WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology research fellowships

  1. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  2. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  3. Educational Research Postdoctoral Fellowship. Terminal Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeding, Robert W.

    During his postdoctoral fellowship year, Dr. Schmeding audited courses in the sociology and economics of education, educational development and planning, and instructional technology. He also did independent study in these areas. (RT)

  4. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  5. New Water Disinfection Technology for Earth and Space Applications as Part of the NPP Fellowship Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    SilvestryRodriquez, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    There is the need for a safe, low energy consuming and compact water disinfection technology to maintain water quality for human consumption. The design of the reactor should present no overheating and a constant temperature, with good electrical and optical performance for a UV water treatment system. The study assessed the use of UVA-LEDs to disinfectant water for MS2 Bacteriophage. The log reduction was sufficient to meet US EPA standards as a secondary disinfectant for maintaining water quality control. The study also explored possible inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli.

  6. Transforming a hospital nursing research fellowship into an evidence-based practice fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, Jami S; Hinds, Pamela S; Beaumont, Cynthia; Funk, Adam J; Green, Jo; Max, Anita; Russell, Philisa; Windsor, Kelley

    2007-12-01

    An established hospital-based nursing research fellowship program was transformed into an evidence-based practice fellowship despite its previous high satisfaction ratings from nursing leaders and nurse fellow participants. The faculty for the fellowship program determined that the long-term outcomes of the research program were insufficient in light of the hospital resources committed to the fellowship program. An evidence-based practice approach was then created in anticipation that greater short-term and more sustained longer-term benefits for the hospital would be realized. The transformation of the fellowship and the short-term outcomes are described.

  7. Health economics and outcomes research fellowship practices reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Kangho; Gabriel, Susan; Adams, Michelle A; Arcona, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The guidelines for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR) fellowship training programs devised by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) and the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) suggest that continuous improvements are made to ensure that postgraduate training through didactic and professional experiences prepare fellows for HEOR research careers. The HEOR Fellowship Program at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation was standardized to enhance the fellows' HEOR research understanding and align professional skill sets with the ACCP-ISPOR Fellowship Program Guidelines. Based on feedback from an internal task force comprised of HEOR employees and current and former fellows, the HEOR Fellowship Program was normatively and qualitatively assessed to evaluate the current curricular program. Fellowship program activities were instituted to ensure that the suggested minimum level requirements established by the guidelines were being met. Research opportunities enabling fellows to work hand-in-hand with other fellows and HEOR professionals were emphasized. Curricular enhancements in research methodology and professional training and development, and materials for a structured journal club focusing on specific methodological and HEOR research topics were developed. A seminar series (e.g., creating SMART Goals, StrengthsFinder 2.0) and professional courses (e.g., ISPOR short courses, statistics.com) were included to enhance the fellows' short- and long-term professional experience. Additional program attributes include an online reference library developed to enrich the current research facilities and a Statistical Analysis Software training program. Continuously assessing and updating HEOR fellowship programs keeps programs up-to-date in the latest HEOR concepts and approaches used to evaluate health care, both professionally and educationally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Kevin M; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of scholarly productivity as measured by research output is a key component of decisions regarding appointment and advancement in academic otolaryngology. An increasing number of graduating residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships, and evaluation of research productivity among these subspecialists is important in determining their role in academic otolaryngology departments. The h-index is a reliable indicator of research productivity, as it takes into account both quantity and relevance of research contributions. Our objective was to evaluate and compare trends in research productivity among the various otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of research productivity trends among otolaryngology subspecialties using the h-index. Faculty members from 92 academic otolaryngology departments were organized by subspecialty and academic rank, and their research productivity, as measured by the h-index, was calculated using the Scopus database. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists in academic programs had higher h-indices than non-fellowship-trained otolaryngologists. Head and neck surgeons and otologists had significantly higher research productivity than their peers in other otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of the subspecialties of chairpersons indicated that 62% were either head and neck surgeons or otologists. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists had higher h-indices, and faculty members trained in the subspecialties with the highest research productivity were disproportionately represented in positions of leadership within academic otolaryngology, probably reflecting the importance of research contributions in the academic advancement process, although other factors, such as educational contributions and clinical performance, may also be important factors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  10. Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Educational Research. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James S.

    This postdoctoral fellowship program involved the following three phases: 1) systematic instruction in the sociology of complex organizations with particular emphasis on the organizational analysis of schools and schooling; 2) systematic instruction in multivariate regression approaches to non-experimental research with particular emphasis on…

  11. Status of pediatric anesthesiology fellowship research education in the United States: a survey of fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hubert A; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Hardy, Courtney A; Suresh, Santhanam

    2014-03-01

    Currently, very little information is known regarding the research education of pediatric anesthesia fellows. The main objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the status of research training in pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs in the United States. Survey responses were solicited from forty-six pediatric anesthesia fellowship directors. Questions evaluated department demographic information, the extent of faculty research activity, research resources and research funding in the department, the characteristics of fellow research education and fellow research productivity, departmental support for fellow research, and perceived barriers to fellow research education. Thirty-six of forty-six fellowship directors responded to the survey, for a response rate of 78%. Eight of fourteen (57%) programs with a structured curriculum had more than 20% of graduating fellows publish a peer-reviewed manuscript compared with only five of twenty-two (23%) programs, which did not have a structured research curriculum (P = 0.03). While the majority of program directors (thirty of thirty-six (83%)) did not think that fellows are adequately trained to pursue research activities, only a minority of program directors (7 of 36 (19%)) thought that an extra year of fellowship dedicated to research should become a requirement. Structured research curriculum is associated with increased research productivity during pediatric anesthesia fellowship. Important barriers to fellows' research education include high clinical demands and lack of research time for faculty. Despite acknowledging the poor research education, a small minority of fellowship directors supports the addition of an extra year exclusively dedicated to research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Office of Naval Research Graduate Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-29

    II Biological/Bioredical Sciences - Dupont I Carolyn Cousin, University of the District of Columbia Vito DelVecchio, University of Scranton Richard...performance semiconductor devices. Penetration-resistant alloys. Ms. Alice Man 259 Saint Paul Street Brookline, MA 02146 617-734-9211 MIT Materials science...than research experience. Her referees also described her potential rather than research involvement. Sylvia Howard had a 3.48 from Saint Paul’s

  13. NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program: 2003 Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnour, Tim (Editor); LopezdeCastillo, Eduardo (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2003 NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the nineteenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2003 program was administered by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 2003. The basic common objectives of the NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program are: A) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; B) To stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA; C) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; D) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The KSC Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks (May 19 through July 25, 2003) working with NASA scientists and engineers on research of mutual interest to the university faculty member and the NASA colleague. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many research areas of current interest to NASA/KSC. A separate document reports on the administrative aspects of the 2003 program. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. In many cases a faculty member has developed a close working relationship with a particular NASA group that had provided funding beyond the two-year limit.

  14. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1994 research reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Camp, Warren (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the tenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1994 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1994. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  15. 2000 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2000 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 16th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2000 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 2000. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  16. 1999 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1999 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 15th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1999 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1999. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member.

  17. 1997 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 13th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1997 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1997. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  18. 1998 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1998 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 14th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1998 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1998. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  19. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2016-12-21

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  20. Research Reports: 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Dowdy, J. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    For the 33rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period June 2, 1997 through August 8, 1997. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program, which are in the 34th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1997. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  1. Research Reports: 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. (Editor); Pruitt, J. (Editor); Nash-Stevenson, S. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Karr, C. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period May 29 - August 3, 2001. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the University Affairs Office, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the thirty-seventh year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 2001.

  2. Research Reports: 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 31st consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 15 May 1995 - 4 Aug. 1995. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 32nd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1995. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  3. Research Reports: 1996 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, M. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 32nd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama and MSFC during the period May 28, 1996 through August 2, 1996. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 33rd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1996. The University of Alabama presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  4. Report from the 2014 Scoliosis Research Society Travelling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quraishi, Nasir A; Enercan, Meric; Naresh-Babu, J; Chopin, D

    2015-03-01

    The Scoliosis Research Society traveling fellowship was conceptualized in 1970, repeated in 1972, and, after a pause, restarted in 1993. International traveling fellows visiting North America first commenced in 2000 and have since alternated annually with the North American fellows. Although a senior fellow had always traveled with them, in 2012 the first senior international fellow traveled with the group. This year, the senior fellow was Daniel Chopin from the Neuro-Orthopedic Spine Unit, Lille University Hospital, France, and past Director of the Spine Center, Institut Calot Berck sur Mer (succeeding Dr. Cotrel). The junior fellows were Meric Enercan from the Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul Spine Center, Turkey; J. Naresh-Babu from Mallika Spine Centre, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India; and Nasir A. Quraishi from the Centre for Spine Studies and Surgery, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK. The host centers were initially suggested by Dr. Chopin, the senior fellow; after some minor tweaking and extensive planning from the Scoliosis Research Society office, the itinerary was confirmed. The researchers were to visit 7 centers in just over 3 weeks. All of the international fellows were going to have an extraordinary adventure although they had not met each other previously. As it turned out, the trip was indeed sensational-professionally stimulating and socially endearing. The following is a short report on this unforgettable experience.

  5. Fellowships in community pharmacy research: Experiences of five schools and colleges of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Margie E; Frail, Caitlin K; Gernant, Stephanie A; Bacci, Jennifer L; Coley, Kim C; Colip, Lauren M; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Hagemeier, Nicholas E; McGivney, Melissa Somma; Rodis, Jennifer L; Smith, Megan G; Smith, Randall B

    2016-01-01

    To describe common facilitators, challenges, and lessons learned in 5 schools and colleges of pharmacy in establishing community pharmacy research fellowships. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States. Schools and colleges of pharmacy with existing community partnerships identified a need and ability to develop opportunities for pharmacists to engage in advanced research training. Community pharmacy fellowships, each structured as 2 years long and in combination with graduate coursework, have been established at the University of Pittsburgh, Purdue University, East Tennessee State University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and The Ohio State University. Program directors from each of the 5 community pharmacy research fellowships identified common themes pertaining to program structure, outcomes, and lessons learned to assist others planning similar programs. Common characteristics across the programs include length of training, prerequisites, graduate coursework, mentoring structure, and immersion into a pharmacist patient care practice. Common facilitators have been the existence of strong community pharmacy partnerships, creating a fellowship advisory team, and networking. A common challenge has been recruitment, with many programs experiencing at least one year without filling the fellowship position. All program graduates (n = 4) have been successful in securing pharmacy faculty positions. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy share similar experiences in implementing community pharmacy research fellowships. Early outcomes show promise for this training pathway in growing future pharmacist-scientists focused on community pharmacy practice. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors influencing scholarly impact: does urology fellowship training affect research output?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasabwala, Khushabu; Morton, Christopher M; Svider, Peter F; Nahass, Thomas A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Jackson-Rosario, Imani

    2014-01-01

    Residents seek postresidency fellowship training to increase competency with novel surgical techniques and augment their fund of knowledge. Research productivity is a vital component of advancement in academic urology. Our objectives were to use the h-index (an objective and readily available bibliometric that has been repeatedly shown to correlate with scholarly impact, funding procurement, and academic promotion in urology as well as other specialties) to determine whether any relationship exists between fellowship training and scholarly impact among academic urologists. Additional examination was performed to determine whether any differences in scholarly influence are present among practitioners in the major urologic subspecialties. Overall, 851 faculty members from 101 academic urology departments were organized by academic rank and fellowship completed. Research productivity was calculated using the h-index, calculated from the Scopus database. There was no statistical difference in h-index found between fellowship-trained and nonfellowship-trained academic urologists. The highest h-indices were seen among urologic oncologists (18.1 ± 0.95) and nonfellowship-trained urologists (14.62 ± 0.80). Nearly 70% of department chairs included in this analysis were urologic oncologists or general urologists. No difference in h-index existed between fellowship-trained and nonfellowship-trained urologists, although practitioners in the subspecialty cohorts with the highest research productivity (nonfellowship-trained and urologic oncologists) comprised 70% of department chairpersons. This relationship suggests that a strong research profile is highly valued during selection for academic promotion. Differences existed on further comparison by subspecialty. Fellowship training may represent another potential opportunity to introduce structured research experiences for trainees. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of

  7. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1991 Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor); Armstrong, Dennis W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Reports from the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program are presented. The editors are responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA Kennedy. Some representative titles are as follows: Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion; Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle; Modeling and Control of the Automated Radiator Inspection Device; Study of the Finite Element Software Packages at KSC; Multispectral Image Processing for Plants; Algorithms for Contours Depicting Static Electric Fields during Adverse Weather Conditions; Transient Study of a Cryogenic Hydrogen Filling System; and Precision Cleaning Verification of Nonvolatile Residues by using Water, Ultrasonics, and Turbidity Analyses.

  8. Hunting for the Right Research Fellowship: The Dos and Don′ts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, thousands and thousands of people from Asia, most of them PhDs, make the ultimate transition in their lives when they travel to the west to take up fellowship positions (in this case a research fellowship position in leading labs in North America and Europe. Many of these people travel with their families, not knowing what is coming their way. In this article, a number of issues have been discussed that might help these potential scientists of the future to plan ahead for such a shift and make their transition as smooth as possible.

  9. Ownership and Autonomy in Early Learning: The Froebel Research Fellowship Project, 2002-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, David J.; Robson, Sue; Greenfield, Sue; Fumoto, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a brief review of the main phases and findings of the Froebel Research Fellowship project, which has been funded by the Froebel Trust (previously the Incorporated Froebel Educational Institute) since 2002. The project is investigating the extent to which Froebelian ideals, such as the notion that children's knowledge should…

  10. Profile and scientific output analysis of physical therapy researchers with research productivity fellowship from the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Análise do perfil e da produção científica dos fisioterapeutas bolsistas produtividade do Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Sturmer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the profile and the scientific output of physical therapists researchers holding a research productivity fellowship (PQ from the Brazilian National Council of Scientific and Technological Development (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico-CNPq. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study, which has evaluated the Lattes Curriculum of all PQ physiotherapy researchers registered at CNPq holding a research productivity fellowship in the period of 2010. The variables analyzed were: gender, geographic and institutional distribution, duration since doctorate defense, research productivity fellowship level, scientific output until 2010 and the H index in Scopus® and ISI databases. RESULTS: A total of 55 PQ from the CNPq were identified in the area of knowledge of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, being 81.8% from the Southeast region of Brazil. They were predominantly female (61.8%, with research productivity fellowship level PQ2 (74.5%, and with average time since doctorate defense of 10.1 (±4.1 years. A total of 2.381 articles were published, with average of 42.5 (±18.9 articles/researcher. The average of articles published after doctorate defense was 39.40 (±18.9 articles/researchers with a mean output of 4.2 (±2.0 articles/year. We found 304 articles indexed in the Scopus® database with 2.463 citations, and 222 articles indexed in the Web of Science with 1.805 citations. The articles were published in 481 journals, being 244 (50.7% of them listed on JCR-web. The researchers presented a median 5 of the H index in the Scopus® database, and a median 3 in ISI. CONCLUSION: The scientific output of the researchers with research productivity fellowship in the field of physical therapy stands out in their indicators, since the figures are very promising for a relatively young area and as it can be observed by the amount of published articles and citations obtained by the national and international

  11. Building a Bright Future. The Hydro Research Foundation's Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Brenna [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Linke, Deborah M. [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The Hydro Fellowship Program (program) began as an experiment to discover whether the hydropower industry could find mechanisms to attract new entrants through conducting relevant research to benefit the industry. This nationwide, new-to-the-world program was started through funding from the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE). Between 2010-2015, the Hydro Research Foundation (HRF) designed and implemented a program to conduct valuable research and attract new entrants to the hydro workforce. This historic grant has empowered and engaged industry members from 25 organizations by working with 91 students and advisors at 24 universities in 19 states. The work funded answered pressing research needs in the fields of civil, mechanical, environmental, and electrical engineering, as well as law, energy engineering and materials innovation. In terms of number of individuals touched through funding, 148 individuals were supported by this work through direct research, mentorship, oversight of the work, partnerships and the day-to-day program administration. Based on the program results, it is clear that the funding achieved the hoped-for outcomes and has the capacity to draw universities into the orbit of hydropower and continue the conversation about industry research and development needs. The Foundation has fostered unique partnerships at the host universities and has continued to thrive with the support of the universities, advisors, industry and the DOE. The Foundation has demonstrated industry support through mentorships, partnerships, underwriting the costs and articulating the universities’ support through in-kind cost sharing. The Foundation recommends that future work be continued to nurture these graduate level programs using the initial work and improvements in the successor program, the Research Awards Program, while stimulating engagement of academia at the

  12. 78 FR 3885 - Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... projects that use rigorous scientific methodologies. To address this interest, applicants are encouraged to... potential for engaging in scientific research related to the solution of rehabilitation problems of... contain all other attachments, including your bibliography, eligibility statement, resume/curriculum...

  13. 76 FR 77505 - Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... rigorous scientific methodologies. To address this interest, applicants are encouraged to articulate goals... (2) have training and experience that indicate a potential for engaging in scientific research... statement; the curriculum vitae; the bibliography; the letters of recommendation; or the information on...

  14. Research reports: 1990 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in this program is presented. The topics covered include: human-computer interface software, multimode fiber optic communication links, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, rocket-triggered lightning, robotics, a flammability study of thin polymeric film materials, a vortex shedding flowmeter, modeling of flow systems, monomethyl hydrazine vapor detection, a rocket noise filter system using digital filters, computer programs, lower body negative pressure, closed ecological systems, and others. Several reports with respect to space shuttle orbiters are presented.

  15. Misrepresentation of research publications among orthopedic surgery fellowship applicants: a comparison with documented misrepresentations in other fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish V; Pradhan, Ben B; Meals, Roy A

    2003-04-01

    Study Design. A retrospective study was used to review fellowship applications over 3 years. Objectives. To assess the prevalence of research misrepresentation in orthopedic fellowship applications, and to compare such activity between subspecialties (e.g. spine, sports, hand). Summary of Background Data. Competition for orthopedic surgery fellowships is intense. The applicant pool includes orthopedic, plastic, and general surgeons, as well as neurosurgeons. Residency and fellowship training programs in other disciplines have documented shocking levels of misrepresentation in the curriculum vitae of prospective applicants. However, no study has looked at orthopedic residents applying for subspecialty fellowship programs. Methods. A retrospective analysis investigated 280 applications for fellowship positions in the department of orthopedic surgery at the authors' academic institution from 1996 to 1998 inclusively. To allow for press and publication delays, a minimum 24-month follow-up period was instituted. The listings of applicants' research publications were analyzed for evidence of misrepresentation through an exhaustive literature search. Only the most obvious confirmable discrepancies were labeled as misrepresentations. The results then were compared with those found in studies conducted in other fields: gastroenterology fellowship, emergency medicine residency, pediatric residency, dermatology residency, orthopedic residency, and medical faculty applications. Results. Among 280 (54%) applicants for orthopedic surgery candidates, 151 claimed journal publications. It was found that 16 (10.6%) of these 151 applicants had misrepresented their citations. This rate was highest in spine fellowship applicants (20%). However, considering the numbers available, this was not significantly different among the various subspecialty fellowship applicants (P>0.1). In addition, various demographic data did not correlate with the rate of misrepresentation (P>0.1). These

  16. Nonverifiable research publications among applicants to an academic trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Bernardino C; Inaba, Kenji; Gausepohl, Andrew; Okoye, Obi; Teixeira, Pedro G; Breed, Wynne; Lam, Lydia; Talving, Peep; Sullivan, Maura; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and predictors of nonverifiable research publications among applicants to a trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program. All complete applications submitted to our trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program were prospectively collected for 4 application cycles (2009 to 2012). All publications listed by applicants were tabulated and underwent verification using MEDLINE and direct journal search with verification by a team of professional health sciences librarians. Demographics and academic criteria were compared between applicants with nonverifiable and verifiable publications. A total of 100 applicants reported 301 publications. Of those, 20 applicants (20%) listed 32 papers (11%) that could not be verified. These applicants comprised 30% of those with 1 or more peer-reviewed publications. There were no significant differences in sex (male, 55% nonverifiable vs 60% verifiable, p = 0.684) or age (34.3 ± 6.6 years vs 34.2 ± 5.0 years, p = 0.963). There were no differences with regard to citizenship status (foreign medical graduates, 20% nonverifiable vs 28% verifiable, p = 0.495). Applicants with nonverified publications were less likely to be in the military (0% vs 14%, p = 0.079), more likely to have presented their work at surgical meetings (80% vs 58%, p = 0.064), and to be individuals with 3 or more peer-reviewed publications (55% vs 25%, p = 0.009). In this analysis of academic integrity, one-fifth of all applicants applying to a trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program and 30% of those with 1 or more peer-reviewed publications had nonverifiable publications listed in their curricula vitae. These applicants were less likely to be in the military, more likely to have presented their work at surgical meetings and to have 3 or more peer-reviewed publications. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The 1995 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the eleventh year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1995 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1995. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member.

  18. Information Update Research Fellowship for International Young Scientists NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Danish National Research Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects with DFG News in Brief: NSFC set up Department of Medical Sciences NSFC Announced Approved Cooperative Projects With France and Germany NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Academy of Finland NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects with K. T. Li Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research projects With Japan Science and Technology Agency NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects With Royal Society of Edinburgh for 2010 NSFC Announced a List of proved Cooperative Projects With Three International Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Research Fellowship for International Young Scientists NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Danish National Research Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects with DFG News in Brief: NSFC set up Department of Medical Sciences NSFC Announced Approved Cooperative Projects With France and Germany NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Academy of Finland NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects with K. T. Li Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research projects With Japan Science and Technology Agency NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects With Royal Society of Edinburgh for 2010 NSFC Announced a List of proved Cooperative Projects With Three International Organizations

  19. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  20. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  1. Bursaries, writing grants and fellowships: a strategy to develop research capacity in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmer Elizabeth A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners and other primary health care professionals are often the first point of contact for patients requiring health care. Identifying, understanding and linking current evidence to best practice can be challenging and requires at least a basic understanding of research principles and methodologies. However, not all primary health care professionals are trained in research or have research experience. With the aim of enhancing research skills and developing a research culture in primary health care, University Departments of General Practice and Rural Health have been supported since 2000 by the Australian Government funded 'Primary Health Care Research Evaluation and Development (PHCRED Strategy'. A small grant funding scheme to support primary health care practitioners was implemented through the PHCRED program at Flinders University in South Australia between 2002 and 2005. The scheme incorporated academic mentors and three types of funding support: bursaries, writing grants and research fellowships. This article describes outcomes of the funding scheme and contributes to the debate surrounding the effectiveness of funding schemes as a means of building research capacity. Methods Funding recipients who had completed their research were invited to participate in a semi-structured 40-minute telephone interview. Feedback was sought on acquisition of research skills, publication outcomes, development of research capacity, confidence and interest in research, and perception of research. Data were also collected on demographics, research topics, and time needed to complete planned activities. Results The funding scheme supported 24 bursaries, 11 writing grants, and three research fellows. Nearly half (47% of all grant recipients were allied health professionals, followed by general practitioners (21%. The majority (70% were novice and early career researchers. Eighty-nine percent of the grant recipients were

  2. Impact of Professional Student Mentored-Research Fellowship on Medical Education and Academic Medicine Career Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Terry; Kelly, Thomas H.; Starnes, Catherine P.; Sawaya, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Context This study explores the long-term impact of the Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship (PSMRF) program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCOM) on medical students’ research productivity and career paths. Methods Demographic characteristics, academic profiles, number of publications and residency placements from 2007-2012 were used to assess 119 PSMRF graduates against a comparison cohort of 898 UKCOM (non-PSMRF) students. Results PSMRF students had higher MCAT scores at admission (31.5 ± 0.6 vs. 30.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.007) and achieved higher USMLE Step 1 scores (228 ± 4.2 vs. 223 ± 1.5, p = 0.03) than comparison group. PSMRF students were more likely to publish Pubmed-indexed papers (36.7% vs. 17.9%, p < 0.0001), achieve AOA status (19.3% vs. 8.5%, p = 0.0002) and match to top 25 U.S. News and World Report residency programs (23.4% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.008). A greater proportion of PSMRF fellows matched to top tier competitive specialties (23% vs. 14.2%, p= 0.07), however this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions The PSMRF program shows a significant increase in enrollment, as well as positive associations with indicators of success in medical school and subsequent quality of residency program. PMID:25996460

  3. UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clow, Shandra Deann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program (Pilot) for existing postdoctoral researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) to gain skills in entrepreneurship and commercializing technology as part of their postdoctoral experience. This program will incorporate training and mentoring during the first 6-month period, culminating in a focused 6-month Fellowship aimed at creating a new business in Northern New Mexico.

  4. An international fellowship in trauma research and the potential benefits for fellows, sponsoring institution, and the global trauma community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubose, Joseph J; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Recinos, Gustavo; Barmparas, Galinos; Ottochian, Marcus; Inaba, Kenji; Petrone, Patrizio; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2009-04-01

    For over a decade, the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Hospital has supported an international fellowship in trauma that provides research experience, education, and opportunity for clinical observation at a high-volume American College of Surgeons (ACS) designated Level I trauma center. We performed a descriptive study of the design, implementation, and results of an international fellowship in trauma and critical care. Fellows from 27 countries throughout the world have actively engaged in trauma research at Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Hospital. Our program involves intensive education and clinical observation components designed to facilitate dissemination of evidence-based trauma practices throughout the world by graduates. The majority of alumni responding to a survey returned to their countries of origin, remaining active in trauma care and research. Motivation for participation varied, but former fellows universally rated their experience highly and stated they would recommend the program to their colleagues. An international research fellowship in trauma and critical care provides foreign medical trainees opportunities for exposure to research and evidence-based practices at a high-volume trauma center. The program is designed to be beneficial to both the participating fellow and sponsoring institution; and is constructed to effectively promote improved trauma education and the dissemination of quality trauma practices internationally.

  5. Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalist Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintzileos, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    This article establishes the rationale and development of an obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist fellowship program. The pool of OB/GYN hospitalists needs to be drastically expanded to accommodate the country's needs. Fellowship programs should provide extra training and confidence for recent resident graduates who want to pursue a hospitalist career. Fellowships should train physicians in a way that aligns their interests with those of the hospital with respect to patient care, teaching, and research. Research in the core measures should be a necessary component of the fellowship so as to provide long-term benefits for all stakeholders, including hospitals and patients.

  6. Perceived core competency achievements of fellowship and non-fellowship-trained early career pediatric hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Jamie; Winer, Jeffrey C; Banach, Laurie; Davis, Aisha

    2015-06-01

    The pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) core competencies were established in 2010 to identify the specific knowledge base and skill set needed to provide the highest quality of care for hospitalized children. The objectives of this study were to examine the perceived core competency achievements of fellowship-trained and non-fellowship-trained early career pediatric hospitalists and identify perceived gaps in our current training models. An anonymous Web-based survey was distributed in November 2013. Hospitalists within 5 years of their residency graduation reported their perceived competency in select PHM core competencies. χ(2) and multiprobit regression analyses were utilized. One hundred ninety-seven hospitalists completed the survey and were included; 147 were non-fellowship-trained and 50 were PHM fellowship graduates or current PHM fellows. Both groups reported feeling less than competent in sedation and aspects of business practice. Non-fellowship-trained hospitalists also reported mean scores in the less than competent range in intravenous access/phlebotomy, technology-dependent emergencies, performing Plan-Do-Study-Act process and root cause analysis, defining basic statistical terms, and identifying research resources. Non-fellowship-trained hospitalists reported mean competency scores greater than fellowship-trained hospitalists in pain management, newborn care, and transitions in care. Early career pediatric hospitalists report deficits in several of the PHM core competencies, which should be considered when designing PHM-specific training in the future. Fellowship-trained hospitalists report higher levels of perceived competency in many core areas. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  7. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries - An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Käser

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers' and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs

  8. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries - An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M M; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-05-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers' and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  9. Misrepresentation of research citations by applicants to a primary care sports medicine fellowship program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, James L; Hatzenbuehler, John R; Dexter, William W; Kuhn, Celine B

    2008-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of misrepresentation of publications and national presentations claimed in applications to the Maine Medical Center (MMC) Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Program from 2001 through 2004. A retrospective chart review study. The Maine Medical Center Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. Presentations were confirmed in the program of the cited meeting or by contacting the sponsoring organization. Publications were verified by performing a MEDLINE search or by cross-referencing in Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory. If the title was listed, the citation was verified by contacting the publisher. Fifty applicants reported research publications. Of those, 14 applications had publications that could not be verified. The overall misrepresentation rate was 11.3%; among applicants claiming publications it was 28%. There was no difference in misrepresentation rate between specialties. Eighteen applicants reported giving national presentations, and nine presentations could not be verified, corresponding to an overall misrepresentation rate of 5.6%. Of applicants claiming presentations, 38.9% had at least one misrepresentation. Applicants to the Maine Medical Center Sports Medicine Fellowship Program were found to have high rates of misrepresentation in their citations of both publications and presentations.

  10. Improving capacity for evidence-based practice in South East Asia: evaluating the role of research fellowships in the SEA-ORCHID Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martis Ruth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fellowships are a component of many professional education programs. They provide opportunities to develop skills and competencies in an environment where time is protected and resources and technical support are more readily available. The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program aimed to increase capacity for evidence-based practice and research synthesis, and to encourage fellows to become leaders in these areas. Methods Fellows included doctors, nurses, midwives and librarians working in the maternal and neonatal areas of nine hospitals in South East Asia. Fellowships were undertaken in Australia and involved specific outputs related to evidence-based practice or research synthesis. Training and support was tailored according to the type of output and the fellow's experience and expertise. We evaluated the fellowships program quantitatively and qualitatively through written evaluations, interviews and follow-up of fellowship activities. Results During 2006-07, 23 fellows from Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines undertook short-term fellowships (median four weeks in Australia. The main outputs were drafts of Cochrane systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines and protocols for randomised trials, and training materials to support evidence-based practice. Protocols for Cochrane systematic reviews were more likely to be completed than other outcomes. The fellows identified several components that were critical to the program's overall success; these included protected time, tailored training, and access to technical expertise and resources. On returning home, fellows identified a lack of time and limited access to the internet and evidence-based resources as barriers to completing their outputs. The support of colleagues and senior staff was noted as an important enabler of progress, and research collaborators from other institutions and countries were also important sources of support. Conclusions The SEA

  11. Terra Cognita: Graduate Students in the Archives. A Retrospective on the CLIR Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources. CLIR Publication No. 170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Library and Information Resources, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Terra Cognita" surveys the current landscape of archival research and the experiences of emerging scholars seeking to navigate it. Drawing on data from the Council on Library and Information Resources' (CLIR's) Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources, the report takes an in-depth look at how the conditions and…

  12. Application Technology Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To conduct fundamental and developmental research on new and improved application technologies to protect floricultural, nursery, landscape, turf, horticultural, and...

  13. Graduate trainee fellowships for energy research in Mississippi. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR Project has been a program of education and research which has (1) increased the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field and (2) interfaced with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities. Key project activities that have been accomplished are shown below: (1) Statewide conference on energy related research held; (2) HBCU pipeline issue addressed; (3) Research preceptors/problems selected; (4) Trainees screened and accepted; (5) Research initiated; and (6) Practicums organized. Mississippi`s three comprehensive universities -- The University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi -- and the urban institution, Jackson State University have provided a foundation for the expansion of energy-related education and research in the state. The activities of the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR program have been executed under a management strategy developed to establish statewide coordination of research and education programs, i.e., the Mississippi Research Consortium. The Consortium has served as the steering committee for the DOE EPSCoR Program Consortium.

  14. Fellowships in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to encourage stronger research ties between India and the United States, the Indo-U.S. Subcommission on Education and Culture is offering 12 long-term and 9 short-term research fellowships in India in 1985 and 1986. The only requirement is that the applicants be U.S. citizens at the postdoctoral or equivalent postdoctoral level. The awards have no restrictions as to field of study, and because the program seeks to open new channels of communication between academic and professional groups in the two countries, those who have had little or no experience in India are especially encouraged to apply.The long-term fellowships are for 6 to 10 months, with a monthly allowance of $1500. Long-term fellows will also receive travel money and allowances for dependents. The short-term awards, for periods of 2 to 3 months, also offer a monthly payment of $1500. Funding for these fellowships is provided by the U.S. Information Agency, the National Science Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Government of India.

  15. Research and Technology 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Topics are divided into three major areas: Earth resources, advanced development, and technology transfer. Topics include: aerial color infrared photography, fiber optics, lightning research, soil mechanics, corrosion prevention, image processing, and communication systems development.

  16. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries – An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M. M.; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers’ and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  17. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (pcore competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Study of Four Federal Graduate Fellowship Programs: Education and Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Lewis E.; Henke, Robin R.; Nevill, Stephanie; Linnard, David; Pflueger, Jeff; Mattox, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    The Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) in the U.S. Department of Education (ED) sponsors four graduate fellowship programs: the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) fellowship program, the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship program, the Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) fellowship

  19. Space Technology Research Grants Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Technology Research Grants Program will accelerate the development of "push" technologies to support the future space science and exploration...

  20. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  1. Nigerian Journal of Technological Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Technological Research is a pure scientific journal with a ... technology to its immediate environs and the international community. ... and communication Technology; Management and Entrepreneurship sciences.

  2. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  3. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Valdes, Carol (Editor); Brown, Tom (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1993 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC. The basic common objectives of the Program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. 1993 topics include wide band fiber optic communications, a prototype expert/information system for examining environmental risks of KSC activities, alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies, rack insertion end effector (RIEE) automation, FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene, switch configuration for migration to optical fiber network, and more.

  4. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high “motivation score” (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49–9.59; P = 0.005) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01–6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: “attending physician” (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86–11.37; P = 0.001); “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51–11.23; P = 0.006); “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91–6.46; P = 0.0001); and “male gender” (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02–3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33–15.19; P = 0.0002) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university

  5. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies: A Strobe-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high "motivation score" (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49-9.59; P = 0.005) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01-6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: "attending physician" (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86-11.37; P = 0.001); "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51-11.23; P = 0.006); "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91-6.46; P = 0.0001); and "male gender" (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02-3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33-15.19; P = 0.0002) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.46-4.77; P = 0.001). This is the

  6. NRAO Astronomer Wins Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Dr. Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, has been awarded a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, according to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The Guggenheim Foundation describes its fellowships as "mid-career" awards "intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts." Frail, 48, has worked at the NRAO for more than 20 years, first as a postdoctoral fellow, and then as a staff scientist. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, and his Ph.D in astronomy from the University of Toronto. Frail is best known for his landmark contributions to the understanding of gamma ray bursts, making critical measurements that provided key insights into the mechanisms of these superenergetic and once-mysterious explosions. He also has made important contributions to the understanding of other astronomical phenomena, including pulsars and their neighborhoods, supernova remnants, and magnetars. In 1992, he was the co-discoverer, with Alex Wolszczan, of the first planets outside our own solar system. "We congratulate Dale on this well-deserved honor that recognizes not only his past achievements but also his potential for exciting scientific work in the future," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "We're very proud to see one of our scientists receive such a great honor," Lo added. Frail is one of 180 recipients of this year's Guggenheim Fellowships, chosen from some 3,000 applicants. The fellowships were established in 1925 and past recipients include photographer Ansel Adams, author Saul Bellow, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and chemist Linus Pauling. 102 Guggenheim Fellows have subsequently won Nobel Prizes, and others have received Pulitzer Prizes and other honors. As a Guggenheim Fellow, Frail intends to intensify his research in the areas of pulsars

  7. Instructional Technology: The Research Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflects upon opportunities for research in instructional technology provided by present state of media hardware technology and educational requirements. Prospects for research in incidental learning, including learning from television, are discussed, as well as traditional learning research on intentional learning, including possibilities for…

  8. AMS/DOE Fellowship Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Stephanie [American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-21

    The AMS/DOE graduate fellowships were awarded to three students entering their first year of graduate study. The funds allowed each student to take a full course load during their first of year of graduate study which helps each of them to enter the professional, scientific community at an earlier date. Each recipient is academically outstanding, received glowing references of support and demonstrated their strong desire to perform scientific research. As part of the fellowship, each of the students was invited to attend the AMS Annual Meeting where they got to participate in the AMS student conference, attend scientific sessions and visit the exhibition hall. In addition, a student awards luncheon was held where each of the recipients got to meet their sponsor and receive a certificate.

