biosatellite. For this

  12. Science and Technology Review December 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-11-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) High-Performance Computing for Energy Innovation - Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies - Projects using high-performance computing demonstrate Livermore's computational horsepower and improve the quality of energy solutions and the speed of deployment; (3) ARC Comes into Focus - The Advanced Radiographic Capability, a petawatt-class laser, can penetrate dense objects to reveal material dynamics during National Ignition Facility experiments; (4) A New Method to Track Viral Evolution - A sensitive technique developed at the Laboratory can identify virus mutations that may jump from host to host; and (5) Data for Defense: New Software Finds It Fast - Department of Defense warfighters and planners are using Livermore software systems to extract pertinent information from massive amounts of data.

  13. Highlights of the solar thermal conversion program. Semi-annual review, 30 April-2 May 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlayson, F.C.

    1975-07-01

    Overviews of the ERDA and Electric Power Research Institute program plans and the progress in the mission analysis study by the Aerospace Corporation are given. The total energy, distributed collector, surface technology, and central receiver studies are summarized briefly. Informal oral comments, recommendations, and conclusions of the Ad Hoc Review Committee relative to the information presented at the review are compiled. (LEW)

  14. Reviews of accelerator science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are a major invention of the 20th century. In the last eight decades, they have evolved enormously and have fundamentally changed the way we live, think and work. Accelerators are the most powerful microscopes for viewing the tiniest inner structure of cells, genes, molecules, atoms and their constituents such as protons, neutrons, electrons, neutrinos and quarks. This opens up a whole new world for materials science, chemistry and molecular biology.Accelerators with megawatt beam power may ultimately solve a critical problem faced by our society, namely, the treatment of nuclear waste and the supply of an alternative type of energy. There are also tens of thousands of small accelerators all over the world. They are used every day for medical imaging, cancer therapy, radioisotope production, high-density chip-making, mass spectrometry, cargo x-ray/gamma-ray imaging, detection of explosives and illicit drugs, and weapons. This volume provides a comprehensive review of this driving and fas...

  15. Brief communication: On-site data collection of damage caused by flash floods: Experiences from Braunsbach, Germany, in May/June 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudan, Jonas; Rözer, Viktor; Sieg, Tobias; Vogel, Kristin; Thieken, Annegret

    2017-04-01

    At the end of May and beginning of June 2016, several municipalities in Southern Germany suffered from severe flash floods and debris flows which have been triggered by intense rainfall in Central Europe. Overall, the insured losses of these events amounted to EUR 1.2 billion in Germany. Especially the strong and unexpected flash flood on May 29th in Braunsbach (Baden Wurttemberg) - a small village counting about 1,000 residents - attracted media and policymakers due to its devastating character. The understanding of damage caused by flash floods requires ex-post collection of relevant but yet sparsely available information, linking process intensities to damage by using adequate methods of data gathering. Thus, on-site data collection was carried out after the flash flood event in Braunsbach, using open source software as helpful and efficient tool for data acquisition and evaluation. A digital survey was designed and conducted by a team of five researchers who investigated all buildings affected by water and debris flows. The collected data includes an estimation of a particular damage class, the inundation depth, and other relevant information. A post - hoc data analysis was done with R 3.3.1 and QGIS 2.14.3, performing both, a Random Forest Model (RF) and Random Generalized Linear Model (RGLM) as well as preparing a Spearman's rank correlation matrix. For visual interpretation and better overview of the study area and analysis results, a "process intensity" map was created, revealing important links of damage driving factors. We find that not only the water depth, which is often considered as only damage driving factor in riverine flood loss modelling, but also the exposition of a building to the flow direction and susceptible building parts like e.g. shop windows seem to be risk factors in flash-flood prone regions. Although no significant correlations were found, the analyses indicate that also building material (i.e. half-timbered or masonry) and structural

  16. 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-11-01

    The 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2013 Building Technologies Office (BTO) peer review, which was held in Washington, D.C., on April 2–4, 2013. The review was attended by over 300 participants and included presentations on 59 BTO-funded projects: 29 from BTO’s Emerging Technologies Program, 20 from the Commercial Buildings Integration Program, 6 from the Residential Buildings Integration Program, and 4 from the Building Energy Codes Program. This report summarizes the scores and comments provided by the independent reviewers for each project.

