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Sample records for technology ohio state

  1. Ohio Construction Technologies Competency Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob

    This document, which lists construction technologies competencies as identified by representatives from government agencies and labor organizations as well as secondary and postsecondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing both college tech prep programs and apprenticeship training/education…

  2. 2015 State Geodatabase for Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  3. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Ohio. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  4. The Use of Institutional Repositories: The Ohio State University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Tschera Harkness

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author compares the use of digital materials that have been deposited in The Ohio State University (OSU) Knowledge Bank (KB). Comparisons are made for content considered in scope of the university archives and those considered out of scope, for materials originating from different campus sources, and for different types of…

  5. Hunger in Ohio: The State of the State, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shara E.

    This biannual report examines hunger in Ohio, providing current data about hunger programs and direct information from those who use these programs. An introductory section defines hunger and food insecurity and discusses how they are measured. The second section highlights national trends (by household composition, by household income, and…

  6. Ohio state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Ohio. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations

  7. Ohio state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Ohio. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

  8. A Quantitative Examination of the Educational Technology Characteristics of Ohio Schools and Their Blue Ribbon Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Dean A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data from Ohio schools and the frequency of use of educational technology, a teacher's comfort level using technology, and a teacher's beliefs about the effect of educational technology on teaching and learning based upon the school's Blue Ribbon award status. The study used an ex-post facto, quantitative…

  9. Ohio State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Ohio State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Ohio. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Ohio. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Ohio

  10. Ohio State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    The Ohio State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Ohio. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Ohio. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Ohio.

  11. A Survey of Technology Training for Library Media Specialist in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frioni, Jeannette; Kazemzadeh, Andrea

    1994-01-01

    A survey was conducted of 100 Ohio school library media specialists (79% return) to determine where they received their technology training. Years of experience ranged from 1 to 32 with and average of 16 years. Results indicate that 85% of training has occurred after employment; and 8 figures display the survey results. (AEF)

  12. Energy Management of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: 15 years of development at the Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzoni Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to document 15 years of hybrid electric vehicle energy management research at The Ohio State University Center for Automotive Research (OSUCAR. Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV technology encompasses many diverse aspects. In this paper we focus exclusively on the evolution of supervisory control strategies for on-board energy management in HEV. We present a series of control algorithms that have been developed in simulation and implemented in prototype vehicles for charge-sustaining HEVs at OSU-CAR. These solutions span from fuzzy-logic control algorithms to more sophisticated model-based optimal control methods. Finally, methods developed for plug-in HEVs energy management are also discussed

  13. 78 FR 69645 - Ohio State University, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty-Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Ohio State University, et al.; Notice of.... Docket Number: 13-017. Applicant: Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210. Instrument: Cryo-SEM System... failure of orthopaedic implants, and also the evaluation of new materials and implant surfaces for tissue...

  14. Expenditures and Postsecondary Graduation: An Investigation Using Individual-Level Data from the State of Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Using detailed individual-level data from public universities in the state of Ohio, I estimate the effect of various institutional expenditures on the probability of graduating from college. Using a competing risks regression framework, I find differential impacts of expenditure categories across student characteristics. I estimate that student…

  15. Telephone-Assisted Language Study at Ohio State University: A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, Leon I.; Pereszlenyi-Pinter, Martha

    1988-01-01

    Describes the first two years of an innovative telephone-assisted language program at Ohio State University. Administration and structure of this individualized instructional program are detailed. Student body profiles, including age, occupation, reason for enrollment, and tables of student performance according to language, number of units…

  16. The Ohio School Facilities Commission. Revamping the State's School Construction Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Patta, Joe

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with the Ohio School Facilities Commission's (OSFC) Executive Director who discusses the OSFC's history and its work in managing K-12 school facilities throughout the state. Topics include its efforts to help school districts get bond measures on ballets, funding projects, and its "Partnering Program" for construction…

  17. 75 FR 3668 - Conditional Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; Ohio; Carbon Monoxide and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... that the State requests be incorporated into the SIP? 1. Grammar, Spelling, and Definitions 2... accommodate the revised exemption limit for the applicable counties. Ohio EPA has submitted analyses for the... coating usage rate limits (gallons per day per coating line). The analysis considered VOC emissions for...

  18. Community health center integration: experience in the State of Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, John S; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2006-02-01

    In the face of severe financial challenges and demands to improve quality and service to patients, many community health centers (CHCs) have aligned or integrated with other CHCs, physician groups, or hospitals. Yet the nature of and rationale for these organizational decisions are not well understood. Our research applied an organizational theoretical framework to test whether strategic adaptation theory or institutional theory best describes the integration activity of CHCs in Ohio. We collected primary data from case studies of seven CHCs selected for geographic representation and studied December 2000-January 2001. Semi-structured interviews and a case study database supported our chain of evidence. We found that CHC integration activity was substantial (five of seven CHCs integrated) and extremely varied. Consistent with strategic adaptation theory, we determined that CHC integration actions were predominantly center-specific, rational responses to environmental challenges and were initiated to improve operations or financial performance. Rarely did CHCs initiate major organizational change merely to mimic other CHC actions, as might have been expected of highly institutionalized organizations. Understanding the basis for CHCs' strategic decisions while monitoring financial health will remain critical as lawmakers and administrators work to develop policies that both maintain progress made and improve primary care access for the poor, the uninsured, and those with special health care needs served by these important safety net providers.

  19. Government’s involvement in regional policy and development in the state of Ohio, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehić Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brownfield redevelopment has been playing a leading role in urban development in the state of Ohio for some time now. Being one of the most industrialized states in the US, Ohio has been struggling for a long time with numerous consequences of businesses that were shutting down, moving out of Ohio, or restructuring. The State officials have been addressing and taking care of these issues very carefully, and with a lot of concern and attention. Furthermore, the officials have been cooperating on all levels of government, which created a very positive and encouraging environment for successful redevelopment projects. The State has been focusing on comparative advantages of regions, and assisting where the demand is. The State has also been encouraging regional development by providing programs especially designed for ones in need, or valuing projects that propose a regional component/strategy. With establishing public-private partnerships between applicants and the government as the fund provider, a very important way of cooperation is established, and maintained, throughout the funding process. With the evident burden that brown fields impose on all participants in the process of redevelopment, it is sometimes difficult to see the overall benefit of such actions. The crucial role of government’s support has proved to be the key to successful implementation of brown field projects. Enabling continuous flow of funds, establishing intergovernmental relations, along with enabling public-private partnerships, and tightly linking the participants in the process of redevelopment resulted in successfully completed projects, which brought new life and brighter perspective to communities that haven’t been able to struggle through this complex process on their own.

  20. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-198-1560, Division of Public Health Laboratories, State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio. [Ethylene oxide and organic-solvent vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, V.; Burroughs, G.E.

    1985-02-01

    Breathing-zone and environmental samples were analyzed for ethylene oxide and organic-solvent vapors at the Public Health Laboratory, State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio, on March 26 and 27, 1984. The evaluation was requested because of employee complaints of mucous membrane and skin irritation while they poured gonorrhea culture media into petri dishes that had been sterilized with ethylene oxide. The authors conclude that the environmental cause of the health problems cannot be determined due to the lack of symptoms on the days of the survey. Without taking measurements on the exact day when conspicuous symptoms occur, it is difficult to determine the source of the problem. General recommendations include checking the general air circulation in the media laboratory and encouraging employees to wear gloves that protect hands and wrists while pouring culture media.

  1. Relevance of ERTS-1 to the State of Ohio. [agriculture, forestry, land use, mining, and environmental quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, D. C.; Pincura, P. G.; Wukelic, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During the first year of project effort the ability of ERTS-1 imagery to be used for mapping and inventorying strip-mined areas in south eastern Ohio, the potential of using ERTS-1 imagery in water quality and coastal zone management in the Lake Erie region, and the extent that ERTS-1 imagery could contribute to localized (metropolitan/urban), multicounty, and overall state land use needs were experimentally demonstrated and reported as significant project results. Significant research accomplishments were achieved in the technological development of manual and computerized methods to extract multi-feature information as well as singular feature information from ERTS-1 data as is exemplified by the forestry transparency overlay. Fabrication of an image transfer device to superimpose ERTS-1 data onto existing maps and other data sources was also a significant analytical accomplishment.

  2. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  3. Participatory Development of Key Sustainability Concepts for Dialogue and Curricula at The Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clair Bullock

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ohio State University (OSU is one of the many universities committed to sustainability within its operations, traditions, and university framework. The university continues to evolve in relation to its sustainability goals, and currently seeks to both build on and deepen the culture of sustainability at OSU. One way to do this is through increasing the sustainability literacy of students on campus, by creating an introductory sustainability curriculum, which would put forth the definitions, concepts, and initiatives that represent sustainability at Ohio State. However, before such a curriculum can be developed, it is important to first understand the current sustainability perceptions at OSU: what definition does the university want to embrace? What is most pertinent to teach OSU students? Twenty sustainability leaders across the university were interviewed in a participatory development process to produce consensus-based, local definitional concepts that are not only beneficial for student knowledge, but for OSU sustainability progress as a whole. The results of their recommendations have provided a solid framework from which the university can build in its future curricular efforts, and provides insights that may be particularly helpful in promoting sustainability in other large American universities. This study also describes a case of using participatory development (PD methods, which have been under-utilized in a higher education setting, particularly in sustainability implementation.

  4. Apparent glacially induced structural controls on limestone conduit development in Ohio Caverns, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne M. Watts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock discontinuities such as bedding planes and joints are important controls on the form that caves take. We examined structural controls on the development of Ohio Caverns. The cave formed in Devonian limestone underlying a small bedrock knob (Mt. Tabor within the Interior Lowland province, United States. The area has been overridden by continental glaciation multiple times. The bedrock is pervasively fractured, with many curved and wavy near-vertical fractures showing many different orientations. In the case of Ohio Caverns, it appears that the controlling fractures in map view may not be joints sensu stricto, but rather some combination of tensile and shear (mode-1 and mode-2 fractures, probably forming in the regime transition between tensile and shear fracturing. This is easy to envision in a situation with ice advancing over this topographic high, and would result in the curved fractures that are observed in many places in the cave. It can also explain the numerous fracture directions. However, not all fractures are conduit-significant. The cave initiated on or near a single bedding plane, and the cave passages exhibit strong keyhole or plus-sign cross sections. Passage and fracture orientations are inconsistent with regionally expected directions. It is likely that mechanical, hydraulic, and thermal stresses related to glaciation caused the fracturing in Mt. Tabor. The cave then developed on this template according to local hydrologic conditions. This presents a newly documented structural template sub-type for cave development.

  5. United States advanced technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longenecker, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the United States, the advanced technologies have been applied to uranium enrichment as a means by which it can be assured that nuclear fuel cost will remain competitive in the future. The United States is strongly committed to the development of advanced enrichment technology, and has brought both advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) and atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) programs to a point of significant technical refinement. The ability to deploy advanced technologies is the basis for the confidence in competitive future price. Unfortunately, the development of advanced technologies is capital intensive. The year 1985 is the key year for advanced technology development in the United States, since the decision on the primary enrichment technology for the future, AGC or AVLIS, will be made shortly. The background on the technology selection process, the highlights of AGC and AVLIS programs and the way to proceed after the process selection are described. The key objective is to maximize the sales volume and minimize the operating cost. This will help the utilities in other countries supply low cost energy on a reliable, long term basis. (Kako, I.)

  6. 75 FR 65594 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY... the Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) relating to the consolidation of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) into Ohio's State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act. On April 8, 2009, and...

  7. Student Self-Reported Academically Dishonest Behavior in Two-Year Colleges in the State of Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated college students' self-reported academically dishonest behaviors at two-year colleges in the state of Ohio. More specifically, this study investigated two-year students' self-reported perceptions of acts of plagiarism and whether particular characteristics were related to students who chose to plagiarize. This study…

  8. 77 FR 21099 - Public Water System Supervision Program Approval for the State of Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, including the Administrative Penalty Authority (APA... the APA since October 1, 1999, with amendments effective on October 17, 2003. Ohio EPA's revised...

  9. Getting Real Results with Ohio State University Extension’s Real Money. Real World. Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Ferrari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Youth development organizations have a unique opportunity to offer programs that help young people develop financial skills they need to become successful adults. This article describes Ohio State University Extension’s Real Money. Real World. (RMRW and the systematic approach used to evaluate its effectiveness. The RMRW curriculum includes an active, hands-on experience that gives young people the opportunity to make lifestyle and budget choices similar to those they will make as adults. The realistic simulation creates a teachable moment. The outcomes of the statewide evaluation clearly indicate the curriculum accomplishes its goals of raising awareness, changing attitudes, and motivating students to plan for behavior changes concerning financial management, education, and career choices. The article concludes with a discussion of the organizational outcomes of conducting the evaluation.

  10. Building Bridges to Opportunity and Economic Growth in Ohio: The Important Role of the State's Community and Technical Colleges in Educating Low-Wage Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KnowledgeWorks Foundation, Cincinnati, OH.

    The role of Ohio's community and technical colleges in educating low-wage workers was examined. Ohio's community and technical colleges were shown to be uniquely positioned to serve as bridges to growth and opportunity by helping the state and its workers make the transition to a knowledge-based economy and help low-wage workers gain the footing…

  11. Ohio Schools Cautiously Rebuild: Uncertainty in State and Local Funds Affects Strategies. Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Policy Matters Ohio periodically surveys schools about fiscal conditions and operational strategies. The Ohio Association of School Business Officials provided a link to such a survey in their newsletter of December 2014 through February 2015. Fifty-three respondents, representing 8.6 percent of districts and including representatives from all…

  12. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Ohio. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  13. Better Buildings NW Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Kevin [Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-03-04

    When the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority (TLCPA) filed for the Department of Energy EECBG grant in late 2009, it was part of a strategic and Board backed objective to expand the organization’s economic development and financing programs into alternative energy and energy efficiency. This plan was filed with the knowledge and support of the areas key economic development agencies. The City of Toledo was also a key partner with the Mayor designating a committee to develop a Strategic Energy Policy for the City. This would later give rise to a Community Sustainability Strategic Plan for Toledo, Lucas County and the surrounding region with energy efficiency as a key pillar. When the TLCPA signed the grant documents with the DOE in June of 2010, the geographic area was severely distressed economically, in the early stages of a recovery from over a 30% drop in business activity and high unemployment. The TLCPA and its partners began identifying potential project areas well before the filing of the application, continuing to work diligently before the formal award and signing of the grant documents. Strong implementation and actions plans and business and financing models were developed and revised throughout the 3 year grant period with the long term goal of creating a sustainable program. The TLCPA and the City of Toledo demonstrated early leadership by forming the energy improvement district and evaluating buildings under their control including transportation infrastructure and logistics, government services buildings and buildings which housed several for profit and not for profit tenants while completing significant energy efficiency projects that created public awareness and confidence and solid examples of various technologies and energy savings. As was stated in the DOE Award Summary, the undertaking was focused as a commercial program delving into Alternative Energy Utility Districts; what are referred to in Ohio Statute as Energy Special Improvement

  14. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  15. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository operated by the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine...

  16. Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (38th) Held at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio on June 13-17 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY OF MOtZCUIAR IONS IN A RADIOFREQUENCY ION TRAP..................................................... 15 aim. (4:43) CECILIA ...A. PAYNE , ANDREA GOLDBERG, and DONALD S. *.CLURE, Department of Chemistry, Princetoa University, Princeton, New, Jersey, 08544. TH14. EXCITED STATE...DYNAMICS OF Cu + IN NsF HOST CRYSTAL .......................... 15 mn. (4:21) ANDREA GOLDBERG, STEPHEN A. PAYNE , and DONALD S. MCCWRE, Department of

  17. NAEP 1992 Mathematics State Report for Ohio. The Trial State Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Princeton, NJ.

    In 1990, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) included a Trial State Assessment which, for the first time in the NAEP's history, made voluntary state-by-state assessments. This 1992 mathematics report marks the first attempt of the National Center for Education Statistics to shift to standards-based reporting of National…

  18. 78 FR 19990 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards; Correction AGENCY... approved revisions to Ohio regulations that consolidated air quality standards in a new chapter of rules... State's air quality standards into Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 3745-25 and modifying an assortment of...

  19. Development of strategic enterprise architecture design for the Ohio Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In order for the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) to successfully carry out its mission, it is essential to : appropriately incorporate and utilize technology. Information management systems are vital to maintaining the states : transporta...

  20. Ohio USA stoneflies (Insecta, Plecoptera: species richness estimation, distribution of functional niche traits, drainage affiliations, and relationships to other states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. DeWalt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ohio is an eastern USA state that historically was >70% covered in upland and mixed coniferous forest; about 60% of it glaciated by the Wisconsinan glacial episode. Its stonefly fauna has been studied in piecemeal fashion until now. The assemblage of Ohio stoneflies was assessed from over 4,000 records accumulated from 18 institutions, new collections, and trusted literature sources. Species richness totaled 102 with estimators Chao2 and ICE Mean predicting 105.6 and 106.4, respectively. Singletons and doubletons totaled 18 species. All North American families were represented with Perlidae accounted for the highest number of species at 34. The family Peltoperlidae contributed a single species. Most species had univoltine–fast life cycles with the vast majority emerging in summer, although there was a significant component of winter stoneflies. Nine United States Geological Survey hierarchical drainage units level 6 (HUC6 were used to stratify specimen data. Species richness was significantly related to the number of unique HUC6 locations, but there was no relationship with HUC6 drainage area. A nonparametric multidimensional scaling analysis found that larger HUC6s in the western part of the state had similar assemblages with lower species richness that were found to align with more savanna and wetland habitat. Other drainagesricher assemblages were aligned with upland deciduous and mixed coniferous forests of the east and south where slopes were higher. The Ohio assemblage was most similar to the well–studied fauna of Indiana (88 spp. and Kentucky (108 spp., two neighboring states. Many rare species and several high quality stream reaches should be considered for greater protection.

  1. No-till and conservation agriculture in the United States: An example from the David Brandt farm, Carroll, Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Islam

    2014-03-01

    Another early adopter, Bill Richards, from Circleville, Ohio, also became a national leader and promoter of no-till farming. He served as head of the United States Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service in the early 1990s and instituted a program that led to rapid expansion of no-till. He advises that farmers who follow conservation agriculture principles need to be more proactive, from local level to national levels, to influence policy decisions that can lead to robust improvement in soil health.

  2. Ohio CVISN business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Ohio has aggressively initiated and participated in a variety of ITS/CVO initiatives in recent years. The successes of these projects provide the impetus and enthusiasm to pursue higher forms of technology in addressing issues relating to CVO. This d...

  3. OhioLINK: Implementing Integrated Library Services across Institutional Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Carol Pitts

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implementation of the OhioLINK (Ohio Library and Information Network) system, an integrated library system linking 23 public and private academic institutions and the Ohio State Library. Topics include a history of OhioLINK; organizational structure; decision-making procedures; public relations strategies; cooperative circulation;…

  4. A Rising Tide of Digitization--The Ohio Memory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, after a year of planning and preparation, the second generation of Ohio Memory was launched. A collaborative effort of the Ohio Historical Society (OHS) and the State Library of Ohio, Ohio Memory is a repository for more than 75,000 digital items, including photographs, journals, and other manuscript materials, as well as print documents…

  5. Conference on Occupational Health Aspects of Advanced Composite Technology in the Aerospace Industry Held in Dayton, Ohio on 6-9 February 1989. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    editorial assistance of Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, _, 43201-2893, a subcontractor to NSI Technology Services Corporation. 17. CSAT CODES...needs of the customers and their employees with the need for security to protect proprietary materials. 15 Consensus Statements Health Effects and...materials for any industries except shipyards until the beginning of the 1980’s, although many companies provided MSDSs due to customer demand. The

  6. C-TEC: Ohio's First All-Green School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Angie

    2009-01-01

    In Ohio's Licking County, the Career and Technology Education Centers (C-TEC) is a leader in the green movement. This eco-friendly school incorporates environmental sustainability in all aspects of its programming and is the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified public building in the state. While eco-friendly…

  7. Losing Ohio's Future: Why College Graduates Flee the Buckeye State and What Might Be Done about It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute became interested in Ohio's human-talent issues via its work to improve public education. Fordham wanted answers to two related questions: what would it take to excite, attract, and retain more top college students to work in Ohio, and what else would it take to draw them into the field of education? To seek…

  8. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  9. Accelerated Clean-up of the United States Department of Energy, Mound Nuclear Weapons Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehew, J.G.; Bradford, J.D.; Cabbil, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    CH2M HILL is executing a performance-based contract with the United States Department of Energy to accelerate the safe closure of the nuclear facilities at the former Mound plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. The contract started in January 2003 with a target completion date of March 31, 2006. Our accelerated baseline targets completion of the project 2 years ahead of the previous baseline schedule, by spring 2006, and for $200 million less than previous estimates. This unique decommissioning and remediation project is located within the City of Miamisburg proper and is designed for transfer of the property to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse. The project is being performed with the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation and their tenants co-located on the site creating significant logistical, safety and stakeholder challenges. The project is also being performed in conjunction with the United States Department of Energy, United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency under the Mound 2000 regulatory cleanup process. The project is currently over 95% complete. To achieve cleanup and closure of the Mound site, CH2M HILL's scope includes: - Demolition of 64 nuclear, radiological and commercial facilities - Preparation for Transfer of 9 facilities (including a Category 2 nuclear facility) to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse - Removal of all above ground utility structures and components, and preparation for transfer of 9 utility systems to Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation - Investigation, remediation, closure, and documentation of all known Potential Release Sites contaminated with radiological and chemical contamination (73 identified in original contract) - Storage, characterization, processing, packaging and shipment of all waste and excess nuclear materials - Preparation for Transfer of the 306 acre site to the

  10. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  11. Timber resources of Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal P. Kingsley; Carl E. Mayer

    1970-01-01

    Under the authority of the McSweeney-McNary Forest Research Act of May 22, 1928, and subsequent amendments, the Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, conducts a series of continuing forest surveys of all states to provide up-to-date information about the forest resources of the Nation. A resurvey of the timber resources of Ohio was made in 1966 and 1967 by...

  12. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE's mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company

  13. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

  14. Ohio High School Biology Teachers' Views of State Standard for Evolution: Impacts on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    High school biology teachers face many challenges as they teach evolution. State standards for evolution may provide support for sound evolution instruction. This study attempts to build upon previous work by investigating teachers' views of evolution standards and their evolution practices in a state where evolution standards have been…

  15. Economic effects of Ohio's smoke-free law on Kentucky and Ohio border counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyles, Mark K; Hahn, Ellen J

    2011-01-01

    To determine if the Ohio statewide smoke-free law is associated with economic activity in Ohio or Kentucky counties that lie on the border between the two states. In November 2006, Ohio implemented a comprehensive statewide smoke-free law for all indoor workplaces. A feasible generalised least squares (FLGS) time series design to estimate the impact of the Ohio smoke-free law on Kentucky and Ohio border counties. Six Kentucky and six Ohio counties that lie on the border between the two states. All reporting hospitality and accommodation establishments in all Kentucky and Ohio counties including but not limited to food and drinking establishments, hotels and casinos. Total number of employees, total wages paid and number of reported establishments in all hospitality and accommodation services, 6 years before Ohio's law and 1 year after. There is no evidence of a disproportionate change in economic activity in Ohio or Kentucky border counties relative to their non-border counterparts. There was no evidence of a relation between Ohio's smoke-free law and economic activity in Kentucky border counties. The law generated a positive influence on wages and number of establishments in Ohio border counties. The null result cannot be explained by low test power, as minimum changes necessary in the dependent variables to detect a significant influence are very reasonable in size. Our data add to the large body of evidence that smoke-free laws are neutral with respect to the hospitality business across jurisdictions with and without laws.

  16. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Ohio. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  17. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible

  18. Qualitative assessment of the value of the Ohio State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.; Johnson, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) is a major regional research, training, and service facility. The OSTR supports a wide variety of organizations at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels. Examples of usage of the OSTR are given in this paper to serve as a basis for assessing the value of the OSTR to its user organizations. It is difficult to assess the value of a facility such as the OSTR quantitatively, primarily because a dollar value cannot be assigned to many of the services that the OSTR performs, e.g., forensic analysis to assist police agencies in criminal cases. Significant qualitative statements can be made, however, to demonstrate the fact that the value of a research reactor facility such as the OSTR substantially outweighs the capital and operating costs of such a facility. Analysis of the data presented above clearly indicates that the value of the OSTR facility is overwhelmingly positive, i.e., the benefits associated with the services provided by the OSTR facility outweigh the cost of providing such services by perhaps as much as an order of magnitude

  19. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  20. Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory HEU fuel shipment summary. Final

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In November 1988, OSURR converted from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. As a result they needed to get rid of their HEU fuel by shipping it to Savannah River. The players in the fuel shipping game are: OSURR as the keeper of the fuel; DOE as the owner of fuel and shipper of record; Tri-State Motor Transit Co. for transporting the cask; Muth Brothers as the rigger responsible for getting the cask on and off the truck and in and out of the building; Hoffman LaRoche/Cintichem as the owner of the cask; Savannah River as the receiver of the fuel; and the NRC for approval of the Security Plan, QA Plan, etc. This report gives a chronological history of the events from February 1989 to June 1, 1995, the actual day of shipment. The cask was received at Savannah River on June 2, 1995

  1. States Launch High-Tech Program to Bolster Industrial Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepkowski, Wil

    1984-01-01

    Many states are establishing research centers keyed to universities strong in science and engineering as the Unites States' drive to become more technologically competitive shifts to the states. Initiatives in Ohio are provided as an example of this trend. (JN)

  2. technologies in Imo State, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adoption of improved cassava production technologies, while age was negatively but significantly related to ... that Nigeria is leading the cassava production in the world, producing about 20% of total world production .... 8 recommended improved cassava production technologies identified to include appropriate spacing,.

  3. A parametric study of the steady-state operational characteristics of the Ohio State University natural circulation indirect-cycle, inherently safe boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybar, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Ohio State University Inherently Safe Reactor (OSU-ISR) is a conceptual design for a 340-MW(electric) [1,000-MW(thermal)], natural circulation, indirect-cycle, small boiling water reactor. All the OSU-ISR primary loop components are housed within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). The OSU-ISR performance has been investigated as a function of several design parameters in an attempt to better understand the interdependency among the system variables and hence to establish a knowledge base for the refinement of the conceptual design. The computational tool used in the study is a Dynamic Simulation for Nuclear Power Plants (DSNP) code whose predictions for the steady-state OSU-ISR performance compare favorably with RELAP5/MOD3 results for most of the operational characteristics of interest. The results show that (a) the key quantity that governs the OSU-ISR steady-state performance is the pressure difference between the primary and the secondary loops, (b) the magnitude of water-level swell (which occurs due to void formation in the core during operation and which affects the size of the steam separators that need to be used) can be more effectively controlled by varying the PCRV water level at cold shutdown rather than by varying the internal PCRV dimensions, (c) turbine inlet steam quality can be controlled without substantially affecting the other operational parameters by varying the secondary mass flow rate, and (d) the PCRV pressure and core exit steam quality are most sensitive to changes in the secondary loop pressure. The results also show that if there is a large drop in the secondary loop pressure (e.g., due to a steam line break), then although this pressure drop may induce a large drop in the PCRV pressure, the core flow, and hence core cooling capability, will not be appreciably affected

  4. Biomass resources for energy in Ohio: The OH-MARKAL modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Bibhakar

    consequences of alternative energy scenarios for the future. The model can also be used to estimate the relative merits of various energy technologies. By developing OH-MARKAL as an empirical model, this study evaluates the prospects of biomass cofiring in Ohio to generate commercial electricity. As cofiring utilizes the existing infrastructure, it is an attractive option for utilizing biomass energy resources, with the objective of replacing non-renewable fuel (coal) with renewable and cleaner fuel (biomass). It addresses two key issues: first, the importance of diversifying the fuel resource base for the power industry; and second, the need to increase the use of biomass or renewable resources in Ohio. The results of the various model scenarios developed in this study indicate that policy interventions are necessary to make biomass co-firing competitive with coal, and that about 7 percent of electricity can be generated by using biomass feedstock in Ohio. This study recommends mandating an optimal level of a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for Ohio to increase renewable electricity generation in the state. To set a higher goal of RPS than 7 percent level, Ohio needs to include other renewable sources such as wind, solar or hydro in its electricity generation portfolio. The results also indicate that the marginal price of electricity must increase by four fold to mitigate CO2 emissions 15 percent below the 2002 level, suggesting Ohio will also need to consider and invest in clean coal technologies and examine the option of carbon sequestration. Hence, Ohio's energy strategy should include a mix of domestic renewable energy options, energy efficiency, energy conservation, clean coal technology, and carbon sequestration options. It would seem prudent for Ohio to become proactive in reducing CO2 emissions so that it will be ready to deal with any future federal mandates, otherwise the consequences could be detrimental to the state's economy.

  5. 78 FR 68367 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ...] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX SIP Call Rule Revisions... that supersedes the NOx Budget Trading Program. States subject to both the NO X SIP Call and CAIR's... ``The NOx allowance tracking system.'', effective October 18, 2010. (C) October 8, 2010, ``Director's...

  6. NORTHERN OHIO AEROSOL STUDY: STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A consortium of Universities, located in northwest Ohio have received funds to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of land applied biosolids in that state. This USDA funded study includes observing land application practices and evaluating biosolids, soils, runoff water and bioaer...

  7. Kennesaw State University Classroom Technology Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaney, Jane; Wallace, Deborah; Taylor, Beverley

    The purpose of the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Coca Cola/Board of Regents Classroom Technology Initiative was to develop preservice and inservice teachers' expertise in educational technology such as computers, presentation software, and multimedia and to teach educators to apply those skills to content instruction. Project goals were to…

  8. Mastery-Based, Self-Paced Instruction in Foreign Languages at Ohio State University: A Report to the Profession on a Four Year Experiment in Individualized Instruction in Six Foreign Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, Leon I.; Walters, E. Garrison

    1981-01-01

    Describes development and implementation of system of individualized instruction at Ohio State University at elementary level in Arabic, French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. Funded by National Endowment for the Humanities, the project involved three components--teacher-assisted, mastery-based, and self-paced instruction (TAMBSPI).…

  9. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  10. An Exploratory Analysis of the Equity of Ohio School Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetland, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    This research briefly summarizes a series of Ohio Supreme Court litigation known as "DeRolph v. State" and then measures the equality of expenditures among Ohio school districts. "DeRolph v. State" was a high-profile school finance adequacy case. Nevertheless, the high court continuously expressed concern for the financial…

  11. Is Ohio Experiencing "Brain Drain?" The Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is Ohio losing its best and brightest minds to other states? Is the state investing hundreds of millions of dollars in public higher education every year only to see graduates move out of state upon graduating in search of greener pastures? The Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy (CHEE) commissioned a report about this issue…

  12. Raising H2 and Fuel Cell Awareness in Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Patrick R. [Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition, Elyria, OH (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition was tasked with raising the awareness and understanding of Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen economy. This was done by increasing the understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies among state and local governments using a target of more than 10% compared to 2004 baseline. We were also to target key populations by 20 percent compared to 2004 baseline. There are many barriers to an educated fuel cell population, including: a)Lack of Readily Available, Objective and Technical Accurate Information b)Mixed Messages c)Disconnect Between Hydrogen Information and Dissemination Networks d)Lack of Educated Trainers and Training Opportunities e)Regional Differences f)Difficulty of Measuring Success The approach we used for all the Community Leaders Forums were presentations by the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition in conjunction with regional leaders. The presentations were followed by question and answers periods followed up by informal discussions on Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen Economy. This project held a total of 53 events with the following breakdown: From Aug 2009 through June 2010, the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition held 19 community leaders forums and educated over 845 individuals, both from the State of Ohio and across the country: From July 2010 to June 2011 the OFCC held 23 community forum events and educated 915 individuals; From August 2011 to June 2012 there were 11 community forums educating 670 individuals. This report details each of those events, their date, location, purpose, and pertinent details to this report. In summary, as you see the Community Leader Forums have been very successful over the period of the grant with over 2,000 people being drawn to the forums. As always, we followed up the forums with a survey and the survey results were very positive in that the participants had a significant increase in knowledge and awareness of Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen Economy.

  13. Solid-state lighting technology perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2006-08-01

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

  14. School District Response to the Ohio Local Option Income Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Jess E.

    Ohio State Senate Bill 28 allows school districts, with voter approval, to impose a tax on the incomes of district residents. This paper examines the early response of school districts to the opportunity presented by the legislation. The paper explains the Ohio system for funding public schools, with a focus on revenue growth, describes features…

  15. Music Education in the Curriculum of Ohio Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecoth, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the extent to which music education is present in the curriculum of Ohio charter schools. These community schools, as they are identified within the state, enroll over 120,000 students across Ohio. While the mission and focus of these schools are easily found in promotional literature and…

  16. Ohio's Foray into Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Ohio Educational Library Media Association (OELMA) has been working for many years to gather evidence in hopes of convincing their state government of the need for a certified library media specialist in every school. Its latest efforts began in 2002 when the board of OELMA applied for a grant to do a state study. Board members of OELMA, however,…

  17. OSU Extension, Ohio Aging Network Join Forces: Creating Resources for Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goard, Linnette Mizer

    2010-01-01

    Ohio State University Extension and Ohio's Aging Network professionals have worked together for more than a decade to address issues of importance to Ohio's older adult population. The team's mission is to provide education, training, and resources to empower older Ohioans to achieve an optimal level of well-being. The Senior Series team initially…

  18. A Comprehensive System of Community Colleges in Ohio: To Be or Not To Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Elena Y.

    After 40 years of efforts, the first bill authorizing the establishment of community colleges in the state of Ohio was finally adopted in June 1961. Before and after the passage of the act, attempts had been made to create a comprehensive community college system in Ohio, but all of them failed. A 1970 study by the Ohio Board of Regents (OBOR),…

  19. L2 Teachers' Experience of CALL Technology Education and the Use of Computer Technology in the Classroom: The Case of Franklin County, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kwang Hee

    2009-01-01

    Primary issues concerned with CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning) teacher education are twofold: Integration of CALL technology into foreign and second language (L2) teacher education programs and L2 teachers' integration of CALL technology into their classroom. While increased attention has been paid to the former, only a small body of…

  20. Preliminary Assessment of the Flow of Used Electronics, In Selected States: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is the largest growing municipal waste stream in the United States. The improper disposal of e-waste has environmental, economic, and social impacts, thus there is a need for sustainable stewardship of electronics. EPA/ORD has been working to improve ...

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Manual Control (15th) held March 20 - 22, 1979, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    Information about the state of the control, characterized by its movement resistance r1] , [2] . 457 . ..... ....... . .-.~ ....... disla operator conMAl...Manipulator Approach, Load Acquisition and Removal PROXMT PROXIMITY ~. j 8rEIOR COMPLARSDIPLY CAMEM DISLA CNERAMEA ARM CONTRO OPTORERONCE Figure 10. Voice

  2. Venture Capital Initiative: Ohio's School Improvement Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Soonhwa; Loadman, William E.

    In 1994 the Ohio State Legislature established Venture Capital to support school restructuring. The Venture Capital school initiative is a concept borrowed from the business community in which the corporate entity provides risk capital to parts of the organization to stimulate creative ideas and to provide opportunities for local entities to try…

  3. Preliminary Findings on Rural Homelessness in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Richard J.; And Others

    This report is designed to present preliminary findings from the first comprehensive study of rural homelessness in the United States. The study was conducted during the first 6 months of 1990, and data were collected from interviews with 921 homeless adults in 21 randomly selected rural counties in Ohio. The sample counties represent 26% of the…

  4. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance -- United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara; Anderson, John E; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2013-12-06

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information on U.S. ART procedures performed in 2010 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2010 (resulting from procedures performed in 2009 and 2010) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2010. 2010. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States and U.S. territories, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. In 2010, a total of 147,260 ART procedures performed in 443 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 47,090 live-birth deliveries and 61,564 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (18,524), New York (excluding New York City) (14,212), Illinois (10,110), Massachusetts (9,854), New Jersey (8,783), and Texas (8,754). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART procedures and together accounted for 48.0% of all ART procedures performed, 45.0% of all infants born

  5. Attitudes Toward Integration as Perceived by Preservice Teachers Enrolled in an Integrated Mathematics, Science, and Technology Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Donna F.; White, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the purpose of the Master of Education (M. Ed.) Program in Integrated Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (MSAT Program) at The Ohio State University and discusses preservice teachers' attitudes and perceptions toward integrated curriculum. (Contains 35 references.) (YDS)

  6. Use of crushed recycled glass in the construction of local roadways current status of recycled glass collection and processing in the State of Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Junliang (Julian) Tao, ORCiD: 0000-0002-3772-3099 : Glass cullet is produced from crushing waste glass collected in municipal and industrial waste streams to a specific size. In Ohio, it is primarily used in new glass container manufacturing. One pos...