  9. Post-doctoral research fellowship as a health policy and systems research capacity development intervention: a case of the CHESAI initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembani, Martina; Teddy, Gina; Molosiwa, Dintle; Hwabamungu, Boroto

    2016-12-20

    Building capacity in health policy and systems research (HPSR), especially in low- and middle-income countries, remains a challenge. Various approaches have been suggested and implemented by scholars and institutions using various forms of capacity building to address challenges regarding HPSR development. The Collaboration for Health Systems Analysis and Innovation (CHESAI) - a collaborative effort between the Universities of Cape Town and the Western Cape Schools of Public Health - has employed a non-research based post-doctoral research fellowship (PDRF) as a way of building African capacity in the field of HPSR by recruiting four post-docs. In this paper, we (the four post-docs) explore whether a PDRF is a useful approach for capacity building for the field of HPSR using our CHESAI PDRF experiences. We used personal reflections of our written narratives providing detailed information regarding our engagement with CHESAI. The narratives were based on a question guide around our experiences through various activities and their impacts on our professional development. The data analysis process was highly iterative in nature, involving repeated meetings among the four post-docs to reflect, discuss and create themes that evolved from the discussions. The CHESAI PDRF provided multiple spaces for our engagement and capacity development in the field of HPSR. These spaces provided us with a wide range of learning experiences, including teaching and research, policy networking, skills for academic writing, engaging practitioners, co-production and community dialogue. Our reflections suggest that institutions providing PDRF such as this are valuable if they provide environments endowed with adequate resources, good leadership and spaces for innovation. Further, the PDRFs need to be grounded in a community of HPSR practice, and provide opportunities for the post-docs to gain an in-depth understanding of the broader theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the field

  10. The Tsao Fellowship in Global Health: A Model for International Fellowships in a Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Taro, Trisa B; Wipfli, Heather L; Ly, Stephanie; Gillenwater, Justin T; Costa, Melinda A; Gutierrez, Ricardo D; Magee, William

    2016-03-01

    To present a model for integrated global health fellowships in plastic surgical residency training. National surveys have found that North American surgical residents have significant interest in international training. While global health training opportunities exist, less than a third of these are housed within surgical residency programs; even fewer are designed specifically for plastic surgery residents. The Tsao Fellowship was created through a partnership between Operation Smile, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Shriners Hospital for Children, and the University of Southern California. Designed for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited plastic surgery residents between their third and fourth years of residency, the fellowship curriculum is completed over 24 months and divided into 3 areas: clinical research, international reconstructive surgery fieldwork, and the completion of a Master of Science in Clinical and Biomedical Investigations. The Tsao Fellowship has matriculated 4 fellows: 3 have graduated from the program and 1 is in the current cycle. Fellows completed 4 to 7 international missions each cycle and have performed an aggregate total of 684 surgical procedures. Each fellow also conducted 2 to 6 research projects and authored several publications. All fellows continue to assume leadership roles within the field of global reconstructive surgery. Comprehensive global health fellowships provide invaluable opportunities beyond surgical residency. The Tsao Fellowship is a model for integrating international surgical training with global health research in plastic surgical residency that can be applied to other residency programs and different surgical specialties.

  11. Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowship Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramsen, Neil

    2014-01-01

    In March and April 2014, the author travelled overseas on a 2013 Churchill Fellowship to study education programs that successfully engage and enthuse primary and middle school students in maths, engineering and science (MES) or science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) learning in schools, universities and institutions in the United…

  12. Women and Woodrow Wilson Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nancy J.

    1986-01-01

    Based on a presentation made at the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, considers the effect these fellowships had on the scholarly careers of the women to whom they have been awarded. (Author/ABB)

  13. User research & technology, pt.2

    CERN Document Server

    Greifeneder, Elke

    2011-01-01

    This e-book is Part 2 on the theme "User Research and Technology". The research covers the testing of online digital library resources using various methods. Library and information science as a field is changing and the requirements for top quality research are growing more stringent. This is typical of the experience of other professional fields as they have moved from practitioners advising practitioners to researchers building on past results. This e-book contains 12 papers on this theme.

  14. Fellowship trends of pathology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagwinski, Nikolaj; Hunt, Jennifer L

    2009-09-01

    Recent changes in pathology residency education have included a decrease in the program length (from 5 years to 4 years for combined anatomic and clinical pathology training) and a national mandate for programs to assess 6 general competencies of trainees. These have undoubtedly led to changes in program curricula and in residents' desires to seek fellowship training. This study was designed to gather information about what residents are seeking from fellowship training programs. This study used an online survey to assess attitudes of residents in training programs toward fellowship training. The survey instrument had 26 questions pertaining to fellowship choices, motivations for pursuing fellowships, expectations of the fellowships, and postresidency concerns. There were 213 respondents from a mix of program types and representing each postgraduate year. Most residents will seek at least 1 or 2 fellowships after residency training. The most popular first-choice fellowship was surgical pathology (26%), followed by cytopathology (16%), hematopathology (15%), gastrointestinal pathology (10%), dermatopathology (8%), and forensic pathology (5%). The most common reasons for pursuing fellowship training were to "increase marketability" (43%) or to "become an expert in a particular area" (33%). Most trainees got their information about fellowship training programs from Internet sources. Fellowship programs will benefit from an optimally designed Web site because residents seek information predominantly from the Internet. Residents seeking fellowships are particularly concerned with selecting programs that provide job connections, an increase in their marketability, and the opportunity to develop diagnostic expertise.

  15. Space and nuclear research and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A fact sheet is presented on the space and nuclear research and technology program consisting of a research and technology base, system studies, system technology programs, entry systems technology, and experimental programs.

  16. Research Progress of Isotope Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Department; of; Isotope

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive isotope is one of the origins of nonnuclear power technology.In the 12th Five Year Plan period,CIAE made breakthrough progresses on several important fields such as research and development of preparation of radioactive nuclides,preparation of radioactive source and study of radiopharmaceuticals relied on different financial support,successfully

  17. Technology in Education: Research Says!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, Ron

    2011-01-01

    A large amount of research existed in the field of technology in the classroom; however, almost all was focused on the impact of desktop computers and the infamous "school computer room". However, the activities in a classroom represent a multitude of behaviours and interventions, including personal dynamics, classroom management and…

  18. Research technology as a barrier to research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Scheepers

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available There appears to be considerable concern regarding the progress which masters and doctoral students make in their studies and the underlying causes are thought to relate to the absence of a suitable research climate on campuses. The aim of this study was to identify factors which relate to the research output of tutors. With this in mind a questionnaire was developed and handed to 120 tutors in the human sciences for completion. The means and variances of the variables in the questionnaire were computed/ the variables were intercorrelated and subjected to a principal factor analysis. Four factors were extracted and identified as: knowledge of research technology research output/ knowledge of research methodology and ability to conduct research, and teaching experience in research methodology Two regression analyses were done. The first against a "soft" criterion (perceived ability to conduct empirical research and the second against a "hard" criterion (the real research output of tutors. Multiple correlation coefficients of 0,7257 and 0/5824 respectively, were obtained. Opsomming Die vordering van magister en doktorale studente skyn aansienlike kommer te wek, en die oorsake daarvan word in die afwesigheid van 'n gepaste navorsingsklimaat op kampusse, gesoek. Die doel van hierdie studie was om faktore te identifiseer wat verband hou met die navorsingsuitset van dosente. Met die oog hierop is 'n vraelys opgestel en aan 120 dosente in die geesteswetenskappe vir voltooiing oorhandig. Die gemiddeldes en variansies van die veranderlikes is bereken, die veranderlikes is gemterkorreleer en aan 'n hooffaktorontleding onderwerp. Vier faktore is onttrek en geidentifiseer as: kennis van navorsingstegnologie, navorsingsuitset, kennis van navor-singsmetodologie en die vermoe om navorsing te doen, en onderrigervaring m navorsingsmetodologie. Twee prcgressie-ontledings is gedoen. Die eerste teen 'n "sagte" kriterium (persepsie van dosente van hul vermoe om

  19. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  20. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  1. Habitat Technology Research at DLR

    OpenAIRE

    Quantius, Dominik; Schubert, Daniel; Maiwald, Volker; Hauslage, Jens; Bornemann, Gerhild; Waßer, Kai; Hill, Jürgen; Henn, Norbert; Ruyters, Hans-Günter; Braun, Markus

    2013-01-01

    For long duration space missions a closed-loop system which can re-use of materials is mandatory. Also on Earth there are harsh environments or overpopulated areas where a sustainable handling of given goods is indispensable. Addressing these challenges the German Aerospace Center (DLR) conducts research in various fields of habitat technology development, which will be illustrated within this paper. There are various complementary topics, such as coordination and funding of building blocks f...

  2. Innovative technology transfer of nondestructive evaluation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Brashaw; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang

    2008-01-01

    Technology transfer is often an afterthought for many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) researchers. Effective technology transfer should be considered during the planning and execution of research projects. This paper outlines strategies for using technology transfer in NDE research and presents a wide variety of technology transfer methods used by a cooperative...

  3. Research in Antenna Technology, Radar Technology and Electromagnetic Scattering Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-06

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0081 Research in Antenna Technology John Schindler ARCON CORP Final Report 04/06/2015 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...a group of six researchers in the fields of electromagnetics, radar and antenna technology. Research was conducted during this reporting period in...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Research in Antenna technology, Radar Technology and Electromagnetic Scattering Phenomena

  4. Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, E.

    2011-02-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon

  5. Telling business stories as fellowship-tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Robert; Neergaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the “Fellowship-Tale” as an alternative tale type for narrating entrepreneur stories. The authors illustrate this by telling the Pilgrim business story. It is common for the deeds of men who founded businesses to be narrated as heroic entrepreneur stories...... – The research indicates that “fellowship-tales” provide a viable and credible alternative to the fairy-tale rendition common in entrepreneur and business stories. Research limitations/implications – An obvious limitation is that one merely swaps one narrative framework for another, albeit it offers dissenting....../value – A key contribution is to challenge the hegemony of a dominant and embedded social construct allowing new understandings to emerge via a novel combination of research methodologies...

  6. Fellowship Available: 2005 IIASA Young Scientists Summer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) near Vienna, Austria, will host its annual Young Scientists's Summer Program (YSSP) for a selected group of graduate students from around the world. These students, primarily doctoral, will work closely with IIASA's senior scientists on projects within the institute's theme areas: natural resources and environment (e.g., transboundary air pollution and greenhouse gas initiative), population and society (e.g., risk, modeling, and society, and sustainable rural development), and energy and technology (e.g., transitions to new technologies and dynamic systems). Applicants must be advanced graduate students at a U.S. university; have comparable experience with ongoing research at IIASA; students who would benefit from interactions with scientists worldwide; and be interested in investigating the policy implications of his/her work.The U.S. Committee for IIASA provides airfare and a living allowance for those selected to participate in the fellowship.

  7. Evaluation of Association Between Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship Length and a Career in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesterson, Joshua P; Szender, J Brian; Schaefer, Eric; Fanning, James; Lele, Shashikant; Frederick, Peter

    2016-04-28

    The purpose of this study is to determine the association between gynecologic oncology fellowship training factors, including fellowship length, and a career in academic medicine. A survey was sent to all 980 gynecologic oncologists identified via the SGO membership directory. The survey questions focused on demographics, fellowship training, practice- type, and research involvement. Demographics of the study population and survey responses were reported using frequencies and percentages. Chi-squared tests were used to test for associations between selected survey responses and length of fellowship. The authors received 410 (42 %) responses. Most respondents (60 %) graduated from a 3-year fellowship, while 27 and 13 % attended 2- and 4-year fellowships, respectively. Practice descriptions included academic/university (52 %), community/private practice (21 %), private practice with academic appointment (20 %), and other (7 %). A majority (64 %) reported current involvement in research as a principal investigator (PI); however, 54 % reported spending 10 % or less of their time in research-related activities. Approximately half reported that their fellowship research experience contributed to their current practice. Graduates of 3- and 4-year fellowships had similar rates of employment in academic/university settings (58 and 52 %, respectively). Graduates of 4-year fellowships were more likely to hold an advanced degree and 11 or more publications at completion of fellowship. A majority of graduates of a gynecologic oncology fellowship practice in an academic/university setting and are involved in research. Fellowship length does not correlate with a current academic medicine appointment. Graduates of 4-year fellowships are more likely to hold additional advanced degrees and more publications.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  9. Research Agenda in Cloud Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sriram, Ilango

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is the latest effort in delivering computing resources as a service. It represents a shift away from computing as a product that is purchased, to computing as a service that is delivered to consumers over the internet from large-scale data centres - or "clouds". Whilst cloud computing is gaining growing popularity in the IT industry, academia appeared to be lagging behind the rapid developments in this field. This paper is the first systematic review of peer-reviewed academic research published in this field, and aims to provide an overview of the swiftly developing advances in the technical foundations of cloud computing and their research efforts. Structured along the technical aspects on the cloud agenda, we discuss lessons from related technologies; advances in the introduction of protocols, interfaces, and standards; techniques for modelling and building clouds; and new use-cases arising through cloud computing.

  10. Research Supporting Satellite Communications Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan Stephen; Lyman, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the second year of research effort under the grant Research Supporting Satellite Communications Technology. The research program consists of two major projects: Fault Tolerant Link Establishment and the design of an Auto-Configurable Receiver. The Fault Tolerant Link Establishment protocol is being developed to assist the designers of satellite clusters to manage the inter-satellite communications. During this second year, the basic protocol design was validated with an extensive testing program. After this testing was completed, a channel error model was added to the protocol to permit the effects of channel errors to be measured. This error generation was used to test the effects of channel errors on Heartbeat and Token message passing. The C-language source code for the protocol modules was delivered to Goddard Space Flight Center for integration with the GSFC testbed. The need for a receiver autoconfiguration capability arises when a satellite-to-ground transmission is interrupted due to an unexpected event, the satellite transponder may reset to an unknown state and begin transmitting in a new mode. During Year 2, we completed testing of these algorithms when noise-induced bit errors were introduced. We also developed and tested an algorithm for estimating the data rate, assuming an NRZ-formatted signal corrupted with additive white Gaussian noise, and we took initial steps in integrating both algorithms into the SDR test bed at GSFC.

  11. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, David S; Levy, Bruce P; Lane, William J; Lee, Roy E; Baron, Jason M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Onozato, Maristela L; Kim, Jiyeon; Dighe, Anand S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a

  12. A suggested core content for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarris, Lalena M; Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Lind, Karen; Jordan, Jaime; Clarke, Sam; Guth, Todd A; Santen, Sally A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2012-12-01

    A working group at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on education research in emergency medicine (EM) convened to develop a curriculum for dedicated postgraduate fellowships in EM education scholarship. This fellowship is intended to create future education scholars, equipped with the skills to thrive in academic careers. This proceedings article reports on the consensus of a breakout session subgroup tasked with defining a common core content for education scholarship fellowships. The authors propose that the core content of an EM education scholarship fellowship can be categorized in four distinct areas: career development, theories of learning and teaching methods, education research methods, and educational program administration. This core content can be incorporated into curricula for education scholarship fellowships in EM or other fields and can also be adapted for use in general medical education fellowships.

  13. Wilderness Fellowship Program 2012 Fellows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Natural Resources and Conservation Planning Division of the National Wildlife Refuge System established the Wilderness Fellowship Program in 2011. The program...

  14. FY2012 Engineering Research & Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Monya

    2014-07-22

    This report documents engineering research, development, and technology advancements performed by LLNL during fiscal year 2012 in the following areas: computational engineering, engineering information systems, micro/nano-devices and structures, and measurement technologies.

  15. Integration of a NASA faculty fellowship project within an undergraduate engineering capstone design class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen, C.

    2012-11-01

    The United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) provides university faculty fellowships that prepare the faculty to implement engineering design class projects that possess the potential to contribute to NASA ESMD objectives. The goal of the ESMD is to develop new capabilities, support technologies and research that will enable sustained and affordable human and robotic space exploration. In order to create a workforce that will have the desire and skills necessary to achieve these goals, the NASA ESMD faculty fellowship program enables university faculty to work on specific projects at a NASA field center and then implement the project within their capstone engineering design class. This allows the senior - or final year - undergraduate engineering design students, the opportunity to develop critical design experience using methods and design tools specified within NASA's Systems Engineering (SE) Handbook. The faculty fellowship projects focus upon four specific areas critical to the future of space exploration: spacecraft, propulsion, lunar and planetary surface systems and ground operations. As the result of a 2010 fellowship, whereby faculty research was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama (AL), senior design students in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) department at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) had the opportunity to complete senior design projects that pertained to current work conducted to support ESMD objectives. Specifically, the UAH MAE students utilized X-TOOLSS (eXploration Toolset for the Optimization Of Launch and Space Systems), an Evolutionary Computing (EC) design optimization software, as well as design, analyze, fabricate and test a lunar regolith burrowing device - referred to as the Lunar Wormbot (LW) - that is aimed at exploring and retrieving samples of lunar regolith. These two projects were

  16. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  17. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  18. The Role of Technology in SLA Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Dorothy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this review article for the 20th Anniversary Issue, I look back at research from the last two decades on the role of computer technology in understanding and facilitating second language acquisition (SLA) and forward to what future research might investigate. To be discussed are both how technology has been used to conduct research on SLA…

  19. The Role of Technology in SLA Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Dorothy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this review article for the 20th Anniversary Issue, I look back at research from the last two decades on the role of computer technology in understanding and facilitating second language acquisition (SLA) and forward to what future research might investigate. To be discussed are both how technology has been used to conduct research on SLA…

  20. Technology, relationships, and problems: a research synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M; Webster, Megan

    2008-10-01

    The advances in technology alter the ways we interact with each other. For some, the use of technology can facilitate a relationship; for others, technology can complicate aspects of a relationship. The purpose of this research synthesis is to summarize current research exploring the ways in which technology impacts relationships negatively. Eight studies were reviewed across the following areas: preoperational definitions, sample, methodology, control of extraneous variables, causal influence, generalizability, validity of statistical findings, and conclusions. Implications for authors, researchers, and therapists working with couples and families struggling with technology issues are discussed.

  1. Research Extension and Education Programs on Bio-based Energy Technologies and Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Sam [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station; Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station; Womac, Al [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station

    2010-03-02

    The overall objectives of this project were to provide enhanced educational resources for the general public, educational and development opportunities for University faculty in the Southeast region, and enhance research knowledge concerning biomass preprocessing and deconstruction. All of these efforts combine to create a research and education program that enhances the biomass-based industries of the United States. This work was broken into five primary objective areas: • Task A - Technical research in the area of biomass preprocessing, analysis, and evaluation. • Tasks B&C - Technical research in the areas of Fluidized Beds for the Chemical Modification of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Biomass Deconstruction and Evaluation. • Task D - Analyses for the non-scientific community to provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of biomass supply, demand, technologies, markets and policies; identify a set of feasible alternative paths for biomass industry development and quantify the impacts associated with alternative path. • Task E - Efforts to build research capacity and develop partnerships through faculty fellowships with DOE national labs The research and education programs conducted through this grant have led to three primary results. They include: • A better knowledge base related to and understanding of biomass deconstruction, through both mechanical size reduction and chemical processing • A better source of information related to biomass, bioenergy, and bioproducts for researchers and general public users through the BioWeb system. • Stronger research ties between land-grant universities and DOE National Labs through the faculty fellowship program. In addition to the scientific knowledge and resources developed, funding through this program produced a minimum of eleven (11) scientific publications and contributed to the research behind at least one patent.

  2. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC), in the Energy and Transportation Science Division (ETSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  3. Quantum technology: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Ranade, Kedar S.; Anton, Christian; Arndt, Markus; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Bayer, Manfred; Berg, Gunnar; Calarco, Tommaso; Fuchs, Harald; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Grassl, Markus; Hänggi, Peter; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Hertel, Ingolf-Volker; Huelga, Susana; Jelezko, Fedor; Keimer, Bernhard; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Leuchs, Gerd; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Maurer, Ueli; Pfau, Tilman; Plenio, Martin B.; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Renn, Ortwin; Silberhorn, Christine; Schiedmayer, Jörg; Schmitt-Landsiedel, Doris; Schönhammer, Kurt; Ustinov, Alexey; Walther, Philip; Weinfurter, Harald; Welzl, Emo; Wiesendanger, Roland; Wolf, Stefan; Zeilinger, Anton; Zoller, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The term quantum physics refers to the phenomena and characteristics of atomic and subatomic systems which cannot be explained by classical physics. Quantum physics has had a long tradition in Germany, going back nearly 100 years. Quantum physics is the foundation of many modern technologies. The first generation of quantum technology provides the basis for key areas such as semiconductor and laser technology. The "new" quantum technology, based on influencing individual quantum systems, has been the subject of research for about the last 20 years. Quantum technology has great economic potential due to its extensive research programs conducted in specialized quantum technology centres throughout the world. To be a viable and active participant in the economic potential of this field, the research infrastructure in Germany should be improved to facilitate more investigations in quantum technology research.

  4. Research needs of the new accelerator technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1982-08-01

    A review is given of some of the new accelerator technologies with a special eye to the requirements which they generate for research and development. Some remarks are made concerning the organizational needs of accelerator research.

  5. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies: A Strobe-Compliant Article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    .... The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown...

  6. Oil heat technology research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweller, E.R. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); McDonald, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this United States Department of Energy (DOE)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program is to develop a technology base for advancing the state-of-the-art related to oilfired combustion equipment. The major thrust is through technology based research that will seek new knowledge leading to improved designs and equipment optimization. The Combustion Equipment space Conditioning Technology program currently deals exclusively with residential and small commercial building oil heat technology.

  7. Using Videotape Technology: Innovations in Behavioral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Robert E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reviews present and potential uses of videotape technology in behavioral research. Emphasis is placed on research methodology and the value of incorporating videotape in current research practices, including behavior observation studies, in modeling research, and in perceptual attribution investigations. Concludes with an analysis of advantages…

  8. Korea-China Optical Technology Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Cha, H. K.; Rhee, Y. J. (and others)

    2007-04-15

    The main objectives of this project are to develop cooperative channel by personnel exchanges between industrial, educational and research partners of Korea and China on the fields of optical technologies which are the basis of optical industry and being spot-lighted as new industry of 21th century, and to raise the class of Korean optical technology up to world class by utilization of Chinese large facilities through the cooperative research between the optical technology institutions of both sides. To attain the goals mentioned above, we carried out the cooperative researches between the Korean and Chinese optical technology institutions in the following 7 fields; ? research cooperation between KAERI-SITP for the quantum structured far-IR sensor technology - research cooperation for the generation of femtosecond nuclear fusion induced neutrons - research cooperation between KAERI-AIOFM for laser environment analysis and remote sensing technology - research cooperation between KAERI-SIOM for advanced diode-pumped laser technology - cooperative research related on linear and nonlinear magneto-optical properties of advanced magnetic quantum structures - design of pico-second PW high power laser system and its simulation and - cooperative research related on the femto-second laser-plasma interaction physics.

  9. Post-Doctoral Fellowship for Merton S. Krause. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip W.

    The final quarter of Krause's fellowship year was spent in completing his interviews with political socialization researchers in the eastern United States and his work on methodological problems. Krause also completed a long essay on the nature and implications of the "matrix perspective" for research planning, pursued his study of measurement…

  10. New technologies in gastrointestinal research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2009-01-01

    This issue presents different new techniques aiming to increase our understanding of the gastrointestinal system and to improve treatment. The technologies cover selected methods to evoke and assess gut pain, new methods for imaging and physiological measurements, histochemistry, pharmacological modelling etc. There is no doubt that the methods will revolutionize the diagnostic approach in near future.

  11. Technology meets research 60 years of CERN technology : selected highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Thomas; Treille, Daniel; Wenninger, Horst

    2017-01-01

    "Big" science and advanced technology are known to cross-fertilize. This book emphasizes the interplay between particle physics and technology at CERN that has led to breakthroughs in both research and technology over the laboratory's first 60 years. The innovations, often the work of individuals or by small teams, are illustrated with highlights describing selected technologies from the domains of accelerators and detectors. The book also presents the framework and conditions prevailing at CERN that enabled spectacular advances in technology and contributed to propel the European organization into the league of leading research laboratories in the world. While the book is specifically aimed at providing information for the technically interested general public, more expert readers may also appreciate the broad variety of subjects presented. Ample references are given for those who wish to further explore a given topic.

  12. Constituting Information Technology Research: The Experience of IT Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Binh; Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The collective consciousness of effective groups of researchers is characterized by shared understandings of their research object or territory. In this study, we adopted a phenomenographic approach to investigate information technology (IT) research, and its objects and territories, as they are constituted in the experience of IT researchers.…

  13. Improving Fellowship Training in Microsurgery: A Threshold Concepts Perspective on the Curricula of Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Tsironi, Maria; Riley, David

    2015-10-01

    The theory of "threshold concepts" argues that within every discipline there is knowledge that transforms understanding and leads to a previously inaccessible way of thinking, without which the learner cannot progress. This study investigates the factors influencing the development of the characteristic ways of thinking and practicing as a microsurgeon during a microsurgical fellowship. We analyze the challenges in the development of these characteristics during focused fellowship training in microsurgery, of which some could potentially represent "threshold concepts." A qualitative research methodology was followed. Semistructured interviews with trainers and trainees from microsurgical units in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US) were conducted. Data were analyzed using the Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, CA) qualitative data analysis software and interpreted using the theory of "threshold concepts." Five trainees and four trainers from the UK and the US participated in this research project. Although initially some trainees had particular difficulty in developing their practical microsurgical skills, this improved rapidly with adequate practice. Cognitive skills and especially the ability to expect the unexpected and the ability recognize complications presented as a significant challenge for trainees and transformed their understandings regarding the qualities of a microsurgeon. Microsurgical fellowship curricula can be redesigned using the theory of threshold concepts, creating a dynamic framework that addresses individual trainee needs to develop the practical and cognitive skills necessary for independent practice of microsurgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, fly by, land, or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. NASA Glenn Research Center's newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability and system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  15. Computer science research and technology volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Janice P

    2011-01-01

    This book presents leading-edge research from across the globe in the field of computer science research, technology and applications. Each contribution has been carefully selected for inclusion based on the significance of the research to this fast-moving and diverse field. Some topics included are: network topology; agile programming; virtualization; and reconfigurable computing.

  16. KSC Education Technology Research and Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Michael R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Educational technology is facilitating new approaches to teaching and learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Cognitive research is beginning to inform educators about how students learn providing a basis for design of more effective learning environments incorporating technology. At the same time, access to computers, the Internet and other technology tools are becoming common features in K-20 classrooms. Encouraged by these developments, STEM educators are transforming traditional STEM education into active learning environments that hold the promise of enhancing learning. This document illustrates the use of technology in STEM education today, identifies possible areas of development, links this development to the NASA Strategic Plan, and makes recommendations for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Education Office for consideration in the research, development, and design of new educational technologies and applications.

  17. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  18. DOE Theory Graduate Student Fellowship: Gustavo Marques Tavares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaltz, Martin [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Physics Dept.

    2015-12-30

    Marques Tavares was awarded a fellowship for his proposal “The ttbar asymmetry and beyond” to starting in September 2012. This is the final report summarizing the research activities and accomplishments achieved with this grant support. With support from the DOE graduate fellowship Marques Tavares, Katz and Xu at BU have investigated a new technique for obtaining quantitative results in strongly coupled field theories with broken conformal invariance. Such theories are especially interesting as they may be candidates for physics beyond the standard model with possible applications to strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking. However, because of the strong coupling even qualitative results about the spectrum of such theories are not rigorously understood.

  19. Advanced Construction Technology Center Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-19

    M.S., Ceramic Engineering, May 1989 RESEARCH ASSISTANTS: 1 J.M. Bukowski Ph.D., Ceramic Engineering, August 1993* Hung-Yuan Hsieh M.S., Civil...Parallel Processing (St. Charles , IL, August 1988) 204-211 (1988). 97 U LO, T.M. Data modeling of three-dimensional objects. M.S. thesis, J. Liu, advisor U

  20. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    develop a unique measurement platform employing tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy ( TDLAS ). The TDLAS platform provides a novel approach to...conduct research in the exploration and development of fundamental hypersonic aerospace technologies. TDLAS experiments are scheduled for three of...team expects that the TDLAS measurement platform will achieve Technology Readiness Level 6 status (i.e., system/subsystem model or prototype

  1. Research and technology, fiscal year 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Advanced studies are reviewed. Atmospheric sciences, magnetospheric physics, solar physics, gravitational physics, astronomy, and materials processing in space comprise the research programs. Large space systems, propulsion technology, materials and processes, electrical/electronic systems, data bases/design criteria, and facilities development comprise the technology development activities.

  2. Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal ... Determination of Nutritive Value and Mineral Elements of Some Species of Genus Memecylon Linn. ... towards Gender and Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Eastern Ethiopia: A ...

  3. The Europlanet Research Infrastructure and Technology Foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Europlanet Community

    2016-10-01

    The Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure is a project to integrate and support planetary science activities across Europe. The project is funded under the European Commission's Horizon 2020 programme. Technology Foresight is a key activity.

  4. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  5. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  6. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  7. Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowships: a descriptive analysis of programs and postgraduate positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Stephanie; Gangadharan, Amy; Johnson, Hiliary; Schleck, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Alexander, James G

    2012-01-01

    Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowship programs and the employment of fellowship graduates are described. A list of postgraduate industry fellowships was gathered from the 2009 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. Data regarding program characteristics were collected using the Personnel Placement Service database and program-specific brochures. After data compilation, a standardized survey was sent in January 2010 via e-mail to the point of contact for all programs to confirm the accuracy of the program's characteristics. Only academically affiliated industry fellowship programs were analyzed. Retrospective data were collected regarding the first position of employment for all fellows who graduated from the program between 2005 and 2009 and the position of those same individuals at the time of survey completion. Surveys were sent to 64 postgraduate industry fellowship programs affiliated with a school of pharmacy, 56 (87.5%) of whom responded. The departmental breakdown for positions offered (n = 75) across all academically affiliated industry fellowship programs (including nonresponders) was as follows: medical affairs (38.7%, n = 29), clinical research (32.0%, n = 24), regulatory affairs (9.3%, n = 7), commercial (8.0%, n = 6), health economics and outcomes research (8.0%, n = 6), and pharmacovigilance (4.0%, n = 3). Data from fellows during years 1-5 after completion of the industry fellowship indicated that 90.5% of former fellows remained in the industry (n = 238). The postgraduate industry fellowship programs surveyed indicated that the majority of fellowship graduates continued to hold positions in industry after program completion. The majority of industry fellowships and subsequent job placements occurred in the areas of medical affairs, clinical research, and regulatory affairs.

  8. Novel omics technologies in nutrition research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuewu; Yap, Yeeleng; Wei, Dong; Chen, Gu; Chen, Feng

    2008-01-01

    A key scientific objective of nutrition research is to determine the role of diet in metabolic regulation and to improve health. There are many new opportunities and challenges for the nutrition research in post-genome era. Novel omics technologies and bioinformatics tools offer enormous potential to investigate the complex relationship between nutrition and metabolism. An overview of omics technologies in nutrition research is presented in this paper, which focuses on recent applications of nutritranscriptomics, nutriproteomics and nutrimetabolomics in nutrition research. The potential limitations and future prospects are also discussed. The combination of various omics technologies, systems biology, will greatly facilitate the discovery of new biomarkers associated with specific nutrients or other dietary factors. It can be expected that the future omics-based human nutrition research can provide personalized dietary recommendations for disease prevention.

  9. Social technologies and socialization of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Leijten

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether we like it or not, and how many difficulties this may pose, scientific research and technology are becoming the “property” of everybody and increasingly will become subject of public guidance and political decision making. Socialization happens because what people think, want and do has become central to the development of science and technology. Socialization of research is simply happening because it is the development characteristic of a society in which knowledge is becoming the main driving force. And just like in agricultural or industrial societies in the past it leads to (re-invent the institutions and mechanisms which allow the knowledge society to function properly.This note will further explore the developments contributing to the socialization of research and their impact on research and research institutes. It will focus more on technologies than on science per se, because applications and usage will become the main drivers.

  10. [Pharmaceutical technology: development and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traisnel, M

    1994-06-01

    Production of pharmaceutics cannot be compared to the manufacture of consumer goods: pharmaceutical manufacturing is the study and bulk manufacture of the ingredients from which medicines are made, and is concerned with the mixing, preparing, packing, of the ingredients into a dosage form for the patient, in according to the good manufacturing practices (GMP). Development and manufacture are not discrete activities but links in a single chain of activity. Research and development, pharmaceutical training, regulatory requirements: these concepts are present with three ways: bioavailability, targeting and compliance.

  11. A snapshot of research in learning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhona Sharpe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The papers in this issue present a convenient snapshot of current research in learning technology, both in their coverage of the issues that concern us and the methods that are being used to investigate them. This issue shows that e-learning researchers are interested in: what technologies are available and explorations of their potential (Nie et al. explore the role of podcasting, how to design technology-mediated learning activities in ways which support specific learning outcomes (Simpson evaluates the role of ‘book raps' in supporting critical thinking, the identification of critical success factors in implementations (Cochrane's observation of three mobile learning projects and how such e-learning initiatives can be sustained within an institutional context (Gunn's examination of the challenges of embedding ‘grass roots' initiatives. Finally e-learning research is concerned with investigating the impact of emerging technologies on education – in this case Traxler's discussion of mobile, largely student-owned, devices. Together these five papers demonstrate the scope of research in learning technology and it is with this in mind that we will soon be referring to this journal by its subtitle: Research in Learning Technology.

  12. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  13. Engineering research, development and technology report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R T

    1999-02-01

    Nineteen ninety-eight has been a transition year for Engineering, as we have moved from our traditional focus on thrust areas to a more focused approach with research centers. These five new centers of excellence collectively comprise Engineering's Science and Technology program. This publication summarizes our formative year under this new structure. Let me start by talking about the differences between a thrust area and a research center. The thrust area is more informal, combining an important technology with programmatic priorities. In contrast, a research center is directly linked to an Engineering core technology. It is the purer model, for it is more enduring yet has the scope to be able to adapt quickly to evolving programmatic priorities. To put it another way, the mission of a thrust area was often to grow the programs in conjunction with a technology, whereas the task of a research center is to vigorously grow our core technologies. By cultivating each core technology, we in turn enable long-term growth of new programs.

  14. FY08 Engineering Research and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; McNichols, D

    2009-02-24

    This report summarizes the core research, development, and technology accomplishments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2008. These efforts exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing and applying the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's national security missions. A partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, Engineering has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources developed through both internal and external venues. These accomplishments embody Engineering's mission: 'Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.' Engineering's mission is carried out through basic research and technology development. Research is the vehicle for creating competencies that are cutting-edge, or require discovery-class groundwork to be fully understood. Our technology efforts are discipline-oriented, preparing research breakthroughs for broader application to a variety of Laboratory needs. The term commonly used for technology-based projects is 'reduction to practice.' As we pursue this two-pronged approach, an enormous range of technological capabilities result. This report combines our work in research and technology into one volume, organized into thematic technical areas: Engineering Modeling and Simulation; Measurement Technologies; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Engineering Systems for Knowledge and Inference; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but also anticipate the breakthrough engineering innovations that will be needed in the future.

  15. From the NSF: The National Science Foundation’s Investments in Broadening Participation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education through Research and Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sylvia M.; Singer, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has a long history of investment in broadening participation (BP) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. A review of past NSF BP efforts provides insights into how the portfolio of programs and activities has evolved and the broad array of innovative strategies that has been used to increase the participation of groups underrepresented in STEM, including women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. While many are familiar with these long-standing programmatic efforts, BP is also a key component of NSF’s strategic plans, has been highlighted in National Science Board reports, and is the focus of ongoing outreach efforts. The majority of familiar BP programs, such as the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (now 25 years old), are housed in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources. However, fellowship programs such as the Graduate Research Fellowships and Postdoctoral Research Fellowships under the Directorate for Biological Sciences (and parallel directorates in other STEM disciplines) are frequently used to address underrepresentation in STEM disciplines. The FY2016 and FY2017 budget requests incorporate funding for NSF INCLUDES, a new cross-agency BP initiative that will build on prior successes while addressing national BP challenges. NSF INCLUDES invites the use of innovative approaches for taking evidence-based best practices to scale, ushering in a new era in NSF BP advancement. PMID:27587853

  16. From the NSF: The National Science Foundation's Investments in Broadening Participation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education through Research and Capacity Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sylvia M; Singer, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has a long history of investment in broadening participation (BP) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. A review of past NSF BP efforts provides insights into how the portfolio of programs and activities has evolved and the broad array of innovative strategies that has been used to increase the participation of groups underrepresented in STEM, including women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. While many are familiar with these long-standing programmatic efforts, BP is also a key component of NSF's strategic plans, has been highlighted in National Science Board reports, and is the focus of ongoing outreach efforts. The majority of familiar BP programs, such as the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (now 25 years old), are housed in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources. However, fellowship programs such as the Graduate Research Fellowships and Postdoctoral Research Fellowships under the Directorate for Biological Sciences (and parallel directorates in other STEM disciplines) are frequently used to address underrepresentation in STEM disciplines. The FY2016 and FY2017 budget requests incorporate funding for NSF INCLUDES, a new cross-agency BP initiative that will build on prior successes while addressing national BP challenges. NSF INCLUDES invites the use of innovative approaches for taking evidence-based best practices to scale, ushering in a new era in NSF BP advancement.

