WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology review may june

  1. Science & Technology Review May/June 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2008-03-19

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Biomedical Technology Has a Home at Livermore--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) Shaping the Future of Aneurysm Treatments--Livermore foam devices may offer significant advantages for treating some forms of aneurysms; (3) Ring around a Stellar Shell: A Tale of Scientific Serendipity--Using a three-dimensional model, Livermore scientists have solved a long-standing puzzle of stellar evolution; and (4) On Assignment in Washington, DC--Livermore personnel in Washington, DC, support federal sponsors and become valuable assets to Laboratory programs.

  2. Energy and technology review, May--June 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.C.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Highstone, H.; Kroopnick, H.; Sanford, N.M.; Spletter, M.

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes two powerful analytical tools that use ion-beam techniques to make contributions to an astonishing range of fundamental problems. We characterize these techniques -- accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and ion microbeam analysis -- under the common rubric of accelerator microanalysis. Each of these tools is used in disciplines ranging from anthropology to zoology. The rich diversity of applications is reason enough to dedicate an entire issue to these impressive tools. Most of the applications are already under investigation here at LLNL. One section in this issue explains how the high sensitivity of AMS offers the possibility of one day tailoring drugs to the needs of individual patients. Other articles describe the broad potential of AMS in environmental monitoring, so critical to the well-being of the public, and explain how it offers a precise timepiece that can help us understand our prehistoric past and, perhaps, one day help make accurate predictions for future global climate changes. The ion microbeam facility at LLNL may give the United States a competitive edge in advanced production techniques for microdevices. An article on the economic impact of microanalytical tools explains that other industries, too, may benefit during this era when we are facing tough competition from international markets. This is also an article on the history, development, and key advantages of AMS and ion microbeam analysis. Of prime importance for research is that they are nondestructive of many samples, allowing valuable (or irreplaceable) materials to be analyzed. These techniques also make it possible to study unique, small-sample experiments and may allow the first-time imaging of some living materials or functioning systems

  3. Energy and technology review, May--June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.C.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Highstone, H.; Kroopnick, H.; Sanford, N.M.; Spletter, M. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes two powerful analytical tools that use ion-beam techniques to make contributions to an astonishing range of fundamental problems. We characterize these techniques -- accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and ion microbeam analysis -- under the common rubric of accelerator microanalysis. Each of these tools is used in disciplines ranging from anthropology to zoology. The rich diversity of applications is reason enough to dedicate an entire issue to these impressive tools. Most of the applications are already under investigation here at LLNL. One section in this issue explains how the high sensitivity of AMS offers the possibility of one day tailoring drugs to the needs of individual patients. Other articles describe the broad potential of AMS in environmental monitoring, so critical to the well-being of the public, and explain how it offers a precise timepiece that can help us understand our prehistoric past and, perhaps, one day help make accurate predictions for future global climate changes. The ion microbeam facility at LLNL may give the United States a competitive edge in advanced production techniques for microdevices. An article on the economic impact of microanalytical tools explains that other industries, too, may benefit during this era when we are facing tough competition from international markets. This is also an article on the history, development, and key advantages of AMS and ion microbeam analysis. Of prime importance for research is that they are nondestructive of many samples, allowing valuable (or irreplaceable) materials to be analyzed. These techniques also make it possible to study unique, small-sample experiments and may allow the first-time imaging of some living materials or functioning systems.

  4. Science & Technology Review June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  5. Science & Technology Review June 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L A

    2012-04-20

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A New Era in Climate System Analysis - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Seeking Clues to Climate Change - By comparing past climate records with results from computer simulations, Livermore scientists can better understand why Earth's climate has changed and how it might change in the future; (3) Finding and Fixing a Supercomputer's Faults - Livermore experts have developed innovative methods to detect hardware faults in supercomputers and help applications recover from errors that do occur; (4) Targeting Ignition - Enhancements to the cryogenic targets for National Ignition Facility experiments are furthering work to achieve fusion ignition with energy gain; (5) Neural Implants Come of Age - A new generation of fully implantable, biocompatible neural prosthetics offers hope to patients with neurological impairment; and (6) Incubator Busy Growing Energy Technologies - Six collaborations with industrial partners are using the Laboratory's high-performance computing resources to find solutions to urgent energy-related problems.

  6. Science & Technology Review June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Safer and Even More Effective TATB - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Dissolving Molecules to Improve Their Performance - Computer scientists and chemists have teamed to develop a green method for recycling a valuable high explosive that is no longer manufactured; (3) Exceptional People Producing Great Science - Postdoctoral researchers lend their expertise to projects that support the Laboratory's missions; (4) Revealing the Identities and Functions of Microbes - A new imaging technique illuminates bacterial metabolic pathways and complex relationships; and (5) A Laser Look inside Planets - Laser-driven ramp compression may one day reveal the interior structure of Earth-like planets in other solar systems.

  7. Science and Technology Review, June 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eimerl, D

    1999-01-01

    The following two abstracts are for the 2 feature stories in this issue of ''Science and Technology Review''. (1) ''Forewarnings of Coming Hazards''--The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore is an emergency response organization chartered to aid Department of Energy and Department of Defense sites when radioactive or toxic material is released into the atmosphere. Developed from studies beginning in the 1960s, it became a funded operational program in the late 1970s. Using an emergency response modeling system now in its third generation, ARAC scientists predict how atmospheric releases that could affect public health and safety will disperse. The ARAC system has evolved through experience gained during regular training exercises and in over 160 alerts and emergency responses to date. The work of ARAC scientists described in the article demonstrates the different modeling challenges they encounter in preparing for and responding to a variety of atmospheric emergencies. (2) ''Unraveling the Mystery of Detonation''--Laboratory experts in the detonation of high explosives are putting the computational power of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) to the test. Their research centers on insensitive explosives, whose behavior during detonation is slower and more complex than that of sensitive explosives. The article features three research projects, which are exploring detonation from different angles: the initiation phase, the molecules produced during detonation, and further development of CHEETAH, a thermochemical detonation code. All research teams are using ASCI supercomputers, which have increased their ability to simulate the detonation process by a factor of 100,000

  8. Energy and technology review, June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.A.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.; Sanford, N.M.; Van Dyke, P.T. [eds.

    1993-06-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then other major programs have been added, including laser fusion and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense, and applied energy technology. These programs require basic research in chemistry, materials science, computer science, engineering and physics. This bulletin is published on a monthly basis to report on unclassified work in all of the programs. There are two articles in this issue. Herbert F. York reminisces about the early days in Livermore, emphasizing the legacy of E.O. Lawrence, and comments on the role of the Laboratory in the future. COG, a new,high-resolution code for modeling radiation transport is described. The code is a new Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code that solves complex radiation shielding and nuclear criticality problems. It is now available for high-speed desktop workstations as well as mainframes.

  9. Repository Technology Program: Technical progress report for the period May 29, 1986--June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This document reports the progress made in the 13-month period from May 29, 1986--June 30, 1987, on the development of a second geologic repository in rocks other than those being considered for a first repository. Subsequent periods will be covered in reports to be issued on a semiannual basis. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD), a prime contractor of the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Repository Technology Program (RTP) Office in the Repository Technology and Transportation Division (RTTD) of the Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR). The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the OWTD. 50 refs

  10. Science & Technology Review April/May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-03-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Leveraging the National Ignition Facility to Meet the Climate-Energy Challenge--Commentary by George H. Miller; (2) The Journey into a New Era of Scientific Discoveries--The world's largest laser is dedicated on May 29, 2009; (3) Safe and Sustainable Energy with LIFE--A revolutionary technology to generate electricity, modeled after the National Ignition Facility, could either be a pure fusion energy source or combine the best of fusion and fission energy; (4) A Simulated Rehearsal for Battle--Livermore's Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation is the most widely used tactical model in the world; (5) Improving Catalysis with a 'Noble' Material--By infusing carbon aerogels with platinum, researchers have produced a more affordable and efficient catalytic material; and (6) A Time Machine for Fast Neutrons--A new, robust time-projection chamber that provides directional detection of fast neutrons could greatly improve search methods for nuclear materials.

  11. Science and Technology Review April/May 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-03-03

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the focus is on science and technology research to ensure the nation's security. That expertise is also applied to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight time a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for April/May 2011, the features are 'Dealing with the Nonlinear Battlefield' and 'From Video to Knowledge.' Research highlights are 'Kinetic Models Predict Biofuel Efficiency,' Going Deep with MEGa-Rays' and 'Energy on Demand.'

  12. "small ACCELERATORS" 24 May - 2 June 2005

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    CERN Accelerator School and Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) Groningen, the Netherlands announce a course on "Small Accelerators", Hotel Golden Tulip Drenthe, Zeegse, the Netherlands, 24 May - 2 June 2005. This specialised course is dedicated to the physics and the main applications of small accelerators. The course will review the different accelerator types as well as their specificities in terms of accelerator physics.

  13. Comparison of conventional technology and radiation technology. Final report for the period 1 June 1988 - 31 May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.

    1989-01-01

    The project consisted of three parts in which comparison of conventional technology and radiation technology of composite materials was aimed, in the field of impregnated wood-plastics, wood fiber reinforced/filled plastics and UV and EB coated wood products. The report includes 4 papers presented at different meetings. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  15. PVMaT Improvements in the BP Solarex Photovoltaic Module Manufacturing Technology: Annual Report, May 5, 1999 - June 15, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Shea, S. (BP Solarex)

    2001-03-12

    This is the annual report for a 3-year PV program to continue to advance BP Solarex photovoltaic manufacturing technologies to design and implement a process that produces polycrystalline silicon PV modules that can be sold profitably for $2.00 per peak watt or less, and which increases the production capacity of the Frederick plant to at least 25 megawatts per year. The accomplishments discussed in this report include: (1) developed processes to produce high-purity SiF4 gas from a number of available commercial sources; (2) designed and implemented a new control system for casting; (3) verified relationship between higher minority-carrier lifetime in cast Si and cell efficiency; tracking material quality by measuring minority-carrier lifetime for each production casting; (4) reduced the wire-saw pitch to 450 microns with no loss in downstream yield; (5) demonstrated 8% improvement in average cell power on pre-production trial lots using PECVD silicon nitride; (6) developed a new EVA formation and demonstrated a 6-minute process to achieve adequate cure of PV modules in standard lamination equipment; (7) designed, purchased, and installed a new automated assembly line for large-area modules; and (8) implemented a factory-wide data collection and tracking system; production volumes and performance parameters are now monitored in real time through the local area network.

  16. Activity report june 1996 - may 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the scientific activity of the ''Service de Physique Theorique'' (SPhT), during the period june 1996-may 1998: activity in terms of structure, scientific research programs and results, publications, training and contracts. SPhT is one of the service of the ''Direction des Sciences de la Matiere'' (DSM), itself depending of the CEA Institution. The scientific domains covered by this report are: the statistical physics (phase transition, biophysics, soft matter, quantum systems); mathematical physics and fields theory (strings theory, random matrix, quantum theory); astrophysics, nuclear physics and particles physics. (A.L.B.)

  17. Activity report june 1998 - may 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the scientific activity of the ''Service de Physique Theorique'' (SPhT), during the period june 1998-may 2000: activity in terms of structure, scientific research programs and results, publications, training and contracts. SPhT is one of the service of the ''Direction des Sciences de la Matiere'' (DSM), itself depending of the CEA Institution. The scientific domains covered by this report are: the quantum field theory and mathematical physics (phase transitions, integrable systems, random matrix, gravity and strings, quantum chaos and dynamical systems, correlation and super-correlation); nuclear physics, particle physics and astrophysics (quantum chromodynamics, physic beyond the standard model, the early Universe, from cosmic microwave background anisotropies to galaxies); statistical physics and condensed matter (statistical physics and models, spin glasses, quantum systems, soft condensed matter and biological physics). (A.L.B.)

  18. ID brief news May/June

    CERN Multimedia

    Stapnes, S

    The SCT group passed an important milestone at the end of May when the barrel system was reviewed. Test-results of irradiated barrel hybrids and modules, and of a system of modules were presented. The noise levels in the system remain at a level similar to those measured for single modules. The efficiencies measured on single modules remain high even after irradiation to 3 x 1014 protons/cm2 corresponding to ten years of operation at the LHC. The SCT barrel community is now moving towards production with the SCT Frond End ASIC Production Readiness Review early July as the remaining step before all barrel module components are into full production. The modules consist of 4 silicon p,n detectors with 80um pitch, a thermal baseplate and a wrap-around hybrid bridged across the front and back of the module. The upper set of detectors on each module is rotated by 40mrad to provide stereo information. The picture shows 15 modules in the systemtest at CERN, mounted on a barrel structure. The four barrel productio...

  19. Monthly energy review, June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This is the June report by the Energy Information Administration. The contents of the report include an energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Included are appendices containing thermal conversion factors, metric and other physical conversion factors, and carbon dioxide emission factors for coal.

  20. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer technology. Final report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1996-02-01

    Genetic manipulation of plants often involves the introduction of homologous or partly homologous genes. Ectropic introduction of homologous sequences into plant genomes may trigger epigenetic changes, making expression of the genes unpredictable. The main project objective was to examine the feasibility of using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer for homologous gene targeting in plants.

  1. Optical Memory Technology Review Held in Gaithersburg, Maryland on June 11 - 12, 1986. Volume 1. Presentation Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    session, in addition to the list of OMTR participants. Review Organizer Local Coordinator Roman Fedorak Jean Freedman Code 5023 Room A61, Bldg. 225 Naval...the US Department of Defense and Federal government. Thank you for your participation. Review Organizer Local Coordinator Roman Fedorak Jean Freedman...Coordinator Roman Fedorak Ms. Jean Freedman Code 5023 Room A61, Bldg. 225 Naval Air Development Center National Bureau of Standards Warminster, PA 18974-5000

  2. Plant materials program. Progress report, June 1980-May 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.; Cubicciotti, D.; Fox, M.; Giannuzzi, A.; Gilman, J.; Jones, R.; McIlree, A.

    1981-11-01

    This is the first annual progress report of the Plant Materials Subprogram, which was organized in May 1980 to address corrosion-related materials problems in light water reactors. The first section of the report provides an overview of plant materials problems which have a high impact on plant availability. These include pipe and pressure vessel cracking, condenser leakage, turbine disc cracking, and steam generator tube denting and cracking. The status and goals of research and development work related to each of these problems are reviewed briefly. Subsequent report sections provide more detailed reviews of significant progress in the relevant technical topic areas: intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; environmentally-assisted cracking of carbon and low alloy steels; intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-base alloys; and improved fabrication technology

  3. Plant Materials Program: progress June 1981 to May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.; Cubicciotti, D.; Fox, M.; Giannuzzi, A.; Gilman, J.; Jones, R.

    1983-02-01

    This is the second annual progress report of the Plant Materials Subprogram, which was organized in May 1980 to address corrosion-related materials problems in light water reactors. The first section of the report provides an overview of plant materials problems which have a high impact on plant availability. These include pipe and pressure vessel cracking, condenser leakage, turbine disc cracking, steam geerator tube attack and cracking, and cracking of nickel alloy springs, beams and pins. The status and goals of research and development work related to each of these problems are reviewed briefly. Subsequent report sections provide more detailed reviews of significant progress in the relevant technical topic areas: intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; environmentally-assisted cracking of carbon and low alloy steels; intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-base alloys; and improved fabrication technology

  4. Plant Materials Program: progress June 1981-May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.; Cubicciotti, D.; Fox, M.; Giannuzzi, A.; Gilman, J.; Jones, R.

    1983-02-01

    This is the second annual progress report of the Plant Materials Subprogram, which was organized in May 1980 to address corrosion-related materials problems in light water reactors. The first section of the report provides an overview of plant materials problems which have impact on plant availability. These include pipe and pressure vessel cracking, condenser leakage, turbine disc cracking, steam generator tube attack and cracking, and cracking of nickel alloy springs, beams and pins. The status and goals of research and development work related to each of these problems are reviewed briefly. Subsequent report sections provide more detailed reviews of significant progress in the relevant technical topic area: integranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; environmentally-assisted cracking of carbon and low alloy steels; intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-base alloys; and improved fabrication technology

  5. Monthly energy review, June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-26

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  6. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  7. Monthly energy review, June 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Chemical Defense Bioscience Review (4th) Held at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland on 30 May-1 June 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    a dose of 2 milligrams/ kilogram, I.V., of a 2% solution in saline, was used for rapid visual assessments of cerebrovascular permeability. The dye was...may be killed by poisoning, infection, accidental injury, stroke or metabolic failure. The injured cells may respond in several ways to the insult...The effects of atropine upon the cerebrovascular system during Soman-induced respiratory depression. Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn., 235: 211- 218. 12

  9. Science & Technology Review June 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K J

    2010-04-28

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Leader in High-Pressure Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Diamonds Put the Pressure on Materials--New experimental capabilities are helping Livermore scientists better understand how extreme pressure affects a material's structure; (3) Exploring the Unusual Behavior of Granular Materials--Livermore scientists are developing new techniques for predicting the response of granular materials under pressure; (4) A 1-Ton Device in a Briefcase--A new briefcase-sized tool for nuclear magnetic resonance is designed for onsite analysis of suspected chemical weapons; and (5) Targets Designed for Ignition--A series of experiments at the National Ignition Facility is helping scientists finalize the ignition target design.

  10. CERN Accelerator School | 26 May – 5 June 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School in collaboration with MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt, Austria is organising a specialised school on Accelerators for Medical Applications in the Eventhotel Pyramide, Vösendorf, Austria, from 26 May – 5 June 2015. Please note that the deadline for applications is 20 January 2015. More details can be found at the following sites: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Austria2015/Vienna-­‐advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/324187/ For further information please contact Barbara.strasser@cern.ch

  11. Semiannual patents review, January — June 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite S. Sykes; Julie. Blankenburg

    2001-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling that were issued during the first 6 months of 2001. Two online databases, Claims/U.S. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index, were searched for this review. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about recent developments in equipment design, chemicals, and process technology for...

  12. Theoretical physics department, june 96-may 98 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This status report presents the work done at SPhT (service de physique theorique, CEA) from june 96 to may 98. The topics have been classified into 3 themes: - statistical physics, - mathematical physics and field theory, - astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. In the first theme relevant contributions have been made to phase transitions, correlated electronic systems, polymers, membranes, proteins, disordered systems and out of equilibrium processes. The second theme collects various works, some works dedicated to aleatory matrices and quantum chaos aim at developing investigation methods, other works like cord theories use these methods. As for the third theme, the recent discovery of the fluctuations of background cosmological radiation has fomented a great activity at SPhT. Mean field approximation and effective strength have been the starting point of research in the field of nuclear structure. High energy quantum chromodynamics has been applied to deep inelastic scattering where the proton structure is studied through electron-proton collisions. A list of all the publications made by SPhT is given. (A.C.)

  13. Summary report for April, May, and June 1950. Chemistry Divison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, D. W. [ed.

    1950-07-27

    A summary of activities for the Chemistry Division is reported for April-June 1950. Areas reporting activity include: Nuclear and Radiation Chemistry, Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, and Process Chemistry.

  14. Semiannual patents review, January-June 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite. Sykes; Julie J. Blankenburg

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes patents in the area of paper recycling that appeared during the first half of 1998 in either of two on-line data bases: Derwent World Patent Index or Claims/U.S.Patents Abstracts. The information in these data bases is intended to keep readers informed about the latest equipment, chemicals, and technology in this field. The abstracts provide only...

  15. Semiannual patents review, January-June 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite Sykes; Julie Blankenburg

    1999-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling that were issued during the first 6 months of 1999. The two on-line databases used for this search were C1aims/U.S. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about the latest developments in equipment design, chemicals, and process technology for...

  16. 2005 - 2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME From 1st of May to 30 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES Physics at the Tevatron by B. Heinemann Univ. of Liverpool - Fermilab 15, 16, 17, 18 May 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500, 18 May - Council Chamber Pulsed SC Magnets by M. Wilson, 29, 30, 31 May, 1, 2 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Exploring planets and moons in our solar system by H.O. Rucker / Academy of Sciences, Graz, A 6, 7, 8, 9 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC by R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T. Lefevre / CERN-AB, G. Arnau Izquiedo, H. Mainaud / CERN-TS 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry by A. Ferrari, CERN-AB, M. Silari, CERN-SC, F. Salvat, Facultat de Fisica, Univ. Barcelona, E. 26, 27, 28 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, room 3-006 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place ...

  17. Army Sustainment. Volume 44, Issue 3. May-June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Clark W. LeMasters, Jr. The History of Ordnance in America—Karl Rubis Logistics Movements in a Changing Afghan Environment —Captain Owen A. Rose What...relevance of individual learning and deliv- ers multiple learning stimuli to reach audio, visual, and kinesthetic learners. It maximizes opportunities to...supports operations during the Vietnam War. May–June 2012 1716 Army Sustainment Logistics Movements in a Changing Afghan Environment by

  18. Idaho Operations Office: Technology summary, June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) activities funded through the Idaho Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE's cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry's competitiveness in global environmental markets. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more cost-effective technologies available for transfer to DOE environmental restoration and waste management end-users. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD's technology development programs address three major problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets

  19. Idaho Operations Office: Technology summary, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Idaho Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more cost-effective technologies available for transfer to DOE environmental restoration and waste management end-users. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD`s technology development programs address three major problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

  20. FOR INFORMATION - A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. The topics and the dates are as follows: - Windows XP, une nouvelle experience (FR), Tuesday, 11th May 2004, 14.30 hrs. - Windows XP: a new experience (EN), Tuesday 8th of June, 14:30. - Lire votre email et plus avec Outlook 2003 (FR), Thursday 27th of May, 14:30. - Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003 (EN), Thursday 10th of June, 14:30. - Creer des documents Office avec Windows Word 2003 et Excel 2003 (FR), Thursday 3rd of June, 14:30. - Make Office documents with Windows Word 2003 and Excel 2003 (EN), Thursday 17th of June, 1...

  1. LLE Review quarterly report, April--June 1993. Volume 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, R.J. [ed.

    1993-10-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1993, contains articles on spectral features from argon-filled target implosions on OMEGA, and on the theory of an implicit difference scheme for the Fokker-Planck equation. The advanced technology section includes reports on a novel polymer liquid-crystal wave plate and a new scheme for phase conversion of the OMEGA Upgrade beams that results in greater, smoother energy deposition on fusion targets. Finally, reports on the as-designed configuration of the OMEGA newly configured glass development laser system are summarized.

  2. LLE review: Quarterly report, April--June 1992. Volume 51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, R.W. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1992, contains articles on laser-plasma interaction experiments in long-scale-length plasmas and on the theory of a new form of the stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilitity. The advanced technology section includes reports on the optical response of superconducting films, the development of high-reflectance transport mirrors for the OMEGA Upgrade, and a new high-brightness mono-mode laser oscillator. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser systems are summarized.

  3. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.

  4. INEL BNCT Research Program, May/June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylaianine (IBPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed

  5. Environmental monitoring report, May 10, 1993--June 1, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) DOE Oversight Division (DOE-O) monitoring effort will serve as oversight with ongoing compliance and ambient sampling by Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor staff programs. These sources provide a comprehensive database which must be reviewed and analyzed in order to streamline DOE-O sampling efforts. DOE-O monitoring is necessary to provide quality control, to ensure compliance, to ensure completeness, and to assure protection of public health and the environment. The Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA), includes a section on Environmental Monitoring as Attachment A. To accomplish these objectives, DOE-O will implement the following monitoring programs: surface waters; ground water; air; fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas

  6. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE ORDINARY MEETING HELD ON 26 MAY AND 2 JUNE 1999

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Original: FrenchThe meeting was devoted essentially to examining the various items listed below:TREF meeting on 28 May 1999The items on this meeting's agenda were: a status report on the voluntary programmes, the Forum's work planning and in particular preparation for the five-yearly review of financial conditions, and the scope of application of Article R IV 1.25 of the Staff Regulations concerning the reimbursement of taxes to certain categories of students and associates.At the SCC's meeting on 26 May, the Committee members finalised the documents to be submitted to TREF, in particular the Forum's work planning and preparation for the five-yearly review.At its meeting on 2 June, the SCC took note of the results of TREF's meeting and the preparations for the next Finance Committee meeting and Council session in June:Status report on the voluntary programmesThe Forum had regarded the results of these programmes as very positive, especially those of the RSL Programme, which had made it possible to open 36 pos...

  7. MUSC Environmental Biosciences Program First Quarter Report May - June, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr

    2002-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  8. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  9. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2008 - May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2010-03-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 16th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. We provide this annual report to review program activities from June 2008 through May 2009 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2008. Contents include: Welcome Letter Introduction The NGFP Team Program Management Highlights Class of 2008 Incoming Fellows Orientation Travel Career Development Management of the Fellows Performance Highlights Closing Ceremony Encore Performance Where They Are Now Alumnus Career Highlights: Christine Buzzard Class of 2009 Applicant Database Upgrades Fall Recruitment Activities Interviews Hiring and Clearances Introducing the Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Recruitment Strategy On the Horizon Appendix A: Class of 2009 Fellows

  10. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-04-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It’s all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies

  11. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA's mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It's all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies.

  12. Digested disorder: Quarterly intrinsic disorder digest (April-May-June, 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins is overwhelming. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a "Digested Disorder" project and represent a series of reader's digest type articles objectively representing the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the period of April, May, and June of 2013. The papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings.

  13. Defense AT&L (Volume 36, Number 3, May-June 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    recruit from the heritage community; their recruits are known by their MOS [Military Occupational Specialty] “09 Limas ”—es- sentially interpreters...Defense AT&L: May-June 2007 Acquisition & Logistics Excellence Defense AT&L: May-June 2007 86 Acquisition & Logistics Excellence at Huntington Beach , Calif...programs in endangered species protection, historic preservation, waste reduction, environmental cleanup, and pollution prevention. Installation

  14. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Annual report, June 1991--May 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Schultz, C.W. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Parekh, B.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States); Misra, M. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States); Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

  15. LLE Review. Quarterly report, April-June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the fully UV-converted OMEGA laser system, mass-ablation rate experiments, reactor-size target designs, plasma processes in the target corona, degradation in optical performance of dielectric thin films, and the National Laser Users Facility activities for April-June 1985. 65 refs., 35 figs

  16. Science and technology review: June 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.

    1996-06-01

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE's Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO 2 mystery and osteoporosis are also included

  17. Science and technology review: June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1996-06-01

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE`s Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO{sub 2} mystery and osteoporosis are also included.

  18. Science and Technology Review June 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobaum, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Leader in High-Pressure Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Diamonds Put the Pressure on Materials--New experimental capabilities are helping Livermore scientists better understand how extreme pressure affects a material's structure; (3) Exploring the Unusual Behavior of Granular Materials--Livermore scientists are developing new techniques for predicting the response of granular materials under pressure; (4) A 1-Ton Device in a Briefcase--A new briefcase-sized tool for nuclear magnetic resonance is designed for onsite analysis of suspected chemical weapons; and (5) Targets Designed for Ignition--A series of experiments at the National Ignition Facility is helping scientists finalize the ignition target design.

  19. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  20. Nuclear technology review 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    The viability and credibility of a wide range of nuclear-based technologies require ready access to high-quality atomic, molecular and nuclear data. The demands of new nuclear technologies continue to determine the direction(s) of future data development, including the requirements for data that address innovative fuel cycles, accelerator-driven systems, nuclear incineration, fusion devices, diagnostic and therapeutic medical treatment by radiation, optimization of medical isotope production, non-destructive materials testing, radiation analytical techniques, minerals exploration and land-mine detection. Some recent data development projects with diverse applications are a search engine for Atomic and Molecular data to permit simultaneous data retrieval from a number of different sources for both numerical and bibliographic databases to aid designers. For over 50 years, research reactors have made valuable contributions to the development of nuclear power, basic science, materials development, radioisotope production for medicine and industry, and education and training. They remain core experimental instruments. As of June 2004, 672 research reactors are recorded in the IAEA's Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB), of which 274 are operational in 56 countries (85 in 39 developing countries), 214 are shut down, 168 have been decommissioned and 16 are planned or under construction. Nuclear power supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, and as of 31 December 2003 there were 439 NPPs operating worldwide. Their global energy availability factor has risen steadily from 74.2% in 1991 to approximately 84% in 2003. In 2003 two new NPPs were connected to the grid, a 665 MW(e) pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) in China and a 960 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the Republic of Korea. In addition Canada restarted two units that had been shutdown. Construction started on one new NPP in India. Four 50 MW(e) units in the UK were retired, as were one 640 MW

  1. Sscience & technology review; Science Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. This review for the month of July 1996 discusses: Frontiers of research in advanced computations, The multibeam Fabry-Perot velocimeter: Efficient measurement of high velocities, High-tech tools for the American textile industry, and Rock mechanics: can the Tuff take the stress.

  2. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 28, Number 3, May-June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    similarly priced . May–June 2014 Air & Space Power Journal | 68 Byrnes Nightfall Feature Aviators may dislike it, the public will question it, science...Without conscious effort or education, dominant groups simply do not realize that others have a different experience or outlook than their own. As...Representa- tion to Inclusion, 76–78. 14. With the millennial generation forming the junior officer ranks, monetary reasons are not necessarily

  3. Monthly energy review, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This is an overview of the May energy statistics by the Energy Information Administration. The contents of the report include an energy overview, US energy production, trade stocks and prices for petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Energy production during February 1997 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu, a 1.9% decrease from the level of production during February 1996. Coal production increased 1.2%, natural gas production decreased 2.9%, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 2.1%. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.3% from the level of production during February 1996. Energy consumption during February 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.0% below the level of consumption during February 1996. Consumption of petroleum products decreased 4.4%, consumption of natural gas was down 3.5%, and consumption of coal fell 2.2%. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 6.7% from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during February 1997 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.1% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 12.7% and net imports of natural gas were up 7.4%. Net exports of coal fell 12.1% from the level in February 1996. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  4. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  5. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  6. LLE review. Quarterly report, April 1997--June 1997. Volume 71

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1997, includes an article discussing the results from recent experiments performed on OMEGA. These experiments used a new beam-smoothing device-distributed polarization rotators-in concert with existing techniques to improve the on-target uniformity of each beam. The result of this improved radiation uniformity was a substantive reduction in imprinting-the nonuniformity caused by the laser. A novel way to study the time dependence of this imprinting is also presented in this article

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1996). Volume 67

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeldon, Mark D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1996, contains articles detailing several nonlinear processes associated with lasers and their use, as well as an article describing the computer control systems necessary to maintain and operate a large laser system such as the 60-beam OMEGA laser. The specific topics discussed in this issue include stimulated scattering in laser plasmas, power exchange between interacting laser beams, charged particles interacting with a laser pulse, thermal equilibration of optically excited states, an overview of the laser control system software in OMEGA, and a technique for cancellation of the nonlinear phase accumulation in short-pulse lasers.

  8. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2005). Volume 103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myatt, Jason [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2005-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April-June 2005, features the following articles. ''High-Density and High ρR Fuel Assembly for Fast-Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion'' by R. Betti and C. Zhou. In this article (p. 117), the authors optimize implosion parameters for fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion and design fast-ignition targets relevant to direct-drive inertial fusion energy (IFE). It is shown that a 750-kJ laser can assemble fuel with VI = 1.7 X 107 cm/s, a = 0.7, t = 400 g/cc, tR = 3 g/cm2, and a hot-spot volume of less than 10% of the compressed core. If fully ignited, this fuel assembly can produce energy gains of 150. In the second article (p. 122), C. Stoeckl, T. R. Boehly, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu. Glebov, J. Miller, V. A. Smalyuk, W. Theobald, B. Yaakobi, and T. C. Sangster, along with J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Séguin (MIT), S. P. Hatchett (LLNL), and R. B. Stephens (GA) describe recent OMEGA experiments that have studied the fuel assembly of gas-filled, cone-in-shell, fast-ignition targets. Using both fusion products and backlit images, an areal density of ~60-70 mg/cm2 was inferred for the dense core assembly. The results are promising for successful integrated fast-ignition experiments on the OMEGA EP facility, scheduled to be completed in 2007. Other articles are titled ''Planar Cryogenic Target Hangling Capability for the OMEGA Laser-Fusion Facility''; "Fourier-Space, Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3-D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets''; ''Technologies for Mitigating Tritum Releases to the Environment''; ''All-Solid-State, Diode-Pumped, Multiharmonic Laser System for Timing Fiducial''; and ''EXAFS Measurement of Iron bcc-to-hcp Phase Transformation in Nanosecond-Laser Shocks''.

  9. Military Review. Volume 87, Number 3, May-June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    base pairs. DNA with up to 300,000 base pairs has already been suc- cessfully synthesized. ● An Australian research team heated up mouse- pox virus by...ernment declared that the emergency was over. Despite its successful outcome, the malayan emer- gency extracted a toll in time, blood, and treasure...compromises in executing the War on Terrorism. One such compromise is the U.S. negotiation with Musa Kousa, the head of Libya’s external security

  10. Military Review. Volume 91, Number 3, May-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    yesteryear—Mullah Hadda (1893); Mullah Powinda (1893-1907); the Faqir of Ipi (1936-1960); Mawlana Faizani (1970s); and Qazi Amin (1970s-1980s). Each...percent success rate against Al-Qaeda.15 Even David Kilcullen, the author of The Acci- dental Guerrilla,16 dubbed by the media a “coun- terinsurgency guru...for 2010 had the following highlights: “construction of a museum” for $1,087,000; “construction of cement fac- tory” for $150,000,000

  11. Military Review. Volume 83, Number 3, May-June 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    A. Martinson III Art and Design Winona E. Stroble Webmaster Patricia L. Wilson Secretary Consulting Editors Colonel Osmario Zan Brazilian Army...officer development cannot occur without officers cultivating the practice of lifelong study of military art and science. Rounding out this issue are two... transdisciplinary reflexivity” as going beyond the traditional view of unidisciplinary reflexivity and into four levels of reflexive analy- sis (474). To

  12. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory publishes the Energy and Technology Review Monthly. This periodical reviews progress mode is selected programs at the laboratory. This issue includes articles on in-situ coal gasification, on chromosomal aberrations in human sperm, on high speed cell sorting and on supercomputers.

  13. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory publishes the Energy and Technology Review Monthly. This periodical reviews progress mode is selected programs at the laboratory. This issue includes articles on in-situ coal gasification, on chromosomal aberrations in human sperm, on high speed cell sorting and on supercomputers

  14. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, W.J.; Bookless, W.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy, was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, in response to new national needs, we have added other major programs, including technology transfer, laser science (fusion, isotope separation, materials processing), biology and biotechnology, environmental research and remediation, arms control and nonproliferation, advanced defense technology, and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computing science and technology, engineering, and physics. The Laboratory also carries out a variety of projects for other federal agencies. Energy and Technology Review is published monthly to report on unclassified work in all our programs. This issue reviews work performed in the areas of modified retoring for waste treatment and underground stripping to remove contamination

  15. For information: A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. Seminars planned for these weeks are : Windows XP: a new experience (EN), Tuesday 8th of June, 14:30. Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003 (EN), Thursday 10th of June, 14:30. The seminars will take place in the IT Amphitheatre (bldg. 31, 3-005) and last for about one hour plus questions. No registration is necessary. More information is available at http://cern.ch/Win/Seminars/Tutorials. Interested users can also have a look to courses offered by CERN Technical Training, at http://cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/tec...

  16. For information: A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. Seminars planned this week are: Editer des sites Web avec Frontpage 2003 (FR), Tuesday 1st of June, 14:30. Créer des documents bureautiques avec Windows Word 2003 et Excel 2003 (FR), Thursday 3rd of June, 14:30. The seminars will take place in the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31, 3-005) and last for about one hour plus questions. No registration is necessary. More information is available at http://cern.ch/Win/Seminars/Tutorials. Interested users can also have a look to courses offered by CERN Technical Training, at http://cern.ch/humanr...

  17. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    This report covers the activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the first 6 months of calendar 1981. We discuss the Division's major projects, which reflect a variety of applications and sponsors. The varied technologies concerned with the Proton Storage ring are concerned with the Proton Storage Ring are continuing and are discussed in detail. For the racetrack microtron (RTM) project, the major effort has been the design and construction of the demonstration RTM. Our development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. Frequent contacts from other laboratories have revealed a wide acceptance of the RFQ principle in solving low-velocity acceleration problems. In recent work on heavy ion fusion we have developed ideas for funneling beams from RFQ linacs; the funneling process is explained. To test as many aspects as possible of a fully integrated low-energy portion of a Pion generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) Accelerator, a prototype accelerator was designed to take advantage of several pieces of existing accelerator hardware. The important principles to be tested in this prototype accelerator are detailed. Our prototype gyrocon has been extensively tested and modified; we discuss results from our investigations. Our work with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is reviewed in this report

  18. For information: A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. The last seminar will be about: Making presentations with Powerpoint 2003 (FR), Tuesday 22nd of June, 14:30. The seminars will take place in the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31, 3-005) and last for about one hour plus questions. No registration is necessary. More information is available at http://cern.ch/Win/Seminars/Tutorials. Interested users can also have a look to courses offered by CERN Technical Training, at http://cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/tech/office/te_office.asp.

  19. LLE Review: Volume 63. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of April--June 1995, includes a description of the initial performance results of the upgraded OMEGA laser system. A series of acceptance tests were completed, demonstrating that all 60 beams can irradiate targets with more energy and better beam balance than was required by the Department of Energy's acceptance criteria. Other articles in this volume include a description of a novel energy measurement system used to diagnose all 60 OMEGA beams; a theoretical calculation of the cutoff wave number of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability, applicable to both direct and indirect drive; a description of a new algorithm used for designing distributed phase plates that will produce super-Gaussian focal-plane irradiance profiles: a study of the photoresponse of high-T c YBCO thin films; and a description of magnetorheological finishing, a new process for optics polishing

  20. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1998). Volume 75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Reuben [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1998-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April–June 1998, includes a report on a recent series of experiments, performed by A. Babushkin, M. Guardalben, R. Keck, and W. Seka, that demonstrate a new scheme for converting the infrared light of OMEGA to the third harmonic in the ultraviolet over a bandwidth that is significantly wider than has been previously attainable. This innovative scheme, employing a second tripling crystal in addition to the doubler-tripler pair currently in use, was proposed by D. Eimerl at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and adapted to the OMEGA system by S. Craxton and S. Oskoui, a recent participant in LLE’s Summer High-School Research Program. Wider bandwidths on OMEGA will allow the use of broadband beam smoothing with faster smoothing times than have been employed until now.

