WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology nursing occupational

  1. Technology enhanced learning for occupational and environmental health nursing: a global imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D K; Cohn, S; Carlson, V

    2000-04-01

    One strategy for decreasing the barriers to higher education and for increasing the competency and performance of the occupational and environmental health nurse in the information age is technology enhanced learning. Technology enhanced learning encompasses a variety of technologies employed in teaching and learning activities of presentation, interaction, and transmission to on campus and distant students. Web based learning is growing faster than any other instructional technology, offering students convenience and a wealth of information.

  2. Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickson, K.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined

  3. Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickson, K

    1984-03-01

    The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined.

  4. Occupational stressors in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nikpeyma

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsNursing provides a wide range of potential workplace stressors as it is  a profession that requires a high level of skill, teamworking in a variety of situations and provision  of 24-hour delivery of care .Occupational stress is a major factor of Staff sickness an  absenteeism.This study investigates the main occupational stressors in nursing profession in the  hope of identification and reducing it.MethodsIn this study a questionnaire consisting of three parts:demoghraphic data,the nurses  background and questions about occupational stress from Revised index fulfilled by 140 nurses.ResultsLack of reward for work well done(48/6%, Heavy workload(46/4% ,lack of Participation in decisions (39/3% , poor Control of work place(38/4%and lack of job  development (36/4% have been the main sources of Occupational stress for nurses.chronic  diseases, Night Shift working and working hours were positively associated with occupstional  stress.Conclusion Analysis indicated that effects of work factors on occupational stress are more than demoghraphic data. The findings of this study can assist health service organisations to provide an attractive working climate in order to decrease side effects and consequences of occupational stress. Furthermore, understanding this situation can help to develop coping strategies in order to reduce work-related stress.

  5. Occupational health nursing in hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdi, Henriett Éva; Hong, OiSaeng

    2014-10-01

    This article is the first about occupational health nursing in Hungary. The authors describe the Hungarian health care and occupational health care systems, including nursing education and professional organizations for occupational health nurses. The Fundamental Law of Hungary guarantees the right of every employee to healthy and safe working conditions, daily and weekly rest times and annual paid leave, and physical and mental health. Hungary promotes the exercise of these rights by managing industrial safety and health care, providing access to healthy food, supporting sports and regular physical exercise, and ensuring environmental protection. According to the law, the responsibility for regulation of the occupational health service lies with the Ministry of Human Resources. Safety regulations are under the aegis of the Ministry of National Economy. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Health & Safety Journal Awards & Recognition Occupational Health Nurses Week Member Discounts Monthly Newsletter Foundation About the ... 1, 2018. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. is the primary association for the largest ...

  7. Occupational burnout among nursing personel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Wieder-Huszla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Occupational stress and the related burnout syndrome is undoubtedly one of the most important challenges for public health. Objectives . The objective of the study was identifying occupational burnout among nurses. Material and methods . The questionnaire was responded by 408 professionally active male and female nurses, working in the territory of the West Pomeranian Voivodeship. In the evaluation of occupational burnout the standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was applied. Results . Mean values of the level of occupational burnout for the study group amounted to 39.3 ± 30.9 with regard to emotional exhaustion, 30.64 ± 27.89 with respect to the depersonalization subscale and 66.26 ± 27.94 – the lowered level of job satisfaction. Conclusions . 1. The studied nursing personnel showed symptoms of occupational burnout in all dimensions of the syndrome, i.e. high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization as well as low job satisfaction. 2. Individuals with higher education scored lower on the emotional exhaustion scale. 3. Emotional exhaustion is influenced by workplace and position.

  8. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    . Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate...... and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted...

  9. [Role of the occupational health nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Nadine

    2018-02-01

    The missions of occupational health nurses are exclusively preventive, except in the event of emergency situations. They are involved in the prevention of occupational stress, the assessment of psychosocial risks and the improvement of quality of life at work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Eri Shimizu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risks. Data were analyzed with the use of the SPSS, version 12.0, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical significance and differences in occupational health hazards at the beginning and at the end of the workers' careers. As a workplace, ICUs can cause work health hazards, mostly physical, to nurses and nursing technicians due to the frequent use of physical energy and strength to provide care, while psychological and social hazards occur to a lesser degree.

  11. Future preparation of occupational health nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzi, C C; Wilson, D L; Ebert, R

    1991-03-01

    This article presents the results of a national survey of job activities of corporate level occupational health nurse managers. The survey was designed to identify the relative amount of time spent and importance attributed to specific areas of their current job. In general this sample tended to have more management experience and educational preparation than previously cited studies: over 50% had completed a graduate degree. The scores for importance and time spent were highly correlated. That is, occupational health corporate nurse managers seemed to allocate their time to job responsibilities they considered most important. Management activities related to policy, practice standards, quality assurance, staff development, and systems for client care delivery appear to represent the core responsibilities of occupational health nursing management. Curriculum recommendations for management positions in occupational health include: health policy, program planning, and evaluation; business strategy; applications of management information systems; quality assurance; and marketing.

  12. Occupational closure in nursing work reconsidered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traynor, Michael; Nissen, Nina; Lincoln, Carol

    2015-01-01

    In healthcare, occupational groups have adopted tactics to maintain autonomy and control over their areas of work. Witz described a credentialist approach to occupational closure adopted by nursing in the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the recent advancement...... boundaries and a usurpatory stance towards these boundaries. Participants had usually been handpicked by managers and some were ambitious and confident in their abilities. Many aspired to train to be nurses claiming that they will gain recognition that they do not currently get but which they deserve....... Their scope of practice is based upon their managers' or supervisors' perception of their individual aptitude rather than on a credentialist claim. They 'usurp' nurses claim to be the healthcare worker with privileged access to patients, saying they have taken over what nursing has considered its core work...

  13. Virtually Nursing: Emerging Technologies in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, Cynthia L; Alfes, Celeste M; Dev, Parvati; Kleinheksel, A J; Nelson, Douglas A; OʼDonnell, John M; Samosky, Joseph T

    Augmented reality and virtual simulation technologies in nursing education are burgeoning. Preliminary evidence suggests that these innovative pedagogical approaches are effective. The aim of this article is to present 6 newly emerged products and systems that may improve nursing education. Technologies may present opportunities to improve teaching efforts, better engage students, and transform nursing education.

  14. Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

  15. Job stress, achievement motivation and occupational burnout among male nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Lou, Jiunn-Horng

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of job stress, achievement motivation and occupational burnout in male nurses and to identify predictors of occupational burnout. Since the Nightingale era, the nursing profession has been recognized as 'women's work'. The data indicate that there are more female nurses than male nurses in Taiwan. However, the turnover rate for male nurses is twice that of female nurses. Understanding the factors that affect occupational burnout of male nurses may help researchers find ways to reduce the likelihood that they will quit. A survey was conducted in Taiwan in 2008 using a cross-sectional design. A total of 121 male nurses participated in the study. Mailed questionnaires were used to collect data, which were analysed using descriptive statistics and stepwise multiple regression. The job stress of male nurses was strongly correlated with occupational burnout (r = 0.64, P job stress was the only factor to have a statistically significant direct influence on occupational burnout, accounting for 45.8% of the variance in this. Job stress was comprised of three dimensions, of which role conflict accounted for 40.8% of the variance in occupational burnout. The contribution of job stress to occupational burnout of male nurses was confirmed. As occupational burnout may influence the quality of care by these nurses, nurse managers should strive to decrease male nurses' job stress as this should lead to a reduction of negative outcomes of occupational burnout.

  16. Competencies required for occupational health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Keiko; Goto, Yuki; Hatanaka, Junko; Yoshikawa, Etsuko

    2017-11-25

    For occupational health (OH) nurses to perform activities effectively, not only skills and knowledge but also competencies proposed by Dr. McClelland are indispensable. This study aimed to identify competencies required for OH nurses and to show their structure diagram. Qualitative descriptive research was conducted from October 2010 to August 2011. Eight high-performing OH nurses participated, and data were collected from semi-structured interviews held for each nurse. Data were qualitatively and inductively analyzed using the KJ method. Seven competencies were identified: "self-growth competency," "OH nursing essence perpetuation competency," "strategic planning and duty fulfillment competency," "coordination competency," "client growth support competency," "team empowerment competency," and "creative competency." A structure diagram of the seven competencies was clarified. As the definitions of the competencies were different, the findings of competencies for OH nursing in the United States of America (USA) could not simply be compared with the findings of our study; however, all seven competencies were compatible with those in AAOHN model 1 and AAOHN model 2 in the USA. Our seven competencies are essential for OH nurses to perform activities that meet the expectations of employees and the employer.

  17. [Reflections on Occupational Health Nursing in Taiwan: Challenges and Perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Ling; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Liou, Yiing-Mei; Chou, Yen-Fang; Chang, Tsai-Hsiu; Shiao, Shu-Chu Judith

    2018-04-01

    The development of the occupational health nursing profession has promoted stable and healthy human resources in Taiwan. In order to improve the occupational safety, health, and healthcare of workers, the professional core competencies and role functions of occupational health nursing is of utmost importance. This article investigated the current status of occupational health nursing education, role functions, practice scope, and the development and responsibilities of professional associations and proposed the challenges to and the future prospects of the development of occupational health nursing in Taiwan. The key findings include: (1) the role functions and practice scope of occupational health nursing; (2) occupational health nursing courses should be included in the required credits of Department of Nursing and master and doctor programs in occupational health nursing should be established; (3) a certification system of occupational health nursing should be established as soon as possible; (4) the professional associations for occupational health nursing should take responsibility for continuing education and training; and (5) interdisciplinary collaborations among relevant occupational health professionals should be strengthened.

  18. Innovations in occupational health nursing education, including a distance learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowis, A; Ellington, H

    1991-07-01

    The results of a survey in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s indicated that many occupational health nurses were not being sent for formal training because of the length of time nurses needed to be away from their employment and the difficulty employers had in finding nurse replacements during training. To meet the needs of occupational health nurses and their employers, the Robert Gordon Institute of Technology (RGIT) instituted a modular training course that offers full time attendance or distance learning options. RGIT's course consists of six modules over a 1 to 3 year period, which students can take in any order after completing a short Return to Study course. Using the innovative distance learning option, occupational health nurses can earn a Diploma in Occupational Health Nursing while completing most of their courses at the workplace, thus avoiding conflicts between training and work schedules.

  19. An exploration of occupation in nursing home residents with dementia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan-Brown, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the sitting room environment of two nursing homes in Ireland, using interactive occupation and social engagement as outcome measures and defining these rooms as occupational spaces.\\r\

  20. [Occupational nursing specialization: proposed change of paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, M Y

    1998-01-01

    The course of Labour Nursing aimed at preparing nurses for companies security and workers health. It started in 1974 as a result of the efforts of DESP/EEAN/UFRJ and ABEn close to the Ministry of Labour in Rio de Janeiro and based on the Resolution 112/59--OMS/OIT. Later, this course was spread out to other Universities and Brazil's regions and 13 courses have been provided until 1985. In the beginning, the courses follwed the orientation and control of FUNDACENTRO, until 1996 and were directed to the industry. From this time on, these courses register was sent to CORENs and accomplished independently at Nursing Schools, based on Resolution 12/86--MEC, Rec. 161/93--OIT. Instructions from the Ministry of Labour and Ministry of Health. At the EEAN, up to 1995, 11 Specialisation Courses have been accomplished, based on ANENT orientations and fundamental by the subjects: Scientific Investigation Methodology, Methodology of Nursing Teaching and Education for Health; Worker's Health Politics; Labour Organisational and Social Sciences; Environment Sanitation; Work Safety and Hygiene and Human Ecology; Ergonomy; Labour Process; Occupational Risks; Labour Accidents and Illnesses; Labour Legislation; Labour Nursing; Technical Visits and Practice in Workers Health Services at Companies Programmes and Public Health. The course enables nurses of essential, educative, managing and investigative activities and their formation culminates with a dissertation that has as a study object, emerging problems of nursing practice for workers. This programme has been studied by the author herself aiming at a better adjustment for these professionals insertion into the work market.

  1. Job satisfaction of occupational medicine nurses in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    The study aimed at assessment of the Polish occupational medicine service system after over ten years of functioning in the current shape, made by occupational nurses. The article focuses on the job satisfaction level among Polish occupational medicine nurses. The survey was performed among 600 randomly selected occupational medicine nurses, registered in the regional occupational medicine centers. A questionnaire, designed by the research team, containing several questions concerning different aspects of OMS system assessment, including a part dedicated to job satisfaction assessment, was sent to the selected occupational nurses. The response rate was 33.3% (200 questionnaires). The survey shows a relatively high satisfaction level in case of five out of eleven investigated job aspects, and a very low satisfaction level in case of two of them ("Possibility of professional promotion", "Salary"). 26% of the OMS nurses had considered going abroad to work as a nurse in the general health care system, and 17% in the OHS system. Almost 25% of them would not choose a profession of an occupational nurse once again, including 10% who would not choose a nurse job at all. There is a statistically significant correlation between the general job satisfaction and satisfaction with other aspects of nursing work. A strong correlation was observed in case of "Scope of performed tasks" and "Cooperation with employers (clients of the occupational medicine service units)". There is a statistically significant correlation of average strength between the decision concerning choosing an occupational nurse job in case of taking a decision on professional carrier once again and "General job satisfaction". Polish occupational nurses are satisfied with their job, however only 26% are fully satisfied. In their work there is place for improvement. The areas which definitely need attention and improvement are "Possibility of professional promotion" and "Salary". Improvements in cooperation

  2. [Appraisal of occupational stress and its influential factors in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-wei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Wang, Mian-zhen; Lan, Ya-jia

    2004-04-01

    To assess the occupational stress and its influential factors in nurses. A test of occupational stress, its influential factors, work ability were carried out for 248 nurses and 319 controls with revised occupational stress inventory (OSI-R) and work ability index (WAI). The scores of personal cope resource (131.266 +/- 17.176) and work ability index (32.581 +/- 3.158) in nurse group were significantly higher than those in control group (126.931 +/- 19.108, 31.840 +/- 4.069) (P < 0.05). The main occupational stressors scores (role insufficiency, role clash, and responsibility) in nurses were higher than those in controls (P < 0.05). The stress response of interpersonal relationship in nurses was also higher. The items of personal cope resource, such as recreation, self-care and social support of nurses were superior to those of controls (P < 0.05). Stress response was positively correlated with occupational role (r = 0.512, P < 0.01), and negatively correlated with the personal cope resource (r = -0.475, P < 0.01). The primary influential factors of personal stress were recreation, social support, rational conduct, role insufficiency, role clash, responsibility, and poor work environment. To strengthen social support, to improve work condition for nurses, so as to reduce the occupational stress and to enhance the work ability of nurses are important task in occupational health field.

  3. Correlation between workplace and occupational burnout syndrome in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Omid; Azizkhani, Reza; Basravi, Monem

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of nurses' workplace on burnout syndrome among nurses working in Isfahan's Alzahra Hospital as a reference and typical university affiliated hospital, in 2010. In this cross-sectional study, 100 nurses were randomly selected among those working in emergency, orthopedic, dialysis wards and intensive care unit (ICU). Required data on determination of occupational burnout rate among the nurses of these wards were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) standard and validated questionnaire. Nurses were selected using simple random sampling. The multivariate ANOVA analysis showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards were significantly less than those of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU (P = 0.01). There was also no significant difference between occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU (P > 0.05). t-test showed that there was a difference between occupational burnout values of men and women, as these values for women were higher than those of men (P = 0.001). Results showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU were significantly more than those of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards.

  4. Correlation between workplace and occupational burnout syndrome in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to determine the effect of nurses′ workplace on burnout syndrome among nurses working in Isfahan′s Alzahra Hospital as a reference and typical university affiliated hospital, in 2010. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 nurses were randomly selected among those working in emergency, orthopedic, dialysis wards and intensive care unit (ICU. Required data on determination of occupational burnout rate among the nurses of these wards were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI standard and validated questionnaire. Nurses were selected using simple random sampling. Results: The multivariate ANOVA analysis showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards were significantly less than those of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU (P0 = 0.01. There was also no significant difference between occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU ( P > 0.05. t-test showed that there was a difference between occupational burnout values of men and women, as these values for women were higher than those of men (P = 0.001. Conclusion: Results showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU were significantly more than those of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards.

  5. Social, economic, and political forces affecting the future of occupational health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M A

    1989-09-01

    1. By monitoring the major social, economic, and political forces affecting health care, one can predict how these forces may impact the role of occupational health nurses. 2. Nursing can and must chart its own course in the midst of these social, economic, and political changes. 3. Changes which have major implications for occupational health nurses are: health care needs, cost containment, multi-hospital chains, alternative approaches to health care, the workplace, ethical concerns, biomedical technology, nursing shortage, and oversupply of physicians. 4. Nursing implications can also be drawn in the areas of autonomy, political skills, and education. Active involvement and a desire to shape professional change and the future of nursing are keys.

  6. Forensic nursing. Applications in the occupational health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, C L

    1996-11-01

    1. Nurses are inherent investigators through the use of observation, data gathering, and documentation techniques. 2. Occupational health nurses may be involved in assisting with or evaluating workplace accidents, injuries, and deaths. These investigations may be the only critical information gathered. 3. Accurate and through investigations are critical for clients, physicians, insurance companies, medical investigators, law enforcement, legal proceedings, and the company. Utilizing improper techniques during accident investigations could potentially dismiss a litigation case or lead to hazardous situations. 4. The occupational health nurse can improve practices related to investigations by understanding and learning more about forensic nursing.

  7. Occupational health and safety issues among nurses in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A B; Cabrera, Suzanne L; Gee, Gilbert C; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A

    2009-04-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety.

  8. Occupational Health and Safety Issues Among Nurses in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A. B.; Cabrera, Suzanne L.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  9. Occupational and environmental health nursing: ethics and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie

    2012-04-01

    This article provides an overview of ethical issues related to the practice of occupational and environmental health nursing and possible strategies for resolution. Also, professionalism related to professional growth and advancing the specialty is discussed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Business law. Fundamentals for the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arruda, Kimberley A

    2002-05-01

    1. A basic understanding of the judicial system will enable occupational health nurses to read court opinions and have a better understanding of whether or how they or their companies are affected by the decision. With this knowledge, occupational health nurses can help their organization avoid legal liability by ensuring that the company does not act contrary to the decisions of the controlling courts. 2. As they are often involved in the process of contracting for goods and services, occupational health nurses need to be aware of general contract terminology and negotiating techniques so they will be better able to protect their companies. In addition, occupational health nurses can also assist in the actual contract drafting process with knowledge of a few concepts, such as the description, caption, operative language of the agreement, and definitions, of a contract. 3. Occupational health nurses are often called upon to be expert witnesses and can play an integral part in the litigation process. Because of the importance of expert witnesses, occupational health nurses must have an understanding of how to effectively provide expert witness testimony.

  11. Expanding horizons. Integrating environmental health in occupational health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B; Cox, A R

    1998-01-01

    1. Environmental hazards are ubiquitous. Many exist in the workplace or occur as a result of work process exposures. 2. Environmental health is a natural component of the expanding practice of occupational health nursing. 3. AAOHN's vision for occupational and environmental health will continue to set the standard and provide leadership in the specialty.

  12. Doctor or Nurse: Children's Perceptions of Sex Typed Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordua, Glenn D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines children's relabeling of roles when confronted with counter-stereotypical occupational portrayals. A total of 128 children between the ages of five and six years were shown four films depicting all possible combinations of female and male physicians and nurses. They were then questioned with regard to the sex and occupational roles of the…

  13. Correlation between workplace and occupational burnout syndrome in nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Omid; Azizkhani, Reza; Basravi, Monem

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to determine the effect of nurses′ workplace on burnout syndrome among nurses working in Isfahan′s Alzahra Hospital as a reference and typical university affiliated hospital, in 2010. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 nurses were randomly selected among those working in emergency, orthopedic, dialysis wards and intensive care unit (ICU). Required data on determination of occupational burnout rate among the nurses of these wards ...

  14. Daytime sleepiness, sleep habits and occupational accidents among hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenshu; Ohida, Takashi; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Eise; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2005-11-01

    This paper reports a study to determine the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep habits among hospital nurses and to analyse associations between excessive daytime sleepiness and different types of medical error. It has been reported that sleep disorders, and the tiredness and sleepiness brought about by sleep disorders may be associated with occupational accidents. However, to our knowledge, there has so far been no report on associations between sleep disorders, excessive daytime sleepiness in particular, and occupational accidents among hospital nurses. The study was a cross-sectional study targeting 4407 nurses working in eight large general hospitals in Japan. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used to investigate their sleep patterns and experience of occupational accidents. The data were collected in 2003. The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness among hospital nurses in the present study was 26.0%. A statistically significant relationship was observed between having or not having occupational accidents during the past 12 months and excessive daytime sleepiness. Multiple logistic regression analyses on factors leading to occupational accidents during the past 12 months showed statistically significant associations between (1) drug administration errors and (2) shift work and age, between (1) incorrect operation of medical equipment and (2) excessive daytime sleepiness and age, and between needlestick injuries and age. Excessive daytime sleepiness is an important occupational health issue in hospital nurses. It is possible that occupational policies and health promotion measures, such as a provision of sleep hygiene advice and social support at worksites, would be effective in preventing occupational accidents among hospital nurses.

  15. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Technology and Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    In the present age we cannot disassociate from emerging issues, which involve science, communication, health and technology, the influence of media, technological advances, and the use of computers in all spheres of life. The concepts created for technology cover various evaluation approaches, which depend upon which type of technology, approaches, usefulness and influences in a particular area of knowledge. Technological advances cover several areas, figuring quantum physics, nanotechnology,...

  17. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  18. Occupational health among Iranian nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Arsalani, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing global evidence that today’s work environment results in a higher risk of adverse health among nursing staff than among many other professions. Since nurses constitute the largest group in the healthcare workforce and have a crucial role in providing care services, their impaired health might have an adverse effect on the quality of healthcare. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore work-related health and associated factors. A further aim was to describ...

  19. The Future of Occupational Health Nursing in a Changing Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Linda; Peterman, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has significant implications for the future of occupational health nursing practice. As changes are proposed and implemented, occupational health nurses must continue to prioritize preventive care, chronic disease management, healthy communities, environmental health, and sustainability. In particular, immigrant workers are a vulnerable population needing attention by occupational health nurses.

  20. Computer Vision Syndrome: Implications for the Occupational Health Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2018-02-01

    Computers and other digital devices are commonly used both in the workplace and during leisure time. Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a new health-related condition that negatively affects workers. This article reviews the pathology of and interventions for CVS with implications for the occupational health nurse.

  1. How nurses cope with occupational stress outside their workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Dwyer, Trudy; Caperchione, Cristina M; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Burke, Karena J

    2013-01-01

    Nursing is acknowledged as a stressful occupation, and the negative impact of high stress levels have been widely researched. Less attention has been paid to methods for coping with stress. The researchers conducted a study to explore and identify how nurses cope with work-related stress away from their work environments. Six focus groups were conducted with 38 nurses, including nursing directors, nurse unit managers, and ward nurses from a wide range of clinical areas. From the interview material, 11 coping strategies were identified: drinking alcohol, smoking, using the staff social club, using social networking websites, exercising, family activities, home-based activities, outdoor activities, avoiding people, displacement, and sleep. Although several adaptive strategies appear in this list (e.g., exercising, home-based activities), some nurses were using unhealthy behaviours to cope with work-related stress (e.g., drinking alcohol, smoking, displacement). This study clearly demonstrates the value of using qualitative approaches to understanding how nurses cope with stress. Knowledge produced locally, such as that generated for the hospital in this study, should serve as the foundation for organisational strategies to enhance the health of nurses.

  2. Centralized vs. Decentralized Nursing Stations: An Evaluation of the Implications of Communication Technologies in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramzadeh, Sara; Alkazemi, Mariam F

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between the nursing station design and use of communication technologies by comparing centralized and decentralized nursing stations. The rapid changes in communication technologies in healthcare are inevitable. Communication methods can change the way occupants use a space. In the meantime, decentralized nursing stations are emerging as a replacement for the traditional centralized nursing stations; however, not much research has been done on how the design of nursing stations can impact the use of communication technologies. A cross sectional study was conducted using an Internet-based survey among registered nurses in a Southeastern hospital in the United States. Two units with centralized nursing stations and two units with decentralized nursing stations were compared in terms of the application of communication technologies. A total of 70 registered nurses completed the survey in a 2-week period. The results revealed no significant differences between centralized and decentralized nursing stations in terms of frequency of communication technologies used. However, a difference was found between perception of nurses toward communication technologies and perceptions of the use of communication technologies in decentralized nursing stations. Although the study was limited to one hospital, the results indicate that nurses hold positive attitudes toward communication technologies. The results also reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each nursing station design with regard to communication technologies. Hospital, interdisciplinary, nursing, technology, work environment.

  3. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses' Respiratory Protection Education Program and Resources Webkit for Occupational Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeii, Lisa; Byrd, Annette; Delclos, George L; Conway, Sadie H

    2016-12-01

    Organizations are required to adhere to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134) if they have workers that wear a respirator on the job. They must also have an employee "suitably trained" to administer their program. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and its National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory have worked to champion the occupational health nurse in this role by collaborating with the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses to develop free, online respiratory protection training and resources (RPP Webkit). This article describes the development, content, and success of this training. To date, 724 participants have completed the training, 32.6% of whom lead their organization's respiratory protection program, 15.3% who indicated they will lead a program in the near future, and 52% who did not lead a program, but indicated that the training was relevant to their work. The majority "strongly agreed" the training was applicable to their work and it enhanced their professional expertise. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Occupational accidents with piercing and cutting instruments in hospital nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Helena Palucci Marziale; Maria Lúcia Carmo Cruz Robazzi

    2004-01-01

    Goals: To identify factors associated with occupational accidents caused by piercing and cutting instruments and to identify the consequences of these accidents.Methods: Descriptive field research. Data were obtained through semi-structured interviews with nurses who suffered accidents during one year in four hospitals at São Paulo State - Brazil. Results: factors associated with accidents were: work overload, poor quality material, inadequate disposal materials, professional negligence, clie...

  5. The influence of technology in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krau, Stephen D

    2015-06-01

    The complexity of the relationship between nursing and technology is not new. The complexity has increased with the advent of new technology and technological devices. For faculty who are in the clinical area on a limited basis, and for nurses who are not involved in decisions related to the adoption of technology, terms and concepts related to technology can be misconstrued or misunderstood. An overview of some major terms used in reference to technology and technological approaches can only enhance the intricate relationship between nursing and technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Attitudes of occupational medicine nurses towards workers' health promotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Krzysztof; Korzeniowska, Elzbieta; Iwanowicz, Eliza

    2007-01-01

    The paper outlines the outcomes of a survey aimed at identifying the attitudes of occupational medicine nurses towards health promotion. The survey was carried out on a random sample of 277 nurses. Almost all respondents think that their occupational group should undertake health promotion activities. However, half of them is convinced that health promotion is only a new name for health education and medical prophylaxis. The vast majority of nurses think that under health promotion programs they should mostly deal with individual health education of patients and encourage them to adopt healthy lifestyles, and they usually undertake this kind of activities. A large number of respondents are not willing to be involved in the organization, marketing, and evaluation of health promotion projects. There is a great need to intensify measures to motivate nurses to play the roles that are neglected by them, such as looking for new professional groups to undertake activities stimulating health promotion in companies, and developing new institutional and systemic support conducive to making progress in such processes.

  7. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with professional competence and work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    To explore newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with their self-assessed professional competence and other work-related factors. As a factor affecting nurse turnover, newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with work-related factors needs exploring to retain adequate workforce. Nurses' commitment has mainly been studied as organisational commitment, but newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its association with work-related factors needs further studying. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation design. A convenience sample of 318 newly graduated nurses in Finland participated responding to an electronic questionnaire. Statistical software, NCSS version 9, was used in data analysis. Frequencies, percentages, ranges, means and standard deviations summarised the data. Multivariate Analyses of Variance estimated associations between occupational commitment and work-related variables. IBM SPSS Amos version 22 estimated the model fit of Occupational Commitment Scale and Nurse Competence Scale. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment was good, affective commitment reaching the highest mean score. There was a significant difference between the nurse groups in favour of nurses at higher competence levels in all subscales except in limited alternatives occupational commitment. Multivariate analyses revealed significant associations between subscales of commitment and competence, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, earlier professional education and work sector, competence counting only through affective dimension. The association between occupational commitment and low turnover intentions and satisfaction with nursing occupation was strong. Higher general competence indicated higher overall occupational commitment. Managers' recognition of the influence of all dimensions of occupational commitment in newly graduated nurses' professional development is important. Follow

  8. Strategies to facilitate professional development of the occupational health nurse in the occupational health setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolene de Jager

    2016-10-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the needs for professional development of the OHN in the occupational health setting. Method: An explorative, descriptive, contextual generic and qualitative research method was used in this study. The purposive sampling method was used as the OHNs surveyed described their personal need for professional development in the occupational health setting. Data was collected by means of semi-structured individual interviews. Eight interviews were done by an interviewer who held a doctoral degree in community health nursing and a qualification in occupational health and was affiliated with a private occupational health institution at the time of the study. The interviews were conducted during August 2012. Results: The OHNs reported that professional development needs have to be identified by the OHNs. Short courses need to be designed by training institutions and should be attended by the OHNs to improve their operational functioning on a day-to-day basis in the occupational health setting. The OHNs experienced that their role and function in the workplace were not valued by their managers. The results of this study revealed four major themes, namely constraints hindering the OHN in developing professionally, positive aspects identified by the OHNs regarding the need for professional development, professional development needs of the OHN and suggestions of how to meet the OHNs' professional development needs. Conclusion: There is a need for OHNs to identify their professional development needs and recommendations were made to meet these needs.

  9. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurses' occupational health as a driver for curriculum change emphasising health promotion: an historical research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela J

    2014-05-01

    Reasons stated for curriculum change in nursing education are usually shifts in knowledge, care delivery, roles, regulatory standards and population health needs. In New Zealand in the 1930s, a curriculum change was driven instead by the need to protect and promote nurses' health. Tuberculosis was an international occupational health risk among nurses. Mary Lambie, New Zealand's chief nurse, considered nursing a "hazardous profession". One remedy she instituted was curriculum change in the national nurse training programme to emphasise health promotion among nurses. Global nursing issues today also impact on nurses' health. Curriculum changes again address this by promoting self-care and resilience. To examine how international and national concern for nurses' occupational health drove a curriculum change in New Zealand nurse training in the 1930s. Historical Research International occupational health reports (1930s), Lambie's annual reports (1932-1950), and questions and examiners' comments in a new state examination (1940s-1950s), were analysed to identify the reasons for and direction of the curriculum change. Findings were interpreted within international and national concerns and measures related to occupational health in nursing. Lambie used the political leverage of international and national worry over tuberculosis as a nursing occupational health risk to protect nurses' health more generally. In 1933 she revised the first year of the three-year national nursing curriculum to emphasise personal hygiene and bacteriology related to cross-infection, and in 1938 introduced a State Preliminary Examination at the end of the first year of training to test this knowledge. Analysis of examinations, 1940s-1950s, confirms that the curriculum change driver was a concern to make nursing a less "hazardous profession". Nurse educators today should be aware of the variety of factors that can lead to curriculum change in nursing. In addition, concern for nurses' health

  11. Occupational stress and coping strategies among emergency department nurses of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong-Mei; Sun, Ning; Hong, Su; Fan, Yu-ying; Kong, Fan-ying; Li, Qiu-jie

    2015-08-01

    Emergency department(ED) nurses work in a rapidly changing environment with patients that have wide variety of conditions. Occupational stress in emergency department nurses is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between coping strategies and occupational stress among ED nurses in China. A correlational, cross-sectional design was adopted. Two questionnaires were given to a random sample of 127 ED nurses registered at the Heilongjiang Nurses' Association. Data were collected from the nurses that worked in the ED of five general hospitals in Harbin China. Occupational stress and coping strategies were measured by two questionnaires. A multiple regression model was applied to analyze the relationship between stress and coping strategies. The stressors of ED nurses mainly come from the ED specialty of nursing (2.97±0.55), workload and time distribution (2.97±0.58). The mean score of positive coping strategies was 2.19±0.35, higher than the norm (1.78±0.52). The mean score of negative coping strategies was 1.20±0.61, lower than the norm (1.59±0.66), both had significant statistical difference (Pwork, criticism, instrument equipment shortage, night shift, rank of professional were the influence factors about occupational stress to positive coping styles. Too much documents work, and medical insurance for ED nurses were the influential factors on occupational stress to negative coping styles. This study identified several factors associated with occupational stress in ED nurses. These results could be used to guide nurse managers of ED nurses to reduce work stress. The managers could pay more attention to the ED nurse's coping strategies which can further influence their health state and quality of nursing care. Reducing occupational stress and enhancing coping strategies are vital not only for encouraging nurses but also for the future of nursing development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. [Occupational low back pain in nursing workers: massage versus pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Talita Pavarini; Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2014-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of massage for decreasing occupational low back pain in workers of a Nursing team in an Emergency Room. A randomized controlled trial, using a socio-demographic/morbidity questionnaire and a Pain Numeric Scale. Forty-five subjects were randomly allocated for intervention (G1 - Massage by acupressure), placebo group (G2 - application of Garlium Arseneid Laser 904 nm turned off) and control (G3 - no intervention). The main triggering factor, as well as the worsening of pain, was the patient manipulation, both with a prevalence of 34.9%. The main treatment for low back pain before this research was the use of medication, with a prevalence of 44.2%. In accordance with a variance analysis, only G1 presented a significant statistical difference, with a better result after 12 sessions. Massage presented an enormous effect (d = 4.59), corresponding to 86% of reduction in the pain level. Massage was effective to decrease occupational low back pain of those Nursing workers.

  13. Occupational low back pain in nursing workers: massage versus pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Pavarini Borges

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of massage for decreasing occupational low back pain in workers of a Nursing team in an Emergency Room. Method: A randomized controlled trial, using a socio-demographic/morbidity questionnaire and a Pain Numeric Scale. Forty-five subjects were randomly allocated for intervention (G1 – Massage by acupressure, placebo group (G2 – application of Garlium Arseneid Laser 904nm turned off and control (G3 – no intervention. Results: The main triggering factor, as well as the worsening of pain, was the patient manipulation, both with a prevalence of 34.9%. The main treatment for low back pain before this research was the use of medication, with a prevalence of 44.2%. In accordance with a variance analysis, only G1 presented a significant statistical difference, with a better result after 12 sessions. Massage presented an enormous effect (d = 4.59, corresponding to 86% of reduction in the pain level. Conclusion: Massage was effective to decrease occupational low back pain of those Nursing workers.

  14. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Workplace violence in long haul trucking: occupational health nursing update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Debra Gay

    2004-01-01

    Almost 2 million workdays and millions of dollars are lost annually because of non-fatal assaults suffered at the workplace (NIOSH, 1996). Twenty workers, on average, are murdered each week in the United States and an estimated 18,000 workers per week are victims of non-fatal assault (NIOSH, 2001). Violence and stress are two interrelated issues that affect the work force. In-depth studies of these issues have not been conducted with long haul truckers in general, or with women in non-traditional, male dominated fields such as the long haul trucking industry. Epidemiological data related to violence and stress experienced by these under-studied populations are needed to plan effective interventions to reduce occupational risks. Studies employing both qualitative and quantitative methods are needed to articulate risk and protective factors related to violence against workers (Runyan, 2001). Occupational health nurses are qualified to participate in the development and implementation of research and intervention studies to improve worker safety related to violence at the workplace for men and women in both traditional and non-traditional occupational roles.

  16. Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.M. Maja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study. Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions.

  17. Frequent flyer business travelers. The role of the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Olga S; Randolph, Susan A; Ostendorf, Judith S

    2005-03-01

    When managing frequent flyer business travelers, occupational health nurses focus on health promotion and health protection goals. The three types of prevention (i.e., primary, secondary, tertiary) follow a timeline beginning with complete prevention, and proceeding through and ending with management of a disease process. Occupational health nurses design and implement practice strategies based on this progression. Travel health nursing is rapidly expanding as the number of travelers, immunizations, and modes of transportation increase. Physicians focus on disease, industrial hygienists focus on hazard exposure, and safety professionals address occupational issues related to illnesses and injuries. Occupational health nurses are the professionals who focus on all three areas, in addition to health promotion and health protection. Frequent flyer business travelers have specific and complex needs that occupational health nurses are in a unique position to address.

  18. Transforming home health nursing with telehealth technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Francisca Cisneros

    2015-06-01

    Telehealth technology is an evidence-based delivery model tool that can be integrated into the plan of care for mental health patients. Telehealth technology empowers access to health care, can help decrease or prevent hospital readmissions, assist home health nurses provide shared decision making, and focuses on collaborative care. Telehealth and the recovery model have transformed the role of the home health nurse. Nurses need to be proactive and respond to rapidly emerging technologies that are transforming their role in home care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Infectious respiratory disease outbreaks and pregnancy: occupational health and safety concerns of Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen P; O'Sullivan, Tracey L; Dow, Darcie; Amaratunga, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a qualitative study of emergency and critical care nurses' perceptions of occupational response and preparedness during infectious respiratory disease outbreaks including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and influenza. Healthcare workers, predominantly female, face occupational and personal challenges in their roles as first responders/first receivers. Exposure to SARS or other respiratory pathogens during pregnancy represents additional occupational risk for healthcare workers. Perceptions of occupational reproductive risk during response to infectious respiratory disease outbreaks were assessed qualitatively by five focus groups comprised of 100 Canadian nurses conducted between 2005 and 2006. Occupational health and safety issues anticipated by Canadian nurses for future infectious respiratory disease outbreaks were grouped into four major themes: (1) apprehension about occupational risks to pregnant nurses; (2) unknown pregnancy risks of anti-infective therapy/prophylaxis; (3) occupational risk communication for pregnant nurses; and (4) human resource strategies required for pregnant nurses during outbreaks. The reproductive risk perceptions voiced by Canadian nurses generally were consistent with reported case reports of pregnant women infected with SARS or emerging influenza strains. Nurses' fears of fertility risks posed by exposure to infectious agents or anti-infective therapy and prophylaxis are not well supported by the literature, with the former not biologically plausible and the latter lacking sufficient data. Reproductive risk assessments should be performed for each infectious respiratory disease outbreak to provide female healthcare workers and in particular pregnant women with guidelines regarding infection control and use of anti-infective therapy and prophylaxis.

  20. (Ir)reconcilable differences? The debate concerning nursing and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, M

    1997-01-01

    To review and critique the debate concerning nursing and technology. Technology has been considered both at one and at odds with nursing. Mitcham's (1994) concepts of technological optimism and romanticism. Nursing literature since 1960. Historical analysis. Technological optimists in nursing have viewed technology as an extension of and as readily assimilable into humanistic nursing practice, and nursing as socially advantaged by technology. Technological romantics have viewed technology as irreconcilable with nursing culture, as an expression of masculine culture, and as recirculating existing gender and social inequalities. Both optimists and romantics essentialize technology and nursing, treating the two as singular and fixed entities. The (ir)reconcilability of nursing and technology may be a function of how devices are used by people in different contexts, or of the (ir)reconcilability of views of technology in nursing.

  1. Technology in the Nursing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siktberg, Linda L.; Dillard, Nancy L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes nursing education integrating the Internet at Ball State University: (1) redesign of a professional-issues course; (2) electronic conferencing and computer quizzes in a health-appraisal course; (3) Internet tools used in an introductory associate-degree course; and (4) redesign of the required registered nurse-completion course. (SK)

  2. Boot Camp for Occupational Health Nurses: Understanding Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Debra M; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2015-08-01

    Social media is a buzzword frequently referred to in marketing materials, general media, and personal conversations. Although many refer to the term social media, some individuals do not understand its meaning or how it affects their daily lives at work and home. Since the expansion of the Internet to web 2.0, multiple platforms of communication occur virtually through various social media. Understanding and learning how to use these platforms are essential to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues; advance connections to professional organizations; and extend educational opportunities. This article presents basic information for occupational health nurses to improve their understanding of social media and how to communicate virtually using different platforms safely and securely. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Occupational Stress and Quality of Life in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Moraes da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To reduce the work related to stress and the psychosocial risk is not only an imperative question, but also moral. This epistemological study aims to verify the presence of the occupational stress and quality of life related to health in nursing professionals. We used three questionnaires: (a Socio Demographic Questionnaire, (b Job Strain Scale, and (c Item Short Form Health Survey. Statistical analysis was performed between the questionnaires, analysis of variance (ANOVA and simple and multiple linear regression. It was found that 60.8% of the participants see the high demand of work, 71.8% high control on the developed activity and 85.5% low social support. Related to eight dominant of quality of life, the most damaged are: pain (µ = 61.87 and vitality (µ = 62.25. It was concluded that although in most sample experiences an intermediary risk situation to stress, the quality of life showed a damaged.

  4. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of competency priorities between UK occupational physicians and occupational health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Drushca; Demou, Evangelia; Stevenson, Marisa; Gaffney, Mairi; Macdonald, Ewan Beaton

    2017-05-01

    The competencies required of occupational physicians (OPs) and occupational health nurses (OHNs) separately have been studied in various countries but little research has made direct comparisons between these two key occupational health (OH) professional groups. The aim of this study was to compare current competency priorities between UK OPs and OHNs. A modified Delphi study conducted among professional organisations and networks of UK OPs and OHNs. This formed part of a larger Delphi, including international OPs. It was undertaken in two rounds (round 1-'rating', round 2-'ranking'), using a questionnaire based on available OH competency guidance, the literature, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. In each round (rating/ranking), 57/49 and 48/54 responses were received for OPs and OHNs respectively. The principle domain (PD) competency ranks were very highly correlated (Spearman's r=0.972) with the same PDs featuring in the top four and bottom three positions. OPs and OHNs ranked identically for the top two PDs (good clinical care and general principles of assessment and management of occupational hazards to health). Research methods was ranked lowest by both groups. This study has observed a high level of agreement among UK OPs and OHNs on current competency priorities. The 'clinically focused' competency priorities likely reflect that although OH practice will broaden in response to various factors, traditional 'core' OH activities will still be required. These mutually identified priorities can serve to strengthen collaboration between these groups, develop joint education/training programmes and identify common professional development opportunities. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. The role of social support on occupational stress among hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiegen; Ren, Xiaohua; Wang, Quanhai; He, Lianping; Wang, Jinquan; Jin, Yuelong; Chen, Yan; Wang, Linghong; Nie, Zhonghua; Guo, Daoxia; Yao, Yingshui

    2014-01-01

    Stress is a nonspecific reaction to everything the body needs. Although occupational stress exists in every occupation, it is seen with more frequency and intensity amongst those occupations related to human health. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between occupational stress and social support (SS) among hospital nurses. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1144 hospital nurse in China. They were investigated with a self-administered questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, occupational stress and social support. A validated version of the revised Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI-R) was applied to evaluate occupational stress; SS was measured by nine questions. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the association between occupational stress and SS and adjusted for income, gender, marital status, working years, educational level, and profession. Of 1144 nurses, the majority age group was less than 30 years, and the mean age across participants was 31.8 years. Further correlation analysis indicated that score of ORQ and PSQ had a significant negative correlation with score of SS (Poccupational stress in hospitals nurse. We also should pay more attention to occupational stress of married and long working years nurse.