  7. Ohio Career Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  8. Science and Math Lesson Plans to Meet the Ohio Revised Science Standards and the Next Generation of Standards for Today; Technology (Excel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pre-service teachers (K-12 developed and taught lesson plans that met the state and national science and technology standards by integrating Excel and PowerPoint into their lesson. A sample of 74 pre-service teachers in our science education program were required to integrate technology (Excel as they developed science and math lesson plans with graphing as a requirement. These students took pre-test and post-test (n=74 to determine their understanding of Excel in relation to the need of current technology for todays' science classroom. The test results showed that students obtained content gains in Excel graphing in all the inquiry-based lab experiments. They also gained experience in developing math skills, inquiry-based science lesson plans, and communication and presentation skills.

  9. State financed PV technology projects in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoh, L.; Gyoh, S. [Iceberg PVPS Consultants, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Despite the progress made by the democratic government of Nigeria to eradicate poverty, there are still millions of people without access to electricity. It would not be financially viable to extend the national electricity grid to each electoral ward, in remote locations in the country. The use of photovoltaic technology now brings electricity to many rural areas as part of the provision of basic needs by the Nigerian authorities. The Nasarawa State Government has embarked on the provision of all it electoral wards with solar powered water supply systems to carter for a mostly rural population of 3.4 million people. The Benue, Taraba, Bauchi and Jigawa State governments have embarked on similar schemes in Rural Water Supply, Health and the Educational sectors of the economy. Ambitious PV programmes, of this nature, inevitably face challenges in developing countries. The preliminary recommendations, of this ongoing study, have been made to address some of the potential challenges in some of the key areas. This paper reviews the implementation progress and suggests some of the lessons that might be learnt. (authors)

  10. State financed PV technology projects in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoh, L.; Gyoh, S.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the progress made by the democratic government of Nigeria to eradicate poverty, there are still millions of people without access to electricity. It would not be financially viable to extend the national electricity grid to each electoral ward, in remote locations in the country. The use of photovoltaic technology now brings electricity to many rural areas as part of the provision of basic needs by the Nigerian authorities. The Nasarawa State Government has embarked on the provision of all it electoral wards with solar powered water supply systems to carter for a mostly rural population of 3.4 million people. The Benue, Taraba, Bauchi and Jigawa State governments have embarked on similar schemes in Rural Water Supply, Health and the Educational sectors of the economy. Ambitious PV programmes, of this nature, inevitably face challenges in developing countries. The preliminary recommendations, of this ongoing study, have been made to address some of the potential challenges in some of the key areas. This paper reviews the implementation progress and suggests some of the lessons that might be learnt. (authors)

  11. Relations between DNA- and RNA-based molecular methods for cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration at Maumee Bay State Park Lakeside Beach, Oregon, Ohio, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Loftin, Keith A.; Struffolino, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Water samples were collected from Maumee Bay State Park Lakeside Beach, Oregon, Ohio, during the 2012 recreational season and analyzed for selected cyanobacteria gene sequences by DNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and RNA-based quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results from the four DNA assays (for quantifying total cyanobacteria, total Microcystis, and Microcystis and Planktothrix strains that possess the microcystin synthetase E (mcyE) gene) and two RNA assays (for quantifying Microcystis and Planktothrix genera that are expressing the microcystin synthetase E (mcyE) gene) were compared to microcystin concentration results determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Concentrations of the target in replicate analyses were log10 transformed. The average value of differences in log10 concentrations for the replicates that had at least one detection were found to range from 0.05 to >0.37 copy per 100 milliliters (copy/100 mL) for DNA-based methods and from >0.04 to >0.17 copy/100 mL for RNA-based methods. RNA has a shorter half-life than DNA; consequently, a 24-hour holding-time study was done to determine the effects of holding time on RNA concentrations. Holding-time comparisons for the RNA-based Microcystis toxin mcyE assay showed reductions in the number of copies per 100 milliliters over 24 hours. The log difference between time 2 hours and time 24 hours was >0.37 copy/100 mL, which was higher than the analytical variability (log difference of >0.17 copy/100 mL). Spearman’s correlation analysis indicated that microcystin toxin concentrations were moderately to highly related to DNA-based assay results for total cyanobacteria (rho=0.69), total Microcystis (rho=0.74), and Microcystis strains that possess the mcyE gene (rho=0.81). Microcystin toxin concentrations were strongly related with RNA-based assay results for Microcystis mcyE gene expression (rho=0.95). Correlation analysis could

  12. 75 FR 65572 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY... Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) relating to the consolidation of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards... apply to Ohio's SIP. Incorporating the air quality standards into Ohio's SIP helps assure that...

  13. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2017-02-10

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2014 and compares birth outcomes that occurred in 2014 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2013 and 2014) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2014. 2014. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico). In 2014, a total of 169,568 ART procedures (range: 124 in Wyoming to 21,018 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 458 U.S. fertility clinics and reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 56,028 live-birth deliveries (range: 52 in Wyoming to 7,230 in California) and 68,782 infants born (range: 64 in Wyoming to 8,793 in California). Nationally, the total number of ART procedures performed per million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART usage rate, was 2,647 (range: 364 in Puerto Rico

  14. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Boulet, Sheree L; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2018-02-16

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Although the majority of infants conceived through ART are singletons, women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks for both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery (state-specific information for the United States (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2015 and compares birth outcomes that occurred in 2015 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2014 and 2015) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2015. 2015. In 1995, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493 [October 24, 1992]). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System, a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico). In 2015, a total of 182,111 ART procedures (range: 135 in Alaska to 23,198 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 464 U.S. fertility clinics and reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 59,334 live-birth deliveries (range: 55 in Wyoming to 7,802 in California) and 71,152 infants born (range: 68 in Wyoming to 9,176 in California). Nationally, the number of ART procedures performed per 1 million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART utilization rate, was

  15. Beryllium Technology Research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Robert A. Anderl; M. Kay Adleer-Flitton; Gretchen E. Matthern; Troy J. Tranter; Kendall J. Hollis

    2005-01-01

    While most active research involving beryllium in the United States remains tied strongly to biological effects, there are several areas of technology development in the last two years that should be mentioned. (1) Beryllium disposed of in soil vaults at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) has been encapsulated in-situ by high-temperature and pressure injection of a proprietary wax based material to inhibit corrosion. (2) A research program to develop a process for removing heavy metals and cobalt from irradiated beryllium using solvent extraction techniques has been initiated to remove components that prevent the beryllium from being disposed of as ordinary radioactive waste. (3) The JUPITER-II program at the INL Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has addressed the REDOX reaction of beryllium in molten Flibe (a mixture of LiF and BeF2) to control tritium, particularly in the form of HF, bred in the Flibe by reactions involving both beryllium and lithium. (4) Work has been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to produce beryllium high heat flux components by plasma spray deposition on macro-roughened substrates. Finally, (5) corrosion studies on buried beryllium samples at the RWMC have shown that the physical form of some of the corroded beryllium is very filamentary and asbestos-like. This form of beryllium may exacerbate the contraction of chronic beryllium disease

  16. Cost analysis of the Ohio nursing home industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Caswell, R J; Cleverley, W O

    1983-01-01

    This study was part of a major review of long-term care policy in the state of Ohio. The authors analyzed 1532 cost reports filed by nursing homes in 1975-1976 with the Ohio Medical Assistance (Medicaid) program. The objective was to guide policy on size (economies of scale), ownership, certification status, and reimbursement. Economies of scale were not found important: skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) offered the only evidence of operation below optimal scale, and the savings attributable ...

  17. Technology Adoption: A Comparison Between Canada and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, John R.; Sabourin, David

    1999-01-01

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in...

  18. Independent Assessment of Technology Characterizations to Support the Biomass Program Annual State-of-Technology Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, B.

    2011-03-01

    This report discusses an investigation that addressed two thermochemical conversion pathways for the production of liquid fuels and addressed the steps to the process, the technology providers, a method for determining the state of technology and a tool to continuously assess the state of technology. This report summarizes the findings of the investigation as well as recommendations for improvements for future studies.

  19. Ohio's timber harvest revealed in stumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Quigley

    1955-01-01

    Timber is an important resource in Ohio, and cutting records are an essential part of a forest resource appraisal. However, finding out just how much timber is cut in the State during any one year is a big job. Occasionally in the past, wood-using industries have been surveyed to determine the volume cut by species and product, but the variety of industries, the large...

  20. The State of Technology in Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Tyler; Viezel-Mathieu, Alex; Beland, Benjamin; Azzi, Alain J; Galli, Rafael; Gilardino, Mirko

    2018-03-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of ≥1 cranial sutures, is the leading cause of pediatric skull deformities, affecting 1 of every 2000 to 2500 live births worldwide. Technologies used for the management of craniofacial conditions, specifically in craniosynostosis, have been advancing dramatically. This article highlights the most recent technological advances in craniosynostosis surgery through a systematic review of the literature. A systematic electronic search was performed using the PubMed database. Search terms used were "craniosynostosis" AND "technology" OR "innovation" OR "novel.' Two independent reviewers subsequently reviewed the resultant articles based on strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Selected manuscripts deemed novel by the senior authors were grouped by procedure categories. Following review of the PubMed database, 28 of 536 articles were retained. Of the 28 articles, 20 articles consisting of 21 technologies were deemed as being novel by the senior authors. The technologies were categorized as diagnostic imaging (n = 6), surgical planning (n = 4), cranial vault evaluation (n = 4), machine learning (n = 3), ultrasound pinning (n = 3), and near-infrared spectroscopy (n = 1). Multiple technological advances have impacted the treatment of craniosynostosis. These innovations include improvement in diagnosis and objective measurement of craniosynostosis, preoperative planning, intraoperative procedures, communication between both surgeons and patients, and surgical education.

  1. Comparison of State-Funded Technology Maturation Programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warren, Drake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hess, Marguerite Evelyn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the structure and impact of state-funded technology maturation programs that leverage research institutions for economic development throughout the United States. The lessons learned and practices identified from previous experiences will inform Sandia National Laboratories' Government Relations and Technology Partnerships teams as they participate in near-term discussions about the proposed Technology Readiness Gross Receipts Tax Credit and Program, and continue to shape longer-term program and partnership opportunities. This Page Intentionally Left Blank

  2. Blocking the College Door: Cuts to Financial Aid Lock Ohio Students Out. Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    In the twentieth century, Ohioans as individuals and Ohio as a state did much to improve the education level of Ohio's workforce. The state built a world-class network of community colleges and branch campuses, institutions created to make post-secondary education accessible and affordable. These efforts, along with investments in K-12 education…

  3. Blocking the College Door Cuts to Financial Aid Lock Ohio Students Out. Higher Education. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    In the twentieth century, Ohioans as individuals and Ohio as a state did much to improve the education level of Ohio's workforce. The state built a world-class network of community colleges and branch campuses, institutions created to make post-secondary education accessible and affordable. These efforts, along with investments in K-12 education…

  4. 78 FR 19128 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Particulate Matter Standards AGENCY: Environmental... conditional approval of specified provisions of the Ohio state implementation plan (SIP) to a full approval... emission limitation exemption for jet engine testing. Pursuant to a state commitment underlying a previous...

  5. Michigan and Ohio K-12 Educational Financing Systems: Equality and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlin, Michael; Thompson, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    We consider issues of equality and efficiency in two different school funding systems--a state-level system in Michigan and a foundation system in Ohio. Unlike Ohio, the Michigan system restricts districts from generating property or income tax revenue to fund operating expenditures. In both states, districts fund capital expenditures with local…

  6. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States); Afjeh, Abdollah [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Jamali, Mohsin [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Bingman, Verner [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  7. In-depth survey report: control technology for manual transfer of chemical powders at the B. F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gressel, M.G.; Heitbrink, W.A.; McGlothlin, J.D.; Fischbach, T.J.

    1985-12-01

    A field study was conducted in the B.F. Goodrich Industrial Plastics Division facility, Marietta, Ohio to evaluate sources of worker dust exposure at a ventilated booth used for the weigh out and transfer of powdered materials from large drums to small bags. The sources of dust exposure evaluated were: depth of scooping, clothing, worker anthropometry, work practices, biomechanics, and specific items in the job cycle. Dust exposure for workers wearing clean clothing was not significantly different from exposure for workers wearing dirty clothing. Depth of scooping from the drum significantly affected dust exposure. There appeared also to be a relationship between the size of the worker and dust exposure when scooping from the bottom of the drum. Work practices may also play a part. The authors conclude that, while the results showed abnormally high dust levels, all three workers studied wore respirable dust respirators during the experiment to protect them from these high levels. Air flow patterns at the booth suggest that the ventillation provided may even contributed to dust exposure.

  8. State investments in high-technology job growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Kevin T; Jenkins, J Craig

    2017-07-01

    Since the early 1970's state and local governments have launched an array of economic development programs designed to promote high-technology development. The question our analysis addresses is whether these programs promote long-term high-technology employment growth net of state location and agglomeration advantages. Proponents talk about an infrastructure strategy that promotes investment in public research and specialized infrastructure to attract and grow new high technology industries in specific locations, and a more decentralized entrepreneurial strategy that reinforces local agglomeration capacities by investing in new enterprises and products, promoting the development of local networks and partnerships. Our results support the entrepreneurial strategy, suggesting that state governments can accelerate high technology development by adopting market-supportive programs that complement private sector initiatives. In addition to positive direct benefits of technology deployment/transfer programs and SBIR programs, entrepreneurial programs affect change in high-technology employment in concert with existing locational and agglomeration advantages. Rural (i.e. low population density) states tend to benefit by technology development programs. Infrastructure strategy programs also facilitate high technology job growth in places where local advantages already exist. Our results suggest that critics of industrial policy are correct that high technology growth is organic and endogenous, yet state governments are able to "pick winners and losers" in ways that grow their local economy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensors and Technologies in Spain: State-of-the-Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Pajares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this special issue was to provide a comprehensive view on the state-of-the-art sensor technology in Spain. Different problems cause the appearance and development of new sensor technologies and vice versa, the emergence of new sensors facilitates the solution of existing real problems. [...

  10. The Status of Basic Technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    is “to equip the students to live effectively in our modern age of science and technology” (FRN 2004). Despite the relevance of basic technology, the cry for poor implementation of the curriculum for basic technology still poses a challenge to secondary education in Cross River State. Odu (2013) lamented that “unfortunately, ...

  11. The status of basic technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the status of basic technology in Cross River State junior secondary schools. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. The study was guided by three (3) research questions. The population for the study comprised of one hundred and twelve (112) basic technology ...

  12. Adoption of sweet potato production technologies in Abia State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adoption of sweet potato production technologies in Abia State, Nigeria. ... Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) ... Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) Ibadan and National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) Umudike to eliminate constraints associated with farmers' use of local production technologies.

  13. Technologies Extended To Women Farmers in Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as hindrance to the use of extended technologies by the women farmers. Based on the findings, four recommendations for enhancing Home Economics extension programmes were made. Key words: Technologies, Women Farmers, Abia State Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences Vol.2(2) 2004: 58-67 ...

  14. Evaluating the Impact of Performance Funding in Ohio and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Hicklin Fryar, Alisa; Crespín-Trujillo, Valerie

    2018-01-01

    Today, 35 states use performance-based funding models tying appropriations directly to educational outcomes. Financial incentives should induce colleges to improve performance, but there are several well-documented reasons why this is unlikely to occur. We examine how two of the most robust performance funding states--Tennessee and Ohio--responded…

  15. Federal/State Jurisdictional Split: Implications for Emerging Electricity Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Jeffery S. [Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Kelly, Suedeen G. [Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Nordhaus, Robert R. [Van Ness Feldman, LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Douglas W. [Van Ness Feldman, LLP, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The first Administration-wide Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), released in April 2015, found that the “interacting and overlapping” division of authority between “federal, regional and state institutions and regulatory structures” for the electricity sector could “impede development of the grid of the future [and] . . . the development of markets that efficiently integrate” new and emerging technologies.1 While “technology is indifferent to state-Federal boundaries and jurisdictions,” the QER explained, “technology users cannot be.”2 The report concluded that “[b]oth Federal and state governments need to play constructive and collaborative roles in the future to ensure that consumers and industry are able to maximize the value of new technologies.”3 The QER recommended that the Department of Energy (“DOE”) facilitate such collaboration by playing a “convening role” to bring together state and federal regulators and other stakeholders to consider these issues.4 This paper provides background and analysis on these jurisdictional issues and the impact they may have on adoption of emerging energy technologies and coordination of markets for those technologies, in support of future dialogs on these subjects. In particular, this paper reviews the structure of the Federal Power Act (“FPA”),5 and compares the division of authority between the federal and state governments adopted there with other federal energy and energy-related statutes.

  16. Adoption of Rice Technologies Introduced by the United States ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined the levels of adoption of improved rice technologies introduced by USAID MARKETS project phase one in Anambra and Ebonyi States, Nigeria. The population of the study included all project participant rice farmers of USAID MARKETS project in both Anambra and Ebonyi States. A total sample of 80 ...

  17. Status report and approaches for siting a low level waste disposal facility in Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    On July 24, 1991, Michigan was expelled from the Midwest Interstate Low Level Radioactive Waste Compact. This action resulted in Ohio becoming the primary host state based on actions taken by the commission in 1987 when Ohio was designated as first alternate host state. Ohio recognized early on that the existing Midwest Compact needed to be amended and negotiations on a compact document that met the concerns of Ohio were initially completed in June 1993. A region-wide review and comment period was provided and meetings or hearings on the amended and restated compact were completed in all party states with the unamimous adoption of the document by the Commission on November 29, 1993. The document will now be forwarded to the party state for action by their state legislatures. Ohio is expected to enact the compact amendments first with each of the other states following in short order. On October 30, 1992 the governor of Ohio appointed a 13 member blue ribbon committee on siting criteria. In September 1993, the Blue Ribbon Commission on Siting Criteria and Ohio's Low-Level Radioactive Waste Advisory Committee each issued their reports to the Governor, the leadership of the Ohio General Assembly, and the general public. The Blue Ribbon Commission Report focused on concerns relative to siting while the advisory committee concentrated on the overall administrative structural process associated with developing, licensing and operating a low-level waste facility in Ohio. Legislation is currently being drafted based on these reports. Ohio leadership will consider the package in the session which begins in January 1995

  18. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  19. A Brief Review of Current Lithium Ion Battery Technology and Potential Solid State Battery Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Solid state battery technology has recently garnered considerable interest from companies including Toyota, BMW, Dyson, and others. The primary driver behind the commercialization of solid state batteries (SSBs) is to enable the use of lithium metal as the anode, as opposed to the currently used carbon anode, which would result in ~20% energy density improvement. However, no reported solid state battery to date meets all of the performance metrics of state of the art liquid electrolyte lithiu...

  20. The United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology`s Technology Benefits Recording System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, K.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technology`s (OIT`s) Technology Benefits Recording System (TBRS) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The TBRS is used to organize and maintain records of the benefits accrued from the use of technologies developed with the assistance of OIT. OIT has had a sustained emphasis on technology deployment. While individual program managers have specific technology deployment goals for each of their ongoing programs, the Office has also established a separate Technology Deployment Division whose mission is to assist program managers and research and development partners commercialize technologies. As part of this effort, the Technology Deployment Division developed an energy-tracking task which has been performed by PNL since 1977. The goal of the energy-tracking task is to accurately assess the energy savings impact of OIT-developed technologies. In previous years, information on OIT-sponsored technologies existed in a variety of forms--first as a hardcopy, then electronically in several spreadsheet formats that existed in multiple software programs. The TBRS was created in 1993 for OIT and was based on information collected in all previous years from numerous industrial contacts, vendors, and plants that have installed OIT-sponsored technologies. The TBRS contains information on technologies commercialized between 1977 and the present, as well as information on emerging technologies in the late development/early commercialization stage of the technology life cycle. For each technology, details on the number of units sold and the energy saved are available on a year-by-year basis. Information regarding environmental benefits, productivity and competitiveness benefits, or impact that the technology may have had on employment is also available.

  1. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, Sandra; Delmont, Elizabeth; Gangi, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    This report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, provides a snapshot of fuel cell and hydrogen activity in the 50 states and District of Columbia. It features the top five fuel cell states (in alphabetical order): California, Connecticut, New York, Ohio, and South Carolina. State activities reported include supportive fuel cell and hydrogen policies, installations and demonstrations, road maps, and level of activism.

  2. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

  3. Information Communication Technology, State building, and Globalization in the 21st Century: Regional Frameworks for Emerging State Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY , STATE BUILDING, AND GLOBALIZATION IN THE 21ST CENTURY: REGIONAL FRAMEWORKS FOR EMERGING STATE ASSISTANCE by Justin Y...Communication Technology , State building, and Globalization in the 21st Century: Regional Frameworks for Emerging State Assistance 6. AUTHOR(S...SUBJECT TERMS Information Communication Technology (ICT), State building, Globalization , Political stability, Regionalism, Myanmar, Malaysia 16. PRICE

  4. Counter-Terrorism, Technology and Transparency: Reconsidering State Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirine Eijkman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this Discussion Paper, Dr. Quirine Eijkman discusses the use of surveillance, storage of personal information, biometrics, satellite technology and other forms of ICT technology used in the fight against terrorism. Although technology is a powerful tool to fight terrorism, it is also a means for increasing social control by the state. Henceforth, there is a risk that panoptic surveillance – where the few view the many – could develop. Therefore accountability in relation to use of technological counter-terrorism measures such as smart surveillance cameras, biometric devices or the tracking of personal data is discussed in this article. The extra powers that both public authorities and private companies gain through new (surveillance technologies should be counterbalanced. In this context the role of the state, because of its monopoly to use force and its duty to protect the rule of law, is crucial. By reconsidering how to enforce accountability by the state, the effects of technological counter-terrorism measures could be checked and balanced.

  5. Forest land wildlife habitat resources of South-Central Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert T. Brooks

    1986-01-01

    As part of the third survey of Ohio's forest resources, measures for assessing wildlife habitat were taken in the State's 10 southern counties. This publication reports on the analysis of some of that data, describing the status of land use patterns, forest area, forest ownership, mast-producing trees, potential snag trees, and understory woody stems. Certain...

  6. 78 FR 5476 - Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... flooding due to the remnants of Hurricane Sandy during the period October 29-30, 2012, is of sufficient... following areas of the State of Ohio have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  7. Communication Supports in Congregate Residential Care Settings in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Pamela R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Communication skills are important to the pursuit of increased self-determination in individuals with disabilities. The aim of this investigation was to gather information about communication supports in state-run residential care facilities in Ohio, and to compare findings with a previous investigation on this topic examining such…

  8. Science to support the understanding of Ohio's water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Kimberly; Kula, Stephanie; Bambach, Phil; Runkle, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Ohio’s water resources support a complex web of human activities and nature—clean and abundant water is needed for drinking, recreation, farming, and industry, as well as for fish and wildlife needs. The distribution of rainfall can cause floods and droughts, which affects streamflow, groundwater, water availability, water quality, recreation, and aquatic habitats. Ohio is bordered by the Ohio River and Lake Erie and has over 44,000 miles of streams and more than 60,000 lakes and ponds (State of Ohio, 1994). Nearly all the rural population obtain drinking water from groundwater sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) works in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, as well as universities, to furnish decisionmakers, policymakers, USGS scientists, and the general public with reliable scientific information and tools to assist them in management, stewardship, and use of Ohio’s natural resources. The diversity of scientific expertise among USGS personnel enables them to carry out large- and small-scale multidisciplinary studies. The USGS is unique among government organizations because it has neither regulatory nor developmental authority—its sole product is reliable, impartial, credible, relevant, and timely scientific information, equally accessible and available to everyone. The USGS Ohio Water Science Center provides reliable hydrologic and water-related ecological information to aid in the understanding of use and management of the Nation’s water resources, in general, and Ohio’s water resources, in particular. This fact sheet provides an overview of current (2012) or recently completed USGS studies and data activities pertaining to water resources in Ohio. More information regarding projects of the USGS Ohio Water Science Center is available at http://oh.water.usgs.gov/.

  9. 75 FR 73132 - Sypris Technologies, Sypris Solutions Division, Kenton, OH; Notice of Revised Determination on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sypris Technologies, Sypris Solutions Division, Kenton, OH; Notice of... workers of Sypris Technologies, Sypris Solutions Division, Kenton, Ohio (subject firm). The Department's... workers of Sypris Technologies, Sypris Solutions Division, Kenton, Ohio, who are engaged in employment...

  10. Adoption of Bee Keeping Technologies by Farmers in Imo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the adoption of Beekeeping technology in Imo state. Structured questionnaire was used in collecting data from thirty (30) beekeepers purposively selected from the sturdy area. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. The findings revealed that the average age, ...

  11. Tilt Train Technology : A State of the Art Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    This report presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in tilt-train technology. It is intended to give the reader a better understanding of the unique features of this approach to train design and the variations that exist. Briefly described is th...

  12. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  13. Technology in precision viticulture: a state of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matese A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Matese,1 Salvatore Filippo Di Gennaro1,2 1Institute of Biometeorology, National Research Council (IBIMET-CNR, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy Abstract: Precision viticulture aims to maximize the oenological potential of vineyards. This is especially true in regions where the high quality standards of wine production justify the adoption of site-specific management practices to simultaneously increase both quality and yield. The introduction of new technologies for supporting vineyard management allows the efficiency and quality of production to be improved and, at the same time, reduces the environmental impact. The rapid evolution of information communication technologies and geographical science offers enormous potential for the development of optimized solutions for distributed information for precision viticulture. Recent technological developments have allowed useful tools to be elaborated that help in the monitoring and control of many aspects of vine growth. Precision viticulture thus seeks to exploit the widest range of available observations to describe the vineyard spatial variability with high resolution, and provide recommendations to improve management efficiency in terms of quality, production, and sustainability. This review presents a brief outline of state of the art of technologies in precision viticulture. It is divided in two sections, the first focusing on monitoring technologies such as geolocating and remote and proximal sensing; the second focuses on variable-rate technologies and the new agricultural robots. Keywords: remote sensing, proximal sensing, variable-rate technology, robot 

  14. Precipitation Frequency for Ohio River Basin, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Ohio River Basin and Surrounding states is based on precipitation data collected between...

  15. Fracture critical analysis procedures and design and retrofit approaches for pony truss bridges in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The study outlined in this report aimed to quantify the available redundancy in pony truss bridge systems : constructed using standard designs and practices in the state of Ohio. A method of conducting refined : three-dimensional nonlinear finite ele...

  16. Skid resistance of bituminous surfaces in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colony, D. C.

    1984-03-01

    Statistical studies of skid number (SN) on the state highway system in Ohio reveal apparently systematic variations in distributions of SN among the twelve districts in the state. These variations appear to be significantly related to traffic and to geological characteristics of a given district. Regression calculations using traffic index, a function of ADT and age of the pavement surface in months, show a high correlation with SN, although standard errors of estimate were too large to make the equations useful for predicting SN from traffic variables. Similar results were obtained by elating SN to physiographic features in the state. Pavement surface type (bituminous or pcc) and coarse aggregate type (limestone, gravel or slag) are significantly related to SN.

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Ohio single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  18. Forest Statistics for Ohio--1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald F. Dennis; Thomas W. Birch; Thomas W. Birch

    1981-01-01

    A statistical report on the third forest survey of Ohio conducted in 1978 and 1979. Statistical findings are based on data from remeasured and new 10-point variable radius plots. The current status of forest-land area, timber volume, and annual growth and removals is presented. Timber products output by timber industries, based on a 1978 updated canvass of...

  19. Compatibility of Ohio trail users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger E. McCay; George H. Moeller

    1976-01-01

    Compatibility indexes show how Ohio trail users feel about meeting each other on the trail. All four of the major types of trail users-hikers, horseback riders, bicycle riders, and motorcycle riders-enjoy meeting their own kind. But they also feel antagonism toward the faster, more mechanized trail users; e.g., everyone likes hikers, but few like motorcycle riders....

  20. Ohio Special Education Profile, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a brief, but substantive, profile of the special needs student population in Ohio, including academic performance and graduation trends and an overview of special education funding and related policy issues. The report's central message is that investments in students with special educational needs produce substantial results…

  1. HYDRAULICS, Ohio County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  2. Evaluation of Irrigation Technology Adoption in Edo State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imanogor P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance and continuous use of any innovation is the ultimate objective of extension programme. However, extension efforts have failed to avail farmers with some beneficial research-based agricultural technology. There are various factors which predispose farmers to the adoption of any innovation. This study was carried out to find out what factors would favourably dispose farmers to the adoption of irrigation technology. The study was done in the three senatorial districts of Edo State. A total of one hundred and fifty farmers were interviewed of which fifty nine were adopters of irrigation technology. Personal characteristics of farmers which were found to significantly influence the adoption of the innovation include farm size, level of education, social participation and contact with extension agents with a significant index value of 0.88. However the required impact desired through extension service is yet to be appreciated.

  3. Modelling and simulation SSM: latest state of the art technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jahajeeah, N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available during filling stage Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitiveness ? Shear rate history important factor in design and casting processes ? Viscosity decreases over time after applied shear rate ? Ideally... and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitiveness Modelling and Simulation SSM Latest state of the art technology N Jahajeeah Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitiveness BEHAVIOUR OF THIXOTROPIC...

  4. Challenges of Creating an Online Doctoral Program: Panel Discussion of the Trials and Success of the Ohio State Nontraditional Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, Dennis; Green, Cable; Skunza, Barbara

    This paper contains summaries of three presentations that explore critical issues that must be addressed before launching a non-traditional online degree program. "Student Orientation" (Cable Green) provides a comprehensive student orientation, including an introduction to technological infrastructure, pedagogical issues, communication…

  5. An Assessment of the Adequacy of Ohio School Funding: New Performance Standards and Alternative Measurements of Adequacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetland, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Reflecting upon "Rose v. Council," this research traced the development of adequate school funding in Ohio. "DeRolph v. State" centered the constitutional requirement for adequate education in Ohio. Thereafter, scholars estimated costs of adequate education and legislators adjusted those estimated costs. Plaintiffs and justices…

  6. Helping Children Learn 1999-2000: A County-by-County Factbook. For Children For Ohio's Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, David L., Ed.

    This Kids Count report highlights state and countywide findings on key indicators affecting the educational and life success of Ohio's children. The statistical portrait is based on five indicators: (1) fourth graders' performance on the Ohio fourth grade reading proficiency test; (2) number of children receiving child care assistance or…

  7. 34 CFR 403.1 - What is the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the State Vocational and Applied Technology... TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM General § 403.1 What is the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program? (a) Under the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program, the Secretary makes...

  8. 78 FR 68377 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R05-OAR-2010-0997; FRL-9901- 37-Region 5] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio NOX SIP Call Rule Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: On November 15, 2010, Ohio...

  9. A preliminary assessment of the spatial sources of contemporary suspended sediment in the Ohio River basin, United States, using water quality data from the NASQAN programme in a source tracing procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.-S.; Collins, A.L.; Horowitz, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable information on catchment scale suspended sediment sources is required to inform the design of management strategies for helping abate the numerous environmental issues associated with enhanced sediment mobilization and off-site loadings. Since sediment fingerprinting techniques avoid many of the logistical constraints associated with using more traditional indirect measurement methods at catchment scale, such approaches have been increasingly reported in the international literature and typically use data sets collected specifically for sediment source apportionment purposes. There remains scope for investigating the potential for using geochemical data sets assembled by routine monitoring programmes to fingerprint sediment provenance. In the United States, routine water quality samples are collected as part of the US Geological Survey's revised National Stream Quality Accounting Network programme. Accordingly, the geochemistry data generated from these samples over a 10-year period (1996-2006) were used as the basis for a fingerprinting exercise to assess the key tributary sub-catchment spatial sources of contemporary suspended sediment transported by the Ohio River. Uncertainty associated with the spatial source estimates was quantified using a Monte Carlo approach in conjunction with mass balance modelling. Relative frequency weighted means were used as an alternative way of summarizing the spatial source contributions, thereby avoiding the need to use confidence limits. The results should be interpreted in the context of the routine, but infrequent nature, of the suspended sediment samples used to assemble geochemistry as a basis for the sourcing exercise. Nonetheless, the study demonstrates how routine monitoring samples can be used to provide some preliminary information on sediment provenance in large drainage basins. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Resenha de KURTZ, Marcus J. Latin American State Building in Comparative: social foundations of institutional order. New York: Cambrigde University Press/Ohio University Press, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Makino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo  Em seu livro, Kurtz tenta entender a atual diferença nas capacidades estatais de Argentina, Uruguai, Chile e Peru a partir de uma perspectiva institucionalista, sendo fortemente influenciada pela noção de dependência de trajetória. Dois momentos teriam sido cruciais nessa trajetória: as relações de trabalho (livre ou servil à época da independência administrativa e o timing da incorporação das massas ao processo eleitoral. Palavras-chave capacidade estatal, dependência da trajetória, América Latina  --- Abstract In his book, Kurtz analyzes the current diferences in the state capacity of Argentina, Uruguay, Chili and Peru from na institutionalist perspective under strong influence of the notion of path dependence. Two moments would have been crucial in their state-building: the labor relations (free or servile by the time of their administrative independence and the timing of universalization of vote. Key words state-building, path dependence, Latin American --- Resumen En su libro, Kurtz intenta entender la actual diferencia en las capacidades estatales de Argentina, Uruguay, Chile y Perú a partir de una perspectiva institucionalista, destacadamente influenciada por la noción de dependencia de la trayectoria. Dos momentos habrían sido cruciales en esa trayectoria: las relaciones de trabajo (libre o serviles a la época de la independencia administrativa y el timing de la incorporación de las masas al proceso electoral. Palabras-clave capacidad estatal, dependencia da trayectoria, América Latina ---

  11. The New Digital [St]age: Barriers to the Adoption and Adaptation of New Technologies to Deliver Extension Programming and How to Address Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seger, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    With the rise of social media and the need for statewide program cohesiveness, The Ohio State University Extension has the opportunity to position itself as a catalyst for technology adoption and adaptation nationwide. Unfortunately, many barriers exist to the successful use and implementation of technology, including an organizational structure…

  12. Solid-state lighting-a benevolent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E Fred; Kim, Jong Kyu; Luo Hong; Xi, J-Q

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state light sources are in the process of profoundly changing the way humans generate light for general lighting applications. Solid-state light sources possess two highly desirable features, which set them apart from most other light sources: (i) they have the potential to create light with essentially unit power efficiency and (ii) the properties of light, such as spectral composition and temporal modulation, can be controlled to a degree that is not possible with conventional light sources such as incandescent and fluorescent lamps. The implications are enormous and, as a consequence, many positive developments are to be expected including a reduction in global energy consumption, reduction of global-warming-gas and pollutant emissions and a multitude of new functionalities benefiting numerous applications. This review will assess the impact of solid-state lighting technology on energy consumption, the environment and on emerging application fields that make use of the controllability afforded by solid-state sources. The review will also discuss technical areas that fuel continued progress in solid-state lighting. Specifically, we will review the use of novel phosphor distributions in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and show the strong influence of phosphor distribution on efficiency. We will also review the use of reflectors in LEDs with emphasis on 'perfect' reflectors, i.e. reflectors with highly reflective omni-directional characteristics. Finally, we will discuss a new class of thin-film materials with an unprecedented low refractive index. Such low-n materials may strongly contribute to the continuous progress in solid-state lighting

  13. The state of ergonomics for mobile computing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Jack T

    2015-01-01

    Because mobile computing technologies, such as notebook computers, smart mobile phones, and tablet computers afford users many different configurations through their intended mobility, there is concern about their effects on musculoskeletal pain and a need for usage recommendations. Therefore the main goal of this paper to determine which best practices surrounding the use of mobile computing devices can be gleaned from current field and laboratory studies of mobile computing devices. An expert review was completed. Field studies have documented various user configurations, which often include non-neutral postures, that users adopt when using mobile technology, along with some evidence suggesting that longer duration of use is associated with more discomfort. It is therefore prudent for users to take advantage of their mobility and not get stuck in any given posture for too long. The use of accessories such as appropriate cases or riser stands, as well as external keyboards and pointing devices, can also improve postures and comfort. Overall, the state of ergonomics for mobile technology is a work in progress and there are more research questions to be addressed.

  14. Introduction to the Special Issue on "State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Japan 2015".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-08-23

    This Special Issue, "State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Japan 2015", collected papers on different kinds of sensing technology: fundamental technology for intelligent sensors, information processing for monitoring humans, and information processing for adaptive and survivable sensor systems.[...].

  15. Blockchain technology and decentralized governance: Is the state still necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Atzori

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The core technology of Bitcoin, the blockchain, has recently emerged as a disruptive innovation with a wide range of applications, potentially able to redesign our interactions in business, politics and society at large. Although scholarly interest in this subject is growing, a comprehensive analysis of blockchain applications from a political perspective is severely lacking to date. This paper aims to fill this gap and it discusses the key points of blockchain-based decentralized governance, which challenges to varying degrees the traditional mechanisms of State authority, citizenship and democracy. In particular, the paper verifies to which extent blockchain and decentralized platforms can be considered as hyper-political tools, capable to manage social interactions on large scale and dismiss traditional central authorities. The analysis highlights risks related to a dominant position of private powers in distributed ecosystems, which may lead to a general disempowerment of citizens and to the emergence of a stateless global society. While technological utopians urge the demise of any centralized institution, this paper advocates the role of the State as a necessary central point of coordination in society, showing that decentralization through algorithm-based consensus is an organizational theory, not a stand-alone political theory.