  1. Geothermal Technologies Program 2011 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollett, Douglas [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Stillman, Greg [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-01

    On June 6-10, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP or the Program) conducted its annual program peer review in Bethesda, Maryland. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the program and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future program planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  2. Science & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document is the August, 1995 issue of the Science and Technology review, a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory publication. It contains two major articles, one on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - as applied to materials engineering studies, and one on risk assessment, in this case looking primarily at a health care problem. Separate articles will be indexed from this journal to the energy database.

  3. Health hazards associated with laundry detergent pods - United States, May-June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    During May and early June 2012, the Carolinas Poison Center and the Poison Control Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia received four reports of children with vomiting, mental status changes, and respiratory distress after ingesting the contents of laundry detergent pods. Laundry detergent pods are single-load capsules that contain concentrated liquid detergent within a water-soluble membrane that dissolves when in contact with moisture. Laundry detergent pods were introduced in the U.S. market in 2010, and multiple manufacturers now sell laundry detergent packaged in pods (2-4). On May 17, 2012, CDC and the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) began tracking and characterizing reported exposures to laundry detergent from pods. During May 17-June 17, 2012, poison centers reported 1,008 laundry detergent exposures to the National Poison Data System (NPDS), of which 485 (48%) exposures involved laundry detergent pods. Age was recorded for 481 exposures, of which 454 (94%) exposures involved children aged ≤5 years. Among children aged ≤5 years, a significantly greater proportion of those exposed to laundry detergent from pods had gastrointestinal and respiratory adverse health effects and mental status changes compared with those with non-pod laundry detergent exposures. Parents and caregivers should keep laundry detergent pods, as well as other household cleaning products, out of reach and out of sight of children. Health-care providers should be aware that exposure to laundry detergent from pods might be associated with adverse health effects more often than exposure to non-pod laundry detergents.

  4. Activity report june 1998 - may 2000; Rapport d'activite juin 1998 - mai 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the scientific activity of the ''Service de Physique Theorique'' (SPhT), during the period june 1998-may 2000: activity in terms of structure, scientific research programs and results, publications, training and contracts. SPhT is one of the service of the ''Direction des Sciences de la Matiere'' (DSM), itself depending of the CEA Institution. The scientific domains covered by this report are: the quantum field theory and mathematical physics (phase transitions, integrable systems, random matrix, gravity and strings, quantum chaos and dynamical systems, correlation and super-correlation); nuclear physics, particle physics and astrophysics (quantum chromodynamics, physic beyond the standard model, the early Universe, from cosmic microwave background anisotropies to galaxies); statistical physics and condensed matter (statistical physics and models, spin glasses, quantum systems, soft condensed matter and biological physics). (A.L.B.)

  5. Activity report june 1996 - may 1998; Rapport d'activite juin 1996 - mai 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this report is to outline the scientific activity of the ''Service de Physique Theorique'' (SPhT), during the period june 1996-may 1998: activity in terms of structure, scientific research programs and results, publications, training and contracts. SPhT is one of the service of the ''Direction des Sciences de la Matiere'' (DSM), itself depending of the CEA Institution. The scientific domains covered by this report are: the statistical physics (phase transition, biophysics, soft matter, quantum systems); mathematical physics and fields theory (strings theory, random matrix, quantum theory); astrophysics, nuclear physics and particles physics. (A.L.B.)

  6. Summary Report for April, May and June, 1951, Chemistry Division, Section C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemistry Division; Osborne, D. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemistry Division

    1951-08-01

    This is a summary report for April, May and June, 1951, in the Chemistry Division, Section C-1 of Argonne National Laboratory. Topics include Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry with specifics about the following: 1) U238 (n,2n) Cross Section WIthin a Uranium Slug, and 2) Possible Occurrence of Si32 in Nature. Basic Chemistry is also covered, going into the following subjects: 1) Heats of Solution of Salts in Organic Solvents, 2) Effect of Coordination on Absorption Spectra of Anions, 3) Entropy, Enthalpy, and Heat Capacity of Thorium Dioxide from 10 to 300°K, 4) The Thermodynamics of Neptunium Ions, 5) Migration of Ions in Ion-Exchange Resins During Electrolysis, and 5) Mutual Separation of Lanthanides and Actinides by Solvent Extraction Techniques.

  7. Falcon seminar, Winfrith Technology Centre, 27 - 28 June 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.G.; Bowsher, B.R.; Newland, M.S.

    1990-12-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to review the Falcon work and to explore collaborative links with the Phebus-FP programme. Falcon has been designed to study the transport of fission products under conditions representative of severe reactor accidents. Analysis of the experiments is undertaken in conjunction with computer code specialists. Thus, the relevant mechanistic models can be tested and developed so that they may be applied with confidence to the predictions of the consequences of severe accidents in commercial plant. The Falcon tests were also seen as providing important separate-effects data that would aid in the interpretation of the integral data generated during the Phebus-FP project and in testing specific instruments and analytical methods; principles for further collaboration were agreed. (author)

  8. Aerosol optical depth and its relation to regional-scale circulations over Korea during MAPS-Seoul (May-June, 2015) and KORUS-AQ campaigns (May-June, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyunhye; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Ji-Hyoung; Park, Jin-Soo; Ahn, Joon-Young; Lee, Jae-Bum; Lim, Yong-Jae

    2017-04-01

    We investigate aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its relation to regional-scale circulations over Korea during the two recent field campaigns conducted in May-June of 2015 (MAPS-Seoul experiment) and May-June of 2016 (KORUS-AQ campaign), using satellite MODIS and AERONET measurement data. The monthly averaged MODIS AOD at 550 nm was estimated to about 0.35 in May and 0.50 in June during the MAPS-Seoul experiment, which was about 33% and 17% lower than that of 13-year averaged MODIS AOD. MODIS AOD during KORUS-AQ 2016 campaign was similarly about 8˜23% lower than those of 13-year averages, but slightly higher than those in 2015. The monthly averaged MODIS AOD was 0.40 in May and 0.56 in June, 2016. Consistently, ground-based AERONET sky radiometer measurements at Seoul showed AODs of about 0.35 (May) and 0.60 (June) at 500 nm during MAPS-Seoul experiment, which was approximately 32% and 20% lower than the averaged AODs (May - 0.51; June - 0.76) from 4-year measurements (2012, 2013, 2015, and 2016). Also, AOD during KORUS-AQ campaign in 2016 was about 0.43 in May and 0.71 in June, which was about 16% and 6% lower than 4-year mean AOD. This year-to-year variation of AOD in May-June over East Asia, including Korea, was closely linked with synoptic atmospheric circulations. Generally, aerosol optical depth (AOD) is high in May and June due to stagnant synoptic meteorological systems, as previously reported by Kim et al. (Atmospheric Environment, 2007). For example, in 2012, MODIS AOD over the Korean Peninsula was observed to be about 0.71 in May and 0.72 in June. This can be explained by the frequent occurrences of stagnant atmospheric conditions. However, the regional-scale circulations during MAPS-Seoul and KORUS-AQ campaigns were characterized by the fast-moving confluent flows over the Korean peninsula, formed between Siberian high pressure system located in North China and North Pacific high in South China. These results suggest that atmospheric circulations play a

  9. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  10. CTD and Water Chemistry data of the Eastern Pacific Redox Experiment of May - June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Eastern Pacific Redox Experiment (EPREX) took place 24 May to 28 June 2000 on the R/V Roger Revelle. The first station was at the Hawaii Ocean Time Series...

  11. A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. Seminar planned for this week is: Make Office documents with Windows Word 2003 and Excel 2003 (EN), Thursday 17 June, 14:00 (special time). The seminars will take place in the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31, 3-005) and last for about one hour plus questions. No registration is necessary. More information is available at http://cern.ch/Win/Seminars/Tutorials. Interested users can also have a look to courses offered by CERN Technical Training, at http://cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/tech/office/te_office.asp.

  12. Supercapacitors specialities - Technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Münchgesang, Wolfram; Meisner, Patrick; Yushin, Gleb

    2014-01-01

    Commercial electrochemical capacitors (supercapacitors) are not limited to mobile electronics anymore, but have reached the field of large-scale applications, like smart grid, wind turbines, power for large scale ground, water and aerial transportation, energy-efficient industrial equipment and others. This review gives a short overview of the current state-of-the-art of electrochemical capacitors, their commercial applications and the impact of technological development on performance

  13. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.S.

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base

  14. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.S. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  15. Predictable patterns of the May-June rainfall anomaly over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wen; Wang, Bin; Yim, So-Young; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2017-02-01

    During early summer (May-June, MJ), East Asia (EA) subtropical front is a defining feature of Asian monsoon, which produces the most prominent precipitation band in the global subtropics. Here we show that dynamical prediction of early summer EA (20°N-45°N, 100°E-130°E) rainfall made by four coupled climate models' ensemble hindcast (1979-2010) yields only a moderate skill and cannot be used to estimate predictability. The present study uses an alternative, empirical orthogonal function (EOF)-based physical-empirical (P-E) model approach to predict rainfall anomaly pattern and estimate its potential predictability. The first three leading modes are physically meaningful and can be, respectively, attributed to (a) the interaction between the anomalous western North Pacific subtropical high and underlying Indo-Pacific warm ocean, (b) the forcing associated with North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly, and (c) the development of equatorial central Pacific SST anomalies. A suite of P-E models is established to forecast the first three leading principal components. All predictors are 0 month ahead of May, so the prediction here is named as a 0 month lead prediction. The cross-validated hindcast results demonstrate that these modes may be predicted with significant temporal correlation skills (0.48-0.72). Using the predicted principal components and the corresponding EOF patterns, the total MJ rainfall anomaly was hindcasted for the period of 1979-2015. The time-mean pattern correlation coefficient (PCC) score reaches 0.38, which is significantly higher than dynamical models' multimodel ensemble skill (0.21). The estimated potential maximum attainable PCC is around 0.65, suggesting that the dynamical prediction models may have large rooms to improve. Limitations and future work are discussed.

  16. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  17. Laser technology: Foreign language translations from the Joint Publications Research Service. June 1970-June 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for June 1970-June 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning laser technology translated from foreign language (non-English) publications. Laser cavities, laser output, laser pumping, laser mode locking, and laser tuning are among the topics discussed. Applications include the identification of meteorological objects; holography; instruments for spacecraft, communications, target acquisition and positioning; and materials processing. (Contains 233 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  18. Evaluation of Physical Composition and Municipal Solid Waste Generation Rate of Hamadan (June 1999 May 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Samadi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although municipal solid waste (MSW is generated every day , but with comparison to other municipal Environmental aspects such as Air pollution and Sewage, is not well considered. MSW management includes refuse production, storage, collection, transportation and disposal. Without adequate and reliable in formation and data about MSW generation rate and it’s physical components, optimun planning and management is not obtainable. In this research the physical composition of Hamadan MSW was studied . Samples were takan by Truck–Load sampling and portional random method from June 1999 untile May 2000 and analyzed for physical components and moisture percent age. The results showed that the average generation rate, density of wastes and its moisture percent were 252.33 Tons and 204.83 kg/m3 and 22.46% respectively. Average percents of physical componets were 77.72% , 5.75% , 5.42% , 3.15%, 2.11% , 1.04% and 4.92% for Biodegriable materials (garbage, papers, plastics, textiles, metals, glass and other materials respectively. Also maximum generation rate was 328 tons in March and minimum generation rate was 196 tons in December. In general, with planning of enforceable reuse and recycling programmes, could be avoid of 183, 14, 13 and 5 tons of biodegriable materials , paper, plastics and metals burial respectively everyday.

  19. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    Three review articles are presented. The first describes the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory role in the research and development of oil-shale retorting technology through its studies of the relevant chemical and physical processes, mathematical models, and new retorting concepts. Second is a discussion of investigation of properties of dense molecular fluids at high pressures and temperatures to improve understanding of high-explosive behavior, giant-planet structure, and hydrodynamic shock interactions. Third, by totally computerizing the triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer system, the laboratory has produced a general-purpose instrument of unrivaled speed, selectivity, and adaptability for the analysis and identification of trace organic constituents in complex chemical mixtures. (GHT)

  20. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    Three review articles are presented. The first describes the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory role in the research and development of oil-shale retorting technology through its studies of the relevant chemical and physical processes, mathematical models, and new retorting concepts. Second is a discussion of investigation of properties of dense molecular fluids at high pressures and temperatures to improve understanding of high-explosive behavior, giant-planet structure, and hydrodynamic shock interactions. Third, by totally computerizing the triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer system, the laboratory has produced a general-purpose instrument of unrivaled speed, selectivity, and adaptability for the analysis and identification of trace organic constituents in complex chemical mixtures

  1. Sscience ampersand technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This monthly science and technology review features a report about Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work on an awesome, inevitable, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous natural phenomenon, lightning. This feature article tells of the development of guidance by Laboratory engineers on how to deal with the effects of lightning on Department of Energy facilities, especially those where nuclear and high explosive materials are handled and stored. Other topics are Groundwater Modeling: More Cost Effective Cleanup by Design, Dual- Band Infrared Computed Tomography: Searching for Hidden Defects, and Plating Shop Moves to Finish Off Waste

  2. Nuclear technology review 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    The unifying theme of the Nuclear Technology Review 2002 (NTR-2002) is the importance of innovation. Innovation makes it possible to step beyond incremental evolutionary improvements constrained by diminishing returns. For crop production and public health, for example, the sterile insect technique created a whole new path for future improvements, distinctly different from applying ever larger amounts of pesticides. Nuclear techniques offer a new and safer approach to removing the world's estimated 60,000,000 abandoned land mines. New precision techniques create the potential for ever less intrusive and more effective radiation treatments for cancer. For nuclear power continuing innovation will be a key factor in closing the projection gap between long term global energy scenarios in which nuclear power expands substantially and near term scenarios with only modest expansion or even decline. While the NTR-2002 presents a worldwide review of the state-of-the-art of nuclear science and technology, and not an annual report on IAEA activities, it notes areas where the Agency has a particularly important role to play. Part I of the NTR-2002 'Fundamentals of Nuclear Development', reviews developments in the field of nuclear, atomic and molecular data. Research reactors remain essential to progress in nuclear science and technology. Part I reviews advances in radioisotope production, the use of accelerators and neutron activation analysis relevant to applications ranging from medicine particularly the light against cancer to industry. Part I also reviews developments in nuclear instrumentation and nuclear fusion, particularly in connection with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Part II begins with a summary of nuclear power production in 2001. At the end of 2001 there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, corresponding to a total capacity of 353 GW(e), more than 10000 reactor-years of cumulative operating experience and about 16% of global

  3. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  4. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggio, A.J. (ed.)

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an x-ray microscope for biological research.

  5. Accelerator Technology Program. Progress report, January-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (Comps.)

    1980-03-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the first six months of calendar 1980 are discussed. This report is organized around major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be located between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility, followed by a section on the gyrocon, a new type of high-power, high-efficiency radio-frequency (rf) amplifier. The third section discusses the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT Division and the National Bureau of Standards; the fourth section concerns the free-electron studies. The fifth section covers the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, a new concept for the acceleration of low-velocity particles; this section is followed by a section discussing heavy ion fusion accelerator development. The next section reports activities in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The final section deals first with development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, then with accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  6. Accelerator Technology Program. Progress report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1980-03-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the first six months of calendar 1980 are discussed. This report is organized around major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be located between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility, followed by a section on the gyrocon, a new type of high-power, high-efficiency radio-frequency (rf) amplifier. The third section discusses the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT Division and the National Bureau of Standards; the fourth section concerns the free-electron studies. The fifth section covers the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, a new concept for the acceleration of low-velocity particles; this section is followed by a section discussing heavy ion fusion accelerator development. The next section reports activities in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The final section deals first with development of H - ion sources and injectors, then with accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics

  7. Coal technology program. Progress report, May 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-07-01

    Two successful operability tests with sustained operation of the bench-scale hydrocarbonizer were achieved with Illinois No. 6 coal diluted with char. Several activities in the area of nondestructive testing of coatings are reviewed. Failure analysis activities included examination of several components from the solvent refined coal plants at Wilsonville, Alabama, and Tacoma, Washington. In the gas-fired potassium boiler project, all of the design work were completed except for several of the instrument and control drawings. In the design studies of a coal-fired alkali metal vapor topping cycle, the first phase of a cycle analysis and the design and analysis of a metal vapor turbine were completed. A report entitled ''Critical Component Test Facility--Advance Planning for Test Modules'' presents the planning study for the conceptual design of component test modules on a nonsite-specific basis. Engineering studies, project evaluation and process and program analysis of coal conversion processes were continued. A report on the landfill storage of solid wastes from coal conversion is being finalized. In the coal-fueled MIUS project, a series of successful tests of the coal feeding system and a report on the analysis of 500-hr fire-side corrosion tests in a fluidized bed combustor were completed.

  8. Nuclear technology review 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-08-01

    While the current outlook for nuclear power remains mixed, 2005 was a year of rising expectations. In March, high level representatives of 74 governments, including 25 representatives at the ministerial level, gathered in Paris at a conference organized by the IAEA to consider the future role of nuclear power. The vast majority of participants affirmed that nuclear power can make a major contribution to meeting energy needs and sustaining the world's development in the 21st century for a large number of both developed and developing countries. Rising expectations are driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by environmental constraints, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several countries. There were 441 nuclear power plants in operation as of 31 December 2005 and 27 under construction. Four new nuclear power plants were connected to the grid in 2005 (two in Japan and one each in India and the Republic of Korea), and one laid-up plant was reconnected in Canada. There were two nuclear power plant retirements, both in accordance with national nuclear phase-out policies.There were three construction starts, Lingao-3 in China, Olkiluoto-3 in Finland and Chasnupp-2 in Pakistan. Olkiluoto-3 is the first new construction in Western Europe since 1991. Asia remains the centre of expansion, accounting for 16 of the 27 reactors under construction at the end of 2005, and for 24 of the last 34 reactors to have been connected to the grid. National research on advanced reactor designs continues for all reactor categories: water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. A major advance in fusion energy occurred in June 2005 with the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the negotiations on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the agreement to start construction at

  9. Flavonoids and heart health: Proceedings of the ILSI North America Flavonoids Workshop may 31-june 1, 2005, Washington DC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdman, J.W.; Balentine, D.; Arab, L.; Beecher, G.; Dwyer, J.T.; Folts, J.; Harnly, J.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Keen, C.L.; Mazza, G.; Messina, M.; Scalbert, A.; Vita, J.; Williamson, G.; Burrows, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on flavonoids as presented during a workshop entitled, "Flavonoids and Heart Health," held by the ILSI North America Project Committee on Flavonoids in Washington, DC, May 31 and June 1, 2005. Because a thorough knowledge and understanding about

  10. For Information: A Series of Seminars about NICE Environment during May / June 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2004-01-01

    Recently deployed at CERN, Windows XP and Office 2003 offer new functionalities. IT/IS Group has prepared a series of seminars to both introduce the CERN NICE environment to beginners and also to show how to benefit from the advanced features offered by the new versions of Windows and Office. Particular attention will be paid to Collaborative Tasks, like reviewing a document, planning a meeting and to Mobile Computing like working offline, remotely accessing CERN resources, etc.. Seminars for planned these week are : Editing Web Sites with Frontpage 2003 (EN), Tuesday 25th of May, 14:30. Lire votre email et plus avec Outlook 2003 (FR), Thursday 27th of May, 14:30. The seminars will take place in the IT Amphitheatre (bldg. 31, 3-005) and last for about one hour plus questions. No registration is necessary. More information is available at http://cern.ch/Win/Seminars/Tutorials Interested users can also have a look to courses offered by CERN Technical Training, at http://cern.ch/humanresources/external/train...

  11. Nuclear Technology Review 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    The year 2007 saw signs of recent rising expectations for nuclear power starting to translate into increased construction. There were seven construction starts, plus the resumption of active construction at Watts Bar 2 in the USA, and a total of 33 reactors under construction at the end of the year. Watts Bar 2 is the first active construction in the USA since 1996. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) received four applications for combined licences (COLs), the first applications for new nuclear reactors in the USA in nearly 30 years. Construction also began at Flamanville 3, the first construction start in France since 1991. Current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, however, remain centred in Asia. Of the 33 reactors under construction, 19 were in Asia. By the end of the year, 28 of the last 39 new reactors to have been connected to the grid were in Asia. The IAEA revised its medium term projections for global growth in nuclear power upwards in 2007, to 447 GW(e) and 691 GW(e), respectively in its low and high projections for 2030. Others, for instance the OECD International Energy Agency, also revised their projections upwards. Reported uranium resources increased significantly relative to those in the last edition of the 'Red Book', Uranium 2005: Resources, Production and Demand, due mainly to resource increases reported by Australia, the Russian Federation, South Africa and Ukraine. The spot market uranium price reached almost $360/kg in June before falling back to $240/kg in December. Construction began on USEC's new American Centrifuge Plant, and Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited started cascade tests at its advanced centrifuge uranium enrichment plant at Rokkasho. Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation established the International Uranium Enrichment Centre in East Siberia as one step in President Vladimir Putin's 2006 proposal to create a system of international centres providing nuclear fuel cycle services, including enrichment

  12. Nuclear Technology Review 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    In 2011, nuclear energy continued to play an important role in global electricity production despite the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP). Total generating nuclear power capacity was slightly lower than in previous years due to the permanent shutdown of 13 reactors in 2011, including 8 in Germany and 4 in Japan in the wake of the accident. However, there were 7 new grid connections compared to 5 in 2010, 2 in 2009 and none in 2008. Significant growth in the use of nuclear energy worldwide is still anticipated - between 35% and 100% by 2030 - although the Agency projections for 2030 are 7-8% lower than projections made in 2010. The factors that have contributed to an increased interest in nuclear power did not change: an increasing global demand for energy, concerns about climate change, energy security and uncertainty about fossil fuel supplies. Most of the growth is still expected in countries that already have operating NPPs, especially in Asia, with China and India remaining the main centres of expansion while the Russian Federation will also remain a centre of strong growth. The 7-8% drop in projected growth for 2030 reflects an accelerated phase-out of nuclear power in Germany, some immediate shutdowns and a government review of the planned expansion in Japan, as well as temporary delays in expansion in several other countries. Measures taken by countries as a result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident have been varied. A number of countries announced reviews of their programmes. Belgium, Germany and Switzerland took additional steps to phase out nuclear power entirely while others re-emphasized their expansion plans. Many Member States carried out national safety assessment reviews in 2011 (often called 'stress tests'), and commitments were made to complete any remaining assessments promptly and to implement the necessary corrective action. In countries considering the introduction of nuclear power, interest remained strong

  13. Solar-Geophysical Data Number 539, July 1989. Part 1 (prompt reports). Data for June, May 1989, and late data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1989-07-01

    Contents include: detailed index for 1988-1989; data for June 1989 -- IUWDS alert periods (advance and worldwide), solar-activity indices, solar flares, solar radio emission, Stanford mean solar magnetic field; data for May 1989 -- solar active regions, sudden ionospheric disturbances, solar radio spectral observations, cosmic-ray measurements by neutron monitor, geomagnetic indices; late data -- solar radio emission (Nancay 169-MHz solar interferometric chart, May 1989)

  14. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Quantum Simulators and Design (Tokyo, Japan, 31 May-3 June 2008) Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Quantum Simulators and Design (Tokyo, Japan, 31 May-3 June 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Hisazumi; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2009-02-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter comprises selected papers from the proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Quantum Simulators and Design (QSD2008) held in Tokyo, Japan, between 31 May and 3 June 2008. This conference was organized under the auspices of the Development of New Quantum Simulators and Quantum Design Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT). The conference focused on the development of first principles electronic structure calculations and their applications. The aim was to provide an opportunity for discussion on the progress in computational materials design and, in particular, the development of quantum simulators and quantum design. Computational materials design is a computational approach to the development of new materials. The essential ingredient is the use of quantum simulators to design a material that meets a given specification of properties and functionalities. For this to be successful, the quantum simulator should be very reliable and be applicable to systems of realistic size. During the conference, new methods of quantum simulation and quantum design were discussed including methods beyond the local density approximation of density functional theory, order-N methods, methods dealing with excitations and reactions, and the application of these methods to the design of novel materials, devices and systems. The conference provided an international forum for experimental and theoretical researchers to exchange ideas. A total of 220 delegates from eight countries participated in the conference. There were 13 invited talks, ten oral presentations and 120 posters. The 3rd International Conference on Quantum Simulators and Design will be held in Germany in the autumn of 2011.

  15. Biodiesel production technologies: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemelis Nigatu Gebremariam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel with various benefits over the conventional diesel fuel. It is derived from renewable resources, it has less emission to environment, it is biodegradable so has very limited toxicity and above all its production can be decentralized so that it could have a potential in helping rural economies. However, there are also some worth mentioning challenges associated with production of biodiesel. Among them repeatedly mentioned are the cost of feedstock and the choice of convenient technology for efficient production of the fuel from diverse feedstock types. There are four main routes by which raw vegetable oil and/or animal fat can be made suitable for use as substituent fuel in diesel engines without modification. These are direct use or blending of oils, micro-emulsion, thermal cracking or pyrolysis and transesterification reaction. Due to the quality of the fuel produced, the transesterification method is the most preferred way to produce biodiesel from diverse feedstock types. Through this method, oils and fats (triglycerides are converted to their alkyl esters with reduced viscosity to near diesel fuel levels. There are different techniques to carry out transesterification reaction for biodiesel production. Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages as well as its own specifically convenient feedstock character. There are also some very important reaction conditions to be given due attention in each of this techniques for efficient production of biodiesel, such as molar ratio of alcohol to oil, type and amount of catalyst, reaction temperature, reaction time, reaction medium, type and relative amount of solvents, among others. This review is meant to investigate the main transesterification techniques for biodiesel production in terms of their choice of feedstock character as well as their determinately required reaction conditions for efficient biodiesel production, so that to give an overview on their advantages

  16. Revised field pinch experiments. Annual progress report, June 1, 1984-May 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, S.

    1985-01-01

    The dielectric breaks in the Reversatron vacuum chamber were replaced by bellows sections in December 1984, and operation was resumed in January 1985. The plasma current was limited to 20 kA due to the inefficiency of the air-core transformer. RFP discharges were not obtained due to the pinch parameter theta being below the required value of 1.6. Diagnostics indicated n approx. 4 x 10 13 cm -3 and T/sub e/ approx. 75 eV. Inductively decoupled vertical field coils were used to vary the equilibrium position of the plasma and to maximize the plasma current. A new air-core transformer is being installed which will give an increased plasma current and pinch parameter. Operation with the shell in place will begin in June 1985. If adequate theta values and RFP discharges are obtained, operation without the shell will begin in October 1985

  17. Radioactive contamination in the environs of the Hanford Works for the period April, May, June 1949

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paas, H.J.; Singlevich, W.

    1950-04-03

    This report summarizes the measurements made for radioactive contamination in the environs of the Hanford Works for the quarter April through June 1949. This belated document is issued for the records to fill in the gap for the quarterly reports not issued in 1949 because of personnel shortage at that time. Although the data summarized in this report were already reported in the H. I. Evirons Reports for the months involved, it is still of value to study the data combining the three months of data which give better opportunity to evaluate the trends and patterns of the levels of radioactive contamination emanating from the various sources at the Hanford Works. This document discusses: meteorological data and radioactive contamination in vegetation, the atmosphere, rain, Hanford wastes, the Columbia River, and in drinking water and test wells.

  18. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME - 3rd Term: From 1st of May to 30 June 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES QCD and high energy nuclear collisions D. Kharzeev / BNL, Upton, USA 7, 8, 9 May 11:00 -1200 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 9 May - Council Chamber Acceleration of particles in plasma J. Faure / Ecole Polytechnique ENSTA, Palaiseau, F. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 May 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 Nanotechnologies by C. Bottani / Polytechnic of Milano, I., M. Ferrari, Univ. of Texas, Health Science Center, Houston, USA, A. Li Bassi, Polytechnic of Milano, I. 11, 12, 13 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 11 June - Council Chamber The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  19. Science and technology review, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-05-01

    This month`s issue contains articles entitled PEREGRINE: Improving Radiation Treatment for Cancer; The Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell; Better Flash Radiography Using the FXR; and Nuclear Weapons, Information Project.

  20. Energy and Technology Review, May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.; Sefcik, J.A. [eds.

    1993-05-01

    Four articles are included in this issue. The first expounds upon the unique properties of organic aerogels and their applications. The second article describes computer algorithms that help detect and identify small features in complex biomedical images. Third, efforts by scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to assess pollution sources and establish priorities for pollution prevention in the southern Ural mountains where millions of high-level radioactive wastes were discharged into the Techa river between 1949 and 1976. Last, increases in output power of copper vapor lasers used for uranium atomic vapor isotope separation is improved with the use of an internal septum that reduces peak gas temperature.

  1. Science & Technology Review April/May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K M

    2010-03-08

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Fifty Years of Stellar Laser Research - Commentary by Edward I. Moses; (2) A Stellar Performance - By combining computational models with test shot data, scientists at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated that the laser is spot-on for ignition; (3) Extracting More Power from the Wind - Researchers are investigating how atmospheric turbulence affects power production from wind turbines; (4) Date for a Heart Cell - Carbon-14 dating reveals that a significant number of heart muscle cells are regenerated over the course of our lives; and (5) Unique Marriage of Biology and Semiconductors - A new device featuring a layer of fat surrounding a thin silicon wire takes advantage of the communication properties of both biomolecules and semiconductors.

  2. Rehabilitation Technology Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatherleigh Co., Ltd., New York, NY.

    Designed as a special continuing education program for rehabilitation professionals, this document is divided into five lessons. Lesson 1, "Technology Assessment: Determining the Needs" (Ricardo G. Cerna), includes discussion on technology assessment and determining the needs of the clients as well as different types of assistive…

  3. Text of the joint USSR-USA statement following the summit meeting in Moscow, 29 May - 2 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The document reproduces the text of the joint USSR-USA statement following the summit meeting between the President of the United States, Ronald W. Reagan and the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, held in Moscow between May 29 - June 2, 1988. It refers to the arms control (including nuclear weapons), human rights and humanitarian concerns, regional issues, bilateral affairs and further meetings

  4. Solar-geophysical data number 407, Jyul 1978, Part I. (Prompt reports). data for June 1978, May 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1978-07-01

    This prompt report provides data for June 1978 on alert period, daily solar indices, solar flares, solar radio waves, solar x-ray radiation, solar wind measurements, coronal holes, inferred IP magnetic field polarities, mean solar magnetic field, and Boulder geomagnetic substorm log. It also provides data for May 1978 on daily solar activity center, sudden ionospheric disturbances, solar x-ray radiation, solar radio waves, cosmic rays, geomagnetic indices, and radio propagation indices

  5. Solar-Geophysical Data Number 551, July 1990. Part 1 (prompt reports). Data for June, May 1990 and late data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1990-07-01

    ;Contents: Detailed index for 1989-1990; Data for June 1990--Solar-terrestrial environment, IUWDS alert periods (Advance and worldwide), Solar activity indices, Solar flares, Solar radio emission, Stanford mean solar magnetic field; Data for May 1990--Solar active regions, Sudden ionospheric disturbances, Solar radio spectral observations, Cosmic ray measurements by neutron monitor, Geomagnetic indices; Late data--Geomagnetic indices February-April 1990--sudden commencements/solar flare effects

  6. Particle size of sediments collected from the bed of the Amazon River and its tributaries in May and June 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Carl F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Delaney, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    One-hundred-eight samples of bed material were collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries between Belem, Brazil , and Iquitos, Peru. Samples were taken with a standard BM-54 sampler or with pipe dredges from May 18 to June 5, 1977. Most of the samples have median diameters in the size range of fine to medium sand and contain small percentages of fine gravel. Complete size distributions are tabulated. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Tools for Schools. Volume 12, Number 4, May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Link Up & Learn: Use Technology to Create a Personal Learning Network to Connect with Experts and Mentors Everywhere (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: Get Connected with…

  8. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 3, May-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Art into School, Byte by Byte: Innovative Programs Use Technology to Expand Access to the Arts (Patti Hartigan); (2) Differentiated Instruction…

  9. Science & Technology Review September 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duoss, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-16

    This is the September 2017 edition of the LLNL, Science and Technology Review. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  10. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    Research is described in three areas, high-technology design of unconventional, nonnuclear weapons, a model for analyzing special nuclear materials safeguards decisions, and a nuclear weapons accident exercise (NUWAX-81)

  11. Defense AT&L (Volume 37, Number 3, May-June 2008)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... Brian Shimel, USAF -- A problem with an acquisition program isn't a one-time event. DoD must conduct an objective program review identifying what "broke" the program and how the department should improve performance, delivery speed, and economy...

  12. Nuclear Technology Review 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The year 2006 saw increasing activities in the field of nuclear power. Significant plans for expansion were announced in some countries and plans for introducing nuclear power in some others. The year began with announcements by both the Russian Federation and the United States of America of international fuel cycle proposals in anticipation of a substantial expansion of nuclear power worldwide. In January, Russian President Vladimir Putin outlined a proposal to create 'a system of international centres providing nuclear fuel cycle services, including enrichment, on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA'. In February, the USA proposed a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership to develop advanced recycling technologies that would not separate pure plutonium; international collaboration in supplying fuel for States which agree not to pursue enrichment and reprocessing; advanced reactors to consume recycled spent fuel while providing energy; and safe and secure small reactors suited to the needs of developing countries. New medium-term projections by the IAEA and the International Energy Agency present a picture with opportunities for substantial nuclear expansion, but still with notable uncertainty. A number of countries have announced plans for significant expansion: China, India, Japan, Pakistan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Korea. Announcements of planned license applications by US companies and consortia mentioned approximately 25 new reactors. Two site preparation applications were submitted in Canada. A major energy review by the United Kingdom concluded that new nuclear power stations would make a significant contribution to meeting the UK's energy policy goals. Utilities from Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia launched a joint feasibility study of a new nuclear power plant to serve all three countries, and Belarus, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey made announcements of steps they are taking toward their first nuclear power plants

  13. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O'Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P.

    1982-07-01

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs

  14. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O' Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P. (eds.)

    1982-07-01

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs. (GHT)

  15. IAEA research coordination meeting on X- and gamma-ray standards for detector efficiency calibration, Braunschweig, FRG, 31 May - 2 June 1989. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christmas, P.; Nichols, A.L.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1989-07-01

    The final official meeting of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the Measurement and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Efficiency Calibration was held in Braunschweig from 31 May to 2 June 1989. Work undertaken by the participants was reviewed in detail, and actions were agreed to resolve specific issues and problems. Initial steps were also made to establish a format and procedure for the preparation by mid-1990 of an IAEA Technical Reports Series booklet; the measurements and recommended data will be listed, and an IAEA data file established for issue to all interested organisations. (author). 3 tabs

  16. Mechanical Engineering Department quarterly review, April--June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, R.G.; Bathgate, M.B. (eds.)

    1978-06-30

    The review is presented in sections on x-ray spectrograph development, sampling of gases in a post shot cavity, oil shale retort heat losses, development of an automated thermocouple, seismic engineering, testing fuel rod casks, and nuclear materials control. A separate abstract was prepared for each section. (JRD)

  17. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.B.; McCleb, C.S.; Prono, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Brief discussions of research progress on the following topics are given: (1) lasers and laser applications, (2) advanced energy systems, (3) science and technology, and (4) national security. Some experiments on the in-flight laser irradiation of ammonia pellets are discussed

  18. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.A.; McElroy, L.; Wheatcraft, D.; Middleton, C.; Shang, S. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    Two articles are included: the industrial computing initiative, and artificial hip joints (applying weapons expertise to medical technology). Three research highlights (briefs) are included: KEN project (face recognition), modeling groundwater flow and chemical migration, and gas and oil national information infrastructure.

  19. Energy and Technology Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bookless, W.A.; McElroy, L.; Wheatcraft, D.; Middleton, C.; Shang, S.

    1994-10-01

    Two articles are included: the industrial computing initiative, and artificial hip joints (applying weapons expertise to medical technology). Three research highlights (briefs) are included: KEN project (face recognition), modeling groundwater flow and chemical migration, and gas and oil national information infrastructure

  20. Selected safety-related occurrences reported in May and June 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casto, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    The following occurrences are reviewed because of their uniqueness and/or general interest: (1) short reactor periods have occurred at Quad Cities 1 during shutdown margin tests; (2) loss of instrument air caused damage to reactor coolant-pump seals at a pressurized-water reactor (PWR); (3) a power-distribution anomaly occurred because of a failure of burnable poison rods at St. Lucie 1; (4) short reactor periods have occurred at some boiling-water reactors (BWRs) during startups at peak xenon; and (5) surging in the feedwater flow caused pipe vibrations at Beaver Valley 1

  1. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included

  2. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  3. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-26

    The 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 14-18, 2012 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 309 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 189 reviewers. A total of 1,473 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews.

  4. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This is the first of two issues commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The early history of the laboratory is reviewed, including: the LLNL-Nevada organization; project Plowshare; the chemistry and materials science department; and development of computer systems. (GHT)

  5. Energy and Technology Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This is the first of two issues commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The early history of the laboratory is reviewed, including: the LLNL-Nevada organization; project Plowshare; the chemistry and materials science department; and development of computer systems

  6. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Research programs at LLNL are reviewed. This issue discusses validation of the pulsed-power design for FXR, the NOVA plasma shutter, thermal control of the MFTF superconducting magnet, a low-energy x-ray spectrometer for pulsed-source diagnostics, micromachining, the electronics engineer's design station, and brazing with a laser microtorch

  7. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.B.; Bathgate, M.B.; Crawford, R.B.; McCaleb, C.S.; Prono, J.K. (eds.)

    1976-05-01

    The chief objective of LLL's biomedical and environmental research program is to enlarge mankind's understanding of the implications of energy-related chemical and radioactive effluents in the biosphere. The effluents are studied at their sources, during transport through the environment, and at impact on critical resources, important ecosystems, and man himself. We are pursuing several projects to acquire such knowledge in time to guide the development of energy technologies toward safe, reasonable, and optimal choices.