  17. Studies in fusion reactor technology. Progress report, June 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Hydrogen permeation through first wall, radiolytic fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axtmann, R C; Perkins, H K; Noda, T; Fish, J D

    1976-01-01

    Two investigations are described that are pertinent to hydrogen hold-up and re-emission in the first wall of fusion reactors. The first employs existing theory to calculate the range distributions for light ions normally incident on metallic targets at energies of one to 20 keV. Three different statistical atomic potentials were used to approximate the interaction between a swift atom and a target atom. A surface correction to the theory of ion penetration was developed to account for the presence of a free surface in the target. The second study employed the diffusion equation to calculate the time dependent fluxes and concentration profiles of a gas originating at a planar source within a finite slab. The purpose of this procedure was to model the transport of gas implanted beneath a metal surface by the impingement of energetic, gaseous ions. Some studies on radiolytic fuel production are briefly reviewed. (MOW)

  18. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Physics and Technology of Amorphous SiO2 Held in Les Arcs, France on 29 June-3 July 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-03

    Physics and Technology of Amorphous SiO , held June 29-July 3, 1987, in Les Arcs, France"-T.p. verso . Includes bibliographical references and indexes. ISBN...practically unchanged. while that for the amor - 98 10’s phous shows a blue shift. 10 2.0x 16’s SI I _ - 2 3 4 PHOTON ENERGY (eV) 6 Fig. 3 Decay of the

  19. JMBR VOLUME 14 NO 1 - JUNE 2015.cdr- CORRESPONDENCE.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    JMBR: A Peer-review Journal of Biomedical Sciences. June 2015, Vol. 14 No. 1 pp 40 - ... 1Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Life. Sciences, University of ... medicinal plants, ornamentals, culinary applications, and are ...

  20. DOE project review Massachusetts Photovoltaic Program. Annual report, June 1989--July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is the third year of operations for work under the Cooperative Agreement between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Photovoltaic Center and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a collaborative effort with shared resources, the activity at the Photovoltaic Center and the University of Lowell Photovoltaic Program has continued to advance the utilization and implementation of photovoltaic-powered systems into society. The programs and activities developed over the past three years have supported strategies that cover both international utilization as well as domestic application. Three major areas of activities have centered around the following themes: (1) The identification of market opportunities to enlarge sales potential for the photovoltaic industry. (2) The development of a knowledgeable infrastructure to support PV diffusion in Massachusetts, in the United States, and around the world. (3) The analysis of the physical, economic, and regulatory environment in which PV must compete with mature energy technologies. This past year has been an experience of contrasts for the Photovoltaic Center. Projects and activities have resulted in the successful completion of programs goals.

  1. Science and Technology Review, April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D

    1999-04-01

    The following two abstracts are for the 2 feature stories in this issue of ''Science and Technology Review''. (1) ''Structural Biology Looks at the Ties That Bind''--Over the last five years, Lawrence Livermore has established a program in structural biology to further its work on DNA damage and repair processes. This new program supports a number of other newer projects as well, including the development of antidotes, detection systems, and countermeasures for minimizing the threat of exposure to biological warfare agents. Laboratories have been established for x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the only methods for obtaining high-resolution, three-dimensional data about individual molecules. This experimental structural biology work is supplemented by computational efforts in molecular modeling and protein prediction. (2) ''Duplicating the Plasmas of Distant Stars''--Livermore researchers are creating in the laboratory the same kinds of extremely hot plasmas found in distant stars. The experimental program, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories' pulsed-power facilities, focuses on cepheids (big pulsating stars), supernovae (the brightest objects in the universe), and stars that generate x rays through a process called accretion. A key aspect of the experiments is testing advanced Livermore atomic models--OPAL for the cepheid and supernova experiments and LXSS for the x-ray tests. The data from these experiments will help scientists better understand the birth and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the universe itself. The new experimental techniques, strengthened codes, and diagnostics developed for the tests are also helping the Department of Energy's Stockpile Stewardship Program keep the nation's aging nuclear weapons safe, secure, and reliable in the absence of nuclear testing.