  16. Wireless Power Transmission Technology State-Of-The-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M. T.

    2002-01-01

    This first Bill Brown SSP La Crescenta, CA 91214 technology , including microwave and laser systems for the transfer of electric , as related to eventually developing Space Solar Power (SSP) systems. Current and past technology accomplishments in ground based and air and space applied energy conversion devices, systems and modeling performance and cost information is presented, where such data are known to the author. The purpose of the presentation is to discuss and present data to encourage documenting and breaking the current technology records, so as to advance the SOA in WPT for SSP . For example, regarding DC to RF and laser converters, 83% efficient 2.45 GHz cooker-tube magnetrons with 800W CW output have been jointly developed by Russia and US. Over 50% wa11-plug efficient 1.5 kW/cm2 CW, water cooled, multibeam, solid state laser diode bar-arrays have been developed by LLNL at 808 nm wavelength. The Gennans have developed a 36% efficient, kW level, sing1e coherent beam, lateral pumped semiconductor laser. The record for end-to-end DC input to DC output power overall WPT link conversion efficiency is 54% during the Raytheon-JPL experiments in 1975 for 495.6 W recovered at 1.7-mrange at 2.4469 GAz. The record for usefully recovered electric power output ( as contrasted with thennally induced power in structures) is 34 kW OC output at a range of 1.55 km, using 2.388 GHz microwaves, during the JPL- Raytheon experiments by Bill Brown and the author at Goldstone, CA in 1975. The GaAs-diode rectenna array had an average collection-conversion efficiency of 82.5%. A single rectenna element operating a 6W RF input, developed by Bill Brown demonstrated 91.4% efficiency. The comparable record for laser light to OC output power conversion efficiency of photovoltaics is 590/0. for AlGaAs at 1.7 Wand 826nm wavelength. Russian cyclotron-wave converters have demonstrated 80% rectification efficiency at S-band. Concerning WPT technology equipment costs, magnetron conversion

  17. Biopower Technical Assessment: State of the Industry and the Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bain, R. L.; Amos, W. P.; Downing, M.; Perlack, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the state of the biopower industry and the technology for producing electricity and heat from biomass. Biopower (biomass-to-electricity generation), a proven electricity generating option in the United States and with about 11 GW of installed capacity, is the single largest source of non-hydro renewable electricity. This 11 GW of capacity encompasses about 7.5 GW of forest product industry and agricultural industry residues, about 3.0 GW of municipal solid waste-based generating capacity and 0.5 GW of other capacity such as landfill gas based production. The electricity production from biomass is being used and is expected to continue to be used as base load power in the existing electrical distribution system. An overview of sector barriers to biopower technology development is examined in Chapter 2. The discussion begins with an analysis of technology barriers that must be overcome to achieve successful technology pathways leading to the commercialization of biomass conversion and feedstock technologies. Next, an examination of institutional barriers is presented which encompasses the underlying policies, regulations, market development, and education needed to ensure the success of biopower. Chapter 3 summarizes biomass feedstock resources, characteristics, availability, delivered prices, requirements for processing, and the impediments and barriers to procurement. A discussion of lessons learned includes information on the California biomass energy industry, lessons from commercial biopower plants, lessons from selected DOE demonstration projects, and a short summary of the issues considered most critical for commercial success is presented in Chapter 4. A series of case studies, Chapter 5, have been performed on the three conversion routes for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) applications of biomass--direct combustion, gasification, and cofiring. The studies are based on technology characterizations developed by NREL and EPRI

  18. Evaluation of radiation safety in 29 central Ohio veterinary practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritz, S.A.; Wilkins, J.R. III; Hueston, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    A sample of 29 veterinary practices in Central Ohio were visited to assess radiation safety practices and observance of state regulations. Lead aprons and gloves were usually available, but gloves were not always worn. Protective thyroid collars and lead glasses were not available in any practice, lead shields in only five practices, and lead-lined walls and doors in only two practices. Eighteen practices had none of the required safety notices posted

  19. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level is described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The introductory section examines the regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and concludes with an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC. A developer must obtain title or interest to a streambed from the proper riparian owners. Ohio provides assistance to an electric company in this undertaking by providing it with the power of eminent domain in the event it is unable to reach a purchase agreement with the riparian proprietors. The Ohio Water Law is discussed in detail, followed by discussions: Licensing, Permitting, and Review Procedures; Indirect Considerations; Ohio Public Utilities Commission; Ohio Department of Energy; Incidental Provision; and Financial Considerations.

  20. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern Railway...

  1. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology and assisted reproductive technology in the United States: a 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, James P; Coddington, Charles C; Doody, Kevin; Van Voorhis, Brad; Seifer, David B; Ball, G David; Luke, Barbara; Wantman, Ethan

    2016-09-01

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) was established within a few years of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in the United States, and has not only reported on the evolution of infertility care, but also guided it toward improved success and safety. Moving beyond its initial role as a registry, SART has expanded its role to include quality assurance, data validation, practice and advertising guidelines, research, patient education and advocacy, and membership support. The success of ART in this country has greatly benefited from SART's role, as highlighted by a series of graphs. SART continues to set the standard and lead the way. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance--United States, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2014-11-21

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information on U.S. ART procedures performed in 2011 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2011 (resulting from procedures performed in 2010 and 2011) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2011. 2011. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. In 2011, a total of 151,923 ART procedures performed in 451 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 47,818 live-birth deliveries and 61,610 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (18,808), New York (excluding New York City) (14,576), Massachusetts (10,106), Illinois (9,886), Texas (9,576), and New Jersey (8,698). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART procedures and together accounted for 47.2% of all ART procedures performed, 45.3% of all infants born from ART, and 45.1% of

  3. State of the art survey of technologies applicable to NASA's aeronautics, avionics and controls program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, R. K. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art survey (SOAS) covers six technology areas including flightpath management, aircraft control system, crew station technology, interface & integration technology, military technology, and fundamental technology. The SOAS included contributions from over 70 individuals in industry, government, and the universities.

  4. A state of the art on metallic fuel technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, Hee Young; Nam, Cheol; Kim, Jong Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Since worldwide interest turned toward ceramic fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel could be achieved in the late 1960`s, the development of metallic fuels continued throughout the 1970`s at ANL`s experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II) because EBR-II continued to be fueled with the metallic uranium-fissium alloy, U-5Fs. During this decade the performance limitations of metallic fuel were satisfactorily resolved resolved at EBR-II. The concept of the IFR developed at ANL since 1984. The technical feasibility had been demonstrated and the technology database had been established to support its practicality. One key features of the IFR is that the fuel is metallic, which brings pronounced benefits over oxide in improved inherent safety and lower processing costs. At the outset of the 1980`s, it appeared that metallic fuels are recognized as a professed viable option with regard to safety, integral fuel cycle, waste minimization and deployment economics. This paper reviews the key advances in the last score and summarizes the state-of the art on metallic fuel technology development. (author). 29 refs., 1 tab.

  5. A state of the art on metallic fuel technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, Hee Young; Nam, Cheol; Kim, Jong Oh

    1997-01-01

    Since worldwide interest turned toward ceramic fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel could be achieved in the late 1960's, the development of metallic fuels continued throughout the 1970's at ANL's experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II) because EBR-II continued to be fueled with the metallic uranium-fissium alloy, U-5Fs. During this decade the performance limitations of metallic fuel were satisfactorily resolved resolved at EBR-II. The concept of the IFR developed at ANL since 1984. The technical feasibility had been demonstrated and the technology database had been established to support its practicality. One key features of the IFR is that the fuel is metallic, which brings pronounced benefits over oxide in improved inherent safety and lower processing costs. At the outset of the 1980's, it appeared that metallic fuels are recognized as a professed viable option with regard to safety, integral fuel cycle, waste minimization and deployment economics. This paper reviews the key advances in the last score and summarizes the state-of the art on metallic fuel technology development. (author). 29 refs., 1 tab

  6. Earthquake Seismic Risk Reduction in Ohio: ODNR's Efforts to Address Issues with Natural and Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.

    2013-05-01

    With the increasing concerns regarding both natural and induced seismicity in Ohio, ODNR (Ohio Department of Natural Resources) initial efforts on seismic risk reduction paved way to various changes and improvement to tackle several major issues. For natural earthquakes, regional seismicity indicates a NE-SW structure in the northern portion of the area associated with a number of moderate historical earthquakes but no active trace identified. On the other hand, earthquakes of 1986 and 2011 are most probably incidents of induced seismicity that trigger more public uproar against disposal of regulated waste waters through injections. ODNR, in efforts to adapt with increasing need to regulate all operations related to both the Utica and Marcellus shale play within the state, had recently strengthen itself both through additional human resources and improved infrastructure. Tougher regulations and additional field tests were required that took effect immediately when a M4 earthquake was associated with the operations of an injection well. Public meetings were undertaken focused on educating many local inhabitants related to oil and gas operations, hydraulic fracturing, injection wells, and seismicity. Trainings for new and existing staff were regularly done especially for field inspection, data management and technology advancements. Considering the existing seismic stations that are few and distant related to sites of the injection wells, additional seismic stations were installed to gather baseline data and monitor for earthquakes within the injection area(s). Furthermore, to assess if the sites of the injection wells are safe from active structures, initial geomorphic and structural analyses indicated possible active faults in the northern portion of state oriented NE-SW. With the above-mentioned recent changes, ODNR had made a significant leap not only in the improvement of its principal regulatory role in the state for oil and gas operations but also in its

  7. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance — United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2015-08-14

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure, women who undergo ART procedures, compared with those who conceive naturally, are more likely to deliver multiple birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2012 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2012 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2011 and 2012) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2012. 2012. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System, a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia [DC], and Puerto Rico). In 2012, a total of 157,635 ART procedures performed in 456 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 51,261 live-birth deliveries and 65,151 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (20,241), New York (19,618), Illinois (10,449), Texas (10,281), Massachusetts (9,754), and New Jersey (8,590). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of

  8. Atlas of Ohio Aquatic Insects: Volume II, Plecoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Scott A.; Armitage, Brian J.; Baumann, Richard W.; Clark, Shawn M.; Bolton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species. New information This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2​. Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan

  9. Watershed inventory, Ravenna Training and Logistics Site, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostheimer, Chad J.; Tertuliani, John S.

    2003-01-01

    The Ohio Army National Guard (OHARNG) conducts training activities on the lands it manages to fulfill its primary mission of maintaining combat readiness. One of the training areas OHARNG manages is the Ravenna Training and Logistics Site (RTLS). This facility is co-located with the Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant (RVAAP) in Portage and Trumbull Counties, Ohio. Training activities can subject watersheds to various effects. Although environmental effects from training activities cannot be completely avoided, OHARNG is actively seeking for ways to minimize such effects in accordance with Federal, State, and local laws and regulations. This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the OHARNG, to inventory current conditions of the watersheds that drain the RTLS/RVAAP facility. As part of the inventory, a digital geographic database was developed.

  10. Institutional Response to Ohio's Campus Safety Initiatives: A Post-Virginia Tech Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Natalie Jo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how institutions of higher education were responding to unprecedented state involvement in campus safety planning and policymaking in the aftermath of the Virginia Tech tragedy. Focused on Ohio, a state in which a state-level task force was convened and charged to promulgate campus safety recommendations…

  11. Advocacy, Assessment and Accountability: Using Policy to Impact Practice in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorson, Kevin; Mitchell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Physical education teachers and programs are affected by increasing accountability demands. The purpose of this article is to explain Ohio's journey from advocacy for state physical education academic content standards to state-level policy that led to the development of state-wide assessments and data reporting on each school's report card. The…

  12. Solid state frequency conversion technology for remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velsko, S.P.; Webb, M.S.; Cook, W.M.; Neuman, W.A.

    1994-07-01

    Long range remote sensing from airborne or other highly mobile platforms will require high average power tunable radiation from very compact and efficient laser systems. The solid state laser pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) has emerged as a leading candidate for such high average power, widely tunable sources. In contrast to laboratory systems, efficiency and simplicity can be the decisive issues which determine the practicality of a particular airborne remote sensing application. The recent advent of diode laser pumped solid state lasers has produced high average power OPO pump sources which are themselves both compact and efficient. However, parametric oscillator technology which can efficiently convert the average powers provided by these pump sources remains to be demonstrated. In addition to the average power requirement, many airborne long range sensing tasks will require a high degree of frequency multiplexing to disentangle data from multiple chemical species. A key advantage in system simplicity can be obtained, for example, if a single OPO can produce easily controlled multispectral output. In this paper the authors address several topics pertaining to the conversion efficiency, power handling, and multispectral capabilities of OPOs which they are currently investigating. In Section 2, single pulse conversion efficiency issues are addressed, while average power effects are treated in Section 3. Section 4 is concerned with multispectral performance of a single OPO. The last section contains a short summary and some concluding remarks

  13. Constitutive modeling of salt behavior: State of the technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Wawersik, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The modern investigation of the thermomechanical behavior of salt started in the mid-1930's and, for what appears to be a very narrow discipline, ''salt mechanics'' has acquired considerable technical depth and sophistication. The last three decades have been especially productive in constitutive model development and laboratory investigations of time-dependent creep behavior. This has been largely due ot anticipated use of domal or bedded salt deposits as sites for radioactive waste repositories and to expanded need for hydrocarbon and feedback storage caverns. Salt is an interesting material, in that it is ''metal-like''; and, therefore, constitutive modeling can draw upon a large body of metal deformation information to arrive at appropriate models of behavior. Testing apparatus and methods have centered on either uniaxial or triaxial compression to obtain steady state and transient creep responses. Flow and fracture potentials have been defined. Validation attempts of the models against field data, although limited, have proved promising. The objective here is to summarize the state-of-the-technology of the constitutive modeling of salt behavior or ''salt mechanics.''

  14. Gravity Data For The State of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (6,591 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity parameters...

  15. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  16. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance--United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Flowers, Lisa; Anderson, John E; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2012-11-02

    Since the birth of the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in 1981, use of advanced technologies to overcome the problem of infertility has increased steadily, as has the number of fertility clinics providing ART services in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report presents the most recent data on ART use and birth outcomes for U.S. states and territories. 2009. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in the United States, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493 [October 24, 1992]). ART data for 1995-2003 were obtained from the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) through its proprietary Clinical Outcomes Reporting System data base (SART CORS). Since 2004, CDC has contracted with Westat, Inc., a statistical survey research organization, to obtain data from fertility clinics in the United States through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. In 2009, a total of 146,244 ART procedures were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 45,870 live-birth deliveries and 60,190 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of California (18,405), New York (14,539), Illinois (10,192), Massachusetts (9,845), New Jersey (9,146), and Texas (8,244). Together, these six states reported the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART and accounted for 48% of all ART procedures initiated, 46% of all infants born from ART, and 45

  17. 34 CFR 403.63 - How does a State carry out the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Applied Technology Education Program? 403.63 Section 403.63 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Kinds of Activities Does the Secretary Assist Under... Technology Education Program? (a) Unless otherwise indicated in the regulations in this part, a State board...

  18. National Educational Technology Trends: 2012. State Leadership Empowers Educators, Transforms Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Delia, R.; Fox, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) is the principal association representing the technology leadership in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This is SETDA's ninth annual report on select educational technology activities. This year's report includes…

  19. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - 
United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2015-12-04

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2013 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2013 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2012 and 2013) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2013. 2013. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia [DC], and Puerto Rico). In 2013, a total of 160,521 ART procedures (range: 109 in Wyoming to 20,299 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 467 U.S. fertility clinics and were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 53,252 live-birth deliveries (range: 47 in Alaska to 6,979 in California) and 66,691 infants (range: 61 in Alaska to 8,649 in California). Nationally, the total number of ART procedures performed per million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART usage rate, was 2,521 (range: 352 in Puerto Rico to 7,688 in DC). ART use

  20. Technology applications bulletins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W. Jr.

    1989-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), operates five facilities for the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is a large, multidisciplinary research and development (R and D) center whose primary mission is energy research; the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which engages in defense research, development, and production; and the uranium-enrichment plants at Oak Ridge; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Much of the research carried out at these facilities is of interest to industry and to state or local governments. To make information about this research available, the Energy Systems Office of Technology Applications publishes brief descriptions of selected technologies and reports. These technology applications bulletins describe the new technology and inform the reader about how to obtain further information, gain access to technical resources, and initiate direct contact with Energy Systems researchers

  1. Solid State Electrolyte for Li Battery Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —  The fabrication technology developed in this project will aid GRC in advancing  Lithium Ion Batteries (LIB) technology by developing new electrode and SSE...

  2. The epidemiology of family meals among Ohio's adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Rachel; Anderson, Sarah E

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of family meals among adults at a population level is poorly characterized and whether living with children impacts this health behaviour is uncertain. We determined the prevalence of family meals among US adults in a mid-western state whose families did and did not include minor children and described how it varied by sociodemographic characteristics. The cross-sectional 2012 Ohio Medicaid Assessment Survey is representative of Ohio adults and included questions on their sociodemographic characteristics and the frequency with which they eat family meals at home. Trained interviewers administered landline and cell phone surveys to adults sampled from Ohio's non-institutionalized population. We analysed data from 5766 adults living with minor children and 8291 adults not living alone or with children. The prevalence of family meals was similar for adults who did and did not live with minor children: 47 % (95 % CI 46, 49 %) of adults living with and 51 % (95 % CI 50, 53 %) of adults living without children reported eating family meals on most (six or seven) days of the week. Family meal frequency varied by race/ethnicity, marital and employment status in both groups. Non-Hispanic African-American adults, those who were not married and those who were employed ate family meals less often. Adults in Ohio frequently shared meals with their family and family meal frequency was not strongly related to living with children. Broadening the scope of future studies to include adults who are not parents could enhance our understanding of the potential health benefits of sharing meals.

  3. United States Department of Energy solar receiver technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, P. C.; Diver, R. B.; Chavez, J. M.

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Sandia National Laboratories, has been conducting a Solar Thermal Receiver Technology Development Program, which maintains a balance between analytical modeling, bench and small scale testing, and experimentation conducted at scales representative of commercially-sized equipment. Central receiver activities emphasize molten salt-based systems on large scales and volumetric devices in the modeling and small scale testing. These receivers are expected to be utilized in solar power plants rated between 100 and 200 MW. Distributed receiver research focuses on liquid metal refluxing devices. These are intended to mate parabolic dish concentrators with Stirling cycle engines in the 5 to 25 kW(sub e) power range. The effort in the area of volumetric receivers is less intensive and highly cooperative in nature. A ceramic foam absorber of Sandia design was successfully tested on the 200 kW(sub t) test bed at Plataforma Solar during 1989. Material integrity during the approximately 90-test series was excellent. Significant progress has been made with parabolic dish concentrator-mounted receivers using liquid metals (sodium or a potassium/sodium mixture) as heat transport media. Sandia has successfully solar-tested a pool boiling reflux receiver sized to power a 25 kW Stirling engine. Boiling stability and transient operation were both excellent. This document describes these activities in detail and will outline plans for future development.

  4. Technology innovation and entrepreneurial state: the development of China's high-speed rail industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.

    2015-01-01

    China proactively promotes indigenous technology innovation towards developing an innovation-based economy. This contradicts the developmental state literature that puts emphasis on technology imitation. Drawn from the strategic entrepreneurship perspective, this article explores the role of the

  5. Silver flip chip interconnect technology and solid state bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Chu-Hsuan

    -section, there is no void or gap observed. The new bonding technique presented should be valuable in packaging high power electronic devices for high temperature operations. It should also be useful to bond two 304SS parts together at low bonding temperature of 190ºC. Solid state bonding technique is then introduced to bond semiconductor chips, such as Si, to common substrates, such as Cu or alumina, using pure Ag and Au at a temperature matching the typical reflow temperature used in packaging industries, 260°C. In bonding, we realize the possibilities of solid state bonding of Au to Au, Au to Ag, and Ag to Cu. The idea comes from that Cu, Ag, and Au are located in the same column on periodic table, meaning that they have similar electronic configuration. They therefore have a better chance to share electrons. Also, the crystal lattice of Cu, Ag, and Au is the same, face-centered cubic. In the project, the detailed bonding mechanism is beyond the scope and here we determine the bonding by the experimental result. Ag is chosen as the joint material because of its superior physical properties. It has the highest electrical and thermal conductivities among all metals. It has low yield strength and is relatively ductile. Au is considered as well because its excellent ductility and fatigue resistance. Thus, the Ag or Au joints can deform to accommodate the shear strain caused by CTE mismatch between Si and Cu. Ag and Au have melting temperatures higher than 950°C, so the pure Ag or Au joints are expected to sustain in high operating temperature. The resulting joints do not contain any intermetallic compound. Thus, all reliability issues associated with intermetallic growth in commonly used solder joints do not exist anymore. We finally move to the applications of solid state Ag bonding in flip chip interconnects design. At present, nearly all large-scale integrated circuit (IC) chips are packaged with flip-chip technology. This means that the chip is flipped over and the active

  6. 77 FR 71383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... and industrial facilities. Nitrates, another common type of secondary particulate, are formed from... comprehensive emissions inventory requirement of the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). Ohio's maintenance plan... Permanent and Enforceable Reductions (Section 107(d)(3)(E)(iii)) 4. Ohio Has a Fully Approved Maintenance...

  7. STEM and Technology Education: International State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.; Fan, Szu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the perceptions of 20 international technology education scholars on their country's involvement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Survey research was used to obtain data. It was found that the concept of STEM education is being discussed differently by nations. Some consider STEM education…

  8. Impact of 2001 Building Technology, state and community programs on United States employment and wage income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Scott; DJ Hostick; DB Elliott

    2000-03-20

    The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model allied In Build is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1995$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion.

  9. Impact of 2001 Building Technology, State and Community Programs on United States Employment and Wage Income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Elliott, Douglas B.

    2000-03-20

    The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1999$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion.

  10. Impact of 2001 Building Technology, state and community programs on United States employment and wage income

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MJ Scott; DJ Hostick; DB Elliott

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of programs on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model allied In Build is used in this study of all 38 BTS programs included in the FY2001 federal budget. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and wage income are reported by program for selected years to the year 2030. Energy savings from these programs have the potential of creating a total of nearly 332,000 jobs and about $5.3 billion in wage income (1995$) by the year 2030. Because the required investments to achieve these savings are capital intensive, the net effect after investment is 304,000 jobs and $5.0 billion

  11. United States geothermal technology: Equipment and services for worldwide applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This document has two intended audiences. The first part, ``Geothermal Energy at a Glance,`` is intended for energy system decision makers and others who are interested in wide ranging aspects of geothermal energy resources and technology. The second part, ``Technology Specifics,`` is intended for engineers and scientists who work with such technology in more detailed ways. The glossary at the end of the document defines many of the specialized terms. A directory of US geothermal industry firms who provide goods and services for clients around the world is available on request.

  12. The United States Advanced Reactor Technologies Research and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The following aspects are addressed: • Nuclear energy mission; • Reactor research development and deployment (RD&D) programs: - Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program; - Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support; - Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART)

  13. The State and Pattern of Health Information Technology Adoption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fonkych, Kateryna; Taylor, Roger

    2005-01-01

    ... Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMR-S) and Clinical Decision Support tools, has occurred. Government intervention has been called for to speed the adoption process for Health Information Technology (HIT...

  14. Multidisciplinary applications of ERTS and Skylab data in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, D. C.; Pincura, P. G.; Meier, C. J.; Garrett, G. B.; Herd, L. O.; Dowdy, J. M.; Anderson, D. M.; Wukelic, G. E.; Stephan, J. G.; Smail, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental studies of ERTS-1 and Skylab earth resources data, in combination with correlative aircraft and on-site data, for environmental quality, land use, and resource management applications in Ohio show several areas of operational promise. Prime data use candidates demonstrated to date include definition and enforcement of surface mining (all minerals) legislation; Lake Erie modeling/management; land use classification and mapping studies at state, regional, and localized levels; and resources' inventories particularly of forested areas on both regional (multicounty) and localized scales.

  15. Motivating Factors of Florida Community and State College Information Technology Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Wendy Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this study the core job characteristics that contribute to the internal motivational factors and job satisfaction of information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida were investigated. Fifty-four information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida completed the Job…

  16. Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death: Automated External Defibrillators in Ohio High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Aaron; Hoang, Minh-Ha; Zyzanski, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    Ohio passed legislation in 2004 for optional public funding of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in all Ohio high schools. To report occurrences of sudden cardiac arrest in which AEDs were used in Ohio high schools and to evaluate the adherence of Ohio high schools with AEDs to state law and published guidelines on AEDs and emergency action plans (EAPs) in schools. Cross-sectional survey. Web-based survey. A total of 264 of 827 schools that were members of the Ohio High School Athletic Association. We surveyed schools on AED use, AED maintenance, and EAPs. Twenty-five episodes of AED deployment at 22 schools over an 11-year period were reported; 8 (32%) involved students and 17 (68%) involved adults. The reported survival rate was 60% (n = 15). Most events (n = 20, 80%) in both students and adults occurred at or near athletic facilities. The annual use rate of AEDs was 0.7%. Fifty-three percent (n = 140) of schools reported having an EAP in place for episodes of cardiac arrest. Of the schools with EAPs, 57% (n = 80) reported having rehearsed them. Our data supported the placement of AEDs in high schools given the frequency of use for sudden cardiac arrest and the survival rate reported. They also suggested the need for increased awareness of recommendations for EAPs and the need to formulate and practice EAPs. School EAPs should emphasize planning for events in the vicinity of athletic facilities.

  17. Information Technology and Art: Concepts and State of the Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Salah Uddin; Camerano, Cristoforo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Jaccheri, Letizia

    The interaction between information technology (IT) and art is an increasing trend. Science, art and technology have been connected since the 60's, when scientists, artists, and inventors started to cooperate and use electronic instruments to create art. In 1960 Marshall McLuhan predicted the idea that the era of "machine-age" technology was next to close, and the electronic media were creating a new way to perform art [1]. The literature is full with examples of artists applying mathematics, robotic technology, and computing to the creation of art. The work in [2] is a good introduction to the merge of IT and art and introduces genetic art, algorithmic art, applications of complex systems and artificial intelligence. The intersection is drawing attention of people from diverse background and it is growing in size and scope. For these reasons, it is beneficiary for people interested in art and technology to know each other's background and interests well. In a multidisciplinary collaboration, the success depends on how well the different actors in the project collaborate and understand each other. See [3] for an introduction about multidisciplinary issues. Meyer and others in [4] explains the collaboration process between artists and technologists.

  18. T21-Ohio, a System Dynamics Approach to Policy Assessment for Sustainable Development: A Waste to Profit Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Cimren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A new system dynamics tool, T21-Ohio, was developed to support integrated and comprehensive development planning at the state level. Based on the Threshold 21 (T21 framework, T21-Ohio provides insights into the potential impacts of energy and environmental policies across a wide range of sectors, and reveals how different strategies interact with one another to achieve planned goals and objectives. This paper shows how T21-Ohio was used to model the broader social, economic and environmental impacts of “waste to profit” activities in Ohio, such as recycling, electricity generation from waste, and bio-fuel production. Three alternative scenarios were simulated to evaluate the impacts of biomass co-firing, government stimulus for solid waste recycling, and by-product synergy activities. The results of the three scenario analyses indicate significant potential for economic development and creation of jobs while reducing emissions and waste.

  19. State-of-the-art of fiber-reinforced polymers in additive manufacturing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have received a lot of attention in recent years for their use in multiple materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers. The aim of this review article is to analyze the technology of fiber-reinforced polymers and its implementation with additive...... manufacturing. This article reviews recent developments, ideas, and state-of-the-art technologies in this field. Moreover, it gives an overview of the materials currently available for fiber-reinforced material technology....

  20. Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembly, Jason P. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Russ College of Engineering and Technology

    2007-06-01

    Coal is the United States’ most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coal’s availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

  1. A State-of-the-Art Report on Cutting Technologies for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyun; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-10-15

    This report provides the status of the cryogenic cutting technology as a new dismantling technology for dismantling radioactive nuclear facilities and also presents the direction of study to apply it to a radioactive nuclear facility research aim of its nuclear. This report consists of four chapter : - 1. Background and objectives of dismantling technology for dismantling a radioactive nuclear facility. - 2. Analysis of the status of conventional cutting technologies - 3. Analysis of the status of cryogenic cutting technology - 4. Discussion, conclusion, and future work on state-of-the-art technology of dismantling for nuclear facilities.

  2. A State-of-the-Art Report on Cutting Technologies for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyun; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-10-01

    This report provides the status of the cryogenic cutting technology as a new dismantling technology for dismantling radioactive nuclear facilities and also presents the direction of study to apply it to a radioactive nuclear facility research aim of its nuclear. This report consists of four chapter : - 1. Background and objectives of dismantling technology for dismantling a radioactive nuclear facility. - 2. Analysis of the status of conventional cutting technologies - 3. Analysis of the status of cryogenic cutting technology - 4. Discussion, conclusion, and future work on state-of-the-art technology of dismantling for nuclear facilities

  3. Animal traction technology in Ogun State, Nigeria. Potentials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulani of Kwara State of Nigeria origin settled in Ogun State with their cattle for over 25 years and are pursuing sedentary lifestyle as agro-pastoralists. They operate under a relatively secure tenurial arrangement that allow them to settle and practise arable crop farming. They prepare the land for planting using the ridge ...

  4. Telecommunications technology and rural education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The rural sector of the US is examined from the point of view of whether telecommunications technology can augment the development of rural education. Migratory farm workers and American Indians were the target groups which were examined as examples of groups with special needs in rural areas. The general rural population and the target groups were examined to identify problems and to ascertain specific educational needs. Educational projects utilizing telecommunications technology in target group settings were discussed. Large scale regional ATS-6 satellite-based experimental educational telecommunications projects were described. Costs and organizational factors were also examined for large scale rural telecommunications projects.

  5. Criticism of technology in a state of antagonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detzer, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The book presents a compilation of public lectures, review articles, and statements of opinion from public debates that all refer to topical, socio-political problems in connection with technology and industry, and is intended to reveal structural interdependencies in order to contradict the frequently observed simplifications, prejudices, or ideologies, and in order to point out true arguments that can be used in a fair discussion based on pluralistic principles, about the decisions to be taken. Technology and its impacts on industry, politics, education and ethics. (HSCH) [de

  6. Impact of building technology, state and community programs on United States employment and wage income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Schultz, R.W.

    1998-04-01

    As part of measuring the impact of government programs on improving the energy efficiency of the nation`s building stock, the Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the economic impacts of its portfolio of programs, specifically the potential impact on national employment and income. This assessment is being done for the first time in FY99 as a supplement to the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA--formerly, Quality Metrics) estimates of primary energy savings and environmental and direct financial benefits of the BTS programs. The programmatic needs of BTS suggest that a simple, flexible, user-friendly method is needed to derive national employment and income impacts of individual BTS programs. Therefore, BTS funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a special-purpose version of the Impact Analysis for Planning (IMPLAN) national input-output model (Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc. 1997) specifically to estimate the employment and income effects of building energy technologies. The special-purpose version of the IMPLAN model used in this study is called ImBuild. Extensive documentation and a user`s guide are provided in Scott et al. (1998). Compared with simple economic multiplier approaches, such as the published multipliers from the Department of Commerce Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS 2), ImBuild allows for more complete and automated analysis of the economic impacts of energy efficiency investments in buildings. ImBuild is also easier to use than existing macroeconomic simulation models. In this report, the authors use the ImBuild model to calculate the impact of all 32 BTS programs reported in the BTS GPRA Metrics Estimates, FY99 Budget Request, December 19, 1997.

  7. Impact of building technology, state and community programs on United States employment and wage income

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.J.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Schultz, R.W.

    1998-04-01

    As part of measuring the impact of government programs on improving the energy efficiency of the nation's building stock, the Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is interested in assessing the economic impacts of its portfolio of programs, specifically the potential impact on national employment and income. This assessment is being done for the first time in FY99 as a supplement to the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA--formerly, Quality Metrics) estimates of primary energy savings and environmental and direct financial benefits of the BTS programs. The programmatic needs of BTS suggest that a simple, flexible, user-friendly method is needed to derive national employment and income impacts of individual BTS programs. Therefore, BTS funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a special-purpose version of the Impact Analysis for Planning (IMPLAN) national input-output model (Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc. 1997) specifically to estimate the employment and income effects of building energy technologies. The special-purpose version of the IMPLAN model used in this study is called ImBuild. Extensive documentation and a user's guide are provided in Scott et al. (1998). Compared with simple economic multiplier approaches, such as the published multipliers from the Department of Commerce Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS 2), ImBuild allows for more complete and automated analysis of the economic impacts of energy efficiency investments in buildings. ImBuild is also easier to use than existing macroeconomic simulation models. In this report, the authors use the ImBuild model to calculate the impact of all 32 BTS programs reported in the BTS GPRA Metrics Estimates, FY99 Budget Request, December 19, 1997

  8. E3 Success Story - Working Together: E3 Ohio and the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) received funding to support the integration of the national E3 sustainability initiative with the Ohio By-Product Synergy (BPS) Network to create an efficient and replicable model for reducing GHGs.

  9. Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector. School Survey Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector is the second entry in the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "School Survey Series." This report synthesizes information on Ohio's private schools collected by the U.S. Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE). Two appendices provide supplementary tables and…

  10. State-of-the-art report for the instrumentation and control technology based on the nuclear-information technology convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Lee, Dong Young; Lee, Cheol Kwon; Lee, Hyun Chul [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    As digitalized the instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, in the past that were implemented in an analog system or circuit for monitoring, control and protection, most of the them is implemented in embedded software based on hardware platform. Digital instrumentation and control system hardware platforms and a digital safety systems have developed in Korea. The fundamental technology of the software part of MMIS (Man-Machine Interface System) has achieved the localization. But in order to secure our global competitiveness, in the -based software, the source of the content areas / It is needed to develop core technologies of the software and contents areas based on the nuclear-IT convergence technology. In this report, the IT technology centered for the characteristics of embedded software applied to nuclear power is described. Also state-of-the-art IT technologies that will converge to nuclear power plants are mentioned

  11. Labor Market Supply in the Four Counties Served by the Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    A study examined the labor market supply in the four counties served by the Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative (SODI). Data were collected on the characteristics of the following groups: labor market entrants from the Joint Vocational Schools (JVSs) serving the four counties and Shawnee State University, area Job Training Partnership Act…

  12. Effects of ice storm damage on hardwood survival and growth in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard M. Turcotte; Thomas R. Elliott; Mary Ann Fajvan; Yong-Lak Park; Daniel A. Snider; Patrick C. Tobin

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, an ice storm occurred across four Mid-Atlantic states. This study investigated the effects of the ice-storm damage on growth and mortality of five tree species (Acer rubrum, Acer saccharum, Quercus alba, Quercus prinus, and Quercus rubra) from three forest stands in the Wayne National Forest in Ohio. We remeasured the same...

  13. Human Resource Implications of Information Technology in State Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Sharon S.

    1994-01-01

    Outlines how changing information technologies influence the nature and operation of public programs, the structure and function of public organizations, and the content of public service jobs. Problems in the areas of title structures, recruitment, testing and selection, and civil service processes are discussed. (Author/JOW)

  14. The state of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Institute libraries occupy prominent place in the creation, communication, consumption and dissemination of knowledge, data and information. Use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) is gaining ascendancy in libraries in Higher Institutions of learning in Nigeria, particularly in the south western ...

  15. United States societal experiments via the Communications Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    After a brief description of the Communication Technology Satellite and its U.S. coverage, the U.S. societal experiments via the CTS are discussed. These include education (college curriculum sharing, and project interchange), health care (biomedical communications, health communications, and communication support for decentralized education), and community and special experiments (satellite library information network, and transportable earth terminal).

  16. Technological dynamics and social capability: US states and European nations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fagerberg, J.; Feldman, M.; Srholec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2014), s. 313-337 ISSN 1468-2702 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/10/2310 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : innovation * technological capability * social capability Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.494, year: 2014

  17. Laser cutting, State of the art and technological trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review of the development trends in laser cutting will be given. The technoloty which is the fastest expanding industrial production technology will develop in both its core market segment: Flat bed cutting of sheet metal as it will expand in heavy industry and in cutting of 3...

  18. The Status of Basic Technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    Olaitan, 1996). Implicitly, one of the broad aims of secondary education, among others is “to equip the students to live effectively in our modern age of science and technology” (FRN 2004). Despite the relevance of basic technology, the cry for ...