  8. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    Three areas of research are discussed: microcomputer technology applied to inspecting machined parts to determine roundness in ultraprecision measurements; development of an electrolytic technique for preparing dinitrogen pentoxide as a potentially less expensive step in the large-scale synthesis of the explosive HMX; and the application of frequency conversion to short wavelengths in the Novette and Nova lasers to improve the performance of inertial-confinement fusion targets. (GHT)

  9. Review of encapsulation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaulis, L.

    1996-09-01

    The use of encapsulation technology to produce a compliant waste form is an outgrowth from existing polymer industry technology and applications. During the past 12 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been researching the use of this technology to treat mixed wastes (i.e., containing hazardous and radioactive wastes). The two primary encapsulation techniques are microencapsulation and macroencapsulation. Microencapsulation is the thorough mixing of a binding agent with a powdered waste, such as incinerator ash. Macroencapsulation coats the surface of bulk wastes, such as lead debris. Cement, modified cement, and polyethylene are the binding agents which have been researched the most. Cement and modified cement have been the most commonly used binding agents to date. However, recent research conducted by DOE laboratories have shown that polyethylene is more durable and cost effective than cements. The compressive strength, leachability, resistance to chemical degradation, etc., of polyethylene is significantly greater than that of cement and modified cement. Because higher waste loads can be used with polyethylene encapsulant, the total cost of polyethylene encapsulation is significantly less costly than cement treatment. The only research lacking in the assessment of polyethylene encapsulation treatment for mixed wastes is pilot and full-scale testing with actual waste materials. To date, only simulated wastes have been tested. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site had planned to conduct pilot studies using actual wastes during 1996. This experiment should provide similar results to the previous tests that used simulated wastes. If this hypothesis is validated as anticipated, it will be clear that polyethylene encapsulation should be pursued by DOE to produce compliant waste forms

  10. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Three areas of research are discussed: microcomputer technology applied to inspecting machined parts to determine roundness in ultraprecision measurements; development of an electrolytic technique for preparing dinitrogen pentoxide as a potentially less expensive step in the large-scale synthesis of the explosive HMX; and the application of frequency conversion to short wavelengths in the Novette and Nova lasers to improve the performance of inertial-confinement fusion targets

  11. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.B.; Bathgate, M.B.; Crawford, R.B.; McCaleb, C.S.; Prono, J.K.

    1976-05-01

    The chief objective of LLL's biomedical and environmental research program is to enlarge mankind's understanding of the implications of energy-related chemical and radioactive effluents in the biosphere. The effluents are studied at their sources, during transport through the environment, and at impact on critical resources, important ecosystems, and man himself. We are pursuing several projects to acquire such knowledge in time to guide the development of energy technologies toward safe, reasonable, and optimal choices

  12. Improvement of solar air collectors: Study and Experimental Research Project. Final report, May 1976-June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole-Appel, B.E.; Loef, G.O.G.; Shaw, L.E.; Fischer, B.B.

    1978-01-01

    Literature and patents relevant to solar air-heating collectors were reviewed. The design constraints are listed. The analysis considered the heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of the various designs. Three absorbers along with the baseline design were mounted in identical collector bodies and subjected to thermal efficiency tests on Solaron's collector test stand. The testing was done simultaneously on the four panels in a side-by-side collector test. Various manufacturing techniques for producing an absorber with extended heat transfer surface were investigated. It was found that fins could be attached to the absorber in a cost-effective manner by an electrical resistance weld. Four finned absorbers were fabricated by resistance welding and installed in a 2 x 2 collector array to verify that these production model prototypes would, in fact, increase performance by a factor of 1.11. (MHR)

  13. 2015 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the FCTO and the VTO: 258 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by 170 reviewers. A total of 1,095 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE on the Office with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  14. 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. The review encompassed all of the work done by the FCTO and the VTO: a total of 295 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by a total of 179 reviewers. A total of 1,354 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE on the Office with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  15. Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

  16. Nuclear Technology Review 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    With 434 nuclear power reactors in operation worldwide at the end of 2013, nuclear energy had a global generating capacity of 371.7 GW(e). There were four new grid connections and ten construction starts on new reactors. Belarus became the second nuclear ‘newcomer’ State in three decades to start building its first nuclear power plant. Near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia, particularly in China. The 72 reactors under construction in 2013 represented the highest number since 1989. Of these, 48 were in Asia, as were 42 of the last 52 new reactors to have been connected to the grid since 2000. Thirty States currently use nuclear power and about the same number are considering including it as part of their energy mix. Of the 30 States already operating nuclear power plants, 13 are either constructing new plants or actively completing previously suspended constructions, and 12 are planning to either construct new plants or to complete suspended constructions. The IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century, held in June 2013, reaffirmed that nuclear power remains an important option for many States to improve energy security, reduce the impact of volatile fossil fuels prices and mitigate the effects of climate change. The Concluding Statement said that “nuclear power, as a stable base-load source of electricity in an era of ever increasing global energy demands, complements other energy sources including renewables.” In the IAEA’s 2013 projections, nuclear power is expected to grow by between 17% as the low projection and 94% as the high projection by 2030. These figures are slightly lower than projected in 2012, reflecting the continued impact of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the low prices of natural gas and the increasing use of renewable energy. Additional information focuses on the linkages between nuclear power and climate change, as nuclear power, hydropower and wind energy have the lowest life cycle

  17. LLW Notes Supplement, May/June 1994: Ward Valley, California: Legal issues in summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Lovinger, T.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a digest of the major issues raised by the petitioners for the superior court's consideration and of the responses to those issues that were supplied by the state respondents. The issues have been extracted from a joint memorandum filed by the petitioners on March 9. The responses are taken from the state respondents' April 6 memorandum. The superior court's decision about the merit of each issue - as reported in the court's May 4 order - is also included. This information is necessarily summary in nature. Persons interested in a detailed explanation of these lawsuits are directed to the parties' memorandums of March 9 and April 6, as well as to the court's May 4 order

  18. Plasma magnetic field measurement by intracavity absorption. Progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, G.O.

    1984-01-01

    Dye laser intracavity absorption (ICA) is being studied as a potential diagnostic for plasma or neutral beam systems. For magnetic field measurements it is necessary to make Zeeman effect measurements on the resonance transition of atomic lithium on a millisecond time scale. To do this it is necessary to sweep the dye laser in wavelength at a rapid rate so that the absorber can be sampled many times during the measurement. Our results indicate that the ICA signal becomes small at high sweep rates limiting the rate at which such sweeping may be carried out. It may be possible to avoid this limitation by chopping the pump laser. The studies of coupled cavity ICA are continuing, and are discussed in detail in an appendix. An ICA system using a dye cell has been designed, and supplementary experiments involving the observation of ICA in a ring dye laser are discussed

  19. Energy and Technology Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    An overview is given of research programs at a two-stage light-gas gun facility. Representative gas-gun experiments are described, and the impact of this research on other LLNL programs and on high-pressure physics work in general are discussed. Particular applications reported include: measurement of equations of state for various materials, synthesis and study of novel materials, and studies of high explosives. Specialized diagnostic techniques for gas-gun experiments are reviewed

  20. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    Brief reviews are presented of research programs at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. In one, fast and precise measurement techniques to meet the demanding specifications for microsphere targets used in inertial-confinement fusion experiments are described. Another program is described in which a Raman-spectroscopy microprobe is used to perform molecular-structure analyses on submicron-size particles. Finally, the first year of the controlled thermonuclear reactions program is described

  1. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-03-01

    An overview is given of research programs at a two-stage light-gas gun facility. Representative gas-gun experiments are described, and the impact of this research on other LLNL programs and on high-pressure physics work in general are discussed. Particular applications reported include: measurement of equations of state for various materials, synthesis and study of novel materials, and studies of high explosives. Specialized diagnostic techniques for gas-gun experiments are reviewed. (LEW)

  2. Status review of CHEMVAL2 technical areas, June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Crawford, M.; Fabriol, R.; Jamet, Ph.; Lang, H.; Read, D.; Tweed, C.; Warwick, P.

    1993-01-01

    The second phase of the CHEMVAL project has the principal aim of advancing the state of validation of predictive geochemical models in defined areas. Target areas are those known to be of concern in radiological assessment, namely temperature effects, ionic strength effects, organic complexation, sorption processes, coprecipitation and solid solution formation, and coupled chemical transport modelling. The first stage of CHEMVAL2 involved production of status reviews, which are now complete and combined in this report. The two remaining stages comprise the execution of the main research programme on code verification and model validation, followed by a more detailed comparison with experimental data, model refinement and final reporting. (author)

  3. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the {open_quotes}Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNA{close_quotes}.

  4. Radiological protection 1993 post-graduate course: 22 Feb -19 March and 10 May - 4 June

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This pamphlet describes a post-graduate course organized by the NRPB and intended to meet the initial and early training requirements of full-time staff of graduate level or equivalent involved in radiological protection including health physics. The course contains sixty-five lectures covering topics such as nuclear physics, sources and uses of radiation, instrumentation, radiation biology, system of protection, occupational protection, dosimetry, population protection, legal, medical and administrative aspects and general hazards. The 1994 courses are being held from 28th February - 25th March and 18th April -13th May, 1993. (UK)

  5. CERN takes part in the GE200.CH celebrations | 30 May - 1 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Come and discover the universe of CERN at the Mont Blanc rotunda during a weekend of celebrations marking the 200th anniversary of the arrival of the confederate troops at Geneva’s Port Noir.   CERN will also be taking part in the procession through the city centre from 2.30 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. on Saturday 31 May. Starting at the Parc des Bastions, the procession will pass through the Rues Basses and along the lake to the Port Noir. More information on this event here.  

  6. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Guidry, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Research conducted during the year ending May 31, 1980 is reported. Work is described in the following areas: radioactive decay studies, in-beam spectroscopy of high-spin states, inelastic scattering and reactions of heavy ions from deformed nuclei, and alpha decay of high-spin short-lived isomers. Particularly significant results were obtained on the band structure of light Yb nuclei. Activities relating to facilities development and administrative matters are also included, along with lists of references and publications. 14 figures

  7. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  8. Review of opening switch technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristiansen, M.; Schoenbach, K.M.; Schaefer, G.

    1984-01-01

    Review of opening switch technology is given. Classification of open switches applied in pulsed power technology is presented. The most familiar opening switches are fuses. It is shown that a strong oxidizer (H 2 O 2 in water), especially in combination with wires of Al, increases the maximum voltage. Thermally driven opening switches are the result of attempts to achive the speed and economy of fuse opening switches but with added advantage of repetitive operation. The search for coordinate materials for this type of opening switch is in its infancy and it is difficult to predict how successful such a switch may be. Explosive opening switches offer the possibility of precise timing and permit the delay before explosion to be controlled independently of current flowing through the switch. Plasma guns, dense plasma focus and MHD switches are also considered. Diffuse discharge opening switches are attractive for repetitive operation. The plasma erosion switch operates on a very short time scale of 10 ns to 100 ns, both to regard to conduction and opening times

  9. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  10. Fires. A Joint Professional Bulletin for U.S. Field and Air Defense Artillerymen. May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    fi eld artillery offi cer in the region, I had to focus on what I could effectively manage and advise for the school and the units with quality ...2 sill-www.army.mil/fi resbulletin/ • May-June 2010 INSIDE U.S. Army National Guard 2010 Red Book A Joint Professional Bulletin for U.S. Field...per FA/fi res/battalion/ squadron; 3 per fi re support element (FSE), fi res and ef- fects cell (FEC), effects coordination cell (ECC) fi re support

  11. 7 June No 54. Act amending Act No 10 of 22 May 1902 (Penal Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Norway as a Contracting Party to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material has complied with its obligations under the Convention by amending the Penal Code. The major amendment concerns sanctions with respect to nuclear materials. It is provided that any person who, without lawful authority, receives, possesses, uses, transfers, disposes of nuclear materials etc., thereby affecting the life, health or property of persons or the environment is liable to a fine or to a term of imprisonment not exceeding four years. Furthermore, any person creating such danger, which may result in loss of life or extensive damage to any other person's property, is liable to a severe penalty under the Code. (NEA) [fr

  12. Five centuries of Czech May-June precipitation and drought variability inferred from instrumental measurements, tree rings and documentary archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázdil, R.; Büntgen, U.; Dobrovolný, P.; Trnka, M.; Kyncl, T.

    2010-09-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important meteorological elements for different natural processes as well as for human society. Its long term fluctuations in the Czech Lands (recent Czech Republic) can be studied using long instrumental series (Brno since January 1803, Prague-Klementinum since May 1804), a tree-ring chronology from southern Moravian fir Abies alba Mill. developed from living and historical trees (since A.D. 1376), and monthly precipitation indices derived from documentary evidence (from A.D. 1500). The analysis focuses on May-June precipitation and drought patterns represented by the Z-index for the past 500 years showing the highest response of the tree-ring chronology to the mentioned months in the calibration/verification period between 1803 and 1932. Tree-ring and documentary-based May-June Z-index reconstructions explaining ca 30-40% of its variability are compared with existing reconstructions of hydroclimatic patterns of the Central European region. Uncertainties of tree-ring and documentary datasets and corresponding reconstructions are discussed.

  13. Nuclear technology review 2005 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    The year 2004 marked the 50th anniversary of civilian nuclear power generation. While the current outlook for nuclear energy remains mixed, there is clearly a sense of rising expectations. Both the OECD International Energy Agency and the IAEA adjusted their medium-term projections for nuclear power upwards. The IAEA now projects 423 - 592 GW(e) of nuclear power installed worldwide in 2030, compared to 366 GW(e) at the end of 2004. This is driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by new environmental constraints including entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several key countries. National research on advanced reactor designs continues on all reactor categories - water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. Five members of the US-initiated Generation IV International Forum (GIF) signed a framework agreement on international collaboration in research and development on Generation IV nuclear energy systems in February 2005. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 23 members. It completed a series of case studies testing its assessment methodology and the final report on the updated INPRO methodology was published in December. The realization of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, came closer with the announcement on 28 June 2005 by the ITER parties. The aim of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy by constructing a functional fusion power plant. Nuclear technology developments are rapid and cover many fields of application. Not all can be covered in this update review, but certain key areas and trends are covered where these are seen to be of significant interest to IAEA Member States, and which are of relevance to and have

  14. Report of Official Foreign Travel to Germany, May 16-June 1, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Mason

    2001-06-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and associated agencies have moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards over proprietary designs promoted as ''standards'' by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), to which DOE long ago made a commitment. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML: Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, Netscape, Oracle, and Sun, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During my May 2001 trip, I chaired the spring 2001 meeting of SC34 in Berlin, Germany. I also attended XML Europe 2001, a major conference on the use of SGML and XML sponsored by the Graphic Communications Association (GCA), and chaired a meeting

  15. Science & Technology Review: September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This is the September issue of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Science & Technology Review, which communicates, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. This month, there are features on "Laboratory Investments Drive Computational Advances" and "Laying the Groundwork for Extreme-Scale Computing." Research highlights include "Nuclear Data Moves into the 21st Century", "Peering into the Future of Lick Observatory", and "Facility Drives Hydrogen Vehicle Innovations."

  16. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F. (ed.)

    1982-01-01

    Three research programs at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are described. (1) The solid-state microscope, specifically designed for computer input, enables automated high-resolution population screening for blood-cell abnormalities or early signs of cancer. Nonmedical applications appear possible in powder metallurgy, geology, and semiconductor fabrication. (2) The studies of ion-atom collisions have led to improved atomic-structure measurements, new techniques for determining elemental composition, and better x-ray detector calibrations. (3) A new and promising source of high-power laser radiation has characteristics that may make it feasible for the production of fusion power on a commercial scale. (GHJ)

  17. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowers, I.F.

    1982-01-01

    Three research programs at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are described. (1) The solid-state microscope, specifically designed for computer input, enables automated high-resolution population screening for blood-cell abnormalities or early signs of cancer. Nonmedical applications appear possible in powder metallurgy, geology, and semiconductor fabrication. (2) The studies of ion-atom collisions have led to improved atomic-structure measurements, new techniques for determining elemental composition, and better x-ray detector calibrations. (3) A new and promising source of high-power laser radiation has characteristics that may make it feasible for the production of fusion power on a commercial scale

  18. Loglines. May - June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    anchors off the coast of Tumaco, Colombia , during Continuing Promise 2011. DLA is the sole supplier of medical supplies and equipment to the...required, said Linda Grugan, contracting officer for the pharmaceutical fleet prime vendor program in DLA Troop Support. She Ai r F or ce S ta ff Sg... Pharmaceutical supplies for the Comfort are included as part of DLA’s regular prime vendor program, but DLA Troop Support also has contingency contracts in

  19. Nuclear Technology Review 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In 2009, construction started on 12 new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985, and projections of future nuclear power growth were once again revised upwards. However, only two new reactors were connected to the grid, and, with three reactors retired during the year, the total nuclear power capacity around the world dropped slightly for the second year in a row. Current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Ten of the 12 construction starts were in Asia, as were both of the new grid connections. Although the global financial crisis that started in the second half of 2008 did not dampen overall projections for nuclear power, it was cited as a contributing factor in near-term delays or postponements affecting nuclear projects in some regions of the world. In some European countries where previously there were restrictions on the future use of nuclear power, there was a trend towards reconsidering these policies. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high. Over 60 Member States have expressed to the IAEA interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power, and, in 2009, the IAEA conducted its first Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions in Jordan, Indonesia and Vietnam. Estimates of identified conventional uranium resources (at less than $130/kg U) increased slightly, due mainly to increases reported by Australia, Canada and Namibia. Uranium spot prices declined, and final data for 2009 are expected to show a consequent decrease in uranium exploration and development. The Board of Governors has authorized the IAEA Director General to sign an agreement with the Russian Federation to establish an international reserve of low enriched uranium (LEU). It would contain 120 tonnes of LEU that could be made available to a country affected by a non-commercial interruption of its LEU supply. The agreement between the IAEA and the Russian Federation was signed in March 2010

  20. Nuclear Technology Review 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-08-01

    The year 2008 was paradoxical for nuclear power. Projections of future growth were revised upwards, but no new reactors were connected to the grid. It was the first year since 1955 without at least one new reactor coming on-line. There were, however, ten construction starts, the most since 1985. At least until the global financial crisis, cost estimates reported for new nuclear reactors were often higher than those in previous years, particularly in regions with less recent experience in new construction. However, growth targets for nuclear power were raised in the Russian Federation, and similar considerations were under review in China. India negotiated a safeguards agreement with the Agency in August, and the Nuclear Suppliers Group subsequently exempted India from previous restrictions on nuclear trade, which should allow India to accelerate its planned expansion of nuclear power. In the USA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) received combined licence (COL) applications for 26 new reactors. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) received 19 'Part I applications' for Federal loan guarantees to build 21 new reactors. Nonetheless, current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Of the ten construction starts in 2008, eight were in Asia. Twenty-eight of the 44 reactors under construction at the end of the year were in Asia, as were 28 of the last 39 new reactors to have been connected to the grid. Armenia joined the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan as members of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre in Angarsk, Siberia. The Ukrainian Government announced that Ukraine would also join. AREVA and USEC applied to the USDOE for loan guarantees for the construction of AREVA's proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility and USEC's American Centrifuge Plant. Construction of an underground repository for low and medium level radioactive waste began at the former Konrad iron mine in Germany. The USDOE submitted a formal

  1. Energy and Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Satellites have shrunk the world to the size of the proverbial global village. They track weather and the traffic patterns of ships and aircraft, and monitor our environment. Defense satellites provide high-resolution images of objects on the ground to protect our troops and allies. Telecommunication satellites have interwoven business sectors, corporations, and markets into global networks. Nevertheless, orbiting satellites may not be the best choice for all applications requiring a high vantage point. satellites and their payloads are expensive, and launching them by rocket is expensive and risky. They must operate in the extreme conditions of space, bombarded by radiation and with no airflow to cool their electronics. Only valuable, long-term missions would seem to justify the expense and risk of a satellite. Even then, satellites are not always the best choice. They typically cannot hop to a new orbit, and some uses, such as local and global communications, require a large number of satellites to ensure adequate coverage. There is clearly a large potential role for high-altitude, atmospheric vehicles that can stay aloft for very long periods (weeks or months) and can roam virtually anywhere.

  2. 2017 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-31

    The 2017 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held June 5-9, 2017, in Washington, DC. The review encompassed work done by the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and VTO: 263 individual activities were reviewed for VTO by 191 reviewers. Exactly 1,241 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  3. 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-12-01

    The 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held June 6-9, 2016, in Washington, DC. The review encompassed work done by the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and VTO: 226 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by 171 reviewers. A total of 1,044 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  4. Geochemical features and effects on deep-seated fluids during the May-June 2012 southern Po Valley seismic sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Italiano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A periodic sampling of the groundwaters and dissolved and free gases in selected deep wells located in the area affected by the May-June 2012 southern Po Valley seismic sequence has provided insight into seismogenic-induced changes of the local aquifer systems. The results obtained show progressive changes in the fluid geochemistry, allowing it to be established that deep-seated fluids were mobilized during the seismic sequence and reached surface layers along faults and fractures, which generated significant geochemical anomalies. The May-June 2012 seismic swarm (mainshock on May 29, 2012, M 5.8; 7 shocks M >5, about 200 events 3 > M > 5 induced several modifications in the circulating fluids. This study reports the preliminary results obtained for the geochemical features of the waters and gases collected over the epicentral area from boreholes drilled at different depths, thus intercepting water and gases with different origins and circulation. The aim of the investigations was to improve our knowledge of the fluids circulating over the seismic area (e.g. origin, provenance, interactions, mixing of different components, temporal changes. This was achieved by collecting samples from both shallow and deep-drilled boreholes, and then, after the selection of the relevant sites, we looked for temporal changes with mid-to-long-term monitoring activity following a constant sampling rate. This allowed us to gain better insight into the relationships between the fluid circulation and the faulting activity. The sampling sites are listed in Table 1, along with the analytical results of the gas phase. […

  5. RE/SPEC Inc. technical support to the Repository Technology Program; Summary of activities for September 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report presents a summary of all RE/SPEC Inc. technical support activities to the Repository Technology Program (RTP) from September 1, 1988, through June 30, 1992. The RE/SPEC Inc. activities are grouped into the following categories: project management, project quality assurance (QA), performance assessment (PA), support of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) through technical reviews and general assistance, participation in the Department of Energy (DOE) International Program, and code evaluation and documentation.

  6. Measuring emotions in traffic : paper presented at the ESF Congress ‘Towards Safer Road Traffic in Southern Europe’, May 31st-June 2nd 2001, Ankara, Turkey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesken, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper contains the text of a presentation held at the European Science Foundation Congress ‘Towards Safer Road Traffic in Southern Europe’ (May 31st – June 2nd, 2001, Ankara , Turkey). In this paper, methods to measure emotions are reviewed and possible applications for traffic research are

  7. User-Driven Workflow for Modeling, Monitoring, Product Development, and Flood Map Delivery Using Satellites for Daily Coverage Over Texas May-June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. S.; Frye, S. W.; Wells, G. L.; Adler, R. F.; Brakenridge, R.; Bolten, J. D.; Murray, J. J.; Slayback, D. A.; Kirschbaum, D.; Wu, H.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Schumann, G.; Howard, T.; Flamig, Z.; Clark, R. A.; Stough, T.; Chini, M.; Matgen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Intense rainfall during late April and early May 2015 in Texas and Oklahoma led to widespread flooding in several river basins in that region. Texas state agencies were activated for the May-June floods and severe weather event that ensued for six weeks from May 8 until June 19 following Tropical Storm Bill. This poster depicts a case study where modeling flood potential informed decision making authorities for user-driven high resolution satellite acquisitions over the most critical areas and how experimental flood mapping techniques provided the capability for daily on-going monitoring of these events through the use of increased automation. Recent improvements in flood models resulting from higher frequency updates, better spatial resolution, and increased accuracy of now cast and forecast precipitation products coupled with advanced technology to improve situational awareness for decision makers. These advances enabled satellites to be tasked, data products to be developed and distributed, and feedback loops between the emergency authorities, satellite operators, and mapping researchers to deliver a daily stream of relevant products that informed deployment of emergency resources and improved management of the large-scale event across the local, state, and national levels. This collaboration was made possible through inter-agency cooperation on an international scale through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Flood Pilot activity that is supported in the USA by NASA, NOAA, and USGS and includes numerous civilian space agency assets from the European Space Agency along with national agencies from Italy, France, Germany, Japan, and others. The poster describes the inter-linking technology infrastructure, the development and delivery of mapping products, and the lessons learned for product improvement in the future.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 6-10, 2016, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2016-10-01

    The fiscal year 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 6-10, 2015, in Washington, D.C.. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 8-12, 2015, Arlington, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The fiscal year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  10. Mount St Helens eruptions, May 18 to June 12, 1980. An overview of the acute health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, P J; Ing, R; Falk, H; French, J; Stein, G F; Bernstein, R S; Merchant, J A; Allard, J

    1981-12-04

    Thirty-five known deaths were caused by the landslide and lateral blast of the May 18 eruption of Mount St Helens and at least 23 persons are missing. In 18 of 23 cases that reached autopsy, asphyxiation from ash inhalation was the cause of death. A rapidly established hospital surveillance system detected increases in the number of emergency room (ER) visits and admissions for asthma and bronchitis in communities with the heaviest ashfall after the May 18 eruption and the eruptions on May 25 and June 12. There were also increases in the number of ER visits for ash-related eye complaints in some areas. laboratory studies indicated that the May 18 ash was not acutely toxic, but the respirable portion contained 3% to 7% of crystalline free silica, a potential pneumoconiosis hazard to certain heavily exposed occupational groups. Continuing volcanic activity of Mount St Helens and future eruption of other volcanoes in the Cascade Range may pose a variety of health hazards, including blast, ashfalls, flooding, damage to public utilities, and possible psychosocial effects.

  11. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from FARRAGUT in the Mediterranean Sea from 20 May 1986 to 30 June 1986 (NODC Accession 8700046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the FARRAGUT in the Mediterranean Sea. Data were collected from 20 May 1986 to 30 June...

  12. Temperature profile and oxygen data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 11 May 1979 to 08 June 1979 (NODC Accession 0000356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and oyxgen data were collected from the YAKOV GAKKEL from May 11, 1979 to June 8, 1979. These data were collected using bottle casts in North...

  13. Temperature profile data from MBT casts from NAUKA and other platforms in a World-wide distribution from 18 June 1970 to 05 May 1989 (NODC Accession 0000229)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using MBT casts in a World-wide distribution from the NAUKA, AELITA, LESNOYE, and other platforms from 18 June 1970 to 05 May...

  14. Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Progress report, June 15, 1991--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raber, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    BCST is concerned with areas in chemical science and technology that can contribute to the solution of important national problems: Nuclear and radiochemistry, atmospheric and chemical sciences, chemical handling in laboratories, radwaste disposal, environment, computation chemistry, curriculum, etc. Review panel member addresses are included in an appendix.

  15. Geothermal Technologies Office 2012 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-01

    On May 7-10, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office conducted its annual program peer review in Westminster, CO. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the office and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future office planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the office and to assess progress made against stated objectives. Project scoring results, expert reviewer comments, and key findings and recommendations are included in this report.

  16. Characterization of Water Quality in Unmonitored Streams in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, Northwestern Mississippi, May-June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Jeannie R.; Coupe, Richard H.; Manning, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality is required to develop restoration and remediation plans for water bodies not meeting their designated uses, as stated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water Act section 303(d). The majority of streams in northwestern Mississippi are on the 303(d) list of water-quality limited waters. Agricultural effects on streams in northwestern Mississippi have reduced the number of unimpaired streams (reference streams) for water-quality comparisons. As part of an effort to develop an index to assess impairment, the U.S. Geological Survey collected water samples from 52 stream sites on the 303(d) list during May-June 2006, and analyzed the samples for nutrients and chlorophyll. The data were analyzed by trophic group as determined by total nitrogen concentrations. Seven constituents (nitrite plus nitrate, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, total phosphorus, orthophosphorus, total organic carbon, chlorophyll a, and pheophytina) and four physical property measurements (specific conductance, pH, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen) were determined to be significantly different (p indicators of stream productivity with which to infer stream health. Streams having high total Kjeldhal nitrogen values and high turbidity values along with low dissolved oxygen concentrations were typically eutrophic abundant in nutrients), whereas streams having low total Kjeldhal nitrogen values and low turbidity values along with high dissolved oxygen concentrations were typically oligotrophic (deficient in nutrients).

  17. Mercury Plumes in the Global Upper Troposphere Observed during Flights with the CARIBIC Observatory from May 2005 until June 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Slemr

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric sections of flights with the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrumented Container observatory from May 2005 until June 2013, are investigated for the occurrence of plumes with elevated Hg concentrations. Additional information on CO, CO2, CH4, NOy, O3, hydrocarbons, halocarbons, acetone and acetonitrile enable us to attribute the plumes to biomass burning, urban/industrial sources or a mixture of both. Altogether, 98 pollution plumes with elevated Hg concentrations and CO mixing ratios were encountered, and the Hg/CO emission ratios for 49 of them could be calculated. Most of the plumes were found over East Asia, in the African equatorial region, over South America and over Pakistan and India. The plumes encountered over equatorial Africa and over South America originate predominantly from biomass burning, as evidenced by the low Hg/CO emission ratios and elevated mixing ratios of acetonitrile, CH3Cl and particle concentrations. The backward trajectories point to the regions around the Rift Valley and the Amazon Basin, with its outskirts, as the source areas. The plumes encountered over East Asia and over Pakistan and India are predominantly of urban/industrial origin, sometimes mixed with products of biomass/biofuel burning. Backward trajectories point mostly to source areas in China and northern India. The Hg/CO2 and Hg/CH4 emission ratios for several plumes are also presented and discussed.

  18. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Weeks Bay, Alabama (June 1990 - May 2000) (NODC Accession 0116469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: This dataset contains ten years of physical, chemical, and biological data collected during shipboard surveys in Weeks Bay, Alabama, between June 1990 and...

  19. Science & Technology Review September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-07-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Remembering the Laboratory's First Director - Commentary by Harold Brown; (2) Herbert F. York (1921-2009): A Life of Firsts, an Ambassador for Peace - The Laboratory's first director, who died on May 19, 2009, used his expertise in science and technology to advance arms control and prevent nuclear war; (3) Searching for Life in Extreme Environments - DNA will help researchers discover new marine species and prepare to search for life on other planets; (4) Energy Goes with the Flow - Lawrence Livermore is one of the few organizations that distills the big picture about energy resources and use into a concise diagram; and (5) The Radiant Side of Sound - An experimental method that converts sound waves into light may lead to new technologies for scientific and industrial applications.

  20. Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1978--May 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, C.W.

    1979-03-01

    The following document is a third-year progress report for the period June 1, 1978 to May 31, 1979. The overall objective of the project is to study the effects of seeding techniques, species mixtures, fertilizer, ecotypes, improved plant materials, mycorrhizal fungi, and soil microorganisms on the initial and final stages of reclamation obtained through seeding and subsequent succession on disturbed oil shale lands. Plant growth medias that are being used in field-established test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Because of the long-term nature of successional and ecologically oriented studies the project is just beginning to generate significant publications. Several of the studies associated with the project have some phases being conducted principally in the laboratories and greenhouses at Colorado State Univerisity. The majority of the research, however, is being conducted on a 20 hectare Intensive Study Site located near the focal points of oil shale activity in the Piceance Basin. The site is at an elevation of 2,042 m, receives approximately 30 to 55 cm of precipitation annually, and encompasses the plant communities most typical of the Piceance Basin. Most of the information contained in this report originated from the monitoring and sampling of research plots established in either the fall of 1976 or 1977. Therefore, data that have been obtained from the Intensive Study Site represent only first- or second-year results. However, many trends have been identified in thesuccessional process and the soil microorganisms and mycorrhizal studies continue to contribute significant information to the overall results. The phytosociological study has progressed to a point where field sampling is complete and the application and publication of this materials will be forthcoming in 1979.

  1. A Population-Based Acute Meningitis and Encephalitis Syndromes Surveillance in Guangxi, China, May 2007- June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Wu, Xinghua; Bi, Fuyin; Hadler, Stephen C.; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith; Lin, Mei; Quan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acute meningitis and encephalitis (AME) are common diseases with the main pathogens being viruses and bacteria. As specific treatments are different, it is important to develop clinical prediction rules to distinguish aseptic from bacterial or fungal infection. In this study we evaluated the incidence rates, seasonal variety and the main etiologic agents of AME, and identified factors that could be used to predict the etiologic agents. Methods A population-based AME syndrome surveillance system was set up in Guigang City, Guangxi, involving 12 hospitals serving the study communities. All patients meeting the case definition were investigated. Blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid were tested for bacterial pathogens using culture or RT-PCR and serological tests for viruses using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Laboratory testing variables were grouped using factor analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to predict the etiology of AME. Results From May 2007 to June 2012, the annual incidence rate of AME syndrome, and disease specifically caused by Japanese encephalitis (JE), other viruses, bacteria and fungi were 12.55, 0.58, 4.57, 0.45 and 0.14 per 100,000 population, respectively. The top three identified viral etiologic agents were enterovirus, mumps virus, and JE virus, and for bacteria/fungi were Streptococcus sp., Cryptococcus neoformans and Staphylococcus sp. The incidence of JE and other viruses affected younger populations and peaked from April to August. Alteration of consciousness and leukocytosis were more likely to be caused by JE, bacteria and fungi whereas CSF inflammation was associated with bacterial/fungal infection. Conclusions With limited predictive validity of symptoms and signs and routine laboratory tests, specific tests for JE virus, mumps virus and enteroviruses are required to evaluate the immunization impact and plan for further intervention. CSF bacterial culture cannot be omitted in guiding clinical decisions

  2. Cutting-edge technology may yield elephants in Orphan basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, W.

    2006-10-15

    Controlled source electromagnetic survey (CSEM) technology may soon supply vital information to oil companies about Newfoundland's offshore basins. The technology shoots low-frequency electromagnetic signals at the sea-floor to measure resistivity. Natural gas, crude oil and water each have a particular strength to resist the power of an electromagnetic signal, and leave a unique signature. To collect data, the electromagnetic pulse emitter is towed back and forth over an area of seabed potentially holding hydrocarbons. Connected to the ship by a long tether, the emitter hangs approximately 30 to 50 m above the ocean floor, and reaches depths of 2.4 km. The sea floor has 36 receivers anchored to it in a grid of concrete blocks that dissolve within 3 months of installation. The test blocks are first dropped overboard to verify current speed and strength in order to calculate exactly where on the water's surface the concrete blocks will be lowered. The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (CNLOPB) has deemed the technology environmentally safe. Eight land parcels have now been leased for exploration in the Orphan Basin and are expected to receive approval for seismic and electromagnetic surveys. Industry players have shown unusual optimism about the basin's potential, which is estimated to contain 4 oilfields containing a billion barrels of oil each. 2 figs.

  3. Ms Naledi G. Pandor Minister of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa Wednesday 22nd June 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    During a visit to CERN on 22 June, Naledi G Pandor, minister of science and technology for the Republic of South Africa, looked round the ATLAS visitor centre with Peter Jenni, former spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment. She also toured the LHC superconducting magnet test hall and the ALICE visitor centre.

  4. Proceedings of the 4th New World Luminescence Dating and Dosimetry Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 31 June 2, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is one of a class of measurements known as stimulated phenomena. Such phenomena may be stimulated thermally or optically and the reader is referred to works by Aitken (1998) and Botter-Jensen and others (2003) for more detail. In recent years OSL has become a popular procedure for the determination of environmental radiation doses absorbed by archeological and geological materials in an attempt to date these materials. The first OSL measurements on quartz and feldspar were made using an argon ion-laser (Huntley et al., 1985). However, the development of cheaper stimulation systems based first on filtered lamps and then on light- emitting diodes (LEDs) (Spooner, et al., 1990; Botter-Jensen, and others, 1999) has led to a massive expansion in OSL dating applications. The abstracts in this volume represent presentations from a workshop held in May-June 2006, at the Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado, in which OSL methodologies and applications were summarized and integrated to provide a current synthesis of the OSL science being applied throughout North America. The workshop, sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Imaging and Characterization Team and North Dakota State University, was open to all scientists interested in OSL dating techniques and radiation dosimetry. Participants included thirty-six research scientists and students in geology, archaeology, and physics from the U.S. Geological Survey, Los Alamos National Labs, Kentucky Geological Survey, eight universities in the United States, one university in Canada, one university in India, and Riso National Labs of Denmark. The workshop included two keynote speakers: Dr. Ashok Singhvi (Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India) spoke on 'Some Unexplored Methodological Aspects and Some New Applications of Luminescence Dating,' while Dr. Jim Feathers (University of Seattle, WA) spoke on OSL Dating of Sediments From Paleoindian Sites in Brazil

  5. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  6. Science& Technology Review November 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Science & Technology Review covers the following topics: (1) We Will Always Need Basic Science--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) When Semiconductors Go Nano--experiments and computer simulations reveal some surprising behavior of semiconductors at the nanoscale; (3) Retinal Prosthesis Provides Hope for Restoring Sight--A microelectrode array is being developed for a retinal prosthesis; (4) Maglev on the Development Track for Urban Transportation--Inductrack, a Livermore concept to levitate train cars using permanent magnets, will be demonstrated on a 120-meter-long test track; and (5) Power Plant on a Chip Moves Closer to Reality--Laboratory-designed fuel processor gives power boost to dime-size fuel cell.

  7. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    The importance of foundry coating in improving the surface quality of castings cannot be over emphasized. The appli-cation of mould and core washes creates a high thermal integrity barrier between the metal and the mould resulting in the reduction of the thermal shock experienced by the sand system....... These thermal shock leads to series of surface de-fects such as veining/finning, metal penetration, burn-on/in, scab, rat tail, erosion etc. The use of coatings reduces the tendency of occurrence of these defects. However, the understanding of the coating, its components, characteristics and mechanism of action...... is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  8. Tidal energy - a technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.

    1991-01-01

    The tides are caused by gravitational attraction of the sun and the moon acting upon the world's oceans. This creates a clean renewable form of energy which can in principle be tapped for the benefit of mankind. This paper reviews the status of tidal energy, including the magnitude of the resource, the technology which is available for its extraction, the economics, possible environmental effects and non-technical barriers to its implementation. Although the total energy flux of the tides is large, at about 2 TW, in practice only a very small fraction of this total potential can be utilised in the foreseeable future. This is because the energy is spread diffusely over a wide area, requiring large and expensive plant for its collection, and is often available remote from centres of consumption. The best mechanism for exploiting tidal energy is to employ estuarine barrages at suitable sites with high tidal ranges. The technology is relatively mature and components are commercially available now. Also, many of the best sites for implementation have been identified. However, the pace and extent of commercial exploitation of tidal energy is likely to be significantly influenced, both by the treatment of environmental costs of competing fossil fuels, and by the availability of construction capital at modest real interest rates. The largest projects could require the involvement of national governments if they are to succeed. (author) 8 figs., 2 tabs., 19 refs

  9. Science& Technology Review October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-10-01

    The October 2003 issue of Science & Technology Review consists of the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Technologies from Collaborative Efforts--Commentary by Hal Graboske; (2) BASIS Counters Airborne Bioterrorism--The Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System is the first integrated biodefense system; (3) In the Chips for the Coming Decade--A new system is the first full-field lithography tool for use at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths; (4) Smoothing the Way to Print the Next Generation of Computer Chips--With ion-beam thin-film planarization, the reticles and projection optics made for extreme ultraviolet lithography are nearly defect-free; (5) Eyes Can See Clearly Now--The MEMS-based adaptive optics phoropter improves the process of measuring and correcting eyesight aberrations; (6) This Switch Takes the Heat--A thermally compensated Q-switch reduces the light leakage on high-average-power lasers; (7) Laser Process Forms Thick, Curved Metal Parts--A new process shapes parts to exact specifications, improving their resistance to fatigue and corrosion cracking; and (8) Characterizing Tiny Objects without Damaging Them--Livermore researchers are developing nondestructive techniques to probe the Lilliputian world of mesoscale objects.