  2. Energy & technology review, November--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L. [eds.

    1993-11-01

    For the 40-plus years of the Cold War, both the United States and the Soviet Union built up nuclear stockpiles of tens of thousands of weapons. Now, as the Cold War has ended and tensions between the superpowers have subsided, the US faces the task of significantly reducing its nuclear arsenal. Many thousands of nuclear weapons are being removed from the stockpile as a result of recent treaties and unilateral decisions. This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes the Laboratory`s role in the nation`s effort to dismantle these weapons safely and rapidly. The dismantlement of the United States` nuclear weapons takes place at the Department of Energy`s Pantex facility near Amarillo, Texas. The first article in this issue summarizes the Laboratory`s involvement in dismantling Livermore-designed nuclear weapons. LLNL (like Los Alamos) has responsibility for the weapons it designed, from design concept to retirement. In the past, the responsibilities ended when the weapon was retired from the stockpile. Now however, the role has been extended to include dismantlement. The second article reports on an incident that occurred in November 1992, in which the pit of a W48 warhead cracked during dismantlement. The Laboratory was called upon to handle the pit safely and determine the causes of the cracking. The third article explores a variety of methods proposed for reusing the high explosives after they are removed from the weapon. In the past, Laboratory work on nuclear weapons focused primarily on design and development. However, as the size and composition of the US stockpile changes with evolving international conditions, they will be called upon with increasing frequency to provide the scientific and technical expertise needed to dismantle the nation`s retired nuclear weapons safely and efficiently.

  3. The DTIC Review. Hybrid and Electronic Vehicles. Volume 4. Number 1, June 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    16. PRICE CODE Auxiliary Power Unit Four-Stroke HCCI Free-Piston Engine 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY...39 3. HCCI Engine With Pressure Relief........................ 42 V TABLE OF CONTENTS, CONT’D Section Page 4. High-Speed Detonation Engine ...may be difficult because of the high leakages around the large sealing surfaces and resulting poor compression at low speed. 41 3. HCCI Engine With

  4. Evaluation of moisture sources of the Central European summer flood of May/June 2013 based on an ensemble of regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Fanni D.; Ludwig, Patrick; Reyers, Mark; Ulbrich, Sven; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2015-04-01

    In May/June 2013, heavy precipitation hit Central Europe, triggering damaging floods both on the Danube and on Elbe basins. In this study, we perform a detailed analysis of the synoptic development of the event based on an ensemble of regional climate model simulations performed with the COSMO-CLM. Simulations are performed with reanalysis data boundary conditions in multiple set-ups and horizontal resolutions of 0.375° and 0.125°. In particular, the aim is to identify potential moisture sources, and how they contributed to the event quantitatively. A control simulation with undisturbed (reanalysis) boundary conditions and sensitivity experiments with modified evaporation characteristics are performed to distinguish the role of moisture evaporated from marine and land areas. To keep the structure of the simulations close to reality as possible, spectral nudging is applied on the upper level atmospheric wind fields. For all simulations, the synoptic situations and cyclone tracks are evaluated against an independent reanalysis dataset, and simulated precipitation amounts are validated against E-OBS precipitation data. In general, the upper level atmospheric characteristics, which trigger the cyclones, are similar in the simulations compared to the reanalysis. Moreover, the time evolution of the precipitation event is well simulated. Nevertheless there are some differences in the spatial and temporal distribution of the precipitation. In both, the reanalysis and the control simulation, the cyclones relevant for this event were moving westward (retrograde movement), counterclockwise from the Mediterranean region over Eastern Europe towards the northern slopes of the Alps. The pre-existing moist soil over East and Central Europe and the circulation associated with the cyclones contributed to intense evapotranspiration, and thus the westward propagating cyclones brought a lot of moisture along their tracks towards Central Europe. The sensitivity studies performed with