  19. Science to support the understanding of Ohio's water resources, 2016-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Kimberly; Kula, Stephanie P.; Shaffer, Kimberly; Kula, Stephanie P.

    2016-12-19

    Ohio’s water resources support a complex web of human activities and nature—clean and abundant water is needed for drinking, recreation, farming, and industry, as well as for fish and wildlife needs. Although rainfall in normal years can support these activities and needs, occasional floods and droughts can disrupt streamflow, groundwater, water availability, water quality, recreation, and aquatic habitats. Ohio is bordered by the Ohio River and Lake Erie; it has over 44,000 miles of streams and more than 60,000 lakes and ponds (State of Ohio, 1994). Nearly all of the rural population obtains drinking water from groundwater sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) works in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, as well as universities, to furnish decisionmakers, policy makers, USGS scientists, and the general public with reliable scientific information and tools to assist them in management, stewardship, and use of Ohio’s natural resources. The diversity of scientific expertise among USGS personnel enables them to carry out large- and small-scale multidisciplinary studies. The USGS is unique among government organizations because it has neither regulatory nor developmental authority—its sole product is impartial, credible, relevant, and timely scientific information, equally accessible and available to everyone. The USGS Ohio Water Science Center provides reliable hydrologic and water-related ecological information to aid in the understanding of the use and management of the Nation’s water resources, in general, and Ohio’s water resources, in particular. This fact sheet provides an overview of current (2016) or recently completed USGS studies and data activities pertaining to water resources in Ohio. More information regarding projects of the USGS Ohio Water Science Center is available at http://oh.water.usgs.gov/.

  20. Information technology of assessment of the state of students’ health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Валеріївна Антонова-Рафі

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the use of information technology for health assessments of students. Also, the evaluation methods of physical health by Apanasenko-Naumenko method, research of Martin test at analysis of the students during physical exercises. It was counted and given a body mass index, life index, strength index (hand dynamometry, the Robinson index and the recovery of heart rate

  1. Blockchain technology and decentralized governance: Is the state still necessary?

    OpenAIRE

    Marcella Atzori

    2017-01-01

    The core technology of Bitcoin, the blockchain, has recently emerged as a disruptive innovation with a wide range of applications, potentially able to redesign our interactions in business, politics and society at large. Although scholarly interest in this subject is growing, a comprehensive analysis of blockchain applications from a political perspective is severely lacking to date. This paper aims to fill this gap and it discusses the key points of blockchain-based decentralized governance,...

  2. The current state of FPGA technology in the nuclear domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranta, J.

    2012-07-01

    Field programmable gate arrays are a form of programmable electronic device used in various applications including automation systems. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of FPGA-based systems also for safety automation of nuclear power plants. The interest is driven by the need for reliable new alternatives to replace, on one hand, the aging technology currently in use and, on the other hand, microprocessor and software-based systems, which are seen as overly complex from the safety evaluation point of view. This report presents an overview of FPGA technology, including hardware aspects, the application development process, risks and advantages of the technology, and introduces some of the current systems. FPGAs contain an interesting combination of features from software-based and fully hardware-based systems. Application development has a great deal in common with software development, but the final product is a hardware component without the operating system and other platform functions on which software would execute. Currently the number of FPGA-based applications used for safety functions of nuclear power plants is rather limited, but it is growing. So far there is little experience or common solid understanding between different parties on how FPGAs should be evaluated and handled in the licensing process. (orig.)

  3. Arsenic in drinking water and adverse birth outcomes in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, Kirsten S; Turyk, Mary E; Jones, Rachael M; Rankin, Kristin; Freels, Sally; Graber, Judith M; Stayner, Leslie T

    2017-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water has been associated with adverse reproductive outcomes in areas with high levels of naturally occurring arsenic. Less is known about the reproductive effects of arsenic at lower levels. This research examined the association between low-level arsenic in drinking water and small for gestational age (SGA), term low birth weight (term LBW), very low birth weight (VLBW), preterm birth (PTB), and very preterm birth (VPTB) in the state of Ohio. Exposure was defined as the mean annual arsenic concentration in drinking water in each county in Ohio from 2006 to 2008 using Safe Drinking Water Information System data. Birth outcomes were ascertained from the birth certificate records of 428,804 births in Ohio from the same time period. Multivariable generalized estimating equation logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between arsenic and each birth outcome separately. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the roles of private well use and prenatal care utilization in these associations. Arsenic in drinking water was associated with increased odds of VLBW (AOR 1.14 per µg/L increase; 95% CI 1.04, 1.24) and PTB (AOR 1.10; 95% CI 1.06, 1.15) among singleton births in counties where water was positively associated with VLBW and PTB in a population where nearly all (>99%) of the population was exposed under the current maximum contaminant level of 10µg/L. Current regulatory standards may not be protective against reproductive effects of prenatal exposure to arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Technology applications bulletins: Number one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W. Jr. (ed.)

    1989-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), operates five facilities for the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is a large, multidisciplinary research and development (R and D) center whose primary mission is energy research; the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which engages in defense research, development, and production; and the uranium-enrichment plants at Oak Ridge; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Much of the research carried out at these facilities is of interest to industry and to state or local governments. To make information about this research available, the Energy Systems Office of Technology Applications publishes brief descriptions of selected technologies and reports. These technology applications bulletins describe the new technology and inform the reader about how to obtain further information, gain access to technical resources, and initiate direct contact with Energy Systems researchers.

  5. State-of-the-art report of spent fuel management technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S. G.; Park, S. W.; Shin, Y. J. and others

    1998-06-01

    Essential technologies for a long-term management of domestic nuclear fuel have been described in this report. The technologies of interest are advanced processes for spent fuel management, spent fuel examination technology, evaluation of radiation effect on equipment, chemical characterization of spent fuel, and hot cell-related technology state of the art for the above-mentioned technologies has been reviewed and analyzed in detail. As a result, a future R and D direction that seems to be appropriate for us is drawn up in due consideration of in- and out-circumstances encountered with. (author). 304 refs., 28 tabs., 43 figs

  6. Fish Culture Technologies in Cross River State, Nigeria | Offem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquaculture has become an important sector in Nigerian economy and is considered a possible means of bridging the gap between the supply and demand for fish whose wild stock is fast declining, especially in the Cross River State of Nigeria. This study was carried out to assess the status, structure, operation and ...

  7. Adoption of precision agriculture technology in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural production in the Southeast is diverse and differs from other regions of the United States (U.S.). Crops grown in the Southeast are specific to the region, such as cotton and peanuts. Corn farmers supply most of the grain produced to the poultry industry to support over 15 billion dolla...

  8. Economics of alternative palm oil processing technologies in Imo State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to analyse the costs and returns of alternative palm oil processing techniques in Imo State. Data were collected with structured questionnaire from 120 randomly selected palm oil processors, and analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Results showed that there was a significant ...

  9. State and development of the technology of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, F.; Schueller, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Like in the past thermal power plants shall have to be designed also in the future in a way that a sufficient, low-priced and environment-preserving electricity and heat supply can be granted. The technology applied today in fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants and its further development is outlined under the aspects of a better utilization of primary energy, the substitution of petroleum and, in the long term, also of natural gas and coal, and of the extended protection of the environment against harmful influences. (orig.) [de

  10. Overview of State-Of-The-Art Flywheel Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, M.

    1983-01-01

    The technology and applications evaluation task focuses on defining performance and cost requirements for flywheels in the various areas of application. To date the DOE program has focused on automotive applications. The composite materials effort entails the testing of new commercial composites to determine their engineering properties. The rotor and containment development work uses data from these program elements to design and fabricate flywheels. The flywheels are then tested and their performance is evaluated to indicate possible areas for improvement. Once a rotor was fully developed it is transferred to the private sector.

  11. Communication satellite technology: State of the art and development opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, J. B. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    Opportunities in communication satellite technology are identified and defined. Factors that tend to limit the ready availability of satellite communication to an increasingly wide group of users are evaluated. Current primary limitations on this wide utilization are the availability of frequency and/or synchronous equatorial satellite positions and the cost of individual user Earth terminals. The former could be ameliorated through the reuse of frequencies, the use of higher frequency bands, and the reduction of antenna side lobes. The latter limitation requires innovative hardware, design, careful system design, and large scale production.

  12. 75 FR 72947 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... made below involve clarifications and non-substantive corrections of punctuation, typos, and errors in... provisions of the ``Ohio Rules of Civil Procedure.'' Discovery may include oral depositions, written...: Motions. (A) Except for oral motions which must be made in proceedings on the record, or where the...

  13. Machine Trades. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for machine trades. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  14. Ohio Business Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in business management. Ohio College Tech Prep Program standards are described, and a key to profile codes is provided. Sample occupations in this career area, such as management trainee, product manager, and advertising…

  15. Abundance of Ohio shrimp (Macrobrachium ohione) and Glass shrimp (Palaemonetes kadiakensis) in the unimpounded Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, V.A.; Hrabik, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Large rivers of the United States have been altered by construction and maintenance of navigation channels, which has resulted in habitat loss and degradation. Using 7 y of Long Term Resource Monitoring Program data collected from the unimpounded upper Mississippi River, we investigated Ohio and Glass Shrimp abundance collected from four physical habitats of the unimpounded upper Mississippi River: main channel border, main channel border with wing dike, open side channel and closed side channel. Our objective was to assess associations between Ohio and Glass Shrimp abundance, environmental measurements and the four habitats to better understand the ecology of these species in a channelized river system. Ohio Shrimp were most abundant in the open side channels, while Glass Shrimp were most abundant in the main channel border wing dike habitat. Thirty-two percent of the variance in Glass Shrimp abundance was explained by year 1995, year 1998, water temperature, depth of gear deployment, Secchi disk transparency and river elevation. Approximately 8% of variation in Ohio Shrimp abundance was explained by Secchi disk transparency. Catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) was greatest in 1998 for Glass Shrimp but lowest in 1997. Conversely, CPUE was greatest in 1996 for Ohio Shrimp and lowest in 2000. Both species exhibited inter-annual variability in CPUE. Long-term impacts of river modifications on aquatic invertebrates have not been well documented in many large, river systems and warrants further study. The findings from this study provide ecological information on Glass and Ohio Shrimp in a channelized river system.

  16. Assessment of the Technological Changes Impact on the Sustainability of State Security System of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olexandr Yemelyanov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the governments of many countries are facing with a lack of funds for financing programs for social protection of population. Among the causes of this problem, we can indicate the high unemployment rate, which, among other things, is due to implementation of labor-saving technologies. The purpose of this work is to study the impact of technological changes on the sustainability of the state social security system in Ukraine. The general approaches to the assessment of the stability of the state social security system are described. The simulation of the effect of economically efficient technological changes on the company’s income and expenses was carried out. Some patterns of such changes are established. The group of productive technological changes types is presented. The model is developed, and an indicator of the impact estimation of efficiently effective technological changes on the stability of the state social security system is proposed. The analysis of the main indicators of the state social security system functioning of Ukraine is carried out. The dynamics of indicators characterizing the labor market of Ukraine is analyzed. The influence of changes in labor productivity on costs and profits by industries of Ukraine is estimated. The evaluation of the impact of economically efficient technological changes in the industries of Ukraine on the stability of its state social security system is carried out. The different state authorities can use the obtained results for developing measures to manage the sustainability of the state social security system.

  17. Application of Smart Solid State Sensor Technology in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Dungan, L.K.; Makel, D.; Ward, B.; Androjna, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aerospace applications require a range of chemical sensing technologies to monitor conditions in both space vehicles and aircraft operations. One example is the monitoring of oxygen. For example, monitoring of ambient oxygen (O2) levels is critical to ensuring the health, safety, and performance of humans living and working in space. Oxygen sensors can also be incorporated in detection systems to determine if hazardous leaks are occurring in space propulsion systems and storage facilities. In aeronautic applications, O2 detection has been investigated for fuel tank monitoring. However, as noted elsewhere, O2 is not the only species of interest in aerospace applications with a wide range of species of interest being relevant to understand an environmental or vehicle condition. These include combustion products such as CO, HF, HCN, and HCl, which are related to both the presence of a fire and monitoring of post-fire clean-up operations. This paper discusses the development of an electrochemical cell platform based on a polymer electrolyte, NAFION, and a three-electrode configuration. The approach has been to mature this basic platform for a range of applications and to test this system, combined with "Lick and Stick" electronics, for its viability to monitor an environment related to astronaut crew health and safety applications with an understanding that a broad range of applications can be addressed with a core technology.

  18. Development of Solid-State Nanopore Technology for Life Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywaters, K. B.; Schmidt, H.; Vercoutere, W.; Deamer, D.; Hawkins, A. R.; Quinn, R. C.; Burton, A. S.; Mckay, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers for life on Earth are an important starting point to guide the search for life elsewhere. However, the search for life beyond Earth should incorporate technologies capable of recognizing an array of potential biomarkers beyond what we see on Earth, in order to minimize the risk of false negatives from life detection missions. With this in mind, charged linear polymers may be a universal signature for life, due to their ability to store information while also inherently reducing the tendency of complex tertiary structure formation that significantly inhibit replication. Thus, these molecules are attractive targets for biosignature detection as potential "self-sustaining chemical signatures." Examples of charged linear polymers, or polyelectrolytes, include deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) as well as synthetic polyelectrolytes that could potentially support life, including threose nucleic acid (TNA) and other xenonucleic acids (XNAs). Nanopore analysis is a novel technology that has been developed for singlemolecule sequencing with exquisite single nucleotide resolution which is also well-suited for analysis of polyelectrolyte molecules. Nanopore analysis has the ability to detect repeating sequences of electrical charges in organic linear polymers, and it is not molecule- specific (i.e. it is not restricted to only DNA or RNA). In this sense, it is a better life detection technique than approaches that are based on specific molecules, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which requires that the molecule being detected be composed of DNA.

  19. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements.

  20. Solid-state radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses the current solid state material used in advance detectors manufacturing and their pros and cons and how one can tailor them using different techniques, to get the maximum performance. The book is application oriented to radiation detectors for medical, X and gamma rays application, and good reference with in-depth discussion of detector's physics as it relates to medical application tailored for engineers and scientists.

  1. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements

  2. United States Rotorcraft Technology Investment: Is There a Lack of a Vision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grotophorst, Jean A

    2008-01-01

    .... The teaming with AgustaWestland, a foreign company, served as a catalyst to question the type and amount of investments the United States was spending in new rotorcraft technologies or improvements...

  3. Portable TMC-TMS Communications Demonstration : Western States Rural Transportation Technology Implementers Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    In cooperation with the California Department of Transportation, Montana State University's Western Transportation Institute has conducted an evaluation of communication technologies for application to TMC-TMS communications in Caltrans District 1. W...

  4. State-of-the-art technologies for intrusion and obstacle detection for railroad operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This report provides an update on the state-of-the-art technologies with intrusion and obstacle detection capabilities for rail rights of way (ROW) and crossings. A workshop entitled Intruder and Obstacle Detection Systems (IODS) for Railroads Requir...

  5. HYDRAULICS, HOCKING COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — "Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make is possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  6. HYDRAULICS, GUERNSEY COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  7. State-of-art of modern technologies for metals production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holappa, L. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Metallurgy

    1995-12-31

    The future raw materials are becoming lower in metal content and more complex, multimetal concentrates will be utilized. This will give challenges for metallurgists to develop new, efficient and energy saving processes. The main impacts for current and future production technologies come from energy need and environmental issues of the production processes themselves as well as the inevitable energy production for the metal making. Metals production consumes huge amount of energy, roughly 10 pct of the global energy consumption is caused by metallurgists. That is the necessity but it also means energy saving is one of the metallurgical industry have been enormous when looking back to the history. Since the 1960`s the efforts of the industry together with the strict legislation in the industrialized countries have conducted to greatly decreased emissions and improved pollution control. Breakthrough of new processes like copper flash smelting has aided this positive progress

  8. Treating Genetic Disorders Using State-Of-The-Art Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Muhammad; Ullah, Arif; Ahsan, Muhammad; Tyagi, Rohit; Habib, Zeshan; Khan, Faheem Ahmad; Rehman, Khaista

    2018-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated Protein 9), basically a bacterial immune system is now widely applicable to engineer genomes of a number of cells and organisms because of its simplicity and robustness. In research avenue the system has been optimized to regulate gene expression, modify epigenome and edit target locus. These applications make CRISPR/Cas9, a technology of choice to edit disease causing mutations as well as the epigenome more efficiently than ever before. Meanwhile its application in in vivo and ex vivo cells is encouraging the scientific community for more vigorous gene therapy and in clinical setups for therapeutic genome editing. Here we review the recent advances that CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing has achieved and is reported in previous studies and address the challenges associated with it.

  9. Information technology in pediatric practice: Current state and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kobrinsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the preceding developmental period, information technologies in pediatrics found rather wide application in various fields (prophylactic examinations, diagnosis, electronic medical records, and specialized registers. At present, there are clearly prospects that are associated with transition to e-health and person-centered data integration. Electronic health records in their modular construction will ensure the formation of a variety of problem-oriented registers based on primary information entered once. Portable electronic devices intended for home use, by transferring the data to processing centers and physicians, will ensure constant monitoring of the health of certain contingents of children and responsiveness of critical changes of monitored physiological parameters. Built-in EHR assisted decision support system will serve as a guide for physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of children, which is particularly important to choose medicines.

  10. The Supply and Demand of Technology and Engineering Teachers in the United States: Who Knows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Johnny J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the supply and demand of technology and engineering teachers in the United States. Once gathered, the resulting data (that was available) was compared to previous studies to determine trends. The researcher reviewed the 2010-11 through 2015-16 Technology & Engineering Teacher Education Directories. To…

  11. Economic effects of smoke-free laws on rural and urban counties in Kentucky and Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyles, Mark K; Hahn, Ellen J

    2012-01-01

    Numerous empirical studies have examined the influence of smoke-free legislation on economic activity, with most finding a null effect. The influence could possibly differ in rural areas relative to urban areas due to differing rates of smoking prevalence and access to prevention and treatment programs. Furthermore, the discussion of the effectiveness of smoke-free laws has been extended to consider local ordinances relative to statewide laws. This study examines these issues using 21 local laws in Kentucky and the Ohio statewide smoke-free law. The number of employees, total wages paid, and number of reporting establishments in all hospitality and accommodation services in Kentucky and Ohio counties were documented, beginning the first quarter 2001 and ending the last quarter of 2009. A generalized estimating equation time-series design is used to estimate the impact of local and state smoke-free laws in Kentucky and Ohio rural and urban counties. There is no evidence that the economies in Kentucky counties were affected in any way from the implementation of local smoke-free laws. There was also no evidence that total employment or the number of establishments was influenced by the statewide law in Ohio, but wages increased following the implementation of the law. Furthermore, there is no evidence that either rural or urban counties experienced a loss of economic activity following smoke-free legislation. The study finds no evidence that local or state smoke-free legislation negatively influences local economies in either rural or urban communities.

  12. Technology audit: the state of human language technologies (HLT) R&D in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grover, AS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available South Africa (SA) epitomises diversity, with the nation boasting eleven official languages. The field of human language technology (HLT) can play a vital role in bridging the digital divide and thus has been recognised as a priority area...

  13. Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Implementations by Information Technology Departments within United States Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, Jon F.

    2010-01-01

    This research study examined whether the overall effectiveness of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) could be predicted by measuring multiple independent variables. The primary variables studied included the number of ITIL process modules adopted and the overall ITIL "maturity level." An online survey was used to…

  14. Low-level radioactive waste disposal technologies used outside the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Molton, P.M.; Leigh, I.W.

    1994-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal technologies are an integral part of the waste management process. In the United States, commercial LLW disposal is the responsibility of the State or groups of States (compact regions). The United States defines LLW as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high- level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material as defined in Section II(e)(2) of the Atomic Energy Act. LLW may contain some long-lived components in very low concentrations. Countries outside the United States, however, may define LLW differently and may use different disposal technologies. This paper outlines the LLW disposal technologies that are planned or being used in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom (UK)

  15. Ocean Bottom Seismometers technology: current state and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskiy, Dmitry; Ganzha, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The beginning of 2000s was marked by a significant progress in the development and use of self-pop-up sea-bottom seismic recorders (Ocean Bottom Seismometers). In Russia it was a novel solution developed by the Russian Academy of Sciences Experimental Design Bureau of Oceanological Engineering. This recorder and its clones have been widely used not only for the Earth crust studies, but also for investigations of sub-basalt structures and gas hydrate exploration. And what has happened over the last 10 years? Let us look closely at the second generation of ocean bottom stations developed by Geonodal Solutions (GNS) as an illustration of the next step forward in the sea-bottom acquisition technology. First of all, hardware components have changed dramatically. The electronic components became much smaller, accordingly, the power consumption and electronic self-noise were dropped down significantly. This enabled development of compact station 330 mm in diameter instead of previous 450mm. The weight fell by half, while the autonomy increased up to 90 days due to both decreased energy consumption and increased capacity of the batteries. The dynamic range of recorded seismic data has expended as a result of decreased set noise and the application of 24-bit A/D converters. The instruments dimensions have been reduced, power consumption decreased, clock accuracy was significantly improved. At the same time, development of advanced time reference algorithms enabled to retain instrument accuracy around 1 ms during all the autonomous recording period. The high-speed wireless data transfer technology offered a chance to develop "maintenance-free" station throughout its operation time. The station can be re-used at the different sea bottom locations without unsealing of the deep-water container for data download, battery re-charge, clock synchronization. This noticeably reduces the labor efforts of the personnel working with the stations. This is critically important in field

  16. Control and automation technology in United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to use computers for nuclear power plant design, engineering, operation and maintenance has been growing since the inception of commercial nuclear power electricity generation in the 1960s. The needs have intensified in recent years as the demands of safety and reliability, as well as economic competition, have become stronger. The rapid advance of computer hardware and software technology in the last two decades has greatly enlarged the potential of computer applications to plant instrumentation and control of future plants, as well as those needed for operation of existing plants. The traditional role of computers for mathematical calculations and data manipulation has been expanded to automate plant control functions and to enhance human performance and productivity. The major goals of using computers for instrumentation and control of nuclear power plants are (1) to improve safety; (2) to reduce challenges to the power plant; (3) to reduce the cost of operations and maintenance; (4) to enhance power production, and (5) to increase productivity of people. Many functions in nuclear power plants are achieved by a combination of human action and automation. Increasingly, computer-based systems are used to support operations and maintenance personnel in the performance of their tasks. There are many benefits which can accrue from the use of computers but it is important to ensure that the design and implementation of the support system and the human task places the human in the correct role in relation to the machine; that is, in a management position, with the computer serving the human. In addition, consideration must be given to computer system integrity, software validation and verification, consequences of error, etc., to ensure its reliability for nuclear power plant applications. (author). 31 refs

  17. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Crist

    2008-12-31

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport

  18. 42 CFR 495.332 - State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... data-access mechanisms. (7) A description of how each State will support integration of clinical and... program, including a description and organizational charts for workgroups within State government..., consistent with § 495.306(g). (2)(i) A revised definition of meaningful use of certified EHR technology...

  19. Computed tomography: acquisition process, technology and current state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Javier Espitia Mendoza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography is a noninvasive scan technique widely applied in areas such as medicine, industry, and geology. This technique allows the three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal structure of an object which is lighted with an X-rays source. The reconstruction is formed with two-dimensional cross-sectional images of the object. Each cross-sectional is obtained from measurements of physical phenomena, such as attenuation, dispersion, and diffraction of X-rays, as result of their interaction with the object. In general, measurements acquisition is performed with methods based on any of these phenomena and according to various architectures classified in generations. Furthermore, in response to the need to simulate acquisition systems for CT, software dedicated to this task has been developed. The objective of this research is to determine the current state of CT techniques, for this, a review of methods, different architectures used for the acquisition and some of its applications is presented. Additionally, results of simulations are presented. The main contributions of this work are the detailed description of acquisition methods and the presentation of the possible trends of the technique.

  20. Discovery Mondays "State-of-the-art technologies for precision"

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic plate drilled with high precision in CERN’s workshop. The diameter of each hole is only 0.02 millimetres, comparable to the diameter of a hair.Scientists have to be infinitely precise to study the infinitely small. Thus, even though the LHC is the world’s largest accelerator, it has to be aligned to within a tenth of a millimetre. The detectors weigh several thousand tonnes but are capable of detecting the tiniest vibration of the Earth. Join us at the next Discovery Monday to find out about CERN’s state-of-the-art tools for achieving the degrees of resolution required in the field of particle physics. Don’t miss this opportunity to discover the world of precision! The event will be conducted in FrenchCome along to the Microcosm (Reception Building 33, Meyrin site) on Monday 5 November from 7.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Entrance Free http://www.cern.ch/LundisDecouverte/

  1. Lecture capture: enhancing learning through technology at the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBacco, Priscilla M; Hetherington, Vincent J; Putman, David

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this research was to evaluate the Mediasite lecture capture system at the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine (formerly the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine) to determine the acceptance, use and benefits to both students and faculty and to identify any concerns, limitations, and suggestions for expansion. There is extreme debate on the effect of lecture capture on student attendance included in the research. Two surveys were compiled, one each for students and faculty. These were distributed by email to the entire student body and all full-time and part-time faculty. Responses were voluntary. The questions sought to identify the priorities of the participant, reasons for viewing lectures compiled by course, to assess any effect on class attendance and to evaluate the ease and use of the technical function. There was also a section for subjective responses and suggestions. The tabulations proved a very high use of the program with the most important reason being to prepare for exams. The question of class attendance is still open to interpretation. Technically, the Mediasite system was ranked easy to use by both groups. The results of this survey confirm the concept of lecture capture as an integral segment of advanced education. Though this system should not replace class attendance, it is a vital supplement to course work and study. By reviewing all of the components of the survey those who may have concerns on its effectiveness are also aware of the advantages. The results of this study met all the objectives to evaluate use and obtain viewpoints to improve and expand the program.

  2. The impact of state financial incentives on market deployment of solar technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarzynski, Andrea; Larrieu, Jeremy; Shrimali, Gireesh

    2012-01-01

    Many states have adopted financial incentives to encourage market deployment of solar energy technology. This paper employs a cross-sectional time-series approach to evaluate the extent to which state solar financial incentives systematically encouraged market deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) technology from 1997 to 2009. The results demonstrate that states offering cash incentives such as rebates and grants experienced more extensive and rapid deployment of grid-tied PV technology than states without cash incentives over the study period. The analysis also finds that the presence of state renewable energy portfolio standards and specific solar carve-out provisions within them heavily influenced the market deployment of grid-tied solar PV technology through 2009. - Highlights: ► We evaluate the impact of state financial incentives on solar technology adoption. ► Cash incentives and renewable portfolio standards strongly influenced deployment. ► The impact of cash incentives and RPS grew significantly over time. ► Tax incentives had little systematic effect on solar market deployment.

  3. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    Keynote lecture. Challenges and opportunities of solid state ionic devices / W. Weppner -- pt. I. Ionically conducting inorganic solids. Invited papers. Multinuclear NMR studies of mass transport of phosphoric acid in water / J. R. P. Jayakody ... [et al.]. Crystalline glassy and polymeric electrolytes: similarities and differences in ionic transport mechanisms / J.-L. Souquet. 30 years of NMR/NQR experiments in solid electrolytes / D. Brinkmann. Analysis of conductivity and NMR measurements in Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] fast Li[symbol] ionic conductor: evidence for correlated Li[symbol] motion / O. Bohnké ... [et al.]. Transport pathways for ions in disordered solids from bond valence mismatch landscapes / S. Adams. Proton conductivity in condensed phases of water: implications on linear and ball lightning / K. Tennakone -- Contributed papers. Proton transport in nanocrystalline bioceramic materials: an investigative study of synthetic bone with that of natural bone / H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Synthesis and properties of the nanostructured fast ionic conductor Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Hydrogen production: ceramic materials for high temperature water electrolysis / A. Hammou. Influence of the sintering temperature on pH sensor ability of Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol]. Relationship between potentiometric and impedance spectroscopy measurements / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Microstructure chracterization and ionic conductivity of nano-sized CeO[symbol]-Sm[symbol]O[symbol] system (x=0.05 - 0.2) prepared by combustion route / K. Singh, S. A. Acharya, S. S. Bhoga. Red soil in Northern Sri Lanka is a natural magnetic ceramic / K. Ahilan ... [et al.]. Neutron scattering of LiNiO[symbol] / K. Basar ... [et al.]. Preparation and properties of LiFePO[symbol] nanorods / L. Q. Mai ... [et al.]. Structural and electrochemical properties of monoclinic and othorhombic MoO[symbol] phases / O. M. Hussain ... [et al.]. Preparation of Zircon (Zr

  4. Level III Ecoregions of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  5. Level IV Ecoregions of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  6. Human papillomavirus vaccine awareness, uptake, and parental and health care provider communication among 11- to 18-year-old adolescents in a rural Appalachian Ohio county in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Madhav P; Phillips, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    This study examined human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine awareness and uptake, and communication with a parent and/or a health care provider among 11- to 18-year-old male and female adolescents in an Appalachian Ohio county. Five questions regarding the HPV vaccine were added to the 2012 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) surveys administered to middle and high school students in the county. The YRBSS surveys are school-based, anonymous, and voluntary. The questions added were about vaccine awareness and uptake, and communication with a parent or health care provider about the vaccine. Of the 1,299 participants, 51.9% were male and 90.3% were white. Overall, 49.2%, 23.5%, 19.2%, and 24.6%, respectively, reported vaccine awareness, uptake of at least 1 dose of the HPV vaccine, communication with a parent, and communication with a health care provider. Females and adolescents ≥ 15 years were significantly more likely to report awareness, uptake, and parental and provider communication than males and adolescents ≤ 14 years. Adolescents receiving any dose of the vaccine were significantly more likely to have had a parent (OR: 3.74; 95% CI: 2.30-6.06) or a health care provider (OR: 10.91; 95% CI: 6.42-18.6) discuss the vaccine than those who had not received any dose. Despite the strong link between parental and health care provider communication and HPV vaccine uptake, the levels of communication remain low in this Appalachian population. These findings suggest the need for public health education programs targeting the health care providers, the parents, and the adolescents to improve awareness, knowledge, and HPV vaccine uptake. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  7. Human contacts with oral rabies vaccine baits distributed for wildlife rabies management--Ohio, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    Baits laden with oral rabies vaccines are important for the management of wildlife rabies in the United States. In August 2012, the Wildlife Services program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service began a field trial involving limited distribution of a new oral rabies vaccine bait in five states, including Ohio. The vaccine consisted of live recombinant human adenovirus type 5 vector, expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (AdRG1.3) (Onrab). A previously used oral rabies vaccine consisting of a live recombinant vaccinia vector, expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (V-RG) (Raboral V-RG), was distributed in other areas of Ohio. To monitor human contacts and potential vaccine virus exposure, surveillance was conducted by the Ohio Department of Health, local Ohio health agencies, and CDC. During August 23-September 7, 2012, a total of 776,921 baits were distributed in Ohio over 4,379 square miles (11,341 square kilometers). During August 24-September 12, a total of 89 baits were reported found by the general public, with 55 human contacts with baits identified (some contacts involved more than one bait). In 27 of the 55 human contacts, the bait was not intact, and a barrier (e.g., gloves) had not been used to handle the bait, leaving persons at risk for vaccine exposure and vaccine virus infection. However, no adverse events were reported. Continued surveillance of human contacts with oral rabies vaccine baits and public warnings to avoid contact with baits are needed because of the potential for vaccine virus infection.

  8. The impact of a standard enforcement safety belt law on fatalities and hospital charges in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Kristen A; Xiang, Huiyun; Smith, Gary A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze linked crash and hospital data to determine the effect that enactment of a standard enforcement safety belt law in Ohio would have on hospital charges and direct medical costs due to motor-vehicle crashes, focusing on the impact to the state's Medicaid system. The linkage and analysis was conducted as part of the Ohio Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System (CODES) program. Current safety belt usage in Ohio stands at 82% with its secondary enforcement safety belt law. Assuming an increase in usage to 92% through standard enforcement, over $15.3 million in medical costs to Medicaid for injuries that occur in a single year could be prevented over a 10-year period. Cumulative savings could reach more than $91.2 million during the 10-year period. In addition, 161 fatalities could have been prevented in one year had all unbelted occupants who sustained a fatal injury instead chosen to wear their safety belt. SUMMARY AND IMPACT ON INDUSTRY: Clearly, substantial progress can be made in reducing the number of deaths and injuries, as well as medical costs associated with motor-vehicle crashes, by strengthening safety belt laws and increasing safety belt usage in Ohio. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The urban heat island in Akron, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank P. Martin; Grace L. Powell

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered by automobile traverse were used to describe the urban heat of Akron, Ohio. Observations were made at 2100 or 2200 EST on four nights-17 April, 11 July, 10 October, and 2 January. Weather conditions not conducive to heat-island development were avoided. Temperatures in the center of the heat island were 6 to 14?F warmer than rural areas outside the city....

  10. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

  11. New York State Technology Education: History, the Current State of Affairs, and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettelis, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, technology education has undergone several changes, incorporating new philosophies, new courses, and even a new name. This discipline, which is historically rooted in industrial arts, has endeavored to carve out a niche based on preparing students for careers, hands-on applications of mathematics and science, critical…

  12. Medicaid in Ohio: The Politics of Expansion, Reauthorization, and Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    When, in 2012, the US Supreme Court held that Medicaid expansion sanctioned by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was essentially optional for states, it ushered in a newly contentious state politics. States led by Republican governors and legislatures opposed to the ACA had to decide whether to accept extensive federal funding to expand Medicaid for citizens in their states who were earning up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. This Report from the States focuses on Ohio, whose Republican governor successfully navigated the rancorous politics of Medicaid to expand the state's program in 2014. Working at odds with his own party and gaining praise from traditional political opponents for his leadership on the issue, John Kasich circumvented the state legislature, turning to the Controlling Board to bring about initial expansion. In the wake of Kasich's landslide reelection in 2014, the politics of expansion and reauthorization have given way to a pervasive discourse of "reform." In this next phase Kasich has endorsed policy positions (e.g., cost sharing, a focus on "personal responsibility") that reunite him with his party's more traditional view of Medicaid while continuing to emphasize the importance of expansion. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  13. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Crist

    2005-10-02

    particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

  14. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: 1) analysis techniques, 2) testing, 3) subsystem and component development, 4) packaging systems development support, and 5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  15. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: (1) analysis techniques; (2) testing; (3) subsystem and component development; (4) packaging systems development support; and (5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  16. Portsmouth annual environmental report for 2003, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none, none

    2004-11-30

    The Portsmouth & Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is located on a 5.8-square-mile site in a rural area of Pike County, Ohio. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities at PORTS include environmental restoration, waste 'management, and long-term'stewardship of nonleased facilities: Production facilities for the separation of uranium isotopes are leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), but most activities associated with the uranium enrichment process ceased in 2001. USEC activities are not covered by this document, with the exception of some environmental compliance information provided in Chap. 2 and radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring program information discussed in Chaps. 4 and 5.

  17. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Ohio.

  18. The ingenuous sovereign: On the relation of state and industry with high technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, O.

    1984-01-01

    Using the example of the fast breeder reactor, the paper discusses the interaction of state and industry in high technology. The fact that the state spent billions of Deutschmark for this project, only to realize that this technology is uneconomic and will remain uneconomic in the foreseeable future, is explained by an information impactedness between state and industry. While the initiative for the project came from within the government sector, industry was skeptical as early as the 1960 about the economic prospects of the technology. But in the policy making process there were no incentives for the industry to show its skepticism. In the area of direct government support to industrial technology a financial contribution by industry from its own funds is required to create an incentive for industry to let government know its views about the economic prospects of a technology. In other areas of technology policy, where this mechanism is not applicable, government must come to grips with the fact that it cannot expect experts to inform government objectively if doing so entails a disadvantage to the expert itself or to the organisation by which he is employed. (orig.) [de

  19. The History and State of the Art of Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlin, P.W.; Laxson, A.S.; Muljadi, E.B.

    2001-03-09

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing several research projects in variable speed. In the near future the laboratory will be reevaluating its ongoing experiments and plans. The starting point for this reevaluation will be a sound understanding of the current state of the art in design and application of variable-speed technology. This report, which outlines current technologies and historical applications of variable-speed, will provide a baseline in deciding the course of research in the upcoming years.

  20. Information Technology of Study of the State Foreign Debt in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvieieva Iuliia M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to expansion of international relations, growth of interest of states in attraction of foreign capital, appearance of excessive debts and problems connected with them, urgency of the issue of the state foreign debt significantly increased. The problem of state foreign debt is especially sharp in developing countries. Taking into account specific features of functioning of economies of these states, it is necessary to develop information approaches with the aim of studying macro-economic processes, which could assist in creation of improved mechanisms of functioning of the debt policy. The goal of the article is building an information technology of study of the state foreign debt, which would allow conduct of a complex analysis of the studied problem. The article offers a three-stage information technology of study of the state foreign debt, which gives a possibility to analyse and assess the study problem. This article also reveals properties, functions and tasks, which are solve by the information technology. It gives a detailed description of each stage and its notional elements. It forms the structured database for a possibility to carry out an experiment. On the basis of the first stage the article builds econometric models, which reflect interrelations between macro-economic factors, which gives an opportunity to forecast, analyse and assess the state foreign debt.