  10. Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, R.H.

    2003-07-21

    In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to

  11. A Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Report for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: May 23, 2014 -- June 5, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States); O' Grady, M. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Renfrow, S. [Abt Environmental Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-09-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in Golden, Colorado, focuses on renewable energy and energy efficiency research. Its portfolio includes advancing renewable energy technologies that can help meet the nation's energy and environmental goals. NREL seeks to better understand the potential effects of climate change on the laboratory--and therefore on its mission--to ensure its ongoing success. Planning today for a changing climate can reduce NREL's risks and improve its resiliency to climate-related vulnerabilities. This report presents a vulnerability assessment for NREL. The assessment was conducted in fall 2014 to identify NREL's climate change vulnerabilities and the aspects of NREL's mission or operations that may be affected by a changing climate.

  12. MSFC Technology Year in Review 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, David; Tinker, Mike

    2015-01-01

    MSFC has a strong diverse portfolio of technology development projects, ranging from flight projects to very low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) laboratory projects. The 2015 Year in Review highlights the Center's technology projects and celebrates their accomplishments to raise awareness of technology development work that is integral to the success of future Agency flight programs.

  13. 2017 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-11-01

    The 2017 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Report summarizes the feedback submitted by reviewers for the 109 Building Technologies Office (BTO) projects presented at the 2017 BTO Peer Review. The report presents an overview of the goals and activities under each technology program area, a summary of project scores for each program, and a brief analysis of general evaluation trends within each program area or its constituent subprograms.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2014 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 16-20, 2014, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2014 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 16-20, 2014, at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  15. Arboviral and other illnesses in travellers returning from Brazil, June 2013 to May 2016: implications for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautret, Philippe; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P.; Rothe, Camilla; von Sonnenburg, Frank; van Genderen, Perry J.; Chappuis, Francois; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Caumes, Eric; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Malvy, Denis; Lopez-Vélez, Rogelio; Jensenius, Mogens; Larsen, Carsten Schade; Castelli, Francesco; Rapp, Christophe; Field, Vanessa; Molina, Israel; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Florescu, Simin; Lalloo, David; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated EuroTravNet (a GeoSentinel subnetwork) data from June 2013 to May 2016 on 508 ill travellers returning from Brazil, to inform a risk analysis for Europeans visiting the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Few dengue fever cases (n = 3) and no cases of chikungunya were

  16. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  17. Review of Desiccant Dehumidification Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    1994-10-01

    This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the I990s.

  18. Mozambique Science, Technology and Innovation Review | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to strengthen the capacity of the Mozambique Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) to govern the country's science, technology and innovation (STI) system, and of researchers and policymakers to conduct systematic reviews of STI policy implementation. It will do so by supporting a review of the ...

  19. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senum, G.I.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: Improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) to apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFI) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of adsorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. Develop additional tracers, and tracer injection, sampling and analyses methodologies for use in petroleum reservoir characterization experiments. Develop a data base of petroleum transport and dispersion properties from tracer experiments for use by modellers for developing, validating and extending petroleum reservoirs models used for characterizing petroleum reservoirs. Technical progress is discussed according to the three ongoing field experiments at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC).

  20. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, April, May, June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The Retort No. 18 burn was terminated on May 11, 1980. A total of 5547 barrels of shale oil or 46 percent of in-place resource was recovered from the retort. The EPA-DOE/LETC post-burn core sampling program is underway on Retort No. 16. Eleven core holes (of 18 planned) have been completed to date. Preliminary results indicate excellent core recovery has been achieved. Recovery of 702 ft of core was accomplished. The Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit application was submitted to the EPA regional office in Denver for review by EPA and Utah air quality officials. The application for an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit to authorize GKI to inject retort wastewater into the Mesa Verde Formation is being processed by the State of Utah. A hearing before the Board of Oil, Gas and Mining is scheduled in Salt Lake City, Utah, for July 22, 1980. Re-entry drilling on Retort No. 24 is progressing and placement of surface equipment is underway. Retort No. 25 blasthole drilling was completed and blast preparations are ongoing. Retort No. 25 will be blasted on July 18, 1980. The retort will be similar to Retort No. 24, with improvements in blasthole loading and detonation. US Patent No. 4,205,610 was assigned to GKI for a shale oil recovery process. Rocky Mountain Energy Company (RME) is evaluating oil shale holdings in Wyoming for application of the GKI process there.

  1. LLE Review Quarterly Report. Volume 79, April-June 1999 [Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) Review, covering the period April-June 1999, features a theoretical analysis of direct-drive target performance on National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this article R. P. J. Town, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, R. W. Short, and S. Skupsky detail ignition target designs developed at LLE specifically to achieve successful direct-drive ignition on the NIF facility. A baseline ''all-DT'' target design is described along with a two shock compression analysis, which includes discussion of the parameters leading to variability in shock timing. The modeling and analysis presented flow down to specification requirements for the laser and target parameters to ignite this baseline target design with the NIF laser

  2. Hydrography, phytoplankton biomass and photosynthesis in shelf and oceanic waters off southeastern Brazil during autumn (may/june, 1983

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Pereira Brandini

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial distribution of chlorophyll-a, phytoplankton photosynthesis and nutrients were studied in relation to the hydrographic environment of the southeastern Brazil from May 3 to June 31 of 1983 during an oceanographia cruise conducted by the R/V "Almirante Saldanha" of the Brazilian Navy. Temperature and salinity at 5 meters depth ranged from 21 to 25º C and from 33.00 to 37.11, respectively. The concentration of nutrients varied, nitrate + nitrite-N from 1.0-3.0 µg-at/l, phosphate-P 0.1-0.9 µg-at/l and silicate-Si 5-25 µg-at/l. The chlorophyll-a concentrations along the coast varied from 0.35 to 1.48 mg/m³ with maxima in front of Paranaguá Bay (PR and over the southern shelf of Santa Catarina State. Low concentrations around 0.20 mg/m³ of uniform distribution were observed in shelf and off-shelf areas. Comparatively high concentrations were measured over the shelf break zone in front of Paranaguá Bay indicationg the occurrence of shelf break upwelling of deep nutrient rich waters. The pattern of vertical distribution was stratified and irregular in coastal stations and uniform in shelf and oceanic waters although some subsurface peaks were sometimes detected. The integrated chlorophyll values within the euphotic layer varied between 2.70 and 28.06 mg/m². The surface photo synthetic capacity varied from 0.4 to 7.7 mgC/mgChl.a/hr with higher values obtained in coastal areas.. The vertical distributions were variable in coastal areas and more uniform in mid-shelf stations. Sub-surface maxima of photosynthesis were detected in both nearshore and off-shore stations, and surface inhibition was not observed.Os padrões de distribuição espacial de parâmetros hidrográficos, clorofila-a e fotossíntese do fitoplancton são estudados em relação ao regime oceanográfico da região sueste do Brasil nos meses de maio e junho de 1983. A região oceânica foi totalmente dominada pela Agua Tropical da Corrente do Brasil (AT com caracter

  3. 2016 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Technologies Office

    2016-12-01

    The 2016 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Report summarizes the feedback submitted by reviewers of the 67 BTO projects presented at the 2016 BTO Peer Review. The report presents an overview of the goals and activities under each technology program area, a summary of project scores for each program, and a brief analysis of general evaluation trends within each program area or its constituent subprograms.

  4. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army, May-June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    agents in Kuala lumpur, malaysia . the cia had information that could have led agent soufan to discover that two of the future 9/11 hijackers had... homelessness , crime, and insecurity. alleviating the environmental conditions that result in near-complete hopelessness can help turn today’s enemies...the Pakistani flag), and in the descend- ing horizontal position, with the crescent pointing downward ( malaysia ). to arabs, the changing appearance of

  5. 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) was held May 13-17, 2013, in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the FCTO and the VTO: a total of 287 individual activities were reviewed for VTO, by a total of 187 reviewers. A total of 1,382 individual review responses were received for the VTO technical reviews. The objective of the meeting was to review the accomplishments and plans for VTO over the previous 12 months, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academia to give inputs to DOE on the Office with a structured and formal methodology. The meeting also provided attendees with a forum for interaction and technology information transfer.

  6. Technological adjuncts to enhance current psychotherapy practices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bonnie A; Casey, Leanne M

    2011-04-01

    Although there are several of reviews of technology in psychology, none to date has focused on technological adjuncts for improving traditional face to face therapy. However, examination of response, adherence, and dropout rates suggests there is considerable scope for improving traditional face to face services. The purpose of this paper was to examine technological adjuncts used to enhance psychotherapy practice. This review focused only on those technologies designed to supplement or enhance traditional therapy methods. Adjuncts designed to reduce direct therapist contact or change the medium of communication were not included. Adjuncts reviewed were mobile phones, personal digital assistants, biofeedback and virtual reality. Limitations in the current literature and directions for future research were identified and discussed. This review provides a comprehensive examination of the way in which adjunctive technologies may be incorporated into face to face therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of quality control tests done by the Canadian power utilities on their external dosimetry systems (June 1988 to May 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, K.A.; Poirier, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    The Canadian nuclear power utilities, Hydro-Quebec, New Brunswick Electric Power Commission and Ontario Hydro, use thermoluminescent dosimetry systems to perform their own external beta/gamma dosimetry. In order to help ensure that these systems perform satisfactorily, they are subjected to routine quality control testing by their parent organizations. The test results for the period of June 1988 to May 1993 have been analyzed, at the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), using the pass criterion which was originally agreed upon the organizations involved and which is described in section 2.3 of this document. The present analysis offers an indication of the performance of the different sites which operate such a service. Comparisons are made each site's performance during the period June 1985 to May 1988 which has been summarized previously (INFO--0301). Finally, recommendations are made in the hope that they will help the organizations in refining their dosimetry. (author) 1 ref., 7 tabs

  8. Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, P.L.

    1977-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards implementing all of the prescribed studies and satisfying the stated objectives since the Oil Shale Rehabilitation Project was actively initiated in June 1976. Concurrent with implementation, research objectives were substantively defined and supplemented without distracting or departing from the original purpose. Current studies are designed to fill voids in the present status of knowledge regarding lands disturbed by an impending oil shale industry in Colorado. The efforts of all contributing investigators have therefore been integrated and directed toward the goal of developing methodologies requisite for restoring diverse and complex ecosystems which will require only a minimal amount of maintenance or input of scarce resources. An intensive study site southeast of the Oil Shale Tract C-a has been obtained through a Cooperative Agreement with the Bureau of Land Management. Following this agreement, most subprojects were initiated at the intensive site. Additional programs will be implemented as spent shale becomes available this summer. Studies conducted principally in the laboratory and greenhouse, such as the microbiological and plant genetic studies, have achieved significant results.

  9. Formation and sustainment of a very low aspect ratio tokamak using coaxial helicity injection. Final report, June 1, 1995--May 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    During the reporting period of this HIT grant (1 June 1995--31 May 1997) we've conducted further stability analysis, used the TIP diagnostic to measure plasma fields in HIT, and developed a single-parameter helicity injector model. HIT has undergone a significant upgrade to the HIT-II configuration which is described here. Parts for HIT-II have been designed, ordered, and received under this grant and are being assembled under the subsequent grant

  10. A comprehensive review on proppant technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main function of traditional proppants is to provide and maintain conductive fractures during well production where proppants should meet closure stress requirement and show resistance to diagenesis under downhole conditions. Many different proppants have been developed in the oil & gas industry, with various types, sizes, shapes, and applications. While most proppants are simply made of silica or ceramics, advanced proppants like ultra-lightweight proppant is also desirable since it reduces proppant settling and requires low viscosity fluids to transport. Additionally, multifunctional proppants may be used as a crude way to detect hydraulic fracture geometry or as matrices to slowly release downhole chemical additives, besides their basic function of maintaining conductive hydraulic fractures. Different from the conventional approach where proppant is pumped downhole in frac fluids, a revolutionary way to generate in-situ spherical proppants has been reported recently. This paper presents a comprehensive review of over 100 papers published in the past several decades on the subject. The objectives of this review study are to provide an overview of current proppant technologies, including different types, compositions, and shapes of proppants, new technologies to pump and organize proppants downhole such as channel fracturing, and also in-situ proppant generation. Finally, the paper sheds light on the current challenges and emphasizes needs for new proppant development for unconventional resources.

  11. Materials technology for coal-conversion processes. Eighteenth quarterly report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, W. A.

    1979-11-01

    A 500-h test run, exposing 11 water-cooled refractories to basic slag (B/A = 1.5), was completed. High chromia content and high density again appeared to be significant factors contributing to the corrosion resistance of refractories used for slag containment. A literature review on high-temperature ultrasonic coupling was completed and suggested that studies on long-term (months to years) pressure-coupling stability are needed. Flow-induced acoustic-energy studies (relevant to acoustic leak detection) suggested that a 20% coal-water slurry flowing through an orifice under pressure produces acoustic-energy excitation mainly at frequencies < 65 kHz, and that a better correlation between acoustic rms levels and flow rate is obtained as the differential pressure is increased. Corrosion studies of Type 310 stainless steel at 1000/sup 0/C with various P/sub O2/ and P/sub S2/ suggested that titanium addition increases the corrosion rate relative to that of commercially available steels. Fluid-bed corrosion studies showed that at temperatures of 800-1000 K addition of salt has no effect on the corrosion behavior of any material examined. Failure analyses were performed on a cyclone nozzle from the Westinghouse Waltz-Mill combined cycle coal-gasification plant and an external cyclone from the Morgantown Energy Technology Center Stirred-bed Gasifier.

  12. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

  13. A compendium of results from long-range alpha detector soil surface monitoring: June 1992--May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, S.E.; Bounds, J.A.; Allander, K.S.; Johnson, J.D.; MacArthur, D.W.; Caress, R.W.

    1994-11-01

    Soil surface monitors based on long-range alpha detector (LRAD) technology are being used to monitor alpha contamination at various sites in the Department of Energy complex. These monitors, the large soil-surface monitor (LSSM) and the small soil-surface monitor (SSSM), were used to help characterize sites at Fernald, Ohio, and active or inactive firing sites at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Monitoring results are presented herein in chronological order

  14. CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 24, Number 3, May/June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    standards available such as ISO 12207, ISO 9001 and the Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI®) [24,25,26]. The CMMI was a collaborative effort...Cycle Systems Engineering. 2007 24. CMMI® for Development, Version 1.2. Pittsburgh: Carnegie Mellon University, 2006. 25. “ ISO 9001 .” Quality Management...CrossTalk, The Journal of Defense Software Engineering is co-sponsored by the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics

  15. 2013 Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office's Peer Review meeting.

  16. New nuclear technology; International developments. Review 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.; Aggeryd, I.; Hultgren, Aa.; Lundell, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1995-09-01

    A summary review of the development of new nuclear rector technology is presented in this report. Fuel cycle strategies and waste handling developments are also commented. Different plans for dismantling nuclear weapons are presented. 18 refs

  17. Energy technology review, July--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy Technology Review'' gives the annual review of the programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This State of the Laboratory issue includes discussions of all major programs: Defense Systems; Laser Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Energy and Earth Sciences; Environmental Technology Program; Biomedical and Environmental Science; Engineering; Physics; Chemistry and Materials Science; Computations; and Administrative and Institutional Services. An index is also given of the 1991 achievements with contact names and telephone number.

  18. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation

  19. Land 125 - Power Technologies Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    technology is a Canadian product, the “ Bionic Energy Harvester”, which is a knee brace that harvests energy from the motion of the knee joint. It is...Needs of Future Warriors. Washington D.C., USA: The National Academies Press, 2004. [2] Task Force Devil Combined Arms Assessment Team. The Modern

  20. Solar--geophysical data number 406, June 1978, Part I. (prompt reports). Data for May 1978, April 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1978-06-01

    This prompt report provides data for May 1978 on: alert period, daily solar indices, solar flares, solar radio waves, solar x-ray radiation, coronal holes, inferred IP Magnetic field polarities, mean solar magnetic field, solar wind measurements, geomagnetic substorms, magnetograms of geomagnetic storm 30 April - 4 May, and energetic solar particles. It also provides data for April 1978 on: daily solar activity center, sudden ionospheric disturbances, solar x-ray radiation, solar radio waves, cosmic rays, geomagnetic indices, and radio propagation

  1. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Annual Technology Review covers the period from October 1983 to September 1984. Topics reviewed include Nuclear Criticality Information System, nuclear dosimetry, personnel dosimetry, laser chemistry, electric filters and neutron spectrometry. Individual papers are indexed and abstracted for the data base. (DT)

  2. State of the technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spino, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a review of different behaviours of fuel elements in relation to fission gases. The influence of the fission gas level and its location regarding differential fuel structures is commented. The gas release process at high burnup is described and some topics that need to be further investigated are suggested. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on national/regional energy-environmental modeling concepts, May 30-June 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschard, R.L.; Haven, K.F.; Ruderman, H.; Sathaye, J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to identify and evaluate approaches to regional economic and energy supply/demand forecasting that are best suited to assisting DOE in the assessment of environmental impacts of national energy policies. Specifically the DOE Office of Technology Impacts uses models to assess the impacts of technology change; to analyze differential impacts of various energy policies; and to provide an early-warning system of possible environmental constraints to energy development. Currently, OTI employs both a top-down model system to analyze national scenarios and a bottom-up assessment conducted from a regional perspective. A central theme of the workshop was to address the problem of how OTI should integrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches. The workshop was structured to use the experience of many fields of regional analysis toward resolving that problem. For the short-term, recommendations were suggested for improving the current OTI models, but most of the comments were directed toward the development of a new methodology. It was recommended that a core set of related models be developed that are modular, dynamic and consistent: they would require an inter-industry accounting framework; inter-regional linkages; and adequate documentation. Further, it was suggested that an advisory group be formed to establish the appropriate methodological framework of the model system. With regard to data used in any policy analysis model, it was recommended that OTI develop and maintain an integrated system of economic, environmental, and energy accounts that is coordinated with the statistical agencies that collect the data.

  4. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  5. Solar-Geophysical Data Number 562, June 1991. Part 1 (prompt reports). Data for May, April 1991, and late data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1991-06-01

    The contents include: Detailed index for 1990-1991; Data for May 1991--Solar-terrestrial environment, IUWDS alert periods (advance and worldwide), Solar activity indices, Solar flares, Solar radio emission, Stanford mean solar magnetic field; Data for April 1991--Solar active regions, Sudden ionospheric disturbances, Solar radio spectral observations, Cosmic ray measurements by neutron monitor, Geomagnetic indices; Late data--Solar radio emission March-April 1991, Geomagnetic indices February-March 1991, Solar active regions errata March 1991

  6. Solar-Geophysical Data Number 538, June 1989. Part 1 (prompt reports). Data for May, April 1989, and late data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1989-06-01

    Contents include: detailed index for 1988-1989; data for May 1989--(IUWDS alert periods (advance and worldwide), solar activity indices, solar flares, solar radio emission, Stanford mean solar magnetic field); data for April 1989--(solar-active regions, sudden ionospheric disturbances, solar radio-spectral observations, geomagnetic indices, radio-propagation indices); late data--(solar active regions--H-alpha synoptic charts 1813 March 1989, solar radio emission--Nancay 169-Mhz solar interferometric chart April 1989, cosmic rays climax and Huancayo--March 1989, geomagnetic indices-sudden commencements/solar flare effects February 1989)

  7. Effects of radiations on DNA and repair of the damage. Progress report, May 1, 1974--June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, F.

    1977-01-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by gamma rays takes place in E. coli. Such repair requires recA function and the presence of another DNA molecule of the same base sequence, so it may involve a recombination-like event. Ultraviolet light acting on DNA containing bromouracil produces doublestrand breaks by single photochemical events, and a simple model can explain this, as well as other results. Bromouracil mutagenesis of either E. coli or lambda phage does not involve the recA or red functions. Bromouracil mutagenesis is greatly increased in E. coli mutants such as uvrE, mutL, mutR and mutS, which are defective in mismatch repair. This, and other results, suggest that bromouracil mutagenesis occurs when cell enzymes fail to remove mismatched bases. Ultraviolet mutagenesis of lambda phage may be a useful model for the study of mutagenesis in cells, because the effects of lesions in the gene mutated (i.e. in the phage) and changes in enzyme systems (by treating the host cells) can be examined separately. Quantitative data support this approach

  8. Managing Psychiatrist-Patient Relationships in the Digital Age: a Summary Review of the Impact of Technology-enabled Care on Clinical Processes and Rapport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Michelle Burke; Fazio, Sarina; Chan, Steven; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2017-10-27

    Participatory medicine and the availability of commercial technologies have given patients more options to view and track their health information and to communicate with their providers. This shift in the clinical process may be of particular importance in mental healthcare where rapport plays a significant role in the therapeutic process. In this review, we examined literature related to the impact of technology on the clinical workflow and patient-provider rapport in the mental health field between January 2014 and June 2017. Thirty three relevant articles, of 226 identified articles, were summarized. The use of technology clinically has evolved from making care more accessible and efficient to leveraging technology to improve care, communication, and patient-provider rapport. Evidence exists demonstrating that information and communication technologies may improve care by better connecting patients and providers and by improving patient-provider rapport, although further research is needed.

  9. Data Validation Package May and June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, August 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dick; Tsosie, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from monitoring wells at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site to monitor groundwater contaminants as specified in the 1997 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Bluewater (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site Near Grants, New Mexico (LTSP). Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations 14(SG) and 21(M). Sampling originally scheduled for the week of May 11, 2015 was interrupted by heavy rainfall and later completed in June.

  10. Atlantic Coastal experiment III, FRV Delaware II cruise, 17-27 May 1977 and R/V ONRUST cruise, 28-30, June 1977. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, S.; Stoddard, A.; von Bock, K. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    The DELAWARE II and ONRUST cruises, continuations of Atlantic Coastal Experiment III, were made during May and late June, 1977, to compare seasonal changes in chlorophyll a, nitrogen nutrient, dissolved oxygen and phytoplankton composition within the mid-Atlantic and New York Bights. Data from 106 stations and 3300 km of surface mapping are reported as classical hydrographic listings, areal and/or vertical contours of chlorophyll a, inorganic nitrogen and salinity, and listings of phytoplankton species abun- dance. Temperature profiles from 100 stations are included, as well as res- piration experiments [ETS assay] for the dinoflagellate, Ceratium tripos.

  11. Data Validation Package May and June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, August 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dick [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsosie, Bernadette [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from monitoring wells at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site to monitor groundwater contaminants as specified in the 1997 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Bluewater (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site Near Grants, New Mexico (LTSP). Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations 14(SG) and 21(M). Sampling originally scheduled for the week of May 11, 2015 was interrupted by heavy rainfall and later completed in June.

  12. Arboviral and other illnesses in travellers returning from Brazil, June 2013 to May 2016: implications for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P; Rothe, Camilla; von Sonnenburg, Frank; van Genderen, Perry J; Chappuis, Francois; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Caumes, Eric; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Malvy, Denis; Lopez-Vélez, Rogelio; Jensenius, Mogens; Larsen, Carsten Schade; Castelli, Francesco; Rapp, Christophe; Field, Vanessa; Molina, Israel; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Florescu, Simin; Lalloo, David; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2016-07-07

    We evaluated EuroTravNet (a GeoSentinel subnetwork) data from June 2013 to May 2016 on 508 ill travellers returning from Brazil, to inform a risk analysis for Europeans visiting the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Few dengue fever cases (n = 3) and no cases of chikungunya were documented during the 2013-15 Brazilian winter months, August and September, the period when the Games will be held. The main diagnoses were dermatological (37%), gastrointestinal (30%), febrile systemic illness (29%) and respiratory (11%). This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  13. Energy & Technology Review, March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.; Van Dyke, P. [eds.

    1994-03-01

    This monthly report of research activities at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory highlights three different research programs. First, the Forensic Science Center supports a broad range of analytical techniques that focus on detecting and analyzing chemical, biological, and nuclear species. Analyses are useful in the areas of nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and law enforcement. Second, starting in 1977, the laboratory initiated a series of studies to understand a high incidence of melanoma among employees. Continued study shows that mortality from this disease has decreased from the levels seen in the 1980`s. Third, to help coordinate the laboratory`s diverse research projects that can provide better healthcare tools to the public, the lab is creating the new Center for Healthcare Technologies.

  14. Science & Technology Review December 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-10-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Homeland Security Begins Abroad--Commentary by John C. Doesburg; (2) Out of Harm's Way--New physical protection and accountability systems, together with a focus on security, safeguard nuclear materials in the Russian Federation; (3) A Calculated Journey to the Center of the Earth--Determining the permeability of partially melted metals in a mineral matrix unlocks secrets about the formation of Earth's core; (4) Wireless That Works--Communication technologies using ultrawideband radar are improving national security; and (5) Power to the People--Edward Teller envisioned safe and plentiful nuclear power for peaceful applications.

  15. Science & Technology Review March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2010-01-29

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Countering the Growing Chem-Bio Threat -- Commentary by Penrose (Parney) C. Albright; (2) Responding to a Terrorist Attack Involving Chemical Warfare Agents -- Livermore scientists are helping the nation strengthen plans to swiftly respond to an incident involving chemical warfare agents; (3) Revealing the Secrets of a Deadly Disease -- A Livermore-developed system helps scientists better understand how plague bacteria infect healthy host cells; (4) A New Application for a Weapons Code -- Simulations reveal for the first time how blast waves cause traumatic brain injuries; (5) Testing Valuable National Assets for X-Ray Damage -- Experiments at the National Ignition Facility are measuring the effects of radiation on critical systems; and (6) An Efficient Way to Harness the Sun's Power -- New solar thermal technology is designed to supply residential electric power at nearly half of the current retail price.

  16. Integrative study of the behavior of transuranic elements in the marine environment. Progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Morse, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This study defines the redox and complexed species of actinide elements dissolved in seawaters. The sorption kinetics of actinides in different oxidation states to various common mineral surfaces found in marine systems is also studied. In the absence of organics (artificial seawater), the halflife for reduction of plutonium(V) was 98 days in the absence of light and 50 days upon regular exposure to daylight. For natural seawater the reduction halflife in solutions kept in the dark was 32 days while those exposed to daylight showed very little reduction. The photolysis of the organic material may result in the production of an oxidant such as H 2 O 2 which may counter natural reducing properties of the humic materials, resulting in a relatively stable Pu(V) concentration in surface seawater. The kinetics and mechanisms of actinide complexation by humic acid were studied. Upon mixing Th(IV) and humic acid all the Th(IV) is bound within one minute. However, the desorption rate varies greatly depending upon the amount of time that the bound thorium has been allowed to remain on the humic acid. Thorium seems to migrate to at least three different sites from which it is removed with more difficulty. PuO 2 1+ ion has been sorbed onto a variety of mineral surfaces. On carbonates it does not undergo significant change in oxidation state. However, on MnO 2 , the Pu(V) is oxidized to Pu(VI). Goethite results in a disproportionation reaction of Pu(V). This slow reaction results in the desorption of the Pu(VI) so that the dominant species remaining on the surface is Pu(IV)

  17. 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geothermal Technologies Office

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal Technologies Office conducted its annual program peer review in April of 2013. The review provided an independent, expert evaluation of the technical progress and merit of GTO-funded projects. Further, the review was a forum for feedback and recommendations on future GTO strategic planning. During the course of the peer review, DOE-funded projects were evaluated for 1) their contribution to the mission and goals of the GTO and 2) their progress against stated project objectives. Principal Investigators (PIs) came together in sessions organized by topic “tracks” to disseminate information, progress, and results to a panel of independent experts as well as attendees.

  18. Ultrasonication and food technology: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishrat Majid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With increasing consumers demand and tightening of food and environmental regulations, traditional food-processing techniques have lost their optimum performance which gave rise to new and powerful technologies. Ultrasonic is a one of the fast, versatile, emerging, and promising non-destructive green technology used in the food industry from last few years. The ultrasound is being carried out in various areas of food technology namely crystallization, freezing, bleaching, degassing, extraction, drying, filtration, emulsification, sterilization, cutting, etc. Ultrasound is being applied as an effective preservation tool in many food-processing fields viz. vegetables and fruits, cereal products, honey, gels, proteins, enzymes, microbial inactivation, cereal technology, water treatment, diary technology, etc. This review summarizes the latest knowledge on impact and application of ultrasound in food technology.

  19. Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks

  20. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  1. The delineation and interpretation of the earth's gravity field. Annual progress report, 1 June 1988-31 May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, B.D.

    1989-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the mechanical interaction of a growing lithosphere containing fracture zones with small and large scale mantle convection, which gives rise to geoid anomalies in oceanic regions, a series of fluid dynamical experiments is in progress to investigate: (1) the influence of lithosphere structure, fluid depth and viscosity field on the onset, scale, and evolution of sublithospheric convection; (2) the role of this convection in determining the rate of growth of lithosphere, especially in light of the flattening of the lithosphere bathymetry and heat flow at late times; and (3) combining the results of both numerical and laboratory experiments to decide the dominate factors in producing geoid anomalies in oceanic regions through the thermo-mechanical interaction of the lithosphere and subjacent mantle. The clear existence of small scale convection associated with a downward propagating solidification front (i.e., the lithosphere) and a larger scale flow associated with a discontinuous upward heat flux (i.e., a fracture zone) has been shown. The flows exist simultaneously and each may have a significant role in deciding the thermal evolution of the lithosphere and in understanding the relation of shallow mantle convection to deep mantle convection. This overall process is reflected in the geoid, gravity, and topographic anomalies in the north-central Pacific. These highly correlated fields of intermediate wavelength (approx. 200 to 2000 km) show isostatic compensation by a thin lithosphere for shorter (less than or equal to approx. 500 km), but not the longer, wavelengths. The ultimate, dynamic origin of this class of anomalies is being investigated

  2. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R γ) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth

  3. Science & Technology Review March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-01-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Seismic Science and Nonproliferation--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Sleuthing Seismic Signals--Supercomputer simulations improve the accuracy of models used to distinguish nuclear explosions from earthquakes and pinpoint their location; (3) Wind and the Grid--The Laboratory lends technical expertise to government and industry to more effectively integrate wind energy into the nation's electrical infrastructure; (4) Searching for Tiny Signals from Dark Matter--Powerful amplifiers may for the first time allow researchers to detect axions, hypothesized particles that may constitute 'dark matter', and (5) A Better Method for Self-Decontamination--A prototype decontamination system could one day allow military personnel and civilians to better treat themselves for exposure to toxic chemicals.

  4. Arsenic accumulation in maize crop (Zea mays): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Garza-González, M T; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid that may represent a serious environmental threat, due to its wide abundance and the high toxicity particularly of its inorganic forms. The use of arsenic-contaminated groundwater for irrigation purposes in crop fields elevates the arsenic concentration in topsoil and its phytoavailability for crops. The transfer of arsenic through the crops-soil-water system is one of the more important pathways of human exposure. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, maize (Zea mays L.) is the most cultivated cereal in the world. This cereal constitutes a staple food for humans in the most of the developing countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Thus, this review summarizes the existing literature concerning the conditions involved in agricultural soil that leads to As influx into maize crops and the uptake mechanisms, metabolism and phytotoxicity of As in corn plants. Additionally, the studies of the As accumulation in raw corn grain and corn food are summarized, and the As biotransfer into the human diet is highlighted. Due to high As levels found in editable plant part for livestock and humans, the As uptake by corn crop through water-soil-maize system may represent an important pathway of As exposure in countries with high maize consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over$5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal-abundant, secure, and economical-can continue in its

  6. USGS field activities 11BHM01 and 11BHM02 on the west Florida shelf, Gulf of Mexico, May and June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, Paul O.; Daly, Kendra L.; Taylor, Carl A.; Barrera, Kira E.

    2014-01-01

    During May and June 2011 the (USGS), in cooperation with (USF), conducted geochemical surveys on the west Florida Shelf to investigate the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the northern Gulf of Mexico, specifically, the effect of ocean acidification on marine organisms and habitats. The first cruise was conducted from May 3 to 9 (11BHM01) and the second was from June 25 to 30 (11BHM02). To view each cruise's survey lines, please see the Trackline page. Each cruise took place aboard the Research Vessel (R/V) Weatherbird II, a ship of opportunity led by Dr. Kendra Daly (USF), which departed from and returned to Saint Petersburg, Florida. Data collection included sampling of the surface and water column with lab analysis of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) or total carbon dioxide (TCO2), and total alkalinity (TA). lLb analysis was augmented with a continuous flow-through system (referred to as sonde data) with a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor, which also recorded salinity and pH. Corroborating the USGS data are the vertical CTD profiles (referred to as station samples) collected by USF. The CTD casts measured continuous vertical profiles of oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence and optical backscatter. Discrete samples for nutrients, chlorophyll, and particulate organic carbon/nitrogen were also collected during the CTD casts. Two autonomous flow-through (AFT) instruments recorded pH and CO2 every 3-5 minutes on each cruise (referred to as AFT data).

  7. Science & Technology Review April 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-27

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Shaking the Foundations of Solar-System Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention--The first samples retrieved from a comet are a treasure trove of surprises to Laboratory researchers; (3) Fire in the Hole--Underground coal gasification may help to meet future energy supply challenges with a production process from the past; (4) Big Physics in Small Spaces--A newly developed computer model successfully simulates particle-laden fluids flowing through complex microfluidic systems; (5) A New Block on the Periodic Table--Livermore and Russian scientists add a new block to the periodic table with the creation of element 118; and (6) A Search for Patterns and Connections--Throughout his career, Edward Teller searched for mathematical solutions to explain the physical world.

  8. Science & Technology Review September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2006-07-18

    This month's article has the following articles: (1) Simulations Help Plan for Large Earthquakes--Commentary by Jane C. S. Long; (2) Re-creating the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake--Supercomputer simulations of Bay Area earthquakes are providing insight into the great 1906 quake and future temblors along several faults; (3) Decoding the Origin of a Bioagent--The microstructure of a bacterial organism can be linked to the methods used to formulate the pathogen; (4) A New Look at How Aging Bones Fracture--Livermore scientists find that the increased risk of fracture from osteoporosis may be due to a change in the physical structure of trabecular bone; and (5) Fusion Targets on the Double--Advances in precision manufacturing allow the production of double-shell fusion targets with submicrometer tolerances.

  9. Science & Technology Review January/February 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  10. Science & Technology Review October/November 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  11. Science & Technology Review January/February 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  12. Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linville, B. (ed.)

    1982-10-01

    This report primarily covers in-house oil, gas, and synfuel research and lists the contracted research. The report is broken into the following areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction, processing, utilization, and project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are listed. (DLC)

  13. May/June Activity Notebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jacqueline, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Presents hand-on, standards-based activities in language arts, math, science, and social studies, including a daily almanac; bookmark buddies; word palettes; bowling for numbers; math thought teasers; plant puzzles; fingerprint fun; a travel bureau; and an end-of-the-year bulletin board of people involved in interesting activities. Reproducible…

  14. Loglines. May-June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    contingency, like a humanitarian assistance operation for an earthquake or tsunami, the vendor is required to be able to surge to 300 percent of what their...was evident in the exercise’s international partners, includ- ing Australia, Canada, Chile , Colombia, France, Indonesia, India, Mexico, The guided

  15. Loglines. May-June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Module. VSM is another Web-based system that taps into DLA’s Distribution Standard System for addressing and routing inform- ation. The module...take control of freight at the vendor dock through the Vendor Shipment Model. Troup said the advantage of VSM for customers is giving them real...Nugent said. “By showing them in the manual, I was able to help them expedite future requests.” Nugent said the manual was designed for customers and

  16. Loglines. May-June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    specification jet fuel. — Photo by Air Force Airman 1st Class Trevor T. McBride ENERGY EXPANSION Story by Sara Moore ven as Defense Logistics Agency...commercial jet fuel, which is readily available in the region, and inject the necessary additives to and deliver it on a destination basis...capabilities to provide timely support to various functional and geographic combatant commands. The exercises, Turbo Challenge 15, Austere Challenge 15

  17. Technical training: Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design' and 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE' course sessions, May-June 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    The next session of the course 'Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design'given in English by Doulos Ltd (UK) will take place at CERN from May 29 through June 2nd (5 days), for a maximum of 14 participants. It will be preceded by an optional, refresher session of the two-day course 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE', given on 23-24 May, in French, by Serge Brobecker of IT/DES. For more information, please visit the Technical Training CTA website, http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300, to consult the detailed course descriptions and to apply via EDH. Organiser: Davide Vitè / HR-PMD / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING technical.training@cern.ch

  18. CERN Technical Training 2006: 'Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design' and 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE' course sessions, May-June 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Learning for the LHC! The next session of the course 'Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design' given in English by Doulos Ltd (UK) will take place at CERN from May 29 through June 2nd (5 days), for a maximum of 14 participants. It will be preceded by an optional, refresher session of the two-day course 'Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE', given on 23-24 May, in French, by Serge Brobecker of IT/DES. For more information, please visit the Technical Training CTA website, http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300, to consult the detailed course descriptions and to apply via EDH. Organiser: Davide Vitè / HR-PMD / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING technical.training@cern.ch

  19. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the Laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled multi-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CPAM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections), as follows. Theme 1: Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the Laboratory. Theme 2: Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution

  20. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical

  1. Book review Information and Communication Technologies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book review. Information and Communication Technologies for Development in Africa: Volume 2. The Experience with Community Telecentres By Florence Etta and Sheila Parvyn-Wamahiu (2003). Kibet A Ngetich. Abstract. No Abstract Available Africa Development Vol. XXX (1&2) 2005: 254-256. Article Metrics. No metrics ...

  2. Book review Information and Communication Technologies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book review. Information and Communication Technologies for Development in Africa: Volume 2. The Experience with Community Telecentres By Florence Etta and Sheila Parvyn-Wamahiu (2003). Kibet A Ngetich. Abstract. No Abstract Available Africa Development Vol. XXX (1&2) 2005: 254-256.