  7. The self employed occupational and environmental health nurse: maximizing business success by managing financial resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, S R; Papp, E

    2000-04-01

    The occupational and environmental health nurse entrepreneur can avoid business failure by engaging in a planning process that maximizes financial resources. Successful financial management involves understanding key financial reports and using those reports as management tools to "keep score" on the business. The prices the occupational and environmental health nurse entrepreneur charges for services will have a direct effect on the success of the business. Payroll, earnings, and expense records are useful management tools to help the occupational and environmental health nurse entrepreneur track the business and meet legal requirements.

  8. Promoting health and safety virtually: key recommendations for occupational health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Debra M; Anton, Bonnie B; Wenskovitch, John

    2014-07-01

    Nurses' use of the Internet and social media has surfaced as a critical concern requiring further exploration and consideration by all health care organizations and nursing associations. In an attempt to support this need, the American Nurses Association (2011) published six principles of social networking that offered guidance and direction for nurses. In addition, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2011) published a nurse's guide to using social media. Surfing the Internet and using social media for professional and personal needs is extremely common among nurses. What is concerning is when nurses do not separate their professional and personal presence in the virtual world. This article presents an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot survey that explored nurses' use of social media personally and professionally and offers recommendations specifically directed to the occupational health nurse. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Occupational stressors among nurses working in urgent and emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denyson Santana PEREIRA

    Full Text Available The study aimed to assess occupational stressors among nurses working in urgent and emergency care facilities. It is a descriptive research developed in two public hospitals of different complexity degrees, with 49 nurses. Data were collected from June to September 2011. The Bianchi's Stress Scale, which is composed of six domains: Relationship, Unit functioning, Staff management, Nursing care, Unit coordination, and Work conditions was used to assess occupational stressors based on the regular activities performed by nurses. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and Mann Whitney-U test. For the nurses working in the high complexity healthcare facility - hospital A the most stressful domain was Nursing care, while for those professionals working in the medium complexity healthcare facility - hospital B, Staff management was the most stressful domain. The nurses from hospital A perceived care-related activities as more stressful, while for those in hospital B administrative activities were considered more stressful.

  10. [Effect of occupational stress on oxidation/antioxidant capacity in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lili; Tian, Honger; Zhang, Qingdong; Zhu, Xinyun; Zhan, Yongguo; Su, Jingguo; Xu, Tian; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Ling

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of occupational stress on the oxidation/antioxidant capacity in nurses. A total of 131 nurses were included as study subjects. The occupational health information collection system (based on the Internet of things) was used for measurement of occupational stress. Levels of hydroxyl free radicals and antioxidant enzymes were determined. The serum level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was the highest in nurses under the age of 30 and the lowest in those over 45 (P occupational stress factors for SOD. Job hazards were negative occupational stress factors for POD. Psychological satisfaction was negative occupational stress reaction for hydroxyl free radicals. Calmness was positive occupational stress reaction for SOD, and daily stress was a negative one. The positive occupational stress reactions for GSH-Px were psychological satisfaction and job satisfaction, and daily stress was negative reaction. Nurses with higher occupational stress have stronger oxidation and weaker antioxidant capacity, which intensifies oxidant-antioxidant imbalance and leads to oxidative stress damage.

  11. Factors Predicting the Provision of Smoking Cessation Services Among Occupational Health Nurses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatdokmaiprai, Kannikar; Kalampakorn, Surintorn; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lagampan, Sunee; Keeratiwiriyaporn, Sansanee

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors predicting occupational health nurses' provision of smoking cessation services. Data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire distributed to 254 occupational health nurses in Thailand. Analysis by structural equation modeling revealed that self-efficacy directly and positively influenced smoking cessation services, and mediated the relationship between workplace factors, nurse factors, and smoking cessation services. The final model had good fit to the data, accounting for 20.4% and 38.0% of the variance in self-efficacy and smoking cessation services, respectively. The findings show that self-efficacy is a mediator that influences provision of smoking cessation services by occupational health nurses. Interventions to enhance nurses' self-efficacy in providing smoking cessation services are expected to promote provision of smoking cessation services to workers.

  12. [Mediating effect of mental elasticity on occupational stress and depression in female nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Liu, G Z; Zhou, X T; Sheng, P J; Cui, F F; Shi, T

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the interaction between mental elasticityand occupational stress and depressionin female nurses and the mediating effect of mental elasticity, as well as the functioning way of mental elasticity in occupational stress-depression. Methods: From August to October, 2015, cluster sampling was used to select 122 female nurses in a county-level medical institution as study subjects. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) , Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) , and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to collect the data on mental elasticity, occupational stress, and depression and analyze their correlation and mediating effect. Results: The 122 female nurses had a mean mental elasticity score of 62.4±15.1, which was significantly lower than the Chinese norm (65.4±13.9) ( P occupational stress and depression ( r =-0.559 and -0.559, both P Occupational stress and the two subscales mental stress reaction and physical stress reaction were positively correlated with depression ( r =0.774, 0.734, and 0.725, all P occupational stress had a positive predictive effect on depression ( β =0.744, P occupational stress on depression and a significant mediating effect of mental elasticity ( a =-0.527, b =-0.227, c =0.744, c '=0.627; all P occupational stress and depression and can alleviate the adverse effect of occupational stress and reduce the development of depression.

  13. Troubling distinctions: a semiotics of the nursing/technology relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, M

    1999-09-01

    I consider the discursive practices that have served conceptually and ontologically to trouble the boundaries between nursing and technology: between nurse/human/subject and machine/non-human/object. Nursing and technology have been semiotically related largely by two processes: (a) by the metaphor that depicts nursing as technology and (b) by opposition, or as not like and even in conflict with technology. Less frequently but no less significantly, nursing and technology have been semiotically linked (c) by the metaphor that depicts technology as nursing and (d) by metonymy, or by word or picture juxtapositions of nursing with technology. The troubling distinctions between nursing and technology suggest yet another reason why the construction of difference continues to elude nursing.

  14. My Daughter Wants to Be a Nurse: Occupational Stereotyping in Health Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Carol Ann

    1981-01-01

    An evaluation of the illustrations in elementary and secondary education textbooks reveals that: (1) Males dominate occupations illustrated in contemporary health textbooks; and (2) females are generally portrayed as assistants (nurses, technicians, dental hygienists) to males in higher-level roles or in occupations with low levels of power,…

  15. Distance Technology in Nursing Education. AACN White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    Careful use of technology in education may enhance the ability of the nursing education profession to educate nurses for practice, prepare future nurse educators, and advance nursing science. To take full advantage of technology, several factors must be addressed. Superior distance education programs require substantial institutional financial…

  16. Filipino nurses in the United States: recruitment, retention, occupational stress, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Arlene N; Gerhardt, Clara; Davis, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    Solutions to the nursing shortage in North America include the recruitment of international nurses. This descriptive study examines strategies to facilitate the cultural adaptation, job satisfaction, and perception of role and social support of a group of recruited Filipino nurses. Instruments used were the Nursing Work Index-Revised Edition and Occupation Stress Inventory-Revised Edition. Results indicated that the investment in promoting the well-being of recruits in both social and work contexts positively benefits job satisfaction and spills over into related areas of satisfaction and positive adaptation. The literature study also focuses on areas of cultural competence in the context of transcultural nursing.

  17. Psychological Distress among Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students: A Longitudinal and Predictive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerdrum, Per; Rustoen, Tone; Helge Ronnestad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present longitudinal data on changes in psychological distress among 232 Norwegian undergraduate students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Nursing students became substantially more distressed during the…

  18. Demonstrating the cost effectiveness of an expert occupational and environmental health nurse: application of AAOHN's success tools. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J A; Smith, P S

    2001-12-01

    According to DiBenedetto, "Occupational health nurses enhance and maximize the health, safety, and productivity of the domestic and global work force" (1999b). This project clearly defined the multiple roles and activities provided by an occupational and environmental health nurse and assistant, supported by a part time contract occupational health nurse. A well defined estimate of the personnel costs for each of these roles is helpful both in demonstrating current value and in future strategic planning for this department. The model highlighted both successes and a business cost savings opportunity for integrated disability management. The AAOHN's Success Tools (1998) were invaluable in launching the development of this cost effectiveness model. The three methods were selected from several tools of varying complexities offered. Collecting available data to develop these metrics required internal consultation with finance, human resources, and risk management, as well as communication with external health, safety, and environmental providers in the community. Benchmarks, surveys, and performance indicators can be found readily in the literature and online. The primary motivation for occupational and environmental health nurses to develop cost effectiveness analyses is to demonstrate the value and worth of their programs and services. However, it can be equally important to identify which services are not cost effective so knowledge and skills may be used in ways that continue to provide value to employers (AAOHN, 1996). As evidence based health care challenges the occupational health community to demonstrate business rationale and financial return on investment, occupational and environmental health nurses must meet that challenge if they are to define their preferred future (DiBenedetto, 2000).

  19. Collective strategy for facing occupational risks of a nursing team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loro, Marli Maria; Zeitoune, Regina Célia Gollner

    2017-03-09

    To socialize an educational action through the process of group discussion and reflection, with the aim to increase the care of nursing workers in facing occupational risks. A qualitative descriptive study using the Convergent Care Research modality with nursing staff working in an emergency department of a hospital in the northwest region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data collection was carried out through educational workshops and information was processed using content analysis, resulting in two thematic categories: A look at the knowledge and practices about occupational risks in nursing; and adherence to protective measures by the nursing team against occupational risks. Twenty-four (24) workers participated in the study. When challenged to critically look at their actions, the subjects found that they relate the use of safety devices to situations in which they are aware of the patient's serological status. Subjects' interaction, involvement and co-responsibility in the health education process were determinant for their reflection on risky practices. They also had the potential to modify unsafe behaviors. Socializar uma ação educativa, por meio de um processo de discussão e reflexão em grupo, com vistas a ampliar o cuidado dos trabalhadores de enfermagem frente aos riscos ocupacionais. Estudo qualitativo, descritivo na modalidade Pesquisa Convergente Assistencial, com trabalhadores da equipe de enfermagem que atuavam no pronto atendimento de um hospital da região noroeste do estado do Rio Grande do Sul. A coleta de dados foi realizada por meio de oficinas educativas, e o tratamento das informações, por análise de conteúdo, resultando em duas categorias temáticas: Um olhar direcionado a saberes e práticas sobre riscos ocupacionais na enfermagem e Adesão às medidas de proteção pela equipe de enfermagem frente aos riscos ocupacionais. Integraram o estudo 24 trabalhadores. Ao serem desafiados a olhar criticamente sobre seu fazer, os

  20. Occupational injury and fatality investigations: the application of forensic nursing science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The forensic evaluation of trauma in occupational injuries and fatalities can provide the benefit of a more thorough analysis of incident causation. Forensic nursing science applied during workplace investigations can assist investigators to determine otherwise unknown crucial aspects of the incident circumstances that are important to event reconstruction, the enforcement of occupational health and safety requirements, and the direction of workplace prevention initiatives. Currently, a medical and forensic medical knowledge gap exists in the subject-matter expertise associated with occupational accident investigations. This gap can be bridged with the integration of forensic nursing in the investigation of workplace fatalities and serious injuries.

  1. Examination of occupational exposure to medical staff (primarily nurses) during 131I medical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masayoshi; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Ito, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a new amendment to protect against radiation damage to humans has been enacted based on a 1990 recommendation by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Consequently, the dose limits of occupational exposure to medical staff were cut down sharply compared with conventional readjustments. This amended bill, however, may be triggering a reduction in the number of applicants, which hope to engage in radiotherapy. This being the case, we measured the dose levels of the occupational exposure to medical staff (doctor's group, nuclear medicine technologist's group, nurse's group and pharmacist's group) from 1999 to 2002. Moreover, we investigated what the main factor is in nurse's occupational exposure to 131 I. The highest doses of occupational exposure were 3.640 mSv to doctors, 7.060 mSv to nuclear medicine technologists, 1.486 mSv to nurses and 0.552 mSv to pharmacists. According to our results, it was clear that the highest doses in each group were far below the legally mandated upper limits of exposure doses. Although we investigated the correlations between the factors of nurse's occupational exposure to 131 I with the number of inpatients, the amount of 131 I and the number of servicing times for patients, there were no correlations found. Furthermore, to analyzing the factors in detail, it became clear that the main factor in the nurse's occupational exposure was due to the existence of patients who needed many more servicing times for their care than ordinary patients. (author)

  2. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  3. Occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance among hospital nurses in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabirye, Rose C; Brown, Kathleen C; Pryor, Erica R; Maples, Elizabeth H

    2011-09-01

    To assess levels of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance among hospital nurses in Kampala, Uganda; and how they are influenced by work and personal characteristics. Occupational stress is reported to affect job satisfaction and job performance among nurses, thus compromising nursing care and placing patients' lives at risk. Although these factors have been studied extensively in the US and Europe, there was a need to explore them from the Ugandan perspective. A correlational study was conducted with 333 nurses from four hospitals in Kampala, Uganda. A questionnaire measuring occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance was used. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and anova. There were significant differences in levels of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance between public and private not-for-profit hospitals, nursing experience and number of children. Organizational differences between public and private not-for-profit hospitals influence the study variables. On-the-job training for nurse managers in human resource management to increase understanding and advocacy for organizational support policies was recommended. Research to identify organizational, family or social factors which contribute to reduction of perceived occupational stress and increase job satisfaction and job performance was recommended. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Does technology really enhance nurse education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Tim

    2018-07-01

    Technology has clearly impacted upon our working lives, and the purpose of this paper is to offer a critical insight into the ubiquitous presence of technology in nurse education. This paper argues that technology enhanced learning is predicated on the promise of potential and purported transformation of teaching and learning. It suggests that there is a lack of critical engagement in the academic field of technology enhanced learning, and adds a critical voice to some of the emerging arguments in this area. There is also a lack of systematic evidence supporting the enhancement offered by technology, and yet the technology enhanced project continues to persist. The discourse surrounding technology enhanced learning has become so dominant, so pervasive, that those of us within it can no longer see alternatives. But there are alternatives, and this paper argues that we need to challenge the dominance of technology enhanced learning, and become aware of its contingent nature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors associated with occupational exposure to biological material among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrinho, Nádia Bruna da Silva; Malaguti-Toffano, Silmara Elaine; Reis, Renata Karina; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir

    2017-01-01

    to identify factors associated with occupational exposure to biological material among nursing professionals. a cross-sectional study was conducted in a high complexity hospital of a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Nursing professionals were interviewed from March to November 2015. All ethical aspects were observed. among the 226 professionals interviewed, 17.3% suffered occupational exposure to potentially contaminated biological material, with 61.5% being percutaneous. Factors such as age (p=0.003), professional experience in nursing (p=0.015), and experience at the institution (p=0.032) were associated with the accidents with biological material. most accidents with biological material among nursing professionals were percutaneous. Age, professional experience, and experience at the institution were considered factors associated with occupational exposure.

  6. [Work-related musculoskeletal disorders and their association with occupational nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Michele Cristiene Nachtigall; Milbrath, Viviane Marten; Bielemann, Valquíria Machado; de Siqueira, Hedi Crecencia Heckler

    2008-12-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal diseases (MSD) are disorders in the musculoskeletal structures caused by chronic occupational processes. The objective of this study was to get to know scientific papers on MSD related to the nursing profession. A bibliographic research of the last ten years was conducted at Health Virtual Library using the main data bases. Twenty-one summaries were found. Among them, thirteen were selected because they specifically focused on the subject. Three main areas were identified: occupational health nurses in relation to MSDs--their importance in health prevention and promotion; Ergonomics as MSDs prevention method: performed as changes on work consider risk factors; Vulnerability of Nursing staff to MSDs--predisposing factors to disease caused by inappropriate working conditions. The conclusion was that an occupational and ergonomic health service is important to prevent MSDs, especially among the nursing staff.

  7. Nurses' Occupational Trauma Exposure, Resilience, and Coping Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sherry Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Nursing education courses and professional development (PD) do not include coping and resilience training for registered nurses (RNs) who work in emergency departments (EDs). Exposure to traumatic events, death, and dying may lead to health issues, substance abuse, stress symptoms, nursing staff turnover, and compassion fatigue among ED RNs.…

  8. Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norten, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification.

  9. Relationship between occupational stress and depression among psychiatric nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kaori; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagam, Taku; Sasaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing is a stressful area of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine occupational stress among psychiatric nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, 238 psychiatric nurses were recruited from 7 hospitals. Data regarding the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Health Practice Index (HPI) were obtained via self-report questionnaires. After adjusting for all the variables, CES-D scores were associated with job stress, but social support reduced the effect of stress on depression among psychiatric nurses. However, the interpretation of these results was hampered by the lack of data concerning important occupational factors, such as working position, personal income, and working hours. Further longitudinal investigation into the factors associated with depression may yield useful information for administrative and psychological interventions.

  10. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION IN NURSING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. B. Costa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies in education, transforms not only the way we communicate, but also work, decide and think, as well as allows you to create rich, complex and diversified learning situations, through sharing the tasks between teachers and students , providing an interactive, continuous and lifelong learning. The paper aims to reflect on the importance of the use of information and communication technologies in higher education and show the potential in promoting changes and challenges for teachers of undergraduate nursing course. This is a literary review concerning the issue at hand, in the period from February to March 2014. The result indicates that the resources of information and communication technologies are strategies for the education of future nurses and promote the changing process for teachers , providing quality education to students and understanding that we must seek new opportunities to build a new style of training.

  11. Forecasting supply and demand in nursing professions: impacts of occupational flexibility and employment structure in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of Germany's ageing society, demand for nursing professionals is expected to increase in the coming years. This will pose a challenge for policy makers to increase the supply of nursing professionals. Methodology To portray the different possible developments in the supply of nursing professionals, we projected the supply of formally trained nurses and the potential supply of persons who are able to work in a nursing profession. This potential supply of nursing professionals was calculated on the basis of empirical information on occupational mobility provided by the German Microcensus 2005 (Labour Force Survey). We also calculated how the supply of full-time equivalents (FTEs) will develop if current employment structures develop in the direction of employment behaviour in nursing professions in eastern and western Germany. We then compared these different supply scenarios with two demand projections ('status quo' and 'compression of morbidity' scenarios) from Germany's Federal Statistical Office. Results Our results show that, even as early as 2005, meeting demand for FTEs in nursing professions was not arithmetically possible when only persons with formal qualification in a nursing profession were taken into account on the supply side. When additional semi-skilled nursing professionals are included in the calculation, a shortage of labour in nursing professions can be expected in 2018 when the employment structure for all nursing professionals remains the same as the employment structure seen in Germany in 2005 (demand: 'status quo scenario'). Furthermore, given an employment structure as in eastern Germany, where more nursing professionals work on a full-time basis with longer working hours, a theoretical shortage of nursing professionals could be delayed until 2024. Conclusions Our analysis of occupational flexibility in the nursing field indicates that additional potential supply could be generated by especially training more young people

  12. Forecasting supply and demand in nursing professions: impacts of occupational flexibility and employment structure in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Tobias; Afentakis, Anja

    2013-06-05

    In light of Germany's ageing society, demand for nursing professionals is expected to increase in the coming years. This will pose a challenge for policy makers to increase the supply of nursing professionals. To portray the different possible developments in the supply of nursing professionals, we projected the supply of formally trained nurses and the potential supply of persons who are able to work in a nursing profession. This potential supply of nursing professionals was calculated on the basis of empirical information on occupational mobility provided by the German Microcensus 2005 (Labour Force Survey). We also calculated how the supply of full-time equivalents (FTEs) will develop if current employment structures develop in the direction of employment behaviour in nursing professions in eastern and western Germany. We then compared these different supply scenarios with two demand projections ('status quo' and 'compression of morbidity' scenarios) from Germany's Federal Statistical Office. Our results show that, even as early as 2005, meeting demand for FTEs in nursing professions was not arithmetically possible when only persons with formal qualification in a nursing profession were taken into account on the supply side. When additional semi-skilled nursing professionals are included in the calculation, a shortage of labour in nursing professions can be expected in 2018 when the employment structure for all nursing professionals remains the same as the employment structure seen in Germany in 2005 (demand: 'status quo scenario'). Furthermore, given an employment structure as in eastern Germany, where more nursing professionals work on a full-time basis with longer working hours, a theoretical shortage of nursing professionals could be delayed until 2024. Our analysis of occupational flexibility in the nursing field indicates that additional potential supply could be generated by especially training more young people for a nursing profession as they tend to

  13. Exploring Smoking Cessation Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices in Occupational Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Ollie; Fortuna, Grace; Weinsier, Stephanie; Campbell, Kay; Cantrell, Jennifer; Furmanski, William L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore occupational health nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding the delivery of smoking cessation services to workers. The study included 707 members of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) who completed a one-time survey during the fall of 2012. Results indicated that occupational health nurses believed that evidence-based treatments are at least somewhat effective and that they should provide smoking cessation services to their workers; however, a majority of occupational health nurses reported that they did not have appropriate smoking cessation training or guidelines in their workplaces. Occupational health nurses would benefit from training in the use of smoking cessation guidelines and evidence-based smoking cessation interventions, which could be used in their clinical practice. Employers should ensure that workplace policies, such as providing coverage for cessation services, facilitate smokers' efforts to quit. Employers can benefit from many of these policies through cost savings via reduced health care costs and absenteeism. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Prevalence of Occupational Exposure to Pathogens and Reporting Behaviour among Cypriot Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Efstathiou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational exposure to pathogens forms a major concern among nurses, the largest team among healthcare professionals. Unfortunately, international literature marks high rates of occupational exposure to pathogens among nurses. Data from these studies allow to the implementation of prevention programs to avoid such incidences.Aim:To assess the prevalence of Cypriot nurses’ occupational exposure to pathogens as well as their reporting behaviour following such incidences.Methodology: A cross sectional survey has been conducted among a convenience sample of 577 nurses, during March and May 2010.Results: Our analysis demonstrated that almost half of Cypriot nurses (48.4% had at least one incidence of occupational exposure to pathogens, with more than 20% of the exposed nurses having been exposed via more than one mode. The majority of them have made a report of the incident, according to the policy of their hospital. Main reasons for not reporting such a critical incident included being too busy and forgetfulness.Conclusions: The results indicate that exposure to pathogens among Cypriot nurses is high, a fact that puts them into danger for acquiring an infection. A risk management program should be implemented to reduce such incidents.

  15. OSHA 101: an introduction to OSHA for the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell-Carlson, Deborah

    2004-10-01

    The OSHA standards become easy to use with experience. Occupational health nurses who are unfamiliar with the standards are better served to use them as a reference, rather than attempting to read the entire document. Many of the standards have booklets published to assist users in understanding the information. These booklets are available within the publications link of the OSHA website. Occupational health nurses who have taken the initiative to gain knowledge about OSHA and to become fluent in navigating the OSHA standards soon discover that the ability to access the information contained in the standards quickly is a marketable skill. Employers depend on occupational health nurses to develop comprehensive programs that achieve the goal of injury prevention and also meet compliance requirements. The standards contain a wealth of information to do just that.

  16. The roles and functions of occupational health nurses in Brazil and in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Hong, Oi Saeng; Morris, Judy A; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi

    2010-01-01

    Cross-sectional exploratory research developed to outline the roles and functions of occupational health nurses (OHNs) in Brazil and compare them with those in the United States. The sample consisted of 154 Brazilian occupational health nurses. First, the instrument Job Analysis Survey of Occupational Health Nursing Practice was translated into Portuguese, followed by data collection and data analysis, comparing the results of the proposed study in Brazil with the findings of a job delineation study conducted in the United States. It was found that most were women, white, between 41 and 50 years of age and working primarily at hospitals or medical centers as clinicians and managers/administrators. Besides, it was found that most Brazilian OHNs spend more time in managerial roles, followed by consultant and educator responsibilities while, in the United States, OHNs spend significantly more time in education/advisory roles.

  17. Occupational health nursing interventions to reduce third-party liability in workplace injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delk, Kayla L

    2012-03-01

    This article explores general principles of workers' compensation law and the ability to sue third parties for employee injuries by using case law and the treatise Larson's Workers' Compensation Law. This overview provides occupational health nurses with a background on workers' compensation law, who is liable for employee injuries, and how recovery from third parties is distributed between the employer or insurer and the employee. The author then explores interventions that occupational health nurses can implement to reduce employee injury and employer costs for providing workers' compensation. The goal of this article is to stimulate occupational health nurses' critical-thinking and problem-solving skills so they may identify risks and implement cost-effective solutions that will prevent injuries to employees. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Infusing PDA technology into nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ann; Allen, Patricia; Goodwin, Linda; Breckinridge, Daya; Dowell, Jeffery; Garvy, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Use of the personal digital assistant (PDA) has been infused into the accelerated baccalaureate program at Duke University to help prepare nursing students for professional practice. The authors provide an overview of the use of PDAs in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting. Technical aspects of PDA infusion and steps to ensure regulatory compliance are explored. Benefits of PDA use by both faculty and students in the program and challenges met with the infusion of this technology are also described.

  19. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  20. [Occupational risks perception in professional nursing practitioners at health care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Povedano, Miguel; Santacruz-Hamer, Virginia; Oliva-Reina, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study aim is to describe the perception of occupational risks by nursing professionals in health care center. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on a total population of 122 registered nurses (RNs) and 89 certified nurse aides (CNAs). A convenience sample of nursing professionals was recruited with 72 RNs (27 males and 45 females), and 45 CNAs (1 male and 44 females). They were asked about their perception of occupational risks during their everyday work practice. Sex and age variables were considered, as well as work-related accidents and occupational risk prevention training that had been registered in the last five years. The sample mean age was 47.29 ± 7.98 years (RNs, 45.11; and CNAs, 50.77). Main sources of risks as perceived by RNs were those accidents due to biological materials exposure (52.78%), carrying and moving weight (19.44%), and to occupational stress (19.44%); amongst CNAs, those accidents due to carrying and moving weight (44.44%), biological materials exposure (26.67%) and other infections (15.56%) were also mentioned. As regards the overall risks identified by these professionals, 23.08% of them had perceived no risk at all during their work; 35.04% only identified one risk, and 29.06% perceived two risks in their day to day activity, whereas 12.82% identified three or more occupational risks. As a general rule, the nursing professionals tend to underestimate the occupational risks they are exposed to, with biological, musculoskeletal, and occupational-related stress are perceived as the main sources of risks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on The Occupational Stress of Nurses in Critical Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Matourypour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: In the nursing profession, there are numerous factors which altogether cause occupational stress and as a result occupational exhaustion in nurses and decrease the quality of patient care. Regarding the importance of this issue which influences the health indices of the society, this study investigates the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the occupational stress of nurses.Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental and before-after study was conducted using progressive muscle relaxation intervention on 33 nurses in special treatment (ICU and CCU and emergency units through simple sampling in Yazd in 2012. To assess occupational stress,Toft-Anderson questionnaire was used. The procedure of applying relaxation in a practical way was given to nurses in pamphlets and questionnaires were filled before and two weeks after the intervention. Analysis was done using SPSS.16 software and T-test.Results: The average total score of stress in nurses before and after the intervention was determined as – 28.12±43.74 and 52.12±04.72 respectively and this difference was not statistically significant (39.0>p. However, in the dimensions of nurses’ workload (/0>p 03 and t=2.27 and patients’ suffering and death, these scores were significantly different (0001.0>p and t=3.94.Conclusion: This study showed that applying progressive muscle relaxation technique as a method of emotion-focused coping cannot be effective in the reduction of occupational stress in nurses.

  2. Motivation for entry, occupational commitment and intent to remain: a survey regarding Registered Nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Kathleen M

    2010-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the relationships between Registered Nurses' motivation for entering the profession, occupational commitment and intent to remain with an employer until retirement. Identifying and supporting nurses who are strongly committed to their profession may be the single most influential intervention in combating the nursing shortage. An understanding of the characteristics these individuals possess could lead to a decline in the high attrition rates plaguing the profession. Using a survey design, Registered Nurses enrolled at the school of nursing and/or employed at the associated university medical centre of a large, not-for-profit state university were polled in 2008. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine how the variables of motivation for entry and occupational commitment could indicate intent to remain. The strongest indicators of intent to remain were normative commitment and age, with a 70% average rate of correctly estimating retention. Exp(B) values for normative commitment (1·09) and age (1·07) indicated that for each one-point increase on the normative commitment scale or one-point increase in age, the odds of remaining with an employer until retirement increased by 1·1%. Transformational changes in healthcare environments and nursing schools must be made to encourage loyalty and obligation, the hallmarks of normative commitment. Retention strategies should accommodate mature nurses as well as promote normative commitment in younger nurses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. An investigation into the attitudes of nursing students toward technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Attitudes toward technology may impact the levels of technology acceptance and training willingness among nursing students. Nurse acceptance and effective utilization of technology are critical to improving patient care and safety. The aims of this cross-sectional study were to measurethe attitude of nursing students toward technology and to determine if demographic characteristics affect their attitudinal measures. Furthermore, the amount of formal education provided on the use of technology applications is explored. A convenience sample of nursing students attending a public university in Jordan was recruited, and a technology attitude scale designed to measure the attitude of nursing students toward technology was used. Scales designed to gather data on participant demographics, self-reported technology skills, and level of formal technology education were also used. The results showed that participants held a positive attitude toward technology. Students who reported a high level of technology skill had the most positive attitude toward technology. The impact years of formal education on the use of technology applications were low, whereas academic level had a significant impact on technology attitudes. Senior student participants had the highest level of technology education, likely because of their exposure to relatively more educational opportunities, and the most positive attitude toward technology. Despite the positive attitude of nursing students toward technology, the problem of minimal technology education should be addressed in future nursing programs to further enhance positive attitudes toward technology.

  4. Work stress, occupational burnout and depression levels: a clinical study of paediatric intensive care unit nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Cheng, Su-Fen; Wu, Li-Min; Ou-Yang, Mei-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between work stress and depression; and investigate the mediating effect of occupational burnout among nurses in paediatric intensive care units. The relationships among work stress, occupational burnout and depression level have been explored, neither regarding occupational burnout as the mediating role that causes work stress to induce depression nor considering the paediatric intensive care unit context. A cross-sectional correlational design was conducted. One hundred and forty-four female paediatric intensive care unit nurses from seven teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan were recruited as the participants. Data were collected by structured questionnaires including individual demographics, the Nurse Stress Checklist, the Occupational Burnout Inventory and the Taiwan Depression Questionnaire. The results indicated that after controlling for individual demographic variables, the correlations of work stress with occupational burnout, as well as work stress and occupational burnout with depression level were all positive. Furthermore, occupational burnout may exert a partial mediating effect on the relationship between work stress and depression level. This study provides information about work stress, occupational burnout and depression level, and their correlations, as well as the mediating role of occupational burnout among paediatric intensive care unit nurses. It suggests government departments and hospital administrators when formulating interventions to prevent work stress and occupational burnout. These interventions can subsequently prevent episodes of depression in paediatric intensive care unit nurses, thereby providing patients with a safe and high-quality nursing environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Efficacy of nursing interventions in reducing social and occupational disabilities among patients with neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajaiah; Jothimani, G; Parthasarathi, R; Reddemma, K; Giri, A T S

    2012-01-01

    Individuals suffering from neurosis suffer from social and occupational disabilities similar to that of psychoses. Though understanding of disabilities in neurosis is essential in management of the clients, the relevant interventional studies are very limited. The present study attempted to evaluate the effect of nursing interventions in reducing social and occupational disabilities in neurotic patients. Sixty neurotic patients diagnosed as per ICD 9 criteria were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups followed by pre-assessment by Groningen social disability schedule. Of the 10 sessions of nursing intervention, 3 were individual sessions with clients, 5 with clients and family members and 2 with small group of clients with similar problems; nursing intervention group and non-nursing intervention group received the routine drug treatment at rural community mental health centre, NIMHANS, Bengaluru. The post-assessment was carried out first, second, and the third month followed by the nursing intervention. The findings revealed statistically significant reduction in social and occupational disabilities. A community-based psychosocial intervention led by community health nurses catering to the needs of neurotic patients is indicated by the results.

  6. [The association between the presence of occupational health nurses at Japanese worksites and health promotion activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Satoru; Kai, Yuko; Kawamata, Kayo; Kusumoto, Mari; Takamiya, Tomoko; Ohya, Yumiko; Odagiri, Yuko; Fukushima, Noritoshi; Inoue, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the presence of occupational health nurses and health promotion activities, relative to the number of employees, and the health promotion policies of the companies. We investigated 3,266 companies with at least 50 employees listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Questionnaires were sent by mail, and employees in charge of health management or promotion were asked about health promotion activities at their own worksites. Logistic regression analysis was performed with each type of health promotion activity (nutrition, exercise, sleep, mental health, smoking cessation, alcohol consumption reduction, and oral health) as dependent variables, and the presence of an occupational health nurse as the independent variable. The results were adjusted for the type of industry, total number of company employees, presence of company health promotion policies, and the presence of an occupational health physician. Responses were received from 415 companies (response rate: 12.7%). Occupational health nurses were present at 172 companies (41.4%). Health promotion activities such as (in order of frequency) mental health (295 companies, 71.1%), smoking cessation (133, 32.0%), exercise (99, 23.9%), nutrition (75, 18.1%), oral health (49, 11.8%), sleep (39, 9.4%), and alcohol consumption reduction (26, 6.3%) were being conducted. Setting worksites with no occupational health nurse as a reference, the odds ratios of each health promotion activity of a worksite with one or more occupational health nurses were calculated. The odds ratios of mental health (2.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.32-4.48), smoking cessation (3.70, 2.14-6.38), exercise (4.98, 2.65-9.35), nutrition (8.34, 3.86-18.03), oral health (4.25, 1.87-9.62), and alcohol consumption reduction (8.96, 2.24-35.92) were significant. Stratified analysis using the number of worksite employees, 499 or fewer and 500 or more, also showed significantly higher odds ratios of

  7. Technology concept in the view of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehraban, Marzieh Adel; Hassanpour, Marzieh; Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Ajami, Sima

    2013-05-01

    Over the years, the concept technology has modified, especially from the viewpoint of the development of scientific knowledge as well as the philosophical and artistic aspects. However, the concept of technology in nursing are still poorly understood. Only small qualitative studies, especially in Iran, have investigated this phenomenon and they just are about information technology. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the concept of technology in the view of Iranian nurses. This study was qualitative explorative study which was done with a purposeful sampling of 23 nurses (staffs, supervisors and chief nurse managers) working in Isfahan hospitals. Unstructured interviews were including 13 individual interviews and 2 focused-group interviews. In addition to this, filed notes and memos were used in data collection. After this data transcribing was done and then conventional content analysis was used for data coding and classification. The results showed that there are various definitions for technology among nurses. In the view of nurses, technology means using new equipment, computers, information technology, etc). Data analysis revealed that nurses understand technology up to three main concepts: Change, Equipment and Knowledge. In deep overview on categories, we found that the most important concept about technology in nursing perspective is equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to develop deep understanding about the possible concepts technology among nurses. We suppose that technology concepts must be defined separately in all disciplines.

  8. Job satisfaction, occupational commitment and intent to stay among Chinese nurses: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Tao, Hong; Ellenbecker, Carol H; Liu, Xiaohong

    2012-03-01

    This study was designed to identify the level of nurses' job satisfaction, occupational commitment and intent to stay among mainland Chinese nurses, to explore the relationship among them.   Little is known about the magnitude of Chinese nurses' intent to stay. Understanding the association among demographic characteristics and job satisfaction, occupational commitment and intent to stay among Chinese nurses is most important in a time of nurse shortages. Methods.  A descriptive correlation design was used to examine the relationship among variables related to intent to stay. Data were collected by a self-administered survey questionnaire from 560 nurses working in four large hospital facilities in Shanghai in 2009. The mean scores for nurses' job satisfaction, occupational commitment and intent to stay were 3·25(0·48), 3·11(0·40) and 3·56(0·65), respectively. Job satisfaction and occupational commitment were significantly related to intent to stay. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between occupational commitment and job satisfaction. Age and job position were significantly related to job satisfaction, occupational commitment and intent to stay. Levels of job satisfaction, occupational commitment and intent to stay reported by nurses in this study can be improved. Suggested strategies for improvement are: increasing salaries, decreasing workloads, modifying task structure, cultivating work passion and creating more professional opportunity for nurses' personal growth development and promotion. Enhancing nurses' job satisfaction and occupational commitment are vital to improve nurses' intent to stay and for strategies to address the nursing shortage. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Analysis of touch used by occupational therapy practitioners in skilled nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Douglas; Henegar, J; Khanin, S; Oberle, G; Thacker, S

    2014-09-01

    Instrumental touch is identified as having purposeful physical contact in order to complete a task. Expressive touch is identified as warm, friendly physical contact and is not solely for performing a task. Expressive touch has been associated with improved client status, increased rapport and greater gains made during therapy. The purpose of the study was to observe the frequency of expressive and instrumental touch utilized by an occupational therapist during an occupational therapy session. Thirty-three occupational therapy professionals, including occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants, employed at skilled nursing facilities in southwest Florida were observed. Data were collected on the Occupational Therapy Interaction Assessment. The results of the data analysis showed a positive relationship between the gender of the therapist and the frequency of expressive touch. The data also showed that a large majority of touches were instrumental touch and pertained to functional mobility. The results of the study can contribute to a better understanding of the holistic aspects of occupational therapy. By the use of more expressive touch, occupational therapy practitioners may have a positive, beneficial effect on both the client and the therapy process as a whole. Further research is needed to determine the effect an occupational therapy setting has on the frequency of instrumental and expressive touch. A larger sample size and a distinction between evaluation and treatment sessions would benefit future studies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Implementation of stress assessments by occupational health nurses working in occupational health agencies and their confidence in conducting such assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Chiseko; Saeki, Kazuko; Hirano, Michiyo

    2016-06-21

    Stress assessments are due to be conducted in December 2015. It is expected that there will be an increase in the number of private health agencies that provide stress assessment services and mental health care. This study aimed to clarify the current situation of and the factors related to stress assessments conducted by nurses in occupational health agencies. Nurses working full time were randomly selected from 60 organizations that were members of the National Federation of Industrial Health Organization. Self-administered questionnaires were sent out between November 2013 and January 2014. The questionnaire included the personal attributes of the participants, training programs, job contents, and how practical mental health care, including stress assessment, is. The study was approved by the ethics committees in the respective organizations. Out of the 162 questionnaires that were distributed, 89 (54.9%) were returned and 85 (53.1%) were valid for analysis. Stress assessments were conducted by 38.8% of the participants. With reference to their confidence in conducting stress assessments, "confidence and" 70.6%, respectively. The groups that conducted and did not conduct the stress assessments did not show any differences in the findings or other attributes. Further, the implementation of stress assessment was not associated with occupational health nurse (OHN) training, education, position, age, years of experience, attendance of lectures on mental health, etc. However, the confidence in conducting the assessment was related to age when dealing with cases on confidence stress assessment consultation in follow-up to the implementation of screening, such as stress, persons at high risk, and so on. Approximately 40% of the nurses were already conducting stress assessments, but most of them conducted such assessments about once a year and were not deeply involved in them. Approximately 70% of the nurses were confident in implementing stress assessments. Further

  11. Impact of Healthcare Information Technology on Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscotty, Ronald J; Kalisch, Beatrice; Gracey-Thomas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    To report additional mediation findings from a descriptive cross sectional study to examine if nurses' perceptions of the impact of healthcare information technology on their practice mediates the relationship between electronic nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The study used a descriptive design. The sample (N = 165) was composed of registered nurses working on acute care hospital units. The sample was obtained from a large teaching hospital in Southeast Michigan in the fall of 2012. All eligible nursing units (n = 19) were included. The MISSCARE Survey, Nursing Care Reminders Usage Survey, and the Impact of Healthcare Information Technology Scale were used to collect data to test for mediation. Mediation was tested using the method described by Baron and Kenny. Multiple regression equations were used to analyze the data to determine if mediation occurred between the variables. Missed nursing care, the outcome variable, was regressed on the predictor variable, reminder usage, and the mediator variable impact of technology on nursing practice. The impact of healthcare information technology (IHIT) on nursing practice negatively affected missed nursing care (t = -4.12, p information technology mediates the relationship between nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The findings are beneficial to the advancement of healthcare technology in that designers of healthcare information technology systems need to keep in mind that perceptions regarding impacts of the technology will influence usage. Many times, information technology systems are not designed to match the workflow of nurses. Systems built with redundant or impertinent reminders may be ignored. System designers must study which reminders nurses find most useful and which reminders result in the best quality outcomes. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Emergency department nurses' experiences of occupational stress: A qualitative study from a public hospital in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwanich, Nuttapol; Sandmark, Hélène; Akhavan, Sharareh

    2015-10-30

    Occupational stress has been a health-related issue among nurses for many decades. Emergency department nurses are frequently confronted with occupational stress in their workplace; in particular, they encounter stressful situations and unpredictable events. These encounters could make them feel more stressed than nurses in other departments. Research considering occupational stress from the perspective of Thai emergency department nurses is limited. This study aimed to explore nurses' perceptions of occupational stress in an emergency department. A qualitative approach was used to gain an understanding of nurses' experiences and perceptions regarding stress in their workplace. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Twenty-one emergency department nurses working in a public hospital in Thailand were interviewed, and the data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings comprised three themes: (1) perceived stress, (2) consequences of stress, and (3) stress management. The results of this study can be used by hospital management to help them adopt effective strategies, such as support programs involving co-workers/supervisors, to decrease occupational stress among emergency department nurses. Future research that explores each of the themes found in this study could offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' occupational stress in the emergency department.

  13. Sex-Role Stereotyping of Nurses and Physicians on Prime-Time Television: A Dichotomy of Occupational Portrayals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Philip A; Kalisch, Beatrice J.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of prime-time television portrayals of nurses and physicians (1950-80) shows extreme levels of both sexual and occupational stereotyping. TV nurses are 99 percent female; TV physicians are 95 percent male. The TV image of female professional nurses is of total dependence on and subservience to male physicians. (Author/CMG)

  14. Hospital Nursing Workforce Costs, Wages, Occupational Mix,and Resource Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, John M

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to better understand how hospitals use different types of RNs, LPNs, and nurse aides in proprietary (for-profit), nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals and to estimate the wages, cost, and intensity of nursing care using a national data set. This is a cross-sectional observational study of 3,129 acute care hospitals in all 50 states and District of Columbia using data from the 2008 Occupational Mix Survey administered by the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Nursing skill mix, hours, and labor costs were combined with other CMS hospital descriptive data, including type of hospital ownership, urban or rural location, hospital beds, and case-mix index. RN labor costs make up 25.5% of all hospital expenditures annually, and all nursing labor costs represent 30.1%, which is nearly a quarter trillion dollars ($216.7 billion) per year for inpatient nursing care. On average, proprietary hospitals employ 1.3 RNs per bed and 1.9 nursing personnel per bed in urban hospitals compared with 1.7 RNs per bed and 2.3 nursing personnel per bed for nonprofit and government-owned hospitals (P G .05). States with higher ratios of RN compared with LPN licenses used fewer LPNs in the inpatient setting. The findings from this study can be helpful in comparing nursing care across different types of hospitals, ownership, and geographic locations and used as a benchmark for future nursing workforce needs and costs.