  5. 2nd Charles Richet et Jules Héricourt workshop: therapeutic antibodies and anaphylaxis; May 31-June 1, 2011, Tours, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The Charles Richet and Jules Héricourt workshops honor the memory of Jules Héricourt (1850-1938) and Charles Richet (1850-1935) who described the principle of serotherapy in 1888 and made the very first attempts to fight cancer with serotherapy in 1895. In 1902, Charles Richet and Paul Portier described "anaphylaxis," a discovery awarded the Nobel Prize in 1913. The first workshop, "Towards the clinical use of mAbs with higher cytolytic efficacy in cancer" was held in Tours, France on November 20-21, 2008. The second Charles Richet and Jules Héricourt workshop, held May 31-June 1, 2011 at the University of Tours, France, was also organized by the Cancéropôle Grand Ouest. The topic of the workshop was therapeutic antibodies and anaphylaxis, a subject rarely addressed in congresses focused on monoclonal antibodies. To have discussions about mAb side effects with complete objectivity, the congress was organized independently of any sponsorship from pharmaceutical companies. This academic event was motivated by the high incidence of shocks to cetuximab and the need to compile and evaluate scattered information. This growing public health concern was thus analyzed from different scientific and medical angles. The first session was devoted to acute infusion reactions, with an emphasis on deconvolution of the terms "cytokine-release syndrome," "cytokine storms," "anaphylaxis" and their epidemiology. This session concluded with the Charles Richet lecture on cetuximab anaphylaxis and anti-αGal IgE by Thomas Platts-Mills, its discoverer. In the next session, the involvement of anti-glycan antibodies in both anaphylaxis and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to therapeutic antibodies was discussed. A gala dinner was held in the gardens of the beautiful château of Villandry, which was acquired and restored by Joachim Carvalho, a pupil of Charles Richet's and great-grandfather of the present owner. The final session focused on strategies to prevent cetuximab anaphylaxis

  6. After the flood is before the next flood - post event review of the Central European Floods of June 2013. Insights, recommendations and next steps for future flood prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoenyi, Michael; Mechler, Reinhard; McCallum, Ian

    2015-04-01

    In early June 2013, severe flooding hit Central and Eastern Europe, causing extensive damage, in particular along the Danube and Elbe main watersheds. The situation was particularly severe in Eastern Germany, Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic. Based on the Post Event Review Capability (PERC) approach, developed by Zurich Insurance's Flood Resilience Program to provide independent review of large flood events, we examine what has worked well (best practice) and opportunities for further improvement. The PERC overall aims to thoroughly examine aspects of flood resilience, flood risk management and catastrophe intervention in order to help build back better after events and learn for future events. As our research from post event analyses shows a lot of losses are in fact avoidable by taking the right measures pre-event and these measures are economically - efficient with a return of 4 Euro on losses saved for every Euro invested in prevention on average (Wharton/IIASA flood resilience alliance paper on cost benefit analysis, Mechler et al. 2014) and up to 10 Euros for certain countries. For the 2013 flood events we provide analysis on the following aspects and in general identify a number of factors that worked in terms of reducing the loss and risk burden. 1. Understanding risk factors of the Central European Floods 2013 We review the precursors leading up to the floods in June, with an extremely wet May 2013 and an atypical V-b weather pattern that brought immense precipitation in a very short period to the watersheds of Elbe, Donau and partially the Rhine in the D-A-CH countries and researched what happened during the flood and why. Key questions we asked revolve around which protection and risk reduction approaches worked well and which did not, and why. 2. Insights and recommendations from the post event review The PERC identified a number of risk factors, which need attention if risk is to be reduced over time. • Yet another "100-year flood" - risk