  3. Review of containment vent filter technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The technology applied for the design and construction of containment vent filters is compiled and reviewed. The national positions leading to the selection of venting or method of filtration are extracted from position papers. Several areas of further information needs are identified

  4. Evaluation of moisture sources for the Central European summer flood of May/June 2013 based on regional climate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanni D. Kelemen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Heavy precipitation affected Central Europe in May/June 2013, triggering damaging floods both on the Danube and the Elbe rivers. Based on a modelling approach with COSMO-CLM, moisture fluxes, backward trajectories, cyclone tracks and precipitation fields are evaluated for the relevant time period 30 May–2 June 2013. We identify potential moisture sources and quantify their contribution to the flood event focusing on the Danube basin through sensitivity experiments: Control simulations are performed with undisturbed ERA-Interim boundary conditions, while multiple sensitivity experiments are driven with modified evaporation characteristics over selected marine and land areas. Two relevant cyclones are identified both in reanalysis and in our simulations, which moved counter-clockwise in a retrograde path from Southeastern Europe over Eastern Europe towards the northern slopes of the Alps. The control simulations represent the synoptic evolution of the event reasonably well. The evolution of the precipitation event in the control simulations shows some differences in terms of its spatial and temporal characteristics compared to observations. The main precipitation event can be separated into two phases concerning the moisture sources. Our modelling results provide evidence that the two main sources contributing to the event were the continental evapotranspiration (moisture recycling; both phases and the North Atlantic Ocean (first phase only. The Mediterranean Sea played only a minor role as a moisture source. This study confirms the importance of continental moisture recycling for heavy precipitation events over Central Europe during the summer half year.

  5. 16th International Command and Control Research Technology Symposium (ICCRTS) June 2011 Overseas Visit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Williams Consultants pierrette.cwc@gmail.com 34 Chan Kevin Army Research Laboratory kevin.s.chan@arl.army.mil 35 Cheah Mervyn Singapore Technologies...Jervell.Hansen@ffi.no 76 Happe Jens MDA jhappe@mdacorporation.com 77 Hayes Richard E. Evidence Based Research rehayes@ebrinc.com 78 Hazen Mark DRDC...Singapore Ministry of Defence Ong_Ming_Yi@starnet.gov.sg 123 Mitchell William Royal Danish Defence College IMO-11@fak.dk 124 Morales-Perea Ernesto

  6. MHD air heater development technology. Technical progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Technology development for the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described. Work is being done under three tasks as described in the following. (1) materials selection, evaluation, and development: The objective of this task is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. The scope of the work will include compilation of materials data, materials selection for testing and design studies, materials property determination, liaison with refractory manufacturers and other organizations to encourage development of materials and fabrication technology, establishment of preliminary HTAH material specifications, analyses of test materials, and development of criteria for thermal stress limits for crack-tolerant refractory materials. (2) operability, performance, and materials testing: The objectives of this task are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. (3) full-scale design concepts: The objectives of this task are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. Progress is described. (WHK)

  7. Advanced conversion technology review panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) established a DOE lead management team and an Advanced Conversion Technology Review Panel. The panel was tasked with providing the management team with an assessment and ranking of the three advanced conversion technologies. The three advanced conversion technologies were alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC), Stirling engine converter (SEC), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV). To rate and rank these three technologies, five criteria were developed: (1) Performance, (2) Development and Cost/Production and Cost/Schedule Risk, (3) Spacecraft Interface and Operations, (4) Ability to Scale Conversion, and (5) Safety. Discussed are the relative importance of each of these criteria and the rankings of the three advanced conversion technologies. It was the conclusion of the panel that the technology decision should be based on the risk that DOE and NASA are willing to accept. SEC is the most mature technology and would provide the lowest risk option. However, if more risk is acceptable, AMTEC not only provides benefits in the spacecraft interface but is also predicted to outperform the SEC. It was proposed that if AMTEC were selected, funding should be provided at a reasonable level to support back-up technology to be developed in a parallel fashion until AMTEC has proven its capability. The panel report and conclusion were provided to DOE in February 1997

  8. Contactless Patient Monitoring for General Wards: A Systematic Technology Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziyok, Tolga P; Zeleke, Atinkut A; Röhrig, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Sudden, serious life-threatening situations happen even on general wards. Current technologies are working with sensors which are attached to every patient, which is a source of failures and false alarms. The goal of this review was to assess the state of the art of potential techniques for contactless patient monitoring in general wards. The MEDLINE database was used for literature retrieval. 453 unique references screened, 34 research articles met inclusion criteria. Ballistocardiography, Radar and Thermography technologies are the most widely tested techniques. The Majority of the studies are done in a laboratory setting. No study shows the feasibility of one contactless monitoring technology over the distance required for monitoring rooms. Today no technology is feasible. A combination of technologies may become feasible in 10 or more years, until then we have to think about ethical and privacy issues of these pervasive technologies.

  9. Nuclear technology: the role of the IAEA. Ninth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems, Tel Aviv, 28 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Ninth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, in Tel Aviv, Israel, on 28 June 1998. The Director General outlines the role of the IAEA in assisting its Member States to meet the challenges facing the use of nuclear energy, based on the Agency' mandate on the following inter-related tasks: ta act as a catalyst for the scientific community and as a hub for state-of-the-art technology; to act as a centre for the transfer of nuclear technologies so as to ensure their accessibility to member State in general, and to developing countries in particular; to assist Member States to make informed and appropriate choices concerning the energy mix by producing comparative assessments of nuclear and other technologies; to strive for the highest level of safety in all areas of the use of nuclear energy; and to assure, through its verification system, the pledges to use nuclear energy exclusively for peaceful purposes are fulfilled

  10. Review of the French photovoltaic facilities connected to the grid at the end of June 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This newsletter takes stock of the evolution of the photovoltaic power plants connected and waiting to be connected to the French national grid (mainland France and overseas territories), at the national and regional scale, and sorted by power categories. This issue takes stock of the situation at the end of June 2013

  11. Coin exposure may cause allergic nickel dermatitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Gawkrodger, David J; White, Ian R; Julander, Anneli; Menné, Torkil; Lidén, Carola

    2013-01-01

    Nickel is used in coins because the metal has beneficial properties, including price, colour, weight, and corrosion resistance, and also because it is easy to stamp. It has often been claimed that the duration of skin contact with coins is too short to cause nickel release and dermatitis. However, it is well known by dermatologists specialized in occupational skin diseases, and by their nickel-allergic patients, that hand eczema in cashiers and other professionals who handle coins may be caused or aggravated by nickel release from coins. In this review, we present evidence from past studies showing that nickel-containing coins can indeed pose a risk for those who handle them. For protection of the health of consumers, cashiers, and other workers who handle coins, it is suggested that coins without nickel release should be used as a substitute for the high nickel-releasing coins currently in widespread use. The key risk factor in this situation is the ability of metal alloys in coins to release nickel and contaminate the skin after repeated contact from coin handling. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Science and Technology Review April/May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L A

    2012-03-07

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Lawrence Livermore as the 'Go-To' National Security Laboratory - Commentary by Penrose (Parney) C. Albright; (2) Launching Traffic Cameras into Space - The Space-Based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris project is designing nanosatellites to more accurately determine the trajectory of space objects orbiting Earth; (3)An Improved Tool for Nuclear Forensics - Resonance ionization mass spectrometry provides rapid isotopic analysis for studying materials derived from nuclear events; (4) A Simple Way to Better Protect Soldiers against Head Trauma - A modest increase in the foam padding used in Army helmets could significantly reduce brain injuries; and (5) Shocking Aluminum for Greater Understanding - Experiments using a laser beam to hit a thin film of aluminum provide an unprecedented look into the physics of shock waves traveling through a metal.

  13. Science & Technology Review July/August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for the months of July and August 2016, there are two features: one on Science and Technology in Support of Nuclear Nonproliferation, and another on Seeking Out Hidden Radioactive Materials. Then there are highlights are three research projects--on optics, plasma science, and the nature of neutrinos--along with a news section and patents and awards.

  14. Energy and Technology Review, August--September

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefcik, J A [ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review focuses on cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs)-one of the Laboratory's most effective means of technology transfer. The first article chronicles the legislative evolution of these agreements. The second article examines the potential beneficial effects of CRADAs on the national economy and discusses their role in the development and marketing of Laboratory technologies. The third article provides information on how to initiate and develop CRADAs at LLNL, and the fourth and fifth articles describe the Laboratory's two most prominent technology transfer projects. One is a 30-month CRADA with General Motors to develop advanced lasers for cutting, welding, and heat-treating operations. The cover photograph shows this laser cutting through a piece of steel 1/16 of an inch thick. The other project is a three-year CRADA with Amoco, Chevron-Conoco, and Unocal to refine our oil shale retorting process.

  15. Analysis of quality control tests done by the Canadian power utilities on their external dosimetry systems (June 1985 to May 1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, G.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Canadian nuclear power utilities, Hydro Quebec, New Brunswick Electric Power Commission and Ontario Hydro, use thermoluminescent dosimetry systems to perform their own external beta/gamma dosimetry. In order to help ensure that these systems perform satisfactorily, they are subjected to routine quality control testing by their parent organizations. The test results for the period of June 1985 to May 1988 have been analyzed, at the AECB, using the pass criterion which was originally agreed upon by the organizations involved. The present analysis offers a comparison of the performance of the different sites which operate such a service. Finally, recommendations are made in the hope that they will help the organizations in refining their dosimetry

  16. Development and application of a permit information system for shale oil (PERMISSO). Final report appendix: summary sheets of regulations required for oil shale development, June 1978--May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This appendix is comprised of summaries of various governmental permits, licenses and other approvals required for oil shale development. The summaries were completed during the period June--October 1978, and are current as of July 1, 1978, although more recent authority was cited in some cases. One of the major purposes of Phase II of the project will be to update these summaries as statutes and regulations are added, changed or eliminated. This updating will be particularly important in the case of environmental permits and approvals. Many legislative and regulatory changes affecting environmental requirements are pending at this time and will alter many of the summaries herein. In addition, many regulatory proposals have been or likely will be challenged in the courts. When such conflicts are resolved further changes may be in order.

  17. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested

  18. Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technologies in Residential Building Codes: June 15, 1998 to September 15, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L.

    2005-02-01

    This report is an attempt to describe the building code requirements and impediments to the application of EE and RE technologies in residential buildings. Several modern model building codes were reviewed. These are representative of the codes that will be adopted by most locations in the coming years. The codes reviewed for this report include: International Residential Code, First Draft, April 1998; International Energy Conservation Code, 1998; International Mechanical Code, 1998; International Plumbing Code, 1997; International Fuel Gas Code, 1997; National Electrical Code, 1996. These codes were reviewed as to their application to (1) PV systems in buildings and building-integrated PV systems and (2) active solar domestic hot water and space-heating systems. A discussion of general code issues that impact these technologies is also included. Examples of this are solar access and sustainability.

  19. Magnetic fusion energy materials technology program annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    The objectives of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Materials Technology Program, which is described in this report, are to continue to solve the materials problems of the Fusion Energy Division of ORNL and to meet needs of the national MFE program, directed by the ERDA Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy (DMFE). This work is a continuation of the program described in previous annual progress reports. The principal areas of work include radiation effects, compatibility studies, materials studies related to the plasma-materials interaction, materials engineering, radiation behavior of superconducting magnet insulation, and mechanical properties of superconducting composites. The level of effort and schedules are consistent with Logic II of the DMFE Program Plan

  20. Fusion reactor physics and technology. Progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Maynard, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    During the present contract period, work has been carried out in the following areas: (a) The NUWMAK tokamak reactor design was completed and distributed throughout the community. In particular, specific work was completed on divertorless tokamak operation in NUWMAK, Ti alloy assessment, materials resource implications of NUWMAK style reactors, and an economic analysis; (b) Tandem mirror reactor technology studies were carried out on tandem mirror physics, the role of rf heating, power balance studies, the design of high field magnets, and blanket/shield design in TMR's; (c) work at Wisconsin is contributing to the evolving picture of an optimum TMR; (d) the WHIST tokamak reactor plasma transport code developed at Wisconsin has been extended in two directions; (e) Work on ICRF heating in tokamak reactors, both in terms of physics and launching structure design, has been completed and published

  1. Testimony presented to the House Science and Technology Committee, 18 June 1981, Washington, DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1981-10-01

    This report is the text of invited testimony given by the author before the House Science and Technology Committee. This Congressional hearing on Societal Risks of Energy Systems reflects the growing interest on the part of Congress, the public, the scientific community, and other groups on this extremely important topic of Risk Analysis. This presentation will contain information on the emergence of an interdisciplinary professional field of risk analysis, including the recently formed Society for Risk Analysis. I will also discuss in some detail various risk analysis programs now in progress at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and other research institutions. Also included will be some general philosophy concerning risks from energy-producing systems and my perspective on the needs for further developments in the field of risk analysis

  2. Tritium processing and containment technology for fusion reactors. Annual report, July 1975--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.; Calaway, W.F.; Misra, B.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Weston, J.R.; Yonco, R.M.; Cafasso, F.A.; Burris, L.

    1976-01-01

    The hydrogen permeabilities of selected metals, alloys, and multiplex preparations that are of interest to fusion reactor technology are being characterized. A high-vacuum hydrogen-permeation apparatus has been constructed for this purpose. A program of studies has been initiated to develop design details for the tritium-handling systems of near-term fusion reactors. This program has resulted in a better definition of reactor-fuel-cycle and enrichment requirements and has helped to identify major research and development problems in the tritium-handling area. The design and construction of a 50-gallon lithium-processing test loop (LPTL) is well under way. Studies in support of this project are providing important guidance in the selection of hardware for the LPTL and in the design of a molten-salt processing test section

  3. MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project. Sixth quarterly report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrick, M.; Tempelmeyer, K. E.; Johnson, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the heat and seed recovery systems downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser and the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The work is being done in cooperation with other DOE contractors working in this general area. The present project activities include: (1) studies of the thermochemistry of seed-slag systems, (2) investigations of ceramic and metallic materials for service in the downstream gas systems, (3) small-scale engineering studies of seed-slag deposition, (4) operation of a 2-MW experimental facility for investigations pertaining to the downstream gas system, and (5) evaluation of seed regeneration processes.

  4. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Annual subcontract report, March 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holley, W A [Springborn Labs., Inc., Enfield, CT (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes work performed under a subcontract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project. The objectives of this subcontract are to (1) define the problem of yellowing/browning of EVA-based encapsulants; (2) determine probable mechanisms and the role of various parameters such as heat, UV exposure, module construction, EVA interfaces, and EVA thickness, in the browning of EVA-based encapsulants; (3) develop stabilization strategies for various module constructions to protect the encapsulant from degradative failure; (4) conduct laboratory, accelerated outdoor, and field testing of encapsulant, laminated test coupons, and full modules to demonstrate the functional adequacy of the stabilization strategies; and (5) implement these strategies. This report summarizes the accomplishments related to the above goals for the reporting period.

  5. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoniette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen

  6. Health effects of synfuels technology: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanathanan, L.P.; Reilly, C.A.; Marshall, S.A.; Wilzbach, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    This document contains annotated synopses of available information pertinent to health impacts of synthetic fuel technologies under development, and identifies needs for further information. The report focuses on carcinogenesis, which appears to be a special problem with coal conversion technologies. This review is intended to serve as a reference for the NEPA Affairs Division of DOE in its evaluation of the overall synthetic fuel program and specific projects in the program. Updated versions of this document are expected to be prepared annually or semiannually as new information becomes available.

  7. Conflict and fear over the impacts of science and technology may retard, or may hasten, societal progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Rapidly changing societal and individual values impact the course of man's future with accompanying conflict, tension and alienation. Conflict and fear over the impacts of science and technology may retard, or may hasten, societal progress. The broadening of the concept of equality of opportunity to an equality of outcome manifests itself by distributing the rewards of society based not on performance but simply on membership in the society. It is concluded that institutional failure caused by organizational and bureaucratic ineffectiveness inhibits change necessary for the solution of societal problems.

  8. Heat Source Technology Programs. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.G. [comp.

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  9. Emerging Technologies Landscape on Education. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis de la Fuente Valentin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a desk research that analysed available recent studies in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning. The desk research is focused on work produced in the frame of FP6 and FP7 European programs, in the area of Information and Communication Technologies. It concentrates in technologies that support existing forms of learning, and also in technologies that enhance new learning paradigms. This approach includes already adopted and successfully piloted technologies. The elaboration of the desk research had three main parts: firstly, the collection of documents from CORDIS and other institutions related to TEL research; secondly, the identification of relevant terms appearing in those documents and the elaboration of a thesaurus; and thirdly, a quantitative analysis of each term occurrences. Many of the identified technologies belong to the fields of interactive multimedia, Human-computer Interaction and-or related to recommendation and learning analytics. This study becomes a thorough review of the current state of these fields through the actual development of R&D European projects. This research, will be used as a basis to better understand the evolution of the sector, and to focus future research efforts on these sectors and their application to education.

  10. Diversity of rotavirus strains circulating in children under 5 years of age admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis in Morocco, June 2006 to May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Elqazoui, Maria; Meryem, Azzouzi Idrissi; Rguig, Ahmed; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim; Elaouad, Rajae

    2013-02-01

    Rotavirus vaccine was introduced in Morocco during 2010. In anticipation of introducing rotavirus vaccines, the Ministry of Health in Morocco established a rotavirus surveillance network in June 2006 at four hospitals in Morocco to obtain baseline data on rotavirus disease burden and prevalent strains. From June 2006 to May 2009, stool samples were collected from children under 5 years of age admitted for diarrhea to four sentinel hospitals serving different regions of Morocco. Rotaviruses were detected in stools using enzyme immunoassay, then genotyped by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Samples with adequate stool in which the P or G types could not be determined by RT-PCR were subjected to nucleotide sequence analysis. Overall, 42% (579 of 1,388) of the stools samples tested were positive for rotavirus. Genotyping of 548 (95%) samples demonstrated that G1P[8] (55%) was the most prevalent strain, followed by G9P[8] (11.3%), G2P[4] (9.1%), G4P[8] (0.9%), and G3P[8] (0.4%). Several other strains were identified including G1P[4] (0.2%), G1P[6] (0.9%), G2P[6] (4.3%), G2P[8] (0.2%), G3P[6] (0.4%), G3P[4] (0.2%), and G9P[6] (0.2%). A high prevalence of mixed infections was found (15% of all samples) of which G1G2P[8] (4%) and G1G3P[8] (3.6%) accounted for the majority. Considerable diversity of rotavirus genotypes was present among strains circulating in Morocco prior to the introduction of the vaccine. This study highlighted the need for maintaining active surveillance to monitor changes in rotavirus disease burden and strain dynamics and to detect changes over time that could impact the effectiveness of the vaccination program. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  12. Science and Technology Review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-08-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. Topics discussed in this August 1996 issue are: Keeping the nuclear stockpile safe, secure, and reliable; Molten salt takes the bang out of high explosives; Security clearances meet the electronic age; and Exploring oil fields with crosshole electromagnetic induction.

  13. Physical and biological data collected with CDT, fluorometer, and SeaSoar aboard the ship WECOMA as part of Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) in the North Pacific Ocean from May 30 to June 16 2000 (NODC Accession 0000986)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and biological data collected with CDT, fluorometer, and SeaSoar aboard the ship WECOMA in the North Pacific Ocean from May 30 to June 16 2000. These data...

  14. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, MayJune 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2011-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system covers nearly 100,000 square miles in the southeastern United States throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, and is one of the most productive aquifers in the world (Miller, 1990). This sequence of carbonate rocks is hydraulically connected and is over 300 feet thick in south Florida and thins toward the north. Typically, this sequence is subdivided into the Upper Floridan aquifer, the middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The majority of freshwater is contained in the Upper Floridan aquifer and is used for water supply (Miller, 1986). The Lower Floridan aquifer contains fresh to brackish water in northeastern Florida and Georgia, while in south Florida it is saline. The potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in May–June 2010 shown on this map was constructed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study (U.S. Geological Survey database, 2011). Previous synoptic measurements and regional potentiometric maps of the Upper Floridan aquifer were prepared for May 1980 (Johnston and others, 1981) and May 1985 (Bush and others, 1986) as part of the Floridan Regional Aquifer System Analysis.

  15. Review of JT-60 experimental results from June to October, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    After the achievement of AEC (Atomic Energy Commission) milestone in October, 1987, a new divertor coil has been installed to produce divertor plasmas with a single null at the buttom. A pellet injector was also installed during the same shut down period. This report presents the results from the experiment held from June to October in 1988. Major experimental issues during this phase are: 1) confinement and 2) divertor characteristics of lower X-point discharges, 3) enhancement of confinement with pellet injection, 4) ion heating with ICRF of LHRF, 5) current drive with LHRF or ICRF, and evaluation of bootstrap current. (J.P.N.)

  16. Technology Review for Mobile Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliaras, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the technological advancement in mobile devices has made possible the development of hypermedia applications that exploit their features. A potential application domain for mobile devices is multimedia educational applications and modules. Such modules may be shared, commented and further reused under other circumstances through the…

  17. Evolution of the Large Scale Circulation, Cloud Structure and Regional Water Cycle Associated with the South China Sea Monsoon During May-June, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K.-M.; Li, Xiao-Fan

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, changes in the large-scale circulation, cloud structures and regional water cycle associated with the evolution of the South China Sea (SCS) monsoon in May-June 1998 were investigated using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and field data from the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX). Results showed that both tropical and extratropical processes strongly influenced the onset and evolution of the SCS monsoon. Prior to the onset of the SCS monsoon, enhanced convective activities associated with the Madden and Julian Oscillation were detected over the Indian Ocean, and the SCS was under the influence of the West Pacific Anticyclone (WPA) with prevailing low level easterlies and suppressed convection. Establishment of low-level westerlies across Indo-China, following the development of a Bay of Bengal depression played an important role in building up convective available potential energy over the SCS. The onset of SCS monsoon appeared to be triggered by the equatorward penetration of extratropical frontal system, which was established over the coastal region of southern China and Taiwan in early May. Convective activities over the SCS were found to vary inversely with those over the Yangtze River Valley (YRV). Analysis of TRMM microwave and precipitation radar data revealed that during the onset phase, convection over the northern SCS consisted of squall-type rain cell embedded in meso-scale complexes similar to extratropical systems. The radar Z-factor intensity indicated that SCS clouds possessed a bimodal distribution, with a pronounced signal (less than 30dBz) at a height of 2-3 km, and another one (less than 25 dBz) at the 8-10 km level, separated by a well-defined melting level indicated by a bright band at around 5-km level. The stratiform-to-convective cloud ratio was approximately 1:1 in the pre-onset phase, but increased to 5:1 in the active phase. Regional water budget calculations indicated that during the

  18. Gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review. [US DOE supported

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The US Department of Energy gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review was held June 24 to 26, 1981, at Germantown, Maryland. Forty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  19. Waste management and technologies analytical database project for Los Alamos National Laboratory/Department of Energy. Final report, June 7, 1993--June 15, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Management and Technologies Analytical Database System (WMTADS) supported by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (EM-50), was developed and based at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, to collect, identify, organize, track, update, and maintain information related to existing/available/developing and planned technologies to characterize, treat, and handle mixed, hazardous and radioactive waste for storage and disposal in support of EM strategies and goals and to focus area projects. WMTADS was developed as a centralized source of on-line information regarding technologies for environmental management processes that can be accessed by a computer, modem, phone line, and communications software through a Local Area Network (LAN), and server connectivity on the Internet, the world's largest computer network, and with file transfer protocol (FTP) can also be used to globally transfer files from the server to the user's computer through Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) using Mosaic

  20. Theoretical physics department, june 96-may 98 status report; Service de physique theorique, rapport d`activite juin 1996 - mai 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-31

    This status report presents the work done at SPhT (service de physique theorique, CEA) from june 96 to may 98. The topics have been classified into 3 themes: - statistical physics, - mathematical physics and field theory, - astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. In the first theme relevant contributions have been made to phase transitions, correlated electronic systems, polymers, membranes, proteins, disordered systems and out of equilibrium processes. The second theme collects various works, some works dedicated to aleatory matrices and quantum chaos aim at developing investigation methods, other works like cord theories use these methods. As for the third theme, the recent discovery of the fluctuations of background cosmological radiation has fomented a great activity at SPhT. Mean field approximation and effective strength have been the starting point of research in the field of nuclear structure. High energy quantum chromodynamics has been applied to deep inelastic scattering where the proton structure is studied through electron-proton collisions. A list of all the publications made by SPhT is given. (A.C.)

  1. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during the pastdecades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Varioustechniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packedbed, dividing-wall columns...... and reactive distillation were studied and reported in literature. All these techniques employ the conventional continuous counter-current contact of vapor andliquid phases. Cyclic distillation technology is based on an alternative operating mode usingseparate phase movement which leads to key practical...... advantages in both chemical andbiochemical processes. This article provides a mini-review of cyclic distillation technology.The topics covered include the working principle, design and control methods, main benefitsand limitations as well as current industrial applications. Cyclic distillation can...

  2. Science and Technology Review, September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Upadhye, R.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The feature articles are `Taking Lasers beyond the National Ignition Facility` and `Jumpin` Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen`. The first article describes the ultimate goal of laser fusion as the production of electricity by inertial confinement fusion. Advances in diode-laser technology promise to take another step closer to that goal. The latter article discusses a Laboratory team`s efforts to provide evidence for the metallization of hydrogen based on the team`s expertise in shock compression. A commentary on `The Next Frontiers of Advanced Lasers Research is provided, and a research highlight is given on `Modeling Human Joints and Prosthetic Implants.

  3. ’A Supreme Act of Faith’. George C. Marshall and the Transfer of Munitions to Great Britain, May-June 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    departments of the Army. Fearing a " transpacific " raid if the fleet left Hawaii, Marshall, on June 17, placed Hawaii and Panama on 24-hour alert status...to other nations, the Army encountered a variety of problems with this transfer. The General Staff realized that the dep3t system of positioning...material for continental defense was inappropriate. The problems first encountered when the transfer began in June 1940 took months to resolve, but they

  4. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program: Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Seventh Quarterly Report April - June 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordan Fielding

    2004-08-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation quarterly report (April–June 2004) details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight INEEL four-cycle diesel engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes and six INEEL Chevrolet Tahoes with gasoline engines are equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. The bypass filters are reported to have engine oil filtering capability of <1 micron and a built-in additive package to facilitate extended oil-drain intervals. This quarter, the eight diesel engine buses traveled 85,632 miles. As of the end of June 2004, the eight buses have accumulated 498,814 miles since the beginning of the test and 473,192 miles without an oil change. This represents an avoidance of 39 oil changes, which equates to 1,374 quarts (343 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, furthermore, 1,374 quarts of waste oil not generated. One bus had its oil changed due to the degraded quality of the engine oil. Also this quarter, the six Tahoe test vehicles traveled 48,193 miles; to date, the six Tahoes have accumulated 109,708 total test miles. The oil for all six of the Tahoes was changed this quarter due to low Total Base Numbers (TBN). The oil used initially in the Tahoe testing was recycled oil; the recycled oil has been replaced with Castrol virgin oil, and the testing was restarted. However, the six Tahoe’s did travel a total of 98,266 miles on the initial engine oil. This represents an avoidance of 26 oil changes, which equates to 130 quarts (32.5 gallons) of new oil not consumed and, consequently, 130 quarts of waste oil not generated. Based on the number of oil changes avoided by the test buses and Tahoes to date, the potential engine oil savings if an oil bypass filter system were used was estimated for the INEEL, DOE

  5. The Use of Technology in Identifying Hospital Malnutrition: Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtovac, Dino; Lee, Joon

    2018-01-19

    Malnutrition is a condition most commonly arising from the inadequate consumption of nutrients necessary to maintain physiological health and is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and sarcopenia. Malnutrition occurring in the hospital setting is caused by insufficient monitoring, identification, and assessment efforts. Furthermore, the ability of health care workers to identify and recognize malnourished patients is suboptimal. Therefore, interventions focusing on the identification and treatment of malnutrition are valuable, as they reduce the risks and rates of malnutrition within hospitals. Technology may be a particularly useful ally in identifying malnutrition due to scalability, timeliness, and effectiveness. In an effort to explore the issue, this scoping review synthesized the availability of technological tools to detect and identify hospital malnutrition. Our objective was to conduct a scoping review of the different forms of technology used in addressing malnutrition among adults admitted to hospital to (1) identify the extent of the published literature on this topic, (2) describe key findings, and (3) identify outcomes. We designed and implemented a search strategy in 3 databases (PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL). We completed a descriptive numerical summary and analyzed study characteristics. One reviewer independently extracted data from the databases. We retrieved and reviewed a total of 21 articles. We categorized articles by the computerized tool or app type: malnutrition assessment (n=15), food intake monitoring (n=5), or both (n=1). Within those categories, we subcategorized the different technologies as either hardware (n=4), software (n=13), or both (n=4). An additional subcategory under software was cloud-based apps (n=1). Malnutrition in the acute hospital setting was largely an unrecognized problem, owing to insufficient monitoring, identification, and initial assessments of identifying both patients who are

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Space Biology & Aerospace Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 3, May-June 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-12

    recorde using an RPG -204 instrument and N-338 recorder at paper feeding rate of 100 mm/s at the following times: before and 10 min after giving atropine...third term of their pregnancy can maintain homeostasis of the develop- ing fetus within the limits that provide the normal development of physiological...systems under such condi- tions. Our choice was based on the fact that pregnancy is related to a need for significant activation of anabolic

  7. A review of treatment technologies for MTBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, D.

    1995-01-01

    Available treatment technologies for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) contamination in soil, groundwater, and recovered groundwater are reviewed and assessed. MTBE contamination is becoming an important issue due to the increasing prevalence and regulation of this gasoline additive. In addition, MTBE is more soluble and more mobile in groundwater than most hydrocarbons, so it is usually the first gasoline constituent to reach sensitive receptors. Treatment of MTBE is complicated by its Henry's constant, which is lower than most other gasoline constituents. Furthermore, evidence of biodegradability of MTBE is mixed, and MTBE does not degrade rapidly abiotically. Groundwater pumping is usually employed to contain and collect MTBE-contaminated groundwater, often successfully because of its high aqueous solubility. Air sparging/soil vapor extraction is also successfully employed to treat MTBE, but its effectiveness is reduced by the low Henry's constant of MTBE. Sparging and other aerobic bioremediation approaches are hampered by the poor biodegradability of MTBE. Oxidation technologies, such as ozone injection, hold promise for rapid in situ remediation of MTBE. Treatment of recovered groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also problematic. MTBE adsorbs poorly to granular activated carbon; advanced oxidation processes are effective on MTBE, but entail high capital and operating costs; bioreactors are of questionable effectiveness on MTBE. Air stripping is usually the most cost-effective treatment technology for MTBE so long as the off gas from the air stripper can be discharged without treatment. However, off gas treatment is expensive, so groundwater is sometimes heated to reduce the requirement for stripping air

  8. Science & Technology Review October/November 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-11

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. The Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNS is a partnership involving Bechtel National, University of California, Babcock & Wilcox, Washington Division of URS Corporation, and Battelle in affiliation with Texas A&M University. More information about LLNS is available online at www.llnsllc.com. Please address any correspondence (including name and address changes) to S&TR, Mail Stop L-664, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551, or telephone (925) 423-3893. Our e-mail address is str-mail@llnl.gov. S&TR is available on the Web at str.llnl.gov.

  9. Evaluation of surface and upper air fine scale WRF meteorological modeling of the May and June 2010 CalNex period in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kirk R.; Misenis, Chris; Obland, Michael D.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Scarino, Amy J.; Kelly, James T.

    2013-12-01

    Prognostic meteorological models such as Mesoscale Model (MM5) and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) are often used to supply inputs for retrospective air quality modeling done to support ozone and PM2.5 emission control demonstrations. In this study, multiple configurations of the WRF model are applied at 4 km grid resolution and compared to routine meteorological measurements and special study measurements taken in California during May-June 2010. One configuration is routinely used by US EPA to generate meteorological inputs for regulatory air quality modeling and another that is used by research scientists for evaluating meteorology and air quality. Mixing layer heights estimated from airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements of aerosol backscatter are compared with WRF modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) height estimates. Both WRF configurations generally capture the variability in HSRL mixing height between days, hour-to-hour, and between surface features such as terrain and land-water interfaces. Fractional bias over all flights and both model configurations range from -38% to 32% and fractional error ranges from 22% to 58%. Surface and upper level measurements of temperature, water mixing ratio, and winds are generally well characterized by both WRF model configurations, often more closely matching surface observations than the input analysis data (12-NAM). The WRF model generally captures orographic and mesoscale meteorological features in the central Valley (bifurcation of wind flow from the San Francisco bay into the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys) and Los Angeles air basin (ocean-land flows) during this summer period.

  10. Analysis of a multiple-well interference test in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-Hole complex, May--June 1995, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldon, A.L.; Umari, A.M.A.; Earle, J.D.; Fahy, M.F.; Gemmell, J.M.; Darnell, J.

    1998-09-01

    A multiple-well interference (pumping) test was conducted in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain, Nev., from May 22 to June 12, 1995, by the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. This pumping test was conducted as part of investigations to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository. During the test, borehole UE-25 c{number_sign}3 was pumped for 10 days at an average rate of 17.9 liters per second. Drawdown in 6 observation wells completed in Miocene tuffaceous rocks 29.0--3,525.6 meters from the pumping well ranged from 0 to 0.42 meters 14,000 minutes after pumping started. The spatial distribution of this drawdown indicates that a northwest-trending zone of discontinuous faults might be affecting ground-water movement in the Miocene tuffaceous rocks near the C-holes. No drawdown was observed in a borehole completed in a regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifer 630.0 meters from the pumping well. Consequently, it could not be determined during the pumping test if the Miocene tuffaceous rocks are connected hydraulically to the regional aquifer. Analyses of drawdown and recovery indicate that the Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the vicinity of the C-holes have transmissivity values of 1,600--3,200 meters squared per day, horizontal hydraulic conductivity values of 6.5--13 meters per day, vertical hydraulic conductivity values of 0.2--1.7 meters per day, storativity values of 0.001--0.003, and specific yield values of 0.01--0.2.

  11. The GEOVIDE cruise in May-June 2014 reveals an intense Meridional Overturning Circulation over a cold and fresh subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Patricia; Lherminier, Pascale; Mercier, Herlé; Daniault, Nathalie; García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2017-11-01

    The GEOVIDE cruise was carried out in the subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA) along the OVIDE section and across the Labrador Sea in May-June 2014. It was planned to clarify the distribution of the trace elements and their isotopes in the SPNA as part of the GEOTRACES international program. This paper focuses on the state of the circulation and distribution of thermohaline properties during the cruise. In terms of circulation, the comparison with the 2002-2012 mean state shows a more intense Irminger Current and also a weaker North Atlantic Current, with a transfer of volume transport from its northern to its central branch. However, those anomalies are compatible with the variability already observed along the OVIDE section in the 2000s. In terms of properties, the surface waters of the eastern SPNA were much colder and fresher than the averages over 2002-2012. In spite of negative temperature anomalies in the surface waters, the heat transport across the OVIDE section estimated at 0.56 ± 0.06 PW was the largest measured since 2002. This relatively large value is related to the relatively strong Meridional Overturning Circulation measured across the OVIDE section during GEOVIDE (18.7 ± 3.0 Sv). By analyzing the air-sea heat and freshwater fluxes over the eastern SPNA in relation to the heat and freshwater content changes observed during 2013 and 2014, we concluded that on a short timescale these changes were mainly driven by air-sea heat and freshwater fluxes rather than by ocean circulation.

  12. Physician communication via Internet-enabled technology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Neil G; Randall, Glen E; Archer, Norman P; Musson, David M

    2017-10-01

    The use of Internet-enabled technology (information and communication technology such as smartphone applications) may enrich information exchange among providers and, consequently, improve health care delivery. The purpose of this systematic review was to gain a greater understanding of the role that Internet-enabled technology plays in enhancing communication among physicians. Studies were identified through a search in three electronic platforms: the Association for Computing Machinery Digital Library, ProQuest, and Web of Science. The search identified 5140 articles; of these, 21 met all inclusion criteria. In general, physicians were satisfied with Internet-enabled technology, but consensus was lacking regarding whether Internet-enabled technology improved efficiency or made a difference to clinical decision-making. Internet-enabled technology can play an important role in enhancing communication among physicians, but the extent of that benefit is influenced by (1) the impact of Internet-enabled technology on existing work practices, (2) the availability of adequate resources, and (3) the nature of institutional elements, such as privacy legislation.