  15. The effect of massage therapy on occupational stress of Intensive Care Unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Fateme; Mirzamohamadi, Mojtaba; Yousefi, Hojatollah

    2015-01-01

    One of the main causes of stress in the lives of people is their jobs. Occupational stress is causing a wide range of significant issues in health and community services. Nursing is the most stressful profession in the health services. Massage therapy is one way of coping with stress. This study was conducted to determine the effect of massage therapy on stress in nurses. This study was a clinical trial on 66 male and female nurses working in intensive care units (dialysis, ICU, and CCU) of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013. Participants were selected according to the aims and inclusion criteria of the study. Then, they were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) (Osipow and Spokane, 1987) was completed by participants of the two groups before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after the intervention. General Swedish massage was performed on participants of the experimental group for 25 min in each session, twice a week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics [Chi-square, t-test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA)] using SPSS software. Results showed that the difference in overall mean occupation stress scores between experimental and control groups 2 weeks after the intervention was significant (P < 0.001). According to the results, it is recommended that massage, as a valuable noninvasive method, be used for nurses in intensive care units to reduce their stress, promote mental health, and prevent the decrease in quality of nursing work life.

  16. [Assessment of the Polish occupational medicine service (oms) system made by OMS nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an assessment of the Polish occupational medicine service (OMS) system made by OMS nurses. The survey was carried out on a random group of OMS nurses. OMS nurses form a professional group comprised of rather experienced personnel. In the opinion of almost 70% of respondents the system guarantees good occupational heath care, whereas 20% took the opposite view. The great majority of respondents think that all employees have to undergo mandatory prophylactic examinations. The nurses have rather critical opinion about the legal regulations pertaining to occupational health care--their number and complexity, and also express negative opinion about the quality of cooperation with employers (who are contractors for OMS units). OMS nurses believe that prophylactic examinations are the strongest point of the system. They are often the only opportunity for establishing contact between an employee and a physician and learning about diseases he or she was previously unaware of. Although the general assessment of the OMS system is rather positive, it is not free of shortcomings. Improvements in such fields as legislation, financing of service, professional attitude towards responsibilities of the OMS staff, cooperation with employers (contractors) and primary health care units would undoubtedly result in even better assessment, and what is more important in better functioning of the Polish OMS system.

  17. Social representations of biosecurity in nursing: occupational health and preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Álvaro Francisco Lopes de; Queiroz, Artur Acelino Francisco Luz Nunes; Oliveira, Layze Braz de; Moura, Maria Eliete Batista; Batista, Odinéa Maria Amorim; Andrade, Denise de

    2016-01-01

    to understand the biosecurity social representations by primary care nursing professionals and analyze how they articulate with quality of care. exploratory and qualitative research based on social representation theory. The study participants were 36 nursing workers from primary health care in a state capital in the Northeast region of Brazil. The data were analyzed by descending hierarchical classification. five classes were obtained: occupational accidents suffered by professionals; occupational exposure to biological agents; biosecurity management in primary health care; the importance of personal protective equipment; and infection control and biosecurity. the different positions taken by the professionals seem to be based on a field of social representations related to the concept of biosecurity, namely exposure to accidents and risks to which they are exposed. However, occupational accidents are reported as inherent to the practice.

  18. Nurses of the psychiatric service as the specific occupational group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimentova I.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for psychiatric services in modern health care system will increase due to the growth in number of mental diseases. The role of nurses in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of mental illness has a number of features. These features are related to care of patients with high level of aggressiveness, behavioral deviations, and problems in self-service. Differences in procedure practice and communicative space specialize and make narrower the nurses' professional practice in psychiatry and determine appearance of specific mechanisms and norms bound up with the necessity of supervision of patients while respecting their rights. Personnel's oversight functions, deviant behavior of patients, high degree of closure of psychiatric medical institutions — are the reasons for specialization of nurses' professional group in psychiatry, forming special mechanisms of maintaining tolerance to patients in professional sphere of this community.

  19. Swedish district nurses' attitudes to implement information and communication technology in home nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Carina; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2008-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology has increased in the society, and can be useful in nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe district nurses' attitudes regarding the implementation of information and communication technology in home nursing. The first and third authors performed five focus group discussions with 19 district nurses' from five primary healthcare centres in northern Sweden. During the focus group discussions, the following topics were discussed: the current and future use of information and communication technology in home nursing; expectations, advantages, disadvantages and hindrances in the use of information and communication technology in home nursing; and the use of information and communication technology from an ethical perspective. The transcribed focus group discussions were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that district nurses' attitudes were positive regarding the use of information and communication technology in their work. They also asked for possibilities to influence the design and its introduction. However, the use of information and communication technology in home nursing can be described as a complement to communication that could not replace human physical encounters. Improvements and risks, as well as the importance of physical presence in home nursing were considered vital. The results revealed that the use of information and communication technology requires changes in the district nurses' work situation.

  20. Measures to reduce occupational radiation exposure in PET facilities from nurses' point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Keiko; Takahashi, Juri; Mochiduki, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    In parallel with the increase in the number of institutions having PET facilities, the number of nurse working in these facilities has also increased, and the issue of occupational radiation exposure has assumed ever greater importance. In our clinic, since nurses have started to administer FDG intravenous injections, their annual radiation exposure has amounted to 4.8 - 7.1 mSv. To reduce their annual radiation exposure to less than 5 mSv, we identified sources of increased exposure and considered countermeasures based on this information. By implementing countermeasures such as improvements in daily working conditions and ways to avoid various troubles, it was possible to reduce the annual radiation exposure of all nurses to less than 5 mSv. Our experience demonstrates that to provide a working environment with a minimum of occupational radiation exposure, educational training and enhancement of knowledge and technical skills are vital. (author)

  1. The incidence of technological stress among baccalaureate nurse educators using technology during course preparation and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mary S

    2009-01-01

    The concept of technology-related stress was first introduced in the 1980s when computers became more prevalent in the business and academic world. Nurse educators have been impacted by the rapid changes in technology in recent years. A review of the literature revealed no research studies that have been conducted to investigate the incidence of technological stress among nurse educators. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to describe the technological stressors that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators experienced while teaching nursing theory courses. A researcher-developed questionnaire, the nurse educator technostress scale (NETS) was administered to a census sample of 311 baccalaureate nurse educators in Louisiana. Findings revealed that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators are experiencing technological stress. The variable, perceived administrative support for use of technology in the classroom, was a significant predictor in a regression model predicting Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators' technological stress (F=14.157, p<.001).

  2. The structure of occupational health nurses' support for return-to-work to workers with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Junko

    2016-07-29

    The present study aimed to explore the structure of occupational health nurses' support for return-to-work to workers with depression. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 occupational health nurses who support workers returning to work. Data were analyzed using the Modified Grounded Theory Approach. The qualitatively analyzed data was grouped into 9 categories. The support for return-to-work was divided into 3 periods: (1) the first priority for recovery, (2) preparation for return-to-work, and (3) adaptation to work. There were indirect supports to workers such as "environmental arrangement for medical treatment," "connection," and "support form parties concerned about workers," and direct supports such as "readiness for medical treatment," "overcoming social and psychological problems," and "working life independence. " Direct support was facilitated by "construction of the relationship. " The occupational health nurses' philosophy was to support "profitable return-to-work for both the worker and the employer. " These processes were "support of confidence recovery process " to regain confidence lost through absence from work because of depression and to accomplish a smooth return-to-work. There were problems in each period corresponding to the return-to-work conditions, and occupational health nurses supported the employees in overcoming each problem. Moreover, it was said that cooperation with the parties concerned in the office would greatly influence the success or failure in the return-to-work support, and it was thought that direct supports and indirect supports to employees with respect to adjustment with the parties concerned in the office were necessary. The structure of occupational health nurses' supports was to support the confidence recovery process of workers by indirect and direct support at each period of return-to-work.

  3. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  4. Perceptions of nurse educators regarding the implementation of the occupational specific dispensation at a selected nursing college in Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Netshiswinzhe Mcur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of nurses regarding the implementation of the occupation-specific dispensation (OSD in a selected nursing college in Limpopo province. A qualitative approach was used with a purposive sampling method for the selection of 12 voluntary participants who had worked for more than five years and been subjected to the implementation of OSD. In-depth interviews were conducted and data analysed according to Tesch's method. The perceptions of nurse educators were shared through participants' responses to a central research question. Participants expressed different responses, both positive and negative. The findings of this study demonstrated: high expectations, unfair treatment in relation to the implementation, and reactions to introduction of OSD. Participants also identified envisaged ways of improving the situation through the identification of ways to correct the problems. This study recommended that management ensure that nurse educators' remuneration packages are competitive with those of similar professions in the clinical setting. Recognition of nurse educators' additional qualifications, long-service experiences and rural allowance reviews in nursing education should be taken into consideration urgently.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Nurses at risk for occupationally acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    black, Asian, and Caucasian blood donors, respectively.2,3 The HBV carrier rate (as ... only 30.6% of the nurses were immune to infection with the virus, ..... of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; research grants for registrars in the clinical ...

  6. Causes and consequences of occupational stress in emergency nurses, a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Jef; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan

    2015-04-01

    This longitudinal study examines the influence of changes over time in work and organisational characteristics on job satisfaction, work engagement, emotional exhaustion, turnover intention and psychosomatic distress in emergency room nurses. Organisational and job characteristics of nurses are important predictors of stress-health outcomes. Emergency room nurses are particularly exposed to stressful work-related events and unpredictable work conditions. The study was carried out in 15 emergency departments of Belgian general hospitals in 2008 (T1) and 18 months later (T2) (n = 170). Turnover rates between T1 and T2 were high. Important changes over time were found in predictors and outcomes. Changes in job demand, control and social support predicted job satisfaction, work engagement and emotional exhaustion. In addition, changes in reward, social harassment and work agreements predicted work engagement, emotional exhaustion and intention to leave, respectively. Work-related interventions are important to improve occupational health in emergency room nurses and should focus on lowering job demands, increasing job control, improving social support and a well-balanced reward system. Nursing managers should be aware of the causes and consequences of occupational stress in emergency room nurses in order to enable preventive interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Occupational Safety Precautions among Nurses at Four Hospitals, Nablus District, Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IA Al-Khatib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Occupational hazards, exposure to blood and body fluids (BBF accidents and safety precautions constitute an important public health issue. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of exposure to occupational hazards among nurses, and their knowledge of occupational safety precautions. In a cross-sectional study, we surveyed 332 nurses working in 4 hospitals, Nablus, West Bank, Palestine, by a questionnaire. Bivariate analysis tested the associations between ever exposure and the high likelihood of BBF exposure and the independent socio-demographic and occupational variables. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations between the same two exposures and selected independent variables (those significant in the bivariate analysis. Prevalence of ever exposure to BBF was 51.7%, and was associated with working in private and charitable hospitals (OR 2.62, 2.68, respectively, having 4–6 family members (OR 0.52 and “nursing” being as one's top career choice at university (OR 0.48. The prevalence of high likelihood of BBF exposure was 62.2%, and was associated with working in charitable and private hospitals (OR 7.81, 2.43, respectively and “nursing” being as one's top career choice (OR 0.57. Regarding knowledge, most respondents believed it is necessary to enact laws and regulations regarding occupational safety precautions, reported the use of sharps containers, immediate disinfection after an accident, reporting an accident, and using personal protective equipment. Nurses had adequate knowledge of the risks of their hospital work. Nevertheless, they exhibited high prevalence of exposure to BBF accidents. Future studies are needed to re-evaluate existing occupational safety guidelines in hospitals, establish monitoring and evaluation protocols for health care workers' adherence to the guidelines, and institute well-defined policies for reporting occupational injury incidents so these can be handled appropriately.

  8. Use of Clinical Health Information Technology in Nursing Homes: Nursing Home Characteristics and Quality Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli-Moraski, Carla

    2014-01-01

    This study compares quality measures among nursing homes that have adopted different levels of clinical health information technology (HIT) and examines the perceived barriers and benefits of the adoption of electronic health records as reported by Nursing Home Administrators and Directors of Nursing. A cross-sectional survey distributed online to…

  9. Effect of information and communication technology on nursing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yuriko; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of information and communication technology use and skills on nursing performance. Questionnaires were prepared relating to using the technology, practical skills in utilizing information, the Six-Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance, and demographics. In all, 556 nurses took part (response rate, 72.6%). A two-way analysis of variance was used to determine the influence of years of nursing experience on the relationship between nursing performance and information and communication technology use. The results showed that the group possessing high technological skills had greater nursing ability than the group with low skills; the level of nursing performance improved with years of experience in the former group, but not in the latter group. Regarding information and communication technology use, the results showed that nursing performance improved among participants who used computers for sending and receiving e-mails, but it decreased for those who used cell phones for e-mail. The results suggest that nursing performance may be negatively affected if information and communication technology are inappropriately used. Informatics education should therefore be provided for all nurses, and it should include information use relating to cell phones and computers.

  10. [Technology in nursing care: an analysis from the conceptual framework of Fundamental Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative, field research, whose purpose was to discuss the use of technologies in the nursing care in intensive therapy, taking as reference the theoretical conceptual framework of Fundamental Nursing. Observation and interviews were conducted with twenty two nurses of an intensive therapy unit, with ethnographic analysis. The technology, from the domain of a technological language, provides conditions so that the fundamentals of the nursing care can be effectively incorporated to the nurse practice. The idea of dehumanization linked to the technology can be explained by the way that the nurse ads sense to the things related to his daily life, which will guide his action. The conclusion is that the technologies help to promote life and to rescue the human.

  11. Assessing systemwide occupational health and safety risks of energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Input-output modelling is now being used to assess systemwide occupational and public health and safety risks of energy technologies. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of this method are presented and some of its important limitations are discussed. Its primary advantage is that it provides a standard method with which to compare technologies on a consistent basis without extensive economic analysis. Among the disadvantages are limited range of applicability, limited spectrum of health impacts, and inability to identify unusual health impacts unique to a new technology. (author)

  12. Information technologies and the transformation of nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, Diane J; Connors, Helen R; Jeffries, Pamela R

    2008-01-01

    Higher education is facing new challenges with the emergence of the Internet and other information and communication technologies. The call for the transformation of higher education is imperative. This article describes the transformation of higher education and its impact on nursing education. Nursing education, considered by many a pioneer in the use of educational technologies, still faces 3 major challenges. The first challenge is incorporation of the Institute of Medicine's recommendation of 5 core competencies for all health professionals. The second challenge focuses on the preparation of nurses to practice in informatics-intensive healthcare environments. The last challenge is the use of emerging technologies, such as Web 2.0 tools, that will help to bridge the gap between the next generation and faculty in nursing schools. Nurse educators need to understand and use the power of technologies to prepare the next generation of nurses.

  13. Occupational genetic risks for nurses at radiotherapy oncology wards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srb, V; Kubzova, E

    1985-05-31

    A lymphocyte chromosome analysis of short-term cultured whole peripheral blood of 14 nurses in the radiotherapy/oncology ward of the radiological clinic (working in health risk conditions for an average of 14 years) classified them into a high risk genetic group. They were found to have 4.7% cells with chromosomal aberrations as compared with 1.5% such cells in the control group. The said difference had a high statistical significance (p<0.001). Only aberrations of the structural type were evaluated.The mitotic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in the study group was also adversely affected (MI=1.8) compared with the control group (MI=2.9). Cytogenetic peripheral lymphocyte analysis used as a collective biological exposure test is being considered for incorporation in the system of preventive medical chec-kups of nurses working in radiotherapy/oncology wards.

  14. Occupational genetic risks for nurses at radiotherapy oncology wards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srb, V.; Kubzova, E.

    1985-01-01

    A lymphocyte chromosome analysis of short-term cultured whole peripheral blood of 14 nurses in the radiotherapy/oncology ward of the radiological clinic (working in health risk conditions for an average of 14 years) classified them into a high risk genetic group. They were found to have 4.7% cells with chromosomal aberrations as compared with 1.5% such cells in the control group. The said difference had a high statistical significance (p<0.001). Only aberrations of the structural type were evaluated.The mitotic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in the study group was also adversely affected (MI=1.8) compared with the control group (MI=2.9). Cytogenetic peripheral lymphocyte analysis used as a collective biological exposure test is being considered for incorporation in the system of preventive medical chec-kups of nurses working in radiotherapy/oncology wards. (author)

  15. Occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J. van der Colff

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population consisted of 818 registered nurses. The Nursing Stress Inventory, the Orientation to Life Questionnaire, the COPE, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were administered. The results show that the experience of depletion of emotional resources and feelings of depersonalisation by registered nurses were associated with stress due to job demands and a lack of organisational support, focus on and ventilation of emotions as a coping strategy, and a weak sense of coherence. Work engagement was predicted by a strong sense of coherence and approach-coping strategies.

  16. The association of Nursing Home Compare quality measures with market competition and occupancy rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Liu, Darren; Engberg, John

    2008-01-01

    Since 2002, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have reported quality measures on the Nursing Home Compare Web site. It has been assumed that nursing homes are able to make improvements on these measures. In this study researchers examined nursing homes to see whether they have improved their quality scores, after accounting for regression to the mean. Researchers also examined whether gains varied according to market competition or market occupancy rates. They identified some regression to the mean for the quality measure scores over time; nevertheless, they also determined that some nursing homes had indeed made small improvements in their quality measure scores. As would be predicted based on the market-driven mechanism underlying quality improvements using report cards, the greatest improvements occurred in the most competitive markets and in those with the Lowest average occupancy rates. As policies to promote more competition in Long-term care proceed, further reducing occupancy rates, further, albeit small, quality gains will likely be made in the future.

  17. An investigation on task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems for nursing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ju-Ling; Chen, Rai-Fu

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates factors affecting the fit between nursing tasks and mobile nursing information systems and the relationships between the task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems and nurse performance from the perspective of task-technology fit. Survey research recruited nursing staffs as subjects from selected case hospital. A total of 310 questionnaires were sent out, and 219 copies were obtained, indicating a valid response rate of 70.6%. Collected data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling technique. Our study found that dependence tasks have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.234, Pinformation identification (γ=0.478, Pinformation acquisition (γ=0.213, Pintroduction of mobile nursing information systems in assisting nursing practices can help facilitate both independent and dependent nursing tasks. Our study discovered that the supporting functions of mobile nursing information systems have positive effects on information integration and interpretation (γ=0.365, Pinformation acquisition (γ=0.253, Pinformation systems have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.318, Pinformation integration and interpretation (γ=0.143, Pinformation identification (β=.055, Pinformation acquisition (β=.176, Pinformation integration and interpretation (β=.706, Pinformation systems have positive effects on nursing performance, indicating 83.2% of totally explained variance. As shown, the use of mobile nursing information systems could provide nursing staffs with real-time and accurate information to increase efficiency and effectiveness in patient-care duties, further improving nursing performance.

  18. How can radio frequency identification technology impact nursing practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Luanne; Wyld, David

    2014-12-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can save nurses time, improve quality of care, en hance patient and staff safety, and decrease costs. However, without a better understanding of these systems and their benefits to patients and hospitals, nurses may be slower to recommend, implement, or adopt RFID technology into practice.

  19. Challenges of technological trends in nursing and coping strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Technology in nursing has been shown to reduce redundancy and improve efficiency of work. Information Communication and technology (ICT) incorporation in nursing at Kenyatta national Hospital (KNH) has been ongoing for some years yet the uptake seemingly is slow. Challenges that could be associated ...

  20. Students' Perception of Technology Use in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathleen M; Muckle, Janelle

    2018-02-01

    Technology is an integral part of a nurse's practice; therefore, it is necessary for technology to be integrated into the nursing curriculum for students. Nursing schools are shifting paradigms by integrating technology into the teaching environment to foster active and meaningful learning experiences. Factors related to external influences on individual beliefs, attitudes, and intention to use need to be studied so nurse educators can support the integration of technology into pedagogy. The Technology Acceptance Model was used to evaluate student perceptions of usefulness and ease of use of technology, while matriculated in a baccalaureate level nursing program. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to uncover how nursing students (N = 375) perceived the usefulness and ease of use of technology while in nursing school. Almost every student (99.7%) owned a smartphone, and 95% were reasonably comfortable using various technologies. Selecting and incorporating technological tools to successfully support learning is essential to overcome challenges and support the innovative delivery of content and use of technology by students.

  1. The integration of Information and Communication Technology into nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Hardey, Michael; Torrent, Joan; Ficapal, Pilar

    2011-02-01

    To identify and characterise different profiles of nurses' utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and the Internet and to identify factors that can enhance or inhibit the use of these technologies within nursing. An online survey of the 13,588 members of the Nurses Association of Barcelona who had a registered email account in 2006 was carried out. Factor analysis, cluster analysis and binomial logit model was undertaken. Although most of the nurses (76.70%) are utilizing the Internet within their daily work, multivariate statistics analysis revealed two profiles of the adoption of ICT. The first profile (4.58%) represents those nurses who value ICT and the Internet so that it forms an integral part of their practice. This group is thus referred to as 'integrated nurses'. The second profile (95.42%) represents those nurses who place less emphasis on ICT and the Internet and are consequently labelled 'non-integrated nurses'. From the statistical modelling, it was observed that undertaking research activities an emphasis on international information and a belief that health information available on the Internet was 'very relevant' play a positive and significant role in the probability of being an integrated nurse. The emerging world of the 'integrated nurse' cannot be adequately understood without examining how nurses make use of ICT and the Internet within nursing practice and the way this is shaped by institutional, technical and professional opportunities and constraints. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nurse education and convergent information technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, B

    This article concerns one of the main problems facing nurse education, that of meeting individualised learner needs. This endeavour is inescapable because of current trends in the curriculum, trends towards continuous assessment and more recently, advice from the English National Board (ENB) regarding continuous theoretical assessment. Computer assisted learning, it is suggested, can be helpful in nurturing individual learner progress. Sophisticated technologies are available to educationalists which develop individual learning strategies, but the cost of producing the necessary courseware is high, both in terms of money and tutor time. Hopefully a solution has been found as a project has been funded and is being run by the ENB allowing tutors to develop skills in this area of education.

  3. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  4. Nurse occupational burnout and patient-rated quality of care: The boundary conditions of emotional intelligence and demographic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Minston; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies on the relationship between occupational burnout and the quality of care among nurses have used self-reported data on the quality of care from nurses, thus rendering evaluating the relationship between burnout and the quality of care difficult. Hospitals increasingly hire contract nurses and high turnover rates remain a concern. Little is known about whether nurses' emotional intelligence and demographic factors such as contract status, tenure, and marital status affect the quality of care when burnout occurs. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and patient-rated quality of care and investigated the moderating role of emotional intelligence and demographic variables. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to analyze 98 sets of paired data obtained from nurses and their patients at a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The results suggest that occupational burnout has a less unfavorable effect on the quality of care from permanent, married, and senior nurses. Nursing management should pay particular attention to retaining permanent, married, and senior nurses. To ensure a sustainable nursing workforce in the future, newly graduated registered nurses should have access to permanent positions and opportunities for long-term professional development. In addition, married nurses should be provided with flexible work-family arrangements to ensure their satisfaction in the nursing profession. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  5. Strategies used by nursing technicians to face the occupational suffering in an emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bassalobre Garcia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the strategies used by nursing technicians in order to face the occupational suffering in an emergency room. Methods: qualitative study carried out in an emergency room of a high complexity hospital located in the north of Paraná state. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 12 nursing technicians. The analysis relied on content analysis procedures. Results: respondents revealed as individual strategies to face suffering: try not to get involved with the patient; separation between professional and personal life; and spirituality/religion as support for coping. The collective strategies described by respondents included: action planning for unexpected events in this unit; creating a supportive environment; and attempt to obtain recognition of headship. Conclusion: individual and collective strategies were used consciously by workers and should be encouraged by managers to face the occupational suffering.

  6. Social and occupational engagement of staff in two Irish nursing homes for people with dementia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan-Brown, M

    2011-01-01

    This observational study evaluated the amounts of social and occupational engagement of staff (nurses, care workers, activity coordinators) in two traditional style Irish residential nursing homes for people with dementia. A snapshot observational technique was used to obtain daily quantitative data. Approximately 65% of the time that staff were in communal sitting rooms during the observational periods was spent in work and care tasks, with approximately 25% of the time spent in social engagement and 10% spent in interactive occupational activities with the residents. Staff were absent from the room for over one-third of the observed time. Environmental and operational observations are discussed using narrative descriptions to give a context to the quantitative outcome measures.

  7. Technology and Occupation: Past, Present, and the Next 100 Years of Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger O

    During the first 100 years of occupational therapy, the profession developed a remarkable practice and theory base. All along, technology was an active and core component of practice, but often technology was mentioned only as an adjunct component of therapy and as if it was a specialty. This lecture proposes a new foundational theory that places technology at the heart of occupational therapy as a fundamental part of human occupation and the human experience. Moreover, this new Metaphysical Physical-Emotive Theory of Occupation pushes the occupational therapy profession and the occupational science discipline to overtly consider occupation on the level of a metaphysical-level reality. The presentation of this theory at the Centennial of the profession charges the field to test and further define the theory over the next 100 years and to leverage technology and its role in optimizing occupational performance into the future. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  8. Establishing the value of occupational health nurses' contributions to worker health and safety: a pilot test of a user-friendly estimation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeve, Catherine; McGovern, Patricia; Nachreiner, Nancy M; Ayers, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health nurses use their knowledge and skills to improve the health and safety of the working population; however, companies increasingly face budget constraints and may eliminate health and safety programs. Occupational health nurses must be prepared to document their services and outcomes, and use quantitative tools to demonstrate their value to employers. The aim of this project was to create and pilot test a quantitative tool for occupational health nurses to track their activities and potential cost savings for on-site occupational health nursing services. Tool developments included a pilot test in which semi-structured interviews with occupational health and safety leaders were conducted to identify currents issues and products used for estimating the value of occupational health nursing services. The outcome was the creation of a tool that estimates the economic value of occupational health nursing services. The feasibility and potential value of this tool is described.

  9. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from the perspective of nursing professionals in hemodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Martins Gallo; Fernanda Aparecida Camargo de Lima; Lúcia Margarete dos Reis; Edivaldo Cremer

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the security measures taken and the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in units of hemodynamic, from the perspective of nursing, this quantitative descriptive study was developed during January and February, 2011. A check-list of binary responses (yes / no) was made based on the legislation and updated literature and it was applied in four hospitals in the northern region of Paraná State. The analysis of the data showed that 29 employees have knowledge...

  10. Managing Science and Technology Occupations of Women in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Olubunmi Aderemi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the occupational activities of female graduates in science and technology related fields with a view to assessing factors influencing their performance and make recommendations to enhance women work experiences in S&T occupations. The data for the study was collected through questionnaire and interview schedule from a sample of 2110 respondents comprising of employed female Science and Technology (S&T graduates and heads of departments in tertiary institutions and S&T firms in Nigeria. The study reveal that most female S&T graduates (FSTGs employed in tertiary institutions and research institutions were engaged in S&T based occupations. However, in corporate firms, most of the FSTGs work either in administration, finance or R&D departments. In addition, a large proportion takes less paying non S&T jobs for domestic reasons and lack of suitable vacancies. This suggests gross under-utilization of human resource. Some S&T organizations did not have any female working in S&T departments. Recommendations were made to enhance the recruitment, retention and performance of women in S&T employment in Nigeria.

  11. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from the perspective of nursing professionals in hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Martins Gallo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the security measures taken and the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in units of hemodynamic, from the perspective of nursing, this quantitative descriptive study was developed during January and February, 2011. A check-list of binary responses (yes / no was made based on the legislation and updated literature and it was applied in four hospitals in the northern region of Paraná State. The analysis of the data showed that 29 employees have knowledge about occupational exposure and apply barrier methods effectively to minimize doses of ionizing radiation. The data also showed that employees are participating in ongoing updating on the subject, and that they claim that this participation has a positive effect so that the occupational exposure occurs consciously, and also, the workers did not refuse to participate in any action facing their individual protection.

  12. A National Study on Nurses' Exposure to Occupational Violence in Lebanon: Prevalence, Consequences and Associated Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Alameddine

    Full Text Available Healthcare institutions have commonly reported exposure of employees, particularly nurses, to high levels of occupational violence. Despite such evidence in the Middle East Region, there is a dearth of national studies that have systematically investigated this phenomenon. This study investigates the prevalence, characteristics, consequences and factors associated with nurses' exposure to occupational violence in Lebanon.A cross-sectional design was utilized to survey a nationally representative sample of 915 nurses registered with the Order of Nurses in Lebanon. Stratified random sampling by governorate was utilized. Individually-mailed questionnaires collected information on exposure to violence, degree of burnout and demographic/professional background. The main outcome variables were exposure to verbal abuse (never, 1-3, 4-9 and 10+ times and physical violence (never, ever over the past 12-months. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate prevalence of violence. Multivariable, binomial and multinomial regression models were carried out to investigate the correlates of exposure to verbal abuse and physical violence, respectively.Response rate was 64.8%. Over the last year, prevalence of nurses' exposure to verbal abuse was 62%, (CI: 58-65% and physical violence was 10%, (CI: 8-13%. Among respondents, 31.7% of nurses indicated likelihood to quit their jobs and 22.3% were undetermined. Furthermore, 54.1% reported high levels of emotional exhaustion and 28.8% reported high levels of depersonalization. Compared to nurses with no exposure to verbal abuse, nurses reporting high exposure had high levels of emotional exhaustion (OR:6.4; CI:1.76-23.32, depersonalization (OR:6.8; CI: 3-15 and intention to quit job (OR:3.9; CI: 1.8-8.3. They further reported absence of anti-violence policies at their institutions (OR: 3; CI: 1.5-6.3. Nurses that were ever exposed to physical violence were more likely to be males (OR: 2.2; CI: 1.1-4.3, working day and

  13. Testing telehealth using technology-enhanced nurse monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leslie A; Rockwood, Todd; Stennes, Leif

    2014-10-01

    Technology-enhanced nurse monitoring is a telehealth solution that helps nurses with assessment, diagnosis, and triage of older adults living in community-based settings. This technology links biometric and nonbiometric sensors to a data management system that is monitored remotely by RNs and unlicensed support staff. Nurses faced a number of challenges related to data interpretation, including making clinical inferences from nonbiometric data, integrating data generated by three different telehealth applications into a clinically meaningful cognitive framework, and figuring out how best to use nursing judgment to make valid inferences from online reporting systems. Nurses developed expertise over the course of the current study. The sponsoring organization achieved a high degree of organizational knowledge about how to use these systems more effectively. Nurses saw tremendous value in the telehealth applications. The challenges, learning curve, and organizational improvements are described. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ann-Claire

    2012-12-01

    Community palliative care nurses in Perth have joined the throng of healthcare workers relying on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to store, access and send client information in 'real time'. This paper is guided by Heidegger's approach to technologies and Habermas' insights into the role of law in administering social welfare programs to reveal how new ethical and legal understandings regarding patient information add to nursing's professional responsibilities. This qualitative research interprets data from interviews with twenty community palliative care nurses about clients' legal rights to informational privacy and confidentiality. It explores nurses' views of their nursing responsibilities regarding clients' legal rights, liability issues, bureaucratic monitoring and enforcement procedures. It concludes that nurses and clients are construed as legal subjects entrenched in legal relations that have magnified since these nurses began using PDAs in 2005/2006. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The migratory factor as a determinant of health: A transcultural occupational health nursing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Escaño, Juan; de Diego-Cordero, Rocío; Badanta-Romero, Bárbara; Barrientos-Trigo, Sergio

    We present a clinical case in occupational health nursing where the worker was showing symptoms of stress caused by a change of residence and related factors at work. A nursing assessment was made following Leininger's theory of Care Diversity and Universality and Sunrise Model, considered suitable for the case. After the assessment, it was determined that the factors associated with the migratory event triggered the reported symptoms, and a care plan was drawn up with monthly telephone contact follow-up and reassessment at 3months. A holistic approach containing social and cultural elements, together with the use of standardised nurse language are very useful in cases such as the one presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Veer, Anke J E; Fleuren, Margot A H; Bekkema, Nienke; Francke, Anneke L

    2011-10-27

    A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of determinants influencing the success of the introduction of new technologies as perceived by nursing staff. The study population is a nationally representative research sample of nursing staff (further referred to as the Nursing Staff Panel), of whom 685 (67%) completed a survey questionnaire about their experiences with recently introduced technologies. Participants were working in Dutch hospitals, psychiatric organizations, care organizations for mentally disabled people, home care organizations, nursing homes or homes for the elderly. Half of the respondents were confronted with the introduction of a new technology in the last three years. Only half of these rated the introduction of the technology as positive.The factors most frequently mentioned as impeding actual use were related to the (kind of) technology itself, such as malfunctioning, ease of use, relevance for patients, and risks to patients. Furthermore nursing staff stress the importance of an adequate innovation strategy. A prerequisite for the successful introduction of new technologies is to analyse determinants that may impede or enhance the introduction among potential users. For technological innovations special attention has to be paid to the (perceived) characteristics of the technology itself.

  17. The Influence of Emotional Labour and Emotional Work on the Occupational Health and Wellbeing of South Australian Hospital Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisaniello, Sandra L.; Winefield, Helen R.; Delfabbro, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is an emotionally complex occupation, requiring performance of both emotional labour (for the benefit of the organisation and professional role) and emotional work (for the benefit of the nurse-patient relationship). According to the Conservation of Resources Theory, such processes can have a significant effect on psychological wellbeing…

  18. The association between rotating shift work and increased occupational stress in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Chen; Chen, Chung-Hey; Pan, Shung-Mei; Chen, Yao-Mei; Pan, Chih-Hong; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether rotating shift work increases occupational stress in nurses. This study measured shift work scheduling and occupational stress by using the Effort-Reward Imbalance model with self-reported questionnaires in a sample of 654 female nurses. Overcommitment risk was higher in nurses who worked rotating shifts than in those who worked day/non-night shifts (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.03-4.66). However, an effort/reward imbalance was not directly associated with work schedules (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 0.87-4.35). Among nurses working rotation rotating shifts, those who had 2 days off after their most recent night shifts showed an alleviated risk of overcommitment (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32-0.82), but those who had worked for at least one series of 7 consecutive work days per month had an increased risk of effort/reward imbalance (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.69-4.48). Additionally, those who had little or no participation in planning working hours and shift scheduling and worked overtime at least three times per week during the preceding 2 months tended to have high stress. The nurses who worked rotating shifts tended to experience work-related stress, but their stress levels improved if they had at least 2 days off after their most recent night shift and if they were not scheduled to work 7 consecutive days. These empirical data can be used to optimize work schedules for nurses to alleviate work stress.

  19. Experiences of technology integration in home care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K A; Valdez, R S; Casper, G R; Kossman, S P; Carayon, P; Or, C K L; Burke, L J; Brennan, P F

    2008-11-06

    The infusion of health care technologies into the home leads to substantial changes in the nature of work for home care nurses and their patients. Nurses and nursing practice must change to capitalize on these innovations. As part of a randomized field experiment evaluating web-based support for home care of patients with chronic heart disease, we engaged nine nurses in a dialogue about their experience integrating this modification of care delivery into their practice. They shared their perceptions of the work they needed to do and their perceptions and expectations for patients and themselves in using technologies to promote and manage self-care. We document three overarching themes that identify preexisting factors that influenced integration or represent the consequences of technology integration into home care: doing tasks differently, making accommodations in the home for devices and computers, and being mindful of existing expectations and skills of both nurses and patients.

  20. Using interactive video technology in nursing education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Daria M; Pulcher, Karen L

    2008-02-01

    A pilot study was conducted to analyze the benefits of using interactive technology with external assessors and graduating senior nursing students during Senior Nurse Leadership Assessment Day at the University of Central Missouri. The primary aim was to determine whether videoconferencing technology would promote recruitment and retention of professional nurse external assessors without compromising student learning. Among the issues discussed are the advantages and disadvantages of using interactive videoconferencing technology in education and the influence of external assessors in nursing education. The study results indicate that interactive videoconferencing is an effective, accepted format for educational opportunities such as Senior Nurse Leadership Assessment Day, based on the lived experiences of the study participants. In addition, the results demonstrate that interactive videoconferencing does not compromise student learning or assessment by external assessors.

  1. [Exploration of Recent Mobile Technologies Applied in Nursing Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Lu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Lei

    2017-12-01

    The development of science and technology has fundamentally changed people's lives and the way that medical systems function. Increasingly, mobile technologies are being introduced and integrated into classroom teaching and clinical applications, resulting in healthcare providers introducing innovative applications into health education. These applications enhance the clinical, education, and research expertise of medical staffs and nurses, while improving quality of care and providing new experiences for patients. In order to understand the current situation and trends in nursing education, the present study adopted literature analysis to explore the influence and effect of mobile technologies that have been introduced into nursing education from the school and clinical environments. The results found that students hold positive attitudes toward introducing these technologies into their curricula. Although these technologies may increase the work efficiency of nurses in the workplace, questions remain user perceptions and professional expression. Therefore, securing patient agreement and healthcare system approval were major turning points in the introduction of mobile technologies into nursing education. In the future, adapting mobile technologies for use in teaching materials and courses may be further developed. Moreover, empirical studies may be used in future research in order to facilitate the increasingly successful integration of relevant technologies into nursing education.

  2. Nursing care in a high-technological environment: Experiences of critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunlind, Adam; Granström, John; Engström, Åsa

    2015-04-01

    Management of technical equipment, such as ventilators, infusion pumps, monitors and dialysis, makes health care in an intensive care setting more complex. Technology can be defined as items, machinery and equipment that are connected to knowledge and management to maximise efficiency. Technology is not only the equipment itself, but also the knowledge of how to use it and the ability to convert it into nursing care. The aim of this study is to describe critical care nurses' experience of performing nursing care in a high technology healthcare environment. Qualitative, personal interviews were conducted during 2012 with eight critical care nurses in the northern part of Sweden. Interview transcripts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes with six categories emerged. The technology was described as a security that could facilitate nursing care, but also one that could sometimes present obstacles. The importance of using the clinical gaze was highlighted. Nursing care in a high technological environment must be seen as multi-faceted when it comes to how it affects CCNs' experience. The advanced care conducted in an ICU could not function without high-tech equipment, nor could care operate without skilled interpersonal interaction and maintenance of basal nursing. That technology is seen as a major tool and simultaneously as a barrier to patient-centred care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Coping with occupational stress among nursing staff by participatory action research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano-Báez, Rocío; Albar-Marín, María Jesús; García-Ramírez, Manuel; Prieto-Guerrero, María Milagros; García-Nieto, Alejandro Antonio

    2009-01-01

    To describe a collaborative practice focused on coping with the occupational stress among nursing staff in a hospital setting. These practices focus on the contextualization of the problems and the design and implementation of actions using the psychopolitical model and the participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Participants were the nurses of 4 units of internal medicine at the public hospital "Virgen Macarena" in Seville. We have used the ISTAS questionnaire, interviews and discussion groups through which nurses and researchers have assessed, defined, proposed and implemented different actions in order to improve their work conditions. Problematic situations detected by the questionnaires are associated to psychological demands, role conflicts and esteem. The main cause of stress in healthcare professionals is the lack of staff, according to the opinion laid by supervisors. In the discussion groups, nurses accorded to get involved in three situations: a) the need of the continuous presence of an orderly to move patients which aren't autonomous; b) the need of controlling visit hours and the number of accompanying people with each patient; and c) the need to improve the registration of the activities assigned to nursing staff. Among the strength of the psychopolitical model and PAR in a hospital context we must emphasize on the mobilization of professionals and the development of a critical consciousness. Among the weakness, those derived from bureaucratic processes. These barriers imply a challenge for change and organizational development.

  4. Patient and nurse safety: how information technology makes a difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Roy L

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's landmark report asserted medical error is seldom the fault of individuals, but the result of faulty healthcare policy/procedure systems. Numerous studies have shown that information technology can shore up weak systems. For nursing, information technology plays a key role in protecting patients by eliminating nursing mistakes and protecting nurses by reducing their negative exposure. However, managing information technology is a function of managing the people who use it. This article examines critical issues that impact patient and nurse safety, both physical and professional. It discusses the importance of eliminating the culture of blame, the requirements of process change, how to implement technology in harmony with the organization and the significance of vision.

  5. Use and development of teaching technologies presented in nursing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: characterizing teaching technologies used or developed in nursing dissertations and theses in Brazil. Methods: a documentary research that had data collection sourced from directories of theses and dissertations available on the website of the Brazilian Nursing Association, from Volumes Nineteen (XIX (2001 to Twenty-one (XXI (2013. Results: of 6346 studies, 18 (0.28% used or developed teaching technologies, composed of the following categories: use of conceptual map; use of games; development of Virtual Learning Environment; development of educational materials; development of Distance Education courses; and artifact development. Conclusion: national research on the development and use of teaching technology in nursing are still insufficient, especially in the North and Northeast. Multiple benefits of the use of teaching technologies in nursing and learning environments were highlighted, not only for students and professionals, but also for patients.

  6. Burnout during nursing education predicts lower occupational preparedness and future clinical performance: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, Ann; Gustavsson, J Petter

    2012-08-01

    Early-career burnout among nurses can influence health and professional development, as well as quality of care. However, the prospective occupational consequences of study burnout have not previously been investigated in a national sample using a longitudinal design. To prospectively monitor study burnout for a national sample of nursing students during their years in higher education and at follow-up 1 year post graduation. Further, to relate the possible development of study burnout to prospective health and life outcomes, as well as student and occupational outcomes. A longitudinal cohort of Swedish nursing students (within the population-based LANE (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education/Entry) study) from all sites of education in Sweden was surveyed annually. Data were collected at four points in time over 4 years: three times during higher education and 1 year post graduation. : A longitudinal sample of 1702 respondents was prospectively followed from late autumn 2002 to spring 2006. Mean level changes of study burnout (as measured by the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, i.e. the Exhaustion and Disengagement subscales) across time, as well as prospective effects of baseline study burnout and changes in study burnout levels, were estimated using Latent Growth Curve Modeling. An increase in study burnout (from 30% to 41%) across 3 years in higher education was found, and levels of both Exhaustion and Disengagement increased significantly across the years in education (pdevelopment of study burnout, predicted lower levels of in-class learner engagement and occupational preparedness in the final year. At follow-up 1 year post graduation, earlier development of study burnout was related to lower mastery of occupational tasks, less research utilization in everyday clinical practice and higher turnover intentions. The results suggest that study burnout may have interfered with learning and psychological well-being. Aspects related to work skills and intention to

  7. Current provision of rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C; Clarke, B; O'Brien, A; Hammond, A; Ryan, S; Kay, L; Hewlett, S

    2006-07-01

    Rheumatological conditions are common and all health professionals (HPs) therefore need sufficient knowledge and skills to manage patients safely and effectively. The aim of this study was to examine current undergraduate education in rheumatology for HPs in the UK. A questionnaire was sent to curriculum organizers and clinical placement officers for all undergraduate courses in adult nursing, occupational therapy (OT) and physiotherapy (PT) in the UK to ascertain the nature and amount of rheumatology theory and clinical exposure provided. Of the 47 adult nursing, 26 OT and 30 PT undergraduate courses surveyed, 85-90% responded. Overall, rheumatology teaching is 5-10 h over 3 yr. Nursing students receive moderate/in-depth teaching on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in only 52% of courses (OT 91%, PT 96%) and on osteoarthritis (OA) in 63% (OT 91%, PT 92%). Clinical experience of RA is probably/definitely available in only 56% of nursing courses (OT 72%, PT 88%), with similar results in OA. Overall, nursing students receive the least rheumatology exposure, particularly in psychosocial issues and symptom management, while PT students receive the most. OT students have limited opportunities for clinical exposure to psychosocial and joint protection issues. Use of local rheumatology clinical HP experts is variable (18-93%) and cross-disciplinary exposure is limited (0-36%). Many educators consider their rheumatology training to be insufficient (nursing 50%, PT 42%, OT 24%). Rheumatology training for undergraduate HPs is limited in key areas and often fails to take advantage of local clinical expertise, with nursing students particularly restricted. Clinical HP experts should consider novel methods of addressing these shortfalls within the limited curriculum time available.