  17. Boren Scholarship and Fellowship Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    from beginner to intermediate, and convinced me that I did want to make China studies central to my career. 2. After completing my NSEP/Boren...current career. 133. My Boren Fellowship provided an amazing experience to study abroad in Russia , which I would have not been able to undertake...otherwise. That overseas experience has been directly applicable to my professional work since graduation, even when I moved away from Russia as an

  18. Graduate School and Fellowship Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles Reed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    This was a presentation presented for the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. This is a set of slides about how to prepare for college, specifically graduate school. It gives instructions for succeeding and getting into a good school with financial aid through assistantships and scholarships, specifically applying to engineering backgrounds. Also, there are tips given for applying for fellowships and concludes with some general recommendations for graduate school.

  19. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    include evidence-based medicine and primary care research methods ... national learning outcomes: http://www.collegemedsa.ac.za/ ... patient lives with her boyfriend and their two children aged four ... three key criteria of cooperative enquiry.

  20. Learning styles in otolaryngology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, David A Diaz Voss; Malik, Mohammad U; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Pandian, Vinciya; Brown, David J; Weatherly, Robert A; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have identified a predominant learning style in trainees from different specialties, more recently in otolaryngology residents. The purpose of our study was to determine a predominant learning style within otolaryngology fellowships and to identify any differences between otolaryngology fellows and residents. We conducted a survey of otolaryngology fellows at 25 otolaryngology fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We emailed Kolb's Learning Style Index version 3.1 to 16 pediatric otolaryngology (PO) and 24 otology/neurotology (ON) fellows. This index is a widely used 12-item questionnaire. The participants answered each item in the questionnaire as it applied to their preferred learning style: accommodating, converging, diverging, or assimilating. Results were then analyzed and compared between each subspecialty and the previously reported preferred styles of otolaryngology residents. Ten PO and 20 ON fellows completed the survey, with an overall response rate of 75%. PO and ON fellows (60% of each group) preferred a learning style that was "balanced" across all four styles. For ON fellows, 35% preferred converging and 5% preferred accommodating styles. For PO fellows, converging and accommodating styles accounted for 20% each. It was previously reported that 74.4% of otolaryngology residents prefer either converging or accommodating styles. We believe that the fellowship training environment calls for fellows to use more than one learning style to become proficient physicians, hence the trend toward potentially developing a balanced style when at this level. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

  2. Contributions of mobile technologies to addiction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendsen, Joel

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies are revolutionizing the field of mental health, and particular progress has been made in their application to addiction research and treatment. The use of smartphones and other mobile devices has been shown to be feasible with individuals addicted to any of a wide range of substances, with few biases being observed concerning the repeated monitoring of daily life experiences, craving, or substance use. From a methodological point of view, the use of mobile technologies overcomes longstanding limitations of traditional clinical research protocols, including the more accurate assessment of temporal relationships among variables, as well as the reduction in both contextual constraints and discipline-specific methodological isolation. The present article presents a conceptual review of these advances while using illustrations of research applications that are capable of overcoming specific methodological barriers. Finally, a brief review of both the benefits and risks of mobile technology use for the treatment of patients will be addressed.

  3. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) fellowship program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleary, D.D. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program administers a Graduate Fellowship Program focused toward helping students who are currently under represented in the nation`s pool of scientists and engineers, enter and complete advanced degree programs. The objectives of the program are to: (1) establish and maintain cooperative linkages between DOE and professors at universities with graduate programs leading toward degrees or with degree options in Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, and Ceramic Engineering, the disciplines most closely related to the AIM Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (2) strengthen the capabilities and increase the level of participation of currently under represented groups in master`s degree programs, and (3) offer graduate students an opportunity for practical research experience related to their thesis topic through the three-month research assignment or practicum at ORNL. The program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

  4. Research on Technology and Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Scott

    2010-10-01

    From Facebook to smart phones, technology is an integral part of our student's lives. For better or for worse, technology has become nearly inescapable in the classroom, enhancing instruction, distracting students, or simply complicating life. As good teachers we want to harness the power we have available to impact our students, but it is getting harder as the pace of technological change accelerates. How can we make good choices in which technologies to invest time and resources in to use effectively? Do some technologies make more of a difference in student learning? In this talk we will look at research studies looking at technology use in the physics classroom---both my work and that of others---and their impact on student learning. Examples will include computers in the laboratory, web-based homework, and different forms of electronic communication. From these examples, I will draw some general principles for effective educational technology and physics education. Technology is simply a tool; the key is how we use those tools to help our students develop their abilities and understanding.

  5. FY06 Engineering Research and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; Alves, S W; Anderson, A T; Bennett, C V; Brown, C G; Brown, W D; Chinn, D; Clague, D; Clark, G; Cook, E G; Davidson, J C; Deri, R J; Dougherty, G; Fasenfest, B J; Florando, J N; Fulkerson, E S; Haugen, P; Heebner, J E; Hickling, T; Huber, R; Hunter, S L; Javedani, J; Kallman, J S; Kegelmeyer, L M; Koning, J; Kosovic, B; Kroll, J J; LeBlanc, M; Lin, J; Mariella, R P; Miles, R; Nederbragt, W W; Ness, K D; Nikolic, R J; Paglieroni, D; Pannu, S; Pierce, E; Pocha, M D; Poland, D N; Puso, M A; Quarry, M J; Rhee, M; Romero, C E; Rose, K A; Sain, J D; Sharpe, R M; Spadaccini, C M; Stolken, J S; Van Buuren, A; Wemhoff, A; White, D; Yao, Y

    2007-01-22

    This report summarizes the core research, development, and technology accomplishments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2006. These efforts exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing and applying the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's national security missions. A partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, Engineering has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources developed through both internal and external venues. These accomplishments embody Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out primarily through two internal programs: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the technology base, or ''Tech Base'', program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating technologies and competencies that are cutting-edge, or require discovery-class research to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to prepare those technologies to be more broadly applicable to a variety of Laboratory needs. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Thus, LDRD reports have a strong research emphasis, while Tech Base reports document discipline-oriented, core competency activities. This report combines the LDRD and Tech Base summaries into one volume, organized into six thematic technical areas: Engineering Modeling and Simulation; Measurement Technologies; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Precision Engineering; Engineering Systems for Knowledge and Inference; and Energy Manipulation.

  6. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Act of 1994. Hearing on S. 2104 To Establish within the National Laboratories of the Department of Energy a National Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program, before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Development of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    These hearings addressed proposed Bill S. 2104 to create a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that would provide them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and communication among the educational community, the Congress, and the Executive Agencies responsible for developing and…

  7. Factors Influencing Radiology Residents' Fellowship Training and Practice Preferences in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Philip S; Probyn, Linda; Finlay, Karen

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to examine the postresidency plans of Canadian radiology residents and factors influencing their fellowship choices and practice preferences, including interest in teaching and research. Institutional ethics approval was obtained at McMaster University. Electronic surveys were sent to second to fifth-year residents at all 16 radiology residency programs across Canada. Each survey assessed factors influencing fellowship choices and practice preferences. A total of 103 (31%) Canadian radiology residents responded to the online survey. Over 89% from English-speaking programs intended to pursue fellowship training compared to 55% of residents from French-speaking programs. The most important factors influencing residents' decision to pursue fellowship training were enhanced employability (46%) and personal interest (47%). Top fellowship choices were musculoskeletal imaging (19%), body imaging (17%), vascular or interventional (14%), neuroradiology (8%), and women's imaging (7%). Respondents received the majority of their fellowship information from peers (68%), staff radiologists (61%), and university websites (58%). Approximately 59% planned on practicing at academic institutions and stated that lifestyle (43%), job prospects (29%), and teaching opportunities (27%) were the most important factors influencing their decisions. A total of 89% were interested in teaching but only 46% were interested in incorporating research into their future practice. The majority of radiology residents plan on pursuing fellowship training and often receive their fellowship information from informal sources such as peers and staff radiologists. Fellowship directors can incorporate recruitment strategies such as mentorship programs and improving program websites. There is a need to increase resident participation in research to advance the future of radiology. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Research and technology, fiscal year 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The responibilities and programs of the Goddard Space Flight Center are ranged from basic research in the space and Earth sciences through the management of numerous flight projects to operational responsibility for the tracking of and data acquisition from NASA's Earth orbiting satellites, Progress in the areas of spacecraft technology, sensor development and data system development, as well as in the basic and applied to research in the space and Earth sciences that they support is highlighted.

  9. Armstrong Flight Research Center Research Technology and Engineering Report 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David F.

    2016-01-01

    I am honored to endorse the 2015 Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Research, Technology, and Engineering Report. The talented researchers, engineers, and scientists at Armstrong are continuing a long, rich legacy of creating innovative approaches to solving some of the difficult problems and challenges facing NASA and the aerospace community.Projects at NASA Armstrong advance technologies that will improve aerodynamic efficiency, increase fuel economy, reduce emissions and aircraft noise, and enable the integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace. The work represented in this report highlights the Center’s agility to develop technologies supporting each of NASA’s core missions and, more importantly, technologies that are preparing us for the future of aviation and space exploration.We are excited about our role in NASA’s mission to develop transformative aviation capabilities and open new markets for industry. One of our key strengths is the ability to rapidly move emerging techniques and technologies into flight evaluation so that we can quickly identify their strengths, shortcomings, and potential applications.This report presents a brief summary of the technology work of the Center. It also contains contact information for the associated technologists responsible for the work. Don’t hesitate to contact them for more information or for collaboration ideas.

  10. Health effects of coal technologies: research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

  11. Landmine detection technology research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the activities on research and development in the technology area for landmine detection in the Netherlands. The main players, their projects and the long term and short term project goals are presented. The projects cover the range from military applications to human

  12. Landmine Detection Technology Research Programme at TNO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of most of the activities on research and development in the technology area for landmine detection at TNO in the Netherlands. The projects cover the range from military applications to humanitarian demining. In the “conventional” detection systems area the activi

  13. Educational Technology Research in a VUCA World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Reeves, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    The status of educational technology research in a VUCA world is examined. The acronym, VUCA, stands for "Volatility" (rapidly changing contexts and conditions), "Uncertainty" (information missing that is critical to problem solving), "Complexity" (multiple factors difficult to categorize or control), and…

  14. Present challenges of research and technology politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulow, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    Research and technology in Germany are discussed. The rapid transfer of scientific knowledge and techniques from the laboratory to the manufacturing and industrial communities is identified as a priority. It is recommended that the government give maximum support to the aviation and space flight industries.

  15. Information Technology Investments in Research Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Examines investments that will ensure that library information technology (IT) meets future academic needs. Looks back on the introduction of IT to research libraries. Assesses outcomes of IT investments in terms of cost and service benefits, and then focuses on developing new service models. (AEF)

  16. Research and Technology: Fiscal year 1982 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Accomplishments and research objectives are described in the following areas: (1) space sciences; (2) space and terrestrial applications; (3) flight projects and mission definition studies; (4) space tracking and data systems; and (5) space technology. Data analysis efforts, instrument development, and measurement projects are among the aspects considered.

  17. Food irradiation: research and technology, preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many interesting and exciting developments have occurred in the field of food irradiation since the publication of the first edition of Food Irradiation: Research and Technology in 2006. The 2nd edition of the book reviews our latest knowledge on food irradiation, highlights the current developments...

  18. Landmine research: technology solutions looking for problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevelyan, James P.

    2004-09-01

    The global landmine problem came to the attention of researchers in the mid 1990's and by 1997 several advanced and expensive sensor research programs had started. Yet, by the end of 2003, there is little sign of a major advance in the technology available to humanitarian demining programs. Given the motivation and dedication of researchers, public goodwill to support such programs, and substantial research resources devoted to the problem, it is worth asking why these programs do not seem to have had an impact on demining costs or casualty rates. Perhaps there are factors that have been overlooked. This paper reviews several research programs to gain a deeper understanding of the problem. A possible explanation is that researchers have accepted mistaken ideas on the nature of the landmine problems that need to be solved. The paper provides several examples where the realities of minefield conditions are quite different to what researchers have been led to believe. Another explanation may lie in the political and economic realities that drive the worldwide effort to eliminate landmines. Most of the resources devoted to landmine clearance programs come from humanitarian aid budgets: landmine affected countries often contribute only a small proportion because they have different priorities based on realistic risk-based assessment of needs and political views of local people. Some aid projects have been driven by the need to find a market for demining technologies rather than by user needs. Finally, there is a common misperception that costs in less developed countries are intrinsically low, reflecting low rates paid for almost all classes of skilled labour. When actual productivity is taken into account, real costs can be higher than industrialized countries. The costs of implementing technological solutions (even using simple technologies) are often significantly under-estimated. Some political decisions may have discouraged thorough investigation of cost

  19. Application of biophysical technologies in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Susan M.; Pender, Neil; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Smith, Philip W.

    2009-05-01

    There is a wealth of evidence to indicate that if dental caries can be recognized at an early stage, it is possible to halt its progression or even reverse it. This has led to an increased interest in the development of diagnostic techniques capable of visualizing caries at an early stage in addition to providing clinicians with an aid to diagnosis. Several techniques are available for research and clinical applications for detecting early demineralization. This manuscript has reviewed some of the techniques currently available to determine their advantages, whether they have any limitations and their applicability to dental research and clinical dentistry. Not one method is the perfect choice in all situations, but what is clear is that the development and application of biophysical technologies have allowed major advances to be made in dental research as well as in clinical dentistry. With continued developments these technologies will play an important role in the future management of dental disease.

  20. Increasing Trends in Orthopedic Fellowships Are Not due to Inadequate Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Almansoori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic residents have one of the highest fellowship participation rates among medical specialities and there are growing concerns that inadequate residency training may be contributing to this trend. Therefore, a mixed-exploratory research survey was distributed to all 148 graduating Canadian orthopedic residents to investigate their perceptions and attitudes for pursuing fellowships. A response rate of 33% (n=49 was obtained with the majority of residents undertaking one (27% or two (60% fellowships. Surgical-skill development was reported as the most common motivating factor, followed by employment and marketability; malpractice protection and financial reasons were the least relevant. The overwhelming majority of residents (94%, n=46 felt adequately prepared by their residency training for independent general practice, and 84% (n=41 of respondents did not feel that current fellowship trends were due to poor residency training. Three common themes were expressed in their comments: the growing perceived expectation by healthcare professionals and employers to be fellowship-certified, the integration of fellowship training into the surgical education hierarchy, and the failure of residency training curriculums to accommodate for this trend. In conclusion, Canadian orthopedic residents are confident of their residency training and are increasingly pursuing fellowships to primarily develop their surgical skills and expertise.

  1. Nanofluid technology : current status and future research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S. U.-S.

    1998-10-20

    Downscaling or miniaturization has been a recent major trend in modern science and technology. Engineers now fabricate microscale devices such as microchannel heat exchangers, and micropumps that are the size of dust specks. Further major advances would be obtained if the coolant flowing in the microchannels were to contain nanoscale particles to enhance heat transfer. Nanofluid technology will thus be an emerging and exciting technology of the 21st century. This paper gives a brief history of the Advanced Fluids Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), discusses the concept of nanofluids, and provides an overview of the R and D program at ANL on the production, property characterization, and performance of nanofluids. It also describes examples of potential applications and benefits of nanofluids. Finally, future research on the fundamentals and applications of nanofluids is addressed.

  2. White LED visible light communication technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao

    2017-03-01

    Visible light communication is a new type of wireless optical communication technology. White LED to the success of development, the LED lighting technology is facing a new revolution. Because the LED has high sensitivity, modulation, the advantages of good performance, large transmission power, can make it in light transmission light signal at the same time. Use white LED light-emitting characteristics, on the modulation signals to the visible light transmission, can constitute a LED visible light communication system. We built a small visible optical communication system. The system composition and structure has certain value in the field of practical application, and we also research the key technology of transmitters and receivers, the key problem has been resolved. By studying on the optical and LED the characteristics of a high speed modulation driving circuit and a high sensitive receiving circuit was designed. And information transmission through the single chip microcomputer test, a preliminary verification has realized the data transmission function.

  3. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mandelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program′s core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  4. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  5. Soviet precision timekeeping research and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vessot, R.F.C.; Allan, D.W.; Crampton, S.J.B.; Cutler, L.S.; Kern, R.H.; McCoubrey, A.O.; White, J.D.

    1991-08-01

    This report is the result of a study of Soviet progress in precision timekeeping research and timekeeping capability during the last two decades. The study was conducted by a panel of seven US scientists who have expertise in timekeeping, frequency control, time dissemination, and the direct applications of these disciplines to scientific investigation. The following topics are addressed in this report: generation of time by atomic clocks at the present level of their technology, new and emerging technologies related to atomic clocks, time and frequency transfer technology, statistical processes involving metrological applications of time and frequency, applications of precise time and frequency to scientific investigations, supporting timekeeping technology, and a comparison of Soviet research efforts with those of the United States and the West. The number of Soviet professionals working in this field is roughly 10 times that in the United States. The Soviet Union has facilities for large-scale production of frequency standards and has concentrated its efforts on developing and producing rubidium gas cell devices (relatively compact, low-cost frequency standards of modest accuracy and stability) and atomic hydrogen masers (relatively large, high-cost standards of modest accuracy and high stability). 203 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. The socialisation of scientific and technological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, production of science and technology as well as science-society relationships started changing rapidly. Research is asked to be more effective, fast, accountable, trans-disciplinary, result-oriented, policy-driven and able to generate benefits for people and firms in the short and middle run. While a strong intensification of science-society relationships is occurring, an increasing number of actors and stakeholders are involved in research production. At the same time, pervasiveness of technology is rendering users an active part in technological development; economic and social interests on science and technology are growing on a global scale; new democratic and ethical issues emerge. Despite the European institutions’ efforts, all those trends and phenomena are occurring in an extremely fragmented way. In this scenario, a fairly balanced and consistent co-evolution between science and society can no longer be taken for granted. This is just the starting point of the following comment section that, through the Luciano d’Andrea, Sally Wyatt, Erik Aarden, Jos Lejten and Peter Sekloča’s writings, aims to analyse the different aspects and questions around the socialisation of science and technology’s matter.

  7. Research Overview on Wireless Power Transmission Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Li Tao; Wu Liheng; Chen Zheng

    2015-01-01

    According to the latest researches, this paper outlines the development of wireless power transmission and introduces the latest applications of wireless power transmission in life. To describe the wireless power transmission technologies in detail, the paper presents the short-range, medium-range and remote wireless power transmission, respectively. In addition, the paper also depicts some unique properties of wireless power transmission system to make readers understand WPT system better. A...

  8. Research in the Division of Pharmaceutical Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, H E

    1985-04-26

    Within the Center for Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences the release characteristics of drugs form the major research object of the Division of Pharmaceutical Technology. Transdermal systems are being developed that can supply a drug during several days. Irritation of the skin may be avoided by using hydrogels. To enable long-term transdermal application also the colloidal structure of creams and ointments is investigated. As most drugs are to be taken orally, however, a research project was also started to make cheap and easy to produce controlled release tablets. The results with a microporous polypropylene polymer are promising.

  9. [New technologies: support opportunities for network research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, A; Novalbos Ruiz, J P; Jiménez-Rodríguez, R; Jiménez-Rodríguez, A

    2012-11-01

    The consolidation of a support area for network research, which promotes collaborative research, training and the dissemination of knowledge through the use of ICTs, requires the organization of a work methodology to share and exchange resources in a specific network that is already running. The establishment of communication mechanisms between researchers from different groups will be necessary along with the introduction of the ICTs in the teaching and advanced environments of research training, different inventories of the research resources that are available for exchanges and shared use between groups and laboratories, and finally, a shared scientific documentation system with the appropriate maintenance of the previously listed tools. Large administrative structures and detailed plans are not needed to comply with all of the above functions. The availability of effective tools, however, to combine efforts and search for resources in all of these areas is needed, with the agility and flexibility that allow us to currently use new communication and information technologies. The results of this research support area should lead to an increase in the efficacy and quality of the network by increasing the flow of information and the inter-group collaboration in teaching, research and professional development, along with the transfer and dissemination of research results.

  10. Research and Practice in Green Chemical Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Yingwu

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry is also called environment harmless or environment friendly chemistry.Green chemistry requires to use new synthetic methods, engineering technologies and processes to eliminate or reduce by-products, wastes or products that harmful to human health, community safety,and ecology environment. Green chemistry pursues to control the usage of the harmful and toxic materials, reduce waste emission, avoid necessity to treat the wastes; Green Chemistry advocates wastes management from the beginning, improving the efficiency of atoms, optimizing the use of resources and energy, lowering the cost of production. Green Chemistry technologies are the ultimate path to the clean chemical production in the future.Insight Co. takes "hospital of enterprises" and "bank of technologies" as our characteristics in business, and deems the development and spread of green chemistry as our mission. We developed an unique business model which combines education, research and production. In the past 8 years,we had applied and obtained more than 30 patents and received more than ten national and provincial awards in technology progress.We had made great progress in the manufacturing of organophosphorus pesticides, especially the production of omethoate, methamidophos, paraquat and glycyrrhizinic phosphor, etc., which made a stable foundation for INSIGHT's development. We had also achieved great success in the high efficiency low toxic pesticides, such as imidacloprid, etofenprox, metalaxyl and in the new synthetic methods in various amino acids as well as in the pharmaceutical intermediates. The new method of preparation indigo using N-phenylglycinonitrile is an advanced process in the world in terms of the clean production technology for Ferro cyanide and HCN's transformation rate improvement. We solved the pollution problem of the old route. The newly developed substituted product for indigo using a clean production technology which greatly reduced the material consumption and

  11. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water

  12. INJECTION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH OF THE PROTECTIVE SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENEJLYUK A. I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. This article contains information about the methods and the planning principles used in experimental research study of the injection technology of impervious screen. Today, there are ways to create impervious screens and curtains solve soil protection issues in the field impermeable layer arrangement at a shallow depth. However, for Ukraine, in the burial sites of radiation and other wastes is urgent issue of protection of underground space in places with deep impermeable layer. Classical methods can not fully solve such problems. To solve them, you need to develop innovative technology to create such a screen, which will lie authentic sole object to be protected, at the project depth. For the experiments, it is necessary to choose the most important indicator, and technological factors affecting it. This is due to the fact that the proposed technology provides for lesser known technical solutions, the use of which should ultimately result in impervious screens with desired properties. Goal. The aim of this study is the selection of technological parameters of injection, design of experiments and the selection of indicators characterizing the efficient operation of the screen. Such constructs must first have almost zero permeability. In this paper, it was of interest to study the influence of process parameters on the filtration rate of the protective screen. Conclusion. As a result of the design of experiments, the basic technological factors that have a significant effect on the studied parameters. varying levels of these factors are also identified, which in turn makes it possible to determine the optimum process parameters creating a screen that meets all the desired properties and characteristics. Based on a series of experiments it is possible to obtain optimal formulations for different types of soils.

  13. Research and technology Fiscal Year 1985 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, F.

    1985-01-01

    A quarter of a century is but a moment on the cosmic calendar. Now that Marshall Space Flight Center has reached its 25th Anniversity, it seems just moments ago that President Dwight D. Eisenhower stood on these grounds and formally dedicated the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Fiscal Year 1985 Research and Technology Report reflects the wide spectrum of activities closely linked with the Center's mainstream spaceflight developments. Past accomplishments testify to the success of getting deeply involved in the science and technology of its projects - 32 Saturn launches, Pegasus, the Skylab missions, three High Energy Astronomy Observatory missions, the Apollo - Soyuz mission, and an accelerating schedule of successful Shuttle, Spacelab, and Shuttle payload missions. The Center continues to be involved in engineering development, scientific research, and technology. At the beginning of the second quarter century, the experience and dedication of the engineers and scientists, and the success of the collaboration with industry and academia will now be aimed at the next great endeavor, the Space Station.

  14. Qualitative Research Methods in Education and Educational Technology. Research Methods for Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    2008-01-01

    "Qualitative Research Methods in Education and Educational Technology" was written for students and scholars interested in exploring the many qualitative methods developed over the last 50 years in the social sciences. The book does not stop, however, at the boundaries of the social sciences. Social scientists now consume and use research methods…

  15. Life after National Science Foundation fellowships: The implications for a graduate student's professional endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarski, Kelly Josephine

    Each year, hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, participate as Fellows in National Science Foundation GK-12 Grants throughout the U.S. These Fellowships create opportunities for university students to improve their communication skills, teaching proficiencies, and team-building skills, in addition to expanding their interest in educational endeavors in their respective communities while pursuing their college degrees. STEP (Science and Technology Enhancement Project) is one such project. University faculty, public school teachers, and community leaders collaborated together in order to bring scientists into middle and secondary classrooms to focus on increasing student interest and proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills. Seventeen Fellows, in the previous four years, designed, developed, and implemented innovative, hands-on lessons in seven local schools. The evaluation team collected a tremendous amount of research evidence focused on the effect of the program on the Fellows while they were participants in the study, but there has been very little data collected about the Fellows after leaving the program. This research study, consisting of two-hour interviews, qualitatively explores how the skills learned while participating in the STEP program affected the Fellows' career and educational choices once leaving the project. This data was analyzed along with historical attitude surveys and yearly tracking documents to determine the effect that participation in the program had on their choices post-STEP. An extensive literature review has been conducted focusing on other GK-12 programs throughout the country, K-16 collaboration, Preparing Future Faculty Programs, as well as on teaching and learning literature. These bodies of literature provide the theoretical basis in which the research is framed in order to assess the impact on Fellow educational and professional choices since leaving the STEP program. This

  16. Accredited Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayac, Michael; Javandal, Mitra; Mulcahey, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of orthopaedic surgeons apply for sports medicine fellowships after residency completion. The Internet is one of the most important resources applicants use to obtain information about fellowship programs, with the program website serving as one of the most influential sources. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), San Francisco Match (SFM), and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) maintain databases of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs. A 2013 study evaluated the content and accessibility of the websites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships. Purpose: To reassess these websites based on the same parameters and compare the results with those of the study published in 2013 to determine whether any improvement has been made in fellowship website content or accessibility. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We reviewed all existing websites for the 95 accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM, SFM, and AANA databases. Accessibility of the websites was determined by performing a Google search for each program. A total of 89 sports fellowship websites were evaluated for overall content. Websites for the remaining 6 programs could not be identified, so they were not included in content assessment. Results: Of the 95 accredited sports medicine fellowships, 49 (52%) provided links in the AOSSM database, 89 (94%) in the SFM database, and 24 (25%) in the AANA database. Of the 89 websites, 89 (100%) provided a description of the program, 62 (70%) provided selection process information, and 40 (45%) provided a link to the SFM website. Two searches through Google were able to identify links to 88% and 92% of all accredited programs. Conclusion: The majority of accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs fail to utilize the Internet to its full potential as a resource to provide applicants with detailed information about the

  17. Research and technology operating plan summary: Fiscal year 1975 research and technology program. [space programs, energy technology, and aerospace sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are presented of Research and Technology Operating Plans currently in progress throughout NASA. Citations and abstracts of the operating plans are presented along with a subject index, technical monitor index, and responsible NASA organization index. Research programs presented include those carried out in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, Office of Energy Programs, Office of Applications, Office of Space Sciences, Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition, and the Office of Manned Space Flight.

  18. Different tracks for pathology informatics fellowship training: Experiences of and input from trainees in a large multisite fellowship program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce P Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology Informatics is a new field; a field that is still defining itself even as it begins the formalization, accreditation, and board certification process. At the same time, Pathology itself is changing in a variety of ways that impact informatics, including subspecialization and an increased use of data analysis. In this paper, we examine how these changes impact both the structure of Pathology Informatics fellowship programs and the fellows′ goals within those programs. Materials and Methods: As part of our regular program review process, the fellows evaluated the value and effectiveness of our existing fellowship tracks (Research Informatics, Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics, Clinical One-year Focused Informatics, and Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics. They compared their education, informatics background, and anticipated career paths and analyzed them for correlations between those parameters and the fellowship track chosen. All current and past fellows of the program were actively involved with the project. Results: Fellows′ anticipated career paths correlated very well with the specific tracks in the program. A small set of fellows (Clinical - one or two year - Focused Informatics tracks anticipated clinical careers primarily focused in informatics (Director of Informatics. The majority of the fellows, however, anticipated a career practicing in a Pathology subspecialty, using their informatics training to enhance that practice (Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics Track. Significantly, all fellows on this track reported they would not have considered a Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics track if it was the only track offered. The Research and the Clinical One-year Focused Informatics tracks each displayed unique value for different situations. Conclusions: It seems a "one size fits all" fellowship structure does not fit the needs of the majority of potential Pathology

  19. Biomedical and health informatics education and research at the Information Technology Institute in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, R; Khalifa, A

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, Egypt has experienced a revolution in the field of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) that has had a corresponding impact on the field of healthcare. Since 1993, the Information Technology Institute (ITI) has been leading the development of the Information Technology (IT) professional training and education in Egypt to produce top quality IT professionals who are considered now the backbone of the IT revolution in Egypt. For the past five years, ITI has been adopting the objective of building high caliber health professionals who can effectively serve the ever-growing information society. Academic links have been established with internationally renowned universities, e.g., Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) in US, University of Leipzig in Germany, in addition those with the Egyptian Fellowship Board in order to enrich ITI Medical Informatics Education and Research. The ITI Biomedical and Health Informatics (BMHI) education and training programs target fresh graduates as well as life-long learners. Therefore, the program's learning objectives are framed within the context of the four specialization tracks: Healthcare Management (HCM), Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR), Bioinformatics Professional (BIP), and Healthcare Professional (HCP). The ITI BMHI research projects tackle a wide-range of current challenges in this field, such as knowledge management in healthcare, providing tele-consultation services for diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases for underserved regions in Egypt, and exploring the cultural and educational aspects of Nanoinformatics. Since 2006, ITI has been positively contributing to develop the discipline of BMHI in Egypt in order to support improved healthcare services.

  20. Survey on Robot-Assisted Surgical Techniques Utilization in US Pediatric Surgery Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Ilan I; Shroyer, Michelle C; Yu, David C; Martin, Colin A; Chen, Mike K; Russell, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Robotic technology has transformed both practice and education in many adult surgical specialties; no standardized training guidelines in pediatric surgery currently exist. The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence of robotic procedures and extent of robotic surgery education in US pediatric surgery fellowships. A deidentified survey measured utilization of the robot, perception on the utility of the robot, and its incorporation in training among the program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) pediatric surgery fellowships in the United States. Forty-one of the 47 fellowship programs (87%) responded to the survey. While 67% of respondents indicated the presence of a robot in their facility, only 26% reported its utilizing in their surgical practice. Among programs not utilizing the robot, most common reasons provided were lack of clear supportive evidence, increased intraoperative time, and incompatibility of instrument size to pediatric patients. While 58% of program directors believe that there is a future role for robotic surgery in children, only 18% indicated that robotic training should play a part in pediatric surgery education. Consequently, while over 66% of survey respondents received training in robot-assisted surgical technique, only 29% of fellows receive robot-assisted training during their fellowship. A majority of fellowships have access to a robot, but few utilize the technology in their current practice or as part of training. Further investigation is required into both the technology's potential benefits in the pediatric population and its role in pediatric surgery training.

  1. Characteristics of pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M

    2009-03-01

    To explore the structure, components, and training goals of pediatric hospitalist fellowship programs in North America. We constructed a 17-item structured questionnaire to be administered by phone. Questionnaire items focused on documenting goals, training, requirements, and clinical duties of pediatric hospitalist training programs. From February through June 2007, research staff contacted directors of the programs. Responses were analyzed to determine program characteristics, including goals, formal training requirements, clinical rotations, and participation in hospital administrative activities. All 8 training programs completed the survey. There appear to be 2 distinct tracks for pediatric hospitalist training programs: clinical or academic specialization. Currently there are no standards or requirements for fellowship training from an external accrediting body and the curriculum for these programs is likely driven by service requirements and speculation on the needs of a future generation of pediatric hospitalists. The stated goals of the programs were quite similar. Seven reported that the provision of advanced training in the clinical care of hospitalized patients, quality improvement (QI), and hospital administration are central goals of their training program. Six reported training in the education of medical students and residents to be a primary goal, while 5 indicated training in health services research as a primary goal. Pediatric hospitalist fellowships are in the very early stages of their development. In time, greater structure across institutions will need to be put in place if they are to succeed in becoming a necessary prerequisite to the practice of hospital medicine. (c) 2009 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Technologies used for research in intelligent buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolková, Zuzana; Matušov, Jozef; Mokrý, Marián

    2016-06-01

    The efficient use of primary energy and their impact on the environment is influenced in several ways. The key is implementation of modern low-energy structures and technologies in building construction, the use of high energy sources such fossil fuels and renewable energy, the optimal management, appropriate choice of sources of heat and cold. Optimal control of energy consumption in buildings and premises may be an appropriate choice of sources of heat and cold. Energy sources should be in addition to high efficiency and meet the requirement of minimizing the emission load environment. All this can be achieved by implementing the construction of intelligent buildings. University of Žilina in the project Research Centre of the University of Žilina decided to build such building. Use of this building will be addressing many research activities at the university with links to industry.

  3. Biomedical engineering frontier research and converging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Ho-Wook; Shin, Jennifer; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with an integrative overview of the latest research and developments in the broad field of biomedical engineering. Each of the chapters offers a timely review written by leading biomedical engineers and aims at showing how the convergence of scientific and engineering fields with medicine has created a new basis for practically solving problems concerning human health, wellbeing and disease. While some of the latest frontiers of biomedicine, such as neuroscience and regenerative medicine, are becoming increasingly dependent on new ideas and tools from other disciplines, the paradigm shift caused by technological innovations in the fields of information science, nanotechnology, and robotics is opening new opportunities in healthcare, besides dramatically changing the ways we actually practice science. At the same time, a new generation of engineers, fluent in many different scientific “languages,” is creating entirely new fields of research that approach the “old” questions f...

  4. [Research progress on biochar carbon sequestration technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Xiang; Zheng, Hao; Li, Feng-Min; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2013-08-01

    Biochar is a fine-grained and porous material, which is produced by pyrolyzing biomass under anaerobic or oxygen-limiting condition. Due to the aromatic structure, it is resistant to the biotic and abiotic degradation which makes biochar production a promising carbon sequestration technology, and it has attracted widespread attention. Factors including biochar production, biochar stability in soil and the response of plant growth and soil organic carbon to the biochar addition can influence the carbon sequestration potential of biochar. Through exploring the mechanisms of biochar carbon sequestration, the influence of these factors was studied. Furthermore, the research progress of carbon sequestration potential and its economic viability were examined. Finally, aiming at the knowledge gaps in the influencing factors as well as the relationship between these factors, some further research needs were proposed for better application of biochar in China.

  5. the Cecil John Adams Travelling Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-09-14

    Sep 14, 1994 ... founded the Cecil John Adams Travelling Fellowship Trust in 1945. (photograph taken .... awards have been made to 137 people. ... Dr Alexander (Sandy) A. Brown. He and Dr T. .... think of a suitable means of achieving this.

  6. Blockchain technology for improving clinical research quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchoufi, Mehdi; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-07-19

    Reproducibility, data sharing, personal data privacy concerns and patient enrolment in clinical trials are huge medical challenges for contemporary clinical research. A new technology, Blockchain, may be a key to addressing these challenges and should draw the attention of the whole clinical research community.Blockchain brings the Internet to its definitive decentralisation goal. The core principle of Blockchain is that any service relying on trusted third parties can be built in a transparent, decentralised, secure "trustless" manner at the top of the Blockchain (in fact, there is trust, but it is hardcoded in the Blockchain protocol via a complex cryptographic algorithm). Therefore, users have a high degree of control over and autonomy and trust of the data and its integrity. Blockchain allows for reaching a substantial level of historicity and inviolability of data for the whole document flow in a clinical trial. Hence, it ensures traceability, prevents a posteriori reconstruction and allows for securely automating the clinical trial through what are called Smart Contracts. At the same time, the technology ensures fine-grained control of the data, its security and its shareable parameters, for a single patient or group of patients or clinical trial stakeholders.In this commentary article, we explore the core functionalities of Blockchain applied to clinical trials and we illustrate concretely its general principle in the context of consent to a trial protocol. Trying to figure out the potential impact of Blockchain implementations in the setting of clinical trials will shed new light on how modern clinical trial methods could evolve and benefit from Blockchain technologies in order to tackle the aforementioned challenges.

  7. Automation of Technology for Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Wietske; Veneman, Wouter J; Groenewoud, Arwin; Chen, Lanpeng; Tulotta, Claudia; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Spaink, Herman P; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos can be obtained for research purposes in large numbers at low cost and embryos develop externally in limited space, making them highly suitable for high-throughput cancer studies and drug screens. Non-invasive live imaging of various processes within the larvae is possible due to their transparency during development, and a multitude of available fluorescent transgenic reporter lines.To perform high-throughput studies, handling large amounts of embryos and larvae is required. With such high number of individuals, even minute tasks may become time-consuming and arduous. In this chapter, an overview is given of the developments in the automation of various steps of large scale zebrafish cancer research for discovering important cancer pathways and drugs for the treatment of human disease. The focus lies on various tools developed for cancer cell implantation, embryo handling and sorting, microfluidic systems for imaging and drug treatment, and image acquisition and analysis. Examples will be given of employment of these technologies within the fields of toxicology research and cancer research.