  13. Review of JT-60 experimental results from June to October, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This is a prompt report on JT-60 experimental results from June to October, 1987. Experiments in hydrogen plasmas have been undertaken with up to 3.2 MA of plasma current in limiter discharges, 2.7 MA in divertor discharges, and 30 MW of total NB (H 0 → H + ) and RF injection power. In limiter discharges with ∼3 MA plasma current, the maximum central electron density of 1.3 x 10 20 m -3 and the energy confinement time of 0.15 - 0.18 sec were obtained with heating powers of 13 - 20 MW. The total plasma stored energy of 3.1 MJ, and n e (0)τ E of 1.4 - 1.8 x 10 19 m -3 sec were achieved. The best set of parameters achieved is n e (0)τ E = 1.8 x 10 19 m -3 sec and T i (0) = 3.7 KeV at plasma current of 3.2 MA. By applying deutrium discharge condition, n e (0)τ E and T i (0) enter the JT-60 target area determined by Atomic Energy Commission. Many short periods (50 - 100 ms) of H-mode phase are found in outside X-point divertor discharges with NB or NB + RF (LH or IC) heating power of more than 16 MW, although at present the energy confinement improvement is limited to within 10 %. In combined LH and NB heating of low-n-bar e discharge, the plasma stored energy increases with the same rate as NB heating only, with preferential absorption of LH wave to the high energy beam ions. In combined NB and on-axis ICRF heating of low-n-bar e discharge, a high incremental energy confinement time is obtained, with strong high energy beam ion acceleration and electron heating in the central region of the plasma. (author)

  14. Brief communication: On-site data collection of damage caused by flash floods: Experiences from Braunsbach, Germany, in May/June 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudan, Jonas; Rözer, Viktor; Sieg, Tobias; Vogel, Kristin; Thieken, Annegret

    2017-04-01

    At the end of May and beginning of June 2016, several municipalities in Southern Germany suffered from severe flash floods and debris flows which have been triggered by intense rainfall in Central Europe. Overall, the insured losses of these events amounted to EUR 1.2 billion in Germany. Especially the strong and unexpected flash flood on May 29th in Braunsbach (Baden Wurttemberg) - a small village counting about 1,000 residents - attracted media and policymakers due to its devastating character. The understanding of damage caused by flash floods requires ex-post collection of relevant but yet sparsely available information, linking process intensities to damage by using adequate methods of data gathering. Thus, on-site data collection was carried out after the flash flood event in Braunsbach, using open source software as helpful and efficient tool for data acquisition and evaluation. A digital survey was designed and conducted by a team of five researchers who investigated all buildings affected by water and debris flows. The collected data includes an estimation of a particular damage class, the inundation depth, and other relevant information. A post - hoc data analysis was done with R 3.3.1 and QGIS 2.14.3, performing both, a Random Forest Model (RF) and Random Generalized Linear Model (RGLM) as well as preparing a Spearman's rank correlation matrix. For visual interpretation and better overview of the study area and analysis results, a "process intensity" map was created, revealing important links of damage driving factors. We find that not only the water depth, which is often considered as only damage driving factor in riverine flood loss modelling, but also the exposition of a building to the flow direction and susceptible building parts like e.g. shop windows seem to be risk factors in flash-flood prone regions. Although no significant correlations were found, the analyses indicate that also building material (i.e. half-timbered or masonry) and structural

  15. Review of ORNL's MSR technology and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Gat, U.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Williams, D.F.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of molten salt reactor development is discussed with reference to the experience from the Oak Ridge Molten Salt Reactor Experiment. Assessment of the future for this reactor system is reviewed with consideration of both advantages and disadvantages. Application of this concept to ADTT (accelerator driven transmutation technology) needs appears to be feasible by drawing on the MSRE experience. Key chemical considerations remain as: solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity and their importance to ADTT planning is briefly explained. Priorities in the future development of molten salts for these applications are listed, with the foremost being the acceptance of the 2LiF-BeF 2 solvent system. 8 refs, 2 figs

  16. A review of magnetic heat pump technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The area of technology classified as heat pumps generally refers to refrigerators, heat pumps and heat engines. This review is restricted to the literature on magnetic refrigerators and magnetic heat pumps which are referred to interchangeably. Significant progress has been made on the development of engineering prototypes of cryogenic, nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators utilizing conductive heat transfer in the 0.1 K to 20 K temperature range. Advances have also been made in analysis of regenerative magnetic refrigerators and heat pumps utilizing the active magnetic regeneration (AMR) concept. Units based on AMR are being modeled, designed and/or built to operate in various temperature ranges including 1.8-4.5 K, 4-15 K, 15-85 K, and 270-320 K. The near room temperature units have been scaled to 50 kW as both refrigerators and heat pumps. The progress of magnetic refrigeration over the last three years is summarized and discussed

  17. Trends in and contributions to entrepreneurship research: a broad review of literature from 1996 to June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luor, Tainyi; Lu, Hsi-Peng; Yu, Hueiju; Chang, Kuoliang

    2014-01-01

    This article, which began as an effort to gauge trends in and contributions to the broad field of "entrepreneur/entrepreneurship," reviews 5,476 academic articles on entrepreneurship that were published in 522 Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index journals from 1996 to June 2012. This survey identifies keywords and conducts a review to search for and identify related articles in the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science database. We then present our findings, including the number of publications by year, categorization of article types, main academic journals, authors, and most-cited articles. The citation counts for authors, journals, and articles are also analyzed. This study indicates that the number of articles related to the keyword entrepreneur increased from 1996 to the end of 2011, which is a sign of an upward trend in the influence of entrepreneurs. Entrepreneur research fascinated numerous scholars during the study period covering 16.5 years. In particular, researchers from the USA, England, Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands have made the most contributions to this field. This literature review provides evidence that the concept of entrepreneur attracted academic researchers, resulting in significant contributions to the field of entrepreneur research.

  18. Reviews on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apinan Soottitantawat

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC is one type of high temperature fuel cell that appears to be one of the most promising technology to provide the efficient and clean energy production for wide range of applications (from small units to large scale power plants. This paper reviews the current status and related researches on SOFC technologies. In details, the research trend for the development of SOFC components(i.e. anode, electrolyte, cathode, and interconnect are presented. Later, the current important designs of SOFC (i.e. Seal-less Tubular Design, Segmented Cell in Series Design, Monolithic Design and Flat Plate Design are exampled. In addition, the possible operations of SOFC (i.e. external reforming, indirect internal reforming, and direct internal reforming are discussed. Lastly, the research studies on applications of SOFCs with co-generation (i.e. SOFC with Combined Heat and Power (SOFC-CHP, SOFC with Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT and SOFC with chemical production are given.

  19. A systematic review of lifestyle monitoring technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownsell, Simon; Bradley, David; Blackburn, Steve; Cardinaux, Fabien; Hawley, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    The evidence base for lifestyle monitoring is relatively weak, even though there are significant numbers of commercial installations around the world. We conducted a literature review to summarize the current position with regard to lifestyle monitoring based on sensors in the home. In total, 74 papers met the inclusion criteria. Only four papers reported trials involving 20 or more subjects, with a further 21 papers reporting trials involving one or more subjects. Most papers (n = 49) were concerned with technology development. Motion detection was the most common of the technologies employed, followed by door and electrical appliance usage. The predominant monitoring strategy was that of detecting changes in activity. However, little attention has been given to determining when or how changes in the profile of activity should be used to raise a call for assistance from a health or care professional. Lifestyle monitoring remains a relatively immature research area in which there is little detailed understanding of how to provide comprehensive and effective systems.

  20. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, Ling [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markham, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yanan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Batan, Liaw [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.

  1. Waste management and proliferation: an assessment of technologies and policies relevant to nuclear power. Final report, June 1975--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.K.; Anderson, R.N.; Selvaduray, G.; Gangwer, T.; Braun, C.; Goellner, D.; Malone, R.; Sevian, W.A.; Lester, R.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the long-term hazards from radioactive waste management and the problems in safeguarding plutonium in a world moving toward a plutonium economy are presented. To ameliorate these problems, several alternative fuel cycle options are presented: homogeneous reactor, denatured thorium, open, tandem, accelerator-regenerative, co-processing, plutonium, spiking, and partitioning. An assessment is made of a variety of separation technologies applied to these options, including a review of 32 different reprocessing methods. The effects of these options on both U.S. and transnational policies regarding waste management and proliferation are examined. This study addresses the transnational environmental policy issues created by a worldwide nuclear industry and suggests the need for two international organizations: one to manage spent fuel and the breeder fuel cycle; the second to protect the global environment. Two photochemical schemes for improving existing reprocessing technology by reducing wastes and materials unaccounted for (MUF) are presented. The applicability of this technology, along with column chromatography, Talspeak, and other separation methods, is examined relative to various waste management alternatives including the partitioning and transmutation option. A computer model to determine the effectiveness of transmutation as a function of separation efficiency has been developed and employed. To estimate health impacts from various fuel cycle options, the Brookhaven energy system network simulator has been integrated with an atmospheric dispersion and pathway analysis model. Using revised 222 Rn emission data, it is estimated from the linear hypothesis that the number of excess cancers is slightly less for the open than for the closed cycle. More importantly, the number of excess cancers induced by mill and mine tailings is from one to two times that caused by the rest of the entire fuel cycle

  2. DOE project review Massachusetts Photovoltaic Program. Annual report, June 1989--July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is the third year of operations for work under the Cooperative Agreement between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Photovoltaic Center and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a collaborative effort with shared resources, the activity at the Photovoltaic Center and the University of Lowell Photovoltaic Program has continued to advance the utilization and implementation of photovoltaic-powered systems into society. The programs and activities developed over the past three years have supported strategies that cover both international utilization as well as domestic application. Three major areas of activities have centered around the following themes: (1) The identification of market opportunities to enlarge sales potential for the photovoltaic industry. (2) The development of a knowledgeable infrastructure to support PV diffusion in Massachusetts, in the United States, and around the world. (3) The analysis of the physical, economic, and regulatory environment in which PV must compete with mature energy technologies. This past year has been an experience of contrasts for the Photovoltaic Center. Projects and activities have resulted in the successful completion of programs goals.

  3. Science and Technology Review December 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-11-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) High-Performance Computing for Energy Innovation - Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies - Projects using high-performance computing demonstrate Livermore's computational horsepower and improve the quality of energy solutions and the speed of deployment; (3) ARC Comes into Focus - The Advanced Radiographic Capability, a petawatt-class laser, can penetrate dense objects to reveal material dynamics during National Ignition Facility experiments; (4) A New Method to Track Viral Evolution - A sensitive technique developed at the Laboratory can identify virus mutations that may jump from host to host; and (5) Data for Defense: New Software Finds It Fast - Department of Defense warfighters and planners are using Livermore software systems to extract pertinent information from massive amounts of data.

  4. Intraoral Scanner Technologies: A Review to Make a Successful Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Richert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome difficulties associated with conventional techniques, impressions with IOS (intraoral scanner and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies were developed for dental practice. The last decade has seen an increasing number of optical IOS devices, and these are based on different technologies; the choice of which may impact on clinical use. To allow informed choice before purchasing or renewing an IOS, this article summarizes first the technologies currently used (light projection, distance object determination, and reconstruction. In the second section, the clinical considerations of each strategy such as handling, learning curve, powdering, scanning paths, tracking, and mesh quality are discussed. The last section is dedicated to the accuracy of files and of the intermaxillary relationship registered with IOS as the rendering of files in the graphical user interface is often misleading. This overview leads to the conclusion that the current IOS is adapted for a common practice, although differences exist between the technologies employed. An important aspect highlighted in this review is the reduction in the volume of hardware which has led to an increase in the importance of software-based technologies.

  5. Report of the IPERS (International Peer Review Service) pre-review workshop for the Zaporozhye, Unit 5 nuclear power plant probabilistic safety assessment in Vienna, Austria 12 to 16 June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the IAEA international peer review services pre-review workshop held in Vienna, 12 to 16 June 1995, which reviewed the status of the present version of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the Zaporozhye, Unit 5, nuclear power plant. 3 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Reviews of accelerator science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are a major invention of the 20th century. In the last eight decades, they have evolved enormously and have fundamentally changed the way we live, think and work. Accelerators are the most powerful microscopes for viewing the tiniest inner structure of cells, genes, molecules, atoms and their constituents such as protons, neutrons, electrons, neutrinos and quarks. This opens up a whole new world for materials science, chemistry and molecular biology.Accelerators with megawatt beam power may ultimately solve a critical problem faced by our society, namely, the treatment of nuclear waste and the supply of an alternative type of energy. There are also tens of thousands of small accelerators all over the world. They are used every day for medical imaging, cancer therapy, radioisotope production, high-density chip-making, mass spectrometry, cargo x-ray/gamma-ray imaging, detection of explosives and illicit drugs, and weapons. This volume provides a comprehensive review of this driving and fas...

  7. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. Volume 89, Number 3, May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    has the capacity to be nearly ubiq- uitous. With only a few notable exceptions (e.g., Chechnya and Western China ), there is little escape from its...Chiarelli, while as a Division Commander in Baghdad, described his area of operations as “ overpopulated yet underdeveloped, divided into neighborhoods...While Chavez has worked with China , Russia, and Iran to diversify his economy, the United States remains Venezuela’s largest trading partner by

  8. Understanding Monitoring Technologies for Adults With Pain: Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Iyubanit; Herskovic, Valeria; Gerea, Carmen; Fuentes, Carolina; Rossel, Pedro O; Marques, Maíra; Campos, Mauricio

    2017-10-27

    Monitoring of patients may decrease treatment costs and improve quality of care. Pain is the most common health problem that people seek help for in hospitals. Therefore, monitoring patients with pain may have significant impact in improving treatment. Several studies have studied factors affecting pain; however, no previous study has reviewed the contextual information that a monitoring system may capture to characterize a patient's situation. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review to (1) determine what types of technologies have been used to monitor adults with pain, and (2) construct a model of the context information that may be used to implement apps and devices aimed at monitoring adults with pain. A literature search (2005-2015) was conducted in electronic databases pertaining to medical and computer science literature (PubMed, Science Direct, ACM Digital Library, and IEEE Xplore) using a defined search string. Article selection was done through a process of removing duplicates, analyzing title and abstract, and then reviewing the full text of the article. In the final analysis, 87 articles were included and 53 of them (61%) used technologies to collect contextual information. A total of 49 types of context information were found and a five-dimension (activity, identity, wellness, environment, physiological) model of context information to monitor adults with pain was proposed, expanding on a previous model. Most technological interfaces for pain monitoring were wearable, possibly because they can be used in more realistic contexts. Few studies focused on older adults, creating a relevant avenue of research on how to create devices for users that may have impaired cognitive skills or low digital literacy. The design of monitoring devices and interfaces for adults with pain must deal with the challenge of selecting relevant contextual information to understand the user's situation, and not overburdening or inconveniencing users with

  9. 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-11-01

    The 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2013 Building Technologies Office (BTO) peer review, which was held in Washington, D.C., on April 2–4, 2013. The review was attended by over 300 participants and included presentations on 59 BTO-funded projects: 29 from BTO’s Emerging Technologies Program, 20 from the Commercial Buildings Integration Program, 6 from the Residential Buildings Integration Program, and 4 from the Building Energy Codes Program. This report summarizes the scores and comments provided by the independent reviewers for each project.

  10. Energy & technology review, November--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L. [eds.

    1993-11-01

    For the 40-plus years of the Cold War, both the United States and the Soviet Union built up nuclear stockpiles of tens of thousands of weapons. Now, as the Cold War has ended and tensions between the superpowers have subsided, the US faces the task of significantly reducing its nuclear arsenal. Many thousands of nuclear weapons are being removed from the stockpile as a result of recent treaties and unilateral decisions. This issue of Energy and Technology Review describes the Laboratory`s role in the nation`s effort to dismantle these weapons safely and rapidly. The dismantlement of the United States` nuclear weapons takes place at the Department of Energy`s Pantex facility near Amarillo, Texas. The first article in this issue summarizes the Laboratory`s involvement in dismantling Livermore-designed nuclear weapons. LLNL (like Los Alamos) has responsibility for the weapons it designed, from design concept to retirement. In the past, the responsibilities ended when the weapon was retired from the stockpile. Now however, the role has been extended to include dismantlement. The second article reports on an incident that occurred in November 1992, in which the pit of a W48 warhead cracked during dismantlement. The Laboratory was called upon to handle the pit safely and determine the causes of the cracking. The third article explores a variety of methods proposed for reusing the high explosives after they are removed from the weapon. In the past, Laboratory work on nuclear weapons focused primarily on design and development. However, as the size and composition of the US stockpile changes with evolving international conditions, they will be called upon with increasing frequency to provide the scientific and technical expertise needed to dismantle the nation`s retired nuclear weapons safely and efficiently.

  11. Electromagnetic Fields, Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation, and Epigenetics: How Wireless Technologies May Affect Childhood Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Cindy; Burgio, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    Mobile phones and other wireless devices that produce electromagnetic fields (EMF) and pulsed radiofrequency radiation (RFR) are widely documented to cause potentially harmful health impacts that can be detrimental to young people. New epigenetic studies are profiled in this review to account for some neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral changes due to exposure to wireless technologies. Symptoms of retarded memory, learning, cognition, attention, and behavioral problems have been reported in numerous studies and are similarly manifested in autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, as a result of EMF and RFR exposures where both epigenetic drivers and genetic (DNA) damage are likely contributors. Technology benefits can be realized by adopting wired devices for education to avoid health risk and promote academic achievement. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  12. Nuclear Technology Review 2013. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to requests by Member States, the Secretariat produces a comprehensive Nuclear Technology Review each year. Attached is this year's report, which highlights notable developments principally in 2012. The Nuclear Technology Review 2013 covers the following areas: power applications, atomic and nuclear data, accelerators and research reactors, and nuclear sciences and applications. Additional documentation associated with the Nuclear Technology Review 2013 is available on the Agency's website1 in English on nuclear hydrogen production technology and preliminary lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident for advanced nuclear power plant technology development. Information on the IAEA's activities related to nuclear science and technology can also be found in the IAEA's Annual Report 2012 (GC(57)/3), in particular the Technology section, and the Technical Cooperation Report for 2012 (GC(57)/INF/4). The document has been modified to take account, to the extent possible, of specific comments by the Board of Governors and other comments received from Member States. (author)

  13. Technology development multidimensional review for engineering and technology managers

    CERN Document Server

    Neshati, Ramin; Watt, Russell; Eastham, James

    2014-01-01

    Developing new products, services, systems, and processes has become an imperative for any firm expecting to thrive in today’s fast-paced and hyper-competitive environment.  This volume integrates academic and practical insights to present fresh perspectives on new product development and innovation, showcasing lessons learned on the technological frontier.  The first part emphasizes decision making.  The second part focuses on technology evaluation, including cost-benefit analysis, material selection, and scenarios. The third part features in-depth case studies to present innovation management tools, such as customer needs identification, technology standardization, and risk management. The fourth part highlights important international trends, such as globalization and outsourcing. Finally the fifth part explores social and political aspects.

  14. Science and Technology Peer Review: GPRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-30

    is secrecy: reviewer anonymity and reviewee non-anonymity ( Altura , 1990; Clayson, 1995; Gresty, 1995; Neetens, 1995). If honest and frank viewpoints...personal gain. BIBLIOGRAPHY Altura , B.T. 1990. Is Anonymous Peer-Review The Best Way To Review And Accept Manuscripts? In: Magnesium And Trace Elements. 9

  15. A Review of Technology-Assisted Interventions for Diabetes Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grock, Shira; Ku, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Julie; Moin, Tannaz

    2017-09-23

    The high prevalence of prediabetes and success of the diabetes prevention program (DPP) has led to increasing efforts to provide readily accessible, cost-effective DPP interventions to the general public. Technology-assisted DPP interventions are of particular interest since they may be easier to widely distribute and sustain as compared to traditional in-person DPP. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of currently available technology-assisted DPP interventions. This review focuses on studies that have examined the use of mobile phone text messaging, smartphone/web-based apps, and telehealth programs to help prevent or delay the onset of incident type 2 diabetes. While there is variability in the results of studies focused on technology-assisted DPP and weight loss interventions, there is evidence to suggest that these programs have been associated with clinically meaningful weight loss and can be cost-effective. Patients who are at risk for diabetes can be offered technology-assisted DPP and weight loss interventions to lower their risk of incident diabetes. Further research should determine what specific combination of intervention features would be most successful.

  16. Bloody Robots as Emotional Design: How Emotional Structures May Change Expectations of Technology Use in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    By applying Gilles Fauconnier & Mark Turner’s theory of conceptual blending to a design case, this paper demonstrates how experiencing emotional qualities in technology design may influence the way users cognitively reconstruct standard expectations of use. In so doing, the paper expands the domi......By applying Gilles Fauconnier & Mark Turner’s theory of conceptual blending to a design case, this paper demonstrates how experiencing emotional qualities in technology design may influence the way users cognitively reconstruct standard expectations of use. In so doing, the paper expands...... the dominating appraisal theory of emotion in design in three central respects: (i) the understanding of mixed emotions is deepened; (ii) a more detailed explanation is given of the specific operations involved in appraisal processes grounded in embodied interaction; and (iii) a structural model is proposed...... for mapping the constitutive role that mixed emotions play in product usage and interaction. Udgivelsesdato: september...

  17. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Min; Gao, Zhongxue; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-06-30

    Fresh foods are perishable, seasonal and regional in nature and their storage, transportation, and preservation of freshness are quite challenging. Smart storage technologies can online detection and monitor the changes of quality parameters and storage environment of fresh foods during storage, so that operators can make timely adjustments to reduce the loss. This article reviews the smart storage technologies from two aspects: online detection technologies and smartly monitoring technologies for fresh foods. Online detection technologies include electronic nose, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), hyperspectral imaging and computer vision. Smartly monitoring technologies mainly include some intelligent indicators for monitoring the change of storage environment. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods need to be highly efficient and nondestructive and need to be competitively priced. In this work, we have critically reviewed the principles, applications, and development trends of smart storage technologies.

  18. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  19. Ec-135 Fiber Optic Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jan R...; Hodges, Harry N.

    1984-10-01

    Fiber optic technology offers many advantages for upgrading nuclear survivability in systems such as the Airborne Command Post EC-135 aircraft, including weight and cost savings, EMI and EMC immunity, high data rates. The greatest advantage seen for nuclear survivable systems, however, is that a fiber optic system's EMP hardness can be maintained more easily with the use of fiber optics than with shielded cables or other protective methods. TRW recently completed a study to determine the feasibility of using fiber optic technology in an EC-135 aircraft environment. Since this study was conducted for a USAF Logistics Command Agency, a feasible system had to be one which could be realistically priced by an integrating contractor. Thus, any fiber optic approach would have to be well developed before it could be considered feasible. During the course of the study problem areas were encountered which are associated with the readiness of the technology for use rather than with the technology itself. These included connectors, standards, fiber radiation resistance, busing, maintenance, and logistics. Because these problems areas have not been resolved, it was concluded that fiber optic technology, despite its advantages, is not ready for directed procurement (i.e., included as a requirement in a prime mission equipment specification). However, offers by a manufacturer to use fiber optic technology in lieu of conventional technology should be considered. This paper treats these problems in more detail, addresses the areas which need further development, and discusses the hardness maintenance advantages of using fiber optic technology.

  20. Book Review: English Language Learning and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaei, Abouzar; Motallebzadeh, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    This book is a very helpful book which gives us information and knowledge of using technology in language learning and teaching. It contains detailed consideration to articulatory and auditory Language learning as well as to the practicalities of English language learning. The book discusses the relationship between English language learning and technology

  1. Laser technologies of ceramics treatment (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, E.M.; Voronezhtsev, Yu.I.; Gol'dade, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Publications on the laser technologies of ceramic coating production, ceramics treatment and ceramics manufacture are analyzed for the past 5 years. Features of production processes utilizing the interaction of laser radiation with ceramics and other substances which form the ceramics as a result of such interaction are considered. Possible ways of improving laser technologies of ceramics treatment are outlined

  2. Book Review: English Language Learning and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaei, Abouzar; Motallebzadeh, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    This book is a very helpful book which gives us information and knowledge of using technology in language learning and teaching. It contains detailed consideration to articulatory and auditory Language learning as well as to the practicalities of English language learning. The book discusses the relationship between English language learning and technology.

  3. Experience in Reviewing Small Modular Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Alfred, S.L.; Phongsakorn, P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is in the stage of conducting Preliminary Technical Feasibility Study for the Deployment of Small Modular Reactor (SMR). There are different types of SMR, some already under construction in Argentina (CAREM) and China (HTR-PM) - (light water reactor and high temperature reactor technologies), others with near-term deployment such as SMART in South Korea, ACP100 in China, mPower and NuScale in the US, and others with longer term deployment prospects (liquid-metal cooled reactor technologies). The study was mainly to get an overview of the technology available in the market. The SMR ranking in the study was done through listing out the most deployable technology in the market according to their types. As a new comer country, the proven technology with an excellent operation history will usually be the main consideration points. (author)

  4. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming.

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY CUPCAKES USING ADDITIVES ROSEHIP MAY (ROSA MAJALIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Belokurova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. This article contains information about newly developed technologies cupcakes with making fine powder (product recycling and water extract of the fruit of the wild rose may (Rosa majalis. Given the chemical composition of the deposited product of the processing of the fine powder hips may. The aim of this study is to develop and scientific substantiation of technologies of production of flour confectionery products, in particular cupcakes, with superior quality with the use of additives rosehip may. The results of experimental studies on changes of physico-chemical properties of the dough during fermentation, depending on the amounts of applied additives and modifying complex indicators of the quality of finished products. Based on the data produced optimal ratios make product recycling and extract from the fruits of medicinal plants in Central Russia hips may (Rosa majalis recipe cake products. See recipe cake products with optimal ratios introduced, enriching the product components. Based on the results of organoleptic and physico-chemical evaluation of the quality of finished products obtained from the samples of the test, the values obtained comprehensive quality indicators. The conclusion is that the best physico-chemical and organoleptic quality, has been studied in a laboratory study, are the samples with the introduction of the product refining of fine powder rosehip 3.6 % from the total amount of wheat flour and rosehip extract 5.7 % instead of the water in the recipe.

  6. Mozambique Science, Technology and Innovation Review | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... system, and of researchers and policymakers to conduct systematic reviews of STI policy implementation. It will do so by supporting a review of the implementation of the current strategy (2006-2016) and a study to assess the feasibility and likely structure of a multidisciplinary scientific and industrial research organization ...

  7. Science and Technology Review, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-12-01

    Featured articles in this issue cover progress in these areas: Advancing Technologies and Applications in Nondestructive Evaluation; Atomic Engineering with Multilayers; Marrying Astrophysics with the Earth; Continuing Work in Breast Cancer Detection Technologies. Furthermore, this issue lists patents issued to and/or the awards received by Laboratory employees. It also includes an index of the contents of all the issues published in calendar year 1997.

  8. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The First Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. The Summary Report (Pt. 2) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 10 papers presented at this meeting. Refs, figs

  9. Carbon trends. June 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This newsletter makes a monthly synthesis of the European CO 2 market: traded volumes, spot prices, conformability of facilities, supply and demand, climate indexes (temperature, precipitations from June 2005 to May 2006), economic activity indicators (industrial production from March 2005 to March 2006), confidence index of business leaders (from May 2005 to May 2006), changes in energy prices (from June 2005 to May 2006), CO 2 quotas allocated to European Union countries and detailed indicators of CO 2 market, climate, economic activity and energy prices. (J.S.)

  10. Adoption of e-health technology by physicians: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grood, Chloe; Raissi, Aida; Kwon, Yoojin; Santana, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this scoping review was to summarize the current literature identifying barriers and opportunities that facilitate adoption of e-health technology by physicians. Scoping review. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases as provided by Ovid were searched from their inception to July 2015. Studies captured by the search strategy were screened by two reviewers and included if the focus was on barriers and facilitators of e-health technology adoption by physicians. Full-text screening yielded 74 studies to be included in the scoping review. Within those studies, eleven themes were identified, including cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support. Cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support were the most frequently mentioned barriers and facilitators to the adoption of e-health technology. Government-level payment incentives and privacy laws to protect health information may be the key to overcome cost and liability issues. The adoption of e-health technology may be facilitated by tailoring to the individual physician's knowledge of the e-health technology and the use of follow-up sessions for physicians and on-site experts to support their use of the e-health technology. To ensure the effective uptake of e-health technologies, physician perspectives need to be considered in creating an environment that enables the adoption of e-health strategies.

  11. Biological/environmental relationships in desert ecosystems of the Nevada Test Site. Progress report for period May 1, 1977--June 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beatley, J.C.

    1978-03-01

    Activities covered by the report are the preparation of reports on endangered and threatened plant species of central-southern Nevada; status of review of Camissonia heterochroma complex in western United States; gift of plant collections to the United States Museum of Natural History; and preparation of shrub data manuscript, and significant conclusions from the data

  12. Biological/environmental relationships in desert ecosystems of the Nevada Test Site. Progress report for period May 1, 1977--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatley, J.C.

    1978-03-01

    Activities covered by the report are the preparation of reports on endangered and threatened plant species of central-southern Nevada; status of review of Camissonia heterochroma complex in western United States; gift of plant collections to the United States Museum of Natural History; and preparation of shrub data manuscript, and significant conclusions from the data.

  13. Science and Technology Peer Review: GPRA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kostoff, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    This report describes practical issues for federal agencies to consider if they choose program peer review for internal purposes and/ or to contribute to satisfying the requirements of the Government...

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: May 14-18, 2012, Arlington, VA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the fiscal year (FY) 2012 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, VA.

  15. Status and prospects for gas cooled reactor fuels. Proceedings of two IAEA meetings held in June 2004 and June 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    Recently, efforts to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors with an aim to building futuristic nuclear energy systems with advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the context of the Generation IV International Forum have increased significantly. In addition, several development projects are ongoing, focusing on the burning of weapons grade plutonium, including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept', or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in the form of coated particles in gas cooled reactor systems. There is also considerable global interest in developing 'nuclear hydrogen' energy systems using high temperature gas cooled reactors. Apart from these developments, the value of preserving the large technology base developed in Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, as well as information developed in other countries, has also been a subject of interest to the IAEA. At the second annual meeting of the 'technical working group on nuclear fuel cycles options and spent fuel management' (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna from 28-30 May 2003, it was recommended to hold a technical meeting on Current Status and Future Prospects of Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels. The meeting should cover the technological progress that has been made in the last three years and plan future fabrication and qualification facilities for GCR/HTR fuel. TWG-NFCO considered it timely that this progress should be presented and discussed in the interested community. Recognizing the numerous activities being pursued in many Member States, the IAEA convened the technical meeting on this topic in June 2004 in Vienna. Consequently, an update meeting was held in June 2005, which was hosted by the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine to review and integrate the latest developments. This publication combines the results of the technical meeting of June 2004 and the meeting of June 2005. The proceedings presented here contain 25 in depth papers on the

  16. Technology and innovation: 2010 a year in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanberg, Paul R; Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia; Eve, David J; Federoff, Howard J

    2011-01-01

    The following commentary provides a discussion of the articles published in Technology and Innovation in 2010 and where possible places them into context with those reported in Cell Transplantation. These articles can be divided into the following topics: a) models for innovation and technological commercialization, b) the ethical and legal consequences of the emergence of new technologies, c) research on novel technologies and methods, and d) the difficulties involved in peer review and scientific assessment. The articles shed light on the effects of technological innovation and commercialization on scientific ethical regulation, the establishment of legal standards for the protection of intellectual property, and the development of financial models.

  17. The paradox of imaging technology: A review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to review the social scientific literature associated with medical imaging technology. Methods: An extensive search of published studies in nursing, psychology and anthropology was undertaken to support the radiography specific literature. Results: Following a broad definition of technology and its profound influence on society, an analysis of imaging literature revealed a complex relationship between technology and human interactions. Examples are cited for CT, MRI and ultrasound. Conclusion: It is suggested that any attempt to understand imaging technology must place at its centre the perspectives of patients and radiographers. Scientific descriptors must be balanced with equal deliberation given to 'soft technology'

  18. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor base-technology program. Progress report, January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coobs, J.H.; Kasten, P.R.

    1976-11-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: PCRV development, studies on structural materials, fission product technology studies, kernel migration and irradiated fuel chemistry, coolant chemistry (steam-graphite reactions), fuel qualification, and characterization and standardization of graphite

  19. Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992. Volume 1, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks.

  20. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor base-technology program. Progress report, January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coobs, J.H.; Kasten, P.R.

    1976-11-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: PCRV development, studies on structural materials, fission product technology studies, kernel migration and irradiated fuel chemistry, coolant chemistry (steam-graphite reactions), fuel qualification, and characterization and standardization of graphite.

  1. Upcoming strategies in obstetrics: how the technology of clinical audit may reduce cesarean birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paracchini, Sara; Masturzo, Bianca; Tangolo, Domenico; Roletti, Enrica; Piazzese, Annalisa; Attini, Rossella; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2017-12-01

    The rate of cesarean delivery is currently increasing all over Europe. In Italy it reaches 38% of all child births. Therefore, it is important to identify the clinical and organizational variables that determine the appropriateness of elective cesarean delivery. With this aim we chose the technology of clinical audit, a process that promotes improvement in clinical practice through systematic review of clinical care in relation with explicit standards derived from scientific literature. This is a prospective audit: in the period March 2014-July 2014 we analyzed the medical records of 150 women who underwent elective cesarean delivery at Gynecological and Obstetrical University Hospital Sant'Anna, Turin. We collected data related to five quality criteria derived from scientific literature. Each criterion was stratified by indicators and matched with respective standards of adequate care. Criteria and indicators are: 1) cesarean section (CS) rate in twin pregnancies with both cephalic fetal presentation (stratified by dichorionic diamniotic and monochorionic diamniotic); 2) CS rates in preterm births (stratified by gestational age ≤32, ≤34 and ≤37 week); 3) CS rates on maternal request due to tokophobia in patients who received a psychological support during pregnancy; 4) repeated CS rates; 5) multidisciplinary evaluation of the indication to CS for non-obstetric reasons (orthopedic, ophthalmologic, psychiatric and neurological). The rate of CSs found in each criterion was compared with the respective standard in literature. The value obtained for each indicator was tested for statistical significance (CI 95%). We considered performing indicators whose final rate was found to be better or equal to the reference standard. The majority of the indicators result to be performant. CS rate for previous CS was 84% (73/86), far more frequent than the standard of optimal care fixed at ≤30% (Paudit because of the high gap between observed and adequate scores, the

  2. 49 CFR 40.405 - May the Federal courts review PIE decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May the Federal courts review PIE decisions? 40.405 Section 40.405 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR... courts review PIE decisions? The Director's decision is a final administrative action of the Department...

  3. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial

  4. Immersive technology and the elderly: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Brett E; Uz, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    Technologies that provide immersive experiences continue to become more ubiquitous across all age groups. This paper presents a review of the literature to provide a snapshot of the current state of research involving the use of immersive technologies and the elderly. A narrative literature review was conducted using the ScienceDirect, EBSCOhost, Springerlink and ERIC databases to summarize primary studies from which conclusions were drawn into a holistic interpretation. The majority of the studies examined the effect of immersive technologies on elder peoples' age-related declines, including sensory and motor changes (vision, hearing, motor skills), cognitive changes and social changes. Various immersive technologies have been described and tested to address these age-related changes, and have been categorized as 'games and simulations', 'robotics' and 'social technologies'. In most cases, promising results were found for immersive technologies to challenge age-related declines, especially through the increase of morale. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-17-122-124 (March 2017), MCU-17-130-132 (April 2017), MCU-17-133-135 (May 2017), and MCU-17-141-149 (June 2017): Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-13

    A trend summary of four Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples; MCU-16-122-124 (March 2017), MCU-17-130-132 (April 2017), MCU-17-133-135 (May 2017), and MCU-17-141-149 (June 2017) are reported. Analyses of the June SHT sample (MCU-17-141-149) indicated that the modifier (CS-7SB) and the extractant (MaxCalix) concentrations were slightly below (4% each) their nominal recommended levels (169,000 mg/L and 46,400 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased since the January 2017 measurement but has remained steady in the range of 666 to 705 mg/L, well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L), but below the nominal level. The “flat” trends observed in the TiDG, MaxCalix, modifier, and Gamma measurement are consistent with the solvent being idle since January 10, 2017.

  6. Technology in Social Work Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wretman, Christopher J.; Macy, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing prevalence of technology-based instruction, social work faculty need a clear understanding of the strengths and limitations of these methods. We systematically examined the evidence for technology-based instruction in social work education. Using comprehensive and rigorous methods, 38 articles were included in the review. Of…

  7. Advance in Bioaerosol Removal Technologies; A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jonidi Jafari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioaerosols are air pollutants that affect human health in various routes. They are characteristically diverse; such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, that everyone has different characteristics and effects, various solutions and technologies are studied or applied for their removal and inactivation. Regarding to lack of specific and integrated publications about the different air quality guidelines for bioaerosols and the methods and technologies, attending to approach the standards, purpose of this study was set on the development of the issue. The importance of presence of bioaerosols in breathing air and related standards and guidelines, also controlling technologies such as filtration, ultraviolet (UV radiation, photo catalyst, temperature and electrostatic precipitators were surveyed in this study by using the scientific literature.Given the results, UV irradiation and photocatalytic methods are ineffective for allergens. In this way, filtration is unable for inactivation of the bioaerosols, then there is the threat that they can aerosolize again. Hence, these technologies individually cannot provide the air quality standards which have established for sensitive conditions such as operation rooms. Regarding the discussions, application of the methods that include collection and inactivation of the bioaerosols simultaneously, such as electrostatic precipitators, could be more effective in the likewise environments.

  8. Review of Trenchless Technologies' Successes and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... costly construction modifications, and use of substandard borrow material, environmental damage to the site, post construction remedial work, and even failure of a structure and subsequent litigation. Trenchless technology can be defined as the use of construction methods to install and repair underground infrastructure ...

  9. A Literature Review of Spreadsheet Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that there would be over 55 million end-user programmers in 2012 in many different fields such as engineering,insurance and banking, and the numbers are not expected to have dwindled since. Consequently, technological advancements of spreadsheets is of great interest to a wide...

  10. Mobile Technology Interventions for Asthma Self-Management: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Benjamin; Walters, Julia; Walters, E Haydn

    2017-01-01

    Background Mobile technology interventions (MTI) are becoming increasingly popular in the management of chronic health behaviors. Most MTI allow individuals to monitor medication use, record symptoms, or store and activate disease-management action plans. Therefore, MTI may have the potential to improve low adherence to medication and action plans for individuals with asthma, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Objective A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of MTI on clinical outcomes as well as adherence in individuals with asthma. As the use of evidence-based behavior change techniques (BCT) has been shown to improve intervention effects, we also conducted exploratory analyses to determine the role of BCT and engagement with MTI as moderators of MTI efficacy. Methods We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials up until June 2016. Random effect models were used to assess the effect of MTI on clinical outcomes as well as adherence to preventer medication or symptom monitoring. Mixed effects models assessed whether the features of the MTI (ie, use of BCT) and how often a person engaged with MTI moderated the effects of MTI. Results The literature search located 11 studies meeting the inclusion criteria, with 9 providing satisfactory data for meta-analysis. Compared with standard treatment, MTI had moderate to large effect sizes (Hedges g) on medication adherence and clinical outcomes. MTI had no additional effects on adherence or clinical outcomes when compared with paper-based monitoring. No moderator effects were found, and the number of studies was small. A narrative review of the two studies, which are not included in the meta-analysis, found similar results. Conclusions This review indicated the efficacy of MTI for self-management in individuals with asthma and also indicated that MTI appears to be as efficacious as paper-based monitoring. This review also suggested a need for robust

  11. When Intrusion Detection Meets Blockchain Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Weizhi; Tischhauser, Elmar Wolfgang; Wang, Qingju

    2018-01-01

    With the purpose of identifying cyber threats and possible incidents, intrusion detection systems (IDSs) are widely deployed in various computer networks. In order to enhance the detection capability of a single IDS, collaborative intrusion detection networks (or collaborative IDSs) have been...... developed, which allow IDS nodes to exchange data with each other. However, data and trust management still remain two challenges for current detection architectures, which may degrade the effectiveness of such detection systems. In recent years, blockchain technology has shown its adaptability in many...... fields such as supply chain management, international payment, interbanking and so on. As blockchain can protect the integrity of data storage and ensure process transparency, it has a potential to be applied to intrusion detection domain. Motivated by this, this work provides a review regarding...