  8. Willingness and preferences of nurses related to learning with technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth W; Bedford, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    To what extent are nurses willing to learn with technology-enhanced tools, such as online education, podcasts, webcasts, mobile learning, and realistic simulations? What factors influence their willingness? This article includes a description of a mixed methodology study that addressed these questions. Nurses of all ages indicated a willingness to learn with a variety of technological tools. Primary determinants of willingness were associated with ease of use, familiarity, convenience, and perceived benefit.

  9. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  10. Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

    2013-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

  11. Determination of nursing students' attitudes towards the use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkes, Nurten; Celik, Ferya; Bektas, Hicran

    2018-03-11

    The use of technology is increasingly important in nursing education and practice. For this reason, it is necessary to determine the attitudes of nursing students towards technology. This study was conducted with 508 nursing students. A personal information form that was prepared by the researchers and the Attitudes Toward Technology Scale were used as the data collection tools. The mean score that was obtained by the nursing students from the Attitudes Toward Technology Scale was 61.53 ± 1.13. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.90. There was a statistically significant difference between the sexes, using a computer, tablet, or laptop, using technology to reach health-related information, and for professional development, using mobile applications related to drug information. There was also a statistical difference between using the Periscope and Scorpio accounts from social media and using Excel and PowerPoint from Microsoft programs. Nursing students are capable of technology-based teaching, which can be expanded as a result. © 2018 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  12. Connecting congregations: technology resources influence parish nurse practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerull, Lisa M; Near, Kelly K; Ragon, Bart; Farrell, Sarah P

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive pilot study evaluated the influence of health resource information education and the use of Web-based communication technology on the professional practice of the parish nurse in the congregational setting. Five parish nurse participants from varied denominations in rural and nonrural Virginia received a laptop computer, printer, video projector, and webcam along with high-speed Internet access in each congregational setting. The nurses attended two group education sessions that incorporated computer applications and training in accessing and using quality health information resources and communication applications such as a group "chat" software and webcam to communicate with others through high-speed Internet access. Qualitative analysis from semistructured interviews of nurses confirmed that participants found the project to be beneficial in terms of awareness, education, and applicability of technology use in parish nurse practice. Quantitative data from preproject and postproject surveys found significant differences in nurses' abilities and confidence with technology use and application. Findings showed that the knowledge and experience gained from this study enhanced parish nurse practice and confidence in using technology for communication, health education, and counseling.

  13. Cogitation on Occupational Stress and Social Support among Hospital Nurses: a Case Study of Zanjan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Jafari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research on stress among hospital nurses, the important effects of support and stress on care quality are not yet well established. Similar to other jobs, nurses face stress in their routine working day. The relationship between occupational stress, social support and factors relating to each of them, among Iranian nurses are attempted to correlate. This cross-sectional analytical-descriptive study was carried out in 2013 in Zanjan province where 248 nurses filled the given questionnaires including Demographic data, Work Factors, Nursing Stress Scale, and Social Integration Scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.00. In our study, we found that the stress and social support were significantly correlated. Our findings revealed a significant relation between social supports and occupational stress in nurses. Conclusively, support from supervisors and coworkers can help control nurses’ stress. In addition, both social support and occupational stress are related to three major components: job satisfaction, job security and others' attitude towards nursing. Therefore, creating a positive attitude towards nursing in society, and a suitable working environment for them is a way to increase their efficiency.

  14. The relationship between knowledge of ergonomic science and the occupational health among nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Juibari, Leila; Sanagu, Akram; Farrokhi, Nafiseh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational hazards are much higher for nurses than many other jobs and neglecting this fact may reduce the quality of nursing services. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between knowledge of ergonomics and occupational health among the nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences. METHODS: It was a cross-sectional analytical study on 423 nursing staff working in various medical centers affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sc...

  15. Occupational Stress Management and Burnout Interventions in Nursing and Their Implications for Healthy Work Environments: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, Behdin; Lightfoot, Nancy; Larivière, Michael; Carter, Lorraine; Rukholm, Ellen; Schinke, Robert; Belanger-Gardner, Diane

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on a literature review of workplace interventions (i.e., creating healthy work environments and improving nurses' quality of work life [QWL]) aimed at managing occupational stress and burnout for nurses. A literature search was conducted using the keywords nursing, nurses, stress, distress, stress management, burnout, and intervention. All the intervention studies included in this review reported on workplace intervention strategies, mainly individual stress management and burnout interventions. Recommendations are provided to improve nurses' QWL in health care organizations through workplace health promotion programs so that nurses can be recruited and retained in rural and northern regions of Ontario. These regions have unique human resources needs due to the shortage of nurses working in primary care. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Organisational intervention to reduce occupational stress and turnover in hospital nurses in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Greg; Lenthall, Sue; Dollard, Maureen; Opie, Tessa; Knight, Sabina; Dunn, Sandra; Wakerman, John; MacLeod, Martha; Seller, Jo; Brewster-Webb, Denise

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of an organisational intervention aimed to reduce occupational stress and turnover rates of 55% in hospital nurses. The evaluation used a pre- and post-intervention design, triangulating data from surveys and archival information. Two public hospitals (H1 and H2) in the Northern Territory (NT) Australia participated in the intervention. 484 nurses from the two NT hospitals (H1, Wave 1, N = 103, Wave 2, N = 173; H2, Wave 1, N = 75, Wave 2, N = 133) responded to questionnaires administered in 2008 and in 2010. The intervention included strategies such as the development and implementation of a nursing workload tool to assess nurse workloads, roster audits, increased numbers of nursing personnel to address shortfall, increased access to clinical supervision and support for graduates, increased access to professional development including postgraduate and short courses, and a recruitment campaign for new graduates and continuing employees. We used an extended Job Demand-Resources framework to evaluate the intervention and 17 evaluation indicators canvassing psychological distress, emotional exhaustion, work engagement, job satisfaction, job demands, job resources, and system factors such as psychosocial safety climate. Turnover rates were obtained from archival data. Results demonstrated a significant reduction in psychological distress and emotional exhaustion and a significant improvement in job satisfaction, across both hospitals, and a reduction in turnover in H2 from 2008 and 2010. Evidence suggests that the intervention led to significant improvements in system capacity (adaptability, communication) in combination with a reduction in job demands in both hospitals, and an increase in resources (supervisor and coworker support, and job control) particularly in H1. The research addresses a gap in the theoretical and intervention literature regarding system/organisation level approaches to occupational stress. The approach was very successful

  17. [Reducing occupational burnout and enhancing job performance in new nurses: the efficacy of "last mile" programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Liu, Pei-Fen; Ho, Hsueh-Hua; Chen, Ping-Ling; Chao, Hui-Lin; Chen, Hsiao-Lien

    2012-08-01

    New nurses undergo a stressful and challenging transition process in the nursing workplace. Lack of patient care knowledge and skills and work adaption difficulties lead to a high turnover rate that drains essential new talent away from the nursing profession and further exacerbates professional staffing shortages in the healthcare sector. The "last mile" program is a program developed jointly by a nursing school and hospital as a mechanism to bridge classroom learning to clinical practice and smooth the transition of nursing students into nursing professionals. The purpose of this study was to understand the effect of the "last mile" program on job performance and occupational burnout among new nurses. We conducted a quasi-experimental study in 2009 on a convenience sample of new nurses in a medical center. Participants were assigned into two groups, namely those enrolled in the last mile program (n = 29) and those not enrolled in the program (n = 94). Research team members and several collaborative universities developed the last mile program used in this study; Seven experts established content validity; The last mile program included 84 hours of lecture courses and 160 hours of clinical practice. Data was collected using the nursing job performance scale developed in 2007 by Greenslade and Jimmieson and translated ÷ back translated into an equivalent Chinese version. Exploratory factor analysis showed all items aggraded into 8 factors, which could be divided into task performance and contextual performance concept categories. Task performance concepts included: social support, information, coordination of care, and technical care; Contextual performance concepts included: interpersonal support, job-task support, volunteering for additional duties and compliance. The Cronbach's α for the 8 factors were .70-.95. The occupational burnout inventory included the 4 subscales of personal burnout, work-related burnout, client-related burnout, and over

  18. Relationship between nurse's general health and their personal occupational traits in Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Adibi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Health state is one of the most important factors in their life. Individuals may be subject to threatening factors in different ways. Nurses are one main group of community whose health may be threatened due to their occupational environment. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating general health of nurses and their personal occupational traits. Method: This study is correlation-descriptive research. Statistical population consists of 220 nurses working in Al-Zahra hospital selected by random sampling. Instrument of this study includes a demographic questionnaire and a standard Goldberg 28-question questionnaire. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Findings: in this study, nurses are subject to occupational events, physical and chemical harmful materials, biologic harmful materials, mental/ ergonomic harmful occupational factors. And there exists relation between their general health and their age, number of children and marital status. But no relation has been seen with their surgery records, rate of sport they do, vaccination, the unit in which they work, their occupational environment, their occupational record and posts.

  19. 78 FR 12065 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology for Pesticide Handlers: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers...: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of...

  20. Nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy preparation in rheumatology in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, A M; Becker, M C

    1980-11-01

    Directors of undergraduate programs in nursing, physical therapy, and occupational therapy in the United States and Canada were surveyed to determine the amount and perceived adequacy of the current degree of classroom and clinical exposure to the rheumatic diseases. One hundred ninety-one (73%) of the 262 mailed questionnaires were returned. Results indicate that regardless of the actual degree of rheumatologic classroom exposure, directors in all three disciplines view current amounts as adequate. A larger proportion views levels of clinical exposure as inadequate. In general, the Canadian programs had a greater emphasis on rheumatology than their United States counterparts.

  1. Development of the Career Anchors Scale among Occupational Health Nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yoshiko; Hatono, Yoko; Kubo, Tomohide; Shimamoto, Satoko; Nakatani, Junko; Burgel, Barbara J

    2016-11-29

    This study aimed to develop the Career Anchors Scale among Occupational Health Nurses (CASOHN) and evaluate its reliability and validity. Scale items were developed through a qualitative inductive analysis of interview data, and items were revised following an examination of content validity by experts and occupational health nurses (OHNs), resulting in a provisional scale of 41 items. A total of 745 OHNs (response rate 45.2%) affiliated with the Japan Society for Occupational Health participated in the self-administered questionnaire survey. Two items were deleted based on item-total correlations. Factor analysis was then conducted on the remaining 39 items to examine construct validity. An exploratory factor analysis with a main factor method and promax rotation resulted in the extraction of six factors. The variance contribution ratios of the six factors were 37.45, 7.01, 5.86, 4.95, 4.16, and 3.19%. The cumulative contribution ratio was 62.62%. The factors were named as follows: Demonstrating expertise and considering position in work (Factor 1); Management skills for effective work (Factor 2); Supporting health improvement in groups and organizations (Factor 3); Providing employee-focused support (Factor 4); Collaborating with occupational health team members and personnel (Factor 5); and Compatibility of work and private life (Factor 6). The confidence coefficient determined by the split-half method was 0.85. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the overall scale was 0.95, whereas those of the six subscales were 0.88, 0.90, 0.91, 0.80, 0.85, and 0.79, respectively. CASOHN was found to be valid and reliable for measuring career anchors among OHNs in Japan.

  2. Development of the Career Anchors Scale among Occupational Health Nurses in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yoshiko; Hatono, Yoko; Kubo, Tomohide; Shimamoto, Satoko; Nakatani, Junko; Burgel, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to develop the Career Anchors Scale among Occupational Health Nurses (CASOHN) and evaluate its reliability and validity. Methods: Scale items were developed through a qualitative inductive analysis of interview data, and items were revised following an examination of content validity by experts and occupational health nurses (OHNs), resulting in a provisional scale of 41 items. A total of 745 OHNs (response rate 45.2%) affiliated with the Japan Society for Occupational Health participated in the self-administered questionnaire survey. Results: Two items were deleted based on item-total correlations. Factor analysis was then conducted on the remaining 39 items to examine construct validity. An exploratory factor analysis with a main factor method and promax rotation resulted in the extraction of six factors. The variance contribution ratios of the six factors were 37.45, 7.01, 5.86, 4.95, 4.16, and 3.19%. The cumulative contribution ratio was 62.62%. The factors were named as follows: Demonstrating expertise and considering position in work (Factor 1); Management skills for effective work (Factor 2); Supporting health improvement in groups and organizations (Factor 3); Providing employee-focused support (Factor 4); Collaborating with occupational health team members and personnel (Factor 5); and Compatibility of work and private life (Factor 6). The confidence coefficient determined by the split-half method was 0.85. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the overall scale was 0.95, whereas those of the six subscales were 0.88, 0.90, 0.91, 0.80, 0.85, and 0.79, respectively. Conclusions: CASOHN was found to be valid and reliable for measuring career anchors among OHNs in Japan. PMID:27725484

  3. Potential predictors of susceptibility to occupational stress in Japanese novice nurses - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Shinobu; Daitoku, Satoshi; Abe, Masaharu; Arimura, Emi; Setoyama, Hitoshi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ushikai, Miharu; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Horiuchi, Masahisa

    2017-04-04

    Occupational stress is a known factor behind employee resignations; thus, early identification of individuals prone to such stress is important. Accordingly, in this pilot study we evaluated potential predictors of susceptibility to occupational stress in Japanese novice nurses. Forty-two female novice nurses at Kagoshima University Hospital were recruited for the study population. Each underwent physical health and urinary examinations, and completed a lifestyle questionnaire at the time of job entry. Each also completed a Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), related to mental health status, at job entry and 5 months post-entry. Psychological stress, somatic symptoms, and combined BJSQ scores were determined for each time point. All three stress condition scores had significantly decreased at 5 months post-entry, suggesting occupational stress. Systolic blood pressure (r = -0.324, p stress condition scores were significantly low in subjects reporting substantial 1-year body weight change (≤ ± 3 kg) and short times between dinner and bedtimes (≤2 h), though baseline stress condition scores were not. Urinary sodium concentration, 1-year body weight change, and pre-sleep evening meals were then targeted for multivariate analysis, and confirmed as independent explanatory variables for post-entry stress condition scores. One-year body weight change, times between dinner and bedtimes, and urinary sodium concentration are promising potential predictors of susceptibility to occupational stress, and should be further investigated in future research. ISRCTN ISRCTN17516023. Retrospectively registered 7 December 2016.

  4. [Relationship between occupational stress, recovery experience, and physiological health of nurses in a municipal grade A tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L; Zhang, C L; Yang, T; Lan, Y J

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To examine the relationship between recovery experience, occupational stress, and physiological health of nurses in a municipal grade A tertiary hospital. Methods: A total of 296 in-service nurses from 7 municipal grade A tertiary hospitals were selected from October 2015 to February 2016. Individual characteristics of the subjects were collected using a self-made questionnaire. The recovery experience, occupational stress, and physiological health of the subjects were assessed based on the physiological health dimensions in the Chinese version of Recovery Experience Questionnaire (REQ-C) , Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) , and Quality of Work Life (QWL7-32) . Results: The mean recovery experience score of nurses from the municipal grade A tertiary hospital was 45.04±7.72, and 51.35% of the nurses had satisfactory recovery experience. Occupational stress was identified in 81.76% of the nurses. Based on the four categories of occupational stress, 65 nurses were identified with high-strain jobs (21.95%) , 56 with relaxed (low-strain) jobs (18.92%) , 49 with passive jobs (16.55%) , and 126 with active jobs (42.57%) . In addition, the mean physiological health score of the nurses was 21.20±4.24. Physiological health was negatively correlated with occupational stress ( r =-0.173, P stress ( r =-0.116, P stress, where subjects with high-demand active jobs had the poorest recovery experience ( F =2.610, P stress of nurses, where increased job demand can lead to stronger stress response, reduced recovery experience, and poorer physiological health.

  5. Occupational exposure of nursing staff working with radioiodine therapy during 11 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, Jose Ulisses Manzzini; Teixeira, Sandra Mara Pessano

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the occupational exposure of nursing staff in charge of inpatients undergoing 131 I therapy during 11 years. Materials and methods: The exposure situations were classified according to a questionnaire answered by three nursing attendants, correlating the procedures with activities, distances and amount of time in the iodotherapy room. Records of received doses by two types of dosimeters were evaluated over two subsequent periods. In both periods the nursing attendants received instructions about radiological protection. Results: In usual situations, their amount of time in the iodotherapy room was in compliance with the standard time established by the service. In unusual situations, where the patient needed assistance for mobility, the exposure period was above the standard. However, this exposure occurs casually (only one or two times a year). During the period between 1993 and 1999 (dosimetric films) there were ten dose records, all of them at record level. From 2000 to 2003 (thermoluminescent dosimeters) ten dose records were also obtained, with only one of them at the investigation level. During this study period, the mean 131 I activity was doubled. Conclusion: Despite the increased levels of activity there was no significant increase in dose to nursing attendants. (author)

  6. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  7. [The relationships among occupational and organizational commitment, human relations in the workplace, and well-being in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tadayuki

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the relationship among human relations in the workplace, job involvement, affective commitment and continuance commitment with occupational and organizational commitment, and well-being. Questionnaires were completed by 855 female nurses who worked in four public hospitals (mean age = 32.6 years). The results of factor analysis showed that each component of the vocational constructs was distinguishable from the others. Path analysis showed that human relations in the workplace directly influenced job involvement and affective commitment both to the occupation and to the organization. Job involvement in turn directly influenced affective commitment and continuance commitment to the occupation. Job involvement also influenced affective commitment to the organization directly, and indirectly through affective commitment to the occupation. Finally, it was found that human relations in the workplace and affective commitment to the occupation positively influenced well-being; continuance commitment to the occupation was a negative influence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  8. The impact of gender, culture, and sexuality on Mauritian nursing: Nursing as a non-gendered occupational identity or masculine field? Qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollup, Oddvar

    2014-05-01

    International studies have generally defined nursing as a female-dominated occupation. The almost absence of male nurses seems universal, except as a privileged minority occupying positions within nursing specialties ('islands of masculinity'). Nursing is associated with relatively low status owing to gender and income, and is also influenced by cultural perceptions of social status, the nature of the work and sexuality. This study aims to describe and analyse how gender and cultural perceptions influenced the development of nursing in Mauritius. This paper examines why nursing in Mauritius became gendered in different ways due to the impact of gender equivalence in the work force, the gendered segregation in clinical practice and the absence of caring feminisation in nursing. This qualitative study is based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews and convenience sampling. The sample includes nurses working at five hospitals. They all come from the central and southern part of Mauritius. The data were collected over a five-month period during 2006. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 nurses, both men (27) and women (20), of different grades, ages, religions and ethnic backgrounds. Nursing practice is gender segregated, influenced and supported by cultural traditions and perceptions of gender relations, sexuality and touch in nursing. However, the professional identity and role is considered non-gendered, implied by the title of 'nursing officer' and the presence of male nurses who constitute almost 50 percent of the work force. Male nurses do not face similar barriers deterring them from entering nursing profession. Nursing did not develop the image of women's work and a low status job in Mauritius. The nursing profession in Mauritius has been shaped by a different 'history of origin', social, cultural and societal conditions on the basis of the absence of gender imbalance in the work force and caring feminisation in nursing. Moreover, the

  9. Encounters with unemployment in occupational health care: Nurses' constructions of clients without work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romppainen, Katri; Jähi, Rita; Saloniemi, Antti; Virtanen, Pekka

    2010-02-01

    This study explores occupational health nurses' encounters with unemployed clients in Finland. It involved setting up and evaluating a new service, Career Health Care, that resembled occupational health care, except that clients were recruited from among job seekers who were participating in one of three active labour market policy measures: vocational training, subsidised employment in the public sector, or participatory training for entering the labour market. Our main interest focused on nurses' perceptions of the unemployed and their professional practices in the context of Career Health Care. The analysis revealed four overlapping discourses with regard to clients: the client as a casualty of unemployment, the client as unemployed but active, the client as a deviant in the labour market, and the client as a skilled user of the system. Each discourse had implications for professional practice. The risk of negative stereotyping and consequent exclusion from services is discussed here. In conclusion, we stress the complexity of providing health services that can match the increasing diversity of contemporary labour market trajectories. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [How to integrate humanization and technology in nursing training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Dagmar Estermann

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the current incorporation of the subject of humanization of care in the current context of Brazilian nursing. The relation between nursing and technology is approached, in this study, from a historical perspective. The study also develops the proposition of "human re-signification", having as reference the concept of Cyborg, considering the way this concept has been employed in the contemporary cultural and feminist theoretical framework.

  11. Relationship between staff-reported culture change and occupancy rate and organizational commitment among nursing homes in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method from four regions nationwide. Culture change in nursing homes was operationalized by five person-directed care (PDC) constructs and three organizational environment constructs, and outcome quality was indicated by changes to occupancy rate and organizational commitment. After controlling for facility characteristics, the effect of staff-reported culture change on occupancy rate and organizational commitment was analyzed through the multiple-regression method. Consistent with previous research, this study revealed positive effects of culture change for nursing homes in South Korea. The study found that staff-reported culture change correlated with occupancy rate and organizational commitment. Given that culture change variables were significantly related to occupancy rate and organizational commitment, the findings of the study provide a persuasive argument that policies and/or programs to support culture change in nursing homes should be enhanced. Management-level workers in these facilities should have the skills and knowledge to foster more PDC and a more person-directed environment.

  12. Work-family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagami, Taku; Kitaoka, Kazuyo; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work-Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including quantitative workload and the variance in workload, disappeared with the addition of WFC (each work interference with family [WIF] or family interference with work [FIW]). The relationship between emotional exhaustion and mental demands disappeared only with the addition of WIF. The relationship between depressive symptoms and variance in workload disappeared with the addition of WFC (each WIF or FIW). Our findings may encourage hospital administrators to consider the risks of medical staff WFC. Furthermore, longitudinal investigations into the factors associated with WFC are required for administrative and psychological interventions.

  13. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better

  14. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: A questionnaire survey of nurse-users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better

  15. Occupational stress among Thai emergency department nurses : Development and validation of an instrument for measuring stressors in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Yuwanich, Nuttapol

    2017-01-01

    Working at an emergency department has some characteristics, which may generate stress. In this thesis, the stressors for emergency nurses were evaluated and an instrument was developed for measuring their impact. In order to gain a deeper understanding regarding the occupational stress among emergency nurses, a descriptive qualitative design with semi-structured interviews were used in two studies (I, II), one at a private and the other at a public hospital in Thailand. Three main categories...

  16. Low back pain characterized by muscle resistance and occupational factors associated with nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Souza Petersen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the occupational factors associated with low back pain using a surveillance tool and to characterize the low back pain by the resistance of the extensor muscles of the vertebral column among nursing professionals at an Intensive Care Unit.METHODS: Cross-sectional study. The workers answered a questionnaire about occupational factors and participated in a resistance test of the extensor muscles of the vertebral column. Associations were established through Student's T-test or Mann-Whitney's U-test and correlations using Pearson's test.RESULTS: Out of 48 participants, 32 (67% suffered from low pain. For the resistance test, the subjects suffering from low back pain endured less time in comparison with asymptomatic subjects, but without significant differences (p=0.147. The duration of the pain episode showed a significant negative correlation (p=0.016 with the results of the resistance test though. The main factors identified as causes of low back pain were biomechanical and postural elements, conditions of the muscle structure and physical and organizational conditions.CONCLUSIONS: the main occupational factors associated with the low back pain were the posture and the characteristics of the physical and organizational conditions. In addition, the extensor muscles of the column showed a trend towards lesser resistance for workers in pain. This evidence is important when considering prevention and treatment strategies.

  17. Nursing. A Basic Course Outline for Health Careers I (Grade 11). A Four Year "2+2" Articulated Curriculum for the Occupation of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Barbara; Stevenson, Nancy

    This course outline provides materials for the first course in a series of four courses that are included in a "2+2" curriculum for the occupation of registered nurse. It is part of a planned and articulated 4-year curriculum that spans the junior and senior years of high school and the freshman and sophomore years of the postsecondary…

  18. Nursing. A Basic Course Outline for Health Careers II (Grade 12). A Four Year "2+2" Articulated Curriculum for the Occupation of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Nancy; Robertson, Barbara

    This course outline provides materials for the second course in a series of four courses that are included in a "2+2" curriculum for the occupation of registered nurse. It is part of a planned and articulated 4-year curriculum that spans the junior and senior years of high school and the freshman and sophomore years of the postsecondary…

  19. Occupational stress among nursing technicians and assistants: coping focused on the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Araújo Bastos Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the association between strategies used to cope with occupational stress that are focused on the problem wand the personal characteristics of nursing technicians and assistants. Methodology. This quantitative and correlational study was conducted in a large teaching hospital in the São Paulo State, Brazil, in 2013. A randomized sample with 310 participants (198 nursing assistants and 112 nursing technicians comprised the study population. Data were collected using a sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire and Scale of Ways of Coping with Problems. Data were submitted to univariate analysis, and variables with statistical significance (p<0.20 were submitted posteriorly in a multiple regression model. Results. Most employees were women (76.1% older than 40 years (67.7%, had nine to 11 years of formal education (73.5%, had a partner (58.7%, were Catholic (53.2%, and had children (74.5%. The final multiple regression model consisted of variable years of formal education and number of children. Conclusion. In this study, formal education and number of children were more strongly associated with a greater use of coping strategies focused on the problem. Such a strategy is related to minimal vulnerability to stress related to the working environment.

  20. Safe Handling of Cytotoxic Drugs and Risks of Occupational Exposure to Nursing Staffs

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    Somayeh Hanafi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inherent toxicity of cytotoxic drugs is the basis for their potential adverse risks from occupational exposure to the nursing staff. In Iran, chemotherapy regimens are prescribed and administered according to the world updated protocols. But little is done regarding the protective standards in this field.Methods: An observational cross-sectional survey was conducted among nurses who work in three tertiary care teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran in 2012. All participants worked in one of the hospital wards handling cytotoxic drugs (preparation and administration. A questionnaire was used for interviewing all subjects, and observing them preparing and administering the drugs. We examined all adverse effects associated with handling of antineoplastic drugs.Results: Totally 270 adverse reactions were reported. The most frequently reported adverse effects included headache and vertigo (40 cases, hair loss (36 cases, skin rashes and itching (31 cases, and burning sensation in eyes (31 cases. In all hospital wards, the standards were met in not more than 50% of the items.Conclusion: Monitoring the personnel who are directly involved in handling of cytotoxic drugs is of great importance. Furthermore, educating the personnel in the field of standards of cytotoxic drugs handling could increase the nursing staff’s knowledge regarding these drugs’ adverse reactions.

  1. Mobile Technology in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Min, Haeyoung; Oh, Su-Mi; Shim, Kaka

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to identify and systematically review the literature on the use of mobile technology in nursing education. The research findings could evidence the effectiveness of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing students' learning outcomes. Computerized searches were conducted using the Ovid-MEDLINE, Ovid-EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases for relevant primary studies and limited to those between 2000 and February 2018. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies published in either English or Korean were included and critically appraised using Joanna Briggs Institute tools. Seven RCTs and 7 quasi-experimental studies were identified. The mobile device and intervention applied varied throughout all the studies. Studies published earlier in the 2000s found that immediate access to clinical and pharmacological referencing information through the mobile device increased students' efficacy in clinical practice. Later studies, which were mostly conducted in Korea, reported that smartphone-based applications could promote nursing students' learning motivation and satisfaction but not their clinical skills and knowledge. We still seem to be in the beginning stage of implementing mobile technology in nursing education due to the limited implication of mobile technology and inconsistent research conclusions. In the future, rigorous primary empirical studies are needed to suggest the effective use of mobile devices in nursing education.

  2. Non-invasive nursing technologies for pain relief during childbirth--the Brazilian nurse midwives' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargens, Octavio M C; Silva, Alexandra C V; Progianti, Jane M

    2013-11-01

    to describe the non-invasive care technologies most frequently used by nurse midwives to relieve childbirth pain, and provide a synthesis of studies published by Brazilian nurse midwives on the use of such technologies. a systematic literature review focusing on the non-invasive pain relief strategies used by nurse midwives in Brazil. Surveys of three databases (BDENF, CINAHL and MEDLINE) were conducted between 2002 and 2012. The inclusion criteria were: (1) full-text article available; (2) published between 2002 and 2012; (3) written by Brazilian nurse midwives, and (4) fitting the descriptors: childbirth pain; non-invasive technologies; labour; and pain relief. For purposes of analysis, the technologies mentioned were classified into four main categories of support as they relate to environment, position, tactile stimulation, and energy level. we located 21 scientific articles that met the inclusion criteria and addressed the non-invasive technologies that nurse midwives use to provide pain relief during labour. The technologies most used was: stimulation of breathing and relaxation; use of massage with essential oils; encouraging freedom to move, to walk and the free choice for vertical positioning; use of showers and baths; use of birth ball. Brazilian nurse midwives have made efforts to focus care during delivery on the parturient. By studying and publishing about the non-invasive care technologies they have strengthened de-medicalised knowledge, based on scientific evidence and good outcomes in pain relief during labour. the study presented ideas towards improved theoretical foundations and strategies for establishing practice consonant with humanised care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using a management perspective to define and measure changes in nursing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J W; Kroposki, M

    2001-09-01

    The aims of this paper are to discuss the uses of the concept of technology from the medical science and the management perspectives; to propose a clear definition of nursing technology; and to present a study applying the use of the concept of nursing technology on nursing units. Nurse managers must use management terms correctly and the term technology may be misleading for some. A review of the nursing literature shows varied uses of the concept of technology. Thus a discussion of the dimensions, attributes, consequences, and definitions of nursing technology from the management perspective are given. A longitudinal study to measure the dimensions of nursing technology on nursing units 10 years apart. The findings suggest that the dimensions of nursing technology change over time and support the need for nurse managers to periodically assess nursing technology before making management changes at the level of the nursing unit. This study helps health care providers understand the unique role of nurses as healthcare professionals by identifying and measuring nursing technology on the nursing unit.

  4. Information and communication technologies in hospital nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Felipe Pissaia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Justification and objective: This study has the objective check the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in care processes of nursing through the methodology of Systematization of Nursing Assistance (SNA in a hospital in the interior of Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Methods: Descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach carried out six nurses of a hospital service. Results: The lack of knowledge about the importance of ICT, the deficit in the provision of continuing education to professionals and cultural prejudice to new working methods were list as existing weaknesses. Contributions are relate to organizing and planning your activities, as well as an effective personnel management based on the principles of comprehensive care provided to the client. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT help in the implementation of processes and implementation of SNA, promoting new models of work to nurses and encouraging compliance by the hospitals.

  5. Benefits and costs of integrating technology into undergraduate nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Cornelius, Frances H

    2005-01-01

    Advances in technology over the last decade have resulted in increased opportunities for educators to become more innovative in classroom and clinical teaching. These innovations have allowed students and faculty to access essential clinical information at the point of care/need. By capitalizing on technologies such as personal digital assistants and course delivery shells, faculty and students have both portable and remote access to information that can guide practice and learning activities in clinical, classroom, and distance settings. For instance, a student can use a personal digital assistant to research a patient's new medication at the bedside, study course information, access references during class in response to a question, or download clinical materials from home. Although the benefits of having ready access to information seem obvious, there are costs and strategic planning activities associated with implementing these projects. Clearly, the objective of any academic nursing program is to develop skills among students so they can efficiently access information and use that information to guide their nursing practice. To do so, academic nursing administrators must have the forethought to envision how new technologies can support achieving this goal as well as the ability to put in place the infrastructure supports needed for success. This article presents a case study of how one institution developed the necessary infrastructure and garnished the appropriate resources to implement an ambitious technology initiative integrated throughout a large undergraduate nursing program. In addition, how the integration of technology, online and mobile, can enhance clinical learning will be discussed.

  6. Digital technologies in occupational therapy and physiotherapy undergraduate and postgraduate education: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Benita; Verdonck, Michele; Casteleijn, Daleen

    2017-11-01

    How have digital technologies been used in occupational therapy and physiotherapy undergraduate and postgraduate education?Specifically, the objective of this scoping review is to present an overview of research on the use of digital technologies in terms of type of digital technology used, pedagogy associated with the use of digital technology, subject/topic/area of application, experiences/perception of digital technology used, outcomes of the digital technology used and challenges to the use of digital technologies in occupational therapy and physiotherapy undergraduate and postgraduate education.

  7. Knowledge and uptake of occupational post-exposure prophylaxis amongst nurses caring for people living with HIV

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    Lufuno Makhado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses caring for people living with HIV (PLWH are at higher risk of exposure to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV by needle sticks, cuts, getting body fluids in their eyes or mouth and skin when bruised or affected by dermatitis. Objectives: To determine knowledge, insight and uptake of occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (OPEP amongst nurses caring for PLWH. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive design was used in this study. Stratified random sampling was used to sample 240 nurses. The study was conducted in a regional hospital in Limpopo province. Both parametric and non-parametric statistics were employed to analyse data. Results: A total of 233 nurses participated in the study. Sixty per cent (n = 138 of all nurses had a situation at work when they thought that they were infected by HIV and 100 (43% nurses had experienced the situation once or more in the past 12 month. Approximately 40% did not know what PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis is, and 22% did not know or were not sure if it was available in the hospital. Only few participants (n = 68, 29% had sought PEP and most (n = 37, 54% of them did not receive PEP when they needed it. There was a significant association between the knowledge and availability of PEP (r = 0.622. Conclusion: The study recommend an urgent need for policy makers in the health sector to put in place policies, guidelines and programmes that will rapidly scale up PEP services in health care settings, so that preventable occupationally acquired HIV infection can be minimised amongst nurses. Keywords: Post-Exposure Prophylaxis; Nurses; HIV, Occupational Exposure; PLWH

  8. Information exchange using a prescribed form and involvement of occupational health nurses promotes occupational physicians to collaborate with attending physicians for supporting workers with illness in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Go; Nakamura, Rina Ishii; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Kitamura, Fumihiko; Omori, Yuki; Saito, Masahiko; Endo, Motoki

    2017-12-19

    The maintenance of a balance between work and disease treatment is an important issue in Japan. This study explored factors that affect collaboration between occupational physicians (OPs) and attending physicians (APs). A questionnaire was mailed to 1,102 OPs. The questionnaire assessed the demographic characteristics of OPs; their opinions and behaviors related to collaboration, including the exchange of medical information with APs; and the occupational health service system at their establishments. In total, 275 OPs completed the questionnaire (25.0% response rate). Over 80% of respondents believed OPs should collaborate with APs. After adjusting for company size, collaboration >10 times/year (with regard to both returning to work following sick leave and annual health check-ups for employees) was significantly associated with environmental factors, such as the presence of occupational health nurses (odds ratio (OR): 5.56 and 5.01, respectively, p0.05). The majority of OPs believed that collaboration with APs is important for supporting workers with illnesses. Support systems including prescribed forms of information exchange and occupational health nurses, play pivotal roles in promoting this collaboration.

  9. Integrated Employee Occupational Health and Organizational-Level Registered Nurse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Schult, Tamara; Eaton, Jennifer Lipkowitz; Awosika, Ebi; McPhaul, Kathleen M

    2016-05-01

    The study examined organizational culture, structural supports, and employee health program integration influence on registered nurse (RN) outcomes. An organizational health survey, employee health clinical operations survey, employee attitudes survey, and administration data were collected. Multivariate regression models examined outcomes of sick leave, leave without pay, voluntary turnover, intention to leave, and organizational culture using 122 medical centers. Lower staffing ratios were associated with greater sick leave, higher turnover, and intention to leave. Safety climate was favorably associated with each of the five outcomes. Both onsite employee occupational health services and a robust health promotion program were associated with more positive organizational culture perceptions. Findings highlight the positive influence of integrating employee health and health promotion services on organizational health outcomes. Attention to promoting employee health may benefit organizations in multiple, synergistic ways.

  10. The situation of nursing work and occupational risks from an ergological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Teresinha Fontana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the work environment according to the concepts, knowledge and values expressed and practiced by nursing professionals in occupational risk management. METHODS: this was an ergology-based participant study. Data collection was performed through interviews with key informants and 25 workers, as well as observations and measurements at a Basic Health Unit located in Rio Grande do Sul. Data analysis was based on the Three-Pole Dynamic Device. RESULTS: work conditions were found to be precarious, and workers are exposed to verbal violence and other psychosocial, biological and ergonomic risks. Chemical and physical risks are neglected, and activity is constantly restandardized toward service effectiveness. CONCLUSION: the studied subjects worked in risky conditions on a daily basis, and this information was expressed through synergistic dialogues and participant observations. Based on the contributions of these individuals, it is possible to merge knowledge obtained from work environments with science in order to address this issue.

  11. Experiences of frontline nursing staff on workplace safety and occupational health hazards in two psychiatric hospitals in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Poku, Kwabena Adu

    2018-06-06

    Psychiatric hospitals need safe working environments to promote productivity at the workplace. Even though occupational health and safety is not completely new to the corporate society, its scope is largely limited to the manufacturing/processing industries which are perceived to pose greater dangers to workers than the health sector. This paper sought to explore the experiences of frontline nursing personnel on the occupational health and safety conditions in two psychiatric hospitals in Ghana. This is an exploratory cross-sectional study among 296 nurses and nurse-assistants in Accra (n = 164) and Pantang (n = 132) psychiatric hospitals using the proportional stratified random sampling technique. Multivariate Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression test was conducted to ascertain the determinants of staff exposure to occupational health hazards and the frequency of exposure to these occupational health hazards on daily basis. Knowledge levels on occupational health hazards was high in Accra and Pantang psychiatric hospitals (i.e. 92 and 81% respectively), but barely 44% of the 296 interviewed staff in the two hospitals said they reported their most recent exposure to an occupational health hazard to hospital management. It was found that staff who worked for more years on the ward had higher likelihood of exposure to occupational health hazards than those who worked for lesser years (p = 0.002). The category of occupational health hazards reported most were the physical health hazards. Psychosocial hazards were the least reported health hazards. Frequency of exposure to occupational health hazards on daily basis was positively associated with work schedules of staff particularly, staff on routine day schedule (Coef = 4.49, p = 0.011) and those who alternated between day and night schedules (Coef = 4.48, p = 0.010). Occupational health and safety conditions in the two hospitals were found to be generally poor. Even though majority of

  12. Applications of Information Technology in Nursing During 2005-15: Evidence from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraji, Marziye; Ramazan Ghorbani, Nahid; Mahmoodian, Sanaz; Samadbeik, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    In this ever-changing health care environment, nurses employ technologies and information systems to accomplish the intentions of the practice of nursing. Information technology supports the basic and advanced nursing practices in all settings. This review provides evidence about applications of information technology in Iranian nursing. We systematically searched all papers about applications of information technology in nursing in Iran that were indexed in SID, Magiran, Iran medex, PubMed and scopus databases. This study indicated that 12 (%52) studies used information technologies in the nursing education domain. Also, in 6 (%26) studies telenursing was used for patient care. 3 (13%) of the articles were related to the impact of the use of computer-based information system on nursing practice. In 2 (%9) papers the researchers developed computerized software for nursing processes. The results of this study indicate the use of information technology in nearly every aspect of nursing in Iran.

  13. US and Dutch nurse experiences with fall prevention technology within nursing home environment and workflow: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenberg, Ann E.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Overdevest, Vera G.P.; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Johnson II, Theodore M.

    2017-01-01

    Falls remain a major geriatric problem, and the search for new solutions continues. We investigated how existing fall prevention technology was experienced within nursing home nurses' environment and workflow. Our NIH-funded study in an American nursing home was followed by a cultural learning

  14. US and Dutch nurse experiences with fall prevention technology within nursing home environment and workflow : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenberg, Ann E.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Overdevest, Vera G.P.; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Johnson II, Theodore M.

    2017-01-01

    Falls remain a major geriatric problem, and the search for new solutions continues. We investigated how existing fall prevention technology was experienced within nursing home nurses' environment and workflow. Our NIH-funded study in an American nursing home was followed by a cultural learning

  15. Coping with expanding nursing practice, knowledge, and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudinski, M A

    1979-10-01

    Nurses utilize transcultural, transactional, systems, primary, and interdisciplinary approaches to physiological and psychosocial components of patient care. Expanded roles, as well as advances in knowledge and technology have prepared nurses for critical, specialized, primary, aerospace, and independent nursing practice. Exciting as they are, nursing's expanded roles and practices frequently contribute to the burnout and distress phenomena increasingly observed in practicing health care professionals. Causes and symptoms of the burnout distress phenomena are many and varied. Selye, Shubin, Maslach, and others adeptly identified and wrote on the phenomena as it specifically relates to nurses and the many facets of nursing practice. Rather than utilizing crisis intervention coping techniques, preventive strategies and adaptations are suggested. This paper reviews and discusses: 1. Factors associated with burnout-distress phenomena identified in professional literature; 2. Identification of factors associated with expanded roles and practice which contribute to burnout stress; 3. Identification of factors in military and civilian air ambulance and aeromedical evacuation systems which contribute to burnout stress; 4. Recommendations for strategies to prevent and cope with burnout distress factors.

  16. Cutting edge technology to enhance nursing classroom instruction at Coppin State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Crystal Day; Watties-Daniels, A Denyce

    2006-01-01

    Educational technologies have changed the paradigm of the teacher-student relationship in nursing education. Nursing students expect to use and to learn from cutting edge technology during their academic careers. Varied technology, from specified software programs (Tegrity and Blackboard) to the use of the Internet as a research medium, can enhance student learning. The authors provide an overview of current cutting edge technologies in nursing classroom instruction and its impact on future nursing practice.

  17. Technology and medication errors: impact in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; St-Pierre, Liette; Lagacé, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study a medication distribution technology's (MDT) impact on medication errors reported in public nursing homes in Québec Province. The work was carried out in six nursing homes (800 patients). Medication error data were collected from nursing staff through a voluntary reporting process before and after MDT was implemented. The errors were analysed using: totals errors; medication error type; severity and patient consequences. A statistical analysis verified whether there was a significant difference between the variables before and after introducing MDT. The results show that the MDT detected medication errors. The authors' analysis also indicates that errors are detected more rapidly resulting in less severe consequences for patients. MDT is a step towards safer and more efficient medication processes. Our findings should convince healthcare administrators to implement technology such as electronic prescriber or bar code medication administration systems to improve medication processes and to provide better healthcare to patients. Few studies have been carried out in long-term healthcare facilities such as nursing homes. The authors' study extends what is known about MDT's impact on medication errors in nursing homes.

  18. Integrated approach for managing health risks at work--the role of occupational health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Luiza G

    2007-02-01

    Currently, many organizations are using a department-centered approach to manage health risks at work. In such a model, segregated departments are providing employee benefits such as health insurance, workers' compensation, and short- and long-term disability or benefits addressing work-life issues. In recent years, a new model has emerged: health and productivity management (HPM). This is an employee-centered, integrated approach, designed to increase efficiency, reduce competition for scarce resources, and increase employee participation in prevention activities. Evidence suggests that corporations using integrated HPM programs achieve better health outcomes for their employees, with consequent increased productivity and decreased absenteeism. Occupational health nurses are well positioned to assume leadership roles in their organizations by coordinating efforts and programs across departments that offer health, wellness, and safety benefits. To assume their role as change agents to improve employees' health, nurses should start using the language of business more often by improving their communication skills, computer skills, and ability to quantify and articulate results of programs and services to senior management.