  7. Opening speech annual meeting on nuclear technology 2013, 14 to 16 May 2013, Berlin, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueldner, Ralf [Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF), Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    and services are still in demand worldwide, despite phasing out nuclear power. In the exhibition you can convince yourself of the variety and quality of producers, suppliers, service providers, expert reviewers and the research in Germany, whether it's a world-famous company or a specialized, medium-sized business. Further proof of the quality is the national stress test for facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle. The internationally unique audit, regarding scope and depth, has also proven the safety level for Germany and all those involved can be proud of the convincing results. The general public is aware that nuclear technology will not be eradicated with the German phase-out and that competence must be maintained in Germany. In a representative survey by Forsa on behalf of the DAtF at the beginning of May 65 % of those interviewed estimated that the 'Energiewende' would not impress other countries that want to use nuclear power in the long term or encourage a phase-out. 89 % support the continued research regarding safety issues of nuclear power plants and nuclear waste disposal. So there is broad public consent to maintain our nuclear competences. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasonication and food technology: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ishrat Majid; Gulzar Ahmad Nayik; Vikas Nanda

    2015-01-01

    With increasing consumers demand and tightening of food and environmental regulations, traditional food-processing techniques have lost their optimum performance which gave rise to new and powerful technologies. Ultrasonic is a one of the fast, versatile, emerging, and promising non-destructive green technology used in the food industry from last few years. The ultrasound is being carried out in various areas of food technology namely crystallization, freezing, bleaching, degassing, extractio...

  9. A review of advanced manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, T.

    1981-03-01

    Joining techniques, hot forming technology, forging technology, investment casting, small cooling hole manufacturing, combustor technology, quality assurance, and chip forming machining of gas turbine engine components are discussed. Electron and laser beam welding; laser hard facing techniques; automatic TIG and plasma welding; diffusion brazing of titanium and nickel alloys; heated die forming: blow forming; superplastic forming; fan and compressor blade forging; and wheel and disk forging from powder superalloys are described.

  10. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Chih Chen; Shing-Han Li; Chien-Yi Li

    2011-01-01

    Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to ...

  11. Health technology assessment and the media: more compatible than one may think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivon, Myriam; Lehoux, Pascale; Rock, Melanie; Denis, Jean-Louis

    2012-05-01

    While the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) community has acknowledged the importance of public and consumer involvement in the HTA process, very few studies have examined how technology-related findings may be reported by the media to the broader public. This paper compares the content of press articles with the content of three Canadian HTA reports that respectively assess electroconvulsive therapy, first-trimester prenatal screening for Down syndrome, and prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer. We qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed 186 press articles addressing the same technologies. Our results show that beyond stylistic emphasis, there is an important overlap between media coverage of these technologies and the content of HTA reports. Findings also highlight shared interests on which both researchers and journalists could build to enhance the communication of health information to the public.

  12. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chih Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to clarify the extension of Technology Acceptance Model. Besides, the application areas are elaborated including electronic service, mobile data service, self-service technology, electronic learning and so on. Finally, the article concluded the conclusions and future research direction.

  13. Technology development multidimensional review for engineering and technology managers

    CERN Document Server

    Neshati, Ramin; Watt, Russell; Eastham, James

    2014-01-01

    Developing new products, services, systems, and processes has become an imperative for any firm expecting to thrive in today’s fast-paced and hyper-competitive environment.  This volume integrates academic and practical insights to present fresh perspectives on new product development and innovation, showcasing lessons learned on the technological frontier.  The first part emphasizes decision making.  The second part focuses on technology evaluation, including cost-benefit analysis, material selection, and scenarios. The third part features in-depth case studies to present innovation management tools, such as customer needs identification, technology standardization, and risk management. The fourth part highlights important international trends, such as globalization and outsourcing. Finally the fifth part explores social and political aspects.