  8. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  9. Society News: Society appoints new Librarian; Read 'A&G' on phone or tablet; RAS Research Fellowships; Time to think about thesis prizes; Spread the word around the world; New editor for 'Monthly Notices'; Speakers for schools; Workshops a hit at IAU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    If you have a smartphone or a tablet, A&G needs your help! The RAS is seeking applicants for two postdoctoral Research Fellowships, to be held in UK institutions. The deadline for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston and Keith Runcorn Prizes is 31 January 2013, for PhD theses examined successfully during 2012. Are you an astronomer interested in supporting the developing world? Are you interested in visiting countries and regions that do not yet have strong astronomy research and education, and supporting astronomy in schools, at universities and for the public?

  10. Energy Technologies Research and Education Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemi, Abbas [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Ranade, Satish [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2014-12-31

    For this project, the intended goal of the microgrid component was to investigate issues in policy and technology that would drive higher penetration of renewable energy, and to demonstrate implementation in a utility system. The work accomplished on modeling the dynamics of photovoltaic (PV) penetration can be expanded for practical application. Using such a tool those involved in public policy can examine what the effect of a particular policy initiative, e.g., renewable portfolio standards (RPS) requirements, might be in terms of the desired targets. The work in the area of microgrid design, protection, and operation is fundamental to the development of microgrids. In particular the “Energy Delivery” paradigm provides new opportunities and business models for utilities. Ultimately, Energy Delivery could accrue significant benefits in terms of costs and resiliency. The experimental microgrid will support continued research and allow the demonstration of technology for better integration of renewables. The algal biofuels component of the project was developed to enhance the test facility and to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a commercial-scale geothermal algal biofuels operation for replication elsewhere in the arid Southwest. The project was housed at New Mexico State University’s (NMSU’s) Geothermal Aquaculture Facility (GAF) and a design for the inoculation train and algae grow-out process was developed. The facility was upgraded with modifications to existing electrical, plumbing and structural components on the GAF and surrounding grounds. The research work was conducted on biomass-processing, harvesting, dewatering, and extraction. Additionally, research was conducted to determine viability of using low-cost, wastewater from municipal treatment plants in the cultivation units as make-up water and as a source of nutrients, including nitrogen and soluble phosphorus. Data was collected on inputs and outputs, growth evaluation and

  11. 香港大学土木工程系香港赛马会滑坡防治研究及资讯中心招聘博士后研究助理%Research Fellowship The Jockey Club Research and Information Centre for Landslip Prevertion and Land Development Department of Civil Engineering The University of HongKong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@1.INTRODUCTION   The Jockey Club Research and Information Centre for Landslip Prevention and Land Development has been established with a generous donation from the Hong Kong Jockey Charities Trust, with a strong support from the Works Bureau and the Geotechnical Engineering Office of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. It forms and integral part of the Chief Executive's Community Projects initiative funded by the Hong Kong Club Charities Trust. One of the basic objectives of the Centre is to promote the professional service capacity of Hong Kong and Mainland China and gain world recognition in the area of slope safety and geotechnical engineering. According to this basic objective, the Centre has established this Research Fellowship Programme.

  12. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society-Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Amy L

    2016-05-01

    At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins) Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants' fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows). Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. In addition, some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago-a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging.

  13. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society–Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM, fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF, established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants’ fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows. Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. Some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago—a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging.

  14. "JEAB" at 50: Coevolution of Research and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence of how behavioral research and technology have evolved together abounds in the history of the "Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior" ("JEAB"). Technology from outside the discipline (exogenous) from such disciplines as electronics and computer science has been adapted for use in behavioral research. Technology from within the…

  15. "JEAB" at 50: Coevolution of Research and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence of how behavioral research and technology have evolved together abounds in the history of the "Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior" ("JEAB"). Technology from outside the discipline (exogenous) from such disciplines as electronics and computer science has been adapted for use in behavioral research. Technology from within the…

  16. Innovative Information Technology for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Qu, M.; Shih, F.; Denker, C.; Gerbessiotis, A.; Lofdahl, M.; Rees, D.; Keller, C.

    2004-05-01

    Solar activity is closely related to the near earth environment -- summarized descriptively as space weather. Changes in space weather have adverse effect on many aspects of life and systems on earth and in space. Real-time, high-quality data and data processing would be a key element to forecast space weather promptly and accurately. Recently, we obtained a funding from US National Science Foundation to apply innovative information technology for space weather prediction. (1) We use the technologies of image processing and pattern recognition, such as image morphology segmentation, Support Vector Machines (SVMs), and neural networks to detect and characterize three important solar activities in real-time: filament eruptions, flares, and emerging flux regions (EFRs). Combining the real time detection with the recent statistical study on the relationship among filament eruptions, flares, EFRs, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and geomagnetic storms, we are establishing real time report of solar events and automatic forecasting of earth directed CMEs and subsequent geomagnetic storms. (2) We combine state-of-art parallel computing techniques with phase diverse speckle imaging techniques, to yield near real-time diffraction limited images with a cadence of approximately 10 sec. We utilize the multiplicity of parallel paradigms to optimize the calculation of phase diverse speckle imaging to improve calculation speed. With such data, we can monitor flare producing active regions continuously and carry out targeted studies of the evolution and flows in flare producing active regions. (3) We are developing Web based software tools to post our processed data, events and forecasting in real time, and to be integrated with current solar activity and space weather prediction Web pages at BBSO. This will also be a part of Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) being developed by the solar physics community. This research is supported by NSF ITR program.

  17. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  18. Postharvest biology and technology research and development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... The applications of biological control agents in pre- and post- ... The evolution of new technologies continues to change ... advances in biotechnology, environment technologies, ..... genetic potential of these antagonists.

  19. Desert Research and Technology Studies 2005 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy J.; Kosmo, Joseph J.; Janoiko, Barbara A.; Bernard, Craig; Splawn, Keith; Eppler, Dean B.

    2006-01-01

    During the first two weeks of September 2005, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) Advanced Extravehicular Activity (AEVA) team led the field test portion of the 2005 Research and Technology Studies (RATS). The Desert RATS field test activity is the culmination of the various individual science and advanced engineering discipline areas year-long technology and operations development efforts into a coordinated field test demonstration under representative (analog) planetary surface terrain conditions. The purpose of the RATS is to drive out preliminary exploration concept of operations EVA system requirements by providing hands-on experience with simulated planetary surface exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware and procedures. The RATS activities also are of significant importance in helping to develop the necessary levels of technical skills and experience for the next generation of engineers, scientists, technicians, and astronauts who will be responsible for realizing the goals of the Constellation Program. The 2005 Desert RATS was the eighth RATS field test and was the most systems-oriented, integrated field test to date with participants from NASA field centers, the United States Geologic Survey (USGS), industry partners, and research institutes. Each week of the test, the 2005 RATS addressed specific sets of objectives. The first week focused on the performance of surface science astro-biological sampling operations, including planetary protection considerations and procedures. The second week supported evaluation of the Science, Crew, Operations, and Utility Testbed (SCOUT) proto-type rover and its sub-systems. Throughout the duration of the field test, the Communications, Avionics, and Infomatics pack (CAI-pack) was tested. This year the CAI-pack served to provide information on surface navigation, science sample collection procedures, and EVA timeline awareness. Additionally, 2005 was the first

  20. Exploring health information technology education: an analysis of the research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgona, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This article is an analysis of the Health Information Technology Education published research. The purpose of this study was to examine selected literature using variables such as journal frequency, keyword analysis, universities associated with the research and geographic diversity. The analysis presented in this paper has identified intellectually significant studies that have contributed to the development and accumulation of intellectual wealth of Health Information Technology. The keyword analysis suggests that Health Information Technology research has evolved from establishing concepts and domains of health information systems, technology and management to contemporary issues such as education, outsourcing, web services and security. The research findings have implications for educators, researchers, journal.

  1. Applied Health Technology – a New Research Discipline at Blekinge Institute of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Olander, Ewy; Nilsson, Lina

    2009-01-01

    Since spring 2008 is Applied Health Technology a new research discipline at Blekinge Institute of Technology. The discipline has been developed in collaboration between the School of Health Science and the School of Technology. In the general syllabus for third-cycle (doctoral research) studies in Applied Health Technology underlines the value of multidisciplinary as well as interdisciplinary research, focusing on how Caring and Nursing Sciences, Public Health Science and Clinical Medical Sci...

  2. Research of Home Information Technology Adoption Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ao Shan; Ren Weiyin; Lin Peishan; Tang Shoulian

    2008-01-01

    The Information Technology at Home has caught the attention of various industries such as IT, Home Appliances, Communication, and Real Estate. Based on the information technology acceptance theories and family consumption behaviors theories, this study summarized and analyzed four key belief variables i.e. Perceived Value, Perceived Risk, Perceived Cost and Perceived Ease of Use, which influence the acceptance of home information technology. The study also summaries three groups of external variables. They axe social, industrial, and family influence factors. The social influence factors include Subjective Norm; the industry factors include the Unification of Home Information Technological Standards, the Perfection of Home Information Industry Value Chain, and the Competitiveness of Home Information Industry; and the family factors include Family Income, Family Life Cycle and Family Educational Level. The study discusses the relationship among these external variables and cognitive variables. The study provides Home Information Technology Acceptance Model based on the Technology Acceptance Model and the characteristics of home information technology consumption.

  3. Qualities and characteristics of successfully matched North American HPB surgery fellowship candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erin H.; Dowden, Jacob E.; Cochran, Allyson R.; Iannitti, David A.; Kimchi, Eric T.; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F.; Jeyarajah, D. Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) fellowships in North America are difficult to secure with an acceptance rate of 1 in 3 applicants. Desirable characteristics in an HPB surgery applicant have not been previously reported. This study examines the perceptions of trainees and HPB program directors with regards to positive attributes in applicants for HPB fellowships. Methods Parallel surveys were distributed by email with a web-link to current and recent HPB fellows in North America (from the past 5 years) with questions addressing the following domains: surgical training, research experience, and mentorship. A similar survey was distributed to HPB fellowship program directors in North America requesting their opinion as to the importance of these characteristics in potential applicants. Results 32 of 60 of surveyed fellows and 21 of 38 of surveyed program directors responded between November 2014–February 2015. Fellows overall came from fairly diverse backgrounds (13/32 were overseas medical graduates) about one third of respondents having had some prior research experience. Program directors gave priority to the applicant's interview, curriculum vitae, and their recommendation letters (in order of importance). Both the surveyed fellows and program directors felt that the characteristics most important in a successful HPB fellowship candidate include interpersonal skills, perceived operative skills, and perceived fund of knowledge. Conclusion Results of this survey provide useful and practical information for trainees considering applying to an HPB fellowship program. PMID:27154813

  4. The Benjamin H. Kean Travel Fellowship in Tropical Medicine: Assessment of Impact at 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Aubri S; John, Chandy C

    2017-06-26

    The Benjamin H. Kean Fellowship in Tropical Medicine is an American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene initiative that provides medical students with funding for international clinical or research experiences lasting at least 1 month. Of the 175 Kean fellows from 1998 to 2013, 140 had current available e-mails, and 70 of the 140 (50%) responded to a survey about their fellowship experience. Alumni indicated that the Kean Fellowship had a high impact on their career plans with regard to preparation for (N = 65, 94.2%) and inspiration to pursue (N = 59, 88.1%) a career in tropical medicine and global health. Continued involvement in tropical medicine and global health was common: 52 alumni (74.3%) were currently working in tropical medicine or global health, 49 (71.0%) had done so in the interim between the Kean fellowship and their current position; and 17 of 19 Kean fellows (89.4%) who had completed all medical training and were now in professional practice continued to work in tropical medicine and global health. Alumni had been highly productive academically, publishing a total of 831 PubMed-indexed manuscripts, almost all on tropical medicine or global health topics, in the period between their fellowship year and 2013. Alumni reported strengths of the fellowship including funding, networking, and flexibility, and suggested that more networking and career mentoring would enhance the program. The Benjamin H. Kean fellowship program has been highly successful at inspiring and fostering ongoing work by trainees in tropical medicine and global health.

  5. Levitation Technology in International Space Station Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinart-Ramirez, Y.; Cooley, V. M.; Love, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique multidisciplinary orbiting laboratory for science and technology research, enabling discoveries that benefit life on Earth and exploration of the universe. ISS facilities for containerless sample processing in Materials Science experiments include levitation devices with specimen positioning control while reducing containment vessel contamination. For example, ESA's EML (ElectroMagnetic Levitator), is used for melting and solidification of conductive metals, alloys, or semiconductors in ultra-high vacuum, or in high-purity gaseous atmospheres. Sample heating and positioning are accomplished through electromagnetic fields generated by a coil system. EML applications cover investigation of solidification and microstructural formation, evaluation of thermophysical properties of highly reactive metals (whose properties can be very sensitive to contamination), and examination of undercooled liquid metals to understand metastable phase convection and influence convection on structural changes. MSL utilization includes development of novel light-weight, high-performance materials. Another facility, JAXA's ELF (Electrostatic Levitation Furnace), is used to perform high temperature melting while avoiding chemical reactions with crucibles by levitating a sample through Coulomb force. ELF is capable of measuring density, surface tension, and viscosity of samples at high temperatures. One of the initial ELF investigations, Interfacial Energy-1, is aimed at clarification of interfacial phenomena between molten steels and oxide melts with industrial applications in control processes for liquid mixing. In addition to these Materials Science facilities, other ISS investigations that involve levitation employ it for biological research. For example, NASA's "Magnetic 3D Culturing and Bioprinting" investigation uses magnetic levitation for three-dimensional culturing and positioning of magnetized cells to generate spheroid assemblies

  6. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chih Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to clarify the extension of Technology Acceptance Model. Besides, the application areas are elaborated including electronic service, mobile data service, self-service technology, electronic learning and so on. Finally, the article concluded the conclusions and future research direction.

  7. Concept-oriented research and development in information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    This book thoroughly analyzes the relationships between concept, technology, and market-which are the main factors in shifting information technology research and development (R&D) to a new approach. It discusses unconventional methods and viewpoints of concept creation, technology innovation, and market cultivation. Featuring contributions from international experts and case studies from IBM and Hitachi, this book is perfect for graduate students in information technology, engineering, technology management, operation research, and business-as well as for R&D researchers, directors, strategis

  8. Information technology research and development critical trends and issues

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    Information Technology Research and Development: Critical Trends and Issues is a report of the Office of Technology Assessment of the United States Government on the research and development in the area of information technology. The report discusses information technology research and development - its goals, nature, issues, and strategies; environment and its changes; the roles of the participants; and the health of its field. The book then goes on to four selected case studies in information technology: advanced computer architecture; fiber optic communications; software engineering; and ar

  9. Sequencing technologies for animal cell culture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremkow, Benjamin G; Lee, Kelvin H

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, 2nd and 3rd generation sequencing technologies have made the use of genomic sequencing within the animal cell culture community increasingly commonplace. Each technology's defining characteristics are unique, including the cost, time, sequence read length, daily throughput, and occurrence of sequence errors. Given each sequencing technology's intrinsic advantages and disadvantages, the optimal technology for a given experiment depends on the particular experiment's objective. This review discusses the current characteristics of six next-generation sequencing technologies, compares the differences between them, and characterizes their relevance to the animal cell culture community. These technologies are continually improving, as evidenced by the recent achievement of the field's benchmark goal: sequencing a human genome for less than $1,000.

  10. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  11. Double Fellowships in Radiology: A Survey of 2014 Graduating Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas Y; Moriarity, Andrew; Lall, Neil; Hoffmann, Jason C; Katz, Douglas S; Flug, Jonathan A

    Radiology fellowship training has evolved from being an uncommon option to being a near requisite for post-training employment in the United States. A subset of fellows elect to pursue second fellowships with potentially substantial implications on both the private sector and academic radiology workforce. The purpose of this study was to assess the proportion of current radiology fellows pursuing multiple years of post-residency fellowship training. After obtaining IRB approval, an anonymous web-based survey was emailed to 1,269 radiology fellows listed as "completing fellowship" in the American College of Radiology database in June 2014. Questions were asked regarding current fellowship training, post-fellowship employment plans, and individual experience pursuing employment. Results were analyzed using the survey analytical software. There were 219 responses received, representing a 17.3% response rate. Ten-percent of respondents were currently completing their second radiology fellowship. Of those completing their first year of fellowship training, 11% indicated plans to complete a second radiology fellowship. This survey provides a snapshot of the percentage of radiology trainees who pursue a second year of fellowship training, currently in the range of 10%. Pursuing a second radiology fellowship may represent a safety net to a substantial subset of fellows who are not able to obtain satisfactory employment following training. Academic programs who rely heavily on fellows should be aware of the proportion of fellows pursuing two fellowships and should be prepared to adapt should this change over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 22 CFR 196.1 - What is the Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Fellowship Program? 196.1 Section 196.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.1 What is the Fellowship Program? The...

  13. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Report for 1971-1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    This document presents the annual report for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation for 1971-72. Included in the report are a listing of the Board of Trustees; a listing of the officers and staff of the Foundation; descriptions of the First Year Fellowship Program, the Dissertation Fellowships, the Internship Programs, the Martin Luther…

  14. Scientific Research and Technological Innovation: The Brazilian Approach to Biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nara Azevedo; Luiz Otavio Ferreira; Simone Petraglia Kropf; Wanda Susana Hamilton

    2002-01-01

    .... The research shows that the lag between scientific capability and technological development at FIOCRUZ resulted from the institutional dynamic related to its process of reconstruction beginning in...

  15. Research Development of MOX Fuel Element Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Qi-fa; YANG; Ting-gui; SHANG; Gai-bin; YIN; Bang-yue; ZHOU; Guo-liang; LI; Qiang; JIANG; Bao-jun

    2015-01-01

    The project of"MOX Fuel Element Research"led by China Institute of Atomic Energy,404Company Ltd.and CNPE Zhengzhou Branch are members of the project research team.The research task of 2015had been accomplished successfully,and the research productions of this year build up a basis for the future research,also

  16. Measuring Research on County Agricultural Technological Innovation Ability Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Taking the mechanism of technological construction guidance theory and mode which consists of "objective-construction-evaluation-construction-objective" as a starting point, on the basis of county agricultural technological innovation ability and its index definition, this paper researches the constructing system of county agricultural technological innovation ability. Firstly, on the basis of defining county agricultural technological innovation ability and the definition of index, according to the principle of purposefulness, scientificity, systematicness, integration of dynamic state and static state, integration of quantitativeness and qualitativeness and so on, we construct the multi-level measuring system of county agricultural technological innovation ability, including 4 first-level indices, namely technological innovation environment, technological innovation basis, technological innovation ability, and technological innovation efficiency; 15 second-level indices, such as technological policy, technological system mechanism, technological institution construction, ability of innovation subject, ability of industrial expansion, scale merit, technological contribution rate. Moreover, this system has 45 third-level indices. Then, by using unascertained mathematics method and AHM method, we establish the multi-level unascertained composite measuring model of county agricultural technological innovation ability index. Finally, by using the survey data of one county in Hebei Province, and the established county agricultural technological innovation ability index model, we get the county agricultural technological innovation ability index of 0.711 by calculation, that is, the innovation ability is at the intermediate level, namely the modern agricultural sub-stage. The empirical research proves the correctness and applicability of this model.

  17. Technology and Meteorology. An Action Research Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Raymond F.

    Meteorology, the science of weather and weather conditions, has traditionally been taught via textbook and rote demonstration. This study was intended to determine to what degree utilizing technology in the study of meteorology improves students' attitudes towards science and to measure to what extent technology in meteorology increases…

  18. Trends and Research Issues in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    If one looks back at the last 50 years or so at educational technologies, one will notice several things. First, the pace of innovation has increased dramatically with many developments in the application of digital technologies to learning and instruction, following by a few years developments in the sciences and engineering disciplines that are…

  19. Teacher Researchers: Technology and Ethical Considerations while Conducting an Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Altinay Aksal, Fahriye; Altinay Gazi, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    The research study stimulates critical approach to research and practice, with an increasing emphasis on ethics and ethical decision making of the teacher researchers within action research process by using technology in its process. The study investigates the impact of technology within the action research, ethical considerations and dilemmas…

  20. Quality and Characteristics of Recent Research in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott D.; Daugherty, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    The focus of research in technology education has evolved throughout its history as the field changed from industrial arts to technology education (Spencer & Rogers, 2006). With the move to technology education, the field has begun to broaden its focus to better understand the teaching, learning, curriculum, and policy implications of preparing…

  1. Research and technology: Fiscal year 1984 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered include extraterrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, astronomy, solar physics, atmospheres, oceans, terrestrial physics, space technology, sensors, techniques, user space data systems, space communications and navigation, and system and software engineering.

  2. American diagnostic radiology residency and fellowship programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumack, Carol Masters

    2011-03-01

    American Diagnostic Radiology Residency and Fellowship programmes are Graduate Medical Education programmes in the United States (US) equivalent to the Postgraduate Medical Education programmes in Singapore. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited diagnostic radiology residency programmes require 5 years total with Post Graduate Year (PGY) 1 year internship in a clinical specialty, e.g. Internal Medicine following medical school. PGY Years 2 to 5 are the core years which must include Radiology Physics, Radiation Biology and rotations in 9 required subspecialty rotations: Abdominal, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Musculoskeletal, Neuroradiology, Nuclear and Paediatric Radiology, Obstetric & Vascular Ultrasound and Vascular Interventional Radiology. A core curriculum of lectures must be organised by the required 9 core subspecialty faculty. All residents (PGY 2 to 4) take a yearly American College of Radiology Diagnostic In-Training Examination based on national benchmarks of medical knowledge in each subspecialty. Because the American Board of Radiology (ABR) examinations are changing, until 2012, residents have to take 3 ABR examinations: (i) ABR physics examination in the PGY 2 to 3 years, (ii) a written examination at the start of the PGY 5 year and (iii) an oral exam at the end of the PGY 5 year. Beginning in 2013, there will be only 2 examinations: (i) the physics and written examinations after PGY 4 will become a combined core radiology examination. Beginning in 2015, the final certifying examination will be given 15 months after the completion of residency. After residency, ACGME fellowships in PGY 6 are all one-year optional programmes which focus on only one subspecialty discipline. There are 4 ACGME accredited fellowships which have a Board Certifi cation Examination: Neuroradiology, Nuclear, Paediatric and Vascular Interventional Radiology. Some ACGME fellowships do not have a certifying examination: Abdominal, Endovascular

  3. Interviewing Objects: Including Educational Technologies as Qualitative Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Thompson, Terrie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article argues the importance of including significant technologies-in-use as key qualitative research participants when studying today's digitally enhanced learning environments. We gather a set of eight heuristics to assist qualitative researchers in "interviewing" technologies-in-use (or other relevant objects), drawing on concrete…

  4. Interviewing Objects: Including Educational Technologies as Qualitative Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Thompson, Terrie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article argues the importance of including significant technologies-in-use as key qualitative research participants when studying today's digitally enhanced learning environments. We gather a set of eight heuristics to assist qualitative researchers in "interviewing" technologies-in-use (or other relevant objects), drawing on concrete…

  5. Research Needs for Technology Education: An International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.; Martin, Gene

    2013-01-01

    These authors report the findings of a study that sought to determine the most relevant research issues needed to be studied by the technology education profession. It used an international panel of experts to develop a list of important research issues for the school subject of technology education and for the preparation of teachers to better…

  6. Attaining interprofessional competencies through a student interprofessional fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Amy; Mitcham, Maralynne; Koutalos, Yiannis; Howell, David; Leaphart, Amy

    2015-05-01

    For students interested in enriching their interprofessional competencies beyond those required and offered by their academic programs, an elective interprofessional education fellowship can serve that need. We designed a fellowship for students linking a conceptual framework grounded in adult learning principles. During the fellowship, students progress through three levels of learning as they acquire, apply, and demonstrate interprofessional collaborative knowledge and skills; fellowship activities are self-directed. A content analysis of students' fellowship summary reports sought to determine the effectiveness of the fellowship as a learning experience to acquire interprofessional collaborative competences. Results indicated that students most consistently report competencies associated with acquisition of values and ethics for interprofessional practice, roles/responsibilities, and teams/teamwork; interprofessional communication was implied. All students expressed commitment to interprofessional collaborative behavior when in practice. Based on the results from this study, this fellowship structure may serve as a model for other institutions to adapt and implement for best practice and best fit.

  7. Increasingly mobile: How new technologies can enhance qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Carrie Ann; Derr, Amelia Seraphia; Lindhorst, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Advances in technology, such as the growth of smart phones, tablet computing, and improved access to the internet have resulted in many new tools and applications designed to increase efficiency and improve workflow. Some of these tools will assist scholars using qualitative methods with their research processes. We describe emerging technologies for use in data collection, analysis, and dissemination that each offer enhancements to existing research processes. Suggestions for keeping pace with the ever-evolving technological landscape are also offered.

  8. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Chih Chen; Shing-Han Li; Chien-Yi Li

    2011-01-01

    Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to ...

  9. Academic Productivity of Faculty Associated With Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Ricci, Joseph A; Silvestre, Jason; Ho, Olivia A; Ganor, Oren; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-03-29

    The H-index is increasingly being used as a measure of academic productivity and has been applied to various surgical disciplines. Here the authors calculate the H-index of craniofacial surgery fellowship faculty in North America in order to determine its utility for academic productivity among craniofacial surgeons. A list of fellowship programs was obtained from the website of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery. Faculty demographics and institution characteristics were obtained from official program websites and the H-index was calculated using Scopus (Elsevier, USA). Data were assessed using bivariate analysis tools (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests) to determine the relationship between independent variables and career publications, H-index and 5-year H-index (H5-index) of faculty. Dunn test for multiple comparisons was also calculated. A total of 102 faculty members from 29 craniofacial surgery fellowship programs were identified and included. Faculty demographics reflected a median age of 48 (interquartile range [IQR] 13), a predominantly male sample (88/102, 89.7%), and the rank of assistant professor being the most common among faculty members (41/102, 40.2%). Median of career publications per faculty was 37 (IQR 52.5) and medians of H-index and H5-index were 10.0 (IQR 13.75) and 3.5 (IQR 3.25), respectively. Greater age, male gender, Fellow of the American College of Surgeons membership, higher academic rank, and program affiliation with ranked research medical schools were significantly associated with higher H-indices. Variables associated with seniority were positively associated with the H-index. These results suggest that the H-index may be used as an adjunct in determining academic productivity for promotions among craniofacial surgeons.

  10. Mixed Methodology Research Design in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Muthu

    2007-01-01

    In recent times many educational researchers have moved away from the traditional purist approach of strictly adopting either a qualitative or quantitative approach to conducting research. Instead they have attempted an eclectic mix of both methods in their research inquiry, combining aspects of both the traditions at various stages of their…

  11. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  12. Mixed Methodology Research Design in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Muthu

    2007-01-01

    In recent times many educational researchers have moved away from the traditional purist approach of strictly adopting either a qualitative or quantitative approach to conducting research. Instead they have attempted an eclectic mix of both methods in their research inquiry, combining aspects of both the traditions at various stages of their…

  13. Attributes of successfully matched versus unmatched obstetrics and gynecology fellowship applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Imran J; Sareen, Pratibha; Shoup, Brenda; Muffly, Tyler

    2014-06-01

    We sought to determine the attributes of successful and unsuccessful fellowship applicants of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology Inc (ABOG)-approved fellowship programs and to identify salient differences between subspecialty applicants. Anonymous questionnaires were completed by obstetrics and gynecology fellowship applicants using a web-based survey after match day of 2012. Fellowship applicant practices were evaluated and included importance of prematch preparations, interview process, networking practices, and postmatch reflections. A total of 327 fellowship applicants applying to programs accredited by the ABOG were surveyed, and 200 completed the survey (61% response rate). A comparison between prematch educational preparations pursued by applicants showed that matched applicants were more likely to come from allopathic medical schools (94%), attain membership in Alpha Omega Alpha and/or Phi Beta Kappa (27%), and receive a letter of recommendation from a nationally known subspecialist (77%) than unmatched applicants (P = .03, .005, and .007, respectively). Applicants to reproductive endocrinology and infertility were more likely than female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery to be members of academic honor societies (P = .008). Research publication was common among matched subspecialist applicants, with over half publishing 1-3 peer-reviewed manuscripts prior to matching. Applicants to gynecologic oncology did more visiting electives than any other specialty applicants (P obstetrics and gynecology fellowship applicants have superior prematch preparations, strong letters of recommendation from leaders in their field of interest, and multiple research publications. These data will guide applicants to a critical self-analysis before deciding to apply. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pseudoscience in Instructional Technology: The Case of Learner Control Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas C.

    Scientific research that is conducted without the structure of a supporting scientific paradigm should be labeled pseudoscience in that such research is deceptive or false science. It is argued that much of the research in educational technology is pseudoscience, with the focus on learner control research. Learner control is the design feature of…

  15. Technology Estimating: A Process to Determine the Cost and Schedule of Space Technology Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stuart K.; Reeves, John D.; Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Greenberg, Marc; Comstock, Doug; Olds, John R.; Wallace, Jon; DePasquale, Dominic; Schaffer, Mark

    2013-01-01

    NASA is investing in new technologies that include 14 primary technology roadmap areas, and aeronautics. Understanding the cost for research and development of these technologies and the time it takes to increase the maturity of the technology is important to the support of the ongoing and future NASA missions. Overall, technology estimating may help provide guidance to technology investment strategies to help improve evaluation of technology affordability, and aid in decision support. The research provides a summary of the framework development of a Technology Estimating process where four technology roadmap areas were selected to be studied. The framework includes definition of terms, discussion for narrowing the focus from 14 NASA Technology Roadmap areas to four, and further refinement to include technologies, TRL range of 2 to 6. Included in this paper is a discussion to address the evaluation of 20 unique technology parameters that were initially identified, evaluated and then subsequently reduced for use in characterizing these technologies. A discussion of data acquisition effort and criteria established for data quality are provided. The findings obtained during the research included gaps identified, and a description of a spreadsheet-based estimating tool initiated as a part of the Technology Estimating process.

  16. Emergent Technologies in Mixed and Multimethod Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Choenni; I.J. Mulder; N. Stembert; L. Remijn

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the developments and potentials of mobile technologies and their major impact on society and the daily activities of individuals. The increase of sensors embedded in everyday objects enable these objects to sense the environment and communicate. This creates new

  17. Identifying Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is defined as communication and collaboration across academic disciplines. The instructional technology (IT) field has claimed to have an interdisciplinary nature influenced by neighboring fields such as psychology, communication, and management. However, it has been difficult to find outstanding evidence of the field's…

  18. The Technological Paradigm of Psychological Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Steinar

    1973-01-01

    The experiment in physics has often been pictured as an ideal for the less mature social sciences, especially by positivist philosophy of science. The thesis to be presented here is that the physical experiment as a paradigm for psychology is merely a pretext, a smoke-screen for a more fundamental and concealed technological paradigm for the study…

  19. Identifying Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is defined as communication and collaboration across academic disciplines. The instructional technology (IT) field has claimed to have an interdisciplinary nature influenced by neighboring fields such as psychology, communication, and management. However, it has been difficult to find outstanding evidence of the field's…

  20. The Technological Paradigm of Psychological Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Steinar

    1973-01-01

    The experiment in physics has often been pictured as an ideal for the less mature social sciences, especially by positivist philosophy of science. The thesis to be presented here is that the physical experiment as a paradigm for psychology is merely a pretext, a smoke-screen for a more fundamental and concealed technological paradigm for the study…

  1. Funding the Technology of a Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom-Blonigen, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Using the central information technology unit (CITU) on the North Dakota State University (NDSU) campus, this project triangulated two independent studies in an effort to converge data findings. The studies were conducted in an effort to determine whether CITU's budget constraints were known to its stakeholders and how the extended use of the…

  2. Defining a core curriculum for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Clarke, Samuel; Jordan, Jaime; Guth, Todd; Santen, Sally A; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    A trained cadre of medical education scholars with a focus on methodologically sound research techniques is needed to ensure development of innovations that can be translated to educational practice, rigorous evaluation of instructional strategies, and progress toward improving patient care outcomes. Most established educational programs are aimed at existing faculty members and focus primarily on the development of teaching and leadership skills. At the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success," a breakout session was convened to develop training recommendations for postgraduate fellowship programs in medical education scholarship that would enable residency graduates to join academic faculties armed with the skills needed to perform research in medical education. Additionally, these graduates would enjoy the benefits of established mentorships. A group of 23 medical education experts collaborated to address the following objectives: 1) construct a formal needs assessment for fellowship training in medical education scholarship in emergency medicine (EM), 2) compare and contrast current education scholarship programs in both EM and non-EM specialties, and 3) develop a set of core curriculum guidelines for specialized fellowship training in medical education scholarship in EM. Fellowship-trained faculty need to be proficient in learner instruction and assessment, organizational leadership, curriculum development, educational methodology, and conducting generalizable hypothesis-driven research to improve patient care.

  3. The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation: Providing Teachers with Opportunities for Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation sponsors rigorous summer residential institutes in math and science that reinvigorate secondary teachers and encourage lifelong learning. Laboratory and field experiences that model student-centered approaches allow teachers to develop strong content knowledge and research skills. Participants…

  4. 34 CFR 657.3 - Who is eligible to receive a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... student— (a)(1) Is a citizen or national of the United States; or (2) Is a permanent resident of the... allocation of fellowships; and (2) In a program that combines modern foreign language training with— (i) Area or international studies; or (ii) Research and training in the international aspects of...

  5. Graduate Student Fellowship Program Effects on Attitude and Interest toward Science of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, James R.; Rayfield, John; Briers, Gary; Johnson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of a graduate student fellowship program on middle school students' attitude toward science and their interest in science. Using a descriptive and correlational research design, data were collected from 588 middle school students (grades 6, 7, and 8). Participants completed a pretest and a…

  6. Local and national impact of aerospace research and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of work at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the areas of aeronautics space, and energy is presented. Local and national impact of the work is discussed. Some aspects of the U.S. research and technology base, the aerospace industry, and foreign competition are discussed. In conclusion, U.S. research and technology programs are cited as vital to U.S. economic health.

  7. Learning Practice and Technology: Extending the Structurational Practice Lens to Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Scholars in the field of educational technology have been calling for robust use of social theory within learning technology research. In view of that, interest has been noted in applying Giddens' structuration theory to the understanding of human interaction with technology in learning settings. However, only few such attempts have been published…

  8. Technology transfer of winder ropes research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available on these "privately" sponsored investigations were made available to the research effort. By the year 2000, more than 100 research reports had been produced. These reports either had some bearing on the new rope load factors that were included in the regulations...

  9. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Martin Aerodynamics, and ZONA Technology worked with collaborators from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop the MEDFFAT...be used on either the wet side (for live fire evaluations) or the dry side (for vehicle and other non-fire-related evaluations). The entire mockup is...devices in common aluminum foil by using inexpensive wet chemical processing. For more information contact publicaffairs@afosr.afmil ° (703)696-7797 U

  10. Research of application mode for FTTX technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Yun, Xiang; Huang, Wei

    2009-08-01

    With rapid development of Internet and broadband access network, the technologies of xDSL, FTTx+LAN, WLAN have more applications, new network service emerges in endless stream, especially the increase of network game, meeting TV, video on demand, etc. FTTH supports all present and future service with enormous bandwidth, including traditional telecommunication service, traditional data service and traditional TV service, and the future digital TV and VOD. With huge bandwidth of FTTH, it wins the final solution of broadband network, becomes the final goal of development of optical access network. In this paper, technique theory of EPON is introduced at first. At the same time, MAC frame structure, automatic detection and ranging of MPCP, DBA,and multi-LLID of EPON is analyzed. Then, service development ability, cost advantage and maintenance superiority based on EPON technology are carried out. At last,with Cost comparison between FTTH / FTTB building model and the traditional model, FTTB + LAN mode which is suitable for the newadding residential users in general areas and FTTN + DSL mode which is suitable for the old city and rural access network transformation are built up in detail. And FTTN + DSL project of rural information in rural areas and FTTH broadband HOUSE project on service solutions program are analyzed. comparing to the traditional access technologies, EPON technology has the obvious advantages, such as distance transmission, high or wide band, saving line resources, service abilities, etc. These are the qualities which not only be served for home users, but solve more access problems for us effectively.

  11. Challenges in industrial fermentation technology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Nørregaard, Anders; Bolic, Andrijana;

    2014-01-01

    Industrial fermentation processes are increasingly popular, and are considered an important technological asset for reducing our dependence on chemicals and products produced from fossil fuels. However, despite their increasing popularity, fermentation processes have not yet reached the same...... engineering challenges: scaling up and scaling down fermentation processes, the influence of morphology on broth rheology and mass transfer, and establishing novel sensors to measure and control insightful process parameters. The greatest emphasis is on the challenges posed by filamentous fungi, because...

  12. Small Hydropower Research and Development Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackmore, Mo [Near Space Systems, Inc.