  19. [Construction and Application of Innovative Education Technology Strategies in Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Fen; Huang, Hsiang-Ping; Ni, Lee-Fen; Tsai, Chia-Lan; Huang, Tsuey-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of information and communication technologies has deeply impacted education reform, promoted the development of digital-learning models, and stimulated the development of diverse nursing education strategies in order to better fulfill needs and expand in new directions. The present paper introduces the intelligent-learning resources that are available for basic medical science education, problem-based learning, nursing scenario-based learning, objective structured clinical examinations, and other similar activities in the Department of Nursing at Chang Gung University of Science and Technology. The program is offered in two parts: specialized classroom facilities and cloud computing / mobile-learning. The latter includes high-fidelity simulation classrooms, online e-books, and virtual interactive simulation and augmented reality mobile-learning materials, which are provided through multimedia technology development, learning management systems, web-certificated examinations, and automated teaching and learning feedback mechanisms. It is expected that the teaching experiences that are shared in this article may be used as a reference for applying professional wisdom teaching models into nursing education.

  20. Occupational stress, mental health and coping among information technology professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Jakkula V.; Chandraiah, K.

    2012-01-01

    Backround: Experience of occupational stress is inevitably involved in the execution of any type of work. Stress has an adaptive value. It motivates the individual to attend to the task and get rid of the tension or demand the unattended task produced. Materials and Methods : The study was planned to investigate the differences between executives and shop floor workers on occupational stress, mental health, job satisfaction and coping. A random sample of 200 executives and shop floor employee...

  1. Scheduling and shift work characteristics associated with risk for occupational injury in newly licensed registered nurses: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T

    2015-11-01

    Registered nurses across the globe bear a heavy injury burden. Every shift, nurses are exposed to a variety of hazards that can jeopardize their health, which negatively impacts their ability to provide high-quality patient care. Previous research suggests that inexperienced, or newly licensed nurses, may have an increased risk for certain occupational injuries. However, the current knowledge base is insufficient to fully understand how work hours influence newly licensed nurses' occupational injury, given the significant variation in hospital organization and work characteristics. To describe newly licensed nurses' shift work characteristics and determine the association between shift type and scheduling characteristics and nurse injury, before and after adjusting for individual and combined effects of demographics, external context, organizational context, and work context, following the Organization of Work model. This study is a secondary analysis of a nationally representative survey of newly licensed registered nurses using a cross-sectional design. The analytic sample includes 1744 newly licensed registered nurses from 34 states and the District of Columbia who reported working in a hospital and were within 6-18 months of passing their state licensure exam at the time of survey administration. Descriptive statistics were calculated, followed by bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression models to assess the relationship between shift type and scheduling characteristics and nurse injury. Lastly, full models with the addition of demographics, external context, organizational context, and work context variables were calculated. The majority (79%) of newly licensed nurses worked 12-h shifts, a near majority worked night shift (44%), and over half (61%) worked overtime (mandatory or voluntary) weekly. Nurses working weekly overtime were associated with a 32% [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.32, CI 1.07-1.62] increase in the risk of a needle stick and nurses

  2. Application of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for occupational therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, Ed

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical models provide a framework for describing practice and integrating evidence into systematic research. There are few models that relate specifically to the provision of assistive technology in occupational therapy practice. The Human Activity Assistive Technology model is an enduring example that has continued to develop by integrating a social model of disability, concepts from occupational therapy theory and principles of assistive technology adoption and abandonment. This study first describes the core concepts of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model and reviews its development over three successive published versions. A review of the research literature reflects application of the model to clinical practice, study design, outcome measure selection and interpretation of results, particularly among occupational therapists. An evaluative framework is used to critique the adequacy of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for practice and research, exploring attributes of clarity, simplicity, generality, accessibility and importance. Finally, recommendations are proposed for continued development of the model and research applications. Most of the existing research literature employs the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for background and study design; there is emerging evidence to support the core concepts as predictive factors. Although the concepts are generally simple, clear and applicable to occupational therapy practice and research, evolving terminology and outcomes become more complex with the conflation of integrated theories. The development of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model offers enhanced access and application for occupational therapists, but poses challenges to clarity among concepts. Suggestions are made for further development and applications of the model. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. The Effect of Morningness-Eveningness on Shift Work Nurses: Sleep Quality, Depressive Symptoms and Occupational Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Sang Yoo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of morningness-eveningness type on nurses relative to sleep quality, depressive symptoms and occupational stress. Methods Data was collected using self-administering questionnaires by 257 three eight-hour randomly rotating shift system nurses at St. Vincent’s Hospital. Questionnaires were composed of baseline demographic data, Korean version of Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Beck Depression Inventory and Korean Occupational Stress Scale. Kruskal-Wallis H test and analysis of covariance were used to identify significant differences in sleep parameters, depressive symptoms and occupational stress according to morningness-eveningness type. Results There was significant difference in Subjective Sleep Quality score (p = 0.018. Post hoc analysis revealed differences between eveningness vs. morningness (p = 0.001 in Subjective Sleep Quality score. There were tendencies in sleep efficiency, PSQI total score and ESS between morningness-eveningness type. However, there were no significant differences in total sleep time, depressive symptoms and occupational stress including eight sub-categories according to morningness-eveningness type. Conclusions Eveningness type nurses revealed lower Subjective Sleep Quality and tendency for poor sleep efficiency, poor overall sleep efficiency and more severe daytime sleepiness than other type. However, morningness-eveningness were not decisive factors for total sleep time, depressive symptoms and occupational stress. Short-term medication, workers’ chronotypes consideration and naps before night shifts may be helpful in improving mental health and quality of life for shift nurses, especially for evening shifts.

  4. Occupational closure in nursing work reconsidered: UK health care support workers and assistant practitioners: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Nissen, Nina; Lincoln, Carol; Buus, Niels

    2015-07-01

    In healthcare, occupational groups have adopted tactics to maintain autonomy and control over their areas of work. Witz described a credentialist approach to occupational closure adopted by nursing in the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the recent advancement of assistant, 'non-qualified' workers by governments and managers forms part of a reconfiguration of traditional professional work. This research used focus groups with three cohorts of healthcare support workers undertaking assistant practitioner training at a London university from 2011 to 13 (6 groups, n = 59). The aim was to examine how these workers positioned themselves as professionals and accounted for professional boundaries. A thematic analysis revealed a complex situation in which participants were divided between articulating an acceptance of a subordinate role within traditional occupational boundaries and a usurpatory stance towards these boundaries. Participants had usually been handpicked by managers and some were ambitious and confident in their abilities. Many aspired to train to be nurses claiming that they will gain recognition that they do not currently get but which they deserve. Their scope of practice is based upon their managers' or supervisors' perception of their individual aptitude rather than on a credentialist claim. They 'usurp' nurses claim to be the healthcare worker with privileged access to patients, saying they have taken over what nursing has considered its core work, while nurses abandon it for largely administrative roles. We conclude that the participants are the not unwilling agents of a managerially led project to reshape the workforce that cuts across existing occupational boundaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge management, health information technology and nurses' work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Paul H J; Ligthart, Paul E M; Schouteten, Roel L J

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge management (KM) extends the health information technology (HIT) literature by addressing its impact on creating knowledge by sharing and using the knowledge of health care professionals in hospitals. The aim of the study was to provide insight into how HIT affects nurses' explicit and tacit knowledge of their ongoing work processes and work engagement. Data were collected from 74 nurses in four wards of a Dutch hospital via a paper-and-pencil survey using validated measurement instruments. In a quasiexperimental research design, HIT was introduced in the two experimental wards in contrast to the two control wards. At the time of the HIT introduction, a pretest was administered in all four wards and was followed by a posttest after 3 months. Data were analyzed via partial least squares modeling. Generally, nurses' tacit knowledge (i.e., their insight into and their capacity to make sense of the work processes) appears to be a significant and strong predictor of their work engagement. In contrast, nurses' explicit knowledge (i.e., information feedback about patients and tasks) only indirectly affects work engagement via its effect on tacit knowledge. Its effect on work engagement therefore depends on the mediating role of tacit knowledge. Interestingly, introducing HIT significantly affects only nurses' explicit knowledge, not their tacit knowledge or work engagement. Nurses' tacit and explicit knowledge needs to be systematically distinguished when implementing HIT/KM programs to increase work engagement in the workplace. Tacit knowledge (insight into work processes) appears to be pivotal, whereas efforts aimed only at improving available information will not lead to a higher level of work engagement in nurses' work environments.

  6. Research on Occupational Safety, Health Management and Risk Control Technology in Coal Mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu-Jie; Cao, Qing-Gui; Yu, Kai; Wang, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2018-04-26

    This paper studies the occupational safety and health management methods as well as risk control technology associated with the coal mining industry, including daily management of occupational safety and health, identification and assessment of risks, early warning and dynamic monitoring of risks, etc.; also, a B/S mode software (Geting Coal Mine, Jining, Shandong, China), i.e., Coal Mine Occupational Safety and Health Management and Risk Control System, is developed to attain the aforementioned objectives, namely promoting the coal mine occupational safety and health management based on early warning and dynamic monitoring of risks. Furthermore, the practical effectiveness and the associated pattern for applying this software package to coal mining is analyzed. The study indicates that the presently developed coal mine occupational safety and health management and risk control technology and the associated software can support the occupational safety and health management efforts in coal mines in a standardized and effective manner. It can also control the accident risks scientifically and effectively; its effective implementation can further improve the coal mine occupational safety and health management mechanism, and further enhance the risk management approaches. Besides, its implementation indicates that the occupational safety and health management and risk control technology has been established based on a benign cycle involving dynamic feedback and scientific development, which can provide a reliable assurance to the safe operation of coal mines.

  7. Occupational stress and mental health among nurses in a medical intensive care unit of a general hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajvar, Abdolhamid; Saraji, Gebraeil Nasl; Ghanbarnejad, Amin; Omidi, Leila; Hosseini, Seyed Sodabeh Seyed; Abadi, Ali Salehi Sahl

    2015-07-01

    Many nurses have reported experiencing high levels of occupational stress in their work environment. Stress, as an outcome of stressful workplaces and tasks, affects nursing behavior in hospital wards. The objectives of this research were to determine the prevalence of occupational stress and mental health problems in nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2013 and to determine the relationship between occupational stress and mental health. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on all of the nurses working in ICU at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital located in Bandar Abbas, Iran. Seventy-two nurses were selected as the population for this study, and all of them were female. Two questionnaires were used in this study, i.e., General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) for assessing mental health and an occupational stress test for assessing job stress. Furthermore, the relationship between occupational stress and mental health was examined. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), independent samples t-test, and Pearson's product-moment correlation test were used to analyze the data. High and moderate levels of occupational stress were experienced by 83.9% and 10.7% of ICU nurses, respectively. The prevalence of mental disorders, somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression were 58.9, 60.7, 62.5, 71.4, and 10.7%, respectively. The findings of the independent samples t-test showed that somatic symptoms had significant relationships with age and working experience (p = 0.01). According to the independent samples t-test, there were no significant differences between somatic symptoms and working different shifts (p > 0.05). There was a high prevalence of occupational stress among ICU nurses. There was a significant relationship between occupational stress and mental health. Future interventions are needed to codify a comprehensive health program in this field to reduce occupational stress and enhance nurses

  8. Internet-generation nursing students' view of technology-based health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houwelingen, C.T.M.; Ettema, R.G.A.; Kort, H.S.M.; ten Cate, O.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today's nursing school applicants are considered “digital natives.” This study investigated students' views of new health care technologies. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey among first-year nursing students, 23 common nursing activities and five telehealth nursing activities were

  9. Work engagement and occupational stress in nurses and other healthcare workers: the role of organisational and personal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiabane, Elena; Giorgi, Ines; Sguazzin, Cinzia; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) identify the role of organisational and personal factors in predicting work engagement in healthcare workers and (2) compare work engagement and occupational stress perceptions of healthcare professional categories. Healthcare professionals, with particular regard to nurses, are exposed to several job stressors that can adversely affect both their mental and physical health and also decrease work engagement. Work engagement can be considered as the positive opposite of burnout, and it is characterised by energy, involvement and professional efficacy. A cross-sectional survey research was conducted with self-report questionnaires. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, the Areas of Worklife Scale and four scales from the Occupational Stress Indicator were administered to a sample of 198 hospital staff (registered nurses, nurse aides, physicians and physiotherapists), of which 110 participated in the study. The most significant predictors of energy were workload, mental health and job satisfaction; the best predictors of involvement were community, workload, mental health and job satisfaction; professional efficacy was best predicted by values and job satisfaction. In relation to the second aim, physiotherapists had the highest levels of occupational stress and disengagement from their work, while nurse aides were the most work-engaged and job-satisfied professional category, with positive perceptions of the work environment. Both organisational and personal factors were found to be significantly associated with work engagement. In this study, physiotherapists were the category with the highest risk of work-related psychological problems, whereas nurse aides had the lowest risk. Interventions aimed at improving clinical practice and psychological health of nurses and hospital staff should focus on workload, workers' personal expectations and job satisfaction. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Occupational stress, mental health and coping among information technology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jakkula V; Chandraiah, K

    2012-01-01

    Experience of occupational stress is inevitably involved in the execution of any type of work. Stress has an adaptive value. It motivates the individual to attend to the task and get rid of the tension or demand the unattended task produced. The study was planned to investigate the differences between executives and shop floor workers on occupational stress, mental health, job satisfaction and coping. A random sample of 200 executives and shop floor employees collected from Nuclear Fuel Complex of Hyderabad City. A well developed sub-scales of Occupational Stress indicator like Mental Health, and Coping behavior were used in the present study. The shop floor workers experiencing more job stress and lower mental health. But these two groups did not differ in their coping behaviour. The executives are better with work home balance.

  11. Occupational therapy students' technological skills: Are 'generation Y' ready for 21st century practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Smith, Derek R; Warren-Forward, Helen; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of clients. 'Generation Y' are purported to be naturally technologically skilled as they have grown up in the digital age. The aim of this study was to explore one cohort of 'Generation Y' occupational therapy students' skills and confidence in the use of technologies relevant to contemporary practice. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a cohort of 274 students enrolled in an Australian undergraduate occupational therapy programme. A total of 173 (63%) students returned the survey. Those born prior to 1982 were removed from the data. This left 155 (56%) 'Generation Y' participants. Not all participants reported to be skilled in everyday technologies although most reported to be skilled in word, Internet and mobile technologies. Many reported a lack of skills in Web 2.0 (collaboration and sharing) technologies, creating and using media and gaming, as well as a lack of confidence in technologies relevant to practice, including assistive technology, specialist devices, specialist software and gaming. Overall, the results suggested that this group of 'Generation Y' students were not universally skilled in all areas of technology relevant to practice but appear to be skilled in technologies they use regularly. Recommendations are therefore made with view to integrating social networking, gaming, media sharing and assistive technology into undergraduate programmes to ensure that graduates have the requisite skills and confidence required for current and future practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  12. Automated Measurement and Verification and Innovative Occupancy Detection Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Phillip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bruce, Nordman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piette, Mary Ann [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Rich [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Page, Janie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lanzisera, Steven [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Granderson, Jessica [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-06-27

    In support of DOE’s sensors and controls research, the goal of this project is to move toward integrated building to grid systems by building on previous work to develop and demonstrate a set of load characterization measurement and evaluation tools that are envisioned to be part of a suite of applications for transactive efficient buildings, built upon data-driven load characterization and prediction models. This will include the ability to include occupancy data in the models, plus data collection and archival methods to include different types of occupancy data with existing networks and a taxonomy for naming these data within a Volttron agent platform.

  13. Forecasting supply and demand in nursing professions: impacts of occupational flexibility and employment structure in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Tobias; Afentakis, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of Germany's ageing society, demand for nursing professionals is expected to increase in the coming years. This will pose a challenge for policy makers to increase the supply of nursing professionals. Methodology To portray the different possible developments in the supply of nursing professionals, we projected the supply of formally trained nurses and the potential supply of persons who are able to work in a nursing profession. This potential supply of nursing professiona...

  14. Effects of Physical Limitations on Daily Activities Among Adults With Mental Health Disorders: Opportunities for Nursing and Occupational Therapy Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jennifer; Swarbrick, Margaret; Ackerman, Ariane; Church, Theodora; Rios, Vanessa; Valente, Laura; Rutledge, John

    2017-10-01

    Individuals living with mental health disorders served by the public mental health system often face comorbid medical conditions that affect their quality of life and lifespan. The effect of physical limitations on the engagement in daily activities among individuals living with mental health disorders has not been extensively researched. Adults attending community wellness centers (N = 53) in a northeastern United State were included in a descriptive study exploring the impact of physical limitations on daily activities. The activities most frequently affected were: walking or moving around, sleeping, and finding a job. The physical limitations affecting these three activities were lack of energy and pain. Health care professionals, including mental health nurses and occupational therapy practitioners, are in an ideal position to collaborate by evaluating and offering treatment interventions that address physical limitations to positively affect occupational functioning and recovery. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(10), 45-51.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. The technology acceptance model: predicting nurses' intention to use telemedicine technology (eICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine factors and predictors that influence nurses' intention to use the eICU technology, to examine the applicability of the Technology Acceptance Model in explaining nurses' intention to use the eICU technology in healthcare settings, and to provide psychometric evidence of the measurement scales used in the study. The study involved 117 participants from two healthcare systems. The Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model was developed based on the original Technology Acceptance Model that was initially developed by Fred Davis in 1986. The eICU Acceptance Survey was used as an instrument for the study. Content validity was examined, and the reliability of the instrument was tested. The results show that perceived usefulness is the most influential factor that influences nurses' intention to use the eICU technology. The principal factors that influence perceived usefulness are perceived ease of use, support from physicians, and years working in the hospital. The model fit was reasonably adequate and able to explain 58% of the variance (R = 0.58) in intention to use the eICU technology with the nursing sample.

  16. Nursing operations automation and health care technology innovations: 2025 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suby, ChrysMarie

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews why nursing operations automation is important, reviews the impact of computer technology on nursing from a historical perspective, and considers the future of nursing operations automation and health care technology innovations in 2025 and beyond. The increasing automation in health care organizations will benefit patient care, staffing and scheduling systems and central staffing offices, census control, and measurement of patient acuity.

  17. Senior Students' Experiences, Perspectives, and Attitudes of Technological Competencies in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological standards appear to be needed in undergraduate nursing education, as existing research has yet to establish technological standards for undergraduate nursing students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the lived experiences of senior nursing students with respect to their perceptions regarding exposure to and…

  18. Level of job satisfaction amongst nurses in the North-West Province, South Africa: Post occupational specific dispensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisinyana H. Khunou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction and burnout have been recurring problems amongst nurses in the Republic of South Africa (RSA. As a result, nurses are still leaving the rural public sector in search of lucrative work at the urban and private sectors and in developed countries. Accordingly, Occupational Specific Dispensation (OSD was introduced as a strategy to ircumvent the problem. However, since the implementation of OSD in 2007, there have been no studies conducted regarding the level of job satisfaction amongst nurses after the implementation of OSD in the North-West Province, especially because each province has its own challenges that are unique to the area. Objectives: The study had two objectives: to describe the level of job satisfaction amongstprofessional and other category nurses (OCNs at a public hospital in the North-West Provinceand describe the perceptions of nurses about OSD and their intention to continue working inthe hospital. Method: A quantitative descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Stratified random sampling was used to select a sample of 92 professional nurses (PNs, 90 enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing assistants (Nursing Act 2005, which made a total of 182 participants. For the purpose of the study, the enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing assistants were referred to as OCNs. Data were collected using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire–short form and OSD statements and analysed with Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS, version 18. Results: The majority of PNs (79.3%, n = 73 and OCNs (86.7%, n = 77 were dissatisfied with the working conditions and salary: PNs (80.4%, n = 74 and OCNs (87.8%, n = 79. The nurses mostly discredited the current state of the OSD implementation. Majority of the PNs (84%, n = 77 and OCNs (91%, n = 82 disagreed with the statement that ‘level of job satisfaction has improved after the implementation of OSD’. Conclusions: The National Department of Health should consider

  19. Work–family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Norio Sugawara,1,2 Kazuma Danjo,3 Hanako Furukori,4 Yasushi Sato,2,5 Tetsu Tomita,2,6 Akira Fujii,7 Taku Nakagami,2,8 Kazuyo Kitaoka,9 Norio Yasui-Furukori2 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Translational Medical Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori, 3Mizoguchi Mental Hospital, Shizuoka, 4Department of Psychiatry, Kuroishi-Akebono Hospital, Kuroishi, 5Department of Psychiatry, Mutsu General Hospital, Mutsu, 6Department of Psychiatry, Hirosaki-Aiseikai Hospital, Kitazono, Hirosaki, 7Department of Psychiatry, Seihoku-Chuoh Hospital, Goshogawara, Aomori, 8Department of Psychiatry, Odate Municipal General Hospital, Odate, Akita, 9Mental Health Nursing, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan Background: Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work–family conflict (WFC in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work–Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. Results: The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including

  20. Health Information Technology, Patient Safety, and Professional Nursing Care Documentation in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Mary Ann; Harper, Ellen; Barr, Nancy

    2015-04-14

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a documentation tool that yields data useful in enhancing patient safety, evaluating care quality, maximizing efficiency, and measuring staffing needs. Although nurses applaud the EHR, they also indicate dissatisfaction with its design and cumbersome electronic processes. This article describes the views of nurses shared by members of the Nursing Practice Committee of the Missouri Nurses Association; it encourages nurses to share their EHR concerns with Information Technology (IT) staff and vendors and to take their place at the table when nursing-related IT decisions are made. In this article, we describe the experiential-reflective reasoning and action model used to understand staff nurses' perspectives, share committee reflections and recommendations for improving both documentation and documentation technology, and conclude by encouraging nurses to develop their documentation and informatics skills. Nursing issues include medication safety, documentation and standards of practice, and EHR efficiency. IT concerns include interoperability, vendors, innovation, nursing voice, education, and collaboration.

  1. Rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students in the UK: standards, challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Hewlett, S.; Clarke, B.; O?Brien, A.; Hammond, A.; Ryan, S.; Kay, L.; Richards, P.; Almeida, C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Rheumatological conditions are common, thus nurses (Ns) occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) require at least basic rheumatology knowledge upon qualifying. The aim of this study was to develop a core set of teaching topics and potential ways of delivering them. Methods. A modified Delphi technique was used for clinicians to develop preliminary core sets of teaching topics for each profession. Telephone interviews with educationalists explored their views on the...

  2. Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Mobile technology in nursing education: where do we go from here? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Janet

    2015-05-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN), Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (STTI), and many National Nurses Associations (NNAs), have called for the integration of information technology into nursing curriculums to prepare nursing students for the current practice environment which requires access to large amounts of information to provide evidence-based patient care. Nurse educators have begun to address the integration of technology in nursing curriculum, but are the available tools, in particular, mobile devices loaded with informational applications, being maximized? Literature Review Aims The aims of this literature review are to 1) explore the literature written on the use of mobile technology in nursing education; 2) methodically discuss the benefits and concerns involved in using mobile technology in nursing education; and 3) consider strategies for enhancing the use of mobile technology in nursing education. Review Methods A search was conducted on the use of mobile technology in nursing programs in Academic Search Complete, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline with Full Text, and Medline Journals. Seventeen studies, published within the last five years in peer-reviewed journals regarding the mobile technology in nursing programs were identified. Findings Although many nursing programs have implemented the use of mobile technology in the clinical, classroom, and laboratory settings, more work needs to be done to overcome the concerns related to: cost, lack of IT support, lack of faculty acceptance and role-modeling, lack of structured assignments and/or activities designed to encourage the implementation of mobile devices; and constraints on their use in clinical settings. While much has been done to incorporate the use of mobile technology in nursing curriculum, nurse educators are encouraged to develop strategies to overcome the concerns noted. Possible strategies to overcome the concerns are

  4. Impact of a physical activity program on the anxiety, depression, occupational stress and burnout syndrome of nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Anderson Rodrigues; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    to assess the effects of a workplace physical activity (WPA) program on levels of anxiety, depression, burnout, occupational stress and self-perception of health and work-related quality of life of a nursing team in a palliative care unit. the WPA was conducted five days per week, lasting ten minutes, during three consecutive months. Twenty-one nursing professionals were evaluated before and after the intervention, with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Maslch Burnout Inventory, and the Job Stress Scale. The changes in self-perceived health and work-related quality of life were measured using a semi-structured questionnaire. the WPA did not yield significant results on the levels of anxiety, depression, burnout or occupational stress. However, after the intervention, participants reported improved perceptions of bodily pain and feeling of fatigue at work. the WPA did not lead to beneficial effects on occupational stress and psychological variables, but it was well accepted by the nursing professionals, who reported improvement in perceptions of health and work-related quality of life.

  5. SHORT REPORT Technological dreams: The implications of new technologies for occupational therapy education and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, BARBARA

    2001-01-01

    Computer technologies will change both occupational therapy education and practice. Technological optimists suggest that there will be positive benefits for distance learning and supervision, universal equal access to information and expertise, and positive cross-cultural exchange. However, technologies have inevitable and unexpected costs. In this report I explore the potential for future problems with professional induction, educational reductionism, cultural imperialism and deprofessionalization through a review of the literature. I suggest that early recognition of the costs as well as the benefits of computer-based education will be important to the development of international occupational therapy.

  6. Cooperation within physician-nurse team in occupational medicine service in Poland - Knowledge about professional activities performed by the team-partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study has been to learn about physicians' and nurses' awareness of the professional activities that are being performed by their colleague in the physician-nurse team. Postal questionnaires were sent out to occupational physicians and nurses in Poland. The analysis includes responses from 232 pairs of physician-nurse teams. The knowledge among occupational professionals about tasks performed by their colleagues in the physician-nurse team seems to be poor. Respondents were asked about who performs tasks from each of 21 groups mentioned in the Occupational Medicine Service Act. In the case of only 3 out of 21 groups of tasks, the rate of non-consistence in answers was lower than 30%. A specified number of professionals performed their tasks on the individual basis. Although in many cases their team colleagues knew about those activities, there was a major proportion of those who had no awareness of such actions. Polish occupational physicians and nurses perform a variety of tasks. Occupational nurses, besides medical role, also play important organizational roles in their units. The cooperation between the two professional groups is, however, slightly disturbed by the deficits in communication. This issue needs to be improved for the betterment of operations within the whole system. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. HEALTH OCCUPATIONS SUPPORTIVE TO NURSING, A STATEMENT OF POLICIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

    TO SOLVE THE NURSING PERSONNEL SHORTAGE, THE AMERICAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION RECOMMENDED--(1) THE FIRST PRIORITY FOR FEDERAL MONIES FOR TRAINING HEALTH WORKERS FOR NURSING SERVICES SHOULD BE TO PREPARE REGISTERED NURSES FOR TEACHING, SUPERVISION, AND ADMINISTRATION, (2) A CONCERTED EFFORT SHOULD BE MADE TO RECRUIT YOUNG PEOPLE AND TO ATTRACT INACTIVE…

  8. How Do Nurses Manage Their Occupational Exposure to Cytotoxic Drugs? A Descriptive Survey in Chemotherapy Settings, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Momeni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs is a global concern. We conducted this cross-sectional study in 2012 to describe the adverse effects experienced by nurses working in one of chemotherapy facilities affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, southern Iran, and their proper use of personal protective equipment and educational programs. The frequency of side effects reported by participants was noticeably high. Approximately, 60% of the nurses used all personal protective equipment. There were air conditioner ventilation systems in all facilities, but they were not standard. Clinics did not have any dedicated room. Lack of adequate training was noticeable among all participants. We concluded that establishment of safety regulations, health care workers safety surveillance systems as well as continuous training for nurses are of paramount importance.

  9. Occupational factors contributing to low self-esteem in registered nurses and licensed practical nurses: a multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, K

    2001-03-01

    The present study examines job-related factors leading to low self-esteem in nurses. The lowering of self-esteem suggests that such nurses had difficulty in fully accepting themselves and their circumstances. Subjects were registered nurses (RN) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) at hospitals, and unemployed registered nurses (UEN) seeking employment. Questionnaires were provided at 53 hospitals and a Nurse Bank in Kanagawa Prefecture. The responses of 552 RN, 146 LPN and 433 UEN were analyzed. Questions were asked about personal life, past or present nursing experience, working conditions, nursing skills, satisfaction with work performance and self-esteem. Factors giving rise to low self-esteem were determined using logistic regression analysis and logistic discriminant analysis. Employment status and qualifications were determined to be the most important factors determining the self-esteem of nurses. The next most important factors were 'a limited number of years of experience (less than five years)' and 'dissatisfaction with discretion and responsibility as a nurse' (P self-esteem for LPN was 4.07 times higher than for UEN, and 2.2 times higher than for RN by logistic regression analysis. LPN are treated as unskilled workers, and thus significant differences were apparent in their performance of certain job tasks. These differences were analyzed using discriminant analysis, and were referred to as follows, 1: Advanced assessment skills, 2: Advanced technical skills, 3: Advanced communication skills, and 4: Nursing plan and documentation (positive discrimination rate was 70.8%). Job dissatisfaction is closely associated with the level of professional training. Continuous education and a feedback system for various levels of nurses are needed.

  10. Factors of adoption of mobile information technology by homecare nurses: a technology acceptance model 2 approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiying; Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2010-01-01

    Pervasive healthcare support through mobile information technology solutions is playing an increasing role in the attempt to improve healthcare and reduce costs. Despite the apparent attractiveness, many mobile applications have failed or have not been implemented as predicted. Among factors possibly leading to such outcomes, technology adoption is a key problem. This must be investigated early in the development process because healthcare is a particularly sensitive area with vital social implications. Moreover, it is important to investigate technology acceptance using the support of scientific tools validated for relevant information systems research. This article presents an empirical study based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 in mobile homecare nursing. The study elicited the perceptions of 91 Canadian nurses who used personal digital assistants for 1 month in their daily activities. A partial least squares modeling data analysis revealed that nurse's perception of usefulness is the main factor in the adoption of mobile technology, having subjective norm and image within the organization as significant antecedents. Overall, this study was the first attempt at investigating scientifically, through a pertinent information systems research model, user adoption of mobile systems by homecare nursing personnel.

  11. The impact of emerging technology on nursing care: warp speed ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Carol

    2013-05-31

    While myriad forces are changing the face of contemporary healthcare, one could argue that nothing will change the way nursing is practiced more than current advances in technology. Indeed, technology is changing the world at warp speed and nowhere is this more evident than in healthcare settings. This article identifies seven emerging technologies that will change the practice of nursing; three skill sets nurses will need to develop to acquire, use, and integrate these emerging technologies; and four challenges nurse leaders will face in integrating this new technology.

  12. The effects of authentic leadership, organizational identification, and occupational coping self-efficacy on new graduate nurses' job turnover intentions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallatah, Fatmah; Laschinger, Heather K S; Read, Emily A

    Nurses' turnover has a costly impact on organizations, patients, and nurses. Numerous studies have highlighted the critical role of nursing leadership in enhancing new nurses' retention. To examine the influence of authentic leadership on new nurses' job turnover intentions through their personal identification with the leader, organizational identification, and occupational coping self-efficacy. Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional national study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted using structural equation modeling. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on nurses' personal identification with their leader and their organization. Personal identification mediated the relationship between authentic leadership and organizational identification. Organizational identification had a significant positive effect on occupational coping self-efficacy, which, in turn, had a negative effect on new graduate nurses' job turnover intentions. The findings demonstrate the vital role authentic leadership plays in retaining new graduate nurses. Authentic leaders foster personal and organizational identification among new graduate nurses, leading to increase in the confidence in their ability to manage work-related challenges, which subsequently results in positive outcomes in both new graduate nurses and the organization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Occupational stress and the importance of self-care and resilience: focus on veterinary nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Ciaran; Campion, Deirdre P

    2017-01-01

    Burnout and compassion fatigue are frequently mentioned in relation to veterinary work. Veterinary nursing is a caring profession and those who seek a career within this field do so because of a natural empathetic desire to care for animals. However it is the individuals who are the most caring and empathetic towards others that will be most at risk of experiencing occupational stress when they are confronted with psychologically demanding workplace roles and working environments. Burnout is considered an 'unintentional end point' for certain individuals who are exposed to chronic stress within their working environment. When suffering burnout, a person may experience emotional exhaustion, may become more cynical or they may have a reduced sense of personal accomplishment in regards to their own work. Signs of burnout can include increased levels of absenteeism at work, or the working standards of that staff member may decline below that of what would normally be expected of them. This could directly impact on patient care in the veterinary practice. Working in a role that places emotional demands on staff, such as a need to show compassion and empathy towards clients who are emotionally distressed, puts staff at risk from experiencing compassion fatigue. Workplace supports may include appropriate debriefing sessions among willing participants, particularly after an emotionally stressful encounter with a client. Taking personal responsibility for care of one's own mental and physical health is just as important as taking care of the patient's health. Personal strategies may include lifestyle changes, adopting a healthier lifestyle, reduction of working hours, and ensuring adequate sleep. Adopting healthy self-care strategies can promote characteristics of "resilience" - personal qualities or traits such as optimism, self-confidence, level headedness, hardiness, and having the ability to be resourceful during times of adversity. All veterinary staff may be better

  14. Predicting nurses' use of healthcare technology using the technology acceptance model: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Gillian

    2015-05-01

    The benefits of healthcare technologies can only be attained if nurses accept and intend to fully use them. One of the most common models utilized to understand user acceptance of technology is the Technology Acceptance Model. This model and modified versions of it have only recently been applied in the healthcare literature among nurse participants. An integrative literature review was conducted on this topic. Ovid/MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, and CINAHL were searched yielding a total of 982 references. Upon eliminating duplicates and applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the review included a total of four dissertations, three symposium proceedings, and 13 peer-reviewed journal articles. These documents were appraised and reviewed. The results show that a modified Technology Acceptance Model with added variables could provide a better explanation of nurses' acceptance of healthcare technology. These added variables to modified versions of the Technology Acceptance Model are discussed, and the studies' methodologies are critiqued. Limitations of the studies included in the integrative review are also examined.

  15. Nurses' Satisfaction With Using Nursing Information Systems From Technology Acceptance Model and Information Systems Success Model Perspectives: A Reductionist Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Nursing information systems can enhance nursing practice and the efficiency and quality of administrative affairs within the nursing department and thus have been widely considered for implementation. Close alignment of human-computer interaction can advance optimal clinical performance with the use of information systems. However, a lack of introduction of the concept of alignment between users' perceptions and technological functionality has caused dissatisfaction, as shown in the existing literature. This study provides insight into the alignment between nurses' perceptions and how technological functionality affects their satisfaction with Nursing Information System use through a reductionist perspective of alignment. This cross-sectional study collected data from 531 registered nurses in Taiwan. The results indicated that "perceived usefulness in system quality alignment," "perceived usefulness in information quality alignment," "perceived ease of use in system quality alignment," "perceived ease of use in information quality alignment," and "perceived ease of use in service quality alignment" have significantly affected nurses' satisfaction with Nursing Information System use. However, "perceived usefulness in service quality alignment" had no significant effect on nurses' satisfaction. This study also provides some meaningful implications for theoretical and practical aspects of design.

  16. Role development of nurses for technology-dependent children attending mainstream schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Suzuki, Machiko

    2015-04-01

    To describe the role development of nurses caring for medical technology-dependent children attending Japanese mainstream schools. Semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses caring for technology-dependent children were conducted and analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. Nurses developed roles centered on maintaining technology-dependent children's physical health to support children's learning with each other, through building relationships, learning how to interact with children, understanding the children and the school community, and realizing the meaning of supporting technology-dependent children. These findings support nurses to build relationships of mutual trust with teachers and children, and learn on the job in mainstream schools. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Associations of Occupational Stressors, Perceived Organizational Support, and Psychological Capital with Work Engagement among Chinese Female Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the associations of occupational stressors (extrinsic effort, reward, and overcommitment, perceived organizational support (POS, and psychological capital (PsyCap and its components (self-efficacy, hope, resilience, and optimism with work engagement and the mediating roles of PsyCap and its components among Chinese female nurses within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R model. A cross-sectional sample (1,330 completed the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Effort-Reward Imbalance Scale, Survey of POS, and PsyCap Questionnaire, and effective respondents were 1,016 (76.4%. Hierarchical regression analysis and Preacher and Hayes’ asymptotic and resampling strategies were used. Extrinsic effort was negatively associated with vigor, dedication, and absorption, while POS, PsyCap, and hope were positively associated with them. Reward and overcommitment were positively associated with dedication and absorption. Optimism was positively associated with vigor and dedication. Optimism mediated the associations of extrinsic effort, reward, and POS with vigor and dedication. PsyCap and hope mediated the associations of POS with vigor, dedication, and absorption. There is a low level of work engagement among Chinese female nurses. Extrinsic effort could reduce work engagement, while reward, overcommitment, POS, PsyCap, hope, and optimism could enhance work engagement. Hospital managers should develop the PsyCap of female nurses through controlling occupational stressors and establishing supportive organizational climate to enhance their work engagement.

  18. Associations of Occupational Stressors, Perceived Organizational Support, and Psychological Capital with Work Engagement among Chinese Female Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxi; Liu, Li; Zou, Futing; Hao, Junhui; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations of occupational stressors (extrinsic effort, reward, and overcommitment), perceived organizational support (POS), and psychological capital (PsyCap) and its components (self-efficacy, hope, resilience, and optimism) with work engagement and the mediating roles of PsyCap and its components among Chinese female nurses within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. A cross-sectional sample (1,330) completed the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Effort-Reward Imbalance Scale, Survey of POS, and PsyCap Questionnaire, and effective respondents were 1,016 (76.4%). Hierarchical regression analysis and Preacher and Hayes' asymptotic and resampling strategies were used. Extrinsic effort was negatively associated with vigor, dedication, and absorption, while POS, PsyCap, and hope were positively associated with them. Reward and overcommitment were positively associated with dedication and absorption. Optimism was positively associated with vigor and dedication. Optimism mediated the associations of extrinsic effort, reward, and POS with vigor and dedication. PsyCap and hope mediated the associations of POS with vigor, dedication, and absorption. There is a low level of work engagement among Chinese female nurses. Extrinsic effort could reduce work engagement, while reward, overcommitment, POS, PsyCap, hope, and optimism could enhance work engagement. Hospital managers should develop the PsyCap of female nurses through controlling occupational stressors and establishing supportive organizational climate to enhance their work engagement.

  19. Nurses using futuristic technology in today's healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Debra M; Kapadia, Amar; Kintzel, Jessie; Anton, Bonnie B

    2009-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) equates nurses using voice assisted technology within a clinical setting to document patient care real time, retrieve patient information from care plans, and complete routine tasks. This is a reality currently utilized by clinicians today in acute and long term care settings. Voice assisted documentation provides hands & eyes free accurate documentation while enabling effective communication and task management. The speech technology increases the accuracy of documentation, while interfacing directly into the electronic health record (EHR). Using technology consisting of a light weight headset and small fist size wireless computer, verbal responses to easy to follow cues are converted into a database systems allowing staff to obtain individualized care status reports on demand. To further assist staff in their daily process, this innovative technology allows staff to send and receive pages as needed. This paper will discuss how leading edge and award winning technology is being integrated within the United States. Collaborative efforts between clinicians and analyst will be discussed reflecting the interactive design and build functionality. Features such as the system's voice responses and directed cues will be shared and how easily data can be documented, viewed and retrieved. Outcome data will be presented on how the technology impacted organization's quality outcomes, financial reimbursement, and employee's level of satisfaction.

  20. Differences in lumbopelvic control and occupational behaviours in female nurses with and without a recent history of low back pain due to back injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiolakis, Corinne S; Kuk, Jennifer L; Drake, Janessa D M

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is highly prevalent in nurses. This study aimed to determine which physical fitness, physical activity (PA) and biomechanical characteristics most clearly distinguish between nurses with [recently injured (RInj)] and without [not recently injured (NRInj)] a recent back injury. Twenty-seven (8 RInj, 19 NRInj) female nurses completed questionnaires (pain, work, PA), physical fitness, biomechanical and low back discomfort measures, and wore an accelerometer for one work shift. Relative to NRInj nurses, RInj nurses exhibited reduced lumbopelvic control (41.4% more displayed a moderate loss of frontal plane position), less active occupational behaviours (less moderate PA; less patient lifts performed alone; more sitting and less standing time) and more than two times higher low back discomfort scores. Despite no physical fitness differences, the lumbopelvic control, occupational behaviours and discomfort measures differed between nurses with and without recent back injuries. It is unclear whether poor lumbopelvic control is causal or adaptive in RInj nurses and may require further investigation. Practitioner Summary: It is unclear which personal modifiable factors are most clearly associated with low back pain in nurses. Lumbopelvic control was the only performance-based measure to distinguish between nurses with and without recent back injuries. Future research may investigate whether reduced lumbopelvic control is causal or adaptive in recently injured nurses.

  1. Chinese Nurses' Acceptance of PDA: A Cross-Sectional Survey Using a Technology Acceptance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling; Xiao, Qian; Sun, Liu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study explores Chinese nurses' acceptance of PDA, using a questionnaire based on the framework of Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). 357 nurses were involved in the study. The results reveal the scores of the nurses' acceptance of PDA were means 3.18~3.36 in four dimensions. The younger of nurses, the higher nurses' title, the longer previous usage time, the more experienced using PDA, and the more acceptance of PDA. Therefore, the hospital administrators may change strategies to enhance nurses' acceptance of PDA, and promote the wide application of PDA.

  2. Educational technology in care management: technological profile of nurses in Portuguese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeiro, Maria José Lumini; Freire, Rosa Maria Albuquerque; Martins, Maria Manuela; Martins, Teresa Vieira; Peres, Heloísa Helena Ciqueto

    2015-12-01

    Objective To identify the technological profile of nurses in Portuguese hospitals. Method A quantitative exploratory study conducted in two hospitals in the northern region and one in the central region of Portugal. The sample was randomly selected and included 960 nurses. Results Of the participants, 420 (46.1%) used computers, 196 (23.4%) reported having knowledge about using computers for teaching, 174 (21.1%) used computers to teach, 112 (15.1%) recognized that using computers can be a technological means to supplement classroom training, 477 (61.6%) would like to receive training on using computers, and 382 (40.9%) reported self-learning of information technology. In relation to distance education, 706 (74.9%) reported they were familiar with it and 752 (76.4%) indicated an interest in participating in training using this modality. Conclusion Organizations should be mindful of the technological profile shown by this group of nurses and look for ways to introduce educational technologies in the management of care.

  3. Currency and Competence of Occupational Therapists and Consumers with Rapidly Changing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Steel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In the policy context of consumer choice and cost-effectiveness, have occupational therapists been left behind? This paper describes the change in context for access to assistive technology resulting in expanded possibilities for participation and inclusion. A case study of environmental control systems is used to explore the overlap of mainstream and assistive products and the funding and services to support their uptake. The analysis describes a future policy and practice context in which assistive technology includes a spectrum of products decoupled from access to independent advice and support services. A broader scope of occupational therapy practice has potential to enhance the occupational rights of people with disability and the efficiency and effectiveness of assistive technology provision.