  14. Biomarkers for Early Detection a nd Screening in Pancreatic Cancer Highlights from the “45 th ASCO Annual Meeting”. Orlando, FL, USA. May 29 - June 2, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hoimes

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the second most frequent gastrointestinal malignancy with an unabated mortality that reflects the advanced stage of presentation. Detection of early disease through screening likely is the best way to meaningfully prolong survival. The development of biomarkers for screening holds enormous promise for increasing early detection and impacting mortality. Many biomarkers have been studied including the serum protein carbohydrate antigen 19-9, vascular endothelial growth factor, and nuclear factor kappa B, however, still no blood test or other fluid analysis reliably predicts patients with disease. The authors review abstracts from the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Orlando, FL, U.S.A., that report evidence for early detection using a salivary biomarker array (#4630; a mucin epitope to PAM4 (#4613; a plasma nucleotide marker of hypoxia, miR-210 (#4624; and a cleavage product of complement pathway component C3b, iC3b (#4626. The meeting featured pancreatic cancer in over 100 research abstracts, of which, four are reviewed that focus on potential markers for early detection. When applied to a population of high risk patients, biomarkers of early pancreatic cancer could provide a minimally invasive way of identifying patients that require further evaluation using endoscopic tools. These molecular beacons may even be found to be sufficiently sensitive, specific, and cost effective to be applied to a broader population of patients.

  15. Review of Infrared Technology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de

    1993-01-01

    The use of infrared sensors in the Netherlands is substantial. Users can be found in a variety of disciplines, military as well as civil. This need for IR sensors implied a long history on IR technology and development. The result was a large technological-capability allowing the realization of IR h

  16. Book Review: English Language Learning and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaei, Abouzar; Motallebzadeh, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    This book is a very helpful book which gives us information and knowledge of using technology in language learning and teaching. It contains detailed consideration to articulatory and auditory Language learning as well as to the practicalities of English language learning. The book discusses the relationship between English language learning and technology

  17. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. Volume 89, Number 3, May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    American warrior accepts no difference in moral worth between those indigenous children who nag him for pens, soccer balls, and chocolates and their...Nation, Strong Army” strategy of the Meiji revolutionaries, the Co-Prosperity Sphere strategy of the 1930s and 1940s militarists, and the Yoshida

  18. Reviews of computing technology: Object-oriented technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeen, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    A useful metaphor in introducing object-oriented concepts is the idea of a computer hardware manufacturer assembling products from an existing stock of electronic parts. In this analogy, think of the parts as pieces of computer software and of the finished products as computer applications. Like its counterpart, the object is capable of performing its specific function in a wide variety of different applications. The advantages to assembling hardware using a set of prebuilt parts are obvious. The design process is greatly simplified in this scenario, since the designer needs only to carry the design down to the chip level, rather than to the transistor level. As a result, the designer is free to develop a more reliable and feature rich product. Also, since the component parts are reused in several different products, the parts can be made more robust and subjected to more rigorous testing than would be economically feasible for a part used in only one piece of equipment. Additionally, maintenance on the resulting systems is simplified because of the part-level consistency from one type of equipment to another. The remainder of this document introduces the techniques used to develop objects, the benefits of the technology, outstanding issues that remain with the technology, industry direction for the technology, and the impact that object-oriented technology is likely to have on the organization. While going through this material, the reader will find it useful to remember the parts analogy and to keep in mind that the overall purpose of object-oriented technology is to create software parts and to construct applications using those parts.

  19. Science and Technology Review, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-12-01

    Featured articles in this issue cover progress in these areas: Advancing Technologies and Applications in Nondestructive Evaluation; Atomic Engineering with Multilayers; Marrying Astrophysics with the Earth; Continuing Work in Breast Cancer Detection Technologies. Furthermore, this issue lists patents issued to and/or the awards received by Laboratory employees. It also includes an index of the contents of all the issues published in calendar year 1997.

  20. A Comparative Review on Car Parking Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    R.Ranjini; D. Manivannan

    2013-01-01

    Information technology embeds microchips and sensors within vehicles, traffic lights, roads and makes transportation system to communicate using wireless technologies. Intelligent transport system embodies several functionalities such as traffic monitoring, parking assistant, and vehicle monitoring by making the system smarter. Parking plays a vital role amongst them. Developing countries are facing major parking management problems. Most of the available parking methods do not satisfy the us...