    2013-12-06

    The objective of this work was to investigate, develop, and validate the next generation of small hydroturbine generator designs that maximize the energy transfer from flowing water to electrical power generation. What resulted from this effort was the design of a new technology hydroturbine that Near Space Systems (NSS) has named the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine. Using a design that eliminates nearly all of the shortfalls of conventional hydroturbines, the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine employs a new mechanical-to-electrical energy transfer hydro design that operates without lubrication of any kind, and does not introduce foreign chemicals or particulate matter from oil or drive shaft seal degradation into the hydro ecology. In its unique configuration, the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine is nearly environmentally inert, without the negative aspects caused by interrupting the ecological continuity, i.e., disruptions to sedimentation, water quality, habitat changes, human displacement, fish migration, etc., - while it ensures dramatically reduced timeframes to project completion. While a remarkable reduction in LCOE resulting from application of the Star*Stream© Hydroturbine technology has been the core achievement of the this effort, there have been numerous technological breakthroughs from the development effort.

  13. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, GLOBALIZATION THROUGH RESEARCH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhu Lovedeep singh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Globalization of science and technology is an integral aspect of globalization per se. The main engine of globalization is assumed to be the global economy propelled by global trade and technology transfers, the latter as aspects of globalization of science and technology. International trade and technology transfers are the engines that drive global economy. Much has been written on these drivers but relatively little on what drives globalization of science and technology which constitutes the backbone of international technology transfers. I attempt to fill this knowledge gap by suggesting that the drivers behind globalization of science and technology are the emerging global centers of collaborative research and development (R&D. “Science” throughout this article means both science and technology as the two closely related aspects of the same knowledge system.

  14. Creating a Cadre of Fellowship-Trained Medical Educators, Part II: A Formal Needs Assessment to Structure Postgraduate Fellowships in Medical Education Scholarship and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Yarris, Lalena M; Santen, Sally A; Guth, Todd A; Rougas, Steven; Runde, Daniel P; Coates, Wendy C

    2017-08-01

    Education leaders at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on education research proposed that dedicated postgraduate education scholarship fellowships (ESFs) might provide an effective model for developing future faculty as scholars. A formal needs assessment was performed to understand the training gap and inform the development of ESFs. A mixed-methods needs assessment was conducted of four emergency medicine national stakeholder groups in 2013: department chairs; faculty education/research leaders; existing education fellowship directors; and current education fellows/graduates. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data. Qualitative data from semistructured interviews and free-text responses were analyzed using a thematic approach. Participants were 11/15 (73%) education fellowship directors, 13/20 (65%) fellows/graduates, 106/239 (44%) faculty education/research leaders, and a convenience sample of 26 department chairs. Department chairs expected new education faculty to design didactics (85%) and teach clinically (96%). Faculty education/research leaders thought new faculty were inadequately prepared for job tasks (83.7%) and that ESFs would improve the overall quality of education research (91.1%). Fellowship directors noted that ESFs provide skills, mentorship, and protected time for graduates to become productive academicians. Current fellows/graduates reported pursing an ESF to develop skills in teaching and research methodology. Stakeholder groups uniformly perceived a need for training in education theory, clinical teaching, and education research. These findings support dedicated, deliberate training in these areas. Establishment of a structure for scholarly pursuits prior to assuming a full-time position will effectively prepare new faculty. These findings may inform the development, implementation, and curricula of ESFs.

  15. The Factors Affecting Definition of Research Problems in Educational Technology Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçekapili, Ekrem; Bahçekapili, Tugba; Fis Erümit, Semra; Göktas, Yüksel; Sözbilir, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Research problems in a scientific research are formed after a certain process. This process starts with defining a research topic and transforms into a specific research problem or hypothesis. The aim of this study was to examine the way educational technology researchers identify their research problems. To this end, sources that educational…

  16. Technology under Planetary Protection Research (PPR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PPR supports research to improve NASA's understanding of the potential for both forward and backward contamination, how to minimize it, and to set standards in these...

  17. Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rejected manuscript will not be returned to the authors. Submission of a manuscript signifies acceptance of journal's guidelines for authors. ... including the purpose, methods, Results, and conclusions of the research described in the paper.

  18. Research of Aerophysics Institute for Strategic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report contains a description of the technical problem areas and accomplishments achieved during the reporting period. The research projects are in the general subject areas of fluid dynamics, flow diagnostics, and laser development .

  19. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Aerospace Research and Development (AOARD) and from the Office of Naval Research-Global (ONRG), AFRL’s Dr. Kevin Kwiat worked with Professor...machined titanium (Ti) doubler to the surface of a C-130’s main wing plank , with positive results. The Ti doubler repair process uses a heat...thus greatly improved—bond-line. Having just undergone its first-ever operational implementation—in the depot repair of the C-130 wing plank —the

  20. Research in space commercialization, technology transfer, and communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Research and internship programs in technology transfer, space commercialization, and information and communications policy are described. The intern's activities are reviewed. On-campus research involved work on the costs of conventional telephone technology in rural areas, an investigation of the lag between the start of a research and development project and the development of new technology, using NASA patent and patent waiver data, studies of the financial impact and economic prospects of a space operation center, a study of the accuracy of expert forecasts of uncertain quantities and a report on frequency coordination in the fixed and fixed satellite services at 4 and 6 GHz.

  1. Research in Technology Education: Looking Back to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. John

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the focus of the research that has recently taken place in Technology Education, and from that basis suggest a trajectory for future research trends. Some research that is considered particularly seminal to the profession is summarised, and the paper is concluded with some reflections about personal research…

  2. Research Needs for Technology Education: A U.S. Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gene; Ritz, John

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of identifying research needs for technology education by generating a rank-ordered list of research topics that the profession's members might wish to explore individually or in collaboration with colleagues and students. The researchers' goal was to provide a concise list of topics that could be used by…

  3. Organisational and Technological Skills: The Overlooked Dimension of Research Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Renata; Fisher, Kath; Ellis, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Over the last three decades new technologies have emerged that have the capacity to considerably streamline the research and publication process and enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of research. This paper argues that to achieve high quality research training in the context of today's government and industry priorities, there must be a…

  4. Design Based Research Methodology for Teaching with Technology in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetnikoff, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Design based research (DBR) is an appropriate method for small scale educational research projects involving collaboration between teachers, students and researchers. It is particularly useful in collaborative projects where an intervention is implemented and evaluated in a grounded context. The intervention can be technological, or a new program…

  5. GPS Technology and Human Psychological Research: A Methodological Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro S. A. Wolf

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal behaviorists have made extensive use of GPS technology since 1991. In contrast, psychological research has made little use of the technology, even though the technology is relatively inexpensive, familiar, and widespread. Hence, its potential for pure and applied psychological research remains untapped. We describe three methods psychologists could apply to individual differences research, clinical research, or spatial use research. In the context of individual differences research, GPS technology permits us to test hypotheses predicting specific relations among patterns of spatial use and individual differences variables. In a clinical context, GPS technology provides outcome measures that may relate to the outcome of interventions designed to treat psychological disorders that, for example, may leave a person homebound (e.g. Agoraphobia, PTSD, TBI. Finally, GPS technology provides natural measures of spatial use. We, for example, used GPS technology to quantify traffic flow and exhibit use at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum. Interested parties could easily extend this methodology some aspects of urban planning or business usage.DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v1i1.74

  6. Science Communication Fellowship Program at the Pacific Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, E. M.; Vukajlovich, D.; Fitzwater, S.; Selvakumar, M.

    2011-12-01

    With funding from an NSF Informal Science Education grant, the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington began the Science Communication Fellowship program in 2009 as part of the Portal to the Public initiative. The purpose of the Science Communication Fellowship program is to train scientists and engineers to communicate more effectively with the general public regarding their research and to assist with the development of hands-on activities that can be used by the scientists and engineers for outreach activities. The program came out of a collaboration to develop a model for effectively communicating current science research at informal science education organizations. The program model has undergone in-depth research and evaluation to assess its effectiveness and impact. To become Science Communication Fellows, researchers participate in four three-hour professional development sessions, where they learn communication techniques through role-playing and hands-on activities. The workshops are supplemented with additional one-on-one meetings with Science Center staff to help the new Fellows develop activities for use at outreach events. These activities are then used by the Fellows at public events that highlight current research taking place in the region. To date over 80 scientists and engineers have gone through the training sessions to become Science Communication Fellows. The Pacific Science Center holds approximately 12 events a year in which Fellows can facilitate their activity. Public programs range from small, monthly programs to large, annual Research Weekends. Funding for this program continues through support from NIH, IMLS, NSF, and NASA grants. For more information, please contact the current program administrator Dana Vukajlovich at DVukajlovich@pacsci.org.

  7. Intake technologies: Research status: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGroddy, P.M.; Matousek, J.A.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes recent research activities related to fish protection at water intake structures, with particular emphasis on research reported on or conducted at pumped cooling-water intakes. Information gathered from 51 organizations (33 utilities, seven equipment manufacturers, six research organizations, two private engineering firms, one steel mill, and two government agencies) is provided along with specific summaries of EPRI-sponsored research on behavioral barriers at pumped and hydroelectric facilities. The level of research activity indicted by utilities at pumped intakes has decreased recently, although the interest in potential plant operational impact mitigative techniques remains high. Two studies sponsored by EPRI at pumped cooling-water intake structures evaluated the individual and combined deterrent capabilities of three devices: an air bubble curtain, pneumatic guns, and underwater strobe lights. A study conducted during 1985 and 1986 at Ontario Hydro's nearshore test facility, located in Lake Ontario off the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station intake, indicated that all three devices and combinations of devices elicited an avoidance response in alewife. The pneumatic gun exhibited the highest deterrent capability and the air bubble curtain the lowest. Studies conducted using the same deterrent devices at the intake of Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corporation's Roseton Generating Station on the Hudson River did not indicate an overall avoidance response; some species-specific responses to the devices were noted. 22 refs., 9 tabs.

  8. Enhancing public involvement in assistive technology design research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tracey; Kenney, Laurence; Barker, Anthony T; Cooper, Glen; Good, Tim; Healey, Jamie; Heller, Ben; Howard, David; Matthews, Martin; Prenton, Sarah; Ryan, Julia; Smith, Christine

    2015-05-01

    To appraise the application of accepted good practice guidance on public involvement in assistive technology research and to identify its impact on the research team, the public, device and trial design. Critical reflection and within-project evaluation were undertaken in a case study of the development of a functional electrical stimulation device. Individual and group interviews were undertaken with lay members of a 10 strong study user advisory group and also research team members. Public involvement was seen positively by research team members, who reported a positive impact on device and study designs. The public identified positive impact on confidence, skills, self-esteem, enjoyment, contribution to improving the care of others and opportunities for further involvement in research. A negative impact concerned the challenge of engaging the public in dissemination after the study end. The public were able to impact significantly on the design of an assistive technology device which was made more fit for purpose. Research team attitudes to public involvement were more positive after having witnessed its potential first hand. Within-project evaluation underpins this case study which presents a much needed detailed account of public involvement in assistive technology design research to add to the existing weak evidence base. The evidence base for impact of public involvement in rehabilitation technology design is in need of development. Public involvement in co-design of rehabilitation devices can lead to technologies that are fit for purpose. Rehabilitation researchers need to consider the merits of active public involvement in research.

  9. Engineering research, development and technology FY99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R T

    2000-02-01

    The growth of computer power and connectivity, together with advances in wireless sensing and communication technologies, is transforming the field of complex distributed systems. The ability to deploy large numbers of sensors with a rapid, broadband communication system will enable high-fidelity, near real-time monitoring of complex systems. These technological developments will provide unprecedented insight into the actual performance of engineered and natural environment systems, enable the evolution of many new types of engineered systems for monitoring and detection, and enhance our ability to perform improved and validated large-scale simulations of complex systems. One of the challenges facing engineering is to develop methodologies to exploit the emerging information technologies. Particularly important will be the ability to assimilate measured data into the simulation process in a way which is much more sophisticated than current, primarily ad hoc procedures. The reports contained in this section on the Center for Complex Distributed Systems describe activities related to the integrated engineering of large complex systems. The first three papers describe recent developments for each link of the integrated engineering process for large structural systems. These include (1) the development of model-based signal processing algorithms which will formalize the process of coupling measurements and simulation and provide a rigorous methodology for validation and update of computational models; (2) collaborative efforts with faculty at the University of California at Berkeley on the development of massive simulation models for the earth and large bridge structures; and (3) the development of wireless data acquisition systems which provide a practical means of monitoring large systems like the National Ignition Facility (NIF) optical support structures. These successful developments are coming to a confluence in the next year with applications to NIF structural

  10. National Rehabilitation Hospital Assistive Technology Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    other researchers would know that ANAM stability in healthy controls may not apply to ANAM performance in brain dysfunctional populations. Should the...Society of Neuroradiology 29th Annual Meeting. Washington DC June 1991. Posterior Sacroiliac Fixation using a Sacropedicular Targeting Device

  11. Cloud Computing Technologies Facilitate Earth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement, NASA partnered with Seattle-based Amazon Web Services to make the agency's climate and Earth science satellite data publicly available on the company's servers. Users can access the data for free, but they can also pay to use Amazon's computing services to analyze and visualize information using the same software available to NASA researchers.

  12. Adaptive Technologies. Research Report. ETS RR-07-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, Valerie J.; Zapata-Rivera, Diego

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes research and development efforts related to adaptive technologies, which can be combined with other technologies and processes to form an adaptive system. The goal of an adaptive system, in the context of this paper, is to create an instructionally sound and flexible environment that supports learning for students with a range…

  13. Social Scholarship: Applying Social Networking Technologies to Research Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Participatory web-based technologies have the potential to change the way scholars engage in scholarship. One reason Web 2.0 technologies, such as online social networking, are not widely integrated in PreK-12 and postsecondary education is the lack of modeling by educators. Their lack of research-based best practices limits the ability to…

  14. Researching Cognition and Technology: How We Learn across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrina, Stephen; Feng, Franc; Kim, Juyun

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses how we learn technology across the lifespan. After outlining findings of research into how children, adolescents, teens and adults learn technology, we address theoretical shifts from sociocultural to technocultural theories of cognition and reorientations from mediated to cyborgenic learning. The balance of the article…

  15. The Effect of New Technologies on Sign Language Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ceil; Mirus, Gene; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Roessler, Nicholas James; Frost, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper first reviews the fairly established ways of collecting sign language data. It then discusses the new technologies available and their impact on sign language research, both in terms of how data is collected and what new kinds of data are emerging as a result of technology. New data collection methods and new kinds of data are…

  16. Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach. Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its…

  17. Digital Mock-up Technology in Product Development and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xu; ZHANG Pandeng; YANG Cheng; XU Zhongming

    2006-01-01

    After introducing the present status of digital mock-up (DMU) technology in product development and research, the modeling and its key technologies in product design are described. The architecture of digital design platform system for main DMU model is developed. Based on the architecture, a method of skeleton design has been applied to the development of digital design system.

  18. Korea-China Optical Technology Research Centre Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Rhee, Y. J.; Jung, D. Y. and others

    2004-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to establish the international collaboration basis of optical technologies between Korea and China. The combination of the Chinese advanced fundamental technologies with the Korean industrialization and commercialization infrastructures is realized, by ways of exchanging scientists and informations, holding joint seminars, cooperative utilization of research resources. On the ground of this establishment, the optical technologies of Korea are supposed to be leveled up to those of the world-most advanced. At the same time, for the improvement of mutual benefit and financial profit of both countries, providing technical advice and suggestions to the optical industries in the two countries is an another goal of this project. The state-of-the-arts of the Chinese technologies such as aerospace engineering, military defence technology, medical technology, laser fusion research, and so on, are known to be far above those of Korean and up to one of the most advanced in the world. Thus it is thought to be necessary that the acquisition of these technologies, implementation of joint research projects for technology development as well as the balanced opportunities for commercial product/sales and cooperation should be actively pursued in order to enhance the levels of Korean technologies in these fields.

  19. Research Progress of Staged Vertical and Horizontal Fracturing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-01-01

    The United States carried out the first hydraulic fracturing in 1947 after 60 years of development, and has made amazing development in fracturing technology from fundamental research to t practice, with the number of fracturing wells rising year by year.

  20. Technological Research and Development Plan 1999-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The present document summarises the ENRESA Technological Research and Development Plan (1999-2003) for the radioactive waste management. The full version of this Plan is included in the ENRESA Technical Publications series corresponding to the year 1999. (Author)

  1. Prototype-Technology Evaluator and Research Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Area-I team has developed and flight tested the unmanned Prototype-Technology Evaluation and Research Aircraft or PTERA ("ptera" being Greek for wing, or...

  2. Reservoir Protection Technology in China: Research & Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qiangui; Wu Juan; Kang Yili

    2006-01-01

    @@ Great development of reservoir protection technology (RPT) has been achieved since 1996, including oil and gas reservoir protection for exploration wells, reservoir protection during underbalanced drilling, protection of fractured tight sandstone gas reservoir, and reservoir protection while increase production and reconstructing, development and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) etc. It has stepped into a new situation with special features and advantage. These technical advancements marked that China's RTP have realized leaps from porous reservoirs to fractured reservoirs,from conventional medium-to-low permeability reservoirs to unconventional reservoirs, from oil and gas producers to exploration wells, and from application mainly in drilling and completion processes to application in stimulation,development, production and EOR processes.

  3. Computer vision research with new imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Guangqi; Liu, Fei; Sun, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Light field imaging is capable of capturing dense multi-view 2D images in one snapshot, which record both intensity values and directions of rays simultaneously. As an emerging 3D device, the light field camera has been widely used in digital refocusing, depth estimation, stereoscopic display, etc. Traditional multi-view stereo (MVS) methods only perform well on strongly texture surfaces, but the depth map contains numerous holes and large ambiguities on textureless or low-textured regions. In this paper, we exploit the light field imaging technology on 3D face modeling in computer vision. Based on a 3D morphable model, we estimate the pose parameters from facial feature points. Then the depth map is estimated through the epipolar plane images (EPIs) method. At last, the high quality 3D face model is exactly recovered via the fusing strategy. We evaluate the effectiveness and robustness on face images captured by a light field camera with different poses.

  4. Recommender systems for technology enhanced learning research trends and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Manouselis, Nikos; Verbert, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Presents cutting edge research from leading experts in the growing field of Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (RecSys TEL) International contributions are included to demonstrate the merging of various efforts and communities Topics include: Linked Data and the Social Web as Facilitators for TEL Recommender Systems in Research and Practice, Personalised Learning-Plan Recommendations in Game-Based Learning and Recommendations from Heterogeneous Sources in a Technology Enhanced Learning Ecosystem

  5. DNA technologies: what's next applied to microbiology research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, J T; Masson, L

    2010-10-01

    This perspective discusses current DNA technologies used in basic and applied microbiology research and speculates on possible new future technologies. DNA remains one of the most fascinating molecules known to humans and will continue to revolutionize many areas ranging from medicine, food and forensics to robotics and new industrial bioproducts/biofuel from waste materials. What's next with DNA is not always obvious, but history shows the international microbiology research community will readily adopt it.

  6. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, M.J. (ed.)

    1993-03-01

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  7. Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Lynn; Jasper, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs fund the research, development, and demonstration of innovative technologies that fulfill NASA's needs as described in the annual Solicitations and have significant potential for successful commercialization. The only eligible participants are small business concern (SBC) with 500 or fewer employees or a nonprofit research institute such as a university or a research laboratory with ties to an SBC. These programs are potential sources of seed funding for the development of small business innovations.

  8. Technology research for digital flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carestia, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The use of advanced digital systems for flight control and guidance for a specific mission is investigated. The research areas include advanced electronic system architectures, tests with the global positioning system (GPS) in a helicopter, and advanced integrated systems concept for rotorcraft. Emphasis is on a search and rescue mission, differential global positioning systems to provide a data base of performance information for navigation, and a study to determine the present usage and trends of microcomputers and microcomputer components in the avionics industries.

  9. European boost for food technology research

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    They set themselves ambitious goals: to maintain food texture, improve shelf life, and reduce energy consumption during preservation processes. The EU-funded ‘NovelQ’ consortium, consisting of 36 research partners from across Europe, is co-ordinated by the Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group (AFSG) of Wageningen UR. Halfway through the five-year term, Wageningen Update examines the state of affairs and the experiences thus far.

  10. Research of MMW radiometer virtual prototyping technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Qinghui; Li Xingguo; Zhang Guangfeng

    2008-01-01

    The idea of millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometer virtual prototyping is discussed in this paper. Designing en-vironment, designing method and the main modeling components of virtual MMW radiometer are researched. Important external parameters, which have significant influence to composing system, are used to components modeling, and then components are taken to buildup virtual MMW radiometer system. Moreover, the effect to output is contrasted whether there is a low-noise amplifier or not.

  11. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The study program consists of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the research topics.

  12. The research of laser marking control technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiue; Zhang, Rong

    2009-08-01

    In the area of Laser marking, the general control method is insert control card to computer's mother board, it can not support hot swap, it is difficult to assemble or it. Moreover, the one marking system must to equip one computer. In the system marking, the computer can not to do the other things except to transmit marking digital information. Otherwise it can affect marking precision. Based on traditional control methods existed some problems, introduced marking graphic editing and digital processing by the computer finish, high-speed digital signal processor (DSP) control marking the whole process. The laser marking controller is mainly contain DSP2812, digital memorizer, DAC (digital analog converting) transform unit circuit, USB interface control circuit, man-machine interface circuit, and other logic control circuit. Download the marking information which is processed by computer to U disk, DSP read the information by USB interface on time, then processing it, adopt the DSP inter timer control the marking time sequence, output the scanner control signal by D/A parts. Apply the technology can realize marking offline, thereby reduce the product cost, increase the product efficiency. The system have good effect in actual unit markings, the marking speed is more quickly than PCI control card to 20 percent. It has application value in practicality.

  13. Challenges in industrial fermentation technology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Nørregaard, Anders; Bolic, Andrijana; Hernandez, Daniela Quintanilla; Hagemann, Timo; Heins, Anna-Lena; Larsson, Hilde; Mears, Lisa; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Krühne, Ulrich; Gernaey, Krist V

    2014-06-01

    Industrial fermentation processes are increasingly popular, and are considered an important technological asset for reducing our dependence on chemicals and products produced from fossil fuels. However, despite their increasing popularity, fermentation processes have not yet reached the same maturity as traditional chemical processes, particularly when it comes to using engineering tools such as mathematical models and optimization techniques. This perspective starts with a brief overview of these engineering tools. However, the main focus is on a description of some of the most important engineering challenges: scaling up and scaling down fermentation processes, the influence of morphology on broth rheology and mass transfer, and establishing novel sensors to measure and control insightful process parameters. The greatest emphasis is on the challenges posed by filamentous fungi, because of their wide applications as cell factories and therefore their relevance in a White Biotechnology context. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is introduced as a promising tool that can be used to support the scaling up and scaling down of bioreactors, and for studying mixing and the potential occurrence of gradients in a tank.

  14. Research on Key Technologies of Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufen; Yan, Hongcan; Chen, Xuebin

    With the development of multi-core processors, virtualization, distributed storage, broadband Internet and automatic management, a new type of computing mode named cloud computing is produced. It distributes computation task on the resource pool which consists of massive computers, so the application systems can obtain the computing power, the storage space and software service according to its demand. It can concentrate all the computing resources and manage them automatically by the software without intervene. This makes application offers not to annoy for tedious details and more absorbed in his business. It will be advantageous to innovation and reduce cost. It's the ultimate goal of cloud computing to provide calculation, services and applications as a public facility for the public, So that people can use the computer resources just like using water, electricity, gas and telephone. Currently, the understanding of cloud computing is developing and changing constantly, cloud computing still has no unanimous definition. This paper describes three main service forms of cloud computing: SAAS, PAAS, IAAS, compared the definition of cloud computing which is given by Google, Amazon, IBM and other companies, summarized the basic characteristics of cloud computing, and emphasized on the key technologies such as data storage, data management, virtualization and programming model.

  15. Application of metabolomics technology in the research of Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Ping

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, a novel analytical technology, metabolomics is widely used in the modern research of Chinese medicine (CM). Metabolomics adopts a "top-down" strategy to reflect the function of organisms from terminal symptoms of metabolic network and understand metabolic changes of a complete system caused by interventions. As a holistic approach, metabolomics technology, including nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, favorable to express the meaning of basic theories of CM, CM syndrome and Chinese herb. Therefore, we believe that metabolomics technology will greatly benefit to development for the research of CM in the light of modern sciences.

  16. Research and Development for Technology Evolution Potential Forecasting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Changqing; Cao, Shukun; Wang, Yuzeng; Ai, Changsheng; Ze, Xiangbo

    Technology forecasting is a powerful weapon for many enterprises to gain an animate future. Evolutionary potential radar plot is a necessary step of some valuable methods to help the technology managers with right technical strategy. A software system for Technology Evolution Potential Forecasting (TEPF) with automatic radar plot drawing is introduced in this paper. The framework of the system and the date structure describing the concrete evolution pattern are illustrated in details. And the algorithm for radar plot drawing is researched. It is proved that the TEPF system is an effective tool during the technology strategy analyzing process with a referenced case study.

  17. Architectural quality: innovation, technological research and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Campioli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Architectural redevelopment and the revival of the construction sector are conditional on the incentivisation and bolstering of innovation processes. Thus the partial declensions that have been attached to these processes over the last few years have seen research and experimentation being tailored to the spectacularisation of shapes or the hidden performance optimisation of materials and components. Genuine improvement in the quality of architecture and its construction in this day and age depends on the abilities of designers to adopt the entire life cycle of buildings as a reference framework and on the willingness of all those working in the construction supply chain to activate virtuous cooperation.

  18. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  19. Application of BIM technology in green scientific research office building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xin; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    BIM technology as a kind of information technology, has been along with the advancement of building industrialization application in domestic building industry gradually. Based on reasonable construction BIM model, using BIM technology platform, through collaborative design tools can effectively improve the design efficiency and design quality. Vanda northwest engineering design and research institute co., LTD., the scientific research office building project in combination with the practical situation of engineering using BIM technology, formed in the BIM model combined with related information according to the energy energy model (BEM) and the application of BIM technology in construction management stage made exploration, and the direct experience and the achievements gained by the architectural design part made a summary.

  20. Outcomes from the GLEON fellowship program. Training graduate students in data driven network science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, H.; Hanson, P. C.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-12-01

    In the water sciences there is a massive need for graduate students who possess the analytical and technical skills to deal with large datasets and function in the new paradigm of open, collaborative -science. The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) graduate fellowship program (GFP) was developed as an interdisciplinary training program to supplement the intensive disciplinary training of traditional graduate education. The primary goal of the GFP was to train a diverse cohort of graduate students in network science, open-web technologies, collaboration, and data analytics, and importantly to provide the opportunity to use these skills to conduct collaborative research resulting in publishable scientific products. The GFP is run as a series of three week-long workshops over two years that brings together a cohort of twelve students. In addition, fellows are expected to attend and contribute to at least one international GLEON all-hands' meeting. Here, we provide examples of training modules in the GFP (model building, data QA/QC, information management, bayesian modeling, open coding/version control, national data programs), as well as scientific outputs (manuscripts, software products, and new global datasets) produced by the fellows, as well as the process by which this team science was catalyzed. Data driven education that lets students apply learned skills to real research projects reinforces concepts, provides motivation, and can benefit their publication record. This program design is extendable to other institutions and networks.

  1. FY10 Engineering Innovations, Research and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, M A; Aceves, S M; Paulson, C N; Candy, J V; Bennett, C V; Carlisle, K; Chen, D C; White, D A; Bernier, J V; Puso, M A; Weisgraber, T H; Corey, B; Lin, J I; Wheeler, E K; Conway, A M; Kuntz, J D; Spadaccini, C M; Dehlinger, D A; Kotovsky, J; Nikolic, R; Mariella, R P; Foudray, A K; Tang, V; Guidry, B L; Ng, B M; Lemmond, T D; Chen, B Y; Meyers, C A; Houck, T L

    2011-01-11

    This report summarizes key research, development, and technology advancements in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2010. These efforts exemplify Engineering's nearly 60-year history of developing and applying the technology innovations needed for the Laboratory's national security missions, and embody Engineering's mission to ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Leading off the report is a section featuring compelling engineering innovations. These innovations range from advanced hydrogen storage that enables clean vehicles, to new nuclear material detection technologies, to a landmine detection system using ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar. Many have been recognized with R&D Magazine's prestigious R&D 100 Award; all are examples of the forward-looking application of innovative engineering to pressing national problems and challenging customer requirements. Engineering's capability development strategy includes both fundamental research and technology development. Engineering research creates the competencies of the future where discovery-class groundwork is required. Our technology development (or reduction to practice) efforts enable many of the research breakthroughs across the Laboratory to translate from the world of basic research to the national security missions of the Laboratory. This portfolio approach produces new and advanced technological capabilities, and is a unique component of the value proposition of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The balance of the report highlights this work in research and technology, organized into thematic technical areas: Computational Engineering; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Measurement Technologies; Engineering Systems for Knowledge Discovery; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but

  2. Advances and Perspectives in Photonic Technology Research in the European Information Society Technologies Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasme, Didier; Minot, Christophe; Ohman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Ackaert, Ann; Demeester, Peter; Lagasse, Paul; Politi, Christina; O'Mahony, Mike; Saniter, Juergen; Patzak, Erwin; Rao, Sathya; Vogel, Paul

    2004-08-01

    The 5th framework programme, which the European Union launched in 1998, supported a wide range of industrial areas among which “Information Society Technologies (IST)” was one of the focus areas. The present paper presents a short overview of the research on photonic component technologies within the IST programme. It also presents the views on the future evolution of photonic component technologies for optical communications, which have emerged from a road map exercise within the thematic network OPTIMIST.

  3. Multidisciplinary Methods in Educational Technology Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Justus J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past thirty years, there has been much dialogue, and debate, about the conduct of educational technology research and development. In this brief volume, the author helps clarify that dialogue by theoretically and empirically charting the research methods used in the field and provides much practical information on how to conduct…

  4. Technology Integration: A Research-Based Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulder, Tori Rose

    2011-01-01

    This research-based thesis project explains the governmental acts and policies, investors, and other stakeholders who have worked to promote, question, and explore the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the classroom. Research suggests that best-practice ICT integration requires using ICT alongside constructivist pedagogy.…

  5. Traveling the Road of Research: Stories of Teaching and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Kate E.

    2014-01-01

    This autobiographical account relates the journey of becoming a critical teacher researcher.. Through critical refection and analysis, the cultural, historical, and social contexts of research, teaching, and technology use are described as lived experience. Rich narrative accounts exemplify personal and professional experiences before and during…

  6. Traveling the Road of Research: Stories of Teaching and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E O'Hara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This autobiographical account relates the journey of becoming a critical teacher researcher.. Through critical refection and analysis, the cultural, historical, and social contexts of research, teaching, and technology use are described as lived experience. Rich narrative accounts exemplify personal and professional experiences before and during the professoriate in a tenure track position.

  7. A Review of Research Methods in Children's Technology Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Jul; Skov, Mikael B.

    2005-01-01

    -ences on the discipline. Inspired by previous studies from other disciplines, we conduct a survey of research methods in paper publications. 105 papers on children's technology design are classified on a two-dimensional matrix on research method and pur-pose. Our results show a strong focus on engineering of products...

  8. Generations of Research on New Technologies in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    This article traces some of the influential ideas and motivations that have shaped a large part of the research on the use of new technologies in mathematics education over the past 40 years. Particular attention is focused on Papert's legacy, Celia's Hoyles' transformation of it, and how both relate to the current research landscape that features…

  9. Engaged Scholarship in Research on Information Technology in Government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2012-01-01

    As the research body on information technology (IT) in government aims at consolidation, it faces one of the common fundamental challenges of scholarly research: how to fill the theory–practice gap, and to contribute to knowledge and practice through means of partnership with stakeholders, co...

  10. Identifying and Researching Market Opportunities for New High Technology Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Peter

    Using a product called the synchro-pulse welder as a case study example, this paper discusses the activities of CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) in identifying and marketing new high-technology products. A general discussion of CSIRO's market research plans includes two goals to be attained within the next 5…

  11. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  12. Research and technology objectives and plans: Summary fiscal year 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY 1991. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOP's (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, industry, and in universities. The first section contains citations and abstracts of the RTOP's and is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  13. Research and development in technology enriched schools: a case for cooperation between teachers and researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, J.J.; Beishuizen, J.J.; Moonen, J.C.M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Technology-enriched schools offer unique opportunities for research into the use of information technology in education. As in every applied educational research project, some concerns should be carefully considered. One of them is teacher involvement. Another issue of concern is finding a proper ba

  14. Research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-xi; Zhang, Kun; Hao, Yi-ni; Hu, Yong-cheng

    2012-08-01

    In the last 10 years, basic and clinical research in orthopaedics has developed rapidly. Understanding of orthopaedic disorders involves not only routine diagnosis, but also the pursuit of highly efficient and accurate three-dimensional imaging of the intra- and extra-medullary distribution, form and structure of orthopaedic disorders, thus allowing scientific evaluation of the indications for surgery, drawing up of the best surgical plan, minimization of operative trauma and the earliest possible restoration of limb function. Meanwhile, the most important type of basic research, which was previously biomechanical research, has gradually become computational biomechanics based on in vitro cadaver experiments. This review aims to summarize the research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics, including virtual reality technology, reverse engineering and rapid prototyping techniques, computational biomechanics, computer navigation technology and management of digitization of medical records. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Finding Qualitative Research Evidence for Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJean, Deirdre; Giacomini, Mita; Simeonov, Dorina; Smith, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) agencies increasingly use reviews of qualitative research as evidence for evaluating social, experiential, and ethical aspects of health technologies. We systematically searched three bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Social Science Citation Index [SSCI]) using published search filters or "hedges" and our hybrid filter to identify qualitative research studies pertaining to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and early breast cancer. The search filters were compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and precision. Our screening by title and abstract revealed that qualitative research constituted only slightly more than 1% of all published research on each health topic. The performance of the published search filters varied greatly across topics and databases. Compared with existing search filters, our hybrid filter demonstrated a consistently high sensitivity across databases and topics, and minimized the resource-intensive process of sifting through false positives. We identify opportunities for qualitative health researchers to improve the uptake of qualitative research into evidence-informed policy making.

  16. Recent expansion of research for light water reactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kiichi (Japan Electric Power Information Center, Tokyo (Japan)); Nemoto, Kazuyasu; Aoki, Norichika; Kusanagi, Hideo

    1990-09-01

    It is needless to say that for simultaneously coping with the increase of energy consumption and the prevention of the worsening of environment in the world, and for maintaining the standard of living in Japan where energy resources are scarce, the development of atomic energy is necessary. Though the technology of LWRs has been already established, the efforts of aiming at the further high safety and reliability of LWRs must be exerted. In this report, the recent technical development is described, centering around the research and technical development promoted by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry. The energy consumption in the world recorded the yearly growth of about 3%, and in 1987, it was 9.65 billion tons in terms of coal (7000 kcal/kg). The problems of earth environment will relax by promoting atomic energy. As for the recent development of LWR technology, the research on existing LWRs, the research on the LWRs of next generation, the research on the new technology for locating nuclear facilities and the research on radiation are carried out. As the research aiming at the LWRs of next generation, the design and evaluation of statically safe LWRs, the evaluation of fuel behavior at high burnup and the development of new location technology are carried out. (K.I.).

  17. From translational research to open technology innovation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savory, Clive; Fortune, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to question whether the emphasis placed within translational research on a linear model of innovation provides the most effective model for managing health technology innovation. Several alternative perspectives are presented that have potential to enhance the existing model of translational research. A case study is presented of innovation of a clinical decision support system. The paper concludes from the case study that an extending the triple helix model of technology transfer, to one based on a quadruple helix, present a basis for improving the performance translational research. A case study approach is used to help understand development of an innovative technology within a teaching hospital. The case is then used to develop and refine a model of the health technology innovation system. The paper concludes from the case study that existing models of translational research could be refined further through the development of a quadruple helix model of heath technology innovation that encompasses greater emphasis on user-led and open innovation perspectives. The paper presents several implications for future research based on the need to enhance the model of health technology innovation used to guide policy and practice. The quadruple helix model of innovation that is proposed can potentially guide alterations to the existing model of translational research in the healthcare sector. Several suggestions are made for how innovation activity can be better supported at both a policy and operational level. This paper presents a synthesis of the innovation literature applied to a theoretically important case of open innovation in the UK National Health Service. It draws in perspectives from other industrial sectors and applies them specifically to the management and organisation of innovation activities around health technology and the services in which they are embedded.