  1. Predictive spatial dynamics and strategic planning for raccoon rabies emergence in Ohio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Russell

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is an important public health concern in North America because of recent epidemics of a rabies virus variant associated with raccoons. The costs associated with surveillance, diagnostic testing, and post-exposure treatment of humans exposed to rabies have fostered coordinated efforts to control rabies spread by distributing an oral rabies vaccine to wild raccoons. Authorities have tried to contain westward expansion of the epidemic front of raccoon-associated rabies via a vaccine corridor established in counties of eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Although sporadic cases of rabies have been identified in Ohio since oral rabies vaccine distribution in 1998, the first evidence of a significant breach in this vaccine corridor was not detected until 2004 in Lake County, Ohio. Herein, we forecast the spatial spread of rabies in Ohio from this breach using a stochastic spatial model that was first developed for exploratory data analysis in Connecticut and next used to successfully hind-cast wave-front dynamics of rabies spread across New York. The projections, based on expansion from the Lake County breach, are strongly affected by the spread of rabies by rare, but unpredictable long-distance translocation of rabid raccoons; rabies may traverse central Ohio at a rate 2.5-fold greater than previously analyzed wildlife epidemics. Using prior estimates of the impact of local heterogeneities on wave-front propagation and of the time lag between surveillance-based detection of an initial rabies case to full-blown epidemic, specific regions within the state are identified for vaccine delivery and expanded surveillance effort.

  2. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, R K; Postma, A K; Jeppson, D W

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues.

  3. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; Postma, A.K.; Jeppson, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues

  4. Planning Process and Considerations for a Statewide Academic Libraries Information System in Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Wei Lee

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available 無Academic libraries in Ohio have led in cooperative library automation, with the establishment of OCLC in 1967 as one example. Beyond OCLC, which provides online shared cataloging, interlibrary loan and the world's largest bibliographic database, many have developed or acquired local systems to meet the needs of individual libraries. A 1986 study by the state Board of Regents recommended development of an Ohio Libraries Information System (OLIS which would permit students and faculty at any public university to have full access to the resources at any public university in the state. Beyond bibliographic access, the system emphasizes information delivery. This paper describes the planning process and considerations of the system which will go to REP in June 1989.

  5. Assessment of the State of the Art of Flight Control Technologies as Applicable to Adverse Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary s.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Leone, Karen M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies was surveyed to assess the state of the art in current Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) aircraft technologies. Over 100 papers from 25 conferences from the time period 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. An assessment of the general state of the art in adaptive flight control is summarized first, followed by an assessment of the state of the art as applicable to 13 identified adverse conditions. Specific areas addressed in the general assessment include flight control when compensating for damage or reduced performance, retrofit software upgrades to flight controllers, flight control through engine response, and finally test and validation of new adaptive controllers. The state-of-the-art assessment applicable to the adverse conditions include technologies not specifically related to flight control, but may serve as inputs to a future flight control algorithm. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IRAC Project

  6. Industrial property for science’s management, technology and innovation in Cuban State companies

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras Villavicencio, Dulce María; Suárez Gutiérrez, Evelio; Moreno Cruz, Marta Milagros; Correa Álvarez, Pascual

    2017-01-01

    The paper synthesizes some research on industrial property aspects from the socio-legal perspective and financial accounting. Its focus to the socialist state enterprise adaptation in his economic fact, social and environmental responsibility as a fundamental Cuban model reach, competitiveness and high performance in socialist state enterprise. It outlines criteria on the ordering and implementation of industrial property through the management of science and technology, protection and dissem...

  7. State-Level Efforts to Transfer Manufacturing Technology: A Survey of Programs and Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew W. Wyckoff; Louis G. Tornatzky

    1988-01-01

    This study analyzed state-level university-based efforts to increase manufacturing productivity through the transfer of technologies, such as robotics and microcomputers, to manufacturing establishments. A survey was conducted by phone interview of 15 state programs that were operating in 1985. Information was gathered on the goals, planning, budgets, marketing, staffing, organizational structure, technical focus, and evaluation practices of the programs. All of the programs were university-b...

  8. State-of-the-art computer technologies used to train nuclear specialists and to conduct research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, Yu.A.; Tikhonenko, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses innovative methods used in the process of training nuclear specialists and conducting research which are based on state-of-the-art computer technologies. The approach proposed makes wide use of mathematical modeling and state-of-the-art programming techniques. It is based on the development, improvement and application of problem-oriented computer codes to support the teaching process and to solve fundamental and applied problems of nuclear physics and nuclear engineering.

  9. Use of health information technology by children's hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Brooks, Robert G; Schwalenstocker, Ellen; Simpson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the adoption of health information technology by children's hospitals and to document barriers and priorities as they relate to health information technology adoption. Primary data of interest were obtained through the use of a survey instrument distributed to the chief information officers of 199 children's hospitals in the United States. Data were collected on current and future use of a variety of clinical health information technology and telemedicine applications, organizational priorities, barriers to use of health information technology, and hospital and chief information officer characteristics. Among the 109 responding hospitals (55%), common clinical applications included clinical scheduling (86.2%), transcription (85.3%), and pharmacy (81.9%) and laboratory (80.7%) information. Electronic health records (48.6%), computerized order entry (40.4%), and clinical decision support systems (35.8%) were less common. The most common barriers to health information technology adoption were vendors' inability to deliver products or services to satisfaction (85.4%), lack of staffing resources (82.3%), and difficulty in achieving end-user acceptance (80.2%). The most frequent priority for hospitals was to implement technology to reduce medical errors or to promote safety (72.5%). This first national look at health information technology use by children's hospitals demonstrates the progress in health information technology adoption, current barriers, and priorities for these institutions. In addition, the findings can serve as important benchmarks for future study in this area.

  10. 77 FR 71371 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Redesignation of the Ohio...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... power plants and industrial facilities. Nitrates, another common type of secondary particulate, are... emissions inventory requirement of the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). Ohio's maintenance plan submission... Approved Maintenance Plan Pursuant to Section 175A of the CAA (Section 107(d)(3)(E)(iv)) 5. Insignificance...

  11. Technology Transfer in the EU: Exporting Strategically Important ICT Solutions to Other EU Member States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Säär Anni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fast development of ICTs pose new challenges to the European Union and its Member States. Every EU country has its own policies regarding technology transfer, ownership of state e-services, and the possibilities how the state-owned or licensed e-service could be exported. Taking into account the free movement of goods, the EU has created a platform to cooperate and export IT solutions. However, the lack of preparedness of infrastructures, legislation and stakeholders for cross-border exchanges poses a threat to IT transfer and should be taken into consideration in the EU as well. In the coming decades the number of outsourced ICT solutions, strategically important ICT solutions, public services and critically important information exchange platforms developed on behalf of the states, will grow exponentially. Still, digital development is uneven across the EU, they grow at different speeds and the performance is quite splintered. There are legal provisions which are outdated and therefore impede technological cooperation and export of IT solutions. A Member State may restrict the ICT licensing based on national security and policy reasons and the ownership of intellectual property might pose a threat to technology transfer or further development of the IT solution. There are examples of strategically important export of ICT solutions, the experience at which can be expanded to cover other EU Member States. Strong collaboration would enable mutual learning from past experiences along with the opportunities for better use of technology. Parallels can be drawn with military technology transfers, as the policies and legal framework was first developed and mostly used with them.

  12. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  13. Combining Brain-Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, J D R; Rupp, R; Müller-Putz, G R; Murray-Smith, R; Giugliemma, C; Tangermann, M; Vidaurre, C; Cincotti, F; Kübler, A; Leeb, R; Neuper, C; Müller, K-R; Mattia, D

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, "Communication and Control", "Motor Substitution", "Entertainment", and "Motor Recovery". We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user-machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users' mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human-computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices.

  14. 76 FR 28895 - Safety Zone; Ohio River, Sewickley, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Ohio River, Sewickley, PA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... public due to the Borough of Sewickley fireworks display that will occur in the city of Sewickley, PA... to read as follows: Sec. 165.T08-0253 Safety Zone; Ohio River, Sewickley, PA. (a) Location. The...

  15. Ohio Department of Transportation : 2008-2009 Business Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    On behalf of the new Administration of Governor Ted Strickland and the more than 6,000 hard working men and women of the Ohio Department of Transportation, I am pleased to submit the Ohio Department of Transportation 2008-2009 Business Plan. : This b...

  16. Roundwood markets and utilization in West Virginia and Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawn T. Grushecky; Jan Wiedenbeck; Ben. Spong

    2011-01-01

    West Virginia and Ohio have similar forest resources and extensive forest-based economies. Roundwood is harvested throughout this central Appalachian region and supports a diverse primary and secondary forest products sector. The objective of this research was to investigate the utilization of the forest resource harvested in West Virginia and Ohio. Utilization and...

  17. Rates of Physical Activity among Appalachian Adolescents in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortz, Brian; Stevens, Emily; Holden, Becky; Petosa, R. Lingyak

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the physical activity behavior of high school students living in the Appalachian region of Ohio. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of 1,024 subjects from 11 schools in Appalachian Ohio was drawn. Previously validated instruments were used to measure physical activity behavior over 7 days.…

  18. Differences among Preferred Methods for Furthering Aging Education in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leson, Suzanne M.; Van Dussen, Daniel J.; Ewen, Heidi H.; Emerick, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Workers serving Ohio's aging population will require increased levels of gerontological education. Using data from 55 Ohio counties, this project investigated the educational needs and reasons for seeking education from professionals in aging. Respondents reported interest in attaining aging related education. Preferred delivery methods included…

  19. Building Software Development Capacity to Advance the State of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Educational technologists may advance the state of the field by increasing capacity to develop software tools and instructional applications. Presently, few academic programs in educational technology require even a single computer programming course. Further, the educational technologists who develop software generally work independently or in…

  20. Teacher Perspectives on the Current State of Computer Technology Integration into the Public School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Ramiro

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of computers into the public school arena over forty years ago, educators have been convinced that the integration of computer technology into the public school classroom will transform education. Joining educators are state and federal governments. Public schools and others involved in the process of computer technology…

  1. Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) Strategic Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandegee

    1999-01-28

    This strategic plan is in direct response to the call by a broad array of interested parties, for the Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) to reduce fragmentation and increase focus. This plan outlines goals for saving energy, three key strategies to accomplish these goals, and a commitment to improving how they do business.

  2. Information and Communication Technologies in Enhancing Learning Ability in Secondary Schools in Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osagie, Roseline O.

    2012-01-01

    The dismal results of 2011, 2010, 2009, and previous years WAEC and NECO Senior School Certificate Examinations (SSCE) show the pitiable state of education in secondary schools in Nigeria. The youths of today live in a digital age. Web technologies and sites have become an integral part of the youth culture. Today's youths use the web tools to…

  3. Information Technology Usage for Epidemiological Functions in U.S. State Public Health Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Linda C.

    2012-01-01

    Information technology (IT) use for epidemiological purposes in state public health departments has been documented only for a limited number of specific applications, leaving questions about its actual utilization and hindering IT's potential for information sharing. Communications, stages of change, and systems theories all influence the…

  4. Virtual Classroom Instruction and Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Sylvester J.; Etim, Paulinus J.; Udom, Stella Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    The virtual classroom and distance education have created new teaching pedagogy. This study was carried out to investigate Virtual Classroom Instruction on Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State. The population for this study was limited to the Students in National Open University, Enugu study…

  5. Paying for the Assistive Technology You Need: A Consumer Guide to Funding Sources in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Frances E.; Brown, Sharan E.

    This manual provides Washington state consumers and their advocates with information and guidance to enable them to pursue appropriate avenues for funding assistive technology (AT). Chapter 1 discusses the legislative history of AT, the definition of AT, and basic funding strategies. Chapter 2 reviews health-related sources of AT funding including…

  6. Using ex ante output elicitation to model state-contingent technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, R.G.; Serra, T.; Stefanou, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Survey-elicited ex ante outputs are used to develop an empirical representation of an Arrow–Debreu–Savage state-contingent technology in an activity-analysis framework. An empirical test of output-cubicality is developed for that framework. We apply those tools to assess production characteristics

  7. Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgunduz, N.; Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Pierce, V.H.

    1997-01-01

    A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented

  8. The state of information and communication technology and health informatics in ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achampong, Emmanuel Kusi

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become a major tool in delivery of health services and has had an innovative impact on quality of life. ICT is affecting the way healthcare is delivered to clients. In this paper, we discuss the state of ICT and health informatics in Ghana. We also discuss the state of various relevant infrastructures for the successful implementation of ehealth projects. We analyse the past and present state of health informatics in Ghana, in comparison to other African countries. We also review the challenges facing successful implementation of health informatics projects in Ghana and suggest possible solutions.

  9. Technology, the evolution of the transnational corporation, and the nation-state: A speculative essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    This study deals with two exceedingly complex matters; first, the causal connection between technology and the rise of giant transnational or multinational corporations, and second, the impact that development is having on the political order called the nation-state. It is concluded that the multinational enterprise and the nation-state are the major participants in the planetary order; that the enterprise has a political role and the state has an economic role; and that they are conjoined ever increasingly into a system of global corporativism.

  10. Evaluation of the Buckeye Crossbuck at public, passive railroad/highway grade crossings in Ohio : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Two new crossbuck designs for use at passive Railroad/Highway Grade Crossings (RRX) were evaluated. : The Standard Improved and the Buckeye crossbuck were evaluated on a state-wide basis in Ohio with : respect to their potential to alter driver risk ...

  11. Methodology and Limitations of Ohio Enrollment Projections. The AIR Professional File, No. 4, Winter 1979-80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraetsch, Gayla A.

    Two quantitative enrollment projection techniques and the methods used by researchers at the Ohio Board of Regents (OBR) are discussed. Two quantitative approaches that are typically used for enrollment projections are curve-fitting techniques and causal models. Many state forecasters use curve-fitting techniques, a popular approach because only…

  12. Number of Ohio's Vital School Professionals Dwindling Student Health, Career Preparation, Art Exposure Suffer. K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Until last year, Ohio had in place a rule requiring a minimum level of staffing for music, visual arts, physical education, counselors, librarians, nurses, social workers and visiting teachers. School districts had to have at least five of these eight positions for every 1,000 students. In March 2015, the State Board of Education eliminated this…

  13. Proceedings of the National Conference on Individualized Instruction in Foreign Languages (1st, Columbus, Ohio, May 10-12, 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Elizabeth P., Ed.; Twarog, Leon I., Ed.

    This conference covered the following topics: (1) individualized instruction in Arabic, French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish at the Ohio State University; (2) individualized instruction in the same languages at other institutions; and (3) individualized instruction in other languages. Panel discussions included individualized instruction at…

  14. Remote and continuous gamma spectrometry for environmental radiation protection: state of the art technology and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Put, Ph.; Lellis, C.; Debauche, A.; Lacroix, J-P.

    2004-01-01

    The instruments technologies for radiological protection of the environment have been considerably enhanced since the last 20 years. From very simple warning bells in the early 80s, the instruments have been sophisticated nowadays to a degree where their performances can be compared to the performances achieved in low level laboratories. This presentation will briefly overview the evolution of these instruments by comparing their technology, their methodology and their performances. Next, it will present the concepts of the state of the art technology in the field of continuous monitoring of the environment. A discussion will follow on the performances and the limitations of this technology. Finally, the presentation will highlight the future perspective of developments by taking into account recent progress in the field of radiation detectors, telecommunication and computer sciences among others. (authors)

  15. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  16. A State-of-the-Art Survey of Indoor Positioning and Navigation Systems and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sakpere

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research and use of positioning and navigation technologies outdoors has seen a steady and exponential growth. Based on this success, there have been attempts to implement these technologies indoors, leading to numerous studies. Most of the algorithms, techniques and technologies used have been implemented outdoors. However, how they fare indoors is different altogether. Thus, several technologies have been proposed and implemented to improve positioning and navigation indoors. Among them are Infrared (IR, Ultrasound, Audible Sound, Magnetic, Optical and Vision, Radio Frequency (RF, Visible Light, Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR/Inertial Navigation System (INS and Hybrid. The RF technologies include Bluetooth, Ultra-wideband (UWB, Wireless Sensor Network (WSN, Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN, Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID and Near Field Communication (NFC. In addition, positioning techniques applied in indoor positioning systems include the signal properties and positioning algorithms. The prevalent signal properties are Angle of Arrival (AOA, Time of Arrival (TOA, Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA and Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI, while the positioning algorithms are Triangulation, Trilateration, Proximity and Scene Analysis/ Fingerprinting. This paper presents a state-of-the-art survey of indoor positioning and navigation systems and technologies, and their use in various scenarios. It analyses distinct positioning technology metrics such as accuracy, complexity, cost, privacy, scalability and usability. This paper has profound implications for future studies of positioning and navigation.

  17. Modern Value Orientations and Attitudes of Southern Ohio's Rural Youths Toward Abortion and Ohio's Law Concerning Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram N.; Wiseman, Patricia

    The hypothesis that value orientation is a more important determinant of fertility behavior than social class was examined in this study. Data were obtained from 4 rural high schools in Lawrence County, Ohio. The sample consisted of 500 Protestant, white single students. Dependent variables were youth attitudes toward abortion and Ohio's abortion…

  18. China, the United States, and competition for resources that enable emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Andrew L; Nassar, Nedal T; Xun, Sean

    2018-04-02

    Historically, resource conflicts have often centered on fuel minerals (particularly oil). Future resource conflicts may, however, focus more on competition for nonfuel minerals that enable emerging technologies. Whether it is rhenium in jet engines, indium in flat panel displays, or gallium in smart phones, obscure elements empower smarter, smaller, and faster technologies, and nations seek stable supplies of these and other nonfuel minerals for their industries. No nation has all of the resources it needs domestically. International trade may lead to international competition for these resources if supplies are deemed at risk or insufficient to satisfy growing demand, especially for minerals used in technologies important to economic development and national security. Here, we compare the net import reliance of China and the United States to inform mineral resource competition and foreign supply risk. Our analysis indicates that China relies on imports for over half of its consumption for 19 of 42 nonfuel minerals, compared with 24 for the United States-11 of which are common to both. It is for these 11 nonfuel minerals that competition between the United States and China may become the most contentious, especially for those with highly concentrated production that prove irreplaceable in pivotal emerging technologies. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. The state of the art of wind energy conversion systems and technologies: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Ming; Zhu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper reviews the state of the art of wind energy conversion systems. • Different types of common wind energy conversion systems are classified and compared. • The four most popular MPPT control methods are reviewed and compared. • The latest development of wind energy conversion technologies is introduced. • Future trends of the wind energy conversion technologies are discussed. - Abstract: This paper gives a comprehensive review of the state of the art of wind energy conversion systems (WECS) and technologies, with an emphasis on wind power generator and control. First, different types of common WECSs are classified according to their features and drive train types. The WECSs are compared on the basis of the volume, weight, cost, efficiency, system reliability and fault ride through capability. The maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control, which aims to make the generator speed meet an optimum value to ensure the maximum energy yield, plays a key role in the variable speed WECSs. A comprehensive review and comparison of the four most popular MPPT control methods are carried out and improvements for each method are presented. Furthermore, the latest development of wind energy conversion technologies is introduced, such as the brushless doubly fed induction generator (BDFIG), the stator permanent magnet synchronous generators, the magnetic-geared generators, dual power flow WECS with the electrical variable transmission (EVT) machine, and direct grid-connected WECS. Finally, the future trends of the technologies are discussed

  20. Analysis of Pilot Feedback Regarding the Use of State Awareness Technologies During Complex Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Emory; Young, Steven D.; Daniels, Taumi; Santiago-Espada, Yamira; Etherington, Tim

    2016-01-01

    A flight simulation study was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate flight deck systems that (1) predict aircraft energy state and/or autoflight configuration, (2) present the current state and expected future state of automated systems, and/or (3) show the state of flight-critical data systems in use by automated systems and primary flight instruments. Four new technology concepts were evaluated vis-à-vis current state-of-the-art flight deck systems and indicators. This human-in-the-loop study was conducted using commercial airline crews. Scenarios spanned a range of complex conditions and several emulated causal factors and complexity in recent accidents involving loss of state awareness by pilots (e.g. energy state, automation state, and/or system state). Data were collected via questionnaires administered after each flight, audio/video recordings, physiological data, head and eye tracking data, pilot control inputs, and researcher observations. This paper strictly focuses on findings derived from the questionnaire responses. It includes analysis of pilot subjective measures of complexity, decision making, workload, situation awareness, usability, and acceptability.

  1. Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos

  2. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A; Hoang, G T

    2008-01-01

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  3. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ''Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.'' Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming

  4. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF 6 and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF 6 PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF 6 inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF 6 PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF 6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF 6 conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF 6 cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the

  5. Explaining technological change of wind power in China and the United States: Roles of energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tian

    The following dissertation explains how technological change of wind power, in terms of cost reduction and performance improvement, is achieved in China and the US through energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration. The objective of this dissertation is to understand how energy policies affect key actors in the power sector to promote renewable energy and achieve cost reductions for climate change mitigation in different institutional arrangements. The dissertation consists of three essays. The first essay examines the learning processes and technological change of wind power in China. I integrate collaboration and technological learning theories to model how wind technologies are acquired and diffused among various wind project participants in China through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)--an international carbon trade program, and empirically test whether different learning channels lead to cost reduction of wind power. Using pooled cross-sectional data of Chinese CDM wind projects and spatial econometric models, I find that a wind project developer's previous experience (learning-by-doing) and industrywide wind project experience (spillover effect) significantly reduce the costs of wind power. The spillover effect provides justification for subsidizing users of wind technologies so as to offset wind farm investors' incentive to free-ride on knowledge spillovers from other wind energy investors. The CDM has played such a role in China. Most importantly, this essay provides the first empirical evidence of "learning-by-interacting": CDM also drives wind power cost reduction and performance improvement by facilitating technology transfer through collaboration between foreign turbine manufacturers and local wind farm developers. The second essay extends this learning framework to the US wind power sector, where I examine how state energy policies, restructuring of the electricity market, and learning among actors in wind industry lead to

  6. Assessment of coal technology options and implications for the State of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.L.; Elcock, D.; Elliott, T.J. [and others

    1993-12-01

    The mandate of this research report was to provide the state of Hawaii with an assessment of the potential opportunities and drawbacks of relying on coal-fired generating technologies to diversify its fuel mix and satisfy future electric power requirements. This assessment was to include a review of existing and emerging coal-based power technologies-including their associated costs, environmental impacts, land use, and infrastructure requirements-to determine the range of impacts likely to occur if such systems were deployed in Hawaii. Coupled with this review, the report was also to (1) address siting and safety issues as they relate to technology choice and coal transport, (2) consider how environmental costs associated with coal usage are included in the integrated resource planning (ERP) process, and (3) develop an analytical tool from which the Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism of the State of Hawaii could conduct first-order comparisons of power plant selection and siting. The prepared report addresses each element identified above. However, available resources and data limitations limited the extent to which particular characteristics of coal use could be assessed. For example, the technology profiles are current but not as complete regarding future developments and cost/emissions data as possible, and the assessment of coal technology deployment issues in Hawaii was conducted on an aggregate (not site-specific) basis. Nonetheless, the information and findings contained in this report do provide an accurate depiction of the opportunities for and issues associated with coal utilization in the state of Hawaii.

  7. Propulsion Control Technology Development in the United States A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaw, Link C.a; Garg, Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a historical perspective of the advancement of control technologies for aircraft gas turbine engines. The paper primarily covers technology advances in the United States in the last 60 years (1940 to approximately 2002). The paper emphasizes the pioneering technologies that have been tested or implemented during this period, assimilating knowledge and experience from industry experts, including personal interviews with both current and retired experts. Since the first United States-built aircraft gas turbine engine was flown in 1942, engine control technology has evolved from a simple hydro-mechanical fuel metering valve to a full-authority digital electronic control system (FADEC) that is common to all modern aircraft propulsion systems. At the same time, control systems have provided engine diagnostic functions. Engine diagnostic capabilities have also evolved from pilot observation of engine gauges to the automated on-board diagnostic system that uses mathematical models to assess engine health and assist in post-flight troubleshooting and maintenance. Using system complexity and capability as a measure, we can break the historical development of control systems down to four phases: (1) the start-up phase (1942 to 1949), (2) the growth phase (1950 to 1969), (3) the electronic phase (1970 to 1989), and (4) the integration phase (1990 to 2002). In each phase, the state-of-the-art control technology is described and the engines that have become historical landmarks, from the control and diagnostic standpoint, are identified. Finally, a historical perspective of engine controls in the last 60 years is presented in terms of control system complexity, number of sensors, number of lines of software (or embedded code), and other factors.

  8. Prospects for Policy Advances in Science and Technology in the Gulf Arab States: "The Role for International Partnerships"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, David P.; Moran, George W.; Siddiqi, Afreen; Richardson, Joshua E.; Anadon, Laura D.; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) policies in the Gulf Arab States are as diverse as the individual economies and political processes that characterize its member states. During the past decade, a number of expert review groups have argued that science and technology policy needs to be reformed and revitalized in the Gulf…

  9. State-of-art technology of fuels for burning minor actinides. An OECD/NEA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Konings, R.J.M.; Pillon, S.; Schram, R.P.C.; Verwerft, M.; Wallenius, J.

    2005-01-01

    At OECD/NEA, Working Party on Scientific Issues in Partitioning and Transmutation was formed for 2000-2004, which studied the status and trends of scientific issues in Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T). The study included the scientific and technical issues of fuels and materials, which are related to dedicated systems for transmutation. This paper summarizes the state-of-art technology of the fuels for burning minor actinides (neptunium, americium and curium). (author)

  10. The Current State and TRL Assessment of Unattended and Left-Behind Object Detection Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Gagnon, Dr. Marc Lalonde , Computer Research Institute of Montreal (CRIM) The feedback from project partners: RCMP, TC, CATSA, DRDC, UK HomeOffice, FBI...The urrent tate and TRL ssessment of nattended and eft-ehind bject etection echnology Prepared by: M. Lalonde ,M...TR) July 2014 The Current State and TRL Assessment of Unattended and Left-Behind Object Detection Technology M. Lalonde , M. Derenne, L. Gagnon, D

  11. China, the United States, and competition for resources that enable emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Andrew L.; Nassar, Nedal T.; Xun, Sean

    2018-01-01

    Historically, resource conflicts have often centered on fuel minerals (particularly oil). Future resource conflicts may, however, focus more on competition for nonfuel minerals that enable emerging technologies. Whether it is rhenium in jet engines, indium in flat panel displays, or gallium in smart phones, obscure elements empower smarter, smaller, and faster technologies, and nations seek stable supplies of these and other nonfuel minerals for their industries. No nation has all of the resources it needs domestically. International trade may lead to international competition for these resources if supplies are deemed at risk or insufficient to satisfy growing demand, especially for minerals used in technologies important to economic development and national security. Here, we compare the net import reliance of China and the United States to inform mineral resource competition and foreign supply risk. Our analysis indicates that China relies on imports for over half of its consumption for 19 of 42 nonfuel minerals, compared with 24 for the United States—11 of which are common to both. It is for these 11 nonfuel minerals that competition between the United States and China may become the most contentious, especially for those with highly concentrated production that prove irreplaceable in pivotal emerging technologies.

  12. Installation of Ohio's First Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Fueling Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, Brianne T.; Lively, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes progress made towards the installation of a hydrogen fueling station in Northeast Ohio. In collaboration with several entities in the Northeast Ohio area, the NASA Glenn Research Center is installing a hydrogen fueling station that uses electrolysis to generate hydrogen on-site. The installation of this station is scheduled for the spring of 2012 at the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority s Hayden bus garage in East Cleveland. This will be the first electrolysis-based hydrogen fueling station in Ohio.

  13. Technological developments in real-time operational hydrologic forecasting in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudlow, Michael D.

    1988-09-01

    The hydrologic forecasting service of the United States spans applications and scales ranging from those associated with the issuance of flood and flash warnings to those pertaining to seasonal water supply forecasts. New technological developments (underway in or planned by the National Weather Service (NWS) in support of the Hydrologic Program) are carried out as combined efforts by NWS headquarters and field personnel in cooperation with other organizations. These developments fall into two categories: hardware and software systems technology, and hydrometeorological analysis and prediction technology. Research, development, and operational implementation in progress in both of these areas are discussed. Cornerstones of an overall NWS modernization effort include implementation of state-of-the-art data acquisition systems (including the Next Generation Weather Radar) and communications and computer processing systems. The NWS Hydrologic Service will capitalize on these systems and will incorporate results from specific hydrologic projects including collection and processing of multivariate data sets, conceptual hydrologic modeling systems, integrated hydrologic modeling systems with meteorological interfaces and automatic updating of model states, and extended streamflow prediction techniques. The salient aspects of ongoing work in these areas are highlighted in this paper, providing some perspective on the future U.S. hydrologic forecasting service and its transitional period into the 1990s.

  14. Prospects of technology adoption in small pump schemes in the River Nile State, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A. T.; Hashim, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Linear programming was used to simulate the farming systems of small pump schemes in Shendi Area, River Nile State, Sudan, to assess the prospect for technology use in cool-season food legumes and wheat. Different production activities, with respect to target crops, were identified to reflect different technology levels. The model constraints were the pump capacity, the scheme size and family labour. Alternative versions of the model were developed to examine possible production options that exist and to examine the effects of alternative resource levels and policy options, which are likely to affects adoption. The model results revealed that while farmers traditional practices were not economically feasible options, tendency is for adoption of medium rather than the recommended high technology levels. This reflects actual farmers behaviour, particularly for irrigation water, and indicates that water is the main resource constraint. The results also showed that the technology is not well supported by the traditional institutions of production relation, which create conflicting perception between resource owner to wards technology use.(Author)

  15. States Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (SMART) Collaborative: data collection, linkage, dissemination, and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mneimneh, Allison S; Boulet, Sheree L; Sunderam, Saswati; Zhang, Yujia; Jamieson, Denise J; Crawford, Sara; McKane, Patricia; Copeland, Glenn; Mersol-Barg, Michael; Grigorescu, Violanda; Cohen, Bruce; Steele, JoAnn; Sappenfield, William; Diop, Hafsatou; Kirby, Russell S; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2013-07-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) refers to fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled outside the body. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) oversees the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), which collects data on all ART procedures performed in the United States. The NASS, while a comprehensive source of data on ART patient demographics and clinical procedures, includes limited information on outcomes related to women's and children's health. To examine ART-related health outcomes, CDC and three states (Massachusetts, Florida, and Michigan) established the States Monitoring ART (SMART) Collaborative to evaluate maternal and perinatal outcomes of ART and improve state-based ART surveillance. To date, NASS data have been linked with states' vital records, disease registries, and hospital discharge data with a linkage rate of 90.2%. The probabilistic linkage methodology used in the SMART Collaborative has been validated and found to be both accurate and efficient. A wide breadth of applied research within the Collaborative is planned or ongoing, including examinations of the impact of insurance mandates on ART use as well as the relationships between ART and birth defects and cancer, among others. The SMART Collaborative is working to improve state-based ART surveillance by developing state surveillance plans, establishing partnerships, and conducting data analyses. The SMART Collaborative has been instrumental in creating linked datasets and strengthening epidemiologic and research capacity for improving maternal and infant health programs and evaluating the public health impact of ART.

  16. Technology and place: A geography of waste-to-energy in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jordan Patterson

    The adoption of technologies differs across space, for reasons attributed to economics, politics, and culture, but also due to limitations imposed by both the physical environment and the technology itself. This dissertation considers the case of waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators in the United States, and asks why this technology is used in some places but rejected in others. The answer to this simple question is remarkably complex, as understandings and arguments about technology and the environment are mobilized differently by various actors to champion, oppose, or in some cases remain ambivalent about the installation and operation of WTE facilities. In this dissertation I explore the geography of WTE incineration in the United States since the 19th century. Informed by the insights of actor-network theory and the social construction of technology school, I employ the tools of discourse analysis to examine published and unpublished statements, papers, project studies, policy briefs, and archival materials generated alongside the development of WTE facilities in the United States, considering the specific case studies discussed below but also WTE technology in general. I look at federal, state, and local environmental agency documents as well as the papers of consulting firms, environmental and industry advocacy groups, and private companies. I also devote significant attention to the analysis of news media outlets in communities where WTE facilities are located or have been considered. In addition to these literal texts, I examine non-written and visual materials associated with WTE facilities, including films, websites, signage and logos, advertising campaigns, facility architecture, and artwork, as well as more abstract `texts' such as industry conferences, trade-show handouts, promotional materials, and academic and industry research programs. I build on this textual analysis with observations of WTE facilities in action. After an introductory chapter, I

  17. Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

  18. Fall prevention intervention technologies: A conceptual framework and survey of the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Julian; Money, Arthur G; Atwal, Anita; Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, an ever increasing range of technology-based applications have been developed with the goal of assisting in the delivery of more effective and efficient fall prevention interventions. Whilst there have been a number of studies that have surveyed technologies for a particular sub-domain of fall prevention, there is no existing research which surveys the full spectrum of falls prevention interventions and characterises the range of technologies that have augmented this landscape. This study presents a conceptual framework and survey of the state of the art of technology-based fall prevention systems which is derived from a systematic template analysis of studies presented in contemporary research literature. The framework proposes four broad categories of fall prevention intervention system: Pre-fall prevention; Post-fall prevention; Fall injury prevention; Cross-fall prevention. Other categories include, Application type, Technology deployment platform, Information sources, Deployment environment, User interface type, and Collaborative function. After presenting the conceptual framework, a detailed survey of the state of the art is presented as a function of the proposed framework. A number of research challenges emerge as a result of surveying the research literature, which include a need for: new systems that focus on overcoming extrinsic falls risk factors; systems that support the environmental risk assessment process; systems that enable patients and practitioners to develop more collaborative relationships and engage in shared decision making during falls risk assessment and prevention activities. In response to these challenges, recommendations and future research directions are proposed to overcome each respective challenge. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Industrial property for science’s management, technology and innovation in Cuban State companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce María Contreras Villavicencio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper synthesizes some research on industrial property aspects from the socio-legal perspective and financial accounting. Its focus to the socialist state enterprise adaptation in his economic fact, social and environmental responsibility as a fundamental Cuban model reach, competitiveness and high performance in socialist state enterprise. It outlines criteria on the ordering and implementation of industrial property through the management of science and technology, protection and dissemination of knowledge results as alternatives of regulation in chain of value to full cycle of innovation, dynamics of intangible heritage and relationships, exchange with marketing as business philosophy of business application. Strategies are proposed regarding the rights of this institution in the economic-organization management state.

  20. Ohio's First Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Fueling Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demattia, Brianne

    2014-01-01

    Presentation to the earth day coalition describing efforts with NASA GRC and Cleveland RTA on Ohio's hydrogen fueling station and bus demonstration. Project background and goals, challenges and successes, and current status.

  1. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  2. Inventory Accuracy at the Defense Depot, Columbus, Ohio

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1997-01-01

    We identified issues on the accuracy of inventory reporting for materiel stored at the Defense Depot, Columbus, Ohio during our overall audit of the inventory accounts in the FY 1996 Defense Business...

  3. Dedolomitization and Alkali Reactions in Ohio-sourced Dolstone Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Concrete samples produced using NW-Ohio sourced aggregates were evaluated for susceptibility to degradation and premature failure due to cracks formed by the volume expansion during hydration of silica gels produced by alkali-silica reactions between...

  4. Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battelle

    1998-10-01

    In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend (E85, which is 85% transportation-grade ethanol and 15% gasoline) as a transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). The study included ten FFVs and three gasoline vehicles (used as control vehicles) operated by five state agencies. The project included 24 months of data collection on vehicle operations. This report presents the data collection and analysis from the study, with a focus on the last year.

  5. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  6. What Drives Local Wine Expenditure in Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee and Pennsylvania? A Consumer Behavior and Wine Market Segmentation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xueting; Woods, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This study explores wine expenditure driven factors for consumers in the United States by employing a four-state consumer behaviors study. A market segmentation method is applied to investigate spending patterns of wine consumers in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Determinants including market segmentation measurements, lifestyle factors and demographic variables are investigated and compared for their significance in driving local wine expenditure, local wine purchase probabilit...

  7. Simultaneous SO[sub 2]/NO/particulate removal from coal combustion gas by solid-state electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, L.P.; Cook, W.J.; Keyvani, M.; Neyman, M. (Helipump Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Helfritch, D.J. (Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States). Environmental Services and Technologies Div.)