  4. Predictors of occupational burnout among nurses: a dominance analysis of job stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji-Wei; Bai, Hua-Yu; Li, Jia-Huan; Lin, Ping-Zhen; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Cao, Feng-Lin

    2017-12-01

    To quantitatively compare dimensions of job stressors' effects on nurses' burnout. Nurses, a key group of health service providers, often experience stressors at work. Extensive research has examined the relationship between job stressors and burnout; however, less has specifically compared the effects of job stressor domains on nurses' burnout. A quantitative cross-sectional survey examined three general hospitals in Jinan, China. Participants were 602 nurses. We compared five potential stressors' ability to predict nurses' burnout using dominance analysis and assuming that each stressor was intercorrelated. Strong positive correlations were found between all five job stressors and burnout. Interpersonal relationships and management issues most strongly predicted participants' burnout (11·3% of average variance). Job stressors, and particularly interpersonal relationships and management issues, significantly predict nurses' job burnout. Understanding the relative effect of job stressors may help identify fruitful areas for intervention and improve nurse recruitment and retention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  6. Policy implementation and financial incentives for nurses in South Africa: a case study on the occupation-specific dispensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Blaauw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, the South African government introduced the occupation-specific dispensation (OSD, a financial incentive strategy, to attract, motivate, and retain health professionals in the public sector. Implementation commenced with the nursing sector, but there have been unintended negative consequences. Objective: First, to examine implementation of the OSD for nurses using Hogwood and Gunn's framework that outlines ‘perfect implementation’ pre-conditions. Second, to highlight the conditions for the successful implementation of financial incentives. Methods: A qualitative case study design using a combination of a document review and in-depth interviews with 42 key informants. Results: The study found that there were several implementation weaknesses. Only a few of the pre-conditions were met for OSD policy implementation. The information systems required for successful policy implementation, such as the public sector human resource data base and the South African Nursing Council register of specialised nurses were incomplete and inaccurate, thus undermining the process. Insufficient attention was paid to time and resources, dependency relationships, task specification, and communication and coordination. Conclusion: The implementation of financial incentives requires careful planning and management in order to avoid loss of morale and staff grievances.

  7. Use and Acceptance of Mobile Technology by Hospital Nurses in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Regina; Behrends, Marianne; Kupka, Thomas; Meyenburg-Altwarg, Iris; Marschollek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and describe user behavior, information and communication technology (ICT) competence and technology acceptance of hospital nurses. 36 nurses received for six weeks a mobile phone or a tablet pc with mobile application and answered one questionnaire before and after the six weeks. The participating nurses show a high technology acceptance and private daily use of technologies. Younger participants judge their ICT competency higher than older nurses. The perceived ease of use is significantly higher in younger participants. The perceived usefulness was evaluated heterogeneously. Despite the barriers mobile technology is perceived as useful for nurses in their daily work. Factors influencing personal, institutional and device acceptance were determined in this study and can be helpful to facilitate the process of implementation of mobile technology.

  8. Simulating care: technology-mediated learning in twenty-first century nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Elizabeth; Hobbs, Nelda

    2012-01-01

    The increased reliance on simulation classrooms has proven successful in learning skills. Questions persist concerning the ability of technology-driven robotic devices to form and cultivate caring behaviors, or sufficiently develop interactive nurse-client communication necessary in the context of nursing. This article examines the disconnects created by use of simulation technology in nursing education, raising the question: "Can learning of caring-as-being, be facilitated in simulation classrooms?" We propose that unless time is spent with human beings in the earliest stages of nursing education, transpersonal caring relationships do not have space to develop. Learning, crafting, and maturation of caring behaviors threatens to become a serendipitous event or is no longer perceived as an essential characteristic of nursing. Technology does not negate caring-the isolation it fosters makes transpersonal caring all the more important. We are called to create a new paradigm for nursing education that merges Nightingale's vision with technology's promise. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Lucas da Silva; Amaral, Irmara Géssica Santos; Dias, Thiago da Silva; Rodrigues, Jorge Lopes

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT) devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (pgrade 2 disabilities.

  10. Occupational stress, coping strategies, and psychological-related outcomes of nurses working in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Abd Alhadi; Elsayed, Sonia; Tumah, Hussein

    2018-02-25

    Psychiatric nurses experience a wide range of stressful events, evolving from the care of violent, aggressive patients, recurrent relapse, and poor prognosis of mental disorders. The aim of the study was to assess workplace stress, coping strategies, and levels of depression among psychiatric nurses. A descriptive correlation design was conducted on psychiatric nurses working in mental health settings Port-Said, Egypt. Data were collected from 70 nurses at a mental health hospital. The results revealed that psychiatric nurses had moderate levels of work-related stress and depression, and exhibiting different coping strategies. Stress and depression are prevalent among psychiatric nurses. Implementing programs aimed at teaching them how to deal with stress at work and improving their coping strategies and problem-solving skills are recommended. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Governing mobile technology use for continuing professional development in the Australian nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey Ann; Gale, Fred; Cummings, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth in the use of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance, especially in healthcare settings. Whilst some Australian professional bodies and organisations have developed standards and guidelines to direct appropriate use of social media and mobile technology, clear governance arrangements regarding when, where and how to use mobile technology at point of care in nursing are currently lacking. This paper analyses how the use of mobile technology by nurses at point of care is governed. It highlights the existence of a mobile technology paradox: an identified inability of nurses to access mobile technology in a context where it is increasingly recognised that its use in situ can enhance nursing practice while contributing to mobile learning and continuing professional development. While the recent release of the Registered Nurse Standards for Practice and accompanying Standard for Continuing Professional Development provides some direction regarding professional standards to support the use of mobile technology for mobile learning, we argue a more inclusive approach is required if emerging technologies are to be fully embraced. We describe how an implementation framework, underpinned by more detailed standards, guidelines and codes, could enable the nursing profession to be leaders in embedding mobile technology in healthcare environments nationally and globally. The prevalence of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance in healthcare environments. Its limited availability at point of care is hindering nursing practice, mobile learning and continuing professional development. We discuss the emergence of mobile technology and impediments for its use by nurses in situ. We analyse the professional codes governing nursing, outlining potential reforms to enable implementation of mobile technology at point of care by nurses.

  12. Adoption of Speech Recognition Technology in Community Healthcare Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masslawi, Dawood; Block, Lori; Ronquillo, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Adoption of new health information technology is shown to be challenging. However, the degree to which new technology will be adopted can be predicted by measures of usefulness and ease of use. In this work these key determining factors are focused on for design of a wound documentation tool. In the context of wound care at home, consistent with evidence in the literature from similar settings, use of Speech Recognition Technology (SRT) for patient documentation has shown promise. To achieve a user-centred design, the results from a conducted ethnographic fieldwork are used to inform SRT features; furthermore, exploratory prototyping is used to collect feedback about the wound documentation tool from home care nurses. During this study, measures developed for healthcare applications of the Technology Acceptance Model will be used, to identify SRT features that improve usefulness (e.g. increased accuracy, saving time) or ease of use (e.g. lowering mental/physical effort, easy to remember tasks). The identified features will be used to create a low fidelity prototype that will be evaluated in future experiments.

  13. Currency and Competence of Occupational Therapists and Consumers with Rapidly Changing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Steel, Emily J.; Buchanan, Ricky; Layton, Natasha; Wilson, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In...

  14. Integrating Information Technology's Competencies into Academic Nursing Education--An Action Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Ayala; Sharon, Dganit; Lev-Ari, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    Today, in the digital age, we are committed to prepare the future nurse for the information technology-rich workplace, and to help them reducing the "shock reality" upon arriving at the clinical setting. The main aim of the study is to promote the knowledge of Information Competencies Technology among nurses' educators and student. The…

  15. The Design and Implementation of Authentic Learning with Mobile Technology in Vocational Nursing Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ying-Hung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chiu, Po-Sheng; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, along with the development of mobile technology, vocational nursing education has improved greatly. In light of this emerging mobile technology, it brings the clinical practice of vocational nursing education closer to authentic learning than ever. In fact, some studies revealed that learners' learn states and learning outcomes…

  16. The Health Information Technology Competencies Tool: Does It Translate for Nursing Informatics in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn; Hunter, Kathleen; McGonigle, Dee; West, Karen; Hill, Taryn; Hebda, Toni

    2017-12-01

    Information technology use in healthcare delivery mandates a prepared workforce. The initial Health Information Technology Competencies tool resulted from a 2-year transatlantic effort by experts from the US and European Union to identify approaches to develop skills and knowledge needed by healthcare workers. It was determined that competencies must be identified before strategies are established, resulting in a searchable database of more than 1000 competencies representing five domains, five skill levels, and more than 250 roles. Health Information Technology Competencies is available at no cost and supports role- or competency-based queries. Health Information Technology Competencies developers suggest its use for curriculum planning, job descriptions, and professional development.The Chamberlain College of Nursing informatics research team examined Health Information Technology Competencies for its possible application to our research and our curricular development, comparing it originally with the TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment of Level 3 and Level 4 tools, which examine informatics competencies at four levels of nursing practice. Additional analysis involved the 2015 Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice. Informatics is a Health Information Technology Competencies domain, so clear delineation of nursing-informatics competencies was expected. Researchers found TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment of Level 3 and Level 4 differed from Health Information Technology Competencies 2016 in focus, definitions, ascribed competencies, and defined levels of expertise. When Health Information Technology Competencies 2017 was compared against the nursing informatics scope and standards, researchers found an increase in the number of informatics competencies but not to a significant degree. This is not surprising

  17. [Brazilian technological output in the area of nursing: advances and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerich, Micheline Henrique Araujo da Luz; Vieira, Raquel Heloisa Guedes; Silva, Daniela Eda; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Meirelles, Betina Horner Shlindwein

    2011-12-01

    This article aims to analyze the patents registered in the nursing area, since these patents may be used as an indicator of the technological development in the area. It presents and discusses national technological productions, tracked through the "nursing" keyword, patented in the period from 1990-2009. This is a retrospective documental research, using, as a source, data from the National Industrial Property Institute (INPI). The information gathered is discussed in relation to the appropriation of the technologies, the incentive to develop them and register them as a source of knowledge in the nursing field, aiming the practice of care. Light and light hard technology productions are increasing in the nursing field. However, these are not registered and patented. The technological advance in the nursing field is emergent and needs policies for its development.

  18. Wanda Ossowska (1912-2001) and Stanisława Leszczyńska (1896-1974): Polish nurses working under Nazi occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolska, Barbara; Hoch, Stefania; Jabkowska-Sochanska, Aniela; Benedict, Susan; Shields, Linda

    2011-11-01

    Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany on 1 September 1939 and World War II began on 3 September. Polish nurses have their place in this difficult history. In the first months of occupation, nurses focused on caring for wounded soldiers. In order to protect them from prisoner-of-war camps and execution, nurses sought safe havens for the wounded in private homes and transported them there. After their regular jobs, the nurses visited them, changed their dressings and provided them with civilian clothes so that soldiers could eventually escape. This paper describes the work of two of these nurses, Wanda Ossowska and Stanisława Leszczyńska. The first three authors (BD, SH, AJS) were nurses in Poland at that time and they present some of the information in this paper as primary source data.

  19. The Radical Flank Effect and Cross-occupational Collaboration for Technology Development during a Power Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Emily; Kellogg, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    This 12-month ethnographic study of an early entrant into the U.S. car-sharing industry demonstrates that when an organization shifts its focus from developing radical new technology to incrementally improving this technology, the shift may spark an internal power struggle between the dominant engineering group and a challenger occupational group such as the marketing group. Analyzing 42 projects in two time periods that required collaboration between engineering and marketing during such a shift, we show how cross-occupational collaboration under these conditions can be facilitated by a radical flank threat, through which the bargaining power of moderates is strengthened by the presence of a more-radical group. In the face of a strong threat by radical members of a challenger occupational group, moderate members of the dominant engineering group may change their perceptions of their power to resist challengers’ demands and begin to distinguish between the goals of radical versus more-moderate challengers. To maintain as much power as possible and prevent the more-dramatic change in engineering occupational goals demanded by radical challengers, moderate engineers may build a coalition with moderate challengers and collaborate for incremental technology development. PMID:28424533

  20. The Radical Flank Effect and Cross-occupational Collaboration for Technology Development during a Power Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Emily; Kellogg, Katherine C

    2016-12-01

    This 12-month ethnographic study of an early entrant into the U.S. car-sharing industry demonstrates that when an organization shifts its focus from developing radical new technology to incrementally improving this technology, the shift may spark an internal power struggle between the dominant engineering group and a challenger occupational group such as the marketing group. Analyzing 42 projects in two time periods that required collaboration between engineering and marketing during such a shift, we show how cross-occupational collaboration under these conditions can be facilitated by a radical flank threat, through which the bargaining power of moderates is strengthened by the presence of a more-radical group. In the face of a strong threat by radical members of a challenger occupational group, moderate members of the dominant engineering group may change their perceptions of their power to resist challengers' demands and begin to distinguish between the goals of radical versus more-moderate challengers. To maintain as much power as possible and prevent the more-dramatic change in engineering occupational goals demanded by radical challengers, moderate engineers may build a coalition with moderate challengers and collaborate for incremental technology development.

  1. Mediating Role of Psychological Capital in Relationship between Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention among Nurses at Veterans Administration Hospitals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hee-Yun; Seo, Hyun-Ju; Cho, Yoonhyung; Kim, JinHee

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mediating role of psychological capital (PCP) in the relationship between occupational stress and turnover intention in nurses. Data were collected from a sample of 447 nurses working at four Veterans Administration Hospitals throughout South Korea from July 1 to July 31, 2014. We collected data from the nurses using the following surveys: the Short Form Korean-Occupational Stress Scale, the Korean version of the Turnover Intention Scale, and the Korean version of the Psychological Capital Questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the mediating role of PCP. The level of occupational stress was 1.81 ± 0.23, the level of turnover intention was 3.29 ± 0.86, and the PCP level was 3.95 ± 0.52. There were significant correlations among the three variables (occupational stress, turnover intention, and PCP). PCP played a partial mediating role (β=-0.22, p=.008) in the relationship between occupational stress and turnover intention (pstress management programs that incorporate relevant programs in efforts to strengthen the overall components of PCP among nurses to reduce turnover intentions. Further studies are required to determine the most effective intervention programs for hospital settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Technology-Based Healthcare for Nursing Education Within The Netherlands: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ybranda; van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, nearly all Dutch nursing schools are searching for suitable ways to implement technology-based healthcare in their curriculum. Some Universities chose elective education, others a mandatory solution. Several studies were executed to determine competencies needed by nurses in order to work with technology-based healthcare. In 2016 a nationwide new curriculum for nurses has been published. Providing technology-based healthcare is included under the core competencies of this new curriculum. All baccalaureate nursing educational institutes must implement this new curriculum at the start of 2016 which will have a huge impact on the implementation of technology-based healthcare in the education programs. In the future, technology centers from Universities will collaborate and specialize, partner with technology companies and crossovers between information and communication technology and healthcare education will be expanded.

  3. The relationship between knowledge of ergonomic science and the occupational health among nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juibari, Leila; Sanagu, Akram; Farrokhi, Nafiseh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational hazards are much higher for nurses than many other jobs and neglecting this fact may reduce the quality of nursing services. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between knowledge of ergonomics and occupational health among the nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences. METHODS: It was a cross-sectional analytical study on 423 nursing staff working in various medical centers affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences in 2008, selected by quota randomized sampling. Data collection instrument was Ergonomics Questionnaire, which consisted of 72 questions. Cronbach’s alpha for main sections of the questionnaire was 0.8, 0.8 and 0.9. Descriptive and analytical tests were used for data analysis and an alpha error of 5% was considered. RESULTS: Of all the subjects, 36.1% had 5-10 years of work experience, 61.9% had a good knowledge of ergonomic principles, and 83% were exposed to a mild level of occupational hazards. There was no significant relationship between knowledge of ergonomics and occupational health (p = 0.08). The relationships between knowledge of ergonomics and age, gender, marital status, work experience, the type, and the location of service were significant (p ergonomics can provide a healthier work environment for nurses and optimize human resource efficiency. PMID:21589793

  4. Effects of rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices among electronics technology employees in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, Theresa Chinyere; Eseadi, Chiedu; Orji, Chibueze Tobias; Ede, Moses Onyemaechi; Ohanu, Ifeanyi Benedict; Bakare, Jimoh

    2017-05-01

    Improving employees' perception of organizational climate, and coaching them to remain steadfast when managing occupational risks associated with their job, might have an important effect on their psychosocial wellbeing and occupational health. This study examined the effects of a rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices. The participants were 77 electronics technology employees in the south-east of Nigeria. The study used a pretest-posttest control group design. The rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program significantly improved perceptions of the organizational climate for the people in the treatment group compared to those in the waitlist control group at post-intervention and follow-up assessments. Occupational risk management practices of the employees in the treatment group were also significantly better than those in the waitlist control group at the same 2 assessments. Corporate application of a rational emotive behavior therapy as an occupational health therapy intervention program is essential for improving the perceptions of organizational climate and promoting the adoption of feasible occupational risk management strategies in the workplace.

  5. Effects of rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices among electronics technology employees in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, Theresa Chinyere; Eseadi, Chiedu; Orji, Chibueze Tobias; Ede, Moses Onyemaechi; Ohanu, Ifeanyi Benedict; Bakare, Jimoh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Improving employees’ perception of organizational climate, and coaching them to remain steadfast when managing occupational risks associated with their job, might have an important effect on their psychosocial wellbeing and occupational health. This study examined the effects of a rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices. Methods: The participants were 77 electronics technology employees in the south-east of Nigeria. The study used a pretest–posttest control group design. Results: The rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program significantly improved perceptions of the organizational climate for the people in the treatment group compared to those in the waitlist control group at post-intervention and follow-up assessments. Occupational risk management practices of the employees in the treatment group were also significantly better than those in the waitlist control group at the same 2 assessments. Conclusions: Corporate application of a rational emotive behavior therapy as an occupational health therapy intervention program is essential for improving the perceptions of organizational climate and promoting the adoption of feasible occupational risk management strategies in the workplace. PMID:28471971

  6. A non-linear relationship between the cumulative exposure to occupational stressors and nurses' burnout and the potentially emotion regulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji-Wei; Lin, Ping-Zhen; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Li, Jia-Huan; Cao, Feng-Lin

    2017-10-08

    Stressful situations can increase the likelihood of nurses experiencing negative emotions, especially burnout. To explore the association of cumulative exposure to occupational stressors and emotion regulation strategies with nurses' burnout. Participants were 602 nurses from three general hospitals in Jinan, China. Social demographic characteristics, occupational stress, burnout, and emotion regulation strategies (cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, and rumination), were assessed. Nearly 70% of nurses reported that they were burnt out. Those with a moderate level and high level of stressors were 3.203 times and 26.444 times more likely to have burnout, respectively (x 2 trend = 62.732). Logistic regression revealed that nurses had higher cognitive reappraisal score (odds ratios (OR) = 0.941), scored lower for burnout. Those who had higher expressive suppression score (OR = 1.054), higher rumination score (OR = 1.037), and a higher level of stressors (OR = 2.779-18.259) scored higher for burnout. The results of sensitivity analysis were similar. A non-linear relationship exists between the cumulative exposure to occupational stressors and nurses' burnout. Those who less frequently use cognitive reappraisal, more frequently use rumination and expressive suppression, and have a high level of stressors may be more likely to experience burnout.

  7. Nursing students' attitudes towards information and communication technology: an exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jae; Clarke, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a shortened version of the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health, in the investigation of nursing students with clinical placement experiences. Nurses and nursing students need to develop high levels of competency in information and communication technology. However, they encounter statistically significant barriers in the use of the technology. Although some instruments have been developed to measure factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards technology, the validity is questionable and few studies have been developed to test the attitudes of nursing students, in particular. A cross-sectional survey design was performed. The Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health was used to collect data from October 2012-December 2012. A panel of experts reviewed the content of the instrument and a pilot study was conducted. Following this, a total of 508 nursing students, who were engaged in clinical placements, were recruited from six universities in South Korea. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed and reliability and construct validity were assessed. The resulting instrument consisted of 19 items across four factors. Reliability of the four factors was acceptable and the validity was supported. The instrument was shown to be both valid and reliable for measuring nursing students' attitudes towards technology, thus aiding in the current understandings of this aspect. Through these measurements and understandings, nursing educators and students are able to be more reflexive of their attitudes and can thus seek to develop them positively. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Vision on and use of physical restraints and 'smart technology' in nursing homes in Flanders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlassara, V; Lampo, E; Degryse, B; Van Audenhove, C; Spruytte, N

    2017-04-01

    The STAFF-project investigates in what way 'smart technology' can offer an alternative for physical restraints in nursing homes. A survey is realized aimed at gaining more insight into the vision on and the use of physical restraints and 'smart technology'. Two partly overlapping structured questionnaires were developed and sent to nursing home staff in Flanders (Belgium). One hundred fifty six administrators (managers or assistant-managers) and 238 caregiving staff (nurses, nursing aids, paramedical staff and other) completed the online questionnaire. In general there is a low acceptability of physical restraint use, however, a more nuanced picture of acceptability is present depending on the specific motivation for using physical restraints and on the specific means of physical restraints. About half of the administrators say they use smart technology in the nursing home. The two main reasons for not applying (yet) smart technology are 'too high price for smart technology' and 'inadequate infrastructure of the nursing home'. All respondents underscore the importance of multiple strategies to diminish the use of physical restraints in nursing homes. Physical restraint use is a complex theme and needs a nuanced analysis and management. This study shows that there is still room for improvement in diminishing the use of physical restraints and that nursing homes in Flanders are open to use smart technology.

  9. The effects of occupational interventions on reduction of musculoskeletal symptoms in the nursing profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Evelien; Krol, B.; Van der Star, A; Groothoff, Johan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the review was to gain more insight into the effects of occupational interventions for primary prevention of musculoskeletal symptoms in healthcare workers. The Cochrane Collaboration methodological guidelines for systematic reviews functioned as a starting point. Thirteen studies

  10. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  11. Resources and technologies in Social Occupational Therapy: actions with the poor youth in town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Esquerdo Lopesa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The METUIA team from the Occupational Therapy Department of the Federal University of Sao Carlos – UFSCar has been elaborating procedures and resources, which have produced contributions to the action of occupational therapy based on a local and communal dimension, aiming at a locally rooted technical contribution and directed to face the challenges of the social field. The territory notion adopted presupposes historical, economic, social and cultural dimensions that contextualize a given geographical area where the therapeutic and occupational action is developed. We have been dealing with questions related to the poor urban youth and working in the production of social technologies (understood as products, techniques or replicable methodologies developed in interaction with the community, and that represent alternatives for social transformation, which have been able to foster new possibilities of action, integrating and articulating actions of macro and micro social scope. This article presents discussions on Workshops of Dynamics, Activities and Projects; Individual and Territorial Follow-up; Articulation of Resources in the Social Field; and Dynamization of the Social Care Network. We support a continuous and critical reflection on the labor process, assuming the technical, ethical and political dimensions that comprise the professional qualification of occupational therapists. We also advocate that the practical and conceptual existence of these technologies promotes actions associated with the social question of the lives of these young individuals, seeking the expansion of equality, recognition of differences, and their space in the public sphere, so that more participation can be produced with more freedom, autonomy and solidarity.

  12. [Structure of Relationships Formed by Occupational Health Nurses for Co-operating with Managers to Support Workers with Mental Health Concerns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Junko; Takasaki, Masako; Hatanaka, Michiyo

    2018-05-31

    Occupational health staff and managers play important roles in supporting workers with mental health concerns and mutual co-operation among them is a necessary element. However, when co-operating with other professionals, several problems arise that often make such co-operation a challenge. Effective mutual actions are needed to promote such co-operation, and relationships must be formed for this purpose. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to clarify how occupational health nurses form relationships for facilitating co-operation with managers to provide support to workers with mental health concerns. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 11 occupational health nurses who provide individualized mental health support and who have at least 5 years of experience as occupational health nurses. Analysis of the recorded interviews was performed using a qualitative statistical method (KJ method). Six elements that constitute the formation of relationships were identified. When occupational health nurses form relationships for facilitating co-operation with a manager to provide support to workers, they "form relationships through strategic communication" with them and when co-operation is required, they form a relationship by "acting in a manner that suits the manager," such as his/her character and the situation. To support this relationship, occupational health nurses "provide mental support to the manager" by listening to his/her anxiety or real intention about supporting the subordinate with mental health concerns and provide relief while understanding their burdens during the co-operation. Occupational health nurses even "provide support to the manager in their activities," which assessed the situation at the workplace as the specialist and advised the manager to understand how to concern to the subordinate specifically. In addition, they "indirectly support the manager" which included coordinating with the concerned persons so as to not excessively

  13. An integrative review of communication between parents and nurses of hospitalized technology-dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Barbara K; Stiffler, Deborah; Broome, Marion E

    2014-12-01

    With advances in health care, the population of children who are technology-dependent is increasing and, therefore, the need for nurses to understand how best to engage in communication with the parents of these children is critical. Shared communication between the parents of hospitalized technology-dependent children and their nurses is essential to provide optimal care for the child. The components and behaviors of the parent-nurse communication process that improve mutual understanding of optimal care for the child had not previously been examined. Among parents of hospitalized technology-dependent children and their nurses, what communication behaviors, components, concepts, or processes improve mutual understanding of optimal care for the child? An integrative review of both qualitative and quantitative studies was conducted. Key words including communication, hospitalized, nurse, parent, pediatric, and technology-dependent were used to search databases such as Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health and Medline for years 2000-2014. The data regarding the process of parent-nurse communication were extracted as they related to the mutual understanding of optimal care for the child. The data were grouped into themes and compared across studies, designs, populations, and settings. Six articles were identified that provided information regarding the processes of shared communication among the parents of hospitalized technology-dependent children and their nurses. Providing clear information, involving parents in care decisions, trust and respect for each other's expertise, caring attitudes, advocacy, and role negotiation were all found to be important factors in shared parent-nurse communication. The results of this integrative review inform our understanding of the parent-nurse communication process. The findings provide nurses with an understanding of strategies to better engage in respectful, engaging, and intentional communication with parents of

  14. Occupational stressors and coping as determinants of burnout in female hospice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, N

    2001-02-01

    Stressors, coping and demographic variables were examined as predictors of burnout in a sample of hospice nurses. The study aimed to investigate the level of burnout among hospice nurses; to ascertain which aspects of nursing work were positively or negatively related to burnout; to examine the relative contributions made by these different variables and to suggest individual and organizational interventions to reduce levels of burnout. Eighty-nine female nurses from nine hospices completed a battery of questionnaires comprising the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Nursing Stress Scale, Ways of Coping Scale and a demographic information form. In general, the level of burnout (characterized by high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization of patients and low personal accomplishment) was found to be low. In multiple regression analyses, 'death and dying', "conflict with staff', 'accepting responsibility' and higher nursing grade contributed to emotional exhaustion. 'Conflict with staff', 'inadequate preparation', 'escape' and reduced 'planful problem-solving' contributed to depersonalization. 'Inadequate preparation', 'escape', reduced 'positive reappraisal' and fewer professional qualifications contributed to lower levels of personal accomplishment. Overall, stressors made the greatest contribution to burnout and demographic factors contributed the least. The importance of not labelling individuals as good and bad 'copers' was discussed, as the effectiveness of a strategy may depend on the situation. It was concluded that the investigation of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping in relation to burnout, was oversimplifying the coping-burnout relationship. Suggestions for stress management included staff training in counselling skills, monitoring staff conflict, implementing stress inoculation training to teach appropriate use of coping skills and finally, monitoring particularly vulnerable groups of hospice staff such as unqualified nursing assistants and

  15. Occupational contact sensitization in female geriatric nurses: Data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, S; Bauer, A; Molin, S; Skudlik, C; Geier, J

    2017-03-01

    Geriatric nurses (GN) have a high risk of occupational contact dermatitis (OCD), with chronic irritant contact dermatitis predominating. However, allergic contact dermatitis is an important issue as well. Little is known whether the relevant occupational allergen spectrum reported in the 1990s, including fragrances, preservatives, rubber chemicals and ingredients of surface disinfectants to be the most common sensitizers in GN, is still valid. To monitor the current allergen spectrum in GN with OCD and verify the validity of the patch test recommendations (baseline-, preservative-, ointment base-, rubber-, disinfectant, series and fragrances) in GN with suspected OCD given by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG). Retrospective analysis of IVDK data (2005-2014) of 743 female GN with OCD, in comparison to 695 GN without OCD. GN with OCD reacted significantly more frequently to both fragrance mixes, hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (HICC), thiuram mix, zinc diethyldithiocarbamate and mercaptobenzothiazole than GN without OCD. Reactions to MDBGN, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and oil of turpentine occurred substantially, but not significantly more frequently among GN with OCD. The latter may be due to former use of a special alcoholic liniment in geriatric care. Among material from the patients' workplaces, tetrazepam was a frequent allergen, due to dust exposure from pill crushing. Furthermore, occupationally used protective gloves, body care products as well as surface disinfectants were often tested positively. The general allergen spectrum in GN with OCD is unchanged, so the DKG patch test recommendations are still valid. Prevention of occupational sensitization should focus on fragrance-free hygiene and body care products, usage of accelerator-free protective gloves and avoidance of drug dust exposure. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Millennial's perspective of clicker technology in a nursing classroom: A Mixed methods research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toothaker, Rebecca

    2018-03-01

    Nursing education is facing challenges and a shift in paradigm within the nursing classroom. Educators need to explore innovative strategies that engage students. Clickers are one tool that can enhance participation, protect anonymity, and promote learning of concepts. This mixed methods study evaluated nursing student's perceptions of clicker technology during lecture. This study uses a 9-item questionnaire to explore perceived levels of student perception of the technology of clickers in a nursing classroom. The sample consisted of ninety-nine sophomore and senior level nursing students. Participants were recruited using convenience sampling. Ninety-one percent of the students agreed or strongly agreed that the use of clickers helped them to develop a better understanding of the subject matter when compared to traditional lecture based class. The findings portray a positive correlation of learning and an enhanced pedagogical approach for nursing students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An ontology model for nursing narratives with natural language generation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yul Ha; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jeon, Eunjoo; Lee, Joo Yun; Jo, Soo Jung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an ontology model to generate nursing narratives as natural as human language from the entity-attribute-value triplets of a detailed clinical model using natural language generation technology. The model was based on the types of information and documentation time of the information along the nursing process. The typesof information are data characterizing the patient status, inferences made by the nurse from the patient data, and nursing actions selected by the nurse to change the patient status. This information was linked to the nursing process based on the time of documentation. We describe a case study illustrating the application of this model in an acute-care setting. The proposed model provides a strategy for designing an electronic nursing record system.

  18. Applying artificial intelligence technology to support decision-making in nursing: A case study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Hung; Hsu, Pei-Ti; Chu, William; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2015-06-01

    This study applied artificial intelligence to help nurses address problems and receive instructions through information technology. Nurses make diagnoses according to professional knowledge, clinical experience, and even instinct. Without comprehensive knowledge and thinking, diagnostic accuracy can be compromised and decisions may be delayed. We used a back-propagation neural network and other tools for data mining and statistical analysis. We further compared the prediction accuracy of the previous methods with an adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system and the back-propagation neural network, identifying differences in the questions and in nurse satisfaction levels before and after using the nursing information system. This study investigated the use of artificial intelligence to generate nursing diagnoses. The percentage of agreement between diagnoses suggested by the information system and those made by nurses was as much as 87 percent. When patients are hospitalized, we can calculate the probability of various nursing diagnoses based on certain characteristics. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Analysis of technologies and experiences for reducing occupational radiation dose and study for applying to regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Park, Moon Soo; Lee, Un Jang; Song, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Byeong Soo; Kim, Chong Uk [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-15

    To reduce Occupational Radiation Dose (ORD) effectively and enhance the radiological safety, the comprehensive assessment of the experiences to reduce ORD should be made by regulatory body as well as utilities. Hence, the objective of this study is to assess the experiences for reducing ORD from the regulatory viewpoint. With the research objective, the followings are performed in this research; analysis of occupational dose trends at domestic and foreign NPPs, identification of the effective technologies for reducing ORD, examination of the effects of the technologies for reducing ORD, derivation of the regulatory means for implementing he research results. From this study, the regulatory means for effective reduction of ORD are derived. Hence, the results can be utilized as a basic materials for ALARA requirements.

  20. Occupational Therapy and assistive technology: thoughts about the experience with collaborative school consulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ramos Baleotti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents thoughts and ideas based on the experience developed in the project entitled Assistive Technology for Inclusion of Students with Physical Disorders: Resources and Procedures, in development since 2009. This project aims to help in the process of school inclusion of students with physical disorder in Early Childhood Education in the city of Marilia, Brazil, through the collaboration between Health and Education departments. Health professionals contribute through the implementation of the Assistive Technology by means of school consulting. The project has been developed in six different stages, namely: Gaining access and establishing goals for the team; Identifying the problem; Interventions/Recommendations; Implementation; Evaluation and further actions. This working model, seeks to insert occupational therapy in the school environment. This project showed the importance of occupational therapists as team members in school settings, and the importance of a collaborative work between Education and Health departments.

  1. Overview of Instructional Technology Used in the Education of Occupational Therapy Students: A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Gee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the type of instructional technology (IT master’s degree level occupational therapy educational programs routinely use as a part of their lecture- and laboratory-based instruction. Surveying the administrators of 121 graduate occupational therapy programs in the United States, we found that the majority of the respondents identified their program as using IT in some form for lecturebased courses, with less inclusion of IT for laboratory-based courses. Hybrid instruction, with the majority of the content being delivered face-to-face and the remainder via online, were the trends among the respondents. The findings also indicated that the respondents’ programs avoid certain IT, including synchronous online chat rooms or instant messaging, digital image collections, blogs or online journaling, Wikis, and audio/video podcasting. Few of the respondents said their programs had made a significant leap into implementing a larger online presence with instructional technology

  2. School-based Telerehabilitation In Occupational Therapy: Using Telerehabilitation Technologies to Promote Improvements in Student Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Joy Criss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of telerehabilitation technologies in occupational therapy for school-based practice. Telerehabilitation, for the purpose of this program, included the implementation of occupational therapy services via two-way interactive videoconferencing technology. The subjects included in this pilot program were children, ages 6 to 11 years, who attended an online charter school and had difficulties in the areas of fine motor and/or visual motor skills which impacted success with handwriting. Each participant completed a virtual evaluation and six 30-minute intervention sessions. The Print Tool™ Assessment was used to determine progress pre- and post-program. A learning coach/student satisfaction survey was given at the end of the program to determine participant satisfaction. Outcomes revealed improvements in handwriting performance for most students who participated in the program and high satisfaction rates reported by all participants.

  3. Information Technology Strategies for Honor Society and Organization Membership Retention in Online Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Emily E; Wasco, Jennifer J

    Membership retention in an honor society or organization is of utmost importance for sustainability. However, retaining members in organizations that serve online education nursing students can be a challenging task. Understanding the importance of creating a sense of community to promote retention within an honor society chapter, nursing faculty at a small private university implemented different online approaches. This article highlights successful information technology strategies to promote membership retention in organizations for online nursing students.

  4. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas da Silva Muniz

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. METHODS: This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. RESULTS: The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (p<0.05 in participants' post-intervention performance and satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: Assistive technology devices may be useful therapeutic tools to enhance autonomy/independence and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

  5. Biomechanics of side impact: Injury criteria, aging occupants, and airbag technology

    OpenAIRE

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.; Gennarelli, Thomas A.; Weigelt, John A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of side impact trauma-related biomedical investigations with specific reference to certain aspects of epidemiology relating to the growing elderly population, improvements in technology such as side airbags geared toward occupant safety, and development of injury criteria. The first part is devoted to the involvement of the elderly by identifying variables contributing to injury including impact severity, human factors, and national and international field data. T...

  6. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Edwards

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in addressing unique learning needs. Competency in informatics will allow the beginning nursing student to navigate the on-line teaching software used by colleges. With rigorous expectations in nursing programs, students may feel overwhelmed with assignments, organization, and time management. Frustration may build when students struggle with basic informatics competency, often leaving them unable to navigate instructional websites or work with necessary on-line learning content. The purpose of this project, Passport Project for Nursing Success, was to assess the skills, knowledge, and informatics comfort level of students, while providing computer training and teaching for beginning nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Central Illinois. The community college encompassed students from a ten county area, with 20 percent of the student population enrolled in the Applied Science curriculum. Initial implementation occurred prior to the students' first nursing course and emphasized basic skills necessary to navigate on-line learning software, library search engines, and electronic communication. The greatest barrier to successful implementation was faculty resistance and academic support during completion of the initial implementation of the Passport Project. Post- project surveys indicated overwhelming student support for the education received and improved retention rates of first semester nursing students.

  7. Applying language technology to nursing documents: pros and cons with a focus on ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, Hanna; Lehtikunnas, Tuija; Back, Barbro; Karsten, Helena; Salakoski, Tapio; Salanterä, Sanna

    2007-10-01

    The present study discusses ethics in building and using applications based on natural language processing in electronic nursing documentation. Specifically, we first focus on the question of how patient confidentiality can be ensured in developing language technology for the nursing documentation domain. Then, we identify and theoretically analyze the ethical outcomes which arise when using natural language processing to support clinical judgement and decision-making. In total, we put forward and justify 10 claims related to ethics in applying language technology to nursing documents. A review of recent scientific articles related to ethics in electronic patient records or in the utilization of large databases was conducted. Then, the results were compared with ethical guidelines for nurses and the Finnish legislation covering health care and processing of personal data. Finally, the practical experiences of the authors in applying the methods of natural language processing to nursing documents were appended. Patient records supplemented with natural language processing capabilities may help nurses give better, more efficient and more individualized care for their patients. In addition, language technology may facilitate patients' possibility to receive truthful information about their health and improve the nature of narratives. Because of these benefits, research about the use of language technology in narratives should be encouraged. In contrast, privacy-sensitive health care documentation brings specific ethical concerns and difficulties to the natural language processing of nursing documents. Therefore, when developing natural language processing tools, patient confidentiality must be ensured. While using the tools, health care personnel should always be responsible for the clinical judgement and decision-making. One should also consider that the use of language technology in nursing narratives may threaten patients' rights by using documentation collected

  8. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  9. Integrating communication skills training in the curricula of 5 healthcare professions: nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiography and midwifery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Tørring, Birgitte; Hansen, Susanne Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    for professionals. In the effort of integrating communication skills training in the undergraduate curricula of nursing, radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and midwifery, we established a communication skills laboratory and arranged a 5 day course for communication teachers from all 5 educational......Structured training of communication skills are needed in undergraduate healthcare education in order to prepare the future professionals to cooperate with patients. Often education in communication is not integrated in the curriculum – making it seem a side activity of less importance...... programs at University College North Denmark. After the course communication skills training was offered at least once during every 3½ year program and after 3 years this is retained and in some cases developed further. The combination of getting a room where to train and developing the skills to train...

  10. Levels of occupational stress and stressful activities for nurses working in emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Ferreira da Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify stress levels, areas and their activities identified as stressful by nurses working in the emergence in Manaus, AM, Brazil. It is an epidemiological, cross-sectional design, with 36 emergency nurses from December 2010 to January 2011. The Bianchi Stress Scale with 57 questions was used. The nurses were at risk for high levels of stress. The most stressful areas were the operation of the unit, conditions of work and personnel administration, and the most stressful activity was the request for equipment review and repair. The difference by Friedman test between the areas was significant (p <0.05, Dunn post-test significant (p <0.05 when compared by peers. The accumulation of management activities with the assistance activities can generate higher levels of stress, it is necessary to invest in improving the work environment and management support to minimize the stress experienced at work.

  11. [Labor accidents involving the eyes: assessment of occupational risks involving nursing workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Cristiana Brasil; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag; Leite, Ana Lourdes Almeida e Silva

    2005-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying nursing workers who were victims of eye accidents and the type of accident; describing the measures taken and proposing Health Education methods. A descriptive and exploratory study was carried out at a public maternity hospital from September 2002 to January 2003. Data were collected through direct observation of the environment and interviews with workers. Subjects were ten professionals (one nurse, two technicians and seven nursing auxiliaries) who were victims of work accidents involving the eye. The accidents were grouped according to the type of material that caused the trauma: chemical substances (4), medication (3), mechanical trauma (1), scalp (1) and urine (1). The results reveal that hospital workers are vulnerable to labor accidents because the environment presents biological, chemical and physical risks. An important step to prevent the occurrence of new accidents would be the prevention of human mistakes through permanent training and the use of protection glasses.

  12. Historical evolution and technology impact in the area of the health and the nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Couto Carvalho Barra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study it is of exploratory and descriptive character. One is about bibliographical research carried through on the basis of the analysis and interpretation of articles, dissertations and thesis produced between 1994 the 2004. We investigate the contributions of researchers that had focused the historical evolution of the technology in the area of the health and the nursing. Of a total of 39 articles, 03 selected dissertations and 02 thesis, we construct for analysis two categories: Technological evolution in the area of the health: hard technology e; Technological evolution in the Nursing: technology leavening and has led. This study it allowed to affirm us that a critical and reflexive position is necessary on the use of the technology, searching an adequacy to the necessities of the patient as a whole and that, independent of the use of the high technology, fits to the nurse to keep this together humanized presence to the sick people.

  13. Technology and its ethics in nursing and caring journals: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Eila-Sisko; Nordman, Tina; Eriksson, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Over the past 20 years, the impact of technology has increased significantly in health care. The diversity of technology is growing and its knowledge scattered. The concept of technology is ambiguous in caring and nursing sciences and its ethics remains unidentified. To find evidence on how the concept of technology and its ethics are defined in caring and nursing sciences and practice. The purpose of this study is to describe and summarize the concept of technology and its ethics in the past nursing and caring literature. The integrative literature review of the past nursing and caring literature. The data were collected from caring and nursing journal articles from 2000 to 2013 focusing on technology and its ethics.The results were summarized and themed. Technology as a concept has three implications. First, technology is devices and products, including ICT and advanced, simple and assistive technology. Second, technology refers to a process consisting of methods for helping people. Third, technology as a service indicates the production of care by technology. The ethics of technology has not been established as a guiding principle. Some studies excluded ethical reflection completely. Many studies discussed the ethics of technology as benefits such as improved communication and symptoms management, and the simple use of e-health services whilst others remained critical presenting ethical problems such as unwillingness and the inability to use technology, or conflicts with human aspects or questions of inequality. In conclusion, this study indicates that technology as a concept is described diversely. The relation between technology and ethics is not a truism. Despite some evidence, more is needed to promote ethical care when using technology. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Technology support in nursing education: clickers in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Janice

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that the present generation of students has a preference for digital literacy, experiential learning, interactivity, and immediacy; therefore, greater use of technology is being brought into university courses to aid in student involvement. Student Response Systems, called clickers, were incorporated as a teaching methodology to enhance student interaction and learning in a didactic pediatric nursing course. This course was taught over Interactive Television (ITV) with students at a distant site as well as face to face, creating the challenge of whole-class engagement. Clickers were used to actively engage students at both sites simultaneously and give immediate feedback to students regarding understanding of lecture material. Clickers also allowed small-group problem solving of questions. Exam grades and level of participation in case studies were monitored and exam scores and final scores were compared to those of a previous class. Student t-tests demonstrated that one of three course exams and final course grades were significantly higher for the students who used clickers in the classroom. Satisfaction feedback also supported the use of clickers as a tool to engage students and enhance learning outcomes.

  15. Effects of Patient Care Unit Design and Technology on Nurse and Patient Care Technician Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mary S; Doscher, Mindy

    2018-04-01

    The current study described RN and patient care technician (PCT) communication in centralized and hybrid decentralized workstation designs using hands-free communication technology and infrared locator badge technology to facilitate communication. New construction of an oncology unit provided the opportunity to compare staff communication in two different workstation designs. Observations and questionnaires compared nurse and PCT communication in the two-unit designs. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the differences. The hybrid decentralized unit had increased use of hands-free communication technology and hallway communication by nurses and PCTs, and increased patient room communication by nurses. Perceptions of communication between nurses and PCTs and congruency of priorities for care were similar for both units. The locator badge technology had limited adoption. Replacement of nurse workstations with new construction or remodeling impact staff communication patterns, necessitating that nurse leaders understand the impact of design and technology on communication. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(4), 17-22.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. The contributions of digital technologies in the teaching of nursing skills: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Maurício de Souza; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2017-07-13

    To analyze the contributions of digital educational technologies used in teaching nursing skills. Integrative literature review, search in five databases, from 2006 to 2015 combining the descriptors 'education, nursing', 'educational technology', 'computer-assisted instruction' or related terms in English. Sample of 30 articles grouped in the thematic categories 'technology in the simulation with manikin', 'incentive to learning' and 'teaching of nursing skills'. It was identified different formats of digital educational technologies used in teaching Nursing skills such as videos, learning management system, applications, hypertext, games, virtual reality simulators. These digital materials collaborated in the acquisition of theoretical references that subsidize the practices, enhancing the teaching and enable the use of active learning methods, breaking with the traditional teaching of demonstrating and repeating procedures.