  18. Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karles Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL /MR/6750--15-9650 Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL ...ABSTRACT Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karle’s Fellowship Sandra (Hernandez) Hangarter Naval Research Laboratory 4555...Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL /MR/6750--15-9650 ONR Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Unclassified Unlimited

  19. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  20. Socialization of scientific and technological research: further comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Research systems are increasingly required to be more practically oriented and to address issues which appear more promising in economic and social results, with special reference to trans-disciplinary research fields, such as nanotechnology or ICTs; policy makers show a sharp tendency to establish research priorities and to drive research systems; universities and research institutions are asked to be more transparent and open to dialogue with social actors on contents, impacts, ethical implications and practical applications of scientific and technological research. These transformations affecting both the ways in which science and technology are produced and their relationships with society pose new challenges to European research. All the aspects of research activities are concerned, including the life of the research groups, the approaches to scientific evaluation, the development of European research policies and the interaction between researchers with their social environment. Continuing a reflection started in the last issue of JCOM, Luisa Prista, Evanthia Kalpazidou-Schmidt, Brigida Blasi, Sandra Romagnosi and Miguel Martínez López offered their contribution in identifying some of the key implications and risks which these changes are bringing about, mainly in the perspective of the construction of the European Research Area.

  1. 77 FR 40647 - Toward Innovative Spectrum-Sharing Technologies: Wireless Spectrum Research and Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Toward Innovative Spectrum-Sharing Technologies: Wireless Spectrum Research and Development Senior... Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD). ACTION: Notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information Technology Research and...

  2. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  3. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The Materials and Components Technology Division (MCT) provides a research and development capability for the design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs related to nuclear energy support the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR): life extension and accident analyses for light water reactors (LWRs); fuels development for research and test reactors; fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology; and safe shipment of hazardous materials. MCT Conservation and Renewables programs include major efforts in high-temperature superconductivity, tribology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and thermal sciences. Fossil Energy Programs in MCT include materials development, NDE technology, and Instrumentation design. The division also has a complementary instrumentation effort in support of Arms Control Technology. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the database.

  4. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow? (a) If the Director pays fellowship award directly to the fellow after the Director determines the amount of a fellowship award, the fellowship...

  5. Research progress of the Superheated Steam Drying Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yongchun; Li, Jie; Li, Xuanyou; Zhao, Gaiju; Wu, Maogang

    2012-01-01

    The superheated steam drying technology has lots of advantages such as safe, energy-saving, pollution-free and so on, so it causes more and more extensive concern. The superheated steam drying technology is introduced and its merits and faults are analyzed. The theoretical research progress of the superheated steam drying is summarized and the recent application of the materials including the food, wood, paper, sludge and lignite is stated. In brief, the superheated steam drying technol...

  6. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  7. FY2011 Engineering Innovations, Research, and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Kip [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Harry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poyneer, Lisa A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shusteff, Maxim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spadaccini, Christopher M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hopkins, Jonathan B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernier, Joel V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); King, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Puso, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weisgraber, Todd H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Goldstein, Noah C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sales, Ana Paula De Oliveira [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dehlinger, Dietrich A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotovsky, Jack [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kuntz, Joshua D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Voss, Lars F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wheeler, Elizabeth K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, John T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lehman, Sean K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vernon, Stephen P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, Vincent [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-04-24

    This report summarizes key research, development, and technology advancements in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Engineering Directorate for FY2011. These efforts exemplify Engineering’s nearly 60-year history of developing and applying the technology innovations needed for the Laboratory’s national security missions, and embody Engineering’s mission to “Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory’s vitality tomorrow.

  8. Development of a Curricular Framework for Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerardi, Karen E; Fisher, Erin; Rassbach, Caroline; Maniscalco, Jennifer; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Chase, Lindsay; Shah, Neha

    2017-07-01

    Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) is an emerging field in pediatrics and one that has experienced immense growth and maturation in a short period of time. Evolution and rapid expansion of the field invigorated the goal of standardizing PHM fellowship curricula, which naturally aligned with the field's evolving pursuit of a defined identity and consideration of certification options. The national group of PHM fellowship program directors sought to establish curricular standards that would more accurately reflect the competencies needed to practice pediatric hospital medicine and meet future board certification needs. In this manuscript, we describe the method by which we reached consensus on a 2-year curricular framework for PHM fellowship programs, detail the current model for this framework, and provide examples of how this curricular framework may be applied to meet the needs of a variety of fellows and fellowship programs. The 2-year PHM fellowship curricular framework was developed over a number of years through an iterative process and with the input of PHM fellowship program directors (PDs), PHM fellowship graduates, PHM leaders, pediatric hospitalists practicing in a variety of clinical settings, and other educators outside the field. We have developed a curricular framework for PHM Fellowships that consists of 8 education units (defined as 4 weeks each) in 3 areas: clinical care, systems and scholarship, and individualized curriculum. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  10. The Cunningham Fellowship : three international points of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flake, D; Verhoeven, A; Robu, I

    2001-01-01

    The Medical Library Association Cunningham Fellowship Program provides funds for one medical librarian per year from outside the United States or Canada to work and learn in United States or Canadian medical libraries for a period of 4 months. An overview of the Cunningham Fellowship is presented fr

  11. The Cunningham Fellowship : three international points of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flake, D; Verhoeven, A; Robu, I

    2001-01-01

    The Medical Library Association Cunningham Fellowship Program provides funds for one medical librarian per year from outside the United States or Canada to work and learn in United States or Canadian medical libraries for a period of 4 months. An overview of the Cunningham Fellowship is presented fr

  12. An Evaluation of the Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesel, Justin; Gutmann, Babette

    The Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program provides fellowships to economically disadvantaged secondary school students, secondary school teachers and administrators, and economically disadvantaged older citizens, and recent immigrants for participation in the Close Up Foundation's week-long civics education programs in Washington, D.C. The Close Up…

  13. Recent advances on NLP research in Harbin Institute of Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tiejun; GUAN Yi; LIU Ting; WANG Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In the 1960s,the researchers of Harbin Institute of Technology(HIT)attempted to do relevant research on natural language processing.With more than 40-year's effort,HIT has already established three research laboratories for Chinese information processing,i.e.the Machine Intelligence and Translation Laboratory(MI&T Lab),the Intelligent Technology and Natural Language Processing Laboratory(ITNLP)and the Information Retrieval Laboratory (IR-Lab).At present,it has a well-balanced research team of over 200 persons,and the research interests have extended to language processing,machine translation,text retrieval and other fields.Harbin Institute of Technology has accumulated a batch of key techniques and data resources,won many prizes in the technical evaluations at home and abroad.Harbin Institute of Technology has become one of the most important natural language processing bases for teaching and scientific research in China now.This paper gives an introduction to the achievements onNLP in HIT.

  14. [Stem cell research and science and technology policy in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashiro, Yoshimi

    2011-12-01

    In this paper I review the present condition of the regeneration medicine research using pluripotency and a somatic stem cell, and I describe the subject of the science and technology policy in Japan towards realization of regeneration medicine. The Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) supported research promotion by the prompt action in 2007 when establishment of the iPS cell was reported by Shinya Yamanaka. Although the hospitable support of the Japanese government to an iPS cell is continued still now, there are some problems in respect of the support to other stem cell researches, and industrialization of regeneration medicine. In order to win a place in highly competitive area of investigation, MEXT needs to change policy so that funds may be widely supplied also to stem cell researches other than iPS cell research.

  15. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  16. Research and Development Needs for Building-Integrated Solar Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-01-01

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) has identified Building Integrated Solar Technologies (BIST) as a potentially valuable piece of the comprehensive pathway to help achieve its goal of reducing energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings by 50% by the year 2030. This report helps to identify the key research and development (R&D) needs that will be required for BIST to make a substantial contribution toward that goal. BIST include technologies for space heating and cooling, water heating, hybrid photovoltaic-thermal systems (PV/T), active solar lighting, and building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV).

  17. Association of Fellowship Training With Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboyewa, Ibukun; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    No prior studies have evaluated whether residents who pursue fellowship training achieve higher performance on the Otolaryngology Training Examination (OTE) and whether a specific fellowship will demonstrate a correlation with the corresponding specialty-specific OTE score. To determine whether residents pursuing fellowship training achieve higher performance on the OTE and whether fellowship choice is correlated with higher scores on the related subspecialty section of the OTE. This retrospective analysis included 35 residents training in an academic otolaryngology residency program from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2014. The OTE scores for postgraduate years 2 through 5 and the type of fellowship were collected for all residents meeting inclusion criteria. Data were collected from September 1 to October 15, 2014, and analyzed from October 16 to December 1, 2014. Residents were divided by whether they pursued fellowship training and by the type of fellowship chosen. Outcome measures included comparison of scores between residents who pursued vs those who did not pursue fellowship training and comparison of subspecialty OTE scores between residents who pursued the corresponding fellowship and those who did not. Of the 35 residents who met the inclusion criteria (24 men and 11 women), 17 (49%) pursued fellowship training. The 3 most common fellowship choices were facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric otolaryngology, and rhinology (4 residents each [24%]). For all residents, mean scores on the OTE improved each subsequent training year, but this difference was only significant between postgraduate years 2 and 3 (from 60.9% to 68.6% correct; P otolaryngology, 72.9% vs 71.3% [P = .79]; and for rhinology, 72.2% vs 71.2% [P = .91]). Residents who pursued fellowship training did not achieve higher scores on the OTE in any examination year compared with residents who did not pursue fellowship training and did not achieve higher scores within the OTE

  18. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Australasian Journal of Educational Technology," 2003-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Camey Andersen; Clegg, J. Aleta; Hickman, Garrett R.; Huyett, Sabrina Lynn; Jensen, Hyrum C.; West, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    The authors analyzed all research articles in the "Australasian Journal of Educational Technology" from 2003 to 2012 to determine the types of research methodologies published, major contributing authors, and most frequently referenced keywords, abstract terms, and cited articles. During this decade, the majority of articles published…

  19. Educational Technology Research Journals: "International Journal of Technology and Design Education", 2005-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, James M.; Jones, Brian; Cooper, Jessica Rose; McAllister, Laura; Ware, Mark B.; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the trends of the "International Journal of Technology and Design Education" over the past decade (2005-2014). The researchers looked at trends in article topics, research methods, authorship, and article citations by analyzing keyword frequencies, performing word counts of article titles, classifying studies…

  20. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  1. Linking theory to practice in learning technology research

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, Cathy; Steel, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    We present a case to reposition theory so that it plays a pivotal role in learning technology research and helps to build an ecology of learning. To support the case, we present a critique of current practice based on a review of articles published in two leading international journals from 2005 to 2010. Our study reveals that theory features only incidentally or not at all in many cases. We propose theory development as a unifying theme for learning technology research study design and repor...

  2. Methods of synthesizing qualitative research studies for health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Nicola; Jepson, Ruth; Ritchie, Karen

    2011-10-01

    Synthesizing qualitative research is an important means of ensuring the needs, preferences, and experiences of patients are taken into account by service providers and policy makers, but the range of methods available can appear confusing. This study presents the methods for synthesizing qualitative research most used in health research to-date and, specifically those with a potential role in health technology assessment. To identify reviews conducted using the eight main methods for synthesizing qualitative studies, nine electronic databases were searched using key terms including meta-ethnography and synthesis. A summary table groups the identified reviews by their use of the eight methods, highlighting the methods used most generally and specifically in relation to health technology assessment topics. Although there is debate about how best to identify and quality appraise qualitative research for synthesis, 107 reviews were identified using one of the eight main methods. Four methods (meta-ethnography, meta-study, meta-summary, and thematic synthesis) have been most widely used and have a role within health technology assessment. Meta-ethnography is the leading method for synthesizing qualitative health research. Thematic synthesis is also useful for integrating qualitative and quantitative findings. Four other methods (critical interpretive synthesis, grounded theory synthesis, meta-interpretation, and cross-case analysis) have been under-used in health research and their potential in health technology assessments is currently under-developed. Synthesizing individual qualitative studies has becoming increasingly common in recent years. Although this is still an emerging research discipline such an approach is one means of promoting the patient-centeredness of health technology assessments.

  3. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. CONCERNING CORRELATION BETWEEN METHODOLOGY AND TECHNOLOGY IN PEDAGOGICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Zagvyazinsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is the continuation of a cycle of the methodological articles, called to help work of young researchers.The general dissatisfaction with quality and results of research work in an education sphere and pedagogics has been largely caused not only insufficient level of methodological culture of competitors of scientific degrees and researchers-experts, but also their inability to choose a work technology of procedure of research that will be adequate to the purposes, problems and a plan of it. The present article is also devoted to this problem.Methods. The methods of the analysis, synthesis, idealisation, generalisation of author’s experience, a concrete definition and modelling are used.Results and scientific novelty. The general technology of scientific search in an education sphere is presented; the technology is developed on the basis of long-term experience of the Tyumen scientific and pedagogical school, and justified in practice. The author doesn’t take into consideration the rigid technology of algorithmic type which is hardly useful in works of creative character; but in the present case – frame technology that defines the expedient organisation, sequence of stages of work and its corresponding maintenance. The following technology components are described: self-determination of the researcher or research group on the basis of creation and the statement of the developed project of all procedures of search; statement of questions on initial allocation of the problem conducting ideas, a plan-way of its realisation; project performance, its ascertaining and a reformative part, research procedures (the basic stage; summarising, generalisation of the research performed, a writing of the text of report documents, preparation of total publications. Examples of typical errors of the young scientists who do not own the technology of scientific activity are given.Practical significance. Proposed recommendations stated

  5. Research Students' Conceptions of the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskaite, Lina; Wardak, Dewa

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "big data," "digital scholarship" and "eResearch" raises the question of how these digital developments in research methods and practices affect research students. This paper presents findings from a phenomenographic study that investigated postgraduate students' conceptions of the role of information…

  6. Research Students' Conceptions of the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskaite, Lina; Wardak, Dewa

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "big data," "digital scholarship" and "eResearch" raises the question of how these digital developments in research methods and practices affect research students. This paper presents findings from a phenomenographic study that investigated postgraduate students' conceptions of the role of information…

  7. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  8. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  9. A Review of Research Methods in Children's Technology Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Jul; Skov, Mikael B.

    2005-01-01

    Research methods have been objects of discussions for dec-ades and defining research methods is still a quite substan-tial challenge. However, it is important to understand how research methods have been adapted in different disciplines as it potentially informs us on future directions and influ......-ences on the discipline. Inspired by previous studies from other disciplines, we conduct a survey of research methods in paper publications. 105 papers on children's technology design are classified on a two-dimensional matrix on research method and pur-pose. Our results show a strong focus on engineering of products...... as applied research and on evaluation of devel-oped products in the field or in the lab. Also, we find that much research is conducted in natural setting environments with strong focus on field studies....

  10. American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators is described. The program involves participation in cooperative research and study. Results of the program evaluation are summarized. The research fellows indicated satisfaction with the program. Benefits of the program cited include: (1) enhancement of professional abilities; (2) contact with professionals in a chosen area of research; (3) familiarity with research facilities; and (4) development of new research techniques and their adaptation to an academic setting. Abstracts of each of the research projects undertaken are presented.

  11. Joint research center activity in thermonuclear fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Rocco, P. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre)

    1984-04-01

    A review of the activities in progress in the field of thermonuclear fusion technology at the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities is presented. The research areas are: (I) reactor studies, including conceptual design studies of experimental Tokamak reactors (INTOR/NET) and safety analyses; (II) experimental investigation on first wall and blanket materials and components. Emphasis has been given to those topics which are not reported in detail in the following articles of the issue.

  12. The impact of space research on semiconductor crystal growth technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments in reduced gravity environment and related ground-based research have contributed significantly to the establishment of a scientific basis for semiconductor growth from the melt. NASA-sponsored research has been instrumental in the introduction of heat pipes for heat and mass transfer control in crystal growth and in the development of magnetic field induced melt stabilization, approaches primarily responsible for recent advances in crystal growth technology.

  13. Achievements of Theoretical Research on Chinese Technological Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hanxi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the CNKI database as the sample source, we investigated the makeup of current research results on Chinese technological innovation, and found that the study of Chinese technological innovation consists of nine directions - underlying principles of innovation behavior, concepts of innovation cognition, methods of innovation, behavior of innovation subjects, structure of innovation mediators, innovation capacity, public service system of innovation, policy support system of innovation, and cultural environment of innovation, as well as several issues of innovation, including its behavior mechanism, operational mechanism, work mechanism, modes of implementation, modes of mathematical representation, modes of physical representation, modes of behavioral representation, modes of performance representation, modes of function realization, modes of structure realization, modes of workflow realization, modes of carrier realization, etc. Such a scattered makeup requires us to formulate the system of Chinese technological innovation achievements from the perspective of philosophy of science. This will be an important mission in the study of Chinese technological innovation.

  14. Information Security / 2002 Command & Control Research & Technology Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Buddenberg, Rex

    2002-01-01

    Approved for public display, distribution unlimited 2002 Command & Control Research & Technology Symposium, Naval Postgraduate School, Code IS/Bu, Monterey,CA,93943 Security in information systems is a complex problem. Single solutions to complex problems don't exist and matching the appropriate solution (or more accurately, a set of solutions) to a requirement is necessary.

  15. Career Pathways of Science, Engineering and Technology Research Postgraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Marnie; Ski, Chantal; Vrdoljak, Davorin

    2009-01-01

    Suitably qualified scientists and engineers are essential for research and development, innovation and, in turn, the growth of the economy. Science, engineering and technology skills are therefore necessary for Australia to remain competitive in a global market. This article reports findings from a nationwide study investigating the career…

  16. Handling Missing Data in Research Studies of Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong-Eun

    Missing data is an important issue that is discussed across many fields. In order to understand the issues caused by missing data, this paper reviews the types of missing data and problems caused by missing data. Also, to understand how missing data are handled in instructional technology research, articles published in "Educational Media…

  17. Using Cluster Analysis for Data Mining in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Pavlo D.; Toy, Serkan; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis is a group of statistical methods that has great potential for analyzing the vast amounts of web server-log data to understand student learning from hyperlinked information resources. In this methodological paper we provide an introduction to cluster analysis for educational technology researchers and illustrate its use through…

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  19. Changing Models for Researching Pedagogy with Information and Communications Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines changing models of pedagogy by drawing on recent research with teachers and their students as well as theoretical developments. In relation to a participatory view of learning, the paper reviews existing pedagogical models that take little account of the use of information and communications technologies as well as those that…

  20. Using Cluster Analysis for Data Mining in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Pavlo D.; Toy, Serkan; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis is a group of statistical methods that has great potential for analyzing the vast amounts of web server-log data to understand student learning from hyperlinked information resources. In this methodological paper we provide an introduction to cluster analysis for educational technology researchers and illustrate its use through…

  1. Linking Theory to Practice in Learning Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Cathy; Steel, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    We present a case to reposition theory so that it plays a pivotal role in learning technology research and helps to build an ecology of learning. To support the case, we present a critique of current practice based on a review of articles published in two leading international journals from 2005 to 2010. Our study reveals that theory features only…

  2. Approaches to Research on Teacher Education and Technology. Society for Technology and Teacher Education Monograph Series. No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Hersholt C., Ed.; Bright, George W., Ed.

    This document addresses the use of technology to enrich education. Twelve papers discuss research programs and perspectives and methods of research in technology and teacher education. Titles are: "Research Methods and Paradigms in Technology and Teacher Education" (Hersholt C. Waxman and George W. Bright); "Past and Future Stages in Educational…

  3. Field and laboratory notes on instream research - Research and Development of New Marking and Monitoring Technologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project addresses how to expand the current fish-tracking technologies to enable the fisheries community to successfully carry out the actions, research, and...

  4. Fellowship or Further Training for Family Medicine Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Dai, Mingliang; Eden, Aimee R; Peterson, Lars E; Mainous, Arch G

    2017-09-01

    The breadth of family medicine (FM) generates debate about the length of residency training. One argument used by proponents for lengthening training is that residents feel unprepared for practice. The objectives of our study were to (1) identify the proportion of FM residency graduates intending to pursue fellowship training and those who would have done an additional year of core residency training had it been available, and (2) determine whether an association exists between these two variables. We used data collected by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) as part of resident certification examination application in 2014 and 2015. Data included fellowship intention, and interest in pursuing another year of residency training if it were available. We used descriptive and bivariate statistics. The questionnaire was completed by 6,235 residents, of which 17.0% (n=1,063) intended to enroll in a fellowship. Overall 54.2% of residents were "not at all likely" to extend residency training, with 19.9% "extremely/moderately likely". Forty-six percent of those intending a fellowship were "not at all likely" to extend training and only 29% of those "extremely/moderately likely" to extend residency training intended to enroll in a fellowship. We found a disconnect between fellowship intention and desire for another year of residency training. Desire for fellowship may be more about obtaining specific skills and expertise or additional certifications, and less about being prepared for general practice in family medicine.

  5. Can a resident's publication record predict fellowship publications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Prasad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internal medicine fellowship programs have an incentive to select fellows who will ultimately publish. Whether an applicant's publication record predicts long term publishing remains unknown. METHODS: Using records of fellowship bound internal medicine residents, we analyzed whether publications at time of fellowship application predict publications more than 3 years (2 years into fellowship and up to 7 years after fellowship match. We calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios for every cutoff number of application publications, and plot a receiver operator characteristic curve of this test. RESULTS: Of 307 fellowship bound residents, 126 (41% published at least one article 3 to 7 years after matching, and 181 (59% of residents do not publish in this time period. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve is 0.59. No cutoff value for application publications possessed adequate test characteristics. CONCLUSION: The number of publications an applicant has at time of fellowship application is a poor predictor of who publishes in the long term. These findings do not validate the practice of using application publications as a tool for selecting fellows.

  6. Video conferencing technology in research on schizophrenia: a qualitative study of site research staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael; Rosenheck, Robert; Stern, Erica; Bellamy, Chyrell

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to advance knowledge of the experience of multisite research staff with video conferencing mental health data collection among study participants with schizophrenia. An end-of-study focus group was conducted with all (N = 19) study coordinators of a multisite randomized trial of pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia to characterize the experiences of coordinators overseeing semistructured assessments via video conferencing technology (VCT). Researchers conducted an audiotaped voluntary focus group. Investigators independently coded a transcript of the focus group, followed by discussions to reach consensus on key themes. Three key themes emerged, involving issues associated with (a) the technology itself, (b) the technology in the context of clinical care and research, and (c) the feasibility of using VCT for study assessments, including coordinators' perceptions of participants' experience of VCT. Additional themes were that (a) interviewer skills appeared to moderate the impact of VCT, (b) research participants with serious psychiatric disorders who participated in VCT assessments appeared, overall, to be more amenable to the technology than research coordinators anticipated, and (c) because VCT will be adapted in a wide range of settings, staffing and resource needs should be considered in planning for and adopting VCT for psychiatric research or clinical assessment. This study adds contextual detail and emphasis to the existing literature on the use of VCT in research and factors regarding the effective deployment of the technology in research.

  7. 34 CFR 1100.1 - What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 1100.1 What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? (a) Under the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program, the Director... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? 1100.1...

  8. Building technology transfer within research universities an entrepreneurial approach

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    For the past number of years, academic entrepreneurship has become one of the most widely studied topics in the entrepreneurship literature. Yet, despite all the research that has been conducted to date, there has not been a systematic attempt to analyze critically the factors which lie behind successful business spin-offs from university research. In this book, a group of academic thought-leaders in the field of technology transfer examine a number of areas critical to the promotion of start-ups on campus. Through a series of case studies, they examine current policies, structures, program initiatives and practices of fourteen international universities to develop a theory of successful academic entrepreneurship, with the aim of helping other universities to enhance the quality of their university transfer programs. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students working on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology transfer, as well as senior managers and policymakers.

  9. The hand surgery fellowship application process: expectations, logistics, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Osterman, Meredith

    2015-04-01

    To investigate expectations, logistics, and costs relevant to the hand surgery fellowship application process. We sought to discover (1) what both applicants and program directors are seeking, (2) what both parties have to offer, (3) how both parties collect information about each other, and (4) the costs incurred in arranging each match. We conducted on-line surveys of hand surgery fellowship applicants for appointment in 2015 and of current fellowship program directors. Sixty-two applicants and 41 program directors completed the survey. Results revealed applicants' demographic characteristics, qualifications, method of ranking hand fellowship programs, costs incurred (both monetary and opportunity) during the application process, ultimate match status, and suggestions for change. Results also revealed program directors' program demographics, rationale for offering interviews and favorably ranking applicants, application-related logistical details, costs incurred (both monetary and opportunity) during the application process, and suggestions for change. Applicants for hand surgery fellowship training are primarily interested in a potential program's academic reputation, emphasis on orthopedic surgery, and location. The typical, successfully matched applicant was a 30-year-old male orthopedic resident with 3 publications to his credit. Applicants rely on peers and Web sites for information about fellowships. Fellowship directors are primarily seeking applicants recommended by other experienced surgeons and with positive personality traits. The typical fellowship director offers a single year of orthopedic-based fellowship training to 2 fellows per year and relies on a common application and in-person interviews to collect information about applicants. Applicants appear to be more concerned than directors about the current state of the match process. Applicants and directors alike incur heavy costs, in both dollars and opportunity, to arrange each match. A nuanced

  10. Clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics: A program description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Gilbertson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in pathology informatics. In 2011, the program benchmarked its structure and operations against a 2009 white paper "Program requirements for fellowship education in the subspecialty of clinical informatics," endorsed by the Board of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA that described a proposal for a general clinical informatics fellowship program. Methods: A group of program faculty members and fellows compared each of the proposed requirements in the white paper with the fellowship program′s written charter and operations. The majority of white paper proposals aligned closely with the rules and activities in our program and comparison was straightforward. In some proposals, however, differences in terminology, approach, and philosophy made comparison less direct, and in those cases, the thinking of the group was recorded. After the initial evaluation, the remainder of the faculty reviewed the results and any disagreements were resolved. Results: The most important finding of the study was how closely the white paper proposals for a general clinical informatics fellowship program aligned with the reality of our existing pathology informatics fellowship. The program charter and operations of the program were judged to be concordant with the great majority of specific white paper proposals. However, there were some areas of discrepancy and the reasons for the discrepancies are discussed in the manuscript. Conclusions: After the comparison, we conclude that the existing pathology informatics fellowship could easily meet all substantive proposals put forth in the 2009 clinical informatics program requirements white paper. There was also agreement on a number of philosophical issues, such as the advantages of multiple fellows, the need for core knowledge and skill sets, and the need to maintain clinical skills during informatics training. However

  11. The latest progress in research of plastics processing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Jinping

    2012-01-01

    According to the great demand for the" green" plastics processing technology of the low energy consumption, high efficiency and environmental protection in plastics industry, the plastics processing method and technology based on the elongation rheology, with continuing evolution and innovation of the plastics plasticating and conveying method, are presented and researched on the basis of the plastics dynamic processing method arid equipment, and the plastics plasticating and conveying process in the vane extrusion system, the technical characteristics and the applications of vane plasticating and conveying technology are discussed. The research results show that compared with the conventional processing equipment, this new technology and equipment shows many outstanding advantages, such as shortening the thermo-meehanical history of the plastics processing by more than 50 % , reducing the energy consumption by 30 % or so, improving the mixing and blending effects, improving the quality of the products and the adaptability to materials, etc. , and it is found that the new technology and equipment has special superiority in the fields of the processing for material systems, such as the multiphase and multicomponent composite materials, the shear heat sensitive macromolecular materials, etc.

  12. 77 FR 46909 - Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directives... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) Policy... technology@sba.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Information SBA is publishing Policy Directives...

  13. New Territories in Information Technologies and Tourism Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Munar, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The chapter presents a novel research agenda that expands the fields of technology studies and design in tourism. It does so by adopting a series of theoretical frameworks external to tourism and grounded in the fields of philosophy, digital humanities, communication, and design. The chapter sugg...... (IT) changes sociocultural practices and the way tourism can be performed and imagined. The chapter indicates three areas where an expansion of the territories of knowledge creation might benefit the development and innovation of IT in tourism.......The chapter presents a novel research agenda that expands the fields of technology studies and design in tourism. It does so by adopting a series of theoretical frameworks external to tourism and grounded in the fields of philosophy, digital humanities, communication, and design. The chapter...... suggests that the (post)positivist methodology that has dominated work in the field of tourism technology needs to be supplemented by more critical understandings. Viewed through the lens of the critical turn in tourism research, the authors propose that the increasing ubiquity of information technologies...

  14. Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creed, Robert John; Laney, Patrick Thomas

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

  15. Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creed, R.J.; Laney, P.T.

    2002-05-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

  16. Creating a Fellowship Curriculum in Patient Safety and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookire, Susan A; Gandhi, Tejal K; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to create a curriculum suitable for a newly created clinical fellowship curriculum across Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching hospitals as part of a newly created 2-year quality and safety fellowship program described in the companion article "Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality." The aim of the curriculum development process was to define, coordinate, design, and implement a set of essential skills for future physician-scholars of any specialty to lead operational quality and patient safety efforts. The process of curriculum development and the ultimate content are described in this article. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  18. FY03 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C

    2004-03-05

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2003, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of researching and developing the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the LDRD program and the ''Tech Base'' program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2003, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technology

  19. Data management and global change research: Technology and infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, W.A. (Technical Information Specialist, Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    There is a consensus among many scientists who would perform global change research that global-scale scientific data management programs and enabling policies need to be developed and implemented concomitantly with, if not in advance of, global change research programs. They are hopeful that US Federal government policies for scientific and technical data and information management will provide timely archival, analysis, and dissemination of global change research data and will enable them to share that data with colleagues, internationally. Federal data managers believe that data management technology and infrastructure requirements for global change research programs can be met through existing or planned enhancements to systems in operation used for scientific data gathering, processing, and dissemination. Scientists are concerned, however, that because of the scope and diversity of global change research programs entirely new systems and approaches to data management may need to be devised.

  20. Space Grant Research Launches Rehabilitation Chair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Working with funding from the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program-which was implemented by NASA Headquarters to fund research, education, and public service projects-a biomedical engineering student created a vibration-based system that could combat bone loss from prolonged trips to space. A rehabilitation chair incorporating the technology is now sold by Sheboygan, Wisconsin-based VibeTech Inc. and is helping people recover more quickly from injuries and surgery.

  1. Research Data Reusability: Conceptual Foundations, Barriers and Enabling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Thanos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput scientific instruments are generating massive amounts of data. Today, one of the main challenges faced by researchers is to make the best use of the world’s growing wealth of data. Data (reusability is becoming a distinct characteristic of modern scientific practice. By data (reusability, we mean the ease of using data for legitimate scientific research by one or more communities of research (consumer communities that is produced by other communities of research (producer communities. Data (reusability allows the reanalysis of evidence, reproduction and verification of results, minimizing duplication of effort, and building on the work of others. It has four main dimensions: policy, legal, economic and technological. The paper addresses the technological dimension of data reusability. The conceptual foundations of data reuse as well as the barriers that hamper data reuse are presented and discussed. The data publication process is proposed as a bridge between the data author and user and the relevant technologies enabling this process are presented.

  2. Collaborative Action Research on Technology Integration for Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Hsing; Ke, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jin-Tong; Hsu, Wen-Hua

    2012-02-01

    This paper briefly reports the outcomes of an action research inquiry on the use of blogs, MS PowerPoint [PPT], and the Internet as learning tools with a science class of sixth graders for project-based learning. Multiple sources of data were essential to triangulate the key findings articulated in this paper. Corresponding to previous studies, the incorporation of technology and project-based learning could motivate students in self-directed exploration. The students were excited about the autonomy over what to learn and the use of PPT to express what they learned. Differing from previous studies, the findings pointed to the lack information literacy among students. The students lacked information evaluation skills, note-taking and information synthesis. All these findings imply the importance of teaching students about information literacy and visual literacy when introducing information technology into the classroom. The authors suggest that further research should focus on how to break the culture of "copy-and-paste" by teaching the skills of note-taking and synthesis through inquiry projects for science learning. Also, further research on teacher professional development should focus on using collaboration action research as a framework for re-designing graduate courses for science teachers in order to enhance classroom technology integration.

  3. 76 FR 77361 - Announcement of Funding Award for 2011 for Request for Qualification (RFQ) for the Fellowship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... the Fellowship Placement Pilot Program AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy..., Policy Division, Office of Policy Development and Research, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban... persons who are hearing- or speech-impaired, this number may be reached via TTY by dialing the...

  4. The Three-dimensional Digital Factory for Shipbuilding Technology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional digital factory technology research is the hotspot in shipbuilding recently. The three-dimensional digital factory technology not only focus on design the components of the product, but also discuss on the simulation and analyses of the production process.Based on the three-dimensional model, the basic data layer, application control layer and the presentation layer of hierarchical structure are established in the three-dimensional digital factory of shipbuilding in this paper. And the key technologies of three-dimensional digital factory of shipbuilding are analysed. Finally, a case study is applied and the results show that the three-dimensional digital factory will play an important role in the future.

  5. Research on Digital Product Modeling Key Technologies of Digital Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Guoping; ZHOU Zude; HU Yefa; ZHAO Liang

    2006-01-01

    With the globalization and diversification of the market and the rapid development of Information Technology (IT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), the digital revolution of manufacturing is coming. One of the key technologies in digital manufacturing is product digital modeling. This paper firstly analyzes the information and features of the product digital model during each stage in the product whole lifecycle, then researches on the three critical technologies of digital modeling in digital manufacturing-product modeling, standard for the exchange of product model data and digital product data management. And the potential signification of the product digital model during the process of digital manufacturing is concluded-product digital model integrates primary features of each stage during the product whole lifecycle based on graphic features, applies STEP as data exchange mechanism, and establishes PDM system to manage the large amount, complicated and dynamic product data to implement the product digital model data exchange, sharing and integration.

  6. Technology Transfer: From the Research Bench to Commercialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A. Van Norman, MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in medicine hinges on the successful translation of basic science discoveries into new medical devices, diagnostics, and therapeutics. “Technology transfer” is the process by which new innovations flow from the basic research bench to commercial entities and then to public use. In academic institutions, intellectual property rights do not usually fall automatically to the individual inventor per se, but most often are the property of the institution. Technology transfer offices are tasked with seeing to it that such intellectual property rights are properly managed and commercialized. This 2-part series explores the technology transfer process from invention to commercialization. Part 1 reviews basic aspects of intellectual property rights, primarily patents and copyrights. Part 2 will discuss the ways in which inventions become commercialized through startup companies and licensing arrangements with industry players.

  7. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SEDIMENT SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY, AQUATIC RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS, RUSSIAN PEAT BORER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Russian Peat Borer designed and fabricated by Aquatic Research Instruments was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in April and May 1999 at sites in EPA Regions 1 and 5, respectively. In additio...

  8. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Journal of Technology and Teacher Education," 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Karen; Juncker, Janeel; Aitken, Meghan; West, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the "Journal of Technology and Teacher Education" to determine research trends from the past decade (2001-2010). Topical (via EBSCO subject term analysis), article types, and authorship trends were all analyzed. A few of "JTATE"'s seminal articles were also identified using "Publish or Perish." Findings were…

  9. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Journal of Technology and Teacher Education," 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Karen; Juncker, Janeel; Aitken, Meghan; West, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the "Journal of Technology and Teacher Education" to determine research trends from the past decade (2001-2010). Topical (via EBSCO subject term analysis), article types, and authorship trends were all analyzed. A few of "JTATE"'s seminal articles were also identified using "Publish or Perish." Findings were…

  10. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2004, and exemplifies Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program and the LDRD program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply technologies to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2004, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the long-term science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technologies that have been identified as

  11. Accessibility and quality of online information for pediatric orthopaedic surgery fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Austin R; Murphy, Robert F; Spence, David D; Kelly, Derek M; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric orthopaedic fellowship applicants commonly use online-based resources for information on potential programs. Two primary sources are the San Francisco Match (SF Match) database and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) database. We sought to determine the accessibility and quality of information that could be obtained by using these 2 sources. The online databases of the SF Match and POSNA were reviewed to determine the availability of embedded program links or external links for the included programs. If not available in the SF Match or POSNA data, Web sites for listed programs were located with a Google search. All identified Web sites were analyzed for accessibility, content volume, and content quality. At the time of online review, 50 programs, offering 68 positions, were listed in the SF Match database. Although 46 programs had links included with their information, 36 (72%) of them simply listed http://www.sfmatch.org as their unique Web site. Ten programs (20%) had external links listed, but only 2 (4%) linked directly to the fellowship web page. The POSNA database does not list any links to the 47 programs it lists, which offer 70 positions. On the basis of a Google search of the 50 programs listed in the SF Match database, web pages were found for 35. Of programs with independent web pages, all had a description of the program and 26 (74%) described their application process. Twenty-nine (83%) listed research requirements, 22 (63%) described the rotation schedule, and 12 (34%) discussed the on-call expectations. A contact telephone number and/or email address was provided by 97% of programs. Twenty (57%) listed both the coordinator and fellowship director, 9 (26%) listed the coordinator only, 5 (14%) listed the fellowship director only, and 1 (3%) had no contact information given. The SF Match and POSNA databases provide few direct links to fellowship Web sites, and individual program Web sites either do not exist or do not

  12. The 1993 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  13. 1994 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  14. DOE/PSU Graduate Student Fellowship Program for Hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimbala, John M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-03-30

    The primary objective of this project is to stimulate academic interest in the conventional hydropower field by supplying research support for at least eight individual Master of Science (MS) or Doctoral (PhD) level research projects, each consisting of a graduate student supervised by a faculty member. We have completed many of the individual student research projects: 2 PhD students have finished, and 4 are still working towards their PhD degree. 4 MS students have finished, and 2 are still working towards their MS degree, one of which is due to finish this April. In addition, 4 undergraduate student projects have been completed, and one is to be completed this April. These projects were supervised by 7 faculty members and an Advisory/Review Panel. Our students and faculty have presented their work at national or international conferences and have submitted several journal publications. Three of our graduate students (Keith Martin, Dan Leonard and Hosein Foroutan) have received HRF Fellowships during the course of this project. All of the remaining students are anticipated to be graduated by the end of Fall Semester 2014. All of the tasks for this project will have been completed once all the students have been graduated, although it will be another year or two until all the journal publications have been finalized based on the work performed as part of this DOE Hydropower project.