    1991-01-21

    A solid-state electrochemical process now in an early stage of development converts NO[sub x]and SO[sub x] to nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Process objectives are to remove 90+% of SO[sub x] and NO[sub x] and 99% of particulates from Ohio coal combustion flue gases. The electrochemical reactor cell uses ionically conductive ceramics as electrolyte, and electronically conductive materials (including some ceramics) as electrodes; there are no moving parts, no consumable reagents, no by-product sludges, and no process fluids except the flue gas. Downstream of the electro-chemical cell, particulates are removed with a filter or electrostatic precipitator and elemental sulfur is condensed. This work developed and tested electrocatalysts for their ability to selectively reduce SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] in the presence of oxygen gas in concentrations typical of coal combustion flue gases. Several solid electrolytes and various electrode materials were also tested for use in the electrochemical cell. Gold was chosen as the electrode in the tests because it is porous, resistant to chemical attack, and conductive. Electrocatalyst coatings containing a single transition metal were applied to one inch diameter yttria stabilized ceria disks and tested for NO and SO[sub 2] reduction.

  8. Current State of Technology of Fuel Cell Power Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Mendez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs are vehicles that are primarily used to accomplish oceanographic research data collection and auxiliary offshore tasks. At the present time, they are usually powered by lithium-ion secondary batteries, which have insufficient specific energies. In order for this technology to achieve a mature state, increased endurance is required. Fuel cell power systems have been identified as an effective means to achieve this endurance but no implementation in a commercial device has yet been realized. This paper summarizes the current state of development of the technology in this field of research. First, the most adequate type of fuel cell for this application is discussed. The prototypes and design concepts of AUVs powered by fuel cells which have been developed in the last few years are described. Possible commercial and experimental fuel cell stack options are analyzed, examining solutions adopted in the analogous aerial vehicle applications, as well as the underwater ones, to see if integration in an AUV is feasible. Current solutions in oxygen and hydrogen storage systems are overviewed and energy density is objectively compared between battery power systems and fuel cell power systems for AUVs. A couple of system configuration solutions are described including the necessary lithium-ion battery hybrid system. Finally, some closing remarks on the future of this technology are given.

  9. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects

  10. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects.

  11. Factors Influencing Smokeless Tobacco Use in Rural Ohio Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Julianna M.; Liu, Sherry T.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of smokeless tobacco (ST) use disproportionally impacts males in rural Ohio Appalachia. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural factors contributing to this disparity and to articulate the way in which culture, through interpersonal factors (i.e. social norms and social networks) and community factors (i.e. marketing and availability), impacts ST initiation and use of ST among boys and men in Ohio Appalachia. Methods Fifteen focus groups and twenty-three individual qualitative interviews were conducted with adult (n=63) and adolescent (n=53) residents in Ohio Appalachian counties to ascertain factors associated with ST use and the impact of ST marketing. Transcriptions were independently coded according to questions and themes. Results ST use appears to be a rite of passage in the development of masculine identity in Ohio Appalachian culture. Interpersonal factors had the greatest influence on initiation and continued use of ST. Ohio Appalachian boys either emulated current ST users or were actively encouraged to use ST through male family and peer networks. Users perceived their acceptance into the male social network as predicated on ST use. Community factors, including ST advertisement and access to ST, reinforced and normalized underlying cultural values. Conclusions In addition to policy aimed at reducing tobacco marketing and access, interventions designed to reduce ST use in Ohio Appalachia should incorporate efforts to 1) shift the perception of cultural norms regarding ST use and 2) address male social networks as vehicles in ST initiation. PMID:22427033

  12. Impact of improved technologies on small-scale soybean production: empirical evidence from benue state, nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adisa, R.S.; Balogun, K.S.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the impact of improved technologies on the lives of small-scale soybean farmers in Benue State, Nigeria. A total of 160 respondents were selected using simple random sampling technique. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Tobit model and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Findings revealed that 35.6% of the respondents were between 31 and 40 years old, 40.6% had household size of between 6 and 10 members. Majority of the respondents were male, married, and had secondary school education. Tobit analysis revealed that farmers socioeconomic characteristics which include gender, educational status and farming experience; and farmers knowledge on soybean innovations were significant factors determining the adoption of improved soybean production technologies. These factors were statistically significant at p=0.05. The adoption of improved soybean technologies has had a clear positive impact on farmers belief on soybean innovations. The major problems facing farmers in the adoption of improved soybean production technologies according to Kruskal-Wallis ranking were high cost of inputs, problem of labour availability and lack of credit/loan. The results of this study provide a strong case for the promotion of soybean as a solution for malnutrition and a means of poverty alleviation for poor people. (author)

  13. Gender analysis of technology utilisation among small scale oil palm fruits processors in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koledoye Gbenga F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study identified the types of improved technologies utilised, tracked gender involvement at the various stages of oil palm fruits processing activities with a view to highlighting differences in the utilisation of these technologies among male and female processors. Multistage sampling technique was used to select 240 (120 males and 120 females oil palm fruits processors using structured interview schedule. Focus Group Discussion (FGD and Gender Mapping (GM were used to elicit qualitative data. Data collected were summarised with the aid of descriptive statistics while t-test was used to test the hypothesis. Results showed that sterilizer, digester and hydraulic hand press were utilised by both male and female processors. Results of t-test revealed that at P ≤ 0.01, significant differences were found between male and female processors level of utilisation of oil palm processing technologies with male having a higher mean score than the female. The study concluded that gender differences exited in the level of utilisation of oil palm processing technologies among male and female processors in Ondo State, Nigeria.

  14. Technology-based innovation for independent living: policy and innovation in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Clara; Furseth, Peder Inge; Cuthbertson, Richard; Demello, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Interest in utilizing technology to help older adults remain living at home is growing; however, uptake remains low. We present a conceptual framework for understanding independent living technology innovation within health and social services. Public policy and innovation in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Scandinavia are profiled as case studies. In all profiled countries, independent living technology is more rapidly advancing than associated state policy, regulation, and payment systems. The findings from this comparative analysis reveal areas for further exploration, including policy subsystem environments in which technologies and services are regulated, as well as trends and desires of older adults and their caregivers within particular cultural contexts.

  15. The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plan, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-01-07

    This report includes an evaluation of deep rock formations with the objective of providing practical maps, data, and some of the issues considered for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage projects in the Ohio River Valley. Injection and storage of CO{sub 2} into deep rock formations represents a feasible option for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from coal-burning power plants concentrated along the Ohio River Valley area. This study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office, Schlumberger, and Battelle along with its Pacific Northwest Division. An extensive program of drilling, sampling, and testing of a deep well combined with a seismic survey was used to characterize the local and regional geologic features at AEP's 1300-megawatt (MW) Mountaineer Power Plant. Site characterization information has been used as part of a systematic design feasibility assessment for a first-of-a-kind integrated capture and storage facility at an existing coal-fired power plant in the Ohio River Valley region--an area with a large concentration of power plants and other emission sources. Subsurface characterization data have been used for reservoir simulations and to support the review of the issues relating to injection, monitoring, strategy, risk assessment, and regulatory permitting. The high-sulfur coal samples from the region have been tested in a capture test facility to evaluate and optimize basic design for a small-scale capture system and eventually to prepare a detailed design for a capture, local transport, and injection facility. The Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project was conducted in phases with the ultimate objectives of demonstrating both the technical aspects of CO{sub 2} storage and the testing, logistical, regulatory, and outreach issues related to conducting such a project at a large point source under realistic constraints. The site

  16. Symposium on condenser macrofouling control technologies: the state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Tous, I.A.; Miller, M.J. (eds.)

    1983-12-01

    This report is divided into five parts corresponding to the five symposium sessions in which formal presentations and discussions were held. Session 1 discussed the nature of macrofouling problems in general and their impact on power plant operation. Session 2 discussed chemical control technologies, basically chlorine minimization, continuous low-level chlorination, cost of chlorination for the utility industry, and the effects of organotins on marine organisms. Session 3 discussed international experiences (from the United States, France, Germany and the Netherlands) with mechanical controls such as intake screening, in-line filters, and thermal backwash. Alternate control technologies, including antifouling coatings and sheetings, nontoxic sheetings, acoustical, velocity, and Cathelco, were discussed in Session 4. Session 5 consisted of information exchange workshops on utility experience with mechanical and chemical controls. The workshop's notes are presented in this report. Papers presented at the symposium are included. Each paper has been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  17. Academic Dishonesty in the Digital Age from the Perspective of Rural High School General Education Teachers in Southwest Ohio: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Nathan Churchell

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe high school general education teachers' experiences with academic dishonesty in the digital age in rural school districts in southwest Ohio. Academic dishonesty in the digital age is defined as student use of digital technologies to receive credit for academic work beyond their own ability…

  18. Report to the United States Congress clean coal technology export markets and financing mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This report responds to a Congressional Conference Report that requests that $625,000 in funding provided will be used by the Department to identify potential markets for clean coal technologies in developing countries and countries with economies in transition from nonmarket economies and to identify existing, or new, financial mechanisms or financial support to be provided by the Federal government that will enhance the ability of US industry to participate in these markets. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects world coal consumption to increase by 30 percent between 1990 and 2010, from 5.1 to 6.5 billion short tons. Five regions stand out as major foreign markets for the export of US clean coal technologies: China; The Pacific Rim (other than China); South Asia (primarily India); Transitional Economies (Central Europe and the Newly Independent States); and Other Markets (the Americas and Southern Africa). Nearly two-thirds of the expected worldwide growth in coal utilization will occur in China, one quarter in the United States. EIA forecasts nearly a billion tons per year of additional coal consumption in China between 1990 and 2010, a virtual doubling of that country`s coal consumption. A 30-percent increase in coal consumption is projected in other developing countries over that same period. This increase in coal consumption will be accompanied by an increase in demand for technologies for burning coal cost-effectively, efficiently and cleanly. In the Pacific Rim and South Asia, rapid economic growth coupled with substantial indigenous coal supplies combine to create a large potential market for CCTS. In Central Europe and the Newly Independent States, the challenge will be to correct the damage of decades of environmental neglect without adding to already-considerable economic disruption. Though the situation varies, all these countries share the basic need to use indigenous low-quality coal cleanly and efficiently.

  19. Report to the United States Congress clean coal technology export markets and financing mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This report responds to a Congressional Conference Report that requests that $625,000 in funding provided will be used by the Department to identify potential markets for clean coal technologies in developing countries and countries with economies in transition from nonmarket economies and to identify existing, or new, financial mechanisms or financial support to be provided by the Federal government that will enhance the ability of US industry to participate in these markets. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects world coal consumption to increase by 30 percent between 1990 and 2010, from 5.1 to 6.5 billion short tons. Five regions stand out as major foreign markets for the export of US clean coal technologies: China; The Pacific Rim (other than China); South Asia (primarily India); Transitional Economies (Central Europe and the Newly Independent States); and Other Markets (the Americas and Southern Africa). Nearly two-thirds of the expected worldwide growth in coal utilization will occur in China, one quarter in the United States. EIA forecasts nearly a billion tons per year of additional coal consumption in China between 1990 and 2010, a virtual doubling of that country's coal consumption. A 30-percent increase in coal consumption is projected in other developing countries over that same period. This increase in coal consumption will be accompanied by an increase in demand for technologies for burning coal cost-effectively, efficiently and cleanly. In the Pacific Rim and South Asia, rapid economic growth coupled with substantial indigenous coal supplies combine to create a large potential market for CCTS. In Central Europe and the Newly Independent States, the challenge will be to correct the damage of decades of environmental neglect without adding to already-considerable economic disruption. Though the situation varies, all these countries share the basic need to use indigenous low-quality coal cleanly and efficiently

  20. A report from the second US/Japan workshop on global change research: Environmental response technologies (mitigation and adaptation). United States-Japan Science and Technology Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgerton, S. [comp.] [National Science Foundation, Washington, DC (United States). Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences; Mizuno, Tateki [comp.] [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, MITI (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    The Second US - Japan Workshop on Global Change: Environmental Response Technologies for Global Change was hosted by the Program on Resources at the East-West Center, in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 1--3, 1993, on behalf of the United States Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). This workshop brought together over fifty leading scientists from the two countries to review existing technologies and to identify needed research on the development of new technologies for mitigation and adaptation of global change. The Workshop was organized around three areas of research: (1) capture, fixation/utilization, and disposal of CO{sub 2} (e.g. CO{sub 2}, separation and capture technologies, ocean and land disposal of CO{sub 2}; (2) energy production and conservation technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. combustion efficiency, non-carbon based energy technologies, energy conservation technologies); and (3) adaptation technologies and practices related to global climate change (e.g., adaptation responses of crops to climate change, adapting urban infrastructure for climate change). Priorities for joint research in each of these areas were discussed. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Honey bee success predicted by landscape composition in Ohio, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsler, D B; Johnson, R M

    2015-01-01

    Foraging honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) can routinely travel as far as several kilometers from their hive in the process of collecting nectar and pollen from floral patches within the surrounding landscape. Since the availability of floral resources at the landscape scale is a function of landscape composition, apiculturists have long recognized that landscape composition is a critical determinant of honey bee colony success. Nevertheless, very few studies present quantitative data relating colony success metrics to local landscape composition. We employed a beekeeper survey in conjunction with GIS-based landscape analysis to model colony success as a function of landscape composition in the State of Ohio, USA, a region characterized by intensive cropland, urban development, deciduous forest, and grassland. We found that colony food accumulation and wax production were positively related to cropland and negatively related to forest and grassland, a pattern that may be driven by the abundance of dandelion and clovers in agricultural areas compared to forest or mature grassland. Colony food accumulation was also negatively correlated with urban land cover in sites dominated by urban and agricultural land use, which does not support the popular opinion that the urban environment is more favorable to honey bees than cropland.

  2. Current state of the art in science and technology, as seen by atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The decision of the Fed. Adm. Court (BVerwG) deals with the obligation of the licensing authority, to apply the current state of the art in science and technology in its appraisal of appropriate measures for prevention of damage possibly arising out of the operation of a nuclear reactor, and for assessment and evaluation of the risks involved. It also deals with aspects of legal protection of third parties by provisions relating to the licensing procedure under atomic energy law, and with the question whether Art. 6 of the European Human Rights Convention can be applied to institute additional proceedings in the second instance with a public hearing. (RST) [de

  3. Panel session on the state of the art in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1977-01-01

    The state of the art in the technology of pressure vessels and piping of the primary cooling circuit of nuclear steam supply systems is discussed. Design and analysis are considered in the frame of the two types of nuclear reactor retained in France (PWR and the pool type LMFBR). Designing nuclear pressure vessels asks for some more specific Codes and Standards than for conventional vessels, and the stress analysis complementing by a direct comparison between operating loads and failure loads is a mandatory practice in France. As for pool type LMFBR, the structural problems of the nuclear vessel are essentially due to component shape, small thickness, and large stress range

  4. Communications received from Member States regarding guidelines for the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Director General has received notes verbales to the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology from the following Permanent Missions to the International Atomic Energy Agency: notes verbales dated 1 March 1994 from the Permanent Missions of Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the United States of America; and a note verbale dated 12 March 1994 from the Permanent Mission of Romania. The purpose of these notes verbales is to provide further information on these Governments' nuclear export policies and practices

  5. Radiation source states on-line supervision system design and implementation based on RFID technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Binhua; Ling Qiu; Yin Guoli; Yang Kun; Wan Xueping; Wang Kan

    2011-01-01

    It puts forward radiation source states on-line monitoring resolution based on RFID technology. Firstly, the system uses RFID in real-time transmission of the radiation dose rate, and monitors the radiation source states and dose rate of the surrounding environment on-line. Then it adopts regional wireless networking mode to construct enterprise level monitoring network, which resolves long-distance wiring problems. And then it uses GPRS wireless to transport the real-time data to the monitoring center and the government supervision department, By adopting randomly dynamic cording in display update every day, it strengthens the supervision of the radiation source. At last this system has been successful applied to a thickness gauge project, which verifies the feasibility and practicality is good. (authors)

  6. United States societal experiments via the Communications Technology Satellite. [antenna coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) is a cooperative experimental program of the United States and Canadian governments. The CTS uses a high-power transponder at the frequencies of 14/12 GHz for two-way television and voice communication. The United States and Canada have agreed to share equally in the use of CTS. The U.S. program includes a variety of societal experiments. The ground stations for these experiments are located from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The satellite communications capabilities and the antenna coverage for the U.S. are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the U.S. societal experiments in the areas of education, health care, and community and special services; nine separate experiments are discussed.

  7. Competing with the Soviets science, technology, and the state in Cold War America

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Audra J

    2013-01-01

    For most of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States and its allies competed with a hostile Soviet Union in almost every way imaginable except open military engagement. The Cold War placed two opposite conceptions of the good society before the uncommitted world and history itself, and science figured prominently in the picture. Competing with the Soviets offers a short, accessible introduction to the special role that science and technology played in maintaining state power during the Cold War, from the atomic bomb to the Human Genome Project. The high-tech machinery of nuclear physics and the space race are at the center of this story, but Audra J. Wolfe also examines the surrogate battlefield of scientific achievement in such diverse fields as urban planning, biology, and economics; explains how defense-driven federal investments created vast laboratories and research programs; and shows how unfamiliar worries about national security and corrosive questions of loyalty crept into the sup...

  8. Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Recommendations toaddress contaminated soils, concrete, and corrective action managementunit/groundwater contamination at Ashtabula, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoglu, Emily; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Gombert, Dirk; Hazen, Terry; Johnson, Bob; Looney, Brian; Krstich, Michael A.; Rautman, Chris; Tripp,Julia; Whitmill, Larry

    2002-08-26

    The Ashtabula Environmental Management Project (AEMP) at Department of Energy-Ohio (DOE-OH) requested technical assistance from the EM-50 Lead Lab to aid in defining new cost and time effective approaches in the following problem areas: soils, concrete, and groundwater/Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) at RMIES in Ashtabula, Ohio. Attachment 1 provides the site request for assistance. The technical assistance team assembled for this request is provided in Attachment 2. These individuals reviewed key site information prior to convening with DOE and contractor personnel (RMIES and Earthline) for a three-and-a-half-day meeting to better understand baseline technologies, limitations, and site-specific issues. After listening to presentations about the nature and extent of known contamination, the team broke out into several groups to brainstorm ideas and develop viable solutions. This executive summary details unresolved issues requiring management attention as well as recommendations to address soils, concrete, and groundwater/CAMU. It also provides a summary of additional technical assistance that could be provided to the site. More details are presented in the body of this report.

  9. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 3, Task 3.2: Scale-up testing; Topical report No. 4, Task 3.3: Advanced configurations; Topical report No. 5, Task 3.4: Process controls; Topical report No. 6, Task 3.5: Failure modes; Task 3.6: Waste characterization, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    This document is the third interim report on tests that were conducted at the Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) operated for the Department of Energy at Unit 5 of the Ohio Power Company`s Muskingum River station in Beverly, Ohio. At the DITF dry calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), an aqueous slurry of Ca(OH){sub 2} (prepared by slaking quicklime), or a mixture of one of these sorbents with waste ash from earlier tests was injected into a slipstream of flue gas from the Unit 5 boiler to achieve partial removal of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. Up to 50,000 acfm of flue gas was taken from the inlet to the Unit 5 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for these tests. Water was injected separately with the dry sorbent or as part of the slurry to cool the flue gas and increase the water vapor content of the flue gas. The addition of water, either as a separate spray or in the slurry makes the reaction between the sorbent and the SO{sub 2} more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state when it can physically wet the sorbent particles, and not especially effective in the vapor state. Higher values of calcium utilization were obtained with slurry injection than with dry sorbent injection and humidification. Slurries made from reagent slaked lime, mixtures of reagent slaked lime and recycle ash, and from recycle ash alone were injected through the same nozzles used for humidification. The focus of most of these tests was on the constant addition of recycle ash to reduce the amount of slaked lime required for SO{sub 2} removal (for best economics). Testing was continued until the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the recycle ash equaled that predicted for equilibrium Two test cases were evaluated: a low Ca/S ratio (1.0 reagent, 44{degrees}/F approach) for 50% SO{sub 2} removal and a high Ca/S ratio (1.7 reagent, 24{degrees}F approach) for 88% SO{sub 2} removal.

  10. Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 3, Task 3. 2: Scale-up testing; Topical report No. 4, Task 3. 3: Advanced configurations; Topical report No. 5, Task 3. 4: Process controls; Topical report No. 6, Task 3. 5: Failure modes; Task 3. 6: Waste characterization, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This document is the third interim report on tests that were conducted at the Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) operated for the Department of Energy at Unit 5 of the Ohio Power Company's Muskingum River station in Beverly, Ohio. At the DITF dry calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), an aqueous slurry of Ca(OH)[sub 2] (prepared by slaking quicklime), or a mixture of one of these sorbents with waste ash from earlier tests was injected into a slipstream of flue gas from the Unit 5 boiler to achieve partial removal of SO[sub 2] in the flue gas. Up to 50,000 acfm of flue gas was taken from the inlet to the Unit 5 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for these tests. Water was injected separately with the dry sorbent or as part of the slurry to cool the flue gas and increase the water vapor content of the flue gas. The addition of water, either as a separate spray or in the slurry makes the reaction between the sorbent and the SO[sub 2] more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state when it can physically wet the sorbent particles, and not especially effective in the vapor state. Higher values of calcium utilization were obtained with slurry injection than with dry sorbent injection and humidification. Slurries made from reagent slaked lime, mixtures of reagent slaked lime and recycle ash, and from recycle ash alone were injected through the same nozzles used for humidification. The focus of most of these tests was on the constant addition of recycle ash to reduce the amount of slaked lime required for SO[sub 2] removal (for best economics). Testing was continued until the amount of Ca(OH)[sub 2] in the recycle ash equaled that predicted for equilibrium Two test cases were evaluated: a low Ca/S ratio (1.0 reagent, 44[degrees]/F approach) for 50% SO[sub 2] removal and a high Ca/S ratio (1.7 reagent, 24[degrees]F approach) for 88% SO[sub 2] removal.

  11. High-Efficiency, Ka-band Solid-State Power Amplifier Utilizing GaN Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuinStar Technology proposes to develop an efficient, solid-state power amplifier (SSPA), operating at Ka-band frequencies, for high data rate, long range space...

  12. High-Efficiency, Ka-Band Solid-State Power Amplifier Utilizing GaN Technology, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuinStar Technology proposes to develop a high-efficiency, solid-state power amplifier (SSPA), operating at Ka-band frequencies, for high data rate, long range space...

  13. Design of defect spins in piezoelectric aluminum nitride for solid-state hybrid quantum technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hosung; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    2016-02-15

    Spin defects in wide-band gap semiconductors are promising systems for the realization of quantum bits, or qubits, in solid-state environments. To date, defect qubits have only been realized in materials with strong covalent bonds. Here, we introduce a strain-driven scheme to rationally design defect spins in functional ionic crystals, which may operate as potential qubits. In particular, using a combination of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations based on hybrid density functional and many-body perturbation theory, we predicted that the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center in piezoelectric aluminum nitride exhibits spin-triplet ground states under realistic uni- and bi-axial strain conditions; such states may be harnessed for the realization of qubits. The strain-driven strategy adopted here can be readily extended to a wide range of point defects in other wide-band gap semiconductors, paving the way to controlling the spin properties of defects in ionic systems for potential spintronic technologies.

  14. State funding for health information technology and selected ambulatory healthcare quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, L M; Silver, M; Kaushal, R

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the effects of health information technology (health IT) on ambulatory quality have had mixed results. New York State has invested heavily in health IT throughout the State, creating a unique opportunity to assess effects on health care quality across multiple communities. To determine any association between primary care providers' receipt of funding from New York State's Healthcare Efficiency and Affordability Law for New Yorkers Program (HEAL NY) and ambulatory quality of care. A statewide, longitudinal cohort study of primary care physicians in New York State was conducted. Data regarding which primary care physicians received funding through the HEAL NY program (Phase 5 or Phase 10) in 2008 or 2009 were obtained from the New York State Department of Health. Health care quality in 2010 was measured using claims data that had been aggregated across 7 commercial health plans across the state. Physicians were divided into 2 groups, based on receipt of HEAL funding (yes/no). Any association was measured between study group and each of 7 quality measures, all of which appear in the Stage 1 federal Meaningful Use program. Negative binomial regression was used, adjusting for provider gender and specialty. The study included 3,988 primary care providers, of whom 863 (22%) had received HEAL NY funding. The HEAL-funded physicians provided higher quality of care on 5 of the 7 measures: breast cancer screening, eye exams in patients with diabetes, nephropathy screening in patients with diabetes, influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination (phealth IT provided higher quality of care than those who did not receive such funding.

  15. Implementing Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) with State of the Art PT&I Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Sean; Sasser, Chase

    2016-01-01

    Building on the work that was started two decades ago, Jacobs Space Operations Group has utilized state of the art PTI technologies to assess the current condition of the assets they manage under the Test and Operations Support Contract (TOSC). Specifically, the Asset Management department leveraged the benefits of ultrasound technology to quantify a motor issue in the Liquid Oxygen Storage Area, and troubleshoot the sources prior to loading the tank to perform Verification and Validation (VV) activities. This technology was efficient, easy to implement, and provided system engineers with data on a possible source of the problem. In situations where legacy motors are exhibiting unexpected noises, it may seem easier to remove and refurbish the motor and replace the bearings because that solution resolves most of the common causes of the noise. However, that solution would have involved additional spending and may not have solved issues stemming from the foundation, if those existed. By utilizing the ultrasound equipment provided by UE Systems, the sound profiles allowed Jacobs TOSC team to determine that the issue resembled a faulty bearing. After replacing the bearing, the unexpected noise ceased.

  16. Present state of inspection robot technology in nuclear power facilities. Case of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Kuniaki

    1995-01-01

    In the maintenance works in nuclear power facilities such as checkup, inspection and repair, for the main purpose of radiation protection, remote operation technology was introduced since relatively early stage, and at present, the robots that carry out the inspection works for confirming the soundness of main equipment have been developed and put to practical use. At the time of introducing these technologies, in addition to the research and development of robots proper, the coordination with the design of plant machinery and equipment facilities as the premise of introducing robots is an important requirement. In this report, the present state of the development of remote inspection technology for fast breeder reactors is introduced, and the matters to which attention is paid in the plant design for introducing robots are explained. First, fast breeder reactors are described. The needs of robotizing and adopting remote operation in nuclear power facilities are explained, using the examples of the inspection system for a reactor vessel and the inspection system for steam generator heat transfer tubes. (K.I.)

  17. Effects of Regulation and Technology on End Uses of Nonfuel Mineral Commodities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Grecia R.

    2007-01-01

    The regulatory system and advancement of technologies have shaped the end-use patterns of nonfuel minerals used in the United States. These factors affected the quantities and types of materials used by society. Environmental concerns and awareness of possible negative effects on public health prompted numerous regulations that have dramatically altered the use of commodities like arsenic, asbestos, lead, and mercury. While the selected commodities represent only a small portion of overall U.S. materials use, they have the potential for harmful effects on human health or the environment, which other commodities, like construction aggregates, do not normally have. The advancement of technology allowed for new uses of mineral materials in products like high-performance computers, telecommunications equipment, plasma and liquid-crystal display televisions and computer monitors, mobile telephones, and electronic devices, which have become mainstream products. These technologies altered the end-use pattern of mineral commodities like gallium, germanium, indium, and strontium. Human ingenuity and people?s demand for different and creative services increase the demand for new materials and industries while shifting the pattern of use of mineral commodities. The mineral commodities? end-use data are critical for the understanding of the magnitude and character of these flows, assessing their impact on the environment, and providing an early warning of potential problems in waste management of products containing these commodities. The knowledge of final disposition of the mineral commodity allows better decisions as to how regulation should be tailored.

  18. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S.

    2010-10-22

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  19. Bioreactors in solid state fermentation technology: Design, applications and engineering aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sidharth; Rani, Richa; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2018-03-10

    In recent years, substantial credibility in employing Solid-State Fermentation (SSF) technique has been witnessed owing to its numerous advantages over submerged fermentation (SmF). In spite of enormous advantages, true potential of SSF technology has not been fully realized at industrial scale. The lack of rational and scalable bioreactor designs backed by mathematical models and automated control system that could successfully address heterogeneity with respect to heat and mass, and also operate aseptically, remains the prime reason for it. As a result, there still exists vast scope in SSF bioreactor research and development to facilitate broad spectrum of biotechnological applications. The present article reviews state-of-the-art in SSF technology with focus on bioreactors that have been employed for bioprocess applications, in particular, enzyme production. Based on the mode of operation, bioreactors are divided into four categories with emphasis on design features, effect of operating conditions on productivity, applications and limitations. Selected modeling studies developed over the years, have been revised and presented in problem specific manner in order to address the limitations. Some interesting designs including few recent ones that have been proposed and/or employed at pilot and industrial levels are discussed in more detail. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An Examination of Information Technology and Its Perceived Quality Issues in Single System Hospitals in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Linda W.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and quality of healthcare is of great concern in the United States. The positive effects of information technology reported in past research, especially case studies, has encouraged expectations that information technology may increase the quality of healthcare while reducing costs of healthcare. The goals of this study was to examine…

  1. Challenges and the state of the technology for printed sensor arrays for structural monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shiv; Bland, Scott; DeMott, Robert; Anderson, Nickolas; Jursich, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    Printed sensor arrays are attractive for reliable, low-cost, and large-area mapping of structural systems. These sensor arrays can be printed on flexible substrates or directly on monitored structural parts. This technology is sought for continuous or on-demand real-time diagnosis and prognosis of complex structural components. In the past decade, many innovative technologies and functional materials have been explored to develop printed electronics and sensors. For example, an all-printed strain sensor array is a recent example of a low-cost, flexible and light-weight system that provides a reliable method for monitoring the state of aircraft structural parts. Among all-printing techniques, screen and inkjet printing methods are well suited for smaller-scale prototyping and have drawn much interest due to maturity of printing procedures and availability of compatible inks and substrates. Screen printing relies on a mask (screen) to transfer a pattern onto a substrate. Screen printing is widely used because of the high printing speed, large selection of ink/substrate materials, and capability of making complex multilayer devices. The complexity of collecting signals from a large number of sensors over a large area necessitates signal multiplexing electronics that need to be printed on flexible substrate or structure. As a result, these components are subjected to same deformation, temperature and other parameters for which sensor arrays are designed. The characteristics of these electronic components, such as transistors, are affected by deformation and other environmental parameters which can lead to erroneous sensed parameters. The manufacturing and functional challenges of the technology of printed sensor array systems for structural state monitoring are the focus of this presentation. Specific examples of strain sensor arrays will be presented to highlight the technical challenges.

  2. The temporal and spatial dynamics of income and population growth in Ohio, 1950-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, C C

    1994-01-01

    "This paper focuses on spatial variation of growth within a state. Using Ohio as a case study, two hypotheses are extracted from the literature. First, the theories of polarization and polarization reversal suggest that in the old industrial core the leading sector role of manufacturing has diminished in old manufacturing poles, and that income growth trends differ substantially between these old poles and new centres of development. Second, the theories of suburbanization and migration reversals suggest that population growth is contingent upon level of urbanization, and that the relationship has changed drastically between the pre-1970s, 1970s, and post-1970s periods." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND GER) excerpt

  3. Mental health community based funding: Ohio's experience in revising its funding allocation methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiber, Eric E; Sweeney, Helen Anne; Partridge, Jamie; Dembe, Allard E; Jones, Holly

    2012-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, states have increasingly moved away from centrally financed, state-operated facilities to financing models built around community-based service delivery mechanisms. This paper identifies four important broad factors to consider when developing a funding formula to allocate state funding for community mental health services to local boards in an equitable manner, based on local community need: (1) funding factors used by other states; (2) state specific legislative requirements; (3) data availability; and (4) local variation of factors in the funding formula. These considerations are illustrated with the recent experience of Ohio using available evidence and data sources to develop a new community-based allocation formula. We discuss opportunities for implementing changes in formula based mental health funding related to Medicaid expansions for low income adults scheduled to go into effect under the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  4. State-of-the-art remote sensing geospatial technologies in support of transportation monitoring and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paska, Eva Petra

    The widespread use of digital technologies, combined with rapid sensor advancements resulted in a paradigm shift in geospatial technologies the end of the last millennium. The improved performance provided by the state-of-the-art airborne remote sensing technology created opportunities for new applications that require high spatial and temporal resolution data. Transportation activities represent a major segment of the economy in industrialized nations. As such both the transportation infrastructure and traffic must be carefully monitored and planned. Engineering scale topographic mapping has been a long-time geospatial data user, but the high resolution geospatial data could also be considered for vehicle extraction and velocity estimation to support traffic flow analysis. The objective of this dissertation is to provide an assessment on what state-of-the-art remote sensing technologies can offer in both areas: first, to further improve the accuracy and reliability of topographic, in particular, roadway corridor mapping systems, and second, to assess the feasibility of extracting primary data to support traffic flow computation. The discussion is concerned with airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and digital camera systems, supported by direct georeferencing. The review of the state-of-the-art remote sensing technologies is dedicated to address the special requirements of the two transportation applications of airborne remotely sensed data. The performance characteristics of the geospatial sensors and the overall error budget are discussed. The error analysis part is focused on the overall achievable point positioning accuracy performance of directly georeferenced remote sensing systems. The QA/QC (Quality Assurance/Quality Control) process is a challenge for any airborne direct georeferencing-based remote sensing system. A new method to support QA/QC is introduced that uses the road pavement markings to improve both sensor data accuracy as well as the

  5. Disparities in Assisted Reproductive Technology Utilization by Race and Ethnicity, United States, 2014: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieke, Ada C; Zhang, Yujia; Kissin, Dmitry M; Barfield, Wanda D; Boulet, Sheree L

    2017-06-01

    Disparities in infertility and access to infertility treatments, such as assisted reproductive technology (ART), by race/ethnicity, have been reported. However, identifying disparities in ART usage may have been hampered by missing race/ethnicity information in ART surveillance. We review infertility prevalence and treatment disparities, use recent data to examine ART use in the United States by race/ethnicity and residency in states with mandated insurance coverage for in vitro fertilization (IVF), and discuss approaches for reducing disparities. We used 2014 National ART Surveillance System (NASS) data to calculate rates of ART procedures per million women 15-44 years of age, a proxy measure of ART utilization, for Census-defined racial/ethnic groups in the United States; rates were further stratified by the presence of insurance mandates for IVF treatment. Missing race/ethnicity data (35.6% of cycles) were imputed. Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI) women had the highest rates of ART utilization at 5883 ART procedures per million women 15-44 years of age in 2014, whereas American Indian/Alaska Native non-Hispanic women had the lowest rates at 807 per million, compared with other racial/ethnic groups. In each racial/ethnic category, ART utilization rates were higher for women in states with an insurance mandate for IVF treatment versus those without. In 2014, A/PI women had the highest rates of ART utilization. ART utilization for all racial/ethnic groups was higher in states with insurance mandates for IVF than those without, although disparities were still evident. Although mandates may increase access to infertility treatments, they are not sufficient to eliminate these disparities.

  6. Tracking Bicyclists' Route Choices, Case Study : The Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Bicycles have low access costs and moderate travel speeds, reduce congestion, help protect the environment and bring many health benefits (Clifton & Akar, 2009). Within these considerations, several researchers have explored the factors associated wi...

  7. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Ohio. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Ohio.

  8. Assistive Technology and specific care in the granting of wheelchairs in Rio Grande do Norte state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Cabral Galvão

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Orthesis and Prosthesis Grant Program from Rio Grande do Norte State was restructured by a team of occupational and physical therapists specialized in Assistive Technology. The sector has a showroom for the equipment, prepares prescriptions, and makes deliveries after individual assessment made by the team. The work is developed in conjunction with orthopedic workshop technicians to adjust and adapt the wheelchairs when necessary. Social workers guide and follow the bureaucratic processes of documentation and purchasing, which allows the handing in of wheelchairs throughout the year. This program is considered distinctive compared to programs from other states. In this work, a study was conducted to characterize the demand for locomotion assistance devices, such as wheelchairs, and describe the delivery and acquisition process of the Orthesis and Prosthesis Grant Program from Rio Grande do Norte State. The study was carried out after analyzing and correlating information on the wheelchair delivery process in the past three years. A discussion on the organizational structure, operation, and acquisition facilities of this program is presented in order to promote the social inclusion of people with special needs.

  9. Benefits to the United States of Increasing Global Uptake of Clean Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, D.

    2010-07-01

    A previous report describes an opportunity for the United States to take leadership in efforts to transform the global energy system toward clean energy technologies (CET). An accompanying analysis to that report provides estimates of the economic benefits to the United States of such a global transformation on the order of several hundred billion dollars per year by 2050. This report describes the methods and assumptions used in developing those benefit estimates. It begins with a summary of the results of the analysis based on an updated and refined model completed since the publication of the previous report. The framework described can be used to estimate the economic benefits to the U.S. of coordinated global action to increase the uptake of CETs worldwide. Together with a Monte Carlo simulation engine, the framework can be used to develop plausible ranges for benefits, taking into account the large uncertainty in the driving variables and economic parameters. The resulting estimates illustrate that larger global clean energy markets offer significant opportunities to the United States economy.