  17. A study of occupational stress, scope of practice, and collaboration in nurse anesthetists practicing in anesthesia care team settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Steve L

    2005-12-01

    This study examined occupational stress in Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) practicing with anesthesiologists in anesthesia care team (ACT) settings. The focus was to examine the relationships among CRNA scope of practice (SOP) in ACTs, collaboration, and role-related occupational stress. A survey questionnaire was mailed to CRNAs from the 6 New England states, with a return rate of 30.87% (n = 347). Data analysis included practice characteristics and demographics of the sample, and the research questions were examined applying correlational analysis, t test, and analysis of variance addressing relationships among the study measures. Data analyses revealed that limited, restricted CRNA practice scope was particularly evident in respondents employed by anesthesiology groups, compared with hospital-employed CRNAs. Few CRNA respondents perceived their practice as collaborative, and many used compromise as a conflict-resolution style. Respondents with a broader SOP reported higher collaboration than those with restrictions. Respondents reporting a broader SOP also experienced increased job stress in relation to role overload but used coping resources effectively. Implications for future studies include exploring strategies that achieve consensus between CRNAs and anesthesiologists in ACTs, emphasizing clearly defined roles and optimizing productivity.

  18. Radiofrequency identification: exploiting an old technology for measuring nurse time and motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Terry L

    2012-09-01

    A national campaign is underway to increase the amount of time staff nurses spend at the bedside of hospitalized patients through redesign of the work environment. This kind of work redesign requires robust data depicting what nurses do and how they spend their time. Historically, these kinds of data have been difficult, costly, and time consuming to collect. Wireless capture of data on the movement of humans within the work environment (ie, time and motion) is now possible through radiofrequency identification technology. When small tracking devices the size of a quarter are affixed to their clothing, the movement of nurses throughout a patient care unit can be monitored. The duration and frequency of patient interaction are captured along with the duration of time spent in other locations of interest to include nurses' station, supply room, medication room, doctors' station, electronic documentation stations, family waiting rooms, and the hallway. Patterns of nurse movement and time allocation can be efficiently identified, and the effects of staffing practices, workflows, and unit layout evaluated. Integration of radiofrequency identification time and motion data with other databases enables nurse leaders to link nursing time to important cost and quality outcomes. Nurse leaders should explore the usefulness of radiofrequency identification technology in addressing data needs for nurse time and motion.

  19. Reported use of technology in stroke rehabilitation by physical and occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Jeanne; Subryan, Heamchand; Nwogu, Ifeoma; Cavuoto, Lora

    2017-08-16

    With the patient care experience being a healthcare priority, it is concerning that patients with stroke reported boredom and a desire for greater fostering of autonomy, when evaluating their rehabilitation experience. Technology has the potential to reduce these shortcomings by engaging patients through entertainment and objective feedback. Providing objective feedback has resulted in improved outcomes and may assist the patient in learning how to self-manage rehabilitation. Our goal was to examine the extent to which physical and occupational therapists use technology in clinical stroke rehabilitation home exercise programs. Surveys were sent via mail, email and online postings to over 500 therapists, 107 responded. Conventional equipment such as stopwatches are more frequently used compared to newer technology like Wii and Kinect games. Still, less than 25% of therapists' report using a stopwatch five or more times per week. Notably, feedback to patients is based upon objective data less than 50% of the time by most therapists. At the end of clinical rehabilitation, patients typically receive a written home exercise program and non-technological equipment, like theraband and/or theraputty to continue rehabilitation efforts independently. The use of technology is not pervasive in the continuum of stroke rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation The patient care experience is a priority in healthcare, so when patients report feeling bored and desiring greater fostering of autonomy in stroke rehabilitation, it is troubling. Research examining the use of technology has shown positive results for improving motor performance and engaging patients through entertainment and use of objective feedback. Physical and occupational therapists do not widely use technology in stroke rehabilitation. Therapists should consider using technology in stroke rehabilitation to better meet the needs of the patient.

  20. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  1. Use of media technology to enhance the learning of student nurses in regards to auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Kerry

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if simulation aided by media technology contributes towards an increase in knowledge, empathy, and a change in attitudes in regards to auditory hallucinations for nursing students. A convenience sample of 60 second-year undergraduate nursing students from an Australian university was invited to be part of the study. A pre-post-test design was used, with data analysed using a paired samples t-test to identify pre- and post-changes on nursing students' scores on knowledge of auditory hallucinations. Nine of the 11 questions reported statistically-significant results. The remaining two questions highlighted knowledge embedded within the curriculum, with therapeutic communication being the core work of mental health nursing. The implications for practice are that simulation aided by media technology increases the knowledge of students in regards to auditory hallucinations. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Mobile technology and its use in clinical nursing education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Nursing students face a variety of challenges to learning in clinical practice, from the theory-practice gap, to a lack of clinical supervision and the ad hoc nature of learning in clinical environments. Mobile technology is proposed as one way to address these challenges. This article comprehensively summarizes and critically reviews the available literature on mobile technology used in undergraduate clinical nursing education. It identifies the lack of clear definitions and theory in the current body of evidence; the variety of mobile devices and applications used; the benefits of mobile platforms in nursing education; and the complexity of sociotechnical factors, such as the cost, usability, portability, and quality of mobile tools, that affect their use in undergraduate clinical nursing education. Implications for nursing education and practice are outlined, and recommendations for future research are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The effects of occupational interventions on reduction of musculoskeletal symptoms in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, E H; Krol, B; Van Der Star, A; Groothoff, J W

    2006-06-10

    The objective of the review was to gain more insight into the effects of occupational interventions for primary prevention of musculoskeletal symptoms in healthcare workers. The Cochrane Collaboration methodological guidelines for systematic reviews functioned as a starting point. Thirteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were analysed for methodological quality and effects. Eight outcome effect areas were established and defined as areas in which an effect had been determined in at least two studies. A method based on levels of scientific evidence was then used to synthesize the information available. Strong scientific evidence for the beneficial effect of occupational interventions was found for the outcome effect areas physical discomfort, technical performance of transfers and frequency of manual lifting. Insufficient evidence was found for the effect areas absenteeism due to musculoskeletal problems, musculoskeletal symptoms, fatigue, perceived physical load and knowledge of risk factors at work and ergonomic principles. Training and education combined with an ergonomic intervention were found to be effective.

  4. Nurses' Contribution to Health Information Technology of Iran's 2025 Health Map: A Review of the Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Azadi, Tania; Azadi, Tannaz

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of eHealth strategy in Iran has a history less than 17 years. Iran's eHealth strategy is developed in 2011 and is called "Iran' 2025 Health Map: Health Information Technology". Considering the important role of nurses in providing healthcare services as well as in future long term plans such as sustainable development, it is of high value to pay attention to nurses' contribution in developing eHealth strategies. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' contribution to health information technology of Iran's 2025 health map. This study was a qualitative study conducted in 2015 through reviewing the "Iran' 2025 Health Map: Health Information Technology" official report. The strategy published in three volumes and in Persian language was downloaded through the official website of the office of Statistics and Information Technology of Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME). Two main themes were identified in the report indicating areas which nurses' roles were clearly stated. The findings revealed that nurses' contribution is not clearly stated in the strategy. However, there are a few areas highlighting nurses' involvement such as "determining beneficiary groups" and "information dissemination". It is suggested that more attention needs to be paid in contribution of nurses in further actions to revise the Iran's eHealth strategy.

  5. Dental nursing education and the introduction of technology-assisted learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, C; Gorman, T; Claffey, N

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the profile of dental nursing students in the National Dental Nurse Training Programme of Ireland and their adjustment to a technology-assisted learning environment. Evaluation by students of the course and their reactions to the course were analysed. Dental nurses must possess the skills and knowledge to proficiently function in the modern day dental surgery. The implementation of a dental nurse programme that is heavily reliant on technology has started to create a group of dental nurses equipped with basic skills to access and retrieve information over a lifetime. However, the transition to a technology-assisted learning environment including online learning activities requires adaptation and expertise by educators and students alike. Careful evaluation and stakeholder feedback is imperative in the creation and maintaining of a quality programme. In conclusion, the students in this study responded well to the transition to a technology-based learning environment. Furthermore, the findings of this study suggest that the use of an online environment is an effective and stimulating learning environment for the students of a dental nurse programme; however, familiarity skills and knowledge of information technology is a prerequisite for success.

  6. Stages of Adoption Concern and Technology Acceptance in a Critical Care Nursing Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gina M; LoCurto, Jamie; Lippoldt, Diana

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the stages of concern (self, task, and impact) and usability (trust, perceived usefulness, and ease of use) shifts experienced by nurses adopting new technology. Patient care processes in critical care units can be disrupted with the incorporation of information technology. New users of technology typically transition through stages of concern and experience shifts in acceptance during assimilation. Critical care nurses (N = 41) were surveyed twice: (1) pre, immediately after training, and (2) post, 3 months after implementation of technology. From presurvey to postsurvey, self-concerns decreased 14%, whereas impact concerns increased 22%. Furthermore, there was a 30% increase in trust and a 17% increase in perceived usefulness, even with a 27% decrease in ease of use. Adoption of new technology requires critical care nurses to adapt current practices, which may improve trust and perceived usefulness yet decrease perceptions of ease of use.

  7. [The Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Nursing Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Su, Hsiu-Chuan; Huang, Ean-Wen

    2017-12-01

    With the rapid development of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the 21st century, all walks of life have experienced disruptive changes, including the healthcare profession. Although nurses represent the largest number of professionals in medical institutions, it is doubtful whether nurses possess sufficient capabilities to face challenges in this era of rapid medical informatization. Currently, the courses necessary to cultivate information literacy in nursing students are insufficient in Taiwan, and traditional instruction methods are largely adopted as nursing teaching strategies. Additionally, most teachers hold a passive attitude towards the application of ICT in teaching. On the contrary, ICT have been integrated into nursing education in many countries around the world for nearly 20 years, achieving good levels of teaching efficacy. Reflecting the Taiwan government's promotion of digital learning projects, academic circles in various fields have also started to gradually integrate ICT into teaching. Nursing educators in Taiwan have much to reference and to learn from these disparate integration experiences. Therefore, this article introduces the concepts of integration of ICT into teaching, the current status of the application of ICT in international nursing education, and the issues faced during this application as a reference for nursing education in Taiwan in order to promote the integration of ICT into nursing education.

  8. PREVENTION OF OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovica Jovanovic

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical services, physicians and nurses play an essential role in the plant safety program through primary treatment of injured workers and by helping to identify workplace hazards. The physician and nurse should participate in the worksite investigations to identify specific hazard or stresses potentially causing the occupational accidents and injuries and in planning the subsequent hazard control program. Physicians and nurses must work closely and cooperatively with supervisors to ensure the prompt reporting and treatment of all work related health and safety problems. Occupational accidents, work related injuries and fatalities result from multiple causes, affect different segments of the working population, and occur in a myriad of occupations and industrial settings. Multiple factors and risks contribute to traumatic injuries, such as hazardous exposures, workplace and process design, work organization and environment, economics, and other social factors. With such a diversity of theories, it will not be difficult to understand that there does not exist one single theory that is considered right or correct and is universally accepted. These theories are nonetheless necessary, but not sufficient, for developing a frame of reference for understanding accident occurrences. Prevention strategies are also varied, and multiple strategies may be applicable to many settings, including engineering controls, protective equipment and technologies, management commitment to and investment in safety, regulatory controls, and education and training. Research needs are thus broad, and the development and application of interventions involve many disciplines and organizations.

  9. An epidemiological survey of Low back pain and its relationship with occupational and personal factors among nursing personnel at hospitals of Shahrood Faculty of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sadeghian

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although low back pain (LBP represents a significant occupational problem for hospital nurses, few investigations target nurses for low back pain and its association with the personal and work-related factors in Iran. Methods: This cross sectional study was performed on 245 nursing personnel (registered nurses, nursing aides, operating room technicians, anesthesiology technicians working full time for at least 1 month at 4 hospitals. Data were collected by modified Nordic questionnaire and interview followed by clinical examination. c2, Mantel and logistic regression statistical tests were used. Results: The 12-month period-prevalence of LBP was 49.9 % (95%CI 43-55/8. In this study 51(21/7% males and 184(78/3% females participated that mean age of them was 32 years .The prevalence of back pain increased with increasing age. There was no differences between the sexes, but more prevalence was observed in the married ones than singles. Odds ratio of LBP was increased 2/2 times with BMI higher than 27kg/m2. In this study the relationship between cumulative duration of employment in nursing job, duration of employment in present ward and manual handling and back pain was significant statistically. Conclusion: LBP is high among nurses. For prevention of LBP, ergonomic program, lifting team, correct lifting technique and wider research with taking into account LBP psychosocial factors and work task are suggested.

  10. The effects of authentic leadership, six areas of worklife, and occupational coping self-efficacy on new graduate nurses' burnout and mental health: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Borgogni, Laura; Consiglio, Chiara; Read, Emily

    2015-06-01

    New nurse burnout has personal and organizational costs. The combined effect of authentic leadership, person-job fit within areas of worklife, and occupational coping self-efficacy on new nurses' burnout and emotional wellbeing has not been investigated. This study tested a model linking authentic leadership, areas of worklife, occupational coping self-efficacy, burnout, and mental health among new graduate nurses. We also tested the validity of the concept of interpersonal strain at work as a facet of burnout. A cross-sectional national survey of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. Registered nurses working in direct patient care in acute care settings with less than 3 years of experience were selected from provincial registry databases of 10 Canadian provinces. A total of 1009 of 3743 surveyed new graduate nurses were included in the final sample (useable response rate 27%). Participants received a mail survey package that included a letter of information, study questionnaire, and a $2 coffee voucher. To optimize response rates non-responders received a reminder letter four weeks after the initial mailing, followed by a second survey package four weeks after that. Ethics approval was obtained from the university ethics board prior to starting the study. Descriptive statistics and scale reliabilities were analyzed. Structural equation modelling with maximum likelihood estimation was used to test the fit between the data and the hypothesized model and to assess the factor structure of the expanded burnout measure. The hypothesized model was an acceptable fit for the data (χ(2) (164)=1221.38; χ(2) ratio=7.447; CFI=.921; IFI=.921; RMSEA=.08). All hypothesized paths were significant. Authentic leadership had a positive effect on areas of worklife, which in turn had a positive effect on occupational coping self-efficacy, resulting in lower burnout, which was associated with poor mental health. Authentic leaders may play an important role in creating positive

  11. [Self-assessment of tasks and roles of occupational medicine service (OMS) nurses in the Polish system of workers' health protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of survey performed to find out how occupational medicine service (OMS) nurses assess their tasks and roles in the Polish system of workers' health protection. The survey was carried out in a random group of 200 OMS nurses. The survey showed that OMS nurses form-an experienced professional group. According to self-assessment they have an opportunity to use their competence in its full scope. Almost half of respondents agreed that in Poland the skills of OMS nurses are properly used. There are two reasons why certain tasks are not performed by OMS nurses, first, certain tasks are assigned to other persons in the unit; second, employers are sometimes not interested in those tasks or find them not necessary. The majority of nurses assess their knowledge and preparation to perform tasks relatively well, however they want to broaden their knowledge and improve their skills. OMS nurses play an important role in the Polish system of workers' health protection. They perform many tasks, which fall within the scope of OMS activities being currently implemented. Their competences are usually properly used. There is a need to convince employers that the scope of services provided by OMS units should be extended and adequately financed. This should result in the better use of OMS nurses' competences. Nurses are well educated and skilled to perform their jobs. Nevertheless, they feel the need to broaden their knowledge. Although the programs of specialization and qualification courses are rather comprehensive, nurses declare that some areas should be enriched with additional information.

  12. Patient safety and technology-driven medication - A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia; Lefevre, Rikke S; Møller, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Undergraduate Student Nurses' Use of Information and Communication Technology in Their Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Students expect to use technology in their study just as they use technology in other aspects of their life. Technology is embedded in the day-to-day work of nursing, and therefore needs to be integrated in education to prepare students to assume professional roles and develop skills for lifelong learning. A quantitative descriptive study, using an anonymous survey, explored how undergraduate student nurses from one New Zealand school of nursing, access information and communication technologies for their learning. In total 226 completed questionnaires were returned (75%). Nearly all students (96%) have smart phones, all students have a computer and 99% use the university learning management system daily or several times a week. The search engine most commonly used to find information for assignments was Google Scholar (91%), with only 78% using subject specific academic databases. Implications from this study include the need for charging stations and further education on information searching.

  14. Education and information for practicing school nurses: which technology-supported resources meet their needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lori S; Enge, Karmin J

    2012-10-01

    School nurses care for children with a variety of health-related conditions and they need information about managing these conditions, which is accessible, current, and useful. The goal of this literature review was to gather and synthesize information on technology-supported resources and to determine which met the educational needs of school nurses. Successful online educational programs were interactive and self-directed. The most common barriers were lack of time to find educational information, lack of knowledge about computers, technology, the Internet and specific programs, and lack of administrative support from school officials to use technology to access information and evidence for practice. Recommendations for successful use of technology to meet practicing school nurse's educational needs are offered.

  15. Entering a world of uncertainty: community nurses' engagement with information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney-Pratt, Helen; Cummings, Elizabeth; Turner, Paul; Cameron-Tucker, Helen; Wood-Baker, Richard; Walters, Eugene Haydn; Robinson, Andrew Lyle

    2012-11-01

    Achieving adoption, use, and integration of information and communication technology by healthcare clinicians in the workplace is recognized as a challenge that requires a multifaceted approach. This article explores community health nurses' engagement with information and communication technology as part of a larger research project that investigated the delivery of self-management support to people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Following a survey of computer skills, participants were provided with computer training to support use of the project information system. Changes in practice were explored using action research meetings and individual semistructured interviews. Results highlight three domains that affected nurses' acceptance, utilization, and integration of information and communication technology into practice; environmental issues; factors in building capacity, confidence, and trust in the technology; and developing competence. Nurses face individual and practice challenges when attempting to integrate new processes into work activities, and the use of participatory models to support adoption is recommended.

  16. Nurses' perception and barriers to use of information communication technology in a teaching hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinoye, Omolola O; Ayandiran, Emmanuel Olufemi; Fakunle, Imoleayo; Mtshali, Ntombifikile

    2013-08-01

    The impact of information technology on nursing has been a subject of discourse for the latter half of the 20th century and the early part of the 21st. Despite its obvious benefits, adapting information technology to healthcare has been relatively difficult, and rates of use have been limited especially in many developing countries. This quantitative study has shown a generally low usage of information technology among nurses in the study setting. Many of the nurses adjudged themselves as novice in information technology, with 37.8% stating that they had never had formal training in information technology and many rating themselves as possessing little or no skill in the use of spreadsheet, databases, and so on. Many (55.6%) stated that they do not have access to information technology despite the fairly widespread satisfactory perception established among them. Results further showed that unreliable network connections, high work demand, inadequate number of computers, poor access to computers consequent on wrong locations, and poor system design with associated failure to fit work demands are some of the major barriers to the use of information technology in the study setting. These factors therefore need to be taken into consideration in any intervention that seeks to improve the nurses' use of information technology in clinical setting.

  17. Effects of electronic health information technology implementation on nursing home resident outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda H; Teresi, Jeanne A; Chen, Emily K; Henderson, Charles R; Lachs, Mark S; Boratgis, Gabriel; Silver, Stephanie; Eimicke, Joseph P

    2012-02-01

    To examine the effects of electronic health information technology (HIT) on nursing home residents. The study evaluated the impact of implementing a comprehensive HIT system on resident clinical, functional, and quality of care outcome indicators as well as measures of resident awareness of and satisfaction with the technology. The study used a prospective, quasi-experimental design, directly assessing 761 nursing home residents in 10 urban and suburban nursing homes in the greater New York City area. No statistically significant impact of the introduction of HIT on residents was found on any outcomes, with the exception of a significant negative effect on behavioral symptoms. Residents' subjective assessment of the HIT intervention were generally positive. The absence of effects on most indicators is encouraging for the future development of HIT in nursing homes. The single negative finding suggests that further investigation is needed on possible impact on resident behavior. © The Author(s) 2012

  18. Analysis of the concept of nursing educational technology applied to the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cruz Esmeraldo Áfio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is aimed at analyzing the concept of educational technology, produced by nursing, applied to the patient. Rodgers´ Evolutionary Method of Concept Analysis was used, identifying background, attributes and consequential damages. 13 articles were selected for analysis in which the background was identified: knowledge deficiency, shortage of nursing professionals' time, to optimize nursing work, the need to achieve the goals of the patients. Attributes: tool, strategy, innovative approach, pedagogical approach, mediator of knowledge, creative way to encourage the acquisition of skills, health production instrument. Consequences: to improve the quality of life, encouraging healthy behavior, empowerment, reflection and link. It emphasizes the importance of educational technologies for the care in nursing, to boost health education activities.

  19. EFFECTIVENESS OF MUSCLE STRETCHING IN OCCUPATION RELATED CHRONIC MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN IN COMMUNITY NURSES –A SINGLE BLIND STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Khwairakpam Zhimina Devi; Sai Kumar. N; Vinod Babu. K; V.R. Ayyappan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae have an immediate effect on Chronic Lower Back Pain. Hence the purpose is to find the short term effect of stretching of Lower Back Muscle, Hamstring and Tensor Fasciae Latae on intensity of low back pain, flexibility and functional disability in occupation related Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain in Community Nurses. Method: Single blind experimental study design, 40 subjects with Chronic mechani...

  20. A case study from a nursing and occupational therapy perspective - Providing care for a patient with a traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Beverley; McGeehan, Claire

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a case study that demonstrates how collaborative working between professionals enhanced the holistic care for a patient following a traumatic brachial plexus injury. The paper will describe the patient's journey of care from initial presentation, diagnosis and assessment, acute care provision, discharge & rehabilitation to ongoing supportive counselling. The care encompasses input from both a nursing and occupational therapy perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Locating assistive technology research in a clinical setting: an occupational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler-Davis, Sally; Evans, Laura; Cudd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peer research was used to identify the experience and perceptions of assistive technology and telecare adoption in a UK healthcare context. A narrative account of participation and learning is intended to provoke further dialogue. There have been a range of policy and implementation initiatives that are within the direct experience of organisational actors over the last 15 years and this engagement allows for specific reflection on the service achievements and some of the barriers to implementation of technology changes in rehabilitation practice and service design. Insights are presented that suggest a reification of research priorities and a need to align technology, through patient and public engagement, to provider priorities. In addition, an improvement in adoption would be based on sustained capacity building within the Occupational Therapy workforce and a re-focus on specific knowledge sharing and learning about technology. Given the shared desire to promote the sustained adoption of appropriate technology for assistance and rehabilitation it is suggested the voice of practitioners is strengthened through research and knowledge exchange in the clinical setting.

  2. Enabling technologies promise to revitalize the role of nursing in an era of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Marion J; Weaver, Charlotte; Abbott, Patricia A

    2003-01-01

    The application of information technology (IT) in health care has the potential to transform the delivery of care, as well as the health care work environment, by streamlining processes, making procedures more accurate and efficient, and reducing the risk of human error. For nurses, a major aspect of this transformation is the refocusing of their work on direct patient care and away from being a conduit of information and communication among departments. Several of the technologies discussed, such as physician order entry and bar code technology, have existed for years as standalone systems. Many others are just being developed and are being integrated into complex clinical information systems (CISs) with clinical decision support at their core. While early evaluation of these systems shows positive outcome measurements, financial, technical, and organizational hurdles to widespread implementation still remain. One major issue is defining the role nurses, themselves, will play in the selection and implementation of these systems as they become more steeped in the knowledge of nursing informatics. Other challenges revolve around issues of job satisfaction and the attraction and retention of nursing staff in the midst of a serious nursing shortage. Despite these concerns, it is expected that, in the long run, the creation of an electronic work environment with systems that integrate all functions of the health care team will positively impact cost-effectiveness, productivity, and patient safety while helping to revitalize nursing practice. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  3. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  4. Millennial generation student nurses' perceptions of the impact of multiple technologies on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenery, Susan M; Walker, Marjorie; Sorensen, Elizabeth; Thompson, Rhonda; Kirklin, Dena; White, Robin; Ross, Carl

    2013-01-01

    To determine how millennial nursing students perceive the effects of instructional technology on their attentiveness, knowledge, critical thinking, and satisfaction. BACKGROUND Millennial learners develop critical thinking through experimentation, active participation, and multitasking with rapid shifts between technological devices. They desire immediate feedback. METHOD; A descriptive, longitudinal, anonymous survey design was used with a convenience sample of 108 sophomore, junior, and senior baccalaureate nursing students (participation rates 95 percent, winter, 85 percent, spring). Audience response, virtual learning, simulation, and computerized testing technologies were used. An investigator-designed instrument measured attentiveness, knowledge, critical thinking, and satisfaction (Cronbach's alphas 0.73, winter; 0.84, spring). Participants positively rated the audience response, virtual learning, and simulation instructional technologies on their class participation, learning, attention, and satisfaction. They strongly preferred computerized testing. Consistent with other studies, these students engaged positively with new teaching strategies using contemporary instructional technology. Faculty should consider using instructional technologies.

  5. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  6. Using Technologies in Nursing Research Education: A Mixed Methods Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuhong; Yang, Harrison Hao

    2018-02-28

    To better prepare nurses for the new and expanding roles required in healthcare, faculty are expected to integrate emerging technology into educational processes. Using a mixed methods research design, this study aimed to examine nursing student reactions and learning based on their participation in an online research course through two technology-enhanced assignments: (1) annotation of the structure of a research article and (2) reflection on the content of a research article. Quantitative analysis examined students' questionnaire responses, and qualitative analysis explored students' reflective learning journals and the instructor's notes. These two separate strands of data were then integrated using a joint display. The discussion was guided by two components of the New World Kirkpatrick model, reaction and learning. Our findings suggest that the use of technology in the design of assignments is a way to engage students in learning and can be used to enhance nursing students' research learning online.

  7. ICT and OTs: a model of information and communication technology acceptance and utilisation by occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Louise K; Pervan, Graham P

    2007-06-01

    There is evidence to suggest that health professionals are reluctant to accept and utilise information and communication technologies (ICT) and concern is growing within health informatics research that this is contributing to the lag in adoption and utilisation of ICT across the health sector. Technology acceptance research within the field of information systems has been limited in its application to health and there is a concurrent need to develop and gain empirical support for models of technology acceptance within health and to examine acceptance and utilisation issues amongst health professionals to improve the success of information system implementation in this arena. This paper outlines a project that examines ICT acceptance and utilisation by Australian occupational therapists. It describes the theoretical basis behind the development of a research model and the methodology being employed to empirically validate the model using substantial quantitative, qualitative and longitudinal data. Preliminary results from Phase II of the study are presented. The theoretical significance of this work is that it uses a thoroughly constructed research model, with potentially the largest sample size ever tested, to extend technology acceptance research into the health sector.

  8. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes.

  9. Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Nursing Care: Results of an Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Côté, José; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Hudson, Emilie; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2017-01-01

    Background Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming an impetus for quality health care delivery by nurses. The use of ICTs by nurses can impact their practice, modifying the ways in which they plan, provide, document, and review clinical care. Objective An overview of systematic reviews was conducted to develop a broad picture of the dimensions and indicators of nursing care that have the potential to be influenced by the use of ICTs. Methods Quantitative, mixed-method, and qualitative reviews that aimed to evaluate the influence of four eHealth domains (eg, management, computerized decision support systems [CDSSs], communication, and information systems) on nursing care were included. We used the nursing care performance framework (NCPF) as an extraction grid and analytical tool. This model illustrates how the interplay between nursing resources and the nursing services can produce changes in patient conditions. The primary outcomes included nurses’ practice environment, nursing processes, professional satisfaction, and nursing-sensitive outcomes. The secondary outcomes included satisfaction or dissatisfaction with ICTs according to nurses’ and patients’ perspectives. Reviews published in English, French, or Spanish from January 1, 1995 to January 15, 2015, were considered. Results A total of 5515 titles or abstracts were assessed for eligibility and full-text papers of 72 articles were retrieved for detailed evaluation. It was found that 22 reviews published between 2002 and 2015 met the eligibility criteria. Many nursing care themes (ie, indicators) were influenced by the use of ICTs, including time management; time spent on patient care; documentation time; information quality and access; quality of documentation; knowledge updating and utilization; nurse autonomy; intra and interprofessional collaboration; nurses’ competencies and skills; nurse-patient relationship; assessment, care planning, and evaluation; teaching of patients

  10. Impacts of information and communication technologies on nursing care: an overview of systematic reviews (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José

    2015-05-23

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) used in the health sector have well-known advantages. They can promote patient-centered healthcare, improve quality of care, and educate health professionals and patients. However, implementation of ICTs remains difficult and involves changes at different levels: patients, healthcare providers, and healthcare organizations. Nurses constitute the largest health provider group of the healthcare workforce. The use of ICTs by nurses can have impacts in their practice. The main objective of this review of systematic reviews is to systematically summarize the best evidence regarding the effects of ICTs on nursing care. We will include all types of reviews that aim to evaluate the influence of ICTs used by nurses on nursing care. We will consider four types of ICTs used by nurses as a way to provide healthcare: management systems, communication systems, information systems, and computerized decision support systems. We will exclude nursing management systems, educational systems, and telephone systems. The following types of comparisons will be carried out: ICT in comparison with usual care/practice, ICT compared to any other ICT, and ICT versus other types of interventions. The primary outcomes will include nurses' practice environment, nursing processes/scope of nursing practice, nurses' professional satisfaction as well as nursing sensitive outcomes, such as patient safety, comfort, and quality of life related to care, empowerment, functional status, satisfaction, and patient experience. Secondary outcomes will include satisfaction with ICT from the nurses and patients' perspective. Reviews published in English, French, or Spanish from 1 January 1995 will be considered. Two reviewers will independently screen the title and abstract of the papers in order to assess their eligibility and extract the following information: characteristics of the population and setting, type of interventions (e.g., type of ICTs and service

  11. Nurses' perceptions, acceptance, and use of a novel in-room pediatric ICU technology: testing an expanded technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J; Asan, Onur; Wozniak, Erica M; Flynn, Kathryn E; Scanlon, Matthew C

    2016-11-15

    The value of health information technology (IT) ultimately depends on end users accepting and appropriately using it for patient care. This study examined pediatric intensive care unit nurses' perceptions, acceptance, and use of a novel health IT, the Large Customizable Interactive Monitor. An expanded technology acceptance model was tested by applying stepwise linear regression to data from a standardized survey of 167 nurses. Nurses reported low-moderate ratings of the novel IT's ease of use and low to very low ratings of usefulness, social influence, and training. Perceived ease of use, usefulness for patient/family involvement, and usefulness for care delivery were associated with system satisfaction (R 2  = 70%). Perceived usefulness for care delivery and patient/family social influence were associated with intention to use the system (R 2  = 65%). Satisfaction and intention were associated with actual system use (R 2  = 51%). The findings have implications for research, design, implementation, and policies for nursing informatics, particularly novel nursing IT. Several changes are recommended to improve the design and implementation of the studied IT.

  12. Biomechanics of side impact: injury criteria, aging occupants, and airbag technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Stemper, Brian D; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Weigelt, John A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of side impact trauma-related biomedical investigations with specific reference to certain aspects of epidemiology relating to the growing elderly population, improvements in technology such as side airbags geared toward occupant safety, and development of injury criteria. The first part is devoted to the involvement of the elderly by identifying variables contributing to injury including impact severity, human factors, and national and international field data. This is followed by a survey of various experimental models used in the development of injury criteria and tolerance limits. The effects of fragility of the elderly coupled with physiological changes (e.g., visual, musculoskeletal) that may lead to an abnormal seating position (termed out-of-position) especially for the driving population are discussed. Fundamental biomechanical parameters such as thoracic, abdominal and pelvic forces; upper and lower spinal and sacrum accelerations; and upper, middle and lower chest deflections under various initial impacting conditions are evaluated. Secondary variables such as the thoracic trauma index and pelvic acceleration (currently adopted in the United States Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards), peak chest deflection, and viscous criteria are also included in the survey. The importance of performing research studies with specific focus on out-of-position scenarios of the elderly and using the most commonly available torso side airbag as the initial contacting condition in lateral impacts for occupant injury assessment is emphasized.

  13. Organizational and technological correlates of nurses' trust in a smart intravenous pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur; Chiou, Erin

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand technology and system characteristics that contribute to nurses' ratings of trust in a smart intravenous pump. Nurses' trust in new technologies can influence how technologies are used. Trust in technology is defined as a person's belief that a technology will not fail them. Potential outcomes of trust in technology are appropriate trust, overtrust, distrust, and mistrust. Trust in technology is also related to several use-specific outcomes, including appropriate use and inappropriate use such as overreliance, disuse or rejection, or misuse. Understanding trust in relation to outcomes can contribute to designs that facilitate appropriate trust in new technologies. A survey was completed by 391 nurses a year after the implementation of a new smart intravenous pump. The survey assessed trust in the intravenous pump and other elements of the sociotechnical system, individual characteristics, technology characteristics, and organizational characteristics. Results show that perceptions of usefulness, safety, ease of use, and usability are related to ratings of trust in smart intravenous pumps. Other work systemfactors such as perception of work environment, age, experience, quality of work, and perception of work performance are also related to ratings of trust. Nurses' trust in smart intravenous pumps is influenced by both characteristics of the technology and the sociotechnical system. Findings from this research have implications for the design of future smart intravenous pumps and health systems. Recommendations for appropriately trustworthy smart intravenous pumps are discussed. Findings also have implications for how trust in health technologies can be measured and conceptualized in complex sociotechnical systems.

  14. Occupational Biographical Decisions of U.S. Nursing Professionals for Doing a PhD.--Consequences for the Education in Nursing Science in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltrecht, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, nursing science has been developing since the early 1990s. Since then it is possible for nursing professionals (partly with, partly without prior 3-year vocational training) to do a bachelor's or master's degree in nursing science at universities of applied sciences. However, to do a Ph.D. they need to change to a university as in…

  15. Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Patricia A; Coenen, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world.

  16. Investigation of the Effects of a Nursing Information System by Using the Technology Acceptance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Hsiou; Wu, Ya-Hui

    2017-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to investigate the effectiveness of implementing a nursing information system and to discuss several issues affecting its successful deployment from the perspectives of nurses, the major users of the system. The methodology was based on the theory of the technology acceptance model. This study adopted a cross-sectional study method to survey and collect data. In total, 167 questionnaires were distributed to subjects. Approximately 94.6%, or 158 valid questionnaires, were collected. The data were analyzed using SPSS and PLS software.The data analysis indicated that the factors that most significantly influenced the willingness of nurses to use the nursing information system were their degrees of satisfaction with the system and their perceptions of its usefulness. A nursing information system that can provide functions that are useful and convenient and that facilitate the avoidance of tedious repetitive writing and improve the quality of provided care can encourage nurse satisfaction with the system and thus stimulate their interest in using it for their work. The ease of use of the system can also affect the willingness of nurses to use it.

  17. The focused use of posters for graduate education in the complex technological nursing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, D

    1993-10-01

    Posters are increasingly recognised as both a method of professional communication and a strategy for learning and assessment in nurse education. Rapid technological developments in health care and the nursing practice environment are generating specific educational needs in relation to the use of technology. There is a move to incorporate within the traditional rational technical focus a broader, more comprehensive understanding of technology, technological equipment and procedures. Technological innovations are an ideal subject matter for poster presentations at the graduate level particularly as broader dimensions such as the impetus for introduction, the research base, the evaluation strategy and the cost can be incorporated. Each poster can become a teaching focus for a student presentation to classmates or other professional forums in order to catalyse discussions of these wider dimensions. A description of the use of posters for these purposes with examples and comments by participants is included.

  18. Occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment of employees at a university of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Viljoen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment. A survey design was used. The sample (N=353 consisted of academic (n=132 and support staff (n=221 at a university of technology. The Organizational Stress Screening Tool (ASSET and a biographical questionnaire were administered. The results showed that different organisational stressors contributed significantly to ill health and low organisational commitment. Stress about job security contributed to both physical and psychological ill health, whereas overload and job aspects contributed to psychological ill health. Stress about control and resources contributed to low organisational commitment. Low individual commitment to the organisation was predicted by five stressors, namely work-life balance, overload, control, job aspects and pay.

  19. Integrating clicker technology at nursing conferences: an innovative approach to research data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Susan; Cornelius, Frances; Draper, Judy; Fisher, Kathleen

    2010-06-01

    A pilot demonstration of integrating an audience response system, that is, 'clickers' at a nursing education conference as an engaging tool for using the research process for learning through immediate research results is presented. A convenience sample of nursing conference attendees were surveyed using clicker technology before a panel presentation on the 'Impaired Health Professional'. The 208 subjects who used the clickers were mostly women (93%) and were nurse educators (81%) with at least 20 years of nursing experience (75%). The ease of data collection, real-time analysis, the active engagement of both participant and presenter were all findings of this study. The utility of this tool as a stimulus for discussion and learning was also reported. Pilot testing the clicker at an education conference for data collection and educational purposes was an important goal and positive outcome of this study. Researchers and educators are advised on the planning steps required to make this a successful experience.

  20. Beyond the classroom: using technology to meet the educational needs of multigenerational perinatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Ana-Maria

    2011-01-01

    For the first time in history, there are 4 distinct generations of nurses working side by side at the clinical bedside: Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. All the generations have their unique personalities, beliefs, values, and learning styles. Approach to learning range from the traditional instructional method preferred by the Veteran's nurses to the more advanced technology (eg, Web-based, webinars, simulations, podcasts, and blogs) approach favored by Generation Y. Nurse educators and clinical nurse specialists must consider each generation's style of learning to best engage, stimulate, and promote transference and assimilations of new knowledge. This article briefly describes the generational learning style differences and explores alternative educational modalities to the traditional classroom instruction.

  1. Digital learning objects in nursing consultation: technology assessment by undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, DeniseTolfo; Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado

    2010-01-01

    This study followed the teaching-learning process about the nursing consultation, based on digital learning objects developed through the active Problem Based Learning method. The goals were to evaluate the digital learning objects about nursing consultation, develop cognitive skills on the subject using problem based learning and identify the students' opinions on the use of technology. This is an exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 71 students in the sixth period of the nursing program at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. The data was collected through a questionnaire to evaluate the learning objects. The results showed positive agreement (58%) on the content, usability and didactics of the proposed computer-mediated activity regarding the nursing consultation. The application of materials to the students is considered positive.

  2. The Impact of Nursing Students' Cultural Diversity on the Intention and Attitudes Toward the Use of Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Ayala; Sharon, Dganit; Lev-Ari, Lilac; Strauss, Ester; Segev, Ronen

    2016-05-01

    This research highlights the evidences that: The greater the threat, the lower the attitude toward information technology is, and the greater the sense of challenge, the greater self-efficacy is. Innovativeness was found to be a behavioral intention predictor in two groups, secular Jews and Arabs. This study provides nurses and nurse educators with some valuable insights about how culture, religion, and education may influence nursing students' attitudes toward information technology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Improving nurse-patient communication with patients with communication impairments: hospital nurses' views on the feasibility of using mobile communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Bridget; Hemsley, Bronwyn

    2016-05-01

    Nurses communicating with patients who are unable to speak often lack access to tools and technologies to support communication. Although mobile communication technologies are ubiquitous, it is not known whether their use to support communication is feasible on a busy hospital ward. The aim of this study was to determine the views of hospital nurses on the feasibility of using mobile communication technologies to support nurse-patient communication with individuals who have communication impairments. This study involved an online survey followed by a focus group, with findings analyzed across the two data sources. Nurses expected that mobile communication devices could benefit patient care but lacked access to these devices, encountered policies against use, and held concerns over privacy and confidentiality. The use of mobile communication technologies with patients who have communication difficulties is feasible and may lead to improvements in communication and care, provided environmental barriers are removed and facilitators enhanced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. E-learning & information communication technology (ICT) in nursing education: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Didy; Harrington, Ann; Belan, Ingrid

    2014-10-01

    To examine primary research articles published between January 2001 and December 2012 that focused on the issues for students and educators involved with E-learning in preregistration nursing programs. The literature was systematically reviewed, critically appraised and thematically analyzed. E-learning is arguably the most significant change to occur in nursing education since the move from hospital training to the tertiary sector. Differences in computer and information literacy for both students and educators influence the success of implementation of E-learning into current curricula. Online databases including CINAHL, MEDLINE, OVID, the ProQuest Central, PubMed, ERIC and Science Direct were used. The criteria used for selecting studies reviewed were: primary focus on electronic learning and issues faced by nursing students and/or nurse educators from undergraduate preregistration nursing programs; all articles had to be primary research studies, published in English in peer reviewed journals between January 2001 and December 2012. Analysis of the 28 reviewed studies revealed the following three themes: issues relating to E-learning for students; use of information technologies; educator (faculty) issues involving pedagogy, workload and staff development in E-learning and associated technology. The review highlighted that commencing preregistration nursing students required ongoing education and support surrounding nursing informatics. This support would enable students to progress and be equipped with the life-long learning skills required to provide safe evidence based care. The review also identified the increased time and skill demands placed on nurse educators to adapt their current education methodologies and teaching strategies to incorporate E-learning. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Occupational Burnout Syndrome in the nursing context: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Costa, Mateus Estevam; Maciel, Regina Heloísa; Rêgo, Denise Pereira do; Lima, Lucimar Lucas de; Silva, Maria Eliziane Pinto da; Freitas, Julyana Gomes

    2017-07-20

    To characterize the scientific production on Burnout Syndrome in the Nursingcontext, systematizing the location where the studies were carried out, the related constructs, the employed methods and their main results. An integrative review of the literature with a bibliometric approach of articles published in Portuguese, Spanish and English between 2005 and 2016. 106 articles wereincluded. Mostinvolvedprevalence, and were descriptive, quantitative studies performed in hospitals.The Southeastern and Southern regions of Brazil had the largest number of publications, and stress was the construct most related to burnout.Most of the studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory to investigate the presence of the syndrome. New case-control and cohort studies should be carried out.Qualitative-exploratory studies are necessary to better understand Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals usingfocus groups or interviews, as well as comparative causal studies, with the purpose of exploring the syndrome'smanifestations. Caracterizar a produção científica sobre a Síndrome do Esgotamento Profissionalno contexto da enfermagem, sistematizando os locais onde as pesquisas foram realizadas, os construtos relacionados, os métodos empregados e seus principais resultados. Revisão integrativa da literatura, com abordagem bibliométrica, em artigos na língua portuguesa, espanhola e inglesa publicados entre 2005 e 2016. Foram selecionados 106 artigos.A maioria estudos de prevalência, descritivos, quantitativos e realizados em hospitais. Nas regiões Sudeste e Sul do Brasil encontram-se o maior número de publicações, sendo o estresse o construto mais relacionado com o esgotamento profissional. A maior parte dos estudos utilizou o Maslach Burnout Inventory como meio de averiguação da presença da síndrome. Novos estudos de caso controle e coorte devem ser realizados. Pesquisas de cunho qualitativo-exploratório são necessárias para poder compreender melhor a Síndrome do

  6. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Wetzels; H.T.G. Weffers; A.M.C. Dooremalen; Joost van Hoof; Eveline Wouters

    2014-01-01

    Buildings with innovative technologies and architectural solutions are needed as a means of support for future nursing homes alongside adequate care services. This study investigated how various groups of stakeholders from healthcare and technology envision the nursing home of the future in the

  7. Promoting practical clinical management learning: the current situation about Information and Communications Technology capability development in student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmer, Marian

    2005-11-01

    This paper is about work-based learning in information management for student nurses. It seeks, through a literature review, to make a case for and promote Information and Communications Technology capability development in student nurses within their clinical environment. The profession of nursing, like many other jobs, is facing the increasing usage of information technology in day-to-day operations. Admission and discharges of patients have been held on computer databases since at least the 1980s. With the new Labour Government in 1997, increasing focus was placed on the effectiveness of the National Health Service and using computers as one way to assist in achieving greater effectiveness. Nurse education therefore needed to reflect this need and support trainee nurses to acquire skills in Information and Communications Technology. This paper is part of an ongoing professional doctorate inquiry into Information and Communications Technology capability development in student nurses. A literature search was conducted on teaching information and technology skills via Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Most of the available studies were neither based on the UK nor were they about student nurses. As there is a dearth of published work in this specific area, relevant, related and tangential literature was reviewed. It is argued that current practice and published work on Information and Communications Technology capability development by student nurses hardly exists. The literature confirmed that success in this area requires sound change management, an understanding of National Health Service culture, and effective people leadership skills. Nurse educators and managers need to pay more attention to understand how organizations work, particularly organizations where student nurses carry out their work. As the search revealed a significant gap in the literature in this area, a practical conceptual framework to fully analyse, develop and

  8. Metacognitive factors that impact student nurse use of point of care technology in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, RuthAnne

    2010-01-01

    The utility of personal digital assistants (PDA) as a point of care resource in health care practice and education presents new challenges for nursing faculty. While there is a plethora of PDA resources available, little is known about the variables that effect student learning and technology adoption. In this study nursing students used PDA software programs which included a drug guide, medical dictionary, laboratory manual and nursing diagnosis manual during acute care clinical experiences. Analysis of student journals comparative reflective statements about the PDA as an adjunct to other available resources in clinical practice are presented. The benefits of having a PDA included readily available data, validation of thinking processes, and facilitation of care plan re-evaluation. Students reported increased frequency of use and independence. Significant correlations between user perceptions and computer self-efficacy suggested greater confidence in abilities with technology resulting in increased self-awareness and achievement of learning outcomes.