  15. Research on key technology of space laser communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chengwu; Huang, Huiming; Liu, Hongyang; Gao, Shenghua; Cheng, Liyu

    2016-10-01

    Since the 21st century, Spatial laser communication has made a breakthrough development. Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have carried out the test of spatial laser communication technology on-orbit, and put forward a series of plans. In 2011, China made the first technology demonstration of satellite-ground laser communication carried by HY-2 satellite. Nowadays, in order to improve the transmission rate of spatial network, the topic of spatial laser communication network is becoming a research hotspot at home and abroad. This thesis, from the basic problem of spatial laser communication network to solve, analyzes the main difference between spatial network and ground network, which draws forth the key technology of spatial laser communication backbone network, and systematically introduces our research on aggregation, addressing, architecture of spatial network. From the perspective of technology development status and trends, the thesis proposes the development route of spatial laser communication network in stages. So as to provide reference about the development of spatial laser communication network in China.

  16. BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G.

    1995-02-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  17. Design and Implementation of an Evaluation Methodology for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, M. G.; Miller, M.; Freeman, M.; Watson, C.; Khalkho, M.; Smith, T.

    2005-12-01

    The NFFP was created in 2002 to accommodate the needs and capabilities of both NASA and the university community. The program combines aspects of two successful former NASA programs, the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA/USRA JOint VEnture (JOVE) program. The NFFP contributes directly to NASA's strategic goal to "inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics", and NASA's Office of Education strategic objective to "strengthen NASA's involvement in higher education to enhance the nation's science and technology capability in NASA related fields to help meet NASA's future personnel needs." The primary goals of the NFFP are to increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to Agency research objectives; provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; involve faculty in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA's strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; facilitate interdisciplinary networking; and establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of the program. Participants are required to submit a research report and complete a program evaluation. The NFFP is evaluated using Web-based survey instruments in the NASA Education Evaluation Information System (NEEIS) that have been designed to collect data that measure program activities and accomplishments against program goals and NASA's education programs evaluation criteria. Data are collected from Faculty Fellows, NASA Colleagues, and students who accompanied Faculty Fellows. Participant Feedback Forms gather quantitative and qualitative information on research accomplishments, the benefits and impacts of the program, and overall program evaluation data. Follow-up feedback instruments are designed to

  18. Update on factors motivating pharmacy students to pursue residency and fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Bryan C; Weber, Lynn M

    2013-08-15

    The factors motivating pharmacy students to pursue residency and fellowship training in 2011 versus 1993 were assessed. A survey replicating previous research was electronically sent to 794 residency directors and 29 fellowship program directors with a request to forward the survey to current residents and fellows. A similar survey was sent to 124 colleges of pharmacy with a request to forward the survey to the faculty member most involved with residency and fellowship promotion within their doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) curriculum. Participants were asked to rank leading motivating factors and barriers to pharmacy students pursuing these programs. Additional data collected included when and the methods by which these programs are promoted. Among residents and fellows, 865 usable surveys were returned. The leading motivating reasons for residents and fellows to pursue training were "to gain knowledge and experience," a "desire for specialized training," [corrected] and "understood as a prerequisite for certain jobs." A total of 124 U.S. pharmacy schools were surveyed, and 65 (52%) returned completed responses. "Understood as a prerequisite for certain jobs," "faculty stressing importance," and "recognition of the new and challenging roles for pharmacists in the future" were the factors most frequently cited by faculty members. Compared with previous research, a new factor motivating pharmacy students to pursue residency and fellowship training is the consideration that these opportunities are a prerequisite for certain jobs. This development may be attributable to trends in the supply and demand of pharmacists, the recognition of the value in these programs by major pharmacy organizations, and the evolving role of pharmacists in direct patient care.

  19. A Community of Scholars: An NEH Summer Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keroack, Elizabeth Carros

    1990-01-01

    Describes the experiences of a secondary teacher participating in a six-week National Endowment for the Humanities summer fellowship at Oxford, England. Reports that the teacher went back to her duties renewed through change. (RS)

  20. PR Fellowships are Beneficial to Teachers and Private Firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Albert

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of a faculty fellowship with a public relations firm in terms of extra help for the sponsoring organization and improved knowledge and skills for the participating faculty. (HTH)

  1. Benchmarking International High-Technology Research Laboratories' Marketing in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Suvi-Anna

    2014-01-01

    The thesis studies current marketing conventions of international high-technology research laboratories in Europe and is done for the UNELMA-project. UNELMA is a joint project between Finnish and Swedish universities and institutions funded by the European Union, the Provincial Government of Norbotten, Lapin Liitto and Interreg IV A. The project wishes to create a network of professional services which will benefit companies in the Bothnian Arc between Finland and Sweden. The study itself...

  2. Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrieling, P. Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SNL/CA proposes the Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) facility to support customer-driven national security mission requirements while demonstrating a fiscally responsible approach to cost-control. SNL/CA realizes that due to the current backlog of capital projects in NNSA that following the normal Line Item process to procure capital funding is unlikely and therefore SNL/CA will be looking at all options including Alternative Financing.

  3. New Technologies and New Paradigms in Historical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Cartelli; Luisa Miglio; Marco Palma

    2001-01-01

    After a short introduction on media evolution and its implication on human history, the paper presents an account of two experiences the authors had while using new technologies in disseminating bibliographical and historical information. The first experience concerns the Web publication of a bibliography on Beneventan manuscripts and arose from the need to overcome the long de-lays in publishing printed information. The Web publication also serves as an online resource for all researchers in...

  4. Measuring Diagnostic Stand for Experimental Researches in Technology Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Dreval'

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews applied techniques, methods, and structure of the control and measuring means to conduct experimental and scientific researches of cutting processes. Existing research methods in cutting the metals are divided by features, such as essence of methods, the number of records of physical indicators, the number of studied factors, duration of tests. The groups of methods are briefly characterized.The chair "Tool Engineering and Technologies" of BMSTU developed and made a diagnostic stand of control and measurements for conducting research activities in the field of materials processing technology by cutting to define rational technological decisions, when machining, and carry out an analysis of efficiency and economic feasibility of made decisions. The diagnostic stand contains modern the electronic equipment. Record of measuring parameters is made in real time with a possibility for visual representation of read results and mathematical and statistical processing of measurement results. The stand can be used in research laboratories of machine-building enterprises, laboratories of higher education institutions, and other scientific divisions.The paper presents a justification that the stand is reasonable to use for the following: completion and choice of rational cutting modes, workability assessment of new constructional materials, technical and operational characteristics of the processed surfaces, and operational properties of the cutting tools of various producers, choice of optimum geometrical parameters of the cutting tools and brands of the lubricant cooling technological means, as well as the energy consumption for the chosen machining process. The stand allows us to make an assessment of wear resistance and tribology-technical characteristics of tool materials, as well as an accuracy, rigidity, vibration stability of machines, both new and being in operation.

  5. SYRUPS: COMPOSITION, TECHNOLOGY, CURRENT STATE OF RESEARCH (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The overview data for the syrups formulation, including syrups for children, with synthetic substances were represented: assortment, composition, technological approach. The advantages and disadvantages of this dosage form were described. Details considered flavoring agents and other auxiliaries (stabilizers, preservatives, thickeners comprising syrups were closely examined. The issues of current research state of syrups for children were described.

  6. Research on UV detector technology and application in MAWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Da-wei; Hao, Wei; Yang, Xiao-jun; Tian, Yan

    2011-08-01

    The atmospheric transmission characteristics of ultraviolet radiation are unique, which have made ultraviolet detecting technology has been developed rapidly in military application domain. Missile approaching warning system based UV detecting technology distinguish target by detecting the ultraviolet radiation in solar blind spectrum from missile's plumes. This warning system is a passive warning system, which has advantages of good concealment, low false-alarm rate, cooling without low temperature, small size and light weight. It has been an important part of modern battlefield in the electro-optical countermeasure domain This paper expatiate the principle of ultraviolet detecting technology and introduce the developments about ultraviolet warning and related technology, including the ultraviolet transmission in the atmosphere, the ultraviolet radiance characteristic of target and background, the ultraviolet photoelectric detectors, and the ultraviolet detection technology. A suit of ultraviolet photoelectric imaging system has been designed. This system is made up of three parts, there are narrowband ultraviolet optical system in large field, ultraviolet ICCD camera and ultraviolet warming image processing device. A great deal of imaging experiments about ultraviolet target in several kinds of typical meteorological condition have been done, these images shows the system is efficient and reasonable. The characteristics of ultraviolet objective imaging be tested and evaluated by analyze the experiment images obtained by the system. This system provide theoretical and test bases for engineering research on ultraviolet missile approaching warning system.

  7. Environmental Remediation Technologies Derived from Space Industry Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Sauser, Brian; Helminger, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in the 1950s and 1960s, an abundance of effort and initiative was focused on propelling the space industry outward for planetary exploration and habitation. During these early years, the push to take space science to new levels indirectly contributed to the evolution of another science field that would not fully surface until the early 1980s, environmental remediation. This field is associated with the remediation or cleanup of environmental resources such as groundwater, soil, and sediment. Because the space-exploration initiative began prior to the establishment of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in December of 1970, many NASA Centers as well as space-related support contractors allowed for the release of spent chemicals into the environment. Subsequently, these land owners have been directed by the EPA to responsibly initiate cleanup of their impacted sites. This paper will focus on the processes and lessons learned with the development, testing, and commercialization initiatives associated with four remediation technologies. The technologies include installation techniques for permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), the use of ultrasound to improve long-term performance of PRBs, emulsified zero-valent iron for product-level solvent degradation, and emulsion technologies for application to metal and polychlorinated biphenyl contaminated media. Details of the paper cover technology research, evaluation, and testing; contracts and grants; and technology transfer strategies including patenting, marketing, and licensing.

  8. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  9. Book Review: Opening Space Research: Dreams, Technology, and Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Gregory A.

    2012-05-01

    In Opening Space Research: Dreams, Technology, and Scientific Discovery, George Ludwig takes the reader behind the scenes of space exploration in the 1950s. The well-known episodes in this history—such as the stories of Sputnik, Laika the cosmodog, and the founding of NASA—are here placed in the rich context of the scientific and technical goals that motivated Ludwig and his fellow researchers. Ludwig relates the personal experiences of the many engineers, physicists, and university students who made possible humanity’s first ventures into space.

  10. Center for Alternative Energy Storage Research and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    and civilian markets . Research at CAESRT has been directed primarily at Defense Department (Army) applications to provide effective technology...system-level operational strategies . Specifically, CAESRT has conducted interrelated research on: nanostructured battery and capacitor...applications are sensitive to the characteristics of the applications. Often it takes more than 3nS 2pS 4pS 1pS 3pS 2nS 4nS 1Li 3Li 1C 2C 3C 4C 5C 2Li

  11. Research progress of aluminum alloy automotive sheet and application technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Mingtu; You Jianghai; Lu Hongzhou; Wang Zhiwen

    2012-01-01

    Pretrcatment technology is deeply discussed to explain its importance in guaranteeing properties and form- ability of aluminum alloy automotive sheet. Some typical applications of aluminum alloy automotive sheet to automotive industry are listed. Based on the author's knowledge and recognition and research progress presently, the important re- search contents about aluminum alloy automotive sheet are emphasized. Reducing cost and price of sheet and going deeply into application research are the main work for expending the application of aluminum alloy automotive sheet in the automobile.

  12. New technologies and paradigms in education and research: some reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BHAYA, A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article calls attention to the fact that higher education and research worldwide is being transformed by new tools, new methods of evaluation and collaboration and so on. Although some notice has been taken of this in Brazil, by and large, there has not been much debate or discussion on the impact of these novelties on university education and research. We briefly discuss some of these new ideas and technologies and speculate on the changes that they might or should engender in the Brazilian system of higher education.

  13. Design Research through the Lens of Sociology of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Hilde Østerås; Seim, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    The use of an approach to design research inspired by Sociology of Technology offers a nuanced understanding of design processes. The purpose of this paper is to explore how terminology derived from the socio-technical theory of Actor Network (ANT) can be used to understand the complexity of design......-design of existing workspace and work practice in an industrial company. The case study (i) illustrates a socio-technical approach to design research and (ii) shows how ANT terminology can be applied in an analysis of the course of events in a design process with numerous actors involved....

  14. MicroRNA Detection: Current Technology and Research Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Eric A.; Broyles, David; Head, Trajen; Deo, Sapna K.

    2015-07-01

    The relatively new field of microRNA (miR) has experienced rapid growth in methodology associated with its detection and bioanalysis as well as with its role in -omics research, clinical diagnostics, and new therapeutic strategies. The breadth of this area of research and the seemingly exponential increase in number of publications on the subject can present scientists new to the field with a daunting amount of information to evaluate. This review aims to provide a collective overview of miR detection methods by relating conventional, established techniques [such as quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), microarray, and Northern blotting (NB)] and relatively recent advancements [such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), highly sensitive biosensors, and computational prediction of microRNA/targets] to common miR research strategies. This should guide interested readers toward a more focused study of miR research and the surrounding technology.

  15. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Adapting qualitative research strategies to technology savvy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Deanna Marie; Ide, Bette

    2014-05-01

    To adapt research strategies involving adolescents in a grounded theory qualitative research study by conducting email rather than face-to-face interviews. Adolescent culture relies heavily on text-based communication and teens prefer interactions mediated through technology. Traditional qualitative research strategies need to be rethought when working with adolescents. Adapting interviewing strategies to electronic environments is timely and relevant for researching adolescents. Twenty three adolescents (aged 16-21) were interviewed by email. A letter of invitation was distributed. Potential participants emailed the researcher to convey interest in participating. If the inclusion criteria were met, email interviews were initiated. Participants controlled the interviews through their rate of response to interview questions. A grounded theory methodology was employed. Initial contact with participants reiterated confidentiality and the ability to withdraw from the study at any time. Interviews began with the collection of demographic information and a broad opening based on a semi-structured interview guide. All data were permissible, including text, photos, music, videos or outside media, for example YouTube. The participant was allowed to give direction to the interview after initial questions were posed. Email interviews continued until saturation was reached in the data. Participants were enthusiastic about email interviewing. Attrition did not occur. Email interviewing gave participants more control over the research, decreased power differentials between the adolescent and researcher, allowed the study to be adapted to cultural, linguistic and developmental needs, and maintained confidentiality. As participants said that email communication was slow and they preferred instant messaging, replication in faster-paced media is recommended. Repetition in face-to-face settings is warranted to evaluate how technology may have influenced the findings. Implications for

  17. Virtual reality technologies for research and education in obesity and diabetes: research needs and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert Skip; Wansink, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health - Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR's capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  18. Gender differences in recommendation letters for postdoctoral fellowships in geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Kuheli; Pfaff, Danielle L.; Bernstein, Ariel F.; Dillard, Joseph S.; Block, Caryn J.

    2016-11-01

    Gender disparities in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, including the geosciences, are well documented and widely discussed. In the geosciences, despite receiving 40% of doctoral degrees, women hold less than 10% of full professorial positions. A significant leak in the pipeline occurs during postdoctoral years, so biases embedded in postdoctoral processes, such as biases in recommendation letters, may be deterrents to careers in geoscience for women. Here we present an analysis of an international data set of 1,224 recommendation letters, submitted by recommenders from 54 countries, for postdoctoral fellowships in the geosciences over the period 2007-2012. We examine the relationship between applicant gender and two outcomes of interest: letter length and letter tone. Our results reveal that female applicants are only half as likely to receive excellent letters versus good letters compared to male applicants. We also find no evidence that male and female recommenders differ in their likelihood to write stronger letters for male applicants over female applicants. Our analysis also reveals significant regional differences in letter length, with letters from the Americas being significantly longer than any other region, whereas letter tone appears to be distributed equivalently across all world regions. These results suggest that women are significantly less likely to receive excellent recommendation letters than their male counterparts at a critical juncture in their career.

  19. 78 FR 18674 - Invitation for Public Comment on Draft DOT Research, Development and Technology Strategic Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ..., Development and Technology Strategic Plan (2013-2018) AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology.... Department of Transportation, Research, Development and Technology Strategic Plan FY 2013-2018. The new five-year strategic plan will guide the Department's research, development, and technology activities...

  20. [Health research and health technology assessment in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Manuel Antonio; Cabieses, Báltica; Paraje, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Health research is considered an essential element for the improvement of population health and it has been recommended that a share of the national health budget should be allocated to develop this field. Chile has undertaken efforts in the last decades in order to improve the governmental structure created to promote the development of health research, which has increased human resources and funding opportunities. On the other hand, the sustained economic growth of Chile in the last decades suggests that the health expenditure will maintain its increasing trend in the following years. This additional funding could be used to improve coverage of current activities performed in the health system, but also to address the incorporation of new strategies. More recently, health technology assessment (HTA) has been proposed as a process to support decisions about allocation of resources based on scientific evidence. This paper examines the relationship between the development of health research and the HTA process. First, it presents a brief diagnosis of the situation of health research in Chile. Second, it reviews the conceptual basis and the methods that account for the relationship between a HTA process and the development of health research. In particular, it emphasizes the relevance of identifying information gaps where funding additional research can be considered a good use of public resources. Finally, it discusses the challenges and possible courses of action that Chile could take in order to guarantee the continuous improvement of an articulated structure for health research and HTA.

  1. ADVANTAGES AND APPLICATIONS OF TISSUE MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY ON CANCER RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张喜平; 苏丹; 程琪辉

    2003-01-01

    S To provide evidences for exploiting tissue microarray (TMA) technology, we reviewed advantages and applications of TMA on tumor research. TMA has many advantages, including (1) section from TMA blocks can be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of up to 1,000 different tumors at DNA, RNA or protein level; (2) TMA is highly representative of their donor tissues; (3) TMA can improve conservation of tissue resources and experimental reagents, improve internal experimental control, and increase sample numbers per experiment, and can be used for large-scale, massively parallel in situ analysis; (4) TMA facilitates rapid translation of molecular discoveries to clinical applications. TMA has been applied to tumor research, such as glioma, breast tumor, lung cancer and so on. The development of novel biochip technologies has opened up new possibilities for the high-throughput molecular profiling of human tumors. Novel molecular markers emerging from high-throughput expression surveys could be analyzed on tumor TMA. It is anticipated that TMA, a new member of biochip, will soon become a widely used tool for all types of tissue-based research. TMA will lead to a significant acceleration of the transition of basic research findings into clinical applications.

  2. Research trends in electrochemical technology for water and wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianlong; Wang, Juan; Wang, Qunhui; Meng, Huimin; Wang, Lihong

    2017-03-01

    It is difficult to completely degrade wastewater containing refractory pollutants without secondary pollution by biological treatment, as well as physical-chemical process. Therefore, electrochemical technology has attracted much attention for its environmental compatibility, high removal efficiency, and potential cost effectiveness, especially on the industrial wastewater treatment. An effective bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index Core Collection database was conducted to evaluate electrochemical technology for water and wastewater treatment related research from 1994 to 2013. The amount of publications significantly increased in the last two decades. Journal of the Electrochemical Society published the most articles in this field with a top h-index of 90, taking 5.8 % of all, followed by Electrochimica Acta and Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry. The researchers focused on categories of chemistry, electrochemistry, and materials science. China and Chinese Academy of Sciences were the most productive country and institution, respectively, while the USA, with the most international collaborative articles and highest h-index of 130, was the major collaborator with 15 other countries in top 20 most productive countries. Moreover, based on the analysis of author keywords, title, abstract, and `KeyWords Plus', a new method named "word cluster analysis" was successfully applied to trace the research hotspot. Nowadays, researchers mainly focused on novel anodic electrode, especially on its physiochemical and electrochemical properties.

  3. Research trends in electrochemical technology for water and wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianlong; Wang, Juan; Wang, Qunhui; Meng, Huimin; Wang, Lihong

    2015-03-01

    It is difficult to completely degrade wastewater containing refractory pollutants without secondary pollution by biological treatment, as well as physical-chemical process. Therefore, electrochemical technology has attracted much attention for its environmental compatibility, high removal efficiency, and potential cost effectiveness, especially on the industrial wastewater treatment. An effective bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index Core Collection database was conducted to evaluate electrochemical technology for water and wastewater treatment related research from 1994 to 2013. The amount of publications significantly increased in the last two decades. Journal of the Electrochemical Society published the most articles in this field with a top h-index of 90, taking 5.8 % of all, followed by Electrochimica Acta and Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry. The researchers focused on categories of chemistry, electrochemistry, and materials science. China and Chinese Academy of Sciences were the most productive country and institution, respectively, while the USA, with the most international collaborative articles and highest h-index of 130, was the major collaborator with 15 other countries in top 20 most productive countries. Moreover, based on the analysis of author keywords, title, abstract, and `KeyWords Plus', a new method named "word cluster analysis" was successfully applied to trace the research hotspot. Nowadays, researchers mainly focused on novel anodic electrode, especially on its physiochemical and electrochemical properties.

  4. An Application of Latent Variable Structural Equation Modeling For Experimental Research in Educational Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hyeon Woo LEE

    2011-01-01

      AN APPLICATION OF LATENT VARIABL AN APPLICATION OF LATENT VARIABLE STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELING FOR EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY As the technology-enriched learning environments...

  5. The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program: The First Five Years 1989-1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, J.; Ward, E.

    1996-03-01

    NASA accepted the Congressional mandate to manage the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (NSGC&FP) and announced the original competition for Space Grant awards in 1989. Currently, 52 independently governed Space Grant consortia administer programs in three areas of university and NASA concern: research, education, and public service. NASA funds have remained stable at $15 million since 1991, but the consortia have leveraged matching funds, including in-kind contributions, to approximately double the Space Grant awards. The number of affiliated Space Grant institutions has grown from 86 affiliates in 1990 to over 550 affiliates in 1996. Members include many of the finest colleges and universities in the nation, internationally competitive business and industrial partners, small businesses, state and local government agencies, private colleges, community colleges, medical colleges, and other nonprofit organizations. Though the program has been fully operational in all 52 consortia for less than five years, the benefits to the taxpayer have been significant. Space Grant faculty and students obtained funding for over 300 research proposals. Since 1990, the NSGC&FP has served close to 6500 citizens by providing tuition assistance. Among these 6500 were significant numbers of students from underrepresented groups in science and engineering. Space Grant consortia leveraged $16.5 million for precollege activities and administered over 1300 precollege projects that promote NASA-related science education. Space Grant precollege programs, serving both teachers and students, provide good examples of higher education faculty working well with local school systems. The consortia administered over 600 public service programs and leveraged approximately $4.5 million. Space Grant funds provided science and technology lectures, demonstrations, science exhibits, space-related periodicals, audio and video productions of NASA-related subjects, and have helped to

  6. Common Technologies for Environmental Research Infrastructures in ENVRIplus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Jean-Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Environmental and geoscientific research infrastructures (RIs) are dedicated to distinct aspects of the ocean, atmosphere, ecosystems, or solid Earth research, yet there is significant commonality in the way they conceive, develop, operate and upgrade their observation systems and platforms. Many environmental Ris are distributed network of observatories (be it drifting buoys, geophysical observatories, ocean-bottom stations, atmospheric measurements sites) with needs for remote operations. Most RIs have to deal with calibration and standardization issues. RIs use a variety of measurements technologies, but this variety is based on a small, common set of physical principles. All RIs have set their own research and development priorities, and developed their solution to their problems - however many problems are common across RIs. Finally, RIs may overlap in terms of scientific perimeter. In ENVRIplus we aim, for the first time, to identify common opportunities for innovation, to support common research and development across RIs on promising issues, and more generally to create a forum to spread state of the art techniques among participants. ENVRIplus activities include 1) measurement technologies: where are the common types of measurement for which we can share expertise or common development? 2) Metrology : how do we tackle together the diversified challenge of quality assurance and standardization? 3) Remote operations: can we address collectively the need for autonomy, robustness and distributed data handling? And 4) joint operations for research: are we able to demonstrate that together, RIs are able to provide relevant information to support excellent research. In this process we need to nurture an ecosystem of key players. Can we involve all the key technologists of the European RIs for a greater mutual benefit? Can we pave the way to a growing common market for innovative European SMEs, with a common programmatic approach conducive to targeted R&D? Can we

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2004 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2004-08-31

    This meeting is the seventeenth oilheat industry technology meeting held since 1984 and the forth since the National Oilheat Research Alliance was formed. This year's symposium is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Program under the United States Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  8. HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, E

    2009-03-02

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies

  9. Technology Roadmap Research Program for the Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph R. Vehec

    2010-12-30

    The steel industry's Technology Roadmap Program (TRP) is a collaborative R&D effort jointly sponsored by the steel industry and the United States Department of Energy. The TRP program was designed to develop new technologies to save energy , increase competitiveness, and improve the environment. TRP ran from July, 1997 to December, 2008, with a total program budget of $38 million dollars. During that period 47 R&D projects were performed by 28 unique research organizations; co-funding was provided by DOE and 60 industry partners. The projects benefited all areas of steelmaking and much know-how was developed and transferred to industry. The American Iron and Steel Institute is the owner of all intellectual property developed under TRP and licenses it at commercial rates to all steelmakers. TRP technologies are in widespread use in the steel industry as participants received royalty-free use of intellectual property in return for taking the risk of funding this research.

  10. Development of New Technologies for Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, the stem cells have been extensively studied including embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. In the recent years, several stem cells have been initially used in the treatment of diseases, such as in bone marrow transplant. At the same time, isolation and culture experimental technologies for stem cell research have been widely developed in recent years. In addition, molecular imaging technologies including optical molecular imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, and computed tomography have been developed rapidly in recent the 10 years and have also been used in the research on disease mechanism and evaluation of treatment of disease related with stem cells. This paper will focus on recent typical isolation, culture, and observation techniques of stem cells followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future applications of the new technologies in stem cells are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the paper is then concluded.

  11. The Research on Application of Information Technology in sports Stadiums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Han; Lu, Ma; Gan, Luying

    With the Olympic glory in the national fitness program planning and the smooth development of China, the public's concern for the sport continues to grow, while their physical health is also increasingly fervent desired, the country launched a modern technological construction of sports facilities. Information technology applications in the sports venues in the increasingly wide range of modern venues and facilities, including not only the intelligent application of office automation systems, intelligent systems and sports facilities, communication systems for event management, ticket access control system, contest information systems, television systems, Command and Control System, but also in action including the use of computer technology, image analysis, computer-aided training athletes, sports training system and related data entry systems, decision support systems.Using documentary data method, this paper focuses on the research on application of information technology in Sports Stadiums, and try to explore its future trends.With a view to promote the growth of China's national economyand,so as to improve the students'quality and promote the cause of Chinese sports.

  12. Research progress of terahertz wave technology in food inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhanke; Ying, Yibin; Zhang, Hongjian; Yu, Haiyan

    2006-10-01

    Food safety and quality concern have become more and more significant in recent years. There is therefore an increasing focus on new technologies that can be applied to food quality evaluation or safety inspection, either to simplify or speed up the checking process, or to provide additional functionality. For example, the technique of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been used for the authentication of agricultural products and food samples. Terahertz (THz) radiation, or THz wave, is electromagnetic wave lies between mid-infrared and microwave radiation. During the past decade, THz waves have been used to characterize the electronic, vibrational and compositional properties of solid, liquid and gas phase materials. The main two applications in which THz fields involved are THz spectroscopy and THz imaging. Terahertz wave technology, as a new area of research, has shown its wide prospects in imaging, diagnosis, detection, and monitoring, etc. Recently, THz technology has gained a lot of attention from biological spectral analysis to bio-medical imaging due to its unique features compared with microwave and optical waves. In this paper, a brief review is given to summarize the progress of THz techqiues in the field of food inspection. The properties of THz wave, its uniqueness in sensing and imaging applications, and the prospect of this novel technology in food industry were discussed.

  13. Research and development of biochip technologies in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Solomon J.; Chiou, Arthur E. T.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advancements in several genome-sequencing projects have stimulated an enormous interest in microarray DNA chip technology, especially in the biomedical sciences and pharmaceutical industries. The DNA chips facilitated the miniaturization of conventional nucleic acid hybridizations, by either robotically spotting thousands of library cDNAs or in situ synthesis of high-density oligonucleotides onto solid supports. These innovations have found a wide range of applications in molecular biology, especially in studying gene expression and discovering new genes from the global view of genomic analysis. The research and development of this powerful tool has also received great attentions in Taiwan. In this paper, we report the current progresses of our DNA chip project, along with the current status of other biochip projects in Taiwan, such as protein chip, PCR chip, electrophoresis chip, olfactory chip, etc. The new development of biochip technologies integrates the biotechnology with the semiconductor processing, the micro- electro-mechanical, optoelectronic, and digital signal processing technologies. Most of these biochip technologies utilitze optical detection methods for data acquisition and analysis. The strengths and advantages of different approaches are compared and discussed in this report.

  14. An Action Research on Open Knowledge and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Isabel; Cardoso, Margarida; Carvalho, João Vidal; Graça, José Ismael

    R&D has always been considered a strategic asset of companies. Traditionally, companies that have their own R&D function are better prepared to compete in the globalized economy because they are able to produce the knowledge and technology required to advance products and services. SMEs also need to become highly innovative and competitive in order to be successful. Nevertheless, their ability to have an internal R&D function that effectively meets their innovation needs is usually very weak. Open innovation provides access to a vast amount of new ideas and technologies at lower costs than closed innovation. This paper presents an action research study being carried out at University of Minho to develop a business model and technology platform for an innovation brokering service connecting ideas and technologies being developed at Universities with the specific innovation needs of SMEs. The expected contributions of the study include the empirical investigation of the effectiveness and risks of crowdsourcing innovation when applied in the socio-economic context of a European developing country where SMEs represent 99,6% of the businesses.

  15. Fuels from microalgae: Technology status, potential, and research requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neenan, B.; Feinberg, D.; Hill, A.; McIntosh, R.; Terry, K.

    1986-08-01

    Although numerous options for the production of fuels from microalgae have been proposed, our analysis indicates that only two qualify for extensive development - gasoline and ester fuel. In developing the comparisons that support this conclusion, we have identified the major areas of microalgae production and processing that require extensive development. Technology success requires developing and testing processes that fully utilize the polar and nonpolar lipids produced by microalgae. Process designs used in these analyses were derived from fragmented, preliminary laboratory data. These results must be substantiated and integrated processes proposed, tested, and refined to be able to evaluate the commercial feasibility from microalgae. The production of algal feedstocks for processing to gasoline or ester fuel requires algae of high productivity and high lipid content that efficiently utilize saline waters. Species screening and development suggest that algae can achieve required standards taken individually, but algae that can meet the integrated requirements still elude researchers. Effective development of fuels from microalgae technology requires that R and D be directed toward meeting the integrated standards set out in the analysis. As technology analysts, it is inappropriate for us to dictate how the R and D effort should proceed to meet these standards. We end our role by noting that alternative approaches to meeting the feasibility targets have been identified, and it is now the task of program managers and scientists to choose the appropriate approach to assure the greatest likelihood of realizing a commercially viable technology. 70 refs., 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  16. The LSSTC Data Science Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam; Walkowicz, Lucianne; LSSTC DSFP Leadership Council

    2017-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Corporation (LSSTC) Data Science Fellowship Program (DSFP) is a unique professional development program for astronomy graduate students. DSFP students complete a series of six, one-week long training sessions over the course of two years. The sessions are cumulative, each building on the last, to allow an in-depth exploration of the topics covered: data science basics, statistics, image processing, machine learning, scalable software, data visualization, time-series analysis, and science communication. The first session was held in Aug 2016 at Northwestern University, with all materials and lectures publicly available via github and YouTube. Each session focuses on a series of technical problems which are written in iPython notebooks. The initial class of fellows includes 16 students selected from across the globe, while an additional 14 fellows will be added to the program in year 2. Future sessions of the DSFP will be hosted by a rotating cast of LSSTC member institutions. The DSFP is designed to supplement graduate education in astronomy by teaching the essential skills necessary for dealing with big data, serving as a resource for all in the LSST era. The LSSTC DSFP is made possible by the generous support of the LSST Corporation, the Data Science Initiative (DSI) at Northwestern, and CIERA.

  17. Research of design challenges and new technologies for floating LNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Ha, Mun-Keun; Kim, Soo-Young; Shin, Sung-Chul

    2014-06-01

    With the rate of worldwide LNG demand expected to grow faster than that of gas demand, most major oil companies are currently investing their resources to develop floating LNG-FLNG (i.e. LNG FSRU and LNG FPSO). The global Floating LNG (FLNG) market trend will be reviewed based on demand and supply chain relationships. Typical technical issues associated with FLNG design are categorized in terms of global performance evaluation. Although many proven technologies developed through LNG carrier and oil FPSO projects are available for FLNG design, we are still faced with several technical challenges to clear for successful FLNG projects. In this study, some of the challenges encountered during development of the floating LNG facility (i.e. LNG FPSO and FSRU) will be reviewed together with their investigated solution. At the same time, research of new LNG-related technologies such as combined containment system will be presented.

  18. National rf technology research and development program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-05-01

    This plan was prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the Office of Fusion Energy, Division of Development and Technology, to define the technology development needs and priorities. The US rf research and development community, with a wide representation from universities, laboratories and industries, participated in many discussions, meetings and in a three-day workshop in developing the needs and priorities definition. This very active and effective involvement of the rf leaders from all of these groups was an essential feature of the activity and results in the plan representing a broad consensus from the magnetic fusion energy development community. In addition, a number of scientists from Japan and Europe participated by providing data.

  19. Research on the architecture and key technologies of SIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhongliang; Meng, Qingxiang; Huang, Yan; Liu, Shufan

    2007-06-01

    Along with the development of computer network, Grid has become one of the hottest issues of researches on sharing and cooperation of Internet resources throughout the world. This paper illustrates a new architecture of SIG-a five-hierarchy architecture (including Data Collecting Layer, Grid Layer, Service Layer, Application Layer and Client Layer) of SIG from the traditional three hierarchies (only including resource layer, service layer and client layer). In the paper, the author proposes a new mixed network mode of Spatial Information Grid which integrates CAG (Certificate Authority of Grid) and P2P (Peer to Peer) in the Grid Layer, besides, the author discusses some key technologies of SIG and analysis the functions of these key technologies.

  20. Research progress of new technologies in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin MENG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of stroke commonly experience a different range of dysfunction, and recovery can be slow and incomplete, which lead to a serious and long-term impact on patients themselves and their families. Although the treatment of stroke patients relies mainly on rehabilitation intervention, but the rehabilitation needs of discharged patients are not fully met due to lots of restrictions, such as the lack of professional rehabilitation services, the difficulty and inconvenience in transportation from home to hospital, therefore their prognosis of rehabilitation are affected. At present a number of new rehabilitation technologies, including telerehabilitation (TR, virtual reality (VR, robotics, electronic textiles (E-textiles, etc., are coming into being and may solve these problems. This article tries to discuss the research progress of these new rehabilitation technologies, and provide a new perspective for the rehabilitation intervention of stroke patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.03.003

  1. Research of design challenges and new technologies for floating LNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rate of worldwide LNG demand expected to grow faster than that of gas demand, most major oil companies are currently investing their resources to develop floating LNG-FLNG (i.e. LNG FSRU and LNG FPSO. The global Floating LNG (FLNG market trend will be reviewed based on demand and supply chain relationships. Typical technical issues associated with FLNG design are categorized in terms of global performance evaluation. Although many proven technologies developed through LNG carrier and oil FPSO projects are available for FLNG design, we are still faced with several technical challenges to clear for successful FLNG projects. In this study, some of the challenges encountered during development of the floating LNG facility (i.e. LNG FPSO and FSRU will be reviewed together with their investigated solution. At the same time, research of new LNG-related technologies such as combined containment system will be presented.

  2. Research Activities at the Research Centre for Science and Technology in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sarkar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nResearch Center for Science and Technology in Medicine (RCSTIM, affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Science (TUMS, was established in Imam Khomeini Hospital, the largest hospital complex of this kind in Iran in 1994. A major strategy of RCSTIM has been providing a common research environment for close cooperation between specialists involved in science, medicine, engineering and industry. This collaboration in one hand highlights RCSTIM research policy direction and on the other hand assure high quality standards required for design and development of novel medical devices. Since 1998, in line with the Third Development Plan of I.R. of Iran, the work has been focused on applied research activities to promote technical knowledge of the medical device industry, advance the health technology and establish joint research programs between universities and industry. There are seven research groups within RCSTIM conducting advanced re­searches in their specialties. In these many advanced research have been performed leading to design of hi-tech devices and systems. Some of case reports of these technologies are being presented in this paper.