  10. Current State of Production and Finance Development of Scientific and Technological Progress in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danil M. Matveev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor efficiency in the use of land, labor, finance and other resources available is characteristic of Russia’s agriculture at the present stage. In most subindustries, the country has not yet achieved the production volume of the early 90s. In the last decade there was a positive trend marked to update logistics and intensify innovative advance in the agriculture, the processes being actively supported by the state, but this did not result in appreciable improvements of the agriculture competitiveness in the global food market. During the study it is revealed that the industry credit debt has gone up three-fold over the past 7 years that made up 1.43trillion rubles versus 112 billion rubles of revenue in 2012. The authors propose a technique to attract private investments in the agriculture of Russia and economic-organizing mechanism to realize it. Hereto, a considerable part is played by state regulation, particularly to provide investment-back guarantees in the event that a project-implementing agricultural organization goes bankrupt. To hold up, the authors consider a number of investment projects implemented by one of the Russian Federation entities which demonstrate their effectiveness both for the investors and the state. Employing the data obtained from the study will allow to largely increase the rates of technical and technological re-equipment of the industry, improve its investment attractiveness and competitiveness based on innovations and this will provide the country's food safety and gross domestic product growth.

  11. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  12. Restoring public trust while tearing down site in rural Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Jerry; Wagner, Jeffrey; Connell, Judy

    2007-01-01

    encouraging stakeholder participation early in the decision-making process. Fluor's public-participation strategy exceeded the 'check-the-box' approach common within the nuclear-weapons complex, and set a national standard that stands alone today. The second stakeholder-engagement strategy sprang from mending fences with the regulators and the community. The approach for disposing low-level waste was a 25-year plan to ship it off the site. Working with stakeholders, DOE and Fluor were able to convince the community to accept a plan to safely store waste permanently on site, which would save 15 years of cleanup and millions of dollars in cost. The third strategy addressed the potentially long delays in finalizing remedial action plans due to formal public comment periods and State and Federal regulatory approvals. Working closely with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA) and other stakeholders, DOE and Fluor were able to secure approvals of five Records of Decision on time - a first for the DOE complex. Developing open and honest relationships with union leaders, the workforce, regulators and community groups played a major role in DOE and Fluor cleaning up and closing the site. Using lessons learned at Fernald, DOE was able to resolve challenges at other sites, including worker transition, labour disputes, and damaged relationships with regulators and the community. It took significant time early in the project to convince the workforce that their future lay in cleanup, not in holding out hope for production to resume. It took more time to repair relationships with Ohio regulators and the local community. Developing these relationships over the years required constant, open communications between site decision makers and stakeholders to identify issues and to overcome potential barriers. Fluor's open public-participation strategy resulted in stakeholder consensus of five remedial-action plans that directed Fernald cleanup. This strategy included

  13. Knowledge of folic acid and counseling practices among Ohio community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Claire R; Dipietro, Natalie A

    2012-07-01

    To determine knowledge of folic acid use for neural tube defect (NTD) prevention and counseling practices among community pharmacists registered in Ohio. A cross-sectional study was performed on a random sample (n=500) of community pharmacists registered with the Ohio Board of Pharmacy and practicing in Ohio. A survey previously used by researchers to assess folic acid knowledge and practices among samples of other healthcare provider groups in the United States was adapted with permission for this study. The final tool consisted of 28 questions evaluating the knowledge, counseling practices, and demographics of respondents. The cover letter did not reveal the emphasis on folic acid, and surveys were completed anonymously. The university institutional review board deemed the study exempt. Of the 122 pharmacists who completed the survey, 116 (95.1%) knew that folic acid prevents some birth defects. Twenty-eight (22.9%) responded that they "always" or "usually" discuss multivitamins with women of childbearing potential, and 19 (15.6%) responded that they "always" or "usually" discuss folic acid supplements. Some gaps in knowledge specific to folic acid were revealed. While 63.1% of pharmacists selected the recommended dose of folic acid intake for most women of childbearing potential, 13.1% could identify the dose recommended for women who have had a previous NTD-affected pregnancy. Respondents identified continuing education programs, pharmacy journals/magazines, and the Internet as preferred avenues to obtain additional information about folic acid and NTD. This study represents the first systematic evaluation of folic acid knowledge and counseling practices among a sample of pharmacists in the United States. As highly accessible healthcare professionals, community pharmacists can fulfill a vital public health role by counseling women of childbearing potential about folic acid intake. Educational materials may be beneficial in augmenting knowledge of folic acid and

  14. Knowledge of folic acid and counseling practices among Ohio community pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues CR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine knowledge of folic acid use for neural tube defect (NTD prevention and counseling practices among community pharmacists registered in Ohio.Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on a random sample (n=500 of community pharmacists registered with the Ohio Board of Pharmacy and practicing in Ohio. A survey previously used by researchers to assess folic acid knowledge and practices among samples of other healthcare provider groups in the United States was adapted with permission for this study. The final tool consisted of 28 questions evaluating the knowledge, counseling practices, and demographics of respondents. The cover letter did not reveal the emphasis on folic acid, and surveys were completed anonymously. The university institutional review board deemed the study exempt.Results: Of the 122 pharmacists who completed the survey, 116 (95.1% knew that folic acid prevents some birth defects. Twenty-eight (22.9% responded that they “always” or “usually” discuss multivitamins with women of childbearing potential, and 19 (15.6% responded that they “always” or “usually” discuss folic acid supplements. Some gaps in knowledge specific to folic acid were revealed. While 63.1% of pharmacists selected the recommended dose of folic acid intake for most women of childbearing potential, 13.1% could identify the dose recommended for women who have had a previous NTD-affected pregnancy. Respondents identified continuing education programs, pharmacy journals/magazines, and the Internet as preferred avenues to obtain additional information about folic acid and NTD.Conclusion: This study represents the first systematic evaluation of folic acid knowledge and counseling practices among a sample of pharmacists in the United States. As highly accessible healthcare professionals, community pharmacists can fulfill a vital public health role by counseling women of childbearing potential about folic acid intake. Educational

  15. Overdose Deaths Related to Fentanyl and Its Analogs - Ohio, January-February 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniulaityte, Raminta; Juhascik, Matthew P; Strayer, Kraig E; Sizemore, Ioana E; Harshbarger, Kent E; Antonides, Heather M; Carlson, Robert R

    2017-09-01

    Ohio is experiencing unprecedented loss of life caused by unintentional drug overdoses (1), with illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) emerging as a significant threat to public health (2,3). IMF is structurally similar to pharmaceutical fentanyl, but is produced in clandestine laboratories and includes fentanyl analogs that display wide variability in potency (2); variations in chemical composition of these drugs make detection more difficult. During 2010-2015, unintentional drug overdose deaths in Ohio increased 98%, from 1,544 to 3,050.* In Montgomery County (county seat: Dayton), one of the epicenters of the opioid epidemic in the state, unintentional drug overdose deaths increased 40% in 1 year, from 249 in 2015 to 349 in 2016 (estimated unadjusted mortality rate = 57.7 per 100,000) (4). IMFs have not been part of routine toxicology testing at the coroner's offices and other types of medical and criminal justice settings across the country (2,3). Thus, data on IMF test results in the current outbreak have been limited. The Wright State University and the Montgomery County Coroner's Office/Miami Valley Regional Crime Laboratory (MCCO/MVRCL) collaborated on a National Institutes of Health study of fentanyl analogs and metabolites and other drugs identified in 281 unintentional overdose fatalities in 24 Ohio counties during January-February 2017. Approximately 90% of all decedents tested positive for fentanyl, 48% for acryl fentanyl, 31% for furanyl fentanyl, and 8% for carfentanil. Pharmaceutical opioids were identified in 23% of cases, and heroin in 6%, with higher proportions of heroin-related deaths in Appalachian counties. The majority of decedents tested positive for more than one type of fentanyl. Evidence suggests the growing role of IMFs, and the declining presence of heroin and pharmaceutical opioids in unintentional overdose fatalities, compared with 2014-2016 data from Ohio and other states (3-5). There is a need to include testing for IMFs as part

  16. Use of electrical resistivity to detect underground mine voids in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rodney A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical resistivity surveys were completed at two sites along State Route 32 in Jackson and Vinton Counties, Ohio. The surveys were done to determine whether the electrical resistivity method could identify areas where coal was mined, leaving air- or water-filled voids. These voids can be local sources of potable water or acid mine drainage. They could also result in potentially dangerous collapse of roads or buildings that overlie the voids. The resistivity response of air- or water-filled voids compared to the surrounding bedrock may allow electrical resistivity surveys to delineate areas underlain by such voids. Surface deformation along State Route 32 in Jackson County led to a site investigation, which included electrical resistivity surveys. Several highly resistive areas were identified using axial dipole-dipole and Wenner resistivity surveys. Subsequent drilling and excavation led to the discovery of several air-filled abandoned underground mine tunnels. A site along State Route 32 in Vinton County, Ohio, was drilled as part of a mining permit application process. A mine void under the highway was instrumented with a pressure transducer to monitor water levels. During a period of high water level, electrical resistivity surveys were completed. The electrical response was dominated by a thin, low-resistivity layer of iron ore above where the coal was mined out. Nearby overhead powerlines also affected the results.

  17. NE Ohio Urban Growth Monitoring and Modeling Prototype. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Loren; Klosterman, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    At the University of Akron, Dr. Loren Siebert, Dr. Richard Klosterman, and their graduate research assistants (Jung-Wook Kim, Mohammed Hoque, Aziza Parveen, and Ben Stabler) worked on the integration of remote sensing and GIs-based planning support systems. The primary goal of the project was to develop methods that use remote sensing land cover mapping and GIs-based modeling to monitor and project urban growth and farmland loss in northeast Ohio. Another research goal has been to use only GIS data that are accessible via the World Wide Web, to determine whether Ohio's small counties and townships that do not currently have parcel-level GIS systems can apply these techniques. The project was jointly funded by NASA and USGS OhioView grants during the 2000-2001 academic year; the work is now being continued under a USGS grant.

  18. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 3: State of Practiceof Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2004-02-01

    In this report, the third in a series, we provide an evaluation of several products that exemplify the current state of practice of Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the federal sector. The first report [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second report [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. Part 4 of this series will discuss applications software from a user's perspective. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of reports provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  19. State-of-the-art technology in modern computer-aided drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkas, Georgios A; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Kastania, Anastasia; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-11-01

    The quest for small drug-like compounds that selectively inhibit the function of biological targets has always been a major focus in the pharmaceutical industry and in academia as well. High-throughput screening of compound libraries requires time, cost and resources. Therefore, the use of alternative methods is necessary for facilitating lead discovery. Computational techniques that dock small molecules into macromolecular targets and predict the affinity and activity of the small molecule are widely used in drug design and discovery, and have become an integral part of the industrial and academic research. In this review, we present an overview of some state-of-the-art technologies in modern drug design that have been developed for expediting the search for novel drug candidates.

  20. Theory and state-of-the-art technology of software reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Norio

    1999-11-01

    Since FY 1997 , the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been conducting a project , Study on Reliability of Digital I and C Systems. As part of the project , the methodologies and tools to improve software reliability were reviewed in order to examine the theory and the state-of-the-art technology in this field. It is surmised, as results from the review, that computerized software design and implementation tool (CASE tool), algebraic analysis to ensure the consistency between software requirement framework and its detailed design specification, and efficient test method using the internal information of the software (white-box test) at the validation phase just before the completion of the development will play a key role to enhance software reliability in the future. (author)

  1. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Aircraft Wings: State-of-the-Art and Potential Enabling Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Christine; Stanford, Bret K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the state-of-the-art for aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport aircraft and offers additional resources on related research efforts. Emphasis is placed on aircraft having straight or aft swept wings. The literature covers computational synthesis tools developed for aeroelastic tailoring and numerous design studies focused on discovering new methods for passive aeroelastic control. Several new structural and material technologies are presented as potential enablers of aeroelastic tailoring, including selectively reinforced materials, functionally graded materials, fiber tow steered composite laminates, and various nonconventional structural designs. In addition, smart materials and structures whose properties or configurations change in response to external stimuli are presented as potential active approaches to aeroelastic tailoring.

  2. A project based learning experience through best use of state-of-the-art technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José López Berrio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our proposal consists in activating the most important talent in the education institutions (their students, converting them in the change movement they need. How do we do that? We attract them through an enriching and disruptive programme, that suggest them a real entrepreneurship challenge, guiding and empowering them to reach the goals planned. Our vehicle is the Innovation Lab, a permanent program, where through a project based learning and working as a real and modern startup, the students work and collaborate using state of the art technology and methodologies, such as cloud computing, design thinking, flipped classroom, gamification, etc., by combining on-line work and sessions at school. The idea is revolutionary and innovative but also perfectly aligned with the content of the Horizon 2020-Schools Edition. We have achieved great results, both qualitative and quantitative, as you would be able to see along the article.

  3. The state-of-the-art laser bio-cladding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jichang; Fuh, J. Y. H.; Lü, L.

    2010-11-01

    The current state and future trend of laser bio-cladding technology are discussed. Laser bio-cladding is used in implants including fabrication of metal scaffolds and bio-coating on the scaffolds. Scaffolds have been fabricated from stainless steel, Co-based alloy or Ti alloy using laser cladding, and new laser-deposited Ti alloys have been developed. Calcium phosphate bioceramic coatings have been deposited on scaffolds with laser to improve the wear resistence and corrosion resistence of implants and to induce bone regeneration. The types of biomaterial devices currently available in the market include replacement heart valve prosthesis, dental implants, hip/knee implants, catheters, pacemakers, oxygenators and vascular grafts. Laser bio-cladding process is attracting more and more attentions of people.

  4. Condensation induced water hammer (CIWH). Relevance in the nuclear industry and state of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swidersky, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Condensation-induced water hammers (CIWH) are consequences of rapid condensation of steam in partially filled pipes. They present a particular hazard potential, as they seem to occur spontaneously and out of stagnation. The entire process still eludes a secured analytical or numerical predictability and determination of the fluid dynamic loads. The simulation of these processes is one of the most difficult tasks of thermal hydraulic transient analyses. Condensation induced water hammers in plants - mostly power plants - can lead to significant costs if they result in long downtimes, detailed analyses and upgrades. In this contribution, the phenomenon CIWH is explained and the relevance for nuclear engineering will be discussed. An outlook on the actual requirements of regulatory guidelines and the state of science and technology will be given. (orig.)

  5. Current state of information technology use in a US primary care practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James E; Pearce, Kevin A; Sydney, Carey; Ireson, Carol; Love, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    To examine the current levels of information technology (IT) use in a primary care practice-based research network (PBRN) in order to inform future development of its infrastructure. Every primary care practitioner who is a member of the Kentucky Ambulatory Network (KAN),as well as the office managers of each practice. Practitioners included family practitioners, general practitioners, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A cross-sectional study using two survey instruments: one for office managers and one for practitioners. The office manager survey included questions related to the current state of IT within the practice, plans for enhancement and general IT issues from the perspective of managing a practice. The practitioner survey was designed to measure current IT use and attitudes of primary care practitioners. Response rates for the surveys were 46% (n = 68) for the office managers and 51% (n = 116) for practitioners. All but one practice had internet access; however, 43% had only dial-up service. Only 21% of practitioners use an electronic medical record (EMR), with dollar cost being the barrier reported most frequently (58%). More than half of the office managers were either 'somewhat interested' (45%) or 'very interested' (17%) in a low-cost, standardised EMR that was, at the time, to be sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians. For practitioners, 71% were either 'somewhat' or 'very' interested in such a system. Responses to other IT issues are reported. While interest in enabling information technologies was high in KAN, adoption was variable, with use of several key technologies reported as low.The results suggest that research in this network that would be dependent on or enhanced by IT might be impeded and, generally, greater attention should be given to enhancing the IT infrastructure in primary care.

  6. The State of the Art Report on the Development and Manufacturing Technology of Test Blanket Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Kim, K. H.

    2006-07-01

    The main objective of the present R and D on breeder blanket is the development of test blanket modules (TBMs) to be installed and tested in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In the program of the blanket development, a blanket module test in the ITER is scheduled from the beginning of the ITER operation, and the performance test of TBM in ITER is the most important milestone for the development of the DEMO blanket. The fabrication of TBMs has been required to test the basic performance of the DEMO blanket, i.e., tritium production/recovery, high-grade heat generation and radiation shielding. Therefore, the integration of the TBM systems into ITER has been investigated with the aim to check the safety, reliability and compatibility under nuclear fusion state. For this reason, in the Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) as an activity of the International Energy Association (IEA), a variety of ITER TBMs have been proposed and investigated by each party: helium-cooled ceramic (WSG-1), helium-cooled LiPb (WSG-2), water-cooled ceramic (WSG-3), self-cooled lithium (WSG-4) and self-cooled molten salt (WSG-5) blanket systems. Because we are still deficient in investigation of TBM development, the need of development became pressing. In this report, for the development of TBM sub-module and mock-up, it is necessary to analyze and examine the state of the art on the development of manufacturing technology of TBM in other countries. And we will be applied as basic data to establish a manufacturing technology

  7. Environmental impacts and benefits of state-of-the-art technologies for E-waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlayel, Mahdi

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the environmental impacts and benefits of state-of-the-art technologies for proper e-waste handling using Jordan as a case study. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was employed to evaluate five advanced management systems represent state-of-the-art treatment technologies, including sanitary landfilling; proper recycling of metals, materials, and precious metals (PMs); and incineration of plastic and the hazardous portion of printed circuit boards (PCBs). Six e-waste products that contribute the most to the e-waste in Jordan were included in the assessment of each scenario, which resulted in 30 total cases of e-waste management. The findings indicated that landfills for the entire components of the e-waste stream are the worst option and should be avoided. The most promising e-waste management scenario features integrated e-waste processes based on the concept of Integrated Waste Management (IWM), including recycling materials such as non-PMs and PMs, incinerating plastic and the hazardous content of PCBs using the energy recovered from incineration, and using sanitary landfills of residues. For this scenario, the best environmental performance was obtained for the treatment of mobile phones. Incineration of the portion of hazardous waste using energy recovery is an option that deserves attention. Because scenario implementation depends on more than just the environmental benefits (e.g., economic cost and technical aspects), the study proposes a systematic approach founded on the IWM concept for e-waste management scenario selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of improved maize technology on household welfare in Buruku, Benue State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria I. Audu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the welfare effects of improved maize technology in Buruku Local Government Area of Benue State, Nigeria. The study also examined the determinants of the adoption of improved maize technology. Structured questionnaires were used in collecting the primary data for the study. A multi-stage random technique was used in selecting 125 farm households for the study. The Logit and ordinary least square (OLS models were used in analyzing the data. The OLS results show that adoption of improved maize varieties is positively and significantly related to household welfare and thus has contributed to moving farm households out of poverty. Other variables found to be statistically significant in explaining household welfare are education, household size, and landholding. The Logit results show that age, household size, off-farm income, and education were found to be significant in influencing farmers’ adoption decisions. Some robustness checks were performed with different specifications of the Logit and OLS models as well as re-estimation with propensity matching score approach. Overall, the results are robust to different specifications.

  9. Assessment of the State-of-the-Art of System-Wide Safety and Assurance Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Indranil; Reveley, Mary S.; Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Leone, Karen M.

    2017-01-01

    Since its initiation, the System-wide Safety Assurance Technologies (SSAT) Project has been focused on developing multidisciplinary tools and techniques that are verified and validated to ensure prevention of loss of property and life in NextGen and enable proactive risk management through predictive methods. To this end, four technical challenges have been listed to help realize the goals of SSAT, namely (i) assurance of flight critical systems, (ii) discovery of precursors to safety incidents, (iii) assuring safe human-systems integration, and (iv) prognostic algorithm design for safety assurance. The objective of this report is to provide an extensive survey of SSAT-related research accomplishments by researchers within and outside NASA to get an understanding of what the state-of-the-art is for technologies enabling each of the four technical challenges. We hope that this report will serve as a good resource for anyone interested in gaining an understanding of the SSAT technical challenges, and also be useful in the future for project planning and resource allocation for related research.

  10. Silicon solar cell technology state of the art and a proposed double sided cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddik, M.M.

    1987-08-01

    A review of the silicon technology state of the art is given. It had been found that single crystal silicon efficiency was limitd to ≥ 20%. The reason was identified to be due to the recombination current loss mechanisms. However, use of new technologies such as back-surface field, surface passivation, double anti-reflection coatings and back-surface illumination demonstrated to achieve higher efficiencies. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of back surfaces illumination on the cell efficiency enhancement. It was found that for single cell, back-surface illumination contribute a 12% increase in efficiency whereas for double cell illumination (back-to-back cells) the improvement was 59% increase in efficiency. A V-shaped flat mirror reflector with optimum angle of 45 deg. to the plane of the cell from both sides achieved the ultimate efficiency performance. Finally, a proposed high current - high efficiency solar cell called ''Double Drift'' - Double Sided Illumination Cell'' was presented. The new structures were in the form of n + pn + or p + np + double junctions. The expected efficiency ranges 50-60% with proper material design, double anti-reflection coatings and V-shaped irregular plane mirror reflector illumination. (author). 43 refs, 4 figs, 7 tabs

  11. The State of the Technological Structure of the Macro-Region and its Technological Development (for example, the North-Caucasian Federal district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Batov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in modern conditions development of the region is a necessary element of the transition to the new paradigm of economic growth. It is known that scientific and technological progress, which is the result of the knowledge economy is intended to implement technological innovations that should lead to an increase in productivity, renewal of fixed capital and competitiveness. The status of the regions of the Russian Federation, especially in the North Caucasus Federal district (NCFD, raises the need to identify technological potential, which they have that will allow you to change the structure of the economy, to identify the most important directions of its modernisation, to improve existing technology. Methods: methodological base of research is based on the use of a systematic approach and statistical analysis methods. Applied methods of scientific abstraction, analysis and synthesis, analogies and scientific generalizations. Results: the main task that remains is to solve the North Caucasus Federal district regions is to uncover technological structure, which is dominant. Knowledge of the state of the technological structure of the region will set out its development strategy, which can be based on the use of their own potential or the application of the principles of catch-up development, from the point of view of which it is possible to implement "step over" through technological modes by conducting innovative and technological policy that will promote a new economy. Conclusions and Relevance: implementation of planned actions is possible with the use of the theory of technological structures. Approach to the study of the region from the position of this theory allows a deeper look at the status of the economic structure of the region (country, trends of its development, to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the place in the technological development of industries, to identify the main (backbone path of further growth. 

  12. Examining Factors of Acculturative Stress on International Students as They Affect Utilization of Campus-Based Health and Counseling Services at Four-Year Public Universities in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Paul N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined factors of acculturative stress experienced by international students as they affect utilization of campus-based health and counseling services. Eight hundred thirty-eight international students studying at 11 four-year public institutions in the State of Ohio were surveyed to determine how frequently they had experienced 20…

  13. An international comparison of the Ohio department of aging-resident satisfaction survey: applicability in a U.S. and Canadian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Heather A; Yamashita, Takashi; Brown, J Scott; Straker, Jane K; Baiton Wilkinson, Susan

    2013-12-01

    The majority of resident satisfaction surveys available for use in assisted living settings have been developed in the United States; however, empirical assessment of their measurement properties remains limited and sporadic, as does knowledge regarding their applicability for use in settings outside of the United States. This study further examines the psychometric properties of the Ohio Department of Aging-Resident Satisfaction Survey (ODA-RSS) and explores its applicability within a sample of Canadian assisted living facilities. Data were collected from 9,739 residential care facility (RCF) residents in Ohio, United States and 938 assisted-living residents in British Columbia, Canada. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the instrument's psychometric properties within the 2 samples. Although the ODA-RSS appears well suited for assessing resident satisfaction in Ohio RCFs, it is less so in British Columbia assisted living settings. Adequate reliability and validity were observed for all 8 measurable instrument domains in the Ohio sample, but only 4 (Care and Services, Employee Relations, Employee Responsiveness, and Communications) in the British Columbia sample. The ODA-RSS performs best in an environment that encompasses a wide range of RCF types. In settings where greater uniformity and standardization exist, more nuanced questions may be required to detect variation between facilities. It is not sufficient to assume that rigorous development and empirical testing of a tool ensures its applicability in states or countries other than that in which it was initially developed.

  14. Marketing Technology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for marketing technology. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 580 specialty and foundation key indicators for evaluating mastery of…

  15. Feature article. Current state and problems of modeling and simulation technologies in the area of light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi; Okamoto, Koji; Tanaka, Shunichi; Morii, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamamoto, Akio; Okajima, Narimitsu

    2011-01-01

    This special feature article consisted of seven reports summarizing discussions at the workshop on 'modeling and simulation technologies' held in early March 2011. These technologies were one of the most important strategic technologies among nuclear basic researches. Simulation technologies and Verification and Validation (V and V), problems of US software used in Japan and light water reactor simulation technology in regulating agency were overviewed. Experts in the area of thermo hydraulics and safety analysis, particle transport analysis and reactor physics and core analysis detailed current state and problems of simulation technologies. Standardization of V and V, development of original computer code and establishment of experimental database with assured accuracy for V and V should be conducted in Japan. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Wireless power transmission technology state of the art the first Bill Brown lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Richard M.

    2003-08-01

    This first Bill Brown SSP Technology Lecture covers the state-of-the-art (SOA) in wireless power transmission (WPT) technology including microwave and laser systems for the transfer of CW electric power, as related to eventually developing Space Solar Power (SSP) systems. Current and past technology accomplishments in ground based and air and space applied energy conversion devices, systems and modeling information is presented, where such data are known to the author. The purpose of the presentation is to discuss and present data to encourage documenting and breaking the current records, so as to advance the SOA in WPT for SSP. For example, regarding DC to RF and laser converters, 83% efficient 2.45 GHz cooker-tube magnetrons with 800 W CW output have been developed by CPII and the Russians. Over 50% wall-plug efficient 1.5 kW/cm 2 CW, water-cooled, multibeam, solid state laser diode bar-arrays have been developed by LLNL at 808 nm wavelength. The Germans have developed a 36% efficient, kW level, single coherent beam, lateral pumped semiconductor laser. The record for end-to-end DC input to DC output power overall WPT link conversion efficiency is 54% achieved during the Raytheon-JPL experiments in 1975 for 495.6 W recovered at 1.7 -m range, at 2.4469 GHz The record for usefully recovered electric power output (as contrasted with thermally induced power in structures) is 34 kW DC output at a range of 1.55 km, using 2.388 GHz microwaves, during the JPL-Raytheon experiments by Bill Brown and the author at Goldstone, CA in 1975. The GaAs-diode rectenna array had an average collection-conversion efficiency of 82.5%. A single rectenna element developed by Bill Brown demonstrated 91.4% efficiency. The comparable record for laser light to DC output power conversion efficiency of photovoltaics is 59%, for AlGaAs at 1.7 W and 826-nm wavelength.

  17. Development of International Education at Suzuka National College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Takaaki; Kuwabara, Hirofumi; Kondo, Kunikazu; Minoura, Hirohito; Ito, Akira; Kondo, Kazuyuki; Ezaki, Hisakazu; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Inoue, Tetsuo; Lawson, Michael E.

    One of the educational goals of the Advanced Engineering Faculty of Suzuka National College of Technology is to instill in graduates the ability required to become an internationally engaged engineers. To help realize this goal a project oriented toward the development of an international internship or an international cooperative education (Co-op) system was planned and implemented for the past three years. In this paper the results of investigations concerning the present state of Co-op in the United States and Canada, a tentative international internship at a factory in the United States, and an educational program developed in cooperation with Georgian College in Canada are described. In cooperation with the Ohio State University, a newly developed distance interactive-learning system that enables us to simulate international internships is also proposed.

  18. Advancement of the state system of accounting for mainframe to personal computer (PC) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proco, G.; Nardi, J.

    1999-01-01

    The advancement of the U.S. government's state system of accounting from a mainframe computer to a personal computer (PC) had been successfully completed. The accounting system, from 1965 until 1995 a mainframe application, was replaced in September 1995 by an accounting system employing local area network (LAN) capabilities and other state-of-the-art characteristics. The system is called the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS), tracking nuclear material activities and providing accounting reports for a variety of government and private users. The uses of the system include not only the tracking of nuclear materials for international and domestic safeguards purposes but also serving to facilitate the government's resource management purposes as well. The system was converted to PC hardware and fourth generation software to improve upon the mainframe system. The change was motivated by the desire to have a system amenable to frequent modifications, to improve upon services to users and to reduce increasing operating costs. Based on two years of operating the new system, it is clear that these objectives were met. Future changes to the system are inevitable and the national system of accounting for nuclear materials has the technology base to meet the challenges with proven capability. (author)

  19. Transitioning From Paper to Digital: State Statutory and Regulatory Frameworks for Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Cason; Sunshine, Gregory; Pepin, Dawn; Ramanathan, Tara; Menon, Akshara; Penn, Matthew

    In all health system sectors, electronic health information (EHI) is created, used, released, and reused. We examined states' efforts to address EHI uses in law to provide an understanding of the EHI legal environment. Attorney researchers used WestlawNext to search for EHI-related statutes and regulations of the US states, US territories, and the District of Columbia in effect as of January 2014. The researchers independently catalogued provisions by the EHI use described in the law. Researchers resolved discrepancies through peer review meetings and recorded the consensus codes for each law. This study identified 2364 EHI-related laws representing 49 EHI uses in 54 jurisdictions. A total of 18 EHI uses were regulated by ≥10 jurisdictions. More than 750 laws addressed 2 or more EHI uses. Jurisdictions varied by the number of EHI laws in effect, with a mean of 44 laws. Texas had the most EHI laws (n = 145). Hawaii and South Carolina had the fewest (n = 14 each). The EHI legal landscape is complex. The large quantity and diversity of laws complicate legal analysis, likely delay implementation of public health solutions, and might be detrimental to the development of emerging health information technology. Research is needed to understand the effect of EHI-related laws.

  20. Opioid Prescriptions by Specialty in Ohio, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G; Baker, Olesya; Rodgers, Ann F; Garner, Chad; Nelson, Lewis S; Kreiner, Peter W; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2017-03-06

    The current US opioid epidemic is attributed to the large volume of prescribed opioids. This study analyzed the contribution of different medical specialties to overall opioids by evaluating the pill counts and morphine milligram equivalents (MMEs) of opioid prescriptions, stratified by provider specialty, and determined temporal trends. This was an analysis of the Ohio prescription drug monitoring program database, which captures scheduled medication prescriptions filled in the state as well as prescriber specialty. We extracted prescriptions for pill versions of opioids written in the calendar years 2010 to 2014. The main outcomes were the number of filled prescriptions, pill counts, MMEs, and extended-released opioids written by physicians in each specialty, and annual prescribing trends. There were 56,873,719 prescriptions for the studied opioids dispensed, for which 41,959,581 (73.8%) had prescriber specialty type available. Mean number of pills per prescription and MMEs were highest for physical medicine/rehabilitation (PM&R; 91.2 pills, 1,532 mg, N = 1,680,579), anesthesiology/pain (89.3 pills, 1,484 mg, N = 3,261,449), hematology/oncology (88.2 pills, 1,534 mg, N = 516,596), and neurology (84.4 pills, 1,230 mg, N = 573,389). Family medicine (21.8%) and internal medicine (17.6%) wrote the most opioid prescriptions overall. Time trends in the average number of pills and MMEs per prescription also varied depending on specialty. The numbers of pills and MMEs per opioid prescription vary markedly by prescriber specialty, as do trends in prescribing characteristics. Pill count and MME values define each specialty's contribution to overall opioid prescribing more accurately than the number of prescriptions alone. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Investigation of a subsidence event near Flushing, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledney, C.M.; Hawk, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause and extent of events which caused problems to a number of residences along State Route 149 near Flushing, Belmont County, Ohio. The events began in 1988 and continued through 1991 and affected nine homes. The type of problems occurring, as well as surface effects, compared to available mine maps of the area, indicated the problems were caused by subsidence from coal mining. The mining occurred in the Pittsburgh seam at a depth of between 180 and 220 feet. The mining beneath the site took place between 1975 and 1977 and was of the room and pillar type. A subsurface investigation was performed, along with ''down the hole'' video camera inspections to provide necessary subsurface information for analysis of the subsidence event. Factors of safety were calculated for pillars throughout the mine. Based on this analysis, it was determined that pillar failure caused the subsidence event. Once a determination was made as to the likely cause of the subsidence, the data was re-examined to determine the possible location of pillar failure, as well as the type and extent of subsidence. This analysis involved the use of RQD versus depth plots and the compilation of isopach maps of the mine overburden and the Sewickley Sandstone. The trend of the two maps suggested that a relationship existed between the sandstone thickness, the overburden and the surface expression of the subsidence. In order to determine this relationship, the two maps were combined into a second order map showing the mine overburden--Sewickley Sandstone thickness ratios. The combination was accomplished by computer matrix operations using the grid values of the two previous maps that were generated by kriging. It was concluded that the ratio of the Sewickley Sandstone thickness to the mine overburden had a tremendous effect on the amount of damage that occurred to specific residences

  2. The state of the art on the radioactive metal waste recycling technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Moon, Jei Kwon; Jung, Chong Hun; Park, Sang Yoon

    1997-09-01

    As the best strategy to manage the radioactive metal wastes which are generated during operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the following recycling technologies are investigated. 1. decontamination technologies for radioactive metal waste recycling 2. decontamination waste treatment technologies. 3. residual radioactivity evaluation technologies. (author). 260 refs., 26 tabs., 31 figs

  3. Shale gas activity and increased rates of sexually transmitted infections in Ohio, 2000–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeau, Zoe; Elliott, Elise G.; Warren, Joshua L.; Niccolai, Linda M.

    2018-01-01

    Background The growing shale gas (“fracking”) industry depends on a mobile workforce, whose influx could have social impacts on host communities. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can increase through sexual mixing patterns associated with labor migration. No prior studies have quantified the relationship between shale gas activity and rates of three reportable STIs: chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Methods We conducted a longitudinal, ecologic study from 2000–2016 in Ohio, situated in a prolific shale gas region in the United States (US). Data on reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis by county and year were obtained from the Ohio Department of Health. All 88 counties were classified as none, low, and high shale gas activity in each year, using data from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Annual rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated from mixed-effects Poisson regression models evaluating the relationship between shale gas activity and reported annual STI rates while adjusting for secular trends and potential confounders obtained from the US Census. Results Compared to counties with no shale gas activity, counties with high activity had 21% (RR = 1.21; 95%CI = 1.08–1.36) increased rates of chlamydia and 19% (RR = 1.27; 95%CI 0.98–1.44) increased rates of gonorrhea, respectively. No association was observed for syphilis. Conclusion This first report of a link between shale gas activity and increased rates of both chlamydia and gonorrhea may inform local policies and community health efforts. PMID:29570712

  4. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  5. Utilizing GIS to Examine the Relationship Between State Renewable Portfolio Standards and the Adoption of Renewable Energy Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Schelly

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, there is no comprehensive energy policy at the federal level. To address issues as diverse as climate change, energy security, and economic development, individual states have increasingly implemented Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPSs, which mandate that utility providers include a specified amount of electricity from renewable energy sources in their total energy portfolios. Some states have included incentives for individual energy technologies in their RPS, such as solar electric (also called photovoltaic or PV technology. Here, we use GIS to visualize adoption of RPSs and electricity generation from renewable energy sources in the US and examine changes in renewable electricity and solar electric generation over time with the goal of informing future policies aimed at promoting the adoption of renewable energy technologies.

  6. A Review of Wireless Sensor Technologies and Applications in Agriculture and Food Industry: State of the Art and Current Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Garcia, Luis; Lunadei, Loredana; Barreiro, Pilar; Robla, Jose Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to review the technical and scientific state of the art of wireless sensor technologies and standards for wireless communications in the Agri- Food sector. These technologies are very promising in several fields such as environmental monitoring, precision agriculture, cold chain control or traceability. The paper focuses on WSN (Wireless Sensor Networks) and RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), presenting the different systems available, recent developments a...