  9. [Evaluation of digital educational student-technology interaction in neonatal nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Fernanda Salim Ferreira de; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti

    2015-02-01

    To assess the digital educational technology interface Caring for the sensory environment in the neonatal unit: noise, lighting and handling based on ergonomic criteria. Descriptive study, in which we used the guidelines and ergonomic criteria established by ISO 9241-11 and an online Likert scale instrument to identify problems and interface qualities. The instrument was built based on Ergolist, which follows the criteria of ISO 9141-11. There were 58 undergraduate study participants from the School of Nursing of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, who attended the classes about neonatal nursing content. All items were positively evaluated by more than 70% of the sample. Educational technology is appropriate according to the ergonomic criteria and can be made available for teaching nursing students.

  10. Information and Communication Technology: Design, Delivery, and Outcomes from a Nursing Informatics Boot Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleib, Manal; Simpson, Nicole; Rhodes, Beverly

    2016-05-31

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is integral in today’s healthcare as a critical piece of support to both track and improve patient and organizational outcomes. Facilitating nurses’ informatics competency development through continuing education is paramount to enhance their readiness to practice safely and accurately in technologically enabled work environments. In this article, we briefly describe progress in nursing informatics (NI) and share a project exemplar that describes our experience in the design, implementation, and evaluation of a NI educational event, a one-day boot camp format that was used to provide foundational knowledge in NI targeted primarily at frontline nurses in Alberta, Canada. We also discuss the project outcomes, including lessons learned and future implications. Overall, the boot camp was successful to raise nurses’ awareness about the importance of informatics in nursing practice.

  11. Rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students in the UK: standards, challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, S; Clarke, B; O'Brien, A; Hammond, A; Ryan, S; Kay, L; Richards, P; Almeida, C

    2008-07-01

    Rheumatological conditions are common, thus nurses (Ns) occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) require at least basic rheumatology knowledge upon qualifying. The aim of this study was to develop a core set of teaching topics and potential ways of delivering them. A modified Delphi technique was used for clinicians to develop preliminary core sets of teaching topics for each profession. Telephone interviews with educationalists explored their views on these, and challenges and solutions for delivering them. Inter-professional workshops enabled clinicians and educationalists to finalize the core set together, and generate methods for delivery. Thirty-nine rheumatology clinicians (12N, 14OT, 13PT) completed the Delphi consensus, proposing three preliminary core sets (N71 items, OT29, PT26). Nineteen educationalists (6N, 7OT, 6PT) participated in telephone interviews, raising concerns about disease-specific vs generic teaching and proposing many methods for delivery. Three inter-professional workshops involved 34 participants (clinicians: N12, OT9, PT5; educationalists: N2, OT3, PT2; Patient 1) who reached consensus on a single core set comprising six teaching units: Anatomy and Physiology; Assessment; Management and Intervention; Psychosocial Issues; Patient Education; and the Multi-disciplinary Team, recommending some topics within the units receive greater depth for some professions. An innovative range of delivery options was generated plus two brief interventions: a Rheumatology Chat Show and a Rheumatology Road Show. Working together, clinicians and educationalists proposed a realistic core set of rheumatology topics for undergraduate health professionals. They proposed innovative delivery methods, with collaboration between educationalists, clinicians and patients strongly recommended. These potential interventions need testing.

  12. Technology for Improving Medication Monitoring in Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapane, Kate L; Cameron, Kathleen; Feinberg, Janice

    2005-01-01

    .... While clinical informatics systems have focused on the reduction of medication errors at the point of prescribing, dispensing, or administration, few have proposed the use of information technology...

  13. E-learning as a technological tool to meet the requirements of occupational standards in training of it specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, N. A.; Tyatyushkina, O. Y.; Cheremisina, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss issues of updating educational programs to meet requirements of the labor market and occupational standards of IT industry. We suggest the technology of e-learning that utilizes an open educational resource to provide the employers' participation in the development of educational content and the intensification of practical training.

  14. Information technology for medication administration: assessing bedside readiness among nurses in Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marini, Sana Daya; Hasman, Arie; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad

    2009-01-01

    Medication errors continue to be of great concern to hospitals. The use of Information technology (IT) for medication administration was recommended to assist nurses to administer medications safely, decrease the chance of medication errors, and contribute to patient safety. Such IT will be

  15. Nursing education innovation: using e-learning technology to meet learners' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Stacy E; Latayan, Monica B

    2011-11-01

    Globalization, rapid advances in health care and research, and evidence-based practice challenge organizations to meet the continuing education needs of their professional staff while functioning within the confines of economic cutbacks. This column describes an innovative way technology was used to offer asynchronous learning to all members of one organization's nursing staff. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. An information technology enabled sustainability test-bed (ITEST) for occupancy detection through an environmental sensing network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Bing; Lam, Khee Poh; Zhang, Rui; Chiou, Yun-Shang [Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Andrews, Burton; Hoeynck, Michael; Benitez, Diego [Research and Technology Center, Robert BOSCH LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    This paper describes a large-scale wireless and wired environmental sensor network test-bed and its application to occupancy detection in an open-plan office building. Detection of occupant presence has been used extensively in built environments for applications such as demand-controlled ventilation and security; however, the ability to discern the actual number of people in a room is beyond the scope of current sensing techniques. To address this problem, a complex sensor network is deployed in the Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace comprising a wireless ambient-sensing system, a wired carbon dioxide sensing system, and a wired indoor air quality sensing system. A wired camera network is implemented as well for establishing true occupancy levels to be used as ground truth information for deriving algorithmic relationships with the environment conditions. To our knowledge, this extensive and diverse ambient-sensing infrastructure of the ITEST setup as well as the continuous data-collection capability is unprecedented. Final results indicate that there are significant correlations between measured environmental conditions and occupancy status. An average of 73% accuracy on the occupancy number detection was achieved by Hidden Markov Models during testing periods. This paper serves as an exploration to the research of ITEST for occupancy detection in offices. In addition, its utility extends to a wide variety of other building technology research areas such as human-centered environmental control, security, energy efficient and sustainable green buildings. (author)

  17. [Technology in the nurse-patient relationship in diabetology, a true metronome?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desserprix, Agnès

    2016-03-01

    Technology is evolving to keep pace with patients' and caregivers' needs and advances in research. In diabetology, this progress concerns administration systems, the devices for monitoring blood sugar levels, accessories and technical support, and provides hope for tomorrow. In this context, it is essential that the patient remains at the centre of the nurse-patient relationship and that technology remains simply a source of reference points and comfort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Participation of nurses in the execution of clinical research protocol about technological innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Patrícia Andreani Cabral

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo report the nurse's experience of inclusion in interdisciplinary clinical study about technological innovation, involving people with spinal cord injury.METHODDescriptive experience report. The empirical support was based on notes about perspectives and practice of clinical research, with a multi-professional nursing, physical education, physiotherapy and engineering staff.RESULTThe qualification includes the elaboration of the document for the Ethics Committee, familiarization among the members of staff and with the studied topic, and also an immersion into English. The nurse's knowledge gave support to the uptake of participants and time adequacy for data collection, preparation and assistance of the participants during the intervention and after collection. Nursing theories and processes have contributed to reveal risky diagnoses and the plan of care. It was the nurse's role to monitor the risk of overlapping methodological strictness to the human aspect. The skills for the clinical research must be the object of learning, including students in multidisciplinary researches.CONCLUSIONTo qualify the nurse for clinical research and to potentialize its caregiver essence, some changes are needed in the educational system, professional behavior, attitude and educational assistance.

  19. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  20. Nursing In Front Of Technology As A Care Fundament On UTI Obstetric/Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Caxias de Souza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an article about the historical evolution of nursing, emphasizing conceptual and reflexive aspects about the impact of technology on the care process in Obstetrical/Neonatal ICU. Although the technology has contributed to the survival pregnant / premature infants extremes and very low weight in recent years, reveals at times a mechanical and impersonal service, a counterpoint to ethical and human issues. A critical-reflexive discussion is proposed under the use of technology in obstetric and neonatal intensive care, highlighting their implications and adaptations to maternal and child needs. It was concluded that what determines whether a technology is good or bad, if it dehumanises, depersonalises or objectifies care is the way in which it is used, making it necessary to improve and update health professionals. In this reflexive exercise, new ways of caring will be rethought, using art, sensitivity and creativity in the appropriation and humanization of technologies.   Descriptors: Nursing Informatics. Information Technology. Nursing Care. Maternal Health. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal.

  1. Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Nursing Care: Results of an Overview of Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Hudson, Emilie; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2017-04-25

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming an impetus for quality health care delivery by nurses. The use of ICTs by nurses can impact their practice, modifying the ways in which they plan, provide, document, and review clinical care. An overview of systematic reviews was conducted to develop a broad picture of the dimensions and indicators of nursing care that have the potential to be influenced by the use of ICTs. Quantitative, mixed-method, and qualitative reviews that aimed to evaluate the influence of four eHealth domains (eg, management, computerized decision support systems [CDSSs], communication, and information systems) on nursing care were included. We used the nursing care performance framework (NCPF) as an extraction grid and analytical tool. This model illustrates how the interplay between nursing resources and the nursing services can produce changes in patient conditions. The primary outcomes included nurses' practice environment, nursing processes, professional satisfaction, and nursing-sensitive outcomes. The secondary outcomes included satisfaction or dissatisfaction with ICTs according to nurses' and patients' perspectives. Reviews published in English, French, or Spanish from January 1, 1995 to January 15, 2015, were considered. A total of 5515 titles or abstracts were assessed for eligibility and full-text papers of 72 articles were retrieved for detailed evaluation. It was found that 22 reviews published between 2002 and 2015 met the eligibility criteria. Many nursing care themes (ie, indicators) were influenced by the use of ICTs, including time management; time spent on patient care; documentation time; information quality and access; quality of documentation; knowledge updating and utilization; nurse autonomy; intra and interprofessional collaboration; nurses' competencies and skills; nurse-patient relationship; assessment, care planning, and evaluation; teaching of patients and families; communication and care

  2. Patient safety and technology-driven medication e A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia

    2014-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. Aim: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. Methods: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient...

  3. Development of a blended model of teaching and learning for nursing students on rostered placement to ensure competence in information and communication technology for professional practice in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Sile A; Cummins, Ann Maria

    2012-05-01

    Experiences gained from delivering a Health Informatics for Nurses course in a school of nursing and midwifery in a university teaching hospital in Ireland suggest that Web-based courses may facilitate an enhanced understanding of course content. Nursing education must recognize the importance of information and communication technology in nursing to prepare the nursing and midwifery profession to embrace current advances in information and communication technology in healthcare in Ireland, and ultimately to benefit patient care.

  4. Occupational therapy in hospital based care in the Netherlands: a comparison of occupational therapy in general care (nursing homes, rehabilitation centres and general hospitals) and psychiatric care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Zee, J. van der; Lankhorst, G.

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 26-year old woman with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is presented. Multidimensional assessment showing severe debilitating fatigue and considerable psychological, social and occupational impairment confirmed the diagnosis. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was based on a tested causal

  5. Risk analysis and protective measures for occupationally workers with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, R.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Elevated concentrations of these radionuclides are often found in certain geological materials, namely igneous rocks and ores. Human activities that exploit these resources may lead to enhanced concentrations of radionuclides (often referred to as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TE-NORM). Enhanced levels of natural background radiation are encountered in many occupational industrial activities involving a large number of workers. Uncontrolled activities associated with TE-NORM can contaminate the environment and pose a risk to human health. This risk can be alleviated by the adoption of controls to identify where NORM is present; and cleaning the NORM-contaminated equipment and waste management while protecting workers. The main objective of this study is to investigate the natural radioactivity and the hazard parameters in the TE-NORM samples from different industrial activities. Also to describe the models and develop the computer codes that allow one to estimate the risk of cancer resulting from any specified dose of ionizing radiation for occupationally workers in different industrial activities. The present study deals with 50 different samples. This waste generated from petroleum fields, phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples. The radon exhalation rates calculated using solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39). The value of radon exhalation rate 58.82±5.3 x10 3 , 4.28±0.49 x10 3 and 0.306±0.025 x10 3 Bq/m 2 h for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The value of radon exhalation rate 82.67±7.98, 62.58 ±5.7, 46.16 ±3.91 and 198.51±18.68 Bq/m 2 h for phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples, respectively. The 226 Ra activity concentrations were 301.4±771.5, 52.1±438 and 2.56±55.37 kBq/kg for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The

  6. "iM Ready to Learn": Undergraduate Nursing Students Knowledge, Preferences, and Practice of Mobile Technology and Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Benjamin; Carr, Peter J; Dawe, Lydia; Clark-Burg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify in what way social media and mobile technology assist with learning and education of the undergraduate nurse. The study involved undergraduate nursing students across three campuses from the University of Notre Dame Australia. Participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire that related to their current knowledge, preferences, and practice with mobile technology and social media within their undergraduate nursing degree. A quantitative descriptive survey design was adapted from an initial pilot survey by the authors. A total of 386 nursing students (23.47% of the total enrolment) completed the online survey. Overall, results suggested that students are more supportive of social media and mobile technology in principle than in practice. Students who frequently use mobile technologies prefer to print out, highlight, and annotate the lecture material. Findings suggest that nursing students currently use mobile technology and social media and are keen to engage in ongoing learning and collaboration using these resources. Therefore, nursing academia should encourage the appropriate use of mobile technology and social media within the undergraduate curriculum so that responsible use of such technologies positively affects the future nursing workforce.

  7. Exploring changes in nursing students' attitudes towards the use of technology: A four-wave longitudinal panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad; Aljezawi, Ma'en; Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Habiballah, Laila; Akhu-Zaheya, Laila M

    2016-03-01

    It is essential for nursing students to be equipped with the necessary technology skills throughout and after their study period. Their acceptance of this technology depends largely on their attitudes towards technology. To explore the evolution in nursing students' attitudes towards technology, and to determine whether there was a change in participants' formal education in technology over their four years of study. A longitudinal panel study was conducted in a single school of nursing in Jordan. A total of 140 students were followed over their four years of undergraduate study. They completed the same tool (the Technology Attitude Scale) each year, to capture any changes in their attitudes towards technology across the years. In all four waves of data collection, students showed positive attitudes towards technology, with the highest attitude scores being in their final year (M=6.19, SD=0.72). As the students spent more time on their nursing education, they were found to have a more positive attitude. Thus, a strong positive relationship existed between this formal education in technology and attitudes: as the students' education in technology increased, their attitudes were more positive. A remarkable development in students' attitudes towards technology is reported in this study. The positive attitudes displayed by the students should be enhanced by providing technology-related subjects during their studies in nursing schools at a very early stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Shedding light on the Early Pleistocene of TD6 (Gran Dolina, Atapuerca, Spain): The technological sequence and occupational inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Marina; Ollé, Andreu; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Xose Pedro; Carbonell, Eudald

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to update the information available on the lithic assemblage from the entire sequence of TD6 now that the most recent excavations have been completed, and to explore possible changes in both occupational patterns and technological strategies evidenced in the unit. This is the first study to analyse the entire TD6 sequence, including subunits TD6.3 and TD6.1, which have never been studied, along with the better-known TD6.2 Homo antecessor-bearing subunit. We also present an analysis of several lithic refits found in TD6, as well as certain technical features that may help characterise the hominin occupations. The archaeo-palaeontological record from TD6 consists of 9,452 faunal remains, 443 coprolites, 1,046 lithic pieces, 170 hominin remains and 91 Celtis seeds. The characteristics of this record seem to indicate two main stages of occupation. In the oldest subunit, TD6.3, the lithic assemblage points to the light and limited hominin occupation of the cave, which does, however, grow over the course of the level. In contrast, the lithic assemblages from TD6.2 and TD6.1 are rich and varied, which may reflect Gran Dolina cave's establishment as a landmark in the region. Despite the occupational differences between the lowermost subunit and the rest of the deposit, technologically the TD6 lithic assemblage is extremely homogeneous throughout. In addition, the composition and spatial distribution of the 12 groups of lithic refits found in unit TD6, as well as the in situ nature of the assemblage demonstrate the high degree of preservation at the site. This may help clarify the nature of the Early Pleistocene hominin occupations of TD6, and raise reasonable doubt about the latest interpretations that support the ex situ character of the assemblage as a whole.

  9. Knowledge management, health information technology and nurses' work engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Ligthart, P.E.M.; Schouteten, R.L.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge management (KM) extends the health information technology (HIT) literature by addressing its impact on creating knowledge by sharing and using the knowledge of health care professionals in hospitals. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to provide insight into how HIT affects

  10. Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard G; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll; Donelle, Lorie; Compeau, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Actor-Network Theory is a research lens that has gained popularity in the nursing and health sciences domains. The perspective allows a researcher to describe the interaction of actors (both human and non-human) within networked sociomaterial contexts, including complex practice environments where nurses and health technology operate. This study will describe Actor-Network Theory and provide methodological considerations for researchers who are interested in using this sociotechnical lens within nursing and informatics-related research. Considerations related to technology conceptualization, levels of analysis, and sampling procedures in Actor-Network Theory based research are addressed. Finally, implications for future nursing research within complex environments are highlighted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The status of training and education in information and computer technology of Australian nurses: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Robert; Fallon, Tony; Soar, Jeffrey; Buikstra, Elizabeth; Hegney, Desley

    2008-10-01

    A study was undertaken of the current knowledge and future training requirements of nurses in information and computer technology to inform policy to meet national goals for health. The role of the modern clinical nurse is intertwined with information and computer technology and adoption of such technology forms an important component of national strategies in health. The majority of nurses are expected to use information and computer technology during their work; however, the full extent of their knowledge and experience is unclear. Self-administered postal survey. A 78-item questionnaire was distributed to 10,000 Australian Nursing Federation members to identify the nurses' use of information and computer technology. Eighteen items related to nurses' training and education in information and computer technology. Response rate was 44%. Computers were used by 86.3% of respondents as part of their work-related activities. Between 4-17% of nurses had received training in each of 11 generic computer skills and software applications during their preregistration/pre-enrolment and between 12-30% as continuing professional education. Nurses who had received training believed that it was adequate to meet the needs of their job and was given at an appropriate time. Almost half of the respondents indicated that they required more training to better meet the information and computer technology requirements of their jobs and a quarter believed that their level of computer literacy was restricting their career development. Nurses considered that the vast majority of employers did not encourage information and computer technology training and, for those for whom training was available, workload was the major barrier to uptake. Nurses favoured introduction of a national competency standard in information and computer technology. For the considerable benefits of information and computer technology to be incorporated fully into the health system, employers must pay more attention

  12. Educational competencies and technologies for disaster preparedness in undergraduate nursing education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Mini M; Dufrene, Claudine

    2014-04-01

    This integrative review of literature was conducted to determine (1) what are the suitable disaster preparedness competencies for undergraduate nursing curriculum? and (2) what are the suitable methods of instruction to deliver disaster preparedness content? A literature search was conducted on three major electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) using the keywords; Disaster Preparedness, Disaster and nursing education; disaster response and nursing education. Limiters used were published within the last 10 years and in nursing field. Out of the 190 articles retrieved, eight were research articles that met the inclusion criteria. These articles were carefully reviewed and the results are summarized in two sections to answer the research questions. There was no uniformity of intended competencies among the studies, though all studies used resources from reputed national and international organizations. All the studies reviewed adhered to a systematic approach in delivering content and used eclectic methods including multiple technologies to enhance the educational outcomes. Most of the studies had incorporated simulation in different ways involving low to high fidelity simulators, virtual simulation and live actors. Content and length of the programs were greatly varied but stayed focused on the general principles of disaster management and appropriate for the level of the students within the programs. More rigorous research is needed in this area since all published articles had deficiencies in the methodologies, especially in data collection and analysis. Disaster preparedness education was found to be a suitable activity for interprofessional education. © 2013.

  13. [Flipped Classroom: A New Teaching Strategy for Integrating Information Technology Into Nursing Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Su, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Kuei-Fen; Hwang, Hei-Fen

    2015-06-01

    The traditional "teacher-centered" instruction model is still currently pervasive in nursing education. However, this model does not stimulate the critical thinking or foster the self-learning competence of students. In recent years, the rapid development of information technology and the changes in educational philosophy have encouraged the development of the "flipped classroom" concept. This concept completely subverts the traditional instruction model by allowing students to access and use related learning activities prior to class on their smartphones or tablet computers. Implementation of this concept has been demonstrated to facilitate greater classroom interaction between teachers and students, to stimulate student thinking, to guide problem solving, and to encourage cooperative learning and knowledge utilization in order to achieve the ideal of student-centered education. This student-centered model of instruction coincides with the philosophy of nursing education and may foster the professional competence of nursing students. The flipped classroom is already an international trend, and certain domestic education sectors have adopted and applied this concept as well. However, this concept has only just begun to make its mark on nursing education. This article describes the concept of the flipped classroom, the implementation myth, the current experience with implementing this concept in international healthcare education, and the challenging issues. We hope to provide a reference for future nursing education administrators who are responsible to implement flipped classroom teaching strategies in Taiwan.

  14. A survey of nursing faculty needs for training in use of new technologies for education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diane N; Zierler, Brenda; Nguyen, Huong Q

    2011-04-01

    This study describes nursing faculty's use, knowledge of, and training needs associated with distance learning, simulation, telehealth, and informatics tools in nursing education and practice. Web-based surveys were completed by 193 faculty members from nursing schools in the western United States. More than half of the respondents were frequent users of distance learning and informatics tools. Approximately 66% of faculty reported they were competent with distance learning and informatics tools. Training and technical support for the use of distance learning was highest, yet 69% of faculty still reported a need for additional training. The availability of training and financial and technical support was associated with greater use of distance learning technologies (p technologies, the findings suggest nursing faculty perceive a need for training and support to effectively use educational technologies in nursing education. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Clinical case in digital technology for nursing students' learning: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Cristina Yuri Nakata; Aredes, Natália Del Angelo; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira; Camargo, Rosangela Andrade Aukar; de Goes, Fernanda Santos Nogueira

    2016-03-01

    This review aimed to analyze the available evidences in literature about clinical case studies inserted in digital technologies for nursing education, characterizing the technology resources and cognitive, procedural and attitudinal learnings. Integrative review of literature with the following steps: development of the research problem, data collection, data extraction and critic evaluation, data analysis and interpretation and presentation of results. The research question was: how does the clinical case study inserted in educational digital technology collaborate for cognitive, attitudinal and procedural learning of nursing students? data bases LILACS, PUBMED, CINAHL and Scopus. the search resulted in 437 studies: 136 from LILACS, 122 from PUBMED, 104 from Scopus and 75 from CINAHL. Of these, 143 did not meet the including criteria, 93 were duplicated and four studies were unavailable. After analyzing all abstracts based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, there were selected 197 studies and after full text analysis the final sample resulted in 21 primary studies. Case study use in educational digital technologies allowed the students to build different types of learning: cognitive learning (n 16 studies), attitudinal learning (n=12 studies) and procedural learning (n=8 studies). It is possible to conclude that case studies can collaborate with the students to develop different learnings which can be built integrate, continuous, informative and formative, aiming integral formation and aligned to policies of formation in nursing, both national and international. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Circumstances of Using Technological Applications Inside and Outside of the Faculty by Physicianand Nurse Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Sezer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study the aim is to determine which technological applications are used by physician and nurse candidates; where, why and how they are used, based upon the technologic and educational context. Material and Method: The study was carried out pursuant to the design of case study method that is one of the qualitative research methods. The study group was determined by %u201Ceasily accessible case sampling%u201D and consisted of 78 freshman, sophomore and junior physician candidates from the Faculty of Medicine of Hacettepe University; 50 freshman, sophomore, junior and senior nurse candidates from the Nursing Program of the Faculty of Medical Sciences in Baskent University. A questionnaire and a semi-structured interview form created by the researchers were used in this study. The content analysis method was used in the data solution. Results and Discussion: Research participants stated that technological applications they used in daily life and for classes were different. This situation can be considered as an indication that we could not yet integrate technology into education. It was determined in the research that students used search engines and office programs the most. And they are willingness to take distance learning courses and use of social networks in their academic life.

  17. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Technological and architectural solutions for Dutch nursing homes : Results of a multidisciplinary mind mapping session with professional stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, M.; Dooremalen, A.M.C.; Wouters, E.J.M.; Nieboer, M.; Sponselee, A.A.M.; Eyck, A.M.E.; van Gorkom, P.J.L.M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E.L.M.; Peek, S.T.M.; al, et

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing call in society for the improvement of well-being for nursing home residents and the support of care professionals through a wide array of architectural and technological solutions that are available in modern nursing homes. This study investigated which of these solutions are

  19. Technological and architectural solutions for Dutch nursing homes: results of a multidisciplinary mind mapping session with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.L.M. van Gorkom; H.A. van de Vrande; T.E. Raijmakers; M.J.G.A. Moonen; M.H. Wetzels; A.M.C. Dooremalen; C.G.J.J. Hoedemakers; Nieboer M.E.; J. van Hoof; E.L.M. Zwerts-Verhelst; N. Paricharak; L. van der Voort; A.A.M. Sponselee; T.C.F. van de Werff; B. van der Putten; C. Vissers-Luijcks; C.S. van der Voort; C.E. Oude Weernink; C.J.M.L. van Dijck-Heinen; J.M.M. Woudstra; A.M.E. Eyck; R.A. Overdiep; MD E.J.M. Wouters; S.T.M. Peek

    There is an increasing call in society for the improvement of well-being for nursing home residents and the support of care professionals through a wide array of architectural and technological solutions that are available in modern nursing homes. This study investigated which of these solutions are

  20. Technological and architectural solutions for Dutch nursing homes : results of a multidisciplinary mind mapping session with professional stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, M.H.; Dooremalen, A.M.C.; Wouters, E.J.M.; Nieboer, M.; Sponselee, A.A.M.; Eyck, A.M.E.; van Gorkom, P.J.L.M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E.L.M.; Peek, S.T.M.; Vissers-Luijcks, C.; Van der Voort, C.S.; Moonen, M.J.G.A.; Van de Vrande, H.A.; Van Dijck-Heinen, C.J.M.L.; Raijmakers, T.E.; Oude Weernink, C.E.; Paricharak, N.A.; Hoedemakers, C.G.J.J.; Woudstra, J.M.M.; Van der Voort, L.; Van de Werff, T.C.F.; Putten, van der B.; Overdiep, R.A.

    There is an increasing call in society for the improvement of well-being for nursing home residents and the support of care professionals through a wide array of architectural and technological solutions that are available in modern nursing homes. This study investigated which of these solutions are

  1. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  2. [Construction of an educational technology for teaching about nursing on peripheral venipuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frota, Natasha Marques; Barros, Lívia Moreira; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Caldini, Luana Nunes; do Nascimento, Jennara Cândido; Caetano, Joselany Afio

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the construction of a course on peripheral venipuncture using the Information and Communication Technologies. This is a methodological research, developed at the Federal University of Ceara from January to March 2012. The construction phases are: the analysis, design and development according to the theoretical framework of Galvis-Panqueva. In the analysis, objectives, content target audience, the study environment and technology infrastructure were delimited. During the design phase the environment interface and navigation structure of the course were evaluated. The development consisted in the materialization of all that was designed in the previous phase Once all three phases of construction of the course were conducted it was available in the Virtual Learning Environment SOLAR. The finalproduct of the course is presented as support of nursing students and consequently the training of future nurses in their care practice on peripheral venipuncture.

  3. Comparison of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in enhancing fundamental nursing proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zu-Chun

    2013-05-01

    The aim of nursing education is to prepare students with critical thinking, high interests in profession and high proficiency in patient care. Cooperative learning promotes team work and encourages knowledge building upon discussion. It has been viewed as one of the most powerful learning methods. Technology has been considered an influential tool in teaching and learning. It assists students in gathering more information to solve the problems and master skills better. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in nursing students' critical thinking in catheterization knowledge gaining, error discovering, skill acquisitions, and overall scores. This study used a pretest-posttest experimental design. Ninety-eight students were assigned randomly to one of two groups. Questionnaires and tests were collected at baseline and after completion of intervention. The results of this study showed that there was no significant difference in related catheterization skill performance. However, the remaining variables differed greatly between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS AND APPLICATIONS: This study's findings guide the researchers and instructors to use technology-based cooperative learning more appropriately. Future research should address the design of the course module and the availability of mobile devices to reach student-centered and learn on the move goals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The ethics of using cybernetics and cyborg technologies: what every rehabilitation nurse should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Rieg, Linda S

    2005-01-01

    Cybernetics and cyborg technologies are rapidly developing in the field of biotechnology. Such developments have yielded a wide variety of devices and prosthetics that have promoted the quality of life for many individuals with physical limitations and generally have been applauded by society and the rehabilitation field. However, such rapid developments have given rise to multiple ethical concerns. Understanding these ethical concerns and the implications they have for rehabilitation nurses is imperative. While the potential benefits of advances in technology are great for those with disabilities and chronic conditions, ethicists suggest that skepticism must be balanced with the zeal that often accompanies cutting-edge developments. As Hook notes, "We must show not a fear of technology, but a courageous control of technology, and refuse to let technology control us" (2002, p. 67).

  5. An evaluation of virtual reality technology as an occupational therapy treatment tool in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, Angela Dr.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of virtual reality (VR) games as an occupational therapy (OT) treatment tool is an attempt to use technology as purposeful activity that is more relevant to a modern patient population than traditional art and craft based activities. It is unclear however if VR games are suitable for clinical applications and the current project examines the usability of video-capture VR games in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation.\\r\

  6. Recognizing nurse stakeholder dissonance as a critical determinant of patient safety in new healthcare information technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Elizabeth A; Real, Sara D; Curtis, Amber M; Meunier, Tessa S

    2012-01-01

    Proper identification of all stakeholders and the comprehensive assessment of their evolving and often conflicting Needs, Wants, and Desires (NWDs) is a fundamental principle of human factors science and human-centered systems engineering; it is not yet a consistent element in development and deployment of new health information technologies (HIT). As the single largest group of healthcare professionals, nurses are critical stakeholders for these new technologies. Careful analysis can reveal nurse stakeholder dissonance (NSD) when integrating new technologies into the healthcare environment. Stakeholder dissonance is a term that describes the conflict between the NWDs of different stakeholders which, if left unresolved, can result in dissatisfaction, workarounds, errors, and threats to patient safety. Three case studies drawn from the authors' experience in a variety of acute-care settings where new HITs have been recently deployed are examined to illustrate the concept of NSD. Conflicting NWDs, other stakeholders, and possible root causes of the NSD are analyzed and mapped to threats to patient safety. Lessons learned, practical guidance for anticipating, identifying, and mitigating NSD, future research and implications for HFE and nursing practice are discussed.

  7. Teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses: caring for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Katsuda, Hitomi

    2015-01-01

    This study explored special education teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses who specialize in providing nursing care to children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools. Semistructured interviews with 11 teachers were conducted, and data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The teachers surveyed thought that the most important role of nurses was to maintain good health and safety, as well as to support children's education as members of the educational team. Teachers desired that nurses give advice based on their professional knowledge to maintain the children's good health and safety. In supporting education, nurses were required to support the children's autonomy and education, and to act as members of the educational team. Study findings suggest that, for an optimal relationship with teachers, nurses who provide nursing care for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools need not only fulfill medical functions, but also support the education of children as members of the educational team. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  8. 'Catching up': The significance of occupational communities for the delivery of high quality home care by community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mary; Robert, Glenn; Maben, Jill

    2013-07-01

    This article examines the importance of some informal work practices among community nurses during a period of significant organizational change. Ethnographic fieldwork in two purposively selected adult community nursing services in England comprised 79 hours of observation of routine practice, 21 interviews with staff and 23 interviews with patients. We identified the informal work practice of 'catching up', informal work conversations between immediate colleagues, as an important but often invisible aspect of satisfying work relationships and of the relational care of patients. Drawing on anthropological literatures on 'communities of practice' the article examines two central issues concerning the practices of 'catching up': (1) how informal learning processes shape community nursing work; (2) how this informal learning is shaped both in relation to the ideals of community nursing work and the wider political and organizational contexts of community nursing practice. Our findings highlight the distinctive value of informal workplace 'catch ups' for nurses to manage the inherent challenges of good home care for patients and to develop a shared ethic of care and professional identity. Our findings also indicate the decline of 'catching up' between nurses along with diminishing time and opportunity for staff to care holistically for patients in present service climates.

  9. Analiza przyczyn stresu zawodowego w opinii pielęgniarek = An analysis of the causes of occupational stress in the opinions of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Pietraszek

    2016-09-01

    working conditions or requirements which exceed their capabilities. Objective. The objective of the study was to identify the opinions of nurses on stress factors at their workplace. Material and methods. The survey covered a group of 278 individuals performing the profession of a nurse. The diagnostic survey method was applied together with a self-designed questionnaire. The obtained data was subjected to statistical analysis with the use of the Statistica 10.0 software. Results and conclusions. Most of the surveyed nurses were satisfied with their professional work (85%. As many as 95.6% of them claimed that their profession is stressful. Furthermore, 56.1% of the respondents admitted that they were exposed to occupational stress on a daily basis. A considerable percentage of the surveyed declared being able to deal with stress at work. The factors that contribute to a substantial level of stress of most nurses include low remuneration (43.53%, and a sudden decline in a patient's condition and the necessity of resuscitation (39.93%. The variables that constitute significant differentiating factors of the opinions of the nursing personnel are: age, marital status, place of residence, number of children, job position and contact with death and dying patients in the daily nursing practice. Key words: stress, psychological; nurses; occupational exposure

  10. Job leaving intentions and occupation-related beliefs amongst preregistered dental nurses in Scotland: the mediating role of work engagement and personal accomplishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Gillian; Freeman, Ruth; McCombes, Wendy; Humphris, Gerry

    2014-02-01

    To identify the job resource beliefs of preregistration dental nurses and subsequently investigate their relationship with work engagement, personal accomplishment and intention to leave amongst this occupational group in Scotland. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Personal accomplishment (a subscale of Maslach Burnout Inventory) and author-developed questions for job resource beliefs and intention to leave were the measuring instruments used. Two hundred and thirty-one dental nurses participated (82% response rate). Mean age was 25 and mean job tenure was 17.5 months. The job resource belief most valued was 'good working relationship'. A multiple mediated path analytical model was explored. Work engagement adjusted for job resource beliefs was very strongly negatively associated with intention to leave (-0.93). There was an indirect relationship between job resource beliefs and intention to leave (-0.28) mediated via work engagement and personal accomplishment. Dental nurses under training held job resource beliefs about their profession that were associated with work engagement, personal accomplishment and their stability of remaining in the job. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Implementation of occupational health service improvements through application of total quality management processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elizabeth Anne

    2011-06-01

    The occupational health services department for a manufacturing division of a high-technology firm was redesigned from an outsourced model, in which most services were provided by an outside clinic vendor, to an in-house service model, in which services were provided by an on-site nurse practitioner. The redesign and implementation, accomplished by a cross-functional team using Total Quality Management processes, resulted in a comprehensive occupational health services department that realized significant cost reduction, increased compliance with regulatory and company requirements, and improved employee satisfaction. Implications of this project for occupational health nurses are discussed.

  12. Linkage Technologies Which Enhance the Utility of Task-Based Occupational Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phalen, William

    1999-01-01

    .... It is alleged that traditional task-based occupational analysis is too labor intensive, too costly, too cumbersome, and too static to meet the emerging and rapidly changing needs of a business...

  13. Youtube for millennial nursing students; using internet technology to support student engagement with bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Amy Nb; Barton, Matthew J; Williams-Pritchard, Grant A; Todorovic, Michael

    2018-06-09

    Undergraduate nursing programs typically include students with limited 'on-campus' time who need learning resources that are flexible, technologically appropriate, remotely-accessible (mobile smart devices), and above all, engaging. This has presented academics with challenges surrounding institutional security firewalls, password-access requirements, intellectual property/ownership and staff/student privacy. To overcome these challenges a collection of evidence-based YouTube videos, posted on the Biological Sciences YouTube Channel, supported by the Biosciences in Nurse Education, and underpinned by Benner's pedagogical framework, were developed with the intention of moving students from novice to competent clinical bioscience users. The videos are highly successful; with over 310,000 views, 1.5 million minutes of viewing and more than 5000 subscribers since its inception (YouTube videos was enhanced by their familiarity with the presenter and the breadth of information available in small portions, creating a solid basis for the development of bioscience-competent nursing graduates. Moreover, these open source videos provide a free resource for continual revision and professional development informed by an international minimum bioscience standard for nurses post registration. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. #Learning: The use of back channel technology in multi-campus nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Karen; Birks, Melanie; Woods, Cindy; Hitchins, Marnie

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on the results of a study into the use of microblogging technology (TodaysMeet) in large, multi-site lectures in a nursing program. The aim of this study was to investigate students' use of the technology and their perceptions of its value in stimulating engagement in a complex learning environment. The study demonstrated that students like the anonymity that the technology provided, allowing them to ask questions without fear of appearing less competent than their peers. Many of the respondents commented positively on the opportunity to engage with students and the lecturer at other campuses. While some students appreciated the opportunity to interact and have feedback from peers, others saw this as a negative aspect of the technology. This study suggests that, used appropriately, microblogging can be incorporated into large lectures to promote student participation and engagement and ultimately enhance the learning process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Applying State-of-the-Art Technologies to Reduce Escape Times from Fires Using Environmental Sensing, Improved Occupant Egress Guidance, and Multiple Communication Protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Street, Thomas T; Hammond, Mark H; Williams, Frederick W

    2009-01-01

    ...) was tasked with investigating various technology and concepts--such as visual signals and unique audible sounds--that have the potential to improve residential occupant escape in the event of fire...

  16. ICT & OTs: a model of information and communications technology acceptance and utilisation by occupational therapists (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Louise; Pervan, Graham

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this paper describes the development, empirical validation and analysis of a model of technology acceptance by Australian occupational therapists. The study described involved the collection of quantitative data through a national survey. The theoretical significance of this work is that it uses a thoroughly constructed research model, with one of the largest sample sizes ever tested (n=1605), to extend technology acceptance research into the health sector. Results provide strong support for the model. This work reveals the complexity of the constructs and relationships that influence technology acceptance and highlights the need to include sociotechnical and system issues in studies of technology acceptance in healthcare to improve information system implementation success in this arena. The results of this study have practical and theoretical implications for health informaticians and researchers in the field of health informatics and information systems, tertiary educators, Commonwealth and State Governments and the allied health professions.

  17. Lost and misplaced items and assistive devices in nursing homes: Identifying problems and technological opportunities through participatory design research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Weernink, C E; Sweegers, L; Relou, L; van der Zijpp, T J; van Hoof, J

    2018-02-06

    Modern healthcare, including nursing home care, goes together with the use of technologies to support treatment, the provision of care and daily activities. The challenges concerning the implementation of such technologies are numerous. One of these emerging technologies are location technologies (RTLS or Real-Time Location Systems). that can be utilized in the nursing home for monitoring the use and location of assets. This paper describes a participatory design study of RTLS based on context mapping, conducted in two nursing home organizations. Rather than investigating the technological possibilities, this study investigates the needs and wishes from the perspective of the care professional. The study identified semantic themes that relate to the practicalities of lost and misplaced items in the nursing home, as well as latent themes that cover the wishes regarding technology in the nursing homes. The organizational culture and building typology may play a role in losing items. The participants in this study indicated that RTLS can provide a solution to some of the challenges that they encounter in the workplace. However, the implementation of new technologies should be done with care and should be integrated into existing ICT systems in order to minimize additional training and posing a burden on the workload.

  18. Evidence level of nursing care technologies in angioplasty of the lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Soares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the scientific work on nursing care technologies to adult patients undergoing angioplasty of the lower limbs. Systematic review of the literature followed the electronic databases: LILACS, PubMed, Web of Science, SciELO, and Google Scholar. Twelve articles were analyzed and classified according to the levels of evidence. All qualitative studies were classified with a low degree of recommendation, and as for the quantitative studies only one showed a high degree of recommendation. The research showed studies with the lowest level of scientific evidence, aside from a lack of research and poor scientific background in which nursing preoperative care to patients undergoing angioplasty of the lower limbs have been developed. Consequently, there is a lack of information and hence poor training, culminating in unpreparedness in providing care to patients, and in understanding and leading this high complexity service according to the safety principles of patient care.

  19. Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of electronic health records among nurses: Application of Technology Acceptance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2017-09-18

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly being implemented in healthcare organizations but little attention has been paid to the degree to which nurses as end-users will accept these systems and subsequently use them. To explore nurses' perceptions of usefulness and ease-of-use of EHRs. The relationship between these constructs was examined, and its predictors were studied. A national exploratory study was conducted with 1539 nurses from 15 randomly selected hospitals, representative of different regions and healthcare sectors in Jordan. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which was based on the Technology Acceptance