  12. 2009 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-01

    Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to review the FY2008 accomplishments and FY2009 plans for the Vehicle Technologies Program, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academic to give inputs to DOE on the Program with a structured and formal methodology.

  13. Library holdings for EX1605L2: CAPSTONE CNMI and Mariana Trench MNM (Mapping) on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between May 20, 2016 and June 11, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Dive Plans, Dive...

  14. Library holdings for EX1003: Hawaii to Guam on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between May 19, 2010 and June 3, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  15. Library holdings for EX1503L2: Tropical Exploration (Mapping II) on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between May 16, 2015 and June 24, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  16. Library holdings for EX1302: Ship Shakedown, Patch Test and Exploration, NE Canyons and Seamounts on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between May 13, 2013 and June 6, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  17. Genetic use restriction technologies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Luca

    2014-10-01

    Genetic use restriction technologies (GURTs), developed to secure return on investments through protection of plant varieties, are among the most controversial and opposed genetic engineering biotechnologies as they are perceived as a tool to force farmers to depend on multinational corporations' seed monopolies. In this work, the currently proposed strategies are described and compared with some of the principal techniques implemented for preventing transgene flow and/or seed saving, with a simultaneous analysis of the future perspectives of GURTs taking into account potential benefits, possible impacts on farmers and local plant genetic resources (PGR), hypothetical negative environmental issues and ethical concerns related to intellectual property that have led to the ban of this technology. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modern Breast Cancer Detection: A Technological Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Nover

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection for breast cancer as well as a discussion of new and emerging technologies. This paper aims to serve as a starting point for those who are not acquainted with this growing field.

  19. Science and technology review, October 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-10-01

    This month`s issue contains articles entitled Livermore Science and Technology Garner Seven 1997 R&D 100 Awards; New Interferometer Measures to Atomic Dimensions; Compact More Powerful Chips from Virtually Defect-free Thin Film Systems, A New Precision Cutting Tool; The Femtosecond Laser; MELD: A CAD Tool for Photonoics Systems, The Tiltmeter: Tilting at Great Depths to Find Oil; Smaller Insulators Handle Higher Voltage; and Compact Storage Management Software: The Next Generation.

  20. Energy and technology review, March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bookless, W.A.; Wheatcraft, D.

    1995-03-01

    This journal contains two feature articles. The first article reports on the background, design, and capabilities of the Portable Tritium Processing System currently being used to clean up and decontaminate the Laboratory's Tritium Facility. The second article discusses the development of a x-ray lasers as a probe to obtain high-resolution images of high-density plasmas produced at the Nova laser facility. Finally, two research programs are highlighted. They are silicon microcomponents and modern technology for advanced military training

  1. Modern breast cancer detection: a technological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nover, Adam B; Jagtap, Shami; Anjum, Waqas; Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng; Brooks, Ari D

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection for breast cancer as well as a discussion of new and emerging technologies. This paper aims to serve as a starting point for those who are not acquainted with this growing field.

  2. Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edington, C.W.

    1992-06-01

    This progress report relates progress in the various research projects evaluating the late health effects, both somatic and genetic, resulting from radiation exposure of the survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the collection and utilization of the various epidemiological data bases. These include the Life Span Study, (LSS) cohort, the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort, the In Utero cohort, the leukemia registry and the F-1 Study population. Important progress has been made in using RERF Tumor and Tissue Registry records for evaluation of cancer incidence and radiation risk estimates for comparison with cancer mortality and risk in the LSS cohort. At the present time, a manuscript on the incidence of solid tumors (1950-1987) is undergoing internal and external review for publication as an RERF Technical report (TR) and for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. In addition, manuscripts are in preparation on (1) a comprehensive report on the incidence of hematological cancers, including analysis of leukemia by cell type (1950-1987), (2) a general description of Tumor Registry operations and (3) a comparison of incidence- and mortality-based estimates of radiation risk in the LSS cohort.

  3. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  4. Committee Report of the BEPC-II Project Design Review May 13-15, 2002, SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Traci M.

    2002-08-26

    As part of the US-China Cooperative Program in High Energy Physics for the year 2002, a BEPC-II Upgrade Review meeting was held at SLAC, May 13-15, 2002. The upgrade is aimed at improving the luminosity and performance of the BEPC facility at IHEP in Beijing, China with major upgrades to the injector linac, storage ring, and detector. This review addresses mainly the accelerator related issues. Prior to the review, an updated Draft Design Report was made available to the review team. Most important technical change since April 2001 has been a change from a single-ring configuration to a doublering. The goal of the review is to determine whether BEPC-II, if built as described, will meet the operations and physics goals. The charge to the review team is attached as Appendix A.

  5. Multisensory Technology for Flavor Augmentation: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Carlos; Obrist, Marianna; Petit, Olivia; Spence, Charles

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in the development of new technologies that capitalize on our emerging understanding of the multisensory influences on flavor perception in order to enhance human-food interaction design. This review focuses on the role of (extrinsic) visual, auditory, and haptic/tactile elements in modulating flavor perception and more generally, our food and drink experiences. We review some of the most exciting examples of recent multisensory technologies for augmenting such experiences. Here, we discuss applications for these technologies, for example, in the field of food experience design, in the support of healthy eating, and in the rapidly growing world of sensory marketing. However, as the review makes clear, while there are many opportunities for novel human-food interaction design, there are also a number of challenges that will need to be tackled before new technologies can be meaningfully integrated into our everyday food and drink experiences.

  6. Multisensory Technology for Flavor Augmentation: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Velasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the development of new technologies that capitalize on our emerging understanding of the multisensory influences on flavor perception in order to enhance human–food interaction design. This review focuses on the role of (extrinsic visual, auditory, and haptic/tactile elements in modulating flavor perception and more generally, our food and drink experiences. We review some of the most exciting examples of recent multisensory technologies for augmenting such experiences. Here, we discuss applications for these technologies, for example, in the field of food experience design, in the support of healthy eating, and in the rapidly growing world of sensory marketing. However, as the review makes clear, while there are many opportunities for novel human–food interaction design, there are also a number of challenges that will need to be tackled before new technologies can be meaningfully integrated into our everyday food and drink experiences.

  7. Information technologies to improve public health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhas, Melissa; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review examines a total of eighteen studies on the use of health information technologies to improve public health. Health information technologies are tools that allow for the management of health information in computerized systems. Health information technology, including electronic health records, computers/emails, social media, and cellphones/text messaging are becoming widespread and readily accessible to populations around the globe. In this review, the use of these technologies and interventions are discussed and evaluated for their potential to improve public health. This review found some good-quality evidence on the use of electronic health records and little good-quality evidence on the use of email, social media, cell phones and text messaging to improve healthcare, illustrating the need for further study in these areas.

  8. Proceedings of the fuels technology contractors review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R.D. [ed.

    1993-11-01

    The Fuels Technology Contractors Review Meeting was held November 16-18, 1993, at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). METC periodically provides an opportunity to bring together all of the R&D participants in a DOE-sponsored contractors review meeting to present key results of their research and to provide technology transfer to the active research community and to the interested public. This meeting was previously called the Natural Gas Technology Contractors Review Meeting. This year it was expanded to include DOE-sponsored research on oil shale and tar sands and so was retitled the Fuels Technology Contractors Review Meeting. Current research activities include efforts in both natural gas and liquid fuels. The natural gas portion of the meeting included discussions of results summarizing work being conducted in fracture systems, both natural and induced; drilling, completion, and stimulation research; resource characterization; delivery and storage; gas to liquids research; and environmental issues. The meeting also included project and technology summaries on research in oil shale, tar sands, and mild coal gasification, and summaries of work in natural-gas fuel cells and natural-gas turbines. The format included oral and poster session presentations. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  9. Technology for Consumers: Proceedings of the RESNA International Conference (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 6-11, 1992).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presperin, Jessica J., Ed.

    This proceedings document contains approximately 250 papers and posters presented at a conference on the advancement of rehabilitation and assistive technology. Individual sessions focused on the following topics: quantitative functional evaluation, upper limb and therapeutic stimulation, human-computer interface developments, information…

  10. Gridley Ethanol Demonstration Project Utilizing Biomass Gasification Technology: Pilot Plant Gasifier and Syngas Conversion Testing; August 2002 -- June 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-02-01

    This report is part of an overall evaluation of using a modified Pearson Pilot Plant for processing rice straw into syngas and ethanol and the application of the Pearson technology for building a Demonstration Plant at Gridley. This report also includes information on the feedstock preparation, feedstock handling, feedstock performance, catalyst performance, ethanol yields and potential problems identified from the pilot scale experiments.

  11. An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2009-06-26

    Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects – Sleipner, Snøhvit, In Salah and Weyburn – are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the public’s willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earth’s climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport

  12. Science and Technology Review October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eimerl, D.

    1999-01-01

    The following titles are in the review: The Laboratory in the News; Commentary about the year's R and D 100 Honors; The Optical Modulator and Switch: Light on the Move; From Dinosaur Bones to Software, Gamma Rays Protect Property; High-Power Green Lasers Open up Precision Machining; Breakthrough Design for Accelerators; New Deposition System for the Microchip Revolution; and PEREGRINEtrademark Takes Aim at Cancer Tumors

  13. 76 FR 73595 - Healthcare Technology, Policy & Trade Mission: Mexico City, Mexico, May 13-16, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... medical technology industries in Mexico. Participating in an official U.S. industry delegation, rather... pronouncement of regulations for medical technologies, Mexico is expected to become an even more attractive... technology industries; (2) to get a first-hand look at current use of healthcare technology in Mexico's top...

  14. How organic farming of wheat may affect the sourdough and the nutritional and technological features of leavened baked goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontonio, Erica; Rizzello, Carlo G; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Dousset, Xavier; Clément, Héliciane; Filannino, Pasquale; Onno, Bernard; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-12-19

    Organic farming is gaining broad recognition as a system that complies well with sustainability, an overarching principle that should drive agriculture now and in the coming year. Different cultivars and products can harbour different abundances of specific bacterial groups, farming system may influence the composition and abundances of microbial communities found on food product. Despite the growing interest towards organic foods, we still have a limited understanding of the diversity of food-associated microbial communities and the factors that influence the composition of these communities. Consumers in developed nations are commonly exposed to differences in farming practices through their choice between organic and conventionally farmed foods. Organic farming practices can differ from conventional farming practices in a variety of ways, including the types of fertilizer and pesticides that are used. This review aiming to gather current knowledge on chemical, technological, toxicological and functional properties and microbiota composition of wheat flours originating from organic and conventional farming systems and how the use of these may affect the sourdough fermentation and breadmaking. Sourdough fermentation is the most natural and best-performing process to ensure optimal sensory and functional characteristics. It fits perfectly into the processing chain that starts with the organic farming, especially for old wheat varieties with weaker technological properties. Recently, organic and sourdough microbiota diversity was investigated and in some case a comparison between organic and conventional microbial ecosystem was also carried out. Opposites evidences arise. Once a higher diversity of lactic acid bacteria species was found in conventional wheat sourdoughs, while when the diversity of Firmicutes was investigated, organic sourdoughs showed the highest complexity. When occurring, the differences between conventional and organic sourdough microbiota and

  15. 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Amanda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bioenergy Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Wolfe, Alexis [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); English, Christine [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bioenergy Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Ruddick, Colleen [BCS, Incorporated, Washington, DC (United States); Lambert, Devinn [Bioenergy Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, is committed to advancing the vision of a viable, sustainable domestic biomass industry that produces renewable biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower; enhances U.S. energy security; reduces our dependence on fossil fuels; provides environmental benefits; and creates economic opportunities across the nation. BETO’s goals are driven by various federal policies and laws, including the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). To accomplish its goals, BETO has undertaken a diverse portfolio of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities, in partnership with national laboratories, academia, and industry.

  16. Science and technology review, April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1996-04-01

    There are two main feature articles in this publication. The first article tells of how using off-the-shelf computers, state-of-the-art CCDs, and a network of collaborators, scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab explore the composition of dark matter. Indications are that MACHOs (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) make up the bulk of dark matter in the universe. The second article discusses a new breed of Livermore-developed, flywheel-based energy storage systems using new materials, new technologies, and new thinking to develop a new electromechanical battery. Patents and research highlights are also listed in this publication.

  17. Thermal science under extreme conditions. Proceedings of the annual congress of the French Society of Thermal science - SFT 2012, 29 May-1 June, Bordeaux-Talence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendrhi, Philippe; Perrin, Bernard; Journeau, Christophe; MOST, Jean-Michel; Nicolai, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    This publication proposes the contributions made during plenary sessions, and those made on various themes (Multi-physical couplings combustion; Contacts and interfaces; Natural, hybrid and forced convection, Energy and the environment; High temperatures and high flows; Metrology and identification; Micro- and nano-thermal science; Radiation; Control of systems and thermal process; System thermal science; Life thermal science; Transfer in multi-phase media; Transfer in porous media). Among the plenary session conferences some authors more particularly addressed the following issues: Thermal science at the heart of thermonuclear fusion (presentation of thermonuclear fusion by magnetic confinement); Thermal science of severe accidents of nuclear reactors (study of the thermal science of corium-water interaction which could result in a thermal detonation, study of corium baths at the vessel bottom or in interaction with the vessel well concrete, proposition of technological solutions for corium recovery); Fusion by inertial confinement and associated energy exchanges (case of inertial confinement by power lasers, presentation of needed conditions to obtain an energetic gain, of different energy and heat transfers under extreme conditions)

  18. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  19. Adventitious agents, new technology, and risk assessment, 19-20 May 2011, Baltimore, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rebecca; Loewer, Johannes; Raychaudhuri, Gopa; Petricciani, John

    2012-03-01

    In May 2011, the International Alliance for Biological Standardization, with the cooperation of WHO, FDA, and NIAID, organized a conference on adventitious agents that might be found in biological products using new technology (http://www.iabs.org/index.php/past-conference-reports/116-baltimore-2011-slides). The implications of such findings on risk assessment also were considered. Topics that were addressed included: a) current routine testing--what are we doing now?; b) recent advances in testing--what tests are being explored/applied?; c) examples of finding agents with "new" techniques; and d) risk assessment, including recent WHO activities. A draft algorithm for risk assessment was discussed in terms of its applicability to a variety of potential new agents and the possibilities for improving it. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. How may CCS technology affect the electricity market in North-Western Europe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebregts, A.J.; Groenenberg, H.

    2008-11-01

    The EU electricity market is changing. Electricity demand in Europe is on the rise, the power plant fleet is aging, and a large share of the capacity will need to be replaced in the coming decades. An ambitious target has been formulated for the share of renewable energy, and CO2 prices are anticipated to increase. On top of this, CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) has appeared as an important technology in the transition to a long term sustainable energy supply. This paper discusses the implications of all the fore-mentioned developments for the EU electricity market, with an emphasis on the Northwest European market. On the whole, electricity prices in the Northwestern part of Europe are anticipated to increase until 2020, but this may only partly be ascribed to the pending introduction of CCS

  1. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q97.

  2. Acoustic Wave Filter Technology-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Clemens C W

    2017-09-01

    Today, acoustic filters are the filter technology to meet the requirements with respect to performance dictated by the cellular phone standards and their form factor. Around two billion cellular phones are sold every year, and smart phones are of a very high percentage of approximately two-thirds. Smart phones require a very high number of filter functions ranging from the low double-digit range up to almost triple digit numbers in the near future. In the frequency range up to 1 GHz, surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters are almost exclusively employed, while in the higher frequency range, bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and SAW filters are competing for their shares. Prerequisites for the success of acoustic filters were the availability of high-quality substrates, advanced and highly reproducible fabrication technologies, optimum filter techniques, precise simulation software, and advanced design tools that allow the fast and efficient design according to customer specifications. This paper will try to focus on innovations leading to high volume applications of intermediate frequency (IF) and radio frequency (RF) acoustic filters, e.g., TV IF filters, IF filters for cellular phones, and SAW/BAW RF filters for the RF front-end of cellular phones.

  3. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  4. Deviation Among Technology Reviews: An Informative Enrichment of Technology Evolution Theory for Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Sood (Ashish); S. Stremersch (Stefan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding technological change is of critical importance to marketers, as it bears new markets, new brands, new customers, and new market leaders. This paper examines the deviation among reviews of a technology’s performance and its consequences for inferences on technology evolution

  5. Physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Man; Yuan, Songhu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► HCB contamination is still a serious environmental problem. ► Physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal are reviewed. ► Perspectives for most remediation technologies are proposed. ► Pilot and large scale remediation and disposal are presented. - Abstract: Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is one of the 12 persistent organic pollutants (POPs) listed in “Stockholm Convention”. It is hydrophobic, toxic and persistent in the environment. Due to extensive use in the past, HCB contamination is still a serious environmental problem. Strong adsorption on solid particles makes the remediation difficult. This paper presents an overview of the physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal. The adsorption/desorption behavior of HCB is firstly described because it comprises the fundamental for most remediation technologies. Physiochemical technologies concerned mostly for HCB remediation and disposal, i.e., chemical enhanced washing, electrokinetic remediation, reductive dechlorination and thermal decomposition, are reviewed in terms of fundamentals, state of the art and perspectives. The other physiochemical technologies including chemical oxidation, radiation induced catalytic dechlorination, ultrasonic assisted treatment and mechanochemical dechlorination are also reviewed. The pilot and large scale tests on HCB remediation or disposal are summarized in the end. This review aims to provide useful information to researchers and practitioners regarding HCB remediation and disposal.

  6. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 71, quarter ending June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  7. Science and Technology Review December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-11-17

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Advanced Materials for Our Past, Present, and Future - Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) A Defensive 'Coat' for Materials under Attack - Amorphous metal coatings provide the strength and corrosion resistance needed to protect military vessels and spent nuclear fuel containers; (3) Too Close for Comfort - Laboratory scientists are analyzing the feasibility of using nuclear explosives to disrupt or divert asteroids on a collision course with Earth; (4) Hyperion: A Titan of High-Performance Computing Systems - Livermore is collaborating with 10 computing industry leaders to create a test bed for Linux cluster hardware and software technologies; (5) Isolating Pathogens for Speedy Identification - An automated miniature device separates viruses, bacteria, genetic material, and proteins from nasal swabs and blood and urine samples for speedy identification.

  8. Science & Technology Review November/December 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2008-10-07

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Innovation Is Key to Prosperity and Security --Commentary by Erik J. Stenehjem; (2) Taking Ultrafast Snapshots of Material Changes--The dynamic transmission electron microscope captures images a million times faster than conventional instruments; (3) Automated Technology for Laser Fusion Systems--The first completely computer-controlled system for aligning laser beams is helping make fusion research possible; (4) Protecting the Nation through Secure Cargo--A new device tracks and monitors cargo containers during transit to improve national security; (5) Atom by Atom, Layer by Layer--Extremely thin sandwiches of materials called nanolaminates exhibit remarkable, highly useful properties; and (6) Predicting the Bizarre Properties of Plutonium--A supercomputing 'grand challenge' team has made highly precise predictions of the behavior of plutonium's most important solid phase.

  9. Science & Technology Review January/February 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-11-30

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Innovative Materials Rise to the Radiation Challenge - Commentary by Bruce Warner; (2) The Hunt for Better Radiation Detection - New materials will help radiation detectors pick up weak signals and accurately identify illicit radioactive sources; (3) Time-Critical Technology Identifies Deadly Bloodborne Pathogens - A portable device can simultaneously distinguish up to five bloodborne pathogens in just minutes; (4) Defending Computer Networks against Attack - A Laboratory effort takes a new approach to detecting increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks; and (5) Imaging Cargo's Inner Secrets - Livermore-University of California collaborators are modeling a new radiographic technique for identifying nuclear materials concealed inside cargo containers.

  10. Science and Technology Review March 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2012-02-15

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Honoring a Legacy of Service to the Nation - The nation pays tribute to George Miller, who retired in December 2011 as the Laboratory's tenth director; (2) Life-Extension Programs Encompass All Our Expertise - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (3) Extending the Life of an Aging Weapon - Stockpile stewards have begun work on a multiyear effort to extend the service life of the aging W78 warhead by 30 years; (4) Materials by Design - Material microstructures go three-dimensional with improved additive manufacturing techniques developed at Livermore; (5) Friendly Microbes Power Energy-Producing Devices - Livermore researchers are demonstrating how electrogenic bacteria and microbial fuel cell technologies can produce clean, renewable energy and purify water; and (6) Chemical Sensor Is All Wires, No Batteries - Livermore's 'batteryless' nanowire sensor could benefit applications in diverse fields such as homeland security and medicine.

  11. Technology-Enhanced Peer Review: Benefits and Implications of Providing Multiple Reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Lagkas, Thomas D.; Demetriadis, Stavros N.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses the impact of self and peer feedback in technology-enhanced peer review settings. The impact of receiving peer comments (“receiver” perspective) is compared to that of reaching own insights by reviewing others’ work (“giver” perspective). In this study, 38 sophomore students w...... systems that aim to flexibly support more efficient peer review schemes.......This study analyses the impact of self and peer feedback in technology-enhanced peer review settings. The impact of receiving peer comments (“receiver” perspective) is compared to that of reaching own insights by reviewing others’ work (“giver” perspective). In this study, 38 sophomore students...... were randomly assigned in two conditions and engaged in peer review activity facilitated by a web-based learning environment asking them to provide multiple reviews. In the Peer Reviewed (PR) condition students both reviewed peer work and received peer comments for their own work. By contrast...

  12. Market review: Market values summary/May market review/current market data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This article is the May 1996 Uranium transactions summary. Data on Uranium supply and demand is included, as is data on conversion services and separative work units supply and demand. The spot market was active during this period, with 3.6 million pounds U3O8 changing hands in nine transactions. This brought a strengthing of prices. There were also five deals in the long-term market and three deals for natural UF6

  13. A Systematic Literature Review of Technologies for Suicidal Behavior Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Martín, Manuel A; Muñoz-Sánchez, Juan Luis; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Castillo-Sánchez, Gema; Hamrioui, Sofiane; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel

    2018-03-05

    Suicide is the second cause of death in young people. The use of technologies as tools facilitates the detection of individuals at risk of suicide thus allowing early intervention and efficacy. Suicide can be prevented in many cases. Technology can help people at risk of suicide and their families. It could prevent situations of risk of suicide with the technological evolution that is increasing. This work is a systematic review of research papers published in the last ten years on technology for suicide prevention. In September 2017, the consultation was carried out in the scientific databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. A general search was conducted with the terms "prevention" AND "suicide" AND "technology. More specific searches included technologies such as "Web", "mobile", "social networks", and others terms related to technologies. The number of articles found following the methodology proposed was 90, but only 30 are focused on the objective of this work. Most of them were Web technologies (51.61%), mobile solutions (22.58%), social networks (12.90%), machine learning (3.23%) and other technologies (9.68%). According to the results obtained, although there are technological solutions that help the prevention of suicide, much remains to be done in this field. Collaboration among technologists, psychiatrists, patients, and family members is key to advancing the development of new technology-based solutions that can help save lives.

  14. Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 'Capability Review' process at LANL significantly differs from the Division reviews of prior years. The Capabilities being reviewed (some 4-8 per year) are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory, and therefore will include not only several experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines, but also contributions from multiple line organizations. This approach is consistent with the new Laboratory organizational structure, focusing on agile and integrated capabilities applied to present national security missions, and also nurtured to be available for rapid application to future missions. The overall intent is that the Committee assess the quality of the science, engineering, and technology identified in the agenda, and advise the LANS Board of Governors and Laboratory management. Specifically, the Committees will: (1) Assess the quality of science, technology and engineering within the Capability in the areas defined in the agenda. Identify issues to develop or enhance the core competencies within this capability. (2) Evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory organizations that are listed in the agenda in terms of joint programs, projects, proposals, and/or publications. Describe the integration of this capability in the wider scientific community using the recognition as a leader within the community, ability to set research agendas, and attraction and retention of staff. (3) Assess the quality and relevance of this capability's science, technology and engineering contributions to current and emerging Laboratory programs, including Nuclear Weapons, Threat Reduction/Homeland Security, and Energy Security. (4) Advise the Laboratory Director/Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering on the health of the Capability including the current and future (5 year) science, technology and engineering staff needs, mix of research and development activities, program opportunities

  15. Energy and technology review, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses the two-stage light-gas gun which was developed by the Super-High-Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a step toward realizing a launcher that can do this at a fraction of the cost of rockets. The SHARP gun is different from other two-stage designs because it is larger and its launch and pump tube are joined at right angles. This configuration allows the launch tube to point at any angle toward the sky while the pump tube remains horizontal. We have demonstrated that this gun can fire projectiles when the launch tube is in the horizontal position. Dr. Michael M. May who was the Laboratory`s fifth Director (1965--71) and is now a Director Emeritus. Under his directorship, the groundwork was laid for the Laboratory`s Energy Program, environmental science programs, and Laser Program. May remains active in research on arms control, nonproliferation, and cooperative security, and he is doing research and teaching at UC San Diego and at Stanford University. As part of the Laboratory`s 40th anniversary celebration, May was invited to lecture on his views of the changing world and the role of LLNL. In 1992, he participated in an influential National Academy of Sciences study on the reduction of nuclear weapons. This study recommended that the US cut strategic weapons to one-third the present number, withdraw most tactical weapons, and dismantle the retired nuclear weapons. May is convinced that the relative stability now present among the major nations is a precondition for keeping the demand for nuclear weapons low among the nuclear ``have-not`` nations. In the coming years, May believes that the Laboratory will remain most useful at major government-funded R&D projects in the areas of defense, energy, and the environment. May is now working on a new report on the disposition of surplus plutonium from nuclear weapons.

  16. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  17. Searching for the effects of the May-June 2012 Emilia seismic sequence (northern Italy: medium-depth deformation structures at the periphery of the epicentral area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Borgatti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, a seismic sequence occurred in the lowlands of the Emilia-Romagna Region (northern Italy, between the borders of the Modena, Ferrara and Bologna Provinces. It consisted of seven mainshocks (5.9 > Ml > 5 that were recorded between May 20 and 29, 2012 [INGV 2012a] and 2,200 minor earthquakes [INGV 2012b]. An interferometric analysis [Bignami et al. 2012, Salvi et al. 2012, this volume] highlighted three main deformation areas, each of which was 12 km wide (from S to N and 10 km to 20 km long in an ESE-WNW to E-W direction, thus affecting an area of about 600 km2 (Figure 1. Field and aerial geological surveys recorded numerous surficial effects, such as: (i sediment liquefaction [Crespellani et al. 2012]; (ii localized ground fissures resembling surficial faulting [Fioravante and Giretti 2012] (Figure 2; (iii groundwater levels rising up to 400 cm above the local ground level in phreatic wells during the mainshocks (lower values were observed in confined aquifers; and (iv dormancy of previously known sinkholes [Borgatti et al. 2010, Cremonini 2010a, and references therein]. Some of the observed surface phenomena were previously recorded as coseismic effects during the earthquakes of Ferrara (1570 and Argenta (1624 [Boschi et al. 1995, Galli 2000], together with the early rising of the water level of the Po River in the Stellata section. […

  18. Review of lithium-ion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, S.C.; Cieslak, W.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds (GIC) as battery anodes was reported in a 1981 patent by Basu in which a molten salt cell was described having a negative electrode that consisted of lithium intercalated in graphite. A second patent by Basu, issued in 1983, described an ambient temperature rechargeable system which also utilized lithium intercalated in graphite as the anode. Work in this area progressed at a low level, however, until interest was sparked in 1990 when Sony Corporation announced a new ``lithium-ion`` rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode. These cells have the advantages of metallic lithium systems; i.e., high energy density, high voltage, and light weight, without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium. Materials other than carbon have been studied as intercalation anodes. Examples are Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, WO{sub 2} and TiS{sub 2}. Although these alternate anode materials are of interest academically and for specialty applications, they do not hold much promise for widespread general use due to their increased weight and lower cell voltage. Studies of cathode materials for lithium-ion systems have centered on the transition metal chalcogenides. A number of these materials are capable of reversibly intercalating lithium ions at a useful potential versus lithium. Both organic liquids and polymers are candidate electrolytes for this technology.

  19. UK Public Opinion Review - Working Paper - An overview of public opinion polls since the Edward Snowden revelations in June 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Cable, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This document charts public opinion of the Edward Snowden leaks and associated issues\\ud since June 2013. This includes people’s opinions on surveillance, the intelligence services\\ud and personal privacy. Since the Snowden leaks there have been 38 opinion polls on these\\ud topics concerning public opinion in the UK and conducted by large polling organisations,\\ud such as YouGov, ComRes and Ipsos MORI among others.

  20. Game on, science - how video game technology may help biologists tackle visualization challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhihan; Tek, Alex; Da Silva, Franck; Empereur-mot, Charly; Chavent, Matthieu; Baaden, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The video games industry develops ever more advanced technologies to improve rendering, image quality, ergonomics and user experience of their creations providing very simple to use tools to design new games. In the molecular sciences, only a small number of experts with specialized know-how are able to design interactive visualization applications, typically static computer programs that cannot easily be modified. Are there lessons to be learned from video games? Could their technology help us explore new molecular graphics ideas and render graphics developments accessible to non-specialists? This approach points to an extension of open computer programs, not only providing access to the source code, but also delivering an easily modifiable and extensible scientific research tool. In this work, we will explore these questions using the Unity3D game engine to develop and prototype a biological network and molecular visualization application for subsequent use in research or education. We have compared several routines to represent spheres and links between them, using either built-in Unity3D features or our own implementation. These developments resulted in a stand-alone viewer capable of displaying molecular structures, surfaces, animated electrostatic field lines and biological networks with powerful, artistic and illustrative rendering methods. We consider this work as a proof of principle demonstrating that the functionalities of classical viewers and more advanced novel features could be implemented in substantially less time and with less development effort. Our prototype is easily modifiable and extensible and may serve others as starting point and platform for their developments. A webserver example, standalone versions for MacOS X, Linux and Windows, source code, screen shots, videos and documentation are available at the address: http://unitymol.sourceforge.net/.

  1. Game on, science - how video game technology may help biologists tackle visualization challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihan Lv

    Full Text Available The video games industry develops ever more advanced technologies to improve rendering, image quality, ergonomics and user experience of their creations providing very simple to use tools to design new games. In the molecular sciences, only a small number of experts with specialized know-how are able to design interactive visualization applications, typically static computer programs that cannot easily be modified. Are there lessons to be learned from video games? Could their technology help us explore new molecular graphics ideas and render graphics developments accessible to non-specialists? This approach points to an extension of open computer programs, not only providing access to the source code, but also delivering an easily modifiable and extensible scientific research tool. In this work, we will explore these questions using the Unity3D game engine to develop and prototype a biological network and molecular visualization application for subsequent use in research or education. We have compared several routines to represent spheres and links between them, using either built-in Unity3D features or our own implementation. These developments resulted in a stand-alone viewer capable of displaying molecular structures, surfaces, animated electrostatic field lines and biological networks with powerful, artistic and illustrative rendering methods. We consider this work as a proof of principle demonstrating that the functionalities of classical viewers and more advanced novel features could be implemented in substantially less time and with less development effort. Our prototype is easily modifiable and extensible and may serve others as starting point and platform for their developments. A webserver example, standalone versions for MacOS X, Linux and Windows, source code, screen shots, videos and documentation are available at the address: http://unitymol.sourceforge.net/.

  2. Health implications of new-age technologies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgrami, Zaid; McLAUGHLIN, Laura; Milanaik, Ruth; Adesman, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    New-age technologies are ubiquitous in the lives of adolescents. Recent trends in media use suggest that adolescents are spending more time than ever engaging with technologies, and are able to do so in virtually all settings at any time. Given that new-age technologies are so heavily integrated within the daily life of adolescents, the health risks and benefits they offer must be closely examined. In this systematic review, we present recent literature related to the implications of new-age technologies on adolescent health. A total of 94 articles published since 2006 were collected using PubMed and Google Scholar on the most popular new-age technologies among adolescents: the internet, television, cell phones, and video games. The current body of research highlights several health risks related to these technologies. Nearly all have the potential for addiction, which can result in other symptoms and impair one's daily life. Excessive use can affect several components of health, such as quality of sleep, body composition, and mental well-being, and certain practices (viewing pornography, sexting) can lead to risky sexual behaviors. However, the technologies discussed in the present review also have tremendous potential to promote adolescent health. Pediatricians must educate parents and patients on how to safely use technology to minimize the potentially harmful outcomes.

  3. Emerging desalination technologies for water treatment: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Arun; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a review of emerging desalination technologies is presented. Several technologies for desalination of municipal and industrial wastewater have been proposed and evaluated, but only certain technologies have been commercialized or are close to commercialization. This review consists of membrane-based, thermal-based and alternative technologies. Membranes based on incorporation of nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes or graphene-based ones show promise as innovative desalination technologies with superior performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. However, only nanocomposite membranes have been commercialized while others are still under fundamental developmental stages. Among the thermal-based technologies, membrane distillation and adsorption desalination show the most promise for enhanced performance with the availability of a waste heat source. Several alternative technologies have also been developed recently; those based on capacitive deionization have shown considerable improvements in their salt removal capacity and feed water recovery. In the same category, microbial desalination cells have been shown to desalinate high salinity water without any external energy source, but to date, scale up of the process has not been methodically evaluated. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of each technology is discussed along with a comparison of performance, water quality and energy consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Repair and cell-cycle response in cells exposed to environmental biohazards. Comprehensive project report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1982-01-01

    Agents which cause damage to DNA leading to inhibition of DNA synthesis or faulty DNA replication or repair may cause cell death or mutation. Many organisms possess the ability to circumvent some or all of this DNA damage. Many DNA mutants of E. coli and B. subtilis provide a genetic approach to measuring the role of individual components of the DNA repair and replicative system. The information obtained with prokaryotes provides leads to assess the details of DNA repair and replication in mammalian systems including man. Escherichia coli cells treated with a low concentration of toluene become permeable to a variety of compounds, including the precursors and cofactors necessary for DNA synthesis. By their manipulation various aspects of DNA replication and repair can be selectively emphasized. Observations made by use of this system include: (1) Repair synthesis induced by x irradiation or exposure to alkylating chemicals of toluene-treated cells is more extensive if polynucleotide ligase is inhibited. (2) DNA replication in E. coli is carried out by DNA polymerase III. The replication of DNA is strongly inhibited by methylmethansulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. (3) Using a po1A1 po1B100 dnaB (po1I - , po1II - , po1III + ) mutant of E. coli, it was demonstrated that the dnaB gene product is not necessary for Po1III directed repair synthesis. (4) The physiological stage of cells and tissues affects their response to environmental hazards. (5) Procedures for permeabilizing mammalian cells have been developed or further refined; and (6) In earlier studies involving both alkylating agents and x rays, it was observed that the number of DNA single-strand breaks increased with dose along with repair synthesis. It appears that non-repaired sites do not serve as primer ends for Po1I-dependent repair synthesis in toluene-treated cells

  5. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977. [Effects of diurnal temperature changes in Tradescantia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R ..gamma..) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth.

  6. Plastic solid waste utilization technologies: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Shivashankar, Murugesh; Majumder, Suman

    2017-11-01

    Plastics are used in more number of applications in worldwide and it becomes essential part of our daily life. In Indian cities and villages people use the plastics in buying vegetable as a carry bag, drinking water bottle, use of plastic furniture in home, plastics objects uses in kitchen, plastic drums in packing and storage of the different chemicals for industrial use, use plastic utensils in home and many more uses. After usage of plastics it will become part of waste garbage and create pollution due to presence of toxic chemicals and it will be spread diseases and give birth to uncontrolled issues in social society. In current scenario consumption of plastic waste increasing day by day and it is very difficult to manage the plastic waste. There are limited methodologies available for reutilization of plastic waste again. Such examples are recycling, landfill, incineration, gasification and hydrogenation. In this paper we will review the existing methodologies of utilization of plastic waste in current scenario

  7. Foam-mat drying technology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Z; Jideani, V A

    2017-08-13

    This article reviews various aspects of foam-mat drying such as foam-mat drying processing technique, main additives used for foam-mat drying, foam-mat drying of liquid and solid foods, quality characteristics of foam-mat dried foods, and economic and technical benefits for employing foam-mat drying. Foam-mat drying process is an alternative method that allows the removal of water from liquid materials and pureed materials. In this drying process, a liquid material is converted into foam that is stable by being whipped after adding an edible foaming agent. The stable foam is then spread out in sheet or mat and dried by using hot air (40-90°C) at atmospheric pressure. Methyl cellulose (0.25-2%), egg white (3-20%), maltodextrin (0.5-05%), and gum Arabic (2-9%) are the commonly utilized additives for the foam-mat drying process at the given range, either combined together for their effectiveness or individual effect. The foam-mat drying process is suitable for heat sensitive, viscous, and sticky products that cannot be dried using other forms of drying methods such as spray drying because of the state of product. More interest has developed for foam-mat drying because of the simplicity, cost effectiveness, high speed drying, and improved product quality it provides.

  8. Review of casing while drilling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavković Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional drilling methods have been plagued with huge operational and financial challenges, such as cost of purchasing, inspecting, handling, transporting the drill equipment and most importantly, tripping in-and-out of the drill string whenever the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA needs a replacement, needs of wiper trip or when total depth is reached. The tripping in-and-out of the drill string not only contributes to Non Productive Time (NPT but also leads to well control difficulties including wellbore instability and lost circulation. All this has led Oil and Gas industry, as well as any other engineering industry, to seek for new ways and methods in order to reduce these problems. Thanks to the advances in technical solutions and constant improvements of conventional drilling methods, a new drilling method - casing while drilling has been developed. Casing Drilling encompasses the process of simultaneously drilling and casing a well, using the active casing and thus optimizes the production. This paper presents a review of casing while drilling method (CwD and its practical usage in drilling wells. The comparison of conventional drilling method and casing while drilling is also presented. The CwD method achieves significantly better results than conventional drilling method.

  9. Managing tight-binding receptors for new separations technologies. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - June 10, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, D.H.; Givens, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    'This program is fully staffed and all proposed investigations are proceeding as outlined in the Task Schedule of the original proposal. The program aims remain unchanged and excellent progress is reported below. The authors anticipate no substantial unexpended funds from the first year''s budget at the end of the first year of support. Any such remaining funds will certainly be less than 10% of the budget; less than 5% is expected. Three projects make up this program and each focuses on a single aspect of the major problem of overcoming the inherent slow reaction rates of tight-binding ligands. In a logical order, Project 1 addresses the rates of formation of metal complexes using tight-binding ligands; Project 2 addresses the rate of release of metal ions from complexes with tight-binding ligands; and Project 3 provides the possibility of a new technology that should be unimpeded by the inherent dilatory rates.'