  7. Metal recycling technology and related issues in the United States, a BNFL perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, P.; Dam, S.; Starke, W.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactively contaminated metallic materials comprise a large part of the potential waste products which result from nuclear facility repair, refurbishment, and decommissioning. United States Government (Departments of Energy and Defense) facilities, U.S. nuclear power plants, and other commercial nuclear fuel cycle facilities have large inventories of radioactive scrap metal which could be decontaminated and recycled into useful radioactive and non-radioactive products. Residual radioactivity and recycling criteria is needed to avoid the high cost of disposal and the waste of natural resources. In the United Kingdom, BNFL has decommissioned the gaseous diffusion plant at Capenhurst and has recycled a large fraction of the metallic scrap into the metals market. Other structural materials have also been released as uncontaminated scrap. U.K. release criteria for residual radionuclide contamination have been applied to these operations. A variety of techniques were utilized to size reduce large components, to remove radioactivity, and to survey and release these materials. These methods and the application of release criteria has a direct relationship to methods which would be applicable in the U.S. and in other countries. This paper will describe the specific U.K. technology and experience in the decontamination, recycle, and release of scrap metal. It will also describe the U.S. environment for metal recycle, including the volumes and levels of contamination, and the current and proposed release criteria. Comparisons will be presented between the U.S. and U.K., both in technology and methodology for recycle and in regulatory criteria for residual radioactivity and material release and for ultimate decommissioning. The paper will then provide suggested approaches and criteria for U.S. recycling and decommissioning. (author)

  8. Assessing the level of healthcare information technology adoption in the United States: a snapshot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middleton Blackford

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive knowledge about the level of healthcare information technology (HIT adoption in the United States remains limited. We therefore performed a baseline assessment to address this knowledge gap. Methods We segmented HIT into eight major stakeholder groups and identified major functionalities that should ideally exist for each, focusing on applications most likely to improve patient safety, quality of care and organizational efficiency. We then conducted a multi-site qualitative study in Boston and Denver by interviewing key informants from each stakeholder group. Interview transcripts were analyzed to assess the level of adoption and to document the major barriers to further adoption. Findings for Boston and Denver were then presented to an expert panel, which was then asked to estimate the national level of adoption using the modified Delphi approach. We measured adoption level in Boston and Denver was graded on Rogers' technology adoption curve by co-investigators. National estimates from our expert panel were expressed as percentages. Results Adoption of functionalities with financial benefits far exceeds adoption of those with safety and quality benefits. Despite growing interest to adopt HIT to improve safety and quality, adoption remains limited, especially in the area of ambulatory electronic health records and physician-patient communication. Organizations, particularly physicians' practices, face enormous financial challenges in adopting HIT, and concerns remain about its impact on productivity. Conclusion Adoption of HIT is limited and will likely remain slow unless significant financial resources are made available. Policy changes, such as financial incentivesto clinicians to use HIT or pay-for-performance reimbursement, may help health care providers defray upfront investment costs and initial productivity loss.

  9. Travel and Tourism Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for travel and tourism occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  10. Hospitality and Facility Care Services. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for hospitality and facility care occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  11. Modeling emerald ash borer spread in Ohio and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha Prasad; Louis Iverson; Matthew Peters; Jonathan Bossenbroek; Davis Sydnor; Mark Schwartz

    2008-01-01

    Our group has been modelling the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB) in Ohio using a spatially explicit cell-based model that takes into account the insect's flight characteristics (Insect Flight Model) as well as external factors that enable the insects to travel passively (Insect Ride Model).

  12. Ohio Marketing Management and Research. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document provides a framework for a broad-based secondary and postsecondary curriculum to prepare students for employment in marketing management and research (MMR). The first part of the technical competency profile (TCP) contains the following items: an explanation of the purpose and scope of Ohio's TCPs; college tech prep program…

  13. Land use change in Ohio, 1952 to 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W. Birch; Wharton Eric H.; Wharton Eric H.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical report on trends of major land uses in Ohio from 1952 to 1979. The relationship between the decline in farm area and increase in forest land is emphasized. The losses of wood fiber attributable to clearing forest land between 1968 and 1979 are also estimated.

  14. Ohio's Resource Guide to Reduce Chronic Absenteeism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    It is important for every student in Ohio to attend school every day. Missing too much school has longterm, negative effects on students, such as lower achievement and graduation rates. There are many reasons students miss school, but districts often can directly impact their students' attendance. By using data to identify and support students who…

  15. Ohio Medical Office Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document provides a framework for a broad-based secondary and postsecondary curriculum to prepare students for employment in medical office management. The first part of the technical competency profile (TCP) contains the following items: an explanation of the purpose and scope of Ohio's TCPs; college tech prep program standards; an overview…

  16. Ohio Financial Services and Risk Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in financial services and risk management. Ohio College Tech Prep Program standards are described, and a key to profile codes is provided. Sample occupations in this career area, such as financial accountant, loan…

  17. Ohio Legal Office Managment. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document, which lists core business and legal office management competencies identified by representatives from education and business and industry throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary associate degree…

  18. Ohio Agricultural Business and Production Systems. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Kershaw, Isaac; Mokma, Arnie

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in agricultural business and production systems. Following an introduction, the Ohio College Tech Prep standards and program, and relevant definitions are described. Next are the technical competency profiles for these…

  19. Seasonal influence on Ohio hardwood stumpage price trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Eric. McConnell

    2014-01-01

    The average annual percentage rates of change in real sawtimber stumpage prices from 1978 through 2012 (dollars per thousand board feet, Doyle) for the 10 commercial hardwood species of Ohio were determined. Each species was then further examined for differing trend lines between the spring and fall reporting periods. Annual real rates of change ranged from -1.10...

  20. Factors influencing smokeless tobacco use in rural Ohio Appalachia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, J.M.; Liu, S.-T.; Klein, E.G.; Ferketich, A.K.; Kwan, M.P.; Wewers, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    The burden of smokeless tobacco (ST) use disproportionally impacts males in rural Ohio Appalachia. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural factors contributing to this disparity and to articulate the way in which culture, through interpersonal factors (i.e. social norms and

  1. Identifying and Measuring Food Deserts in Rural Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulangu, Francis; Clark, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our article is twofold. First, we introduce a framework for U.S. Extension educators to measure the extent of food access at any scale when information about food carried by retailers is limited. Second, we create a baseline for the Ohio Food Policy Council so that work to increase food access in rural areas will have a benchmark to…

  2. Effects of Teacher Evaluation on Teacher Job Satisfaction in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Pamela R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to explore whether or not increased accountability measures found in the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) impacted teacher job satisfaction. Student growth measures required by the OTES increased teacher accountability. Today, teachers are largely evaluated based on the results of what they do in the…

  3. Turnover Intentions of Ohio Cooperative Extension County Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tilburg, Emmalou

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 229 Ohio Cooperative Extension county agents attempted to determine the role of various factors in formation of intentions to leave the job. Low levels of job satisfaction were related to pay and promotion, while high job satisfaction was related to coworkers, supervision, and the work itself. (CH)

  4. Solar-Heated Public Library--Troy, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Report on installation, operation and performance of a solar-heating system installed at the Troy-Miami County Public Library in Troy, Ohio. Solar retrofit system complements passive solar-energy system and interfaces with existing heat, ventilation and air-conditioning systems.

  5. Survey of Technology with Possible Applications to United States Coast Guard Buoy Tenders. Volume 1. Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    2-19 2.10 THV Mermaid (Ship 18) .................................... 2-20 2.11 THV Patricia (Ship 19...components of the Short Range Aids to Navigation (SRA) servicing task have changed very little . Only minor servicing details (e.g. battery replacement...have changed and those due to developments such as installation of solar power. While major tasks have changed very little , the technology to

  6. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  7. Solid state laser technology for inertial confinement fusion: A collection of articles from ''Energy and Technology Review''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This paper contains reprinted articles that record several milestones in laser research at LLNL. ''Neodymium-Glass Laser Research and Development at LLNL'' recounts the history of the Laser Program and our work on neodymium-glass lasers. ''Nova Laser Technology'' describes the capabilities of the Nova laser and some of its uses. ''Building Nova: Industry Relations and Technology Transfer'' illustrates the Laboratory's commitment to work with US industry in technology development. ''Managing the Nova Laser Project'' details the organization and close monitoring of costs and schedules during the construction of the Nova laser facility. The article ''Optical Coatings by the Sol-Gel Process,'' describes our chemical process for making the damage-resistant, antireflective silica coatings used on the Nova laser glass. The technical challenges in designing and fabricating the KDP crystal arrays used to convert the light wave frequency of the Nova lasers are reported in ''Frequency Conversion of the Nova Laser.'' Two articles, ''Eliminating Platinum Inclusions in Laser Glass'' and ''Detecting Microscopic Inclusions in Optical Glass,'' describe how we dealt with the problem of damaging metal inclusions in the Nova laser glass. The last article reprinted here, ''Auxilliary Target Chamber for Nova,'' discusses the diversion of two of Nova's ten beamlines into a secondary chamber for the purpose of increasing our capacity for experimentation

  8. Cyclodextrins as drug carriers in Pharmaceutical Technology: The state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Jaime; Adeoye, Oluwatomide; Cabral-Marques, Helena Maria; Lobo, Jose Manuel Sousa

    2017-12-18

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are versatile excipients with an essential role in drug delivery, as they can form non-covalently bonded inclusion complexes (host-guest complexes) with several drugs either in solution or in the solid state. The main purpose of this publication was to carry out a state of the art of CDs as complexing agents in drug carrier systems. In this way, the history, properties and pharmaceutical applications of the CDs were highlighted with typical examples. The methods to enhance the complexation efficiency (CE) and the CDs applications in solid dosage forms were emphasized in more detail. The main advantages of using these cyclic oligosaccharides are as follows: (1) to enhance solubility/dissolution/ bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs; (2) to enhance drug stability; (3) to modify the drug release site and/or time profile; and (4) to reduce drug side effects (for example, gastric or ocular irritation). These compounds present favorable toxicological profile for human use and therefore there are various medicines containing CDs approved by regulatory authorities worldwide. On the other hand, the major drawback of CDs is the increase in formulation bulk, once the CE is, in general, very low. This aspect is particularly relevant in solid dosage forms and limits the use of CDs to potent drugs. CDs have great potential as drug carriers in Pharmaceutical Technology and can be used by the formulator in order to improve the drug properties such as solubility, bioavailability and stability. Additionally, recent studies have shown that these compounds can be applied as active pharmaceutical ingredients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Immune Efficacy of Salmonella ohio Somatic antigen in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf Abdulrahman Yousif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Salmonella ohio Somatic antigen on humoral and cellular immunity in mice. Two groups of mice (thirty in each were used, first group was immunized twice at two weeks’ intervals subcutaneously (S/C with 0.5 ml of somatic antigen (prepared by heat inactivation of S. ohio containing 1×108C.F. U (protein content 200 µg; second group was injected S/C with phosphate buffer saline(PBS. Blood samples were collected at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post booster dose. Humoral immunity was detected by ELISA test, while cellular immunity detected by E. rosette and delayed type hypersensitivity test (DTH. The immunized and control mice groups were challenged with 5LD50 of virulent Salmonella ohio six weeks post booster dose. IgG was increased significantly (P<0.05 at 2, 4, and 6 weeks in the immunized group, and the maximum increase of antibody titers was determined at fourth week (651.7 ± 21.3 in comparison with the control group which remained within the normal value in all times of the experiment. E. rosette test showed a significantly increase in the mean of the activated lymphocyte of the immunized group at fourth week of immunization while control group gave normal range of active lymphocyte. In DTH test, immunized group showed a significant increase in footpad thickness after 24 hours post inoculation with soluble antigen in comparison with control group. Immunized mice were resist the challenge dose 5LD50 {5x (1.5x107} of virulent Salmonella ohio and all mice of control group died within (3- 4 days. In conclusion, immunization of mice with somatic S. ohio antigen was induced humoral and cellular immune response against Salmonellosis.

  10. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Lawrence County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  11. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Scioto County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  12. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Morgan County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  13. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Medina County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  14. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Hamilton County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  15. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Noble County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  16. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Brown County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  17. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Perry County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  18. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Gallia County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Madison County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  20. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Clark County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  1. Microbiological Surveillance and State of the Art Technological Strategies for the Prevention of Dialysis Water Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galfrè

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Methods: The present report attempts to illustrate the positive impact on the microbiological quality of dialysis patients over a 15-year period through the progressive implementation of state-of-the-art technological strategies and the optimization of microbiological surveillance procedures in five dialysis units in Sardinia. Results: Following on better microbiological, quality controls of dialysis water and improvement of procedures and equipment, a drastic improvement of microbiological water quality was observed in a total of 945 samples. The main aim was to introduce the use of microbiological culture methods as recommended by the most important guidelines. The microbiological results obtained have led to a progressive refining of controls and introduction of new materials and equipment, including two-stage osmosis and piping distribution rings featuring a greater capacity to prevent biofilm adhesion. The actions undertaken have resulted in unexpected quality improvements. Conclusions: Dialysis water should be viewed by the nephrologist as a medicinal product exerting a demonstrable positive impact on microinflammation in dialysis patients. A synergic effort between nephrologists and microbiologists undoubtedly constitutes the most effective means of preventing dialysis infections.

  2. Microbiological surveillance and state of the art technological strategies for the prevention of dialysis water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Contu, Antonio; Meloni, Patrizia; Vacca, Dorio; Galfrè, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The present report attempts to illustrate the positive impact on the microbiological quality of dialysis patients over a 15-year period through the progressive implementation of state-of-the-art technological strategies and the optimization of microbiological surveillance procedures in five dialysis units in Sardinia. Following on better microbiological, quality controls of dialysis water and improvement of procedures and equipment, a drastic improvement of microbiological water quality was observed in a total of 945 samples. The main aim was to introduce the use of microbiological culture methods as recommended by the most important guidelines. The microbiological results obtained have led to a progressive refining of controls and introduction of new materials and equipment, including two-stage osmosis and piping distribution rings featuring a greater capacity to prevent biofilm adhesion. The actions undertaken have resulted in unexpected quality improvements. Dialysis water should be viewed by the nephrologist as a medicinal product exerting a demonstrable positive impact on microinflammation in dialysis patients. A synergic effort between nephrologists and microbiologists undoubtedly constitutes the most effective means of preventing dialysis infections.

  3. Communications received from Member States regarding guidelines for the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Director General has received notes verbales relating to the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology from the following Permanent Missions to the International Atomic Energy Agency: notes verbales dated 15 June 1994 from the Permanent Missions of Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America; and a note verbale dated 10 November 1994 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation. The purpose of these notes verbales is to provide further information on these Governments' nuclear export policies and practices. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of each note verbale, the analogous text of the notes verbales is attached hereto. The enclosure of these notes verbales with the amendments to the ''Guidelines for Nuclear Transfers'' contained in INFCIRC/254/Rev.1/Part 1/Mod.1 is reproduced in the Annex

  4. PEOPLE RETRIEVAL BY MEANS OF COMPOSITE PICTURES: PROBLEM STATE-OF-THE-ART AND TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgy A. Kukharev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the problem of people retrieval by means of composite pictures constructed according to descriptive portrait. An overview of the problem state-of-the-art is provided beginning from the basic concepts and terminology to a modern technology for composite picture creation, real-world scenarios and search results. The development history of systems for forming composite portraits (photo robots and sketches and the ideas implemented in these systems are provided. The problem of automatic comparison of composite pictures with the original ones is discussed, and the reasons for unattainability of stable retrieval of originals by a composite picture in real-world scenarios are revealed. Requirements to composite pictures databases in addition to the existing benchmark databases of facial images and also methods for implementation of such databases are formulated. Approaches for generation of sketches population from an initial one that increase effectiveness of identikit-based photo image retrieval systems are proposed. The method of similarity index increasing in the couple identikit-photograph based on computation of an average identikit from the created population is provided. It is shown that such composite pictures are more similar to original portraits and their use in the discussed search problem can lead to good results. Thus the created identikits meet the requirements of the truthful scenario as take into account the possibility of incomplete information in descriptions. Results of experiments on CUHK Face Sketch and CUHK Face Sketch FERET databases and also open access identikits and corresponding photos are discussed.

  5. The State of Nursing Home Information Technology Sophistication in Rural and Nonrural US Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L; Madsen, Richard W; Miller, Erin L; Wakefield, Douglas S; Wise, Keely K; Alexander, Rachel L

    2017-06-01

    To test for significant differences in information technology sophistication (ITS) in US nursing homes (NH) based on location. We administered a primary survey January 2014 to July 2015 to NH in each US state. The survey was cross-sectional and examined 3 dimensions (IT capabilities, extent of IT use, degree of IT integration) among 3 domains (resident care, clinical support, administrative activities) of ITS. ITS was broken down by NH location. Mean responses were compared across 4 NH categories (Metropolitan, Micropolitan, Small Town, and Rural) for all 9 ITS dimensions and domains. Least square means and Tukey's method were used for multiple comparisons. Methods yielded 815/1,799 surveys (45% response rate). In every health care domain (resident care, clinical support, and administrative activities) statistical differences in facility ITS occurred in larger (metropolitan or micropolitan) and smaller (small town or rural) populated areas. This study represents the most current national assessment of NH IT since 2004. Historically, NH IT has been used solely for administrative activities and much less for resident care and clinical support. However, results are encouraging as ITS in other domains appears to be greater than previously imagined. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Cutting edge technology to enhance nursing classroom instruction at Coppin State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Crystal Day; Watties-Daniels, A Denyce

    2006-01-01

    Educational technologies have changed the paradigm of the teacher-student relationship in nursing education. Nursing students expect to use and to learn from cutting edge technology during their academic careers. Varied technology, from specified software programs (Tegrity and Blackboard) to the use of the Internet as a research medium, can enhance student learning. The authors provide an overview of current cutting edge technologies in nursing classroom instruction and its impact on future nursing practice.

  7. The Chinese Politics of Communication Technology: Utility, State Building and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an examination into the formulation and construction of information and communication technology policy in China. It traces the rise of information technology and the "informatization" drive in China's political rhetoric, and identifies the changes and trajectory of information and communication technology in China's…

  8. A Phenomenological Approach to Experiences with Technology: Current State, Promise, and Future Directions for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I conceptualize experiences with technology as an object of study for educational technology research and propose phenomenology as a highly suitable method for studying this construct. I begin by reviewing existing research focusing on the construct of experiences with technology and the approaches utilized for its study. To augment…

  9. Thomas Edison State College and Colorado State University: Using Cutting-Edge Technology to Enhance CE Unit Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Henry; Powell, Albert, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Edison State College (TESC) and Colorado State University (CSU) offer significant contrasts in institutional culture, student demographics, faculty and institutional priorities and approaches to distance education course development and delivery. This article offers case studies showing that widely disparate program design and delivery…

  10. A Technology Approach to Improving Process Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Lori; Strasburger, Tom

    2013-01-01

    It is impossible to ignore how technology is infiltrating education. Interactive projectors and other technologies give teachers and students the opportunity to bring lessons to life. Some districts are replacing textbooks with digital content, allowing students to interact with content in new ways. Galion City School District in Galion, Ohio, is…

  11. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  12. Persuasive technology for health and wellness: State-of-the-art and emerging trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orji, Rita; Moffatt, Karyn

    2018-03-01

    The evolving field of persuasive and behavior change technology is increasingly targeted at influencing behavior in the area of health and wellness. This paper provides an empirical review of 16 years (85 papers) of literature on persuasive technology for health and wellness to: (1.) answer important questions regarding the effectiveness of persuasive technology for health and wellness, (2.) summarize and highlight trends in the technology design, research methods, motivational strategies, theories, and health behaviors targeted by research to date, (3.) uncover pitfalls of existing persuasive technological interventions for health and wellness, and (4.) suggest directions for future research.

  13. Preliminary hydrogeologic evaluation of the Cincinnati arch region for underground high-level radioactive waste disposal, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, O.B.; Davis, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary interpretation of available hydrogeologic data suggests that some areas underlying eastern Indiana, north-central Kentucky, and western Ohio might be worthy of further study regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Precambrian crystalline rocks buried beneath Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the area. The data indicate that (1) largest areas of deepest potential burial and thickest sedimentary rock cover occur in eastern Indiana; (2) highest concentrations of dissolved solids in the basal sandstone aquifer, suggesting the most restricted circulation, are found in the southern part of the area near the Kentucky-Ohio State line and in southeastern Indiana; (3) largest areas of lowest porosity in the basal sandstone aquifer, low porosity taken as an indicator of the lowest groundwater flow velocity and contaminant migration, are found in northeastern Indiana and northwestern Ohio, central and southeastern Indiana, and central Kentucky; (4) the thickest confining units that directly overlie the basal sandstone aquifer are found in central Kentucky and eastern Indiana where their thickness exceeds 500 ft; (5) steeply dipping faults that form potential hydraulic connections between crystalline rock, the basal sandstone aquifer, and the freshwater circulation system occur on the boundaries of the study area mainly in central Kentucky and central Indiana. Collectively, these data indicate that the hydrogeology of the sedimentary rocks in the western part of the study area is more favorably suited than that in the remainder of the area for the application of the buried crystalline-rock concept. 39 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Number of genera as a potential screening tool for assessing quality of bryophyte communities in Ohio wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, William; Stapanian, Martin A.; Andreas, Barbara; Gara, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) have numerous advantages as indicators of environmental quality. A quality assessment index for bryophyte species assemblages (BQAI) was developed for the State of Ohio, USA. Reliable identification of bryophytes to species often requires considerable training, practice, and time. In contrast, reliable identification to genera for most bryophytes in Ohio requires much less training. We identified 110 bryophyte species (14 liverworts and 96 mosses) belonging to 69 genera (13 liverwort and 56 moss) in 45 wetlands (27 emergent, 13 forested, and 5 shrub) in Ohio. As expected, there were more genera and higher BQAI scores in forested than in emergent wetlands. Number of genera was highly correlated (r ≥ 0.9) with BQAI in emergent and forested wetlands and for the combined set of wetlands. Number of genera and BQAI responded almost identically to an index of wetland disturbance. The results suggest that number of genera has potential as a screening tool for assessing bryophyte community quality in wetlands in some regions.

  15. Techniques Use by Science, Technology and Mathematics (STM) Teachers for Controlling Undesirable Classroom Behaviours in Anambra State Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinelo, Okigbo Ebele; Nwanneka, Okoli Josephine

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the techniques used by secondary school Science Technology and Mathematics (STM) teachers in controlling undesirable behaviours in their classrooms. It adopted descriptive survey design in which 178 Anambra State teachers teaching STM subjects in senior secondary were involved in the research. Two sections of questionnaire…

  16. Human Resources and Corporate Strategy. Technological Change in Banks and Insurance Companies: France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Olivier; Noyelle, Thierry

    Twelve financial institutions (nine banks and three insurance companies) from five countries (France, West Germany, Japan, Sweden, and the United States) were studied to determine the directions in which financial service markets and firms are moving as a result of increasing competition and technological change. Data were collected from…

  17. Factors Affecting Gender Equity in the Choice of Science and Technology Careers among Secondary School Students in Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osagie, Roseline O.; Alutu, Azuka N.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the factors affecting gender equity in science and technology among senior secondary school students. The study was carried out at the University of Benin Demonstration Secondary School in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. One hundred and fifty students of average age 15 years in their penultimate year were administered the…

  18. Buildings for the 21st Century, Winter 2000 Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    2000-02-24

    A quarterly update published by the Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs on new policies and procedures; upcoming events, highlighted research and success stories, and new partnership projects within the buildings programs at DOE/EERE and its contracting laboratories.

  19. Analyzing the Curricula of Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Technology-Related Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaden, Abdullah; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze on-campus and online PhD programs in educational technology-related fields in the United States. In particular, it sought to evaluate the most common program titles; core, elective, and research courses based on program curricula. The research design was quantitative content analysis and data were collected…

  20. Adoption of renewable energy technologies in oil-rich countries: Explaining policy variation in the Gulf Cooperation Council states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atalay, Y.; Biermann, F.; Kalfagianni, A.

    2016-01-01

    While the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council have economically and politically been dominated by the exploitation of fossil fuels, recent years have seen an increasing adoption of renewable energy technologies, the reasons of which are not yet sufficiently understood. This paper argues

  1. Generation of new spatial and temporal coherent states using VECSEL technology: VORTEX, high order Laguerre-Gauss mode, continuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellahi, Mohamed; Seghilani, Mohamed Seghir; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Gregoire; Lafosse, Xavier; Legratiet, Luc; Lalanne, Philippe; Myara, Mikhal; Garnache, Arnaud

    2017-11-01

    Since years, the VeCSEL concept is pointed out as a technology of choice for beyond-state-of-the-art laser light sources. The targeted coherent state in CW is typically the common gaussian TEM00, single frequency, linearly polarized lightstate. In this work, we take advantage of the VeCSEL technology for the generation of other kinds of coherent states, thanks to the insertion of intracavity functions, such as low-loss intensity and phase filters integrated on a semiconductor chip. This technological development permitted to demonstrate very pure high-order Laguerre-Gauss mode, both degenerate and non-degenerate(vortex)modes, preserving the coherence properties of usual TEM00 VeCSELs. This technology paves the way for the generation of other coherences (Bessel beams) or new functionnalities (wavelength filtering, etc.). We also explore new time domain coherence : owing to a high gain semiconductor chip design and the insertion of intracavity AOM, we demonstrated the first Frequecy-Shifted-Feedback VeCSEL, with a broadband coherence state as wide as 300 GHz.

  2. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Their Relation to Academic Results Indicators in State Public Universities in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos-Vega, José L.; Ramiro Marentes, Fabiola; Algravez Uranga, Juan J.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis regarding Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and their relation with indicators of academic results in bachelor's degree programs offered in state public universities in Mexico. This work is non experimental, cross-sectional, and correlational. The goal is to determine significant relations between variables:…

  3. The Cebu State College of Science and Technology, College of Agriculture Herbarium, Lahug, Cebu City, The Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bout, I.E.

    1992-01-01

    Recognizing the vital role that a herbarium plays in instruction, research, and public service, the Cebu State College of Science and Technology College of Agriculture (CSCSTCA) in Lahug, Cebu City, the Philippines, founded a herbarium in June 1987. It is a very humble scientific project of the

  4. Subject Specialization and Science Teachers' Perception of Information and Communication Technology for Instruction in Kwara State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakomogbon, Michael Ayodele; Adebayo, Rachael Funmi; Adegbija, Mosiforeba Victoria; Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Oyelekan, Oloyede Solomon

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Kwara State secondary school science teachers' perception of [information and communications technology] ICT for instruction based on their area of specialization. Participants were 630 science teachers of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics from both public and private senior secondary schools in 12 Local Government…

  5. A State-of-the-Art Report on Technologies of a Safety Assessment and a Radioactivity Exposure Assessment for the Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-09-15

    This report is to provide the reference contents of research and development for technologies of radioactivity exposure and safety assessment for development of the decommissioning technology for nuclear facilities. This report consists of as follows: - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a radioactivity exposure assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a safety assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities.

  6. Science and technology of farm animal cloning: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajta, Gábor; Gjerris, Mickey

    2006-05-01

    Details of the first mammal born after nuclear transfer cloning were published by Steen Malte Willadsen in 1986. In spite of its enormous scientific significance, this discovery failed to trigger much public concern, possibly because the donor cells were derived from pre-implantation stage embryos. The major breakthrough in terms of public recognition has happened when Ian Wilmut et al. [Wilmut, I., Schnieke, A.E., McWhir, J., Kind, A.J., Campbell, K.H., 1997. Viable offspring derived from fetal és adult mammalian cells. Nature 385, 810-813] described the successful application of almost exactly the same method, but using the nuclei of somatic cells from an adult mammal, to create Dolly the sheep. It has become theoretically possible to produce an unlimited number of genetic replicates from an adult animal or a post-implantation foetus. Since 1997 a number of different species including pigs, goats, horses, cats, etc. have been cloned with the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique. Although the technology still has relatively low success rates and there seems to be substantial problems with the welfare of some of the cloned animals, cloning is used both within basic research and the biomedical sector. The next step seems to be to implement cloning in the agricultural production system and several animals have been developed in this direction. This article reviews the current state of the art of farm animal cloning from a scientific and technological perspective, describes the animal welfare problems and critically assess different applications of farm animal cloning. The scope is confined to animal biotechnologies in which the use of cell nuclear transfer is an essential part and extends to both biomedical and agricultural applications of farm animal cloning. These applications include the production of genetically identical animals for research purposes, and also the creation of genetically modified animals. In the agricultural sector, cloning can be used as a

  7. Bauman Moscow State Technical University Youth Space Centre: Student's Way in Space Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Victoria; Zelentsov, Victor

    2002-01-01

    The Youth Space Center (YSC) was established in Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) in 1989 to provide primary aerospace education for young people, stimulate youth creative research thinking, promote space science and technology achievements and develop cooperation with other youth organizations in the international aerospace community. The center is staffed by the Dr. Victoria Mayorova, BMSTU Associate Professor, the YSC director, Dr. Boris Kovalev, BMSTU Associate Professor, the YSC scientific director, 5 student consultants and many volunteers. Informally YSC is a community of space enthusiasts, an open club for BMSTU students interested in space science and technology and faculty teaching in this field. YSC educational activities are based on the concept of uninterrupted aerospace education, developed and implemented by the center. The concept includes working with young space interested people both in school and university and then assisting them in getting interesting job in Russian Space Industry. The school level educational activities of the center has got different forms, such as lecturing, summer scientific camps and even Classes from Space given by Mir space station flight crew in Mission Control Center - Moscow and done in cooperation with All- Russian Aerospace Society Soyuz (VAKO Soyuz). This helps to stimulate the young people interest to the fundamental sciences ( physics, mathematics, computer science, etc.) exploiting and developing their interest to space and thus increase the overall educational level in the country. YSC hosts annual Cosmonautics conference for high school students that provides the University with capability to select well-prepared and motivated students for its' rocket and space related departments. For the conference participants it's a good opportunity to be enrolled to the University without entrance examinations. BMSTU students can participate in such YSC activities as annual international workshop for space

  8. Bypassing the learning curve in permanent seed implants using state-of-the-art technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Evans, Dee-Ann Radford; Aubin, Sylviane; Angyalfi, Steven; Husain, Siraj; Kay, Ian; Martin, Andre-Guy; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Vigneault, Eric; Dunscombe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate, based on clinical postplan dose distributions, that technology can be used efficiently to eliminate the learning curve associated with permanent seed implant planning and delivery. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions evaluated 30 days after the implant of the initial 22 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implants at two institutions were studied. Institution 1 (I1) consisted of a new team, whereas institution 2 (I2) had performed more than 740 preplanned implantations over a 9-year period before the study. Both teams had adopted similar integrated systems based on three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography, intraoperative dosimetry, and an automated seed delivery and needle retraction system (FIRST, Nucletron). Procedure time and dose volume histogram parameters such as D90, V100, V150, V200, and others were collected in the operating room and at 30 days postplan. Results: The average target coverage from the intraoperative plan (V100) was 99.4% for I1 and 99.9% for I2. D90, V150, and V200 were 191.4 Gy (196.3 Gy), 75.3% (73.0%), and 37.5% (34.1%) for I1 (I2) respectively. None of these parameters shows a significant difference between institutions. The postplan D90 was 151.2 Gy for I1 and 167.3 Gy for I2, well above the 140 Gy from the Stock et al. analysis, taking into account differences at planning, results in a p value of 0.0676. The procedure time required on average 174.4 min for I1 and 89 min for I2. The time was found to decrease with the increasing number of patients. Conclusion: State-of-the-art technology enables a new brachytherapy team to obtain excellent postplan dose distributions, similar to those achieved by an experienced team with proven long-term clinical results. The cost for bypassing the usual dosimetry learning curve is time, with increasing team experience resulting in shorter treatment times

  9. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  10. Information Communication Technology, State building, and Globalization in the 21st Century: Regional Frameworks for Emerging State Assistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reese, Justin Y

    2008-01-01

    .... Globalization has modified the essential role of the nation-state towards managing global flows of resource, capital, and populations rather than, as in the past, presiding over distinct national economies...

  11. Numerical calculation of the stress-strain state of non-rigid pavements, renovated by cold recycling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Михайлівна Талах

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of improving the scientific basis to determine the stress-strain state of non-rigid pavements, renovated by cold recycling technology, is considered. The results of numerical calculation of stress-strain state of non-rigid pavements in the section of road Kyv-Kovel (297 + 700 km - 302 + 400 km are given using automated calculation software complex of thin-walled spatial structures (KARTPK. The real state of the road section through 8.5 years after the renovation is analyzed

  12. A Critical Review of the State-of-the-Art in Autonomous Land Vehicle Systems and Technology; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DURRNAT-WHYTE, HUGH

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the current state-of-the-art in Autonomous Land Vehicle (ALV) systems and technology. Five functional technology areas are identified and addressed. For each a brief, subjective, preface is first provided which envisions the necessary technology for the deployment of an operational ALV system. Subsequently, a detailed literature review is provided to support and elaborate these views. It is further established how these five technology areas fit together as a functioning whole. The essential conclusion of this report is that the necessary sensors, algorithms and methods to develop and demonstrate an operationally viable all-terrain ALV already exist and could be readily deployed. A second conclusion is that the successful development of an operational ALV system will rely on an effective approach to systems engineering. In particular, a precise description of mission requirements and a clear definition of component functionality is essential

  13. Assessment of the State of the Art of Integrated Vehicle Health Management Technologies as Applicable to Damage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies assessed the state of the art in current integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) aircraft technologies. These are the technologies that are used for assessing vehicle health at the system and subsystem level. This study reports on how these technologies are employed by major military and commercial platforms for detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation. Over 200 papers from five conferences from the time period of 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. Over 30 of these IVHM technologies are then mapped into the 17 different adverse event damage conditions identified in a previous study. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IVHM Project.

  14. Current State and Model for Development of Technology-Based Care for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Benyakorn, Songpoom; Riley, Steven J.; Calub, Catrina A.; Schweitzer, Julie B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Care (i.e., evaluation and intervention) delivered through technology is used in many areas of mental health services, including for persons with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Technology can facilitate care for individuals with ADHD, their parents, and their care providers. The adoption of technological tools for ADHD care requires evidence-based studies to support the transition from development to integration into use in the home, school, or work for pers...

  15. Information Technology & Applications Corporation v. United States: An Interested Party's "Substantial Chance" at APA Standing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slicker, Christina

    2003-01-01

    .... Building on CICA's "interested party" definition with Information Technology's refinement of "substantial chance" rule, the Federal Circuit has effectively translated "APA standing" into the language...

  16. Understanding Digital Technology Access and Use Among New York State Residents to Enhance Dissemination of Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Strogatz, David

    2016-01-01

    Many state and local health departments, as well as community organizations, have been using new technologies to disseminate health information to targeted populations. Yet little data exist that show access and use patterns, as well as preferences for receiving health information, at the state level. This study was designed to obtain information about media and technology use, and health information seeking patterns, from a sample of New York State (NYS) residents. A cross-sectional telephone survey (with mobile phones and landlines) was developed to assess media and technology access, use patterns, and preferences for receiving health information among a sample of 1350 residents in NYS. The survey used random digit dialing methodology. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE software. Data suggest that NYS residents have a high level of computer and Internet use; 82% have at least one working computer at home, and 85% use the Internet at least sometimes. Mobile phone use is also high; 90% indicated having a mobile phone, and of those 63% have a smartphone. When asked about preferences for receiving health information from an organization, many people preferred websites (49%); preferences for other sources varied by demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that the Internet and other technologies are viable ways to reach NYS residents, but agencies and organizations should still consider using traditional methods of communication in some cases, and determine appropriate channels based on the population of interest.

  17. The Content of Educational Technology Curricula: A Cross-Curricular State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aesaert, Koen; Vanderlinde, Ruben; Tondeur, Jo; van Braak, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the content features of educational technology curricula for primary education developed by national governments. A qualitative cross-case document analysis of the national educational technology curriculum of Norway, Flanders and England was conducted. The analysis focuses on the underlying visions,…

  18. State of the art of using virtual reality technologies in built environment education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keenaghan, G.; Horvath, I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on our major findings concerning the application of virtual reality technologies in built environment education (BEE). In addition to an analysis of the current trends and developments in current virtual reality technologies and systems, it also evaluates their educational

  19. A review of electrostatic monitoring technology: The state of the art and future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenhua; Hou, Junxing; Atkin, Jason

    2017-10-01

    Electrostatic monitoring technology is a useful tool for monitoring and detecting component faults and degradation, which is necessary for system health management. It encompasses three key research areas: sensor technology; signal detection, processing and feature extraction; and verification experimentation. It has received considerable recent attention for condition monitoring due to its ability to provide warning information and non-obstructive measurements on-line. A number of papers in recent years have covered specific aspects of the technology, including sensor design optimization, sensor characteristic analysis, signal de-noising and practical applications of the technology. This paper provides a review of the recent research and of the development of electrostatic monitoring technology, with a primary emphasis on its application for the aero-engine gas path. The paper also presents a summary of some of the current applications of electrostatic monitoring technology in other industries, before concluding with a brief discussion of the current research situation and possible future challenges and research gaps in this field. The aim of this paper is to promote further research into this promising technology by increasing awareness of both the potential benefits of the technology and the current research gaps.

  20. Current state of information technology use in a US primary care practice-based research network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Andrews

    2004-02-01

    Conclusion While interest in enabling information technologies was high in KAN, adoption was variable, with use of several key technologies reported as low.The results suggest that research in this network that would be dependent on or enhanced by IT might be impeded and, generally, greater attention should be given to enhancing the IT infrastructure in primary care.