  3. The role of market research in the commercialization of technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivey, D.L.; Smith, S.A.

    1988-03-01

    The objectiv eof this report is to provide information on available empirical work that describes criteria used by the residential consumer market in selectign energy and energy-related products. This market is important to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Building and Community Services (OBCS), which sponsors the developement of many energy-conserving technologies ultimately used by the residential consumer. In this report, the consumer decision-making process is described, and case studies are presented to illustrate the importance of conducting systematic market research in the early stages of the technology-development process. Consumer decision making is examined through a discussion of the steps of the decision-making process: problem recognition, information search, evaluation of alternatives, and purchase decision. Post-purchase behavior and its implications to the OBCS and to commercial marketing research are also discussed. The four case studies that are presented in this report illustrate the importance of market research in building energy loss, lighting, water heating, and refrigeration: (1) low-emissivity (low-E) windows; (2) long life light bulbs; (3) heat pump water heaters; and (4) energy efficient refrigerator-freezer.

  4. The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, H T

    1999-05-26

    The development and demonstration of inertial fusion is incredibly challenging because it requires simultaneously controlling and precisely measuring parameters at extreme values in energy, space, and time. The challenges range from building megajoule (10{sup 6} J) drivers that perform with percent-level precision to fabricating targets with submicron specifications to measuring target performance at micron scale (10{sup {minus}6} m) with picosecond (10{sup {minus}12} s) time resolution. Over the past 30 years in attempting to meet this challenge, the inertial fusion community around the world has invented new technologies in lasers, particle beams, pulse power drivers, diagnostics, target fabrication, and other areas. These technologies have found applications in diverse fields of industry and science. Moreover, simply assembling the teams with the background, experience, and personal drive to meet the challenging requirements of inertial fusion has led to spin-offs in unexpected directions, for example, in laser isotope separation, extreme ultraviolet lithography for microelectronics, compact and inexpensive radars, advanced laser materials processing, and medical technology. The experience of inertial fusion research and development of spinning off technologies has not been unique to any one laboratory or country but has been similar in main research centers in the US, Europe, and Japan. Strengthening and broadening the inertial fusion effort to focus on creating a new source of electrical power (inertial fusion energy [IFE]) that is economically competitive and environmentally benign will yield rich rewards in technology spin-offs. The additional challenges presented by IFE are to make drivers affordable, efficient, and long-lived while operating at a repetition rate of a few Hertz; to make fusion targets that perform consistently at high-fusion yield; and to create target chambers that can repetitively handle greater than 100-MJ yields while producing minimal

  5. Sulfur technology update: selected research topics from the ASRL core research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P. D.; Dowling, N. I.; Marriott, R.A.; Primak, A.; Davis, P.M. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This conference presentation is a combined effort by Alberta Sulfur Research, Ltd (ASRL) and the University of Calgary; it focuses on sulfur production technology and the ongoing research behind it. This presentation deals mainly with the use of sulfur in the oil sand industry, sulfur recovery in Claus systems, and sulfur management issues. Sulfur formation, mainly in the form of hydrogen sulfide, and the use of liquid sulfur in bitumen coking in the petrochemical industries were discussed first. This was later followed by an illustration of how sulfur recovery efficiency is greatly enhanced by catalytic tail gas incineration and improved liquid sulfur degassing technologies. A comparative scheme between the current process and the new research in utilizing sulfur in nickel metal production was also presented, showing how the new research results in less waste. In conclusion, the effects of polymeric sulfur on the strength of the solid were discussed, showing a linear relationship between the two parameters.

  6. Diagnosing Management of Agricultural Research and Technology Development under the Agricultural Innovation Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying and analyzing issues and challenges on the agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework. The survey consisted of two groups: agricultural researchers of Agriculture-Research and Education Organization and all faculty members of public agricultural faculties of Ministry of Scientific, Research and Technology. Using Cochran sampling formula and multi-stage sampling method, 188 researchers and 205 faculty members were selected in order to fill in the survey questionnaire. Using the SPSS, collected data analyzed based on explanatory factor analysis. Totally, factor analysis of three sets of issues and challenges on the agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework led to extract 13 factors, including agricultural structure and policy, infrastructure and resources of agricultural development, supportive services for agricultural development (level of agricultural development, investment and capacity building in research and technology, management of research and technology development, research and technology productivity, research culture, networks for research and technology development (level of national innovation system, agricultural research policy, impacts and effectiveness of agricultural research and technology development, integrated management of research and technology, institutional development for agricultural research and technology and systematic synergy of agricultural research and higher education (level of agricultural innovation system. Totally, these three sets of factors explained 64%, 75% and 73% of the total variances. Finally, using conceptual clustering for the extracted factors, a conceptual model of issues and challenges of agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework was presented.

  7. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  8. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  9. Principles for Integrating Mars Analog Science, Operations, and Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.

    2003-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the scientific community and NASA used terrestrial analog sites for understanding planetary features and for training astronauts to be scientists. Human factors studies (Harrison, Clearwater, & McKay 1991; Stuster 1996) have focused on the effects of isolation in extreme environments. More recently, with the advent of wireless computing, we have prototyped advanced EVA technologies for navigation, scheduling, and science data logging (Clancey 2002b; Clancey et al., in press). Combining these interests in a single expedition enables tremendous synergy and authenticity, as pioneered by Pascal Lee's Haughton-Mars Project (Lee 2001; Clancey 2000a) and the Mars Society s research stations on a crater rim on Devon Island in the High Canadian Arctic (Clancey 2000b; 2001b) and the Morrison Formation of southeast Utah (Clancey 2002a). Based on this experience, the following principles are proposed for conducting an integrated science, operations, and technology research program at analog sites: 1) Authentic work; 2) PI-based projects; 3) Unencumbered baseline studies; 4) Closed simulations; and 5) Observation and documentation. Following these principles, we have been integrating field science, operations research, and technology development at analog sites on Devon Island and in Utah over the past five years. Analytic methods include work practice simulation (Clancey 2002c; Sierhuis et a]., 2000a;b), by which the interaction of human behavior, facilities, geography, tools, and procedures are formalized in computer models. These models are then converted into the runtime EVA system we call mobile agents (Clancey 2002b; Clancey et al., in press). Furthermore, we have found that the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (Jones, 1999) provides a vast repository or understanding astronaut and CapCom interactions, serving as a baseline for Mars operations and quickly highlighting opportunities for computer automation (Clancey, in press).

  10. Avionics Collaborative Engineering Technology Delivery Order 0035: Secure Knowledge Management (SKM) Technology Research Roadmap - Technology Trends for Collaborative Information and Knowledge Management Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    International Corporation 4031 Colonel Glenn Highway Beavercreek, OH 45431-1673 Nikolaos G. Bourbakis Wright State University Information Technology...NUMBER 2432 5e. TASK NUMBER 04 6. AUTHOR(S) Russell F. Moody (Science Applications International Corporation) Nikolaos G. Bourbakis (Wright...modeling, retrieving, distributing, and publishing documents on the Web ( Bourbakis ) − Research cryptanalysis. − System security. − Self-healing

  11. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

  12. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

  13. A Research on Investment Casting Technology of Ti Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this research, the materials and the compositions of the surface slurries were chosen by considering the characteristics of Ti investment casting. The effects of solid-liquid ratios on the properties of the slurry and the effects of baking temperatures on the flexural strength have also been investigated. Flawless shells having smooth inner surface were manufactured with proper technology. Ti and its alloys were melted and poured by water-cooled Cu crucible vacuum induction furnace. The qualities of the investment castings made accordingly were studied and analyzed.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2002-08-20

    This is the PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, which was Held at Oilheat Visions Conference, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, Rhode Island, August 20-21, 2002. The specific objectives of this conference are to: (1) identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  15. Aerospace Plane Technology, Research and Development Efforts in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-25

    Technology Experimental Vehicle Source Vesserschrntt Boeii’o:. N~ohm \\1es(’~hmt t-i oelow-~loius)I ut rvAircrah ftDivision has -onl- (hictd tIIhe hIIt jal...balanced program of hypersonic research and duvelop- ment in Europe. All of the facilities capable of testing at speeds greater than Mach 12 have running ...High values of the kinetic parameter and of the viscous interaction parameter will be obtained with a run time duca- tion of up to 50 milliseconds. The

  16. Technology Estimating 2: A Process to Determine the Cost and Schedule of Space Technology Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stuart K.; Wallace, Jon; Schaffer, Mark; May, M. Scott; Greenberg, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    As a leader in space technology research and development, NASA is continuing in the development of the Technology Estimating process, initiated in 2012, for estimating the cost and schedule of low maturity technology research and development, where the Technology Readiness Level is less than TRL 6. NASA' s Technology Roadmap areas consist of 14 technology areas. The focus of this continuing Technology Estimating effort included four Technology Areas (TA): TA3 Space Power and Energy Storage, TA4 Robotics, TA8 Instruments, and TA12 Materials, to confine the research to the most abundant data pool. This research report continues the development of technology estimating efforts completed during 2013-2014, and addresses the refinement of parameters selected and recommended for use in the estimating process, where the parameters developed are applicable to Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) used in the parametric cost estimating analysis. This research addresses the architecture for administration of the Technology Cost and Scheduling Estimating tool, the parameters suggested for computer software adjunct to any technology area, and the identification of gaps in the Technology Estimating process.

  17. Technology Base Research Project for electrochemical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Kim (ed.)

    1991-06-01

    The US DOE's Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an electrochemical energy storage program, which includes R D on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The general R D areas addressed by the project include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced batteries, determination of technical feasibility of the new couples, improvements in battery components and materials, establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion, and the development of air-system (fuel cell, metal/air) technology for transportation applications. Major emphasis is given to applied research which will lead to superior performance and lower life-cycle costs. The TBR Project is divided into three major project elements: Exploratory Research, Applied Science Research, and Air Systems Research. Highlights of each project element are summarized according to the appropriate battery system or electrochemical research area. 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Development of Management Metrics for Research and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheskin, Theodore J.

    2003-01-01

    Professor Ted Sheskin from CSU will be tasked to research and investigate metrics that can be used to determine the technical progress for advanced development and research tasks. These metrics will be implemented in a software environment that hosts engineering design, analysis and management tools to be used to support power system and component research work at GRC. Professor Sheskin is an Industrial Engineer and has been involved in issues related to management of engineering tasks and will use his knowledge from this area to allow extrapolation into the research and technology management area. Over the course of the summer, Professor Sheskin will develop a bibliography of management papers covering current management methods that may be applicable to research management. At the completion of the summer work we expect to have him recommend a metric system to be reviewed prior to implementation in the software environment. This task has been discussed with Professor Sheskin and some review material has already been given to him.

  19. Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

    1998-09-01

    This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

  20. Trends in Global Assisted Reproductive Technologies Research: a Scientometrics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhovati, Maryam; Zare, Morteza; Zare, Fatemeh; Bazrafshan, Maliheh Sadat; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study illustrated the global contribution to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) research in MEDLINE database from 1998 to 2014. Methods In March 2015, the MEDLINE database was searched for research publications indexed under ‘reproductive techniques, assisted’ (including the following MeSH headings: in vitro fertilization [IVF]; intracytoplasmic sperm injections; cryopreservation; and ovulation induction), with the following expressions in the fields of title or abstract: intrauterine insemination; sperm donation; embryo/egg donation and surrogate mothers. The number of publications in MEDLINE database was recorded for each individual year, 1998–2014, and for each country. The following countries were arbitrarily selected for data retrieval: United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Canada, Italy, Japan (G7 countries), Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC countries), Egypt, Turkey, Israel and Iran. Results The absolute number of publications for each country from 1998 to 2014 ranged from 75 to 16453, with a median of 2024. The top five countries were the US (16453 publications), the UK (5427 publications), Japan (4805), China (4660) and France (3795). ART (20277), cryopreservation (11623) and IVF (11209) were the most researched areas. Conclusion Global research on ARTs were geographically distributed and highly concentrated among the world’s richest countries. Cryopreservation and IVF were the most productive research domains among ARTs. PMID:26813255

  1. FY 2005 Congressional Earmark: The Environmental Institute Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon Tracey, Co-PI and Richard Taupier, Co-PI

    2007-02-06

    Congressional Earmark Funding was used to create a Postdoctoral Environmental Fellowship Program, interdisciplinary Environmental Working Groups, and special initiatives to create a dialogue around the environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to mobilize faculty to work together to respond to emerging environmental needs and to build institutional capacity to launch programmatic environmental activities across campus over time. Developing these networks of expertise will enable the University to more effectively and swiftly respond to emerging environmental needs and assume a leadership role in varied environmental fields. Over the course of the project 20 proposals were submitted to a variety of funding agencies involving faculty teams from 19 academic departments; 4 projects were awarded totaling $950,000; special events were organized including the Environmental Lecture Series which attracted more than 1,000 attendees over the course of the project; 75 University faculty became involved in one or more Working Groups (original three Working Groups plus Phase 2 Working Groups); an expertise database was developed with approximately 275 faculty involved in environmental research and education as part of a campus-wide network of environmental expertise; 12 University centers and partners participated; and the three Environmental Fellows produced 3 publications as well as a number of presentations and papers in progress.

  2. Research Funding, Patent Search Training and Technology Transfer: a collaboration

    KAUST Repository

    Tyhurst, Janis

    2016-01-01

    This paper will focus on the collaboration efforts of three different university departments to create, teach and evaluate the benefits of a joint patent training series, as well as the future directions this collaboration will take. KAUST has as one of its goals the diversification of the Saudi economy. There is a strong focus at the university on developing entrepreneurial ideas and commercializing research done. The University Library supports this goal through the provision of electronic resources and introductory patent search training skills. However, the patent training class offered by the University Library is only one step in a process that faculty and students need when starting or taking their research to the next level. In the Fall of 2015, I met with representatives of the two major stakeholders in the patent arena, the office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Technology Transfer Office (TTO), to develop a patent training program to meet the needs of researchers. The OSR provides funding to researchers who have demonstrated that their ideas have merit with potential applications, the TTO works with researchers who are at the point of needing IP protection. The resulting discussion led us to collaborate on creating a workshop series that benefit the researcher’s information needs and each of our departments as well. In the first of the series of three 2 hour workshops, the Manager of TTO and the Lead Integrative Specialist from the OSR presented a workshop on an overview of Intellectual Property and the patenting process. These presentations focused on when and how to determine whether research is potentially patentable, why a researcher needs to protect his/her research and how to go about protecting it. The second workshop focused on introductory patent search skills and tools, how to expand a literature search to include the information found in patents, and how this kind of research will improve not only the literature search but the research

  3. The Invisible Researcher: Using Educational Technologies as Research Tools for Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Joordens

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available As educational technologies become more commonplace, they are often created with the intention of benefiting students through some novel approach, or to fill a perceived educational gap. While these rationales are good ones, it should also be realized that through the use of innovative technologies educators and researchers alike are presented with a unique and powerful opportunity to conduct laboratory-like research in a naturalistic environment. Thus giving the invisible "researcher" the ability to test the desired effectiveness of the tool, and to use the tool as a vehicle to understand learning, all in an unobtrusive manner. This not only ensures that new educational technologies are doing what they were designed to do, but also promises to create pedagogically superior tools and an improved learning environment for both students and educators. To illustrate how this can be successfully implemented, two evidence-based technologies are discussed (the webOption and peerScholar where research has assisted in tool development and also furthered our understanding of educational theory.

  4. In Situ Resource Utilization Technology Research and Facilities Supporting the NASA's Human Systems Research and Technology Life Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Sibille, Laurent; Sacksteder, Kurt; Owens, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science program has transitioned research required in support of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration. Research disciplines including the Materials Science, Fluid Physics and Combustion Science are now being applied toward projects with application in the planetary utilization and transformation of space resources. The scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure in these traditional fields developed at multiple NASA Centers and by external research partners provide essential capabilities to support the agency s new exploration thrusts including In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Among the technologies essential to human space exploration, the production of life support consumables, especially oxygen and; radiation shielding; and the harvesting of potentially available water are realistically achieved for long-duration crewed missions only through the use of ISRU. Ongoing research in the physical sciences have produced a body of knowledge relevant to the extraction of oxygen from lunar and planetary regolith and associated reduction of metals and silicon for use meeting manufacturing and repair requirements. Activities being conducted and facilities used in support of various ISRU projects at the Glenn Research Center and Marshall Space Flight Center will be described. The presentation will inform the community of these new research capabilities, opportunities, and challenges to utilize their materials, fluids and combustion science expertise and capabilities to support the vision for space exploration.

  5. In Situ Resource Utilization Technology Research and Facilities Supporting the NASA's Human Systems Research and Technology Life Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Sibille, Laurent; Sacksteder, Kurt; Owens, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science program has transitioned research required in support of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration. Research disciplines including the Materials Science, Fluid Physics and Combustion Science are now being applied toward projects with application in the planetary utilization and transformation of space resources. The scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure in these traditional fields developed at multiple NASA Centers and by external research partners provide essential capabilities to support the agency s new exploration thrusts including In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Among the technologies essential to human space exploration, the production of life support consumables, especially oxygen and; radiation shielding; and the harvesting of potentially available water are realistically achieved for long-duration crewed missions only through the use of ISRU. Ongoing research in the physical sciences have produced a body of knowledge relevant to the extraction of oxygen from lunar and planetary regolith and associated reduction of metals and silicon for use meeting manufacturing and repair requirements. Activities being conducted and facilities used in support of various ISRU projects at the Glenn Research Center and Marshall Space Flight Center will be described. The presentation will inform the community of these new research capabilities, opportunities, and challenges to utilize their materials, fluids and combustion science expertise and capabilities to support the vision for space exploration.

  6. New Technologies and New Paradigms in Historical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cartelli

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available After a short introduction on media evolution and its implication on human history, the paper presents an account of two experiences the authors had while using new technologies in disseminating bibliographical and historical information. The first experience concerns the Web publication of a bibliography on Beneventan manuscripts and arose from the need to overcome the long de-lays in publishing printed information. The Web publication also serves as an online resource for all researchers involved in studies on the South Italian book script in the Middle Ages. The second one relates to recent studies on women copyists in the Middle Ages and uses an online database to disseminate findings on this subject. The paper then analyzes similarities and differences between the two experiences and suggests they can be seen as a source of online information for scholars. Thus, they represent a first step towards the construction of new paradigms of knowledge and research in historical studies.

  7. Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing advanced energy-conversion technologies for use with both radioisotope power systems and fission surface power systems for many decades. Under NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Science Theme, Technology Program, Glenn is developing the next generation of advanced Stirling convertors (ASCs) for use in the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The next-generation power-conversion technologies require high efficiency and high specific power (watts electric per kilogram) to meet future mission requirements to use less of the Department of Energy's plutonium-fueled general-purpose heat source modules and reduce system mass. Important goals include long-life (greater than 14-yr) reliability and scalability so that these systems can be considered for a variety of future applications and missions including outer-planet missions and continual operation on the surface of Mars. This paper provides an update of the history and status of the ASC being developed for Glenn by Sunpower Inc. of Athens, Ohio.

  8. Opinion & special articles: a guide from fellowship to faculty: Nietzsche and the academic neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, S Thomas

    2012-10-02

    The role of the physician scientist in biomedical research is increasingly threatened. Despite a clear role in clinical advances in translational medicine, the percentage of physicians engaged in research has steadily declined. Several programmatic efforts have been initiated to address this problem by providing time and financial resources to the motivated resident or fellow. However, this decline in physician scientists is due not only to a lack of time and resources but also a reflection of the uncertain path in moving from residency or postdoctoral training toward junior faculty. This article is a practical guide to the milestones and barriers to successful faculty achievement after residency or fellowship training.

  9. 75 FR 57521 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan--URL Correction AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information... Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD)...

  10. 75 FR 55360 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information Technology Research.... EDT on October 11, 2010. SUMMARY: With this notice, the National Coordination Office for...

  11. 78 FR 48537 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... Administration (SBA) is publishing the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program Commercialization Benchmark for the 11 participating agencies for public comment...

  12. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced laucnch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  13. Advances and Research Directions in Data-Warehousing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Mohania

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is one of the most valuable assets of an organisation and when used properly can assist in intelligent decision making that can significantly improve the functioning of an organisation. Data Warehousing is a recent technology that allows information to be easily and efficiently accessed for decision-making activities by collecting data from many operational, legacy and possibly heterogeneous data sources. On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP tools are well-suited for complex data analysis, such as multi-dimensional data analysis, and to assist in decision support activities while data mining tools take the process one step further and actively search the data for patterns and hidden knowledge in the data held in the warehouse. Many organisations are building, or are planning to develop, a data warehouse for their operational and decision support needs. In this paper, we present an overview of data warehousing, multi-dimensional databases, OLAP and data mining technology and discuss the directions of current research in the area. We also discuss recent developments in data warehouse modelling, view selection and maintenance, indexing schemes, parallel query processing and data mining issues. A number of technical issues for exploratory research are presented and possible solutions are also discussed.

  14. CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph

    2003-07-30

    Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

  15. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  16. Evaluation of Policy and Research Interventions in Science and Technology: Consequence Assessment of Regulatory and Technology Transfer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Mary Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    This research contributes to efforts in assessment studies related to science and technology interventions. The work presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effects of policies that influence science and technology interventions, and determining the impact of science and technology interventions themselves. Chapter 1 explores how…

  17. A New Approach to Commercialization of NASA's Human Research Program Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal describes, "A New Approach to Commercialization of NASA's Human Research Program Technologies." NASA has a powerful research...

  18. Proceeding of human exoskeleton technology and discussions on future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Xie, Hanxing; Li, Weilin; Yao, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    After more than half a century of intense efforts, the development of exoskeleton has seen major advances, and several remarkable achievements have been made. Reviews of developing history of exoskeleton are presented, both in active and passive categories. Major models are introduced, and typical technologies are commented on. Difficulties in control algorithm, driver system, power source, and man-machine interface are discussed. Current researching routes and major developing methods are mapped and critically analyzed, and in the process, some key problems are revealed. First, the exoskeleton is totally different from biped robot, and relative studies based on the robot technologies are considerably incorrect. Second, biomechanical studies are only used to track the motion of the human body, the interaction between human and machines are seldom studied. Third, the traditional developing ways which focused on servo-controlling have inborn deficiency from making portable systems. Research attention should be shifted to the human side of the coupling system, and the human ability to learn and adapt should play a more significant role in the control algorithms. Having summarized the major difficulties, possible future works are discussed. It is argued that, since a distinct boundary cannot be drawn in such strong-coupling human-exoskeleton system, the more complex the control system gets, the more difficult it is for the user to learn to use. It is suggested that the exoskeleton should be treated as a simple wearable tool, and downgrading its automatic level may be a change toward a brighter research outlook. This effort at simplification is definitely not easy, as it necessitates theoretical supports from fields such as biomechanics, ergonomics, and bionics.

  19. [Research progress on key technology of power and signal transmission in neuroprosthetic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Peng, Chenglin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Rui; Hou, Wensheng; Zheng, Xiaolin; Zheng, Erxin

    2011-10-01

    The power and signal transmission technology is one of the key technologies in neuroprosthetic research. This paper proposes firstly the related theory of power and signal transmission technology in neuroprosthetic, then summarizes the three key aspects of the power and signal transmission technology in neuroprosthetic. After analyzed the development of the inductive wireless power harvesting technology, the wireless telemetry technology and the wireless power harvesting telemetry technology, the emphasis on research contents will be proposed and discussed, which will help accelerate the further research of prosthetic.

  20. Some Research Aspects of Telecommunication Technologies' Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Gaivoronska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of the telecommunication technologies is being represented by complex dependencies. This work is devoted to some aspects of these dependencies’ research. Development laws of the technology’s life cycle are interested nowadays by many professionals in the field of informatization and telecommunications, as well as in economics, marketing and sociology. This wide interest among experts from a sufficiently diverse subject fields makes necessary a development and study of mathematical model of the various technologies’ development process. With the help of such model it is possible to define patterns, common to all fields of activity, to find the parameters that significantly affect the characteristics of the various technologies’ development process in order to predict its course in further. Carried studies have shown that the mathematical apparatus of the population dynamics is not enough to thoroughly analyze the variety of possible forms of the technology’s life cycle and to set particular properties of the investigated process. For this purpose authors formalized the concept of the kinetic curve and introduced the function describing the development of technology life cycle in time. Using different values of this function’s parameters and choosing the different representations of the function, it is possible to construct a large family of curves representing different variants of technologies development, namely: highly oscillatory; sufficiently smooth; with greater or lesser number of extreme points. Such diversity of the function’s behavior makes it convenient for the usage in simulation models that describe the life cycle of various technologies. A mathematical model based on the theory of the ordinary differential equations is proposed in the paper. This model allows constructing the function that describes the process of the development and changing in the telecommunication technologies. After analyses of the

  1. Nuclear physics detector technology applied to plant biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Lee, Seung Joo [JLAB; McKisson, John E. [JLAB; Xi, Wenze [JLAB; Zorn, Carl J. [JLAB; Howell, Calvin [DUKE; Crowell, A.S. [DUKE; Reid, C.D. [DUKE; Smith, Mark [MARYLAND U.

    2013-08-01

    The ability to detect the emissions of radioactive isotopes through radioactive decay (e.g. beta particles, x-rays and gamma-rays) has been used for over 80 years as a tracer method for studying natural phenomena. More recently a positron emitting radioisotope of carbon: {sup 11}C has been utilized as a {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer for plant ecophysiology research. Because of its ease of incorporation into the plant via photosynthesis, the {sup 11}CO{sub 2} radiotracer is a powerful tool for use in plant biology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using {sup 11}CO{sub 2}. Presently there are several groups developing and using new PET instrumentation for plant based studies. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with the Duke University Phytotron and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is involved in PET detector development for plant imaging utilizing technologies developed for nuclear physics research. The latest developments of the use of a LYSO scintillator based PET detector system for {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer studies in plants will be briefly outlined.

  2. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

  3. Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Ueda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a discussion paper that the authors presented at the International Workshop on Rammed Earth Materials and Sustainable Structures and Hakka Tulou Forum 2011: Structures of Sustainability, 28–31 October 2011, Xiamen University, China. A Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures is proposed to study, preserve, advance, promote, and implement rammed earth structures. The Center concept including the objectives, scope of activities and benefits of the proposed center are outlined. The Center for Alternative Technology in Wales, UK has been examined as a good base model along with a few successful environmental sustainability initiatives in China. The funding options to establish the proposed center have been discussed. The breadth of activities ultimately depends on funding capability. It is believed that the proposed center development will require significant government support at the initial stage but once corporate sponsorships are in place, the proposed center will potentially become self-supporting. The strategies, for the establishment of the proposed center are also addressed.

  4. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiwei, Shan; Caixia, Gao

    2015-10-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model organisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs─zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the development and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight challenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants.

  5. 21st Century Power Partnership: September 2016 Fellowship Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Timothy J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This report details the 21st Century Power Partnership fellowship from September 2016. This Fellowship is a follow-up to the Technical Audit of Eskom's Medium- and Long-term Modelling Capabilities, conducted by U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in April 2016. The prospect and role of variable renewable energy (vRE) in South Africa poses new modelling-related challenges that Eskom is actively working to address by improving the fidelity of PLEXOS LT and ST models.

  6. Research of photolithography technology based on surface plasmon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hai-Hua; Chen Jian; Wang Qing-Kang

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new process of the photolithography technology,used to fabricate simply fine patterns,by employing surface plasmon character.The sub-wavelength periodic silica structures with uniform silver film are used as the exposure mask.According to the traditional semiconductor process,the grating structures are fabricated at exposing wavelength of 436 nm.At the same time,it provides additional and quantitative support of this technique based on the finite-difference time-domain method.The results of the research show that surface plasmon characteristics of metals can be used to increase the optical field energy distribution differences through the silica structures with silver film,which directly impact on the exposure of following photosensitive layer in different regions.

  7. Research on DSP-based Asynchronous Motor Control Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Motor in a variety of electrical transmission and position servo system occupies an extremely important position. After the DSP technology being applied to the motor control, the unification of the hardware and the flexibility of the software can be combined. Take the brushless DC motor for example, studied the mathematical model and the structure of the motor control system, also obtained the design scheme of the DSP-based asynchronous motor control system. With TI's 32 bit fixed point DSPTMS320F2812 as the core design of the hardware system, we wrote the system software, debug the motor control system and the results show that the system achieves the expected effect. The results of the research can be applied to brushless DC motor and other motor control, it will have a wide application prospects.

  8. Automotive Technology and Human Factors Research: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyuki Akamatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the history of automotive technology development and human factors research, largely by decade, since the inception of the automobile. The human factors aspects were classified into primary driving task aspects (controls, displays, and visibility, driver workspace (seating and packaging, vibration, comfort, and climate, driver’s condition (fatigue and impairment, crash injury, advanced driver-assistance systems, external communication access, and driving behavior. For each era, the paper describes the SAE and ISO standards developed, the major organizations and conferences established, the major news stories affecting vehicle safety, and the general social context. The paper ends with a discussion of what can be learned from this historical review and the major issues to be addressed. A major contribution of this paper is more than 180 references that represent the foundation of automotive human factors, which should be considered core knowledge and should be familiar to those in the profession.

  9. An evaluation approach for research project pilot technological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino-Jesus, Elsa; Sarraipa, Joao; Jardim-Goncalves, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    In a world increasingly more competitive and in a constantly development and growth it's important that companies have economic tools, like frameworks to help them to evaluate and validate the technology development to better fits in each company particular needs. The paper presents an evaluation approach for research project pilot applications to stimulate its implementation and deployment, increasing its adequacy and acceptance to their stakeholders and consequently providing new business profit and opportunities. Authors used the DECIDE evaluation framework as a major guide to this approach, which was tested in the iSURF project to support the implementation of an interoperability service utility for collaborative supply chain planning across multiple domains supported by RFID devices.

  10. The COSPAR Capacity Building Initiative and its associated Fellowship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Carlos; Willmore, Peter; Mendez, Mariano; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Vogt, Joachim

    The COSPAR Capacity Building Workshops have been conceived to meet the following objec-tives: i) to increase knowledge and use of public archives of space data in order both to broaden the scope of research programmes in developing countries and also to ensure that scientists in those countries are aware of the full range of facilities that are available to them, ii) to provide highly-practical instruction in the use of these archives and the associated publicly-available software, and iii) to foster personal links between participants and experienced scientists at-tending the workshops to contribute to reducing the isolation often experienced by scientists in developing countries. Since 2001 a total of eleven workshops have been successfully held in different scientific areas (X-ray, Gamma-ray and Space Optical and UV Astronomy, Mag-netospheric Physics, Space Oceanography and Planetary Science) in nine developing countries (Brazil, India, China, South Africa, Morocco, Romania, Uruguay, Egypt and Malaysia). To enable young scientists who have participated in a Workshop to build on skills gained there, the COSPAR Panel for Capacity-Building has initiated in 2008 an associated Fellowship Programme. A total number of 14 institutes from several european countries, USA, China and India are participating in the programme offering those to carry out a 2-4 week research project together with a resident scientist. We will discuss the modalities of the workshops, the so-far gained experience, and the future including collaborations with other institutions sharing the aim of increasing the scientific activities in developing countries.

  11. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teachning activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lecture and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  12. METASYSTEMIC TECHNOLOGY OF INSTRUCTION, STUDENT RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru BALANEL

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metasystemic technology of training, student research and innovation (D.Balanel – MTTRI is the development of educational technology J.F. Herbart by cybernetic, metasystem approach, feedbacks, diffusion of knowledges, com­petences in real time, intuition and with application in high education. “Metasystemic technology training, student research and innovation (D.Balanel” is introducing in science by author. Technology is based on metasystem, including pedagogy, psychology, management, cybernetics, mathematics.The paper discusses training, student-centered and competence-centered, the equation of training, equation of training with notes early, appropriate to Bologna Process, ways to educate interest and research capabilities, innovation of students; studying the factors that determine the student make transition to self-knowledge accumulation, learn with satisfaction the research and innovation, transition from apperception to intuition. The author relies on metasystemic training technology, skills to work in real time, using student thesaurus from computer science, informatics and history of cybernetics; learn experience and performance of the most eminent personalities in the development of computer science and cybernetics, Norbert Wiener and Alain Turing, William Ross Ashby and John von Neumann, others personalities, holding the Turing and Neumann and other Awards in cybernetics and informatics . Scientific education of students includes identifying scientific issues, enrollment of students in research. Identifying the scientific problems inherited as millennial problems in mathematics and computer science, current issues and future of science; incentives in applying forces young people to solve them. The enrollment of students in scientific work is done by conducting research with students on issues of university research in the scientific teams, scientific laboratories and simulators, training. The result of "IRI–triangle activity

  13. Everyday technologies for Alzheimer's disease care: Research findings, directions, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Maria C; Dishman, Eric; Plowman, Tim

    2009-11-01

    The Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer's Care initiative was launched by the Alzheimer's Association and Intel Corporation in 2003 to identify and fund promising research in the use of technology-especially information and communication technologies-for monitoring, diagnosing, and treating Alzheimer's disease. At the last two progress meetings, scientific leaders of the two partners, together with aging health technology academic scientists, met to review the most recent research and discuss how current and developing technologies can address growing needs in Alzheimer care.

  14. Space-Based Research in Fundamental Physics and Quantum Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Israelsson, Ulf E.; Shao, Michael; Yu, Nan; Kusenko, Alexander; Wright, Edward L.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Kasevich, Mark; Lipa, John A.; Mester, John C.; Reasenberg, Robert D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ashby, Neil; Gould, Harvey; Paik, Ho Jung

    Space offers unique experimental conditions and a wide range of opportunities to explore the foundations of modern physics with an accuracy far beyond that of ground-based experiments. Space-based experiments today can uniquely address important questions related to the fundamental laws of Nature. In particular, high-accuracy physics experiments in space can test relativistic gravity and probe the physics beyond the Standard Model; they can perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for investigations in precision cosmology and astroparticle physics. In addition, atomic physics has recently shown substantial progress in the development of optical clocks and atom interferometers. If placed in space, these instruments could turn into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current status of space-based research in fundamental physics, its discovery potential, and its importance for modern science. We offer a set of recommendations to be considered by the upcoming National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics. In our opinion, the Decadal Survey should include space-based research in fundamental physics as one of its focus areas. We recommend establishing an Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee's interagency "Fundamental Physics Task Force" to assess the status of both ground- and space-based efforts in the field, to identify the most important objectives, and to suggest the best ways to organize the work of several federal agencies involved. We also recommend establishing a new NASA-led interagency program in fundamental physics that will consolidate new technologies, prepare key instruments for future space missions, and build a strong scientific and engineering community. Our goal is to expand NASA's science objectives in space by including "laboratory research in fundamental physics" as an element in the agency's ongoing space research efforts.

  15. 22 CFR 196.2 - How is the Fellowship Program administered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the Fellowship Program administered? 196.2 Section 196.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.2 How is the Fellowship Program...

  16. 22 CFR 140.8 - Recipients of scholarships, fellowships, and participant training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recipients of scholarships, fellowships, and... ASSISTANCE TO DRUG TRAFFICKERS Enforcement § 140.8 Recipients of scholarships, fellowships, and participant... of scholarships, fellowships, or participant training, except those falling under the...

  17. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Report from July 1, 1974 through June 30, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    The report reviews: (1) foundation activities: purposes, programs (teacher fellowships, administrative intern program, visiting fellows, women's studies fellowships, a Woodrow Wilson Fellows study, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellowship program); program data (lists of fellows, institutions involved, and selection committee members); and…

  18. Analysis of the frontier technology of agricultural IoT and its predication research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuqing; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhu, Mengshuai; Wu, Jianzhai; Shen, Chen; Kong, Fantao

    2017-09-01

    Agricultural IoT (Internet of Things) develops rapidly. Nanotechnology, biotechnology and optoelectronic technology are successfully integrated into the agricultural sensor technology. Big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence technology have also been successfully used in IoT. This paper carries out the research on integration of agricultural sensor technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology and optoelectronic technology and the application of big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence technology in agricultural IoT. The advantages and development of the integration of nanotechnology, biotechnology and optoelectronic technology with agricultural sensor technology were discussed. The application of big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence technology in IoT and their development trend were analysed.

  19. The Implications of the Differences between Design Research and Instructional Systems Design for Educational Technology Researchers and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eunjung; Reeves, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Design research (DR) has been an emerging research paradigm in the field of educational technology as well as in education generally for two decades. Educational design research integrates design and research into a socially responsible approach to inquiry related to learning and teaching. Given its still relative novelty, design research requires…

  20. The Implications of the Differences between Design Research and Instructional Systems Design for Educational Technology Researchers and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eunjung; Reeves, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Design research (DR) has been an emerging research paradigm in the field of educational technology as well as in education generally for two decades. Educational design research integrates design and research into a socially responsible approach to inquiry related to learning and teaching. Given its still relative novelty, design research requires…