  10. Managing tight-binding receptors for new separations technologies. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--June 10, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, D.H.; Givens, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    'This program is fully staffed and all proposed investigations are proceeding as outlined in the Task Schedule of the original proposal. The program aims remain unchanged and excellent progress is reported below. The authors anticipate no substantial unexpended funds from the first year''s budget at the end of the first year of support. Any such remaining funds will certainly be less than 10% of the budget; less than 5% is expected. Three projects make up this program and each focuses on a single aspect of the major problem of overcoming the inherent slow reaction rates of tight-binding ligands. In a logical order, Project 1 addresses the rates of formation of metal complexes using tight-binding ligands; Project 2 addresses the rate of release of metal ions from complexes with tight-binding ligands; and Project 3 provides the possibility of a new technology that should be unimpeded by the inherent dilatory rates.'

  11. Coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications -- Technology development. Final report, March 1988--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have developed the technology to enable coal-water slurry to be utilized in large-bore, medium-speed diesel engines. The target application is modular power generation in the 10 to 100 MW size, with each plant using between two and eight engines. Such systems are expected to be economically attractive in the non-utility generation market after 2000, when oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate rapidly compared to the price of coal. During this development program, over 1,000 hours of prototype engine operation have been achieved on coal-water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder, 1.8 MW engine with an integrated emissions control system. Arthur D. Little, Inc., managed the coal-fueled diesel development, with Cooper-Bessemer as the principal subcontractor responsible for the engine design and testing. Several key technical advances which enable the viability of the coal-fueled diesel engine were made under this program. Principal among them are the development and demonstration of (1) durable injection nozzles; (2) an integrated emissions control system; ad (3) low-cost clean coal slurry formulations optimized for the engine. Significant advances in all subsystem designs were made to develop the full-scale Cooper-Bessemer coal engine components in preparation for a 100-hour proof-of-concept test of an integrated system, including emissions controls. The Clean Coal Diesel power plant of the future will provide a cost-competitive, low-emissions, modular, coal-based power generation option to the non-utility generation, small utility, independent power producer, and cogeneration markets. Combined cycle efficiencies will be approximately 48% (lower heating value basis) and installed cost will be approximately $1,300/kW (1992 dollars).

  12. Biology, Biography, and Technology: Review in Kinship and Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Frois, Catarina

    2009-01-01

    This review considers four recent works on in vitro fertilization; human egg donation; the relation among family, kinship and nature; genetic databases, and medical research. Assisted reproductive technology has increasingly become a tool for the artificial production of body parts. Anthropology is reformulating kinship and family theories, taking into account their relationship with biology (in the strict sense of body) and technology as primary ‘‘agents’’ of reproductio...

  13. Archive of chirp seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruises 00SCC02 and 00SCC04, Barataria Basin, Louisiana, May 12-31 and June 17-July 2, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, S.V.; Kindinger, J.L.; Flocks, J.G.; Wiese, D.S.; Kulp, Mark; Penland, Shea; Britsch, L.D.; Brooks, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    This archive consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data collected in the Barataria Basin of southern Louisiana. These data were acquired in May, June, and July of 2000 aboard the R/V G.K. Gilbert. Included here are data in a variety of formats including binary, American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII), Hyper-Text Markup Language (HTML), shapefiles, and Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) and Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. Binary data are in Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format and may be downloaded for further processing or display. Reference maps and GIF images of the profiles may be viewed with a web browser. The Geographic Information Systems (GIS) information provided here is compatible with Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) GIS software.

  14. Science and Technology Review October/November 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Rebecca J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-25

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. This is the October/November 2011 issue, with the cover story being "Proton Therapy Advances Cancer Treatment."

  15. Mobile technology in health information systems - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-Y; Zhang, P-Y

    2016-05-01

    Mobile technology is getting involved in every sphere of life including medical health care. There has been an immense upsurge in mobile phone-based health innovations these days. The expansion of mobile phone networks and the proliferation of inexpensive mobile handsets have made the digital information and communication technology capabilities very handy for the people to exploit if for any utility including health care. The mobile phone based innovations are able to transform weak and under performing health information system into more modern and efficient information system. The present review article will enlighten all these aspects of mobile technology in health care.

  16. Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) technology development. Final report, May 15, 1995--December 1, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This program information release (PIR) summarizes work performed under Task Order Contract SF17787, Task Order 18: Thermophotovoltaic Technology Development, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The period of performance was 15 May 1995 to 1 December 1995. Under this task order, a system model for a thermophotovoltaic (MV) converter was implemented and used to compare a conceptual design for an advanced quaternary III-V cell with integral filter with results previously published for a binary GaSb cell with a freestanding filter. Model results were used to assess the merits of TPV conversion for meeting various levels of space power requirements, including low to medium power isotope applications and high-power reactor applications. A TPV cell development program was initiated to determine the feasibility of fabricating quaternary III-V cells by molecular beam epitaxy. Lastly, a conceptual design was completed for a low-cost demonstration system to test the performance of TPV converters at a multi-cell, sub-system level. The results of these efforts are reported briefly in an executive summary, then in somewhat more detail as a final briefing section in which charts have been reproduced. Additional technical detail is provided in the appendices

  17. DOE Lab-Wide Review of Fermilab May 19-20, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan [Fermilab

    1987-05-01

    This book is submitted as a written adjunct to the Annual DOE Lab-Wide Review of Fermilab, scheduled this year for May 19, 20, 1987. In it are described the functions and activities of the various laboratory areas plus statements of plans and goals for the coming year.

  18. Assistive technology for communication of older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrozo Campos Antunes, Thaiany; Souza Bulle de Oliveira, Acary; Hudec, Robert; Brusque Crocetta, Tania; Ferreira de Lima Antão, Jennifer Yohanna; de Almeida Barbosa, Renata Thais; Guarnieri, Regiani; Massetti, Thais; Garner, David M; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2018-02-16

    Describe the use of assistive technology to enhance communication opportunities for older adults. A systematic review was conducted in two databases, PubMed and Web of Science, by using two different searches in each. The search was limited to original articles, in English language, including people aged 60 years and older that used any type of assistive technology for communication. The articles found in the initial search were filtered by title, abstracts and the remaining articles were fully read. Eighteen studies were included in this review after the reading of full-texts. Most of the studies included apparently healthy participants with communication limitations due to aging related changes and the others included people with some pathology that prevent them from normal communication. Four categories of assistive technology were identified: assistive technology for people with speech problems; robot or videoconferencing systems; Information and Communication Technologies and, other types of assistive technology for communication, such as hearing aids and scrapbooks. Assistive technology for communication of older adults is not only used by people with disabilities that prevent them from usual communication. They are mostly for older adults without a pathological communication problem.

  19. Consumer Sleep Technologies: A Review of the Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ping-Ru T; Kientz, Julie A; Choe, Eun Kyoung; Kay, Matthew; Landis, Carol A; Watson, Nathaniel F

    2015-12-15

    To review sleep related consumer technologies, including mobile electronic device "apps," wearable devices, and other technologies. Validation and methodological transparency, the effect on clinical sleep medicine, and various social, legal, and ethical issues are discussed. We reviewed publications from the digital libraries of the Association for Computing Machinery, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and PubMed; publications from consumer technology websites; and mobile device app marketplaces. Search terms included "sleep technology," "sleep app," and "sleep monitoring." Consumer sleep technologies are categorized by delivery platform including mobile device apps (integrated with a mobile operating system and utilizing mobile device functions such as the camera or microphone), wearable devices (on the body or attached to clothing), embedded devices (integrated into furniture or other fixtures in the native sleep environment), accessory appliances, and conventional desktop/website resources. Their primary goals include facilitation of sleep induction or wakening, self-guided sleep assessment, entertainment, social connection, information sharing, and sleep education. Consumer sleep technologies are changing the landscape of sleep health and clinical sleep medicine. These technologies have the potential to both improve and impair collective and individual sleep health depending on method of implementation. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  20. Technology-Enhanced Peer Review: Benefits and Implications of Providing Multiple Reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Lagkas, Thomas D.; Demetriadis, Stavros N.

    2017-01-01

    were randomly assigned in two conditions and engaged in peer review activity facilitated by a web-based learning environment asking them to provide multiple reviews. In the Peer Reviewed (PR) condition students both reviewed peer work and received peer comments for their own work. By contrast......, in the Self Reviewed (SR) condition students provided peer reviews, but did not receive any. Instead, they were asked to perform self reviewing, before proceeding to any revisions of their work. Result showed that the two groups were comparable in all aspects, suggesting that the lack of getting peer reviews......This study analyses the impact of self and peer feedback in technology-enhanced peer review settings. The impact of receiving peer comments (“receiver” perspective) is compared to that of reaching own insights by reviewing others’ work (“giver” perspective). In this study, 38 sophomore students...

  1. Annual report June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report reviews the activities of the National Accelerator Centre until June 1988. The 200 MeV cyclotron facility, the Pretoria cyclotron facility and the Van De Graaff facility are discussed in detail. Aspects of the 200 MeV cyclotron facility examined are, inter alia: the injector cyclotrons, the separated-sector cyclotron, the control system, the beam transport system and radioisotope production. Separate abstracts were prepared for the various subdivisions contained in this annual report

  2. Competitive Technologies for National Security: Review and Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carafano, James J; Gudgel, Andew; Kochems, Alane

    2008-01-01

    .... Innovation will always be a national security wild card. New technologies may unleash or accelerate social and cultural changes that affect how nations protect themselves on battlefields and behind the scenes...

  3. LogLines. May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    million, almost four times the $2.2 million cost DSCR incurred to conduct the studies . And the team earned a Defense Logistics Agency Team Award for...facility on Asad Air Base, Iraq. Defense Supply Center Phila- delphia acquires most produce from local markets for troops deployed to Iraq and

  4. Resection of oligometastatic lung cancer to the pancreas may yield a survival benefit in select patients--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuzio, Matthew R; Moores, Craig; Dhamija, Ankit; Wang, Zuoheng; Cha, Charles; Boffa, Daniel J; Detterbeck, Frank C; Kim, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the existing literature regarding surgical therapy for oligometastatic lung cancer to the pancreas. Data was collected on patients with singular pancreatic metastases from lung cancer from papers published between January 1970 and June 2014. This was performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Kaplan-Meier and Cox Regression analyses were then used to determine and compare survival. There were 27 papers that fulfilled the search criteria, from which data on 32 patients was collected. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was the most prevalent type of primary lung malignancy, and metachronous presentations of metastases were most common. Lesions were most frequently located in the pancreatic head and consequently the most common curative intent metastasectomy was pancreaticoduodenectomy. There was a statistically significant survival benefit for patients whose metastasis were discovered incidentally by surveillance CT as opposed to those whose metastasis were discovered during a work up for new somatic complaints (p = 0.024). The overall median survival for patients undergoing curative intent resection was 29 months, with 2-year and 5-year survivals of 65% and 21% respectively. Palliative surgery or medical only management was associated with a median survival of 8 months and 2-year and 5-year survivals of 25% and 8% respectively. Curative intent resection of isolated pancreatic metastasis from lung cancer may be beneficial in a select group of patients. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Building Innovation: Learning with Technologies. Australian Education Review Number 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Australian Education Review (AER) 56 explores national and international policy priorities for building students' innovation capabilities through information and communication technologies (ICT) in Australian schools. Section 1 sets out the Australian policy context for digital education and highlights some of the emerging challenges. It provides…

  6. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  7. 78 FR 11902 - Review of Gun Safety Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs [OJP (NIJ) Docket No. 1615] Review of Gun Safety...'s Plan to reduce gun violence released on January 16, 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice, Office... emerging gun safety technologies and plans to issue a report on the availability and use of those...

  8. RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY REVIEW VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report gives results of a review of the current state-of-the-art of residential wood combustion (RWC). The key environmental parameter of concern was the air emission of particles. The technological status of all major RWC categories -- cordwood stoves, fireplaces, masonry h...

  9. RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY REVIEW - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a review of the current state-of-the-art of residential wood combustion (RWC). The key environmental parameter of concern was the air emission of particles. The technological status of all major RWC categories--cordwood stoves, fireplaces, masonry heat...

  10. A systematic review examining the effectiveness of blending technology with team-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    River, Jo; Currie, Jane; Crawford, Tonia; Betihavas, Vasiliki; Randall, Sue

    2016-10-01

    Technological advancements are rapidly changing nursing education in higher education settings. Nursing academics are enthusiastically blending technology with active learning approaches such as Team Based Learning (TBL). While the educational outcomes of TBL are well documented, the value of blending technology with TBL (blended-TBL) remains unclear. This paper presents a systematic review examining the effectiveness of blended-TBL in higher education health disciplines. This paper aimed to identify how technology has been incorporated into TBL in higher education health disciplines. It also sought to evaluate the educational outcomes of blended-TBL in terms of student learning and preference. A review of TBL research in Medline, CINAHL, ERIC and Embase databases was undertaken including the search terms, team based learning, nursing, health science, medical, pharmaceutical, allied health education and allied health education. Papers were appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP). The final review included 9 papers involving 2094 student participants. A variety of technologies were blended with TBL including interactive eLearning and social media. There is limited evidence that blended-TBL improved student learning outcomes or student preference. Enthusiasm to blend technology with TBL may not be as well founded as initially thought. However, few studies explicitly examined the value of incorporating technology into TBL. There is a clear need for research that can discern the impact of technology into TBL on student preference and learning outcomes, with a particular focus on barriers to student participation with online learning components. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol [Tennessee Technological University; Caldwell, Blake A [ORNL; Hicks, Susan Elaine [ORNL; Koch, Scott M [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Pelfrey, Daniel S [ORNL; Pogge, James R [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [Tennessee Technological University; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Sorrillo, Lawrence [ORNL

    2014-12-01

    High performance computing environments are often used for a wide variety of workloads ranging from simulation, data transformation and analysis, and complex workflows to name just a few. These systems may process data for a variety of users, often requiring strong separation between job allocations. There are many challenges to establishing these secure enclaves within the shared infrastructure of high-performance computing (HPC) environments. The isolation mechanisms in the system software are the basic building blocks for enabling secure compute enclaves. There are a variety of approaches and the focus of this report is to review the different virtualization technologies that facilitate the creation of secure compute enclaves. The report reviews current operating system (OS) protection mechanisms and modern virtualization technologies to better understand the performance/isolation properties. We also examine the feasibility of running ``virtualized'' computing resources as non-privileged users, and providing controlled administrative permissions for standard users running within a virtualized context. Our examination includes technologies such as Linux containers (LXC [32], Docker [15]) and full virtualization (KVM [26], Xen [5]). We categorize these different approaches to virtualization into two broad groups: OS-level virtualization and system-level virtualization. The OS-level virtualization uses containers to allow a single OS kernel to be partitioned to create Virtual Environments (VE), e.g., LXC. The resources within the host's kernel are only virtualized in the sense of separate namespaces. In contrast, system-level virtualization uses hypervisors to manage multiple OS kernels and virtualize the physical resources (hardware) to create Virtual Machines (VM), e.g., Xen, KVM. This terminology of VE and VM, detailed in Section 2, is used throughout the report to distinguish between the two different approaches to providing virtualized execution

  12. Issues facing the Australian Health Technology Assessment Review of medical technology funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Susanne P

    2010-07-05

    The Australian Health Technology Assessment Review has the potential to have a major effect on the availability of new medical technology and the listing of associated medical procedures on the Medicare Benefits Schedule. Despite this, only about 15% of submissions to the Review came from "medical associations". Pharmaceutical and medical technologies are inherently different, and there are a number of difficulties associated with evaluating medical technology using the same process and evidence levels as those used for pharmaceuticals. The current sequential and lengthy processing of new medical technology and procedures is delaying access to beneficial medical technology and could be substantially reduced. There is currently no effective funding process for medical technology classified as capital equipment or consumables and disposables. This has created a perverse incentive in favour of using funded implantable prostheses based on access to funding rather than superior clinical effectiveness. The existing horizon scanning process could be better used to not only identify all potentially cost-effective new and emerging medical technology and procedures as early as possible, but also to identify gaps in the evidence.

  13. Empowerment of Cancer Survivors Through Information Technology: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wim G; Kuijpers, Wilma; Oldenburg, Hester Sa; Wouters, Michel Wjm; Aaronson, Neil K; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-11-27

    Patient empowerment may be an effective approach to strengthen the role of cancer survivors and to reduce the burden on health care. However, it is not well conceptualized, notably in oncology. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent information technology (IT) services can contribute to empowerment of cancer survivors. We aim to define the conceptual components of patient empowerment of chronic disease patients, especially cancer survivors, and to explore the contribution of existing and new IT services to promote empowerment. Electronic databases were searched to identify theoretical and empirical articles regarding empowerment. We extracted and synthesized conceptual components of patient empowerment (ie, attributes, antecedents, and consequences) according to the integrated review methodology. We identified recent IT services for cancer survivors by examining systematic reviews and a proposed inventory of new services, and we related their features and effects to the identified components of empowerment. Based on 26 articles, we identified five main attributes of patient empowerment: (1) being autonomous and respected, (2) having knowledge, (3) having psychosocial and behavioral skills, (4) perceiving support from community, family, and friends, and (5) perceiving oneself to be useful. The latter two were specific for the cancer setting. Systematic reviews of IT services and our additional inventory helped us identify five main categories: (1) educational services, including electronic survivorship care plan services, (2) patient-to-patient services, (3) electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) services, (4) multicomponent services, and (5) portal services. Potential impact on empowerment included knowledge enhancement and, to a lesser extent, enhancing autonomy and skills. Newly developed services offer promising and exciting opportunities to empower cancer survivors, for instance, by providing tailored advice for supportive or follow-up care based on

  14. Lab on a chip technologies for algae detection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Allison; Rohrlack, Thomas; Bellouard, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Over the last few decades, lab on a chip technologies have emerged as powerful tools for high-accuracy diagnosis with minute quantities of liquid and as tools for exploring cell properties in general. In this paper, we present a review of the current status of this technology in the context of algae detection and monitoring. We start with an overview of the detection methods currently used for algae monitoring, followed by a review of lab on a chip devices for algae detection and classification, and then discuss a case study based on our own research activities. We conclude with a discussion on future challenges and motivations for algae-oriented lab on a chip technologies. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A Literature Review: The Effect of Implementing Technology in a High School Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This study is a literature review to investigate the effects of implementing technology into a high school mathematics classroom. Mathematics has a hierarchical structure in learning and it is essential that students get a firm understanding of mathematics early in education. Some students that miss beginning concepts may continue to struggle with…

  16. Educational Technology: A Review of the Integration, Resources, and Effectiveness of Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolph Delgado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no questioning that the way people live, interact, communicate, and conduct business is undergoing a profound, rapid change. This change is often referred to as the “digital revolution,” which is the advancement of technology from analog, electronic and mechanical tools to the digital tools available today. Moreover, technology has begun to change education, affecting how students acquire the skill sets needed to prepare for college and a career and how educators integrate digital technological instructional strategies to teach. Numerous studies have been published discussing the barriers of integrating technology, the estimated amount of investment that is needed in order to fully support educational technology, and, of course, the effectiveness of technology in the classroom. As such, this article presents a critical review of the transitions that technology integration has made over the years; the amount of resources and funding that has been allocated to immerse school with technology; and the conflicting results presented on effectiveness of using is technology in education. Through synthesis of selected themes, we found a plethora of technological instructional strategies being used to integrate technology into K-12 classrooms. Also, though there have been large investments made to integrate technology into K-12 classrooms to equip students with the skills needed to prepare for college and a career, the practical use of this investment has not been impressive. Lastly, several meta-analyses showed promising results of effectiveness of technology in the classroom. However, several inherent methodological and study design issues dampen the amount of variance that technology accounts for.

  17. Noninvasive imaging technologies for cutaneous wound assessment: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dereck W; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Prindeze, Nicholas J; Moffatt, Lauren T; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    The ability to phenotype wounds for the purposes of assessing severity, healing potential and treatment is an important function of evidence-based medicine. A variety of optical technologies are currently in development for noninvasive wound assessment. To varying extents, these optical technologies have the potential to supplement traditional clinical wound evaluation and research, by providing detailed information regarding skin components imperceptible to visual inspection. These assessments are achieved through quantitative optical analysis of tissue characteristics including blood flow, collagen remodeling, hemoglobin content, inflammation, temperature, vascular structure, and water content. Technologies that have, to this date, been applied to wound assessment include: near infrared imaging, thermal imaging, optical coherence tomography, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging, fluorescence imaging, laser Doppler imaging, microscopy, spatial frequency domain imaging, photoacoustic detection, and spectral/hyperspectral imaging. We present a review of the technologies in use or development for these purposes with three aims: (1) providing basic explanations of imaging technology concepts, (2) reviewing the wound imaging literature, and (3) providing insight into areas for further application and exploration. Noninvasive imaging is a promising advancement in wound assessment and all technologies require further validation. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dezhen; Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan; He, Pinjing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MSW pyrolysis reactors, products and environmental impacts are reviewed. • MSW pyrolysis still has to deal with flue gas emissions and products’ contamination. • Definition of standardized products is suggested to formalize MSW pyrolysis technology. • Syngas is recommended to be the target product for single MSW pyrolysis technology. - Abstract: Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO 2 and NH 3 , contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested

  19. Adoption of e-health technology by physicians: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Grood C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chloe de Grood,1 Aida Raissi,2 Yoojin Kwon,3 Maria Jose Santana1 1Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, 2University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, 3Toronto Public Library, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: The goal of this scoping review was to summarize the current literature identifying barriers and opportunities that facilitate adoption of e-health technology by physicians.Design: Scoping review.Setting: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases as provided by Ovid were searched from their inception to July 2015. Studies captured by the search strategy were screened by two reviewers and included if the focus was on barriers and facilitators of e-health technology adoption by physicians.Results: Full-text screening yielded 74 studies to be included in the scoping review. Within those studies, eleven themes were identified, including cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support.Conclusion: Cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support were the most frequently mentioned barriers and facilitators to the adoption of e-health technology. Government-level payment incentives and privacy laws to protect health information may be the key to overcome cost and liability issues. The adoption of e-health technology may be facilitated by tailoring to the individual physician’s knowledge of the e-health technology and the use of follow-up sessions for physicians and on-site experts to support their use of the e-health technology. To ensure the effective uptake of e-health technologies, physician perspectives need to be considered in creating an environment that enables the adoption of e-health strategies. Keywords: medical informatics, electronic medical records, diffusion of innovation, attitude of health personnel, information seeking behavior

  20. GaN Technology for Power Electronic Applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Tyler J.; Pushpakaran, Bejoy N.; Bayne, Stephen B.

    2016-06-01

    Power semiconductor devices based on silicon (Si) are quickly approaching their limits, set by fundamental material properties. In order to address these limitations, new materials for use in devices must be investigated. Wide bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) have suitable properties for power electronic applications; however, fabrication of practical devices from these materials may be challenging. SiC technology has matured to point of commercialized devices, whereas GaN requires further research to realize full material potential. This review covers fundamental material properties of GaN as they relate to Si and SiC. This is followed by a discussion of the contemporary issues involved with bulk GaN substrates and their fabrication and a brief overview of how devices are fabricated, both on native GaN substrate material and non-native substrate material. An overview of current device structures, which are being analyzed for use in power switching applications, is then provided; both vertical and lateral device structures are considered. Finally, a brief discussion of prototypes currently employing GaN devices is given.

  1. Hemimorphite Ores: A Review of Processing Technologies for Zinc Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ailiang; Li, Mengchun; Qian, Zhen; Ma, Yutian; Che, Jianyong; Ma, Yalin

    2016-10-01

    With the gradual depletion of zinc sulfide ores, exploration of zinc oxide ores is becoming more and more important. Hemimorphite is a major zinc oxide ore, attracting much attention in the field of zinc metallurgy although it is not the major zinc mineral. This paper presents a critical review of the treatment for extraction of zinc with emphasis on flotation, pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical methods based on the properties of hemimorphite. The three-dimensional framework structure of hemimorphite with complex linkage of its structural units lead to difficult desilicification before extracting zinc in the many metallurgical technologies. It is found that the flotation method is generally effective in enriching zinc minerals from hemimorphite ores into a high-grade concentrate for recovery of zinc. Pure zinc can be produced from hemimorphite or/and willemite with a reducing reagent, like methane or carbon. Leaching reagents, such as acid and alkali, can break the complex structure of hemimorphite to release zinc in the leached solution without generation of silica gel in the hydrometallurgical process. For optimal zinc extraction, combing flotation with pyrometallurgical or hydrometallurgical methods may be required.

  2. Technology, applications and modelling of ohmic heating: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, K Shiby; Pandey, M C; Radhakrishna, K; Bawa, A S

    2014-10-01

    Ohmic heating or Joule heating has immense potential for achieving rapid and uniform heating in foods, providing microbiologically safe and high quality foods. This review discusses the technology behind ohmic heating, the current applications and thermal modeling of the process. The success of ohmic heating depends on the rate of heat generation in the system, the electrical conductivity of the food, electrical field strength, residence time and the method by which the food flows through the system. Ohmic heating is appropriate for processing of particulate and protein rich foods. A vast amount of work is still necessary to understand food properties in order to refine system design and maximize performance of this technology in the field of packaged foods and space food product development. Various economic studies will also play an important role in understanding the overall cost and viability of commercial application of this technology in food processing. Some of the demerits of the technology are also discussed.

  3. A Review of Gamification in Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabawa, H. W.

    2017-02-01

    This paper review 10 papers that relating to gamification adoption in developing technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Technological developments lately led to the trend of increased use of ICT in the learning process, one of which is gamification. Gamification is the concept of applying game mechanics and game design techniques to engage and motivate people to achieve their goals. Gamification in education as an intersection of learning and fun. The problem is that not all game’s attributes suitable for use in presents a teaching material. TPACK is a framework for the teacher that described a complex interaction among three bodies of knowledge : content, pedagogy and technology. TPACK engagement has an impact on the teacher mastery in dimension of teaching material content, in addition to improve teachers skill in developing technology in classroom learning.

  4. Ultra-low-head hydroelectric technology: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Daqing; Deng, Zhiqun (Daniel)

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, distributed renewable energy-generation technologies, such as wind and solar, have developed rapidly. Nevertheless, the utilization of ultra-low-head (ULH) water energy (i.e., situations where the hydraulic head is less than 3 m or the water flow is more than 0.5 m/s with zero head) has received little attention. We believe that, through technological innovations and cost reductions, ULH hydropower has the potential to become an attractive, renewable, and sustainable resource. This paper investigates potential sites for ULH energy resources, the selection of relevant turbines and generators, simplification of civil works, and project costs. This review introduces the current achievements on ULH hydroelectric technology to stimulate discussions and participation of stakeholders to develop related technologies for further expanding its utilization as an important form of renewable energy.

  5. Recent development of plasma pollution control technology: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Shih Chang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous pollution control, solid and liquid waste treatments have been commercialized based on incineration, catalysis, adsorption, disposal with landfill, etc. More recently technology based on plasmas has become significant due to the advantages such as lower costs, higher treatment and energy efficiencies, smaller space volume, etc. In order to commercialize this new technology, the treatment rate, energy efficiency of treatment, pressure drop of reactor, reusable by-products production rate, must be improved, based on the identifications of major fundamental mechanism of processes, optimizations of reactor, and power supply for an integrated system. In this work, recent development of plasma pollution control technology was critically reviewed and the principle of processes and reactor technologies were outlined. Special attention will be focused on material processing generated pollutants.

  6. Physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Man; Yuan, Songhu

    2012-08-30

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is one of the 12 persistent organic pollutants (POPs) listed in "Stockholm Convention". It is hydrophobic, toxic and persistent in the environment. Due to extensive use in the past, HCB contamination is still a serious environmental problem. Strong adsorption on solid particles makes the remediation difficult. This paper presents an overview of the physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal. The adsorption/desorption behavior of HCB is firstly described because it comprises the fundamental for most remediation technologies. Physiochemical technologies concerned mostly for HCB remediation and disposal, i.e., chemical enhanced washing, electrokinetic remediation, reductive dechlorination and thermal decomposition, are reviewed in terms of fundamentals, state of the art and perspectives. The other physiochemical technologies including chemical oxidation, radiation induced catalytic dechlorination, ultrasonic assisted treatment and mechanochemical dechlorination are also reviewed. The pilot and large scale tests on HCB remediation or disposal are summarized in the end. This review aims to provide useful information to researchers and practitioners regarding HCB remediation and disposal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Change Management in Information Technology - A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadi Hasan Miraz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the state of the art of research in Information Technology (IT in Change Management (CM. Initial studies indicate that investments into CM in IT often do not add the predictable value, neither to the CM division himself nor to the association supported by the CM section. A basis for further study into this complex and inter disciplinary area is therefore needed. This literature review will contribute to this basis. Based on a Systematic Literature Review (SLR method, journal articles, with a focus on CM in IT were found. Relevant articles were organized in categories according to focus on Technology, IT layer, CM process and theory, research method applied and type of findings. Finally research gaps were identified. There seems to be a general belief in technology combinations as a way to speed up the rather slow IT diffusion process in CM. It is documented that current research into CM in IT has an unbalanced focus on few specific technologies, IT layers and CM processes, and that further research should focus more on the IT implementation process and use. Knowledge from application and use could be fed back into (and strengthen conceptualization and progress, thereby adding more value to CM. Only the search engine Scopus is used. This is the first review paper focusing on CM in general in IT, giving an overview of the area and delivering a basis for further research.

  8. A Review of Factors Influencing the Cost Development of Electricity Generation Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Samadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature on the past cost dynamics of various renewable, fossil fuel and nuclear electricity generation technologies. It identifies 10 different factors which have played key roles in influencing past cost developments according to the literature. These 10 factors are: deployment-induced learning, research, development and demonstration (RD&D-induced learning, knowledge spillovers from other technologies, upsizing, economies of manufacturing scale, economies of project scale, changes in material and labour costs, changes in fuel costs, regulatory changes, and limits to the availability of suitable sites. The article summarises the relevant literature findings for each of these 10 factors and provides an overview indicating which factors have impacted on which generation technologies. The article also discusses the insights gained from the review for a better understanding of possible future cost developments of electricity generation technologies. Finally, future research needs, which may support a better understanding of past and future cost developments, are identified.

  9. Technology in precision viticulture: a state of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matese A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Matese,1 Salvatore Filippo Di Gennaro1,2 1Institute of Biometeorology, National Research Council (IBIMET-CNR, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy Abstract: Precision viticulture aims to maximize the oenological potential of vineyards. This is especially true in regions where the high quality standards of wine production justify the adoption of site-specific management practices to simultaneously increase both quality and yield. The introduction of new technologies for supporting vineyard management allows the efficiency and quality of production to be improved and, at the same time, reduces the environmental impact. The rapid evolution of information communication technologies and geographical science offers enormous potential for the development of optimized solutions for distributed information for precision viticulture. Recent technological developments have allowed useful tools to be elaborated that help in the monitoring and control of many aspects of vine growth. Precision viticulture thus seeks to exploit the widest range of available observations to describe the vineyard spatial variability with high resolution, and provide recommendations to improve management efficiency in terms of quality, production, and sustainability. This review presents a brief outline of state of the art of technologies in precision viticulture. It is divided in two sections, the first focusing on monitoring technologies such as geolocating and remote and proximal sensing; the second focuses on variable-rate technologies and the new agricultural robots. Keywords: remote sensing, proximal sensing, variable-rate technology, robot 

  10. A review of learning rates for electricity supply technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Edward S.; Azevedo, Inês M.L.; Jaramillo, Paulina; Yeh, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    A variety of mathematical models have been proposed to characterize and quantify the dependency of electricity supply technology costs on various drivers of technological change. The most prevalent model form, called a learning curve, or experience curve, is a log-linear equation relating the unit cost of a technology to its cumulative installed capacity or electricity generated. This one-factor model is also the most common method used to represent endogenous technical change in large-scale energy-economic models that inform energy planning and policy analysis. A characteristic parameter is the “learning rate,” defined as the fractional reduction in cost for each doubling of cumulative production or capacity. In this paper, a literature review of the learning rates reported for 11 power generation technologies employing an array of fossil fuels, nuclear, and renewable energy sources is presented. The review also includes multi-factor models proposed for some energy technologies, especially two-factor models relating cost to cumulative expenditures for research and development (R&D) as well as the cumulative installed capacity or electricity production of a technology. For all technologies studied, we found substantial variability (as much as an order of magnitude) in reported learning rates across different studies. Such variability is not readily explained by systematic differences in the time intervals, geographic regions, choice of independent variable, or other parameters of each study. This uncertainty in learning rates, together with other limitations of current learning curve formulations, suggests the need for much more careful and systematic examination of the influence of how different factors and assumptions affect policy-relevant outcomes related to the future choice and cost of electricity supply and other energy technologies. - Highlights: • We review models explaining the cost of 11 electricity supply technologies. • The most prevalent model

  11. Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhen; Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan; He, Pinjing

    2014-12-01

    Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO2 and NH3, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reprint of: Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhen; Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan; He, Pinjing

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO2 and NH3, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 83, quarter ending June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Summaries of 41 research projects on enhanced recovery are presented under the following sections: (1) chemical flooding; (2) gas displacement; (3) thermal recovery; (4) geoscience technology; (5) resource assessment technology; and (6) reservoir classes. Each presentation gives the title of the project, contract number, research facility, contract date, expected completion data, amount of the award, principal investigator, and DOE program manager, and describes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress.

  14. Machines that go "ping" may improve balance but may not improve mobility or reduce risk of falls: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Amy M; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of computer-based electronic devices that provide feedback in improving mobility and balance and reducing falls. Randomized controlled trials were searched from the earliest available date to August 2013. Standardized mean differences were used to complete meta-analyses, with statistical heterogeneity being described with the I-squared statistic. The GRADE approach was used to summarize the level of evidence for each completed meta-analysis. Risk of bias for individual trials was assessed with the (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) PEDro scale. Thirty trials were included. There was high-quality evidence that computerized devices can improve dynamic balance in people with a neurological condition compared with no therapy. There was low-to-moderate-quality evidence that computerized devices have no significant effect on mobility, falls efficacy and falls risk in community-dwelling older adults, and people with a neurological condition compared with physiotherapy. There is high-quality evidence that computerized devices that provide feedback may be useful in improving balance in people with neurological conditions compared with no therapy, but there is a lack of evidence supporting more meaningful changes in mobility and falls risk.

  15. Microwave as an emerging technology for the treatment of biohazardous waste: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Microwave is an emerging technology to treat biohazardous waste, including material from healthcare facilities. A screen of the peer-reviewed literature shows that only limited information may be found in this area of work and, furthermore, analysis of the references reveals that sometimes not all necessary aspects for the appropriate use of the technology are considered. Very often conventional microwave technology is applied for the inactivation of pathogens, which might make sense for certain applications but, on the other hand, may lead to the misbelief that microwave systems cannot be used for the inactivation of a solid "dry" waste. However, conventional microwave units have no means to control the inactivation process, and especially moisture content. But there are a few sophisticated microwave technologies with appropriate measurements allowing a validated inactivation of biohazardous materials. These technologies are an effective tool for inactivation and some of them are commercially available. It must also be considered that the waste should be preferably inactivated either directly at the place where it is generated or biohazardous waste should be transported only in closed systems. Moreover, microwave technology presents a possibility to save energy costs in comparison to the more widely used autoclaves. This mini-review will discuss important aspects for the use of microwave technology for the treatment of biohazardous waste.

  16. The controversy of sports technology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Changes or introductions of technology or equipment can affect how a sport is played or influence its performances. This article conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature to identify any case studies of controversial events surrounding the implementation or use of sports technology. 56 articles were identified that highlighted 31 different case studies found over a three decade time period. Thematic analysis revealed six distinctive themes when reviewing the articles. Whilst the sport of golf had the highest number of case studies, it was found that a significant level of attention had been recorded in the cases of Oscar Pistorius use of prosthetic legs in athletics and the use of full length swimsuits in swimming. The trend surrounding the number of articles was shown to be initially intermittent but saw a peak period from 2008 to 2010. However, the frequency of such articles since this peak has been more consistent. It is proposed that long periods of time without intervention or resolution by a governing body often increases the peer-reviewed attention paid to such cases in examples such as those identified in this systematic review.

  17. Review of design technology of control rod position indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Je Yong; Huh, Hyung; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In; Chang, Moon Hee

    1999-10-01

    An integral reactor SMART is under development at KAERI. The design characteristics of SMART are radically different from those employer in currently operating loop type water reactors in Korea. The objective of this report is to review the design technology of position indicator, and to study the various sensors which can be used in rod position indicator. Design criteria that rod position indicator should satisfy are also examined. Following position indicators are reviewed in this report. 1. Digital positioning indicator (DRPI), 2. Reed switch type position indicator (RSPT), 3. Choke sensor type position indicator, 4. Ultrasonic sensor type position indicator, 5. Comparison of each position indicator. (author)

  18. Why First Movers May Fail: Global Versus Sequential Improvement of Complex Technological Artefacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querbes, A.; Frenken, K.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new theory of late mover advantage where new entrants can leapfrog incumbents through introducing new functionality of an existing technology. Since first mover firms did not take into account new functionalities discovered after they entered, they limited their search on older

  19. CDC-reported assisted reproductive technology live-birth rates may mislead the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Choi, Jennifer; Darmon, Sarah K; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publicly reports assisted reproductive technology live-birth rates (LBR) for each US fertility clinic under legal mandate. The 2014 CDC report excluded 35,406 of 184,527 (19.2%) autologous assisted reproductive technology cycles that involved embryo or oocyte banking from LBR calculations. This study calculated 2014 total clinic LBR for all patients utilizing autologous oocytes two ways: including all initiated assisted reproductive technology cycles or excluding banking cycles, as done by the CDC. The main limitation of this analysis is the CDC report did not differentiate between cycles involving long-term banking of embryos or oocytes for fertility preservation from cycles involving short-term embryo banking. Twenty-seven of 458 (6%) clinics reported over 40% of autologous cycles involved banking, collectively performing 12% of all US assisted reproductive technology cycles. LBR in these outlier clinics calculated by the CDC method, was higher than the other 94% of clinics (33.1% versus 31.1%). However, recalculated LBR including banking cycles in the outlier clinics was lower than the other 94% of clinics (15.5% versus 26.6%). LBR calculated by the two methods increasingly diverged based on proportion of banking cycles performed by each clinic reaching 4.5-fold, thereby, potentially misleading the public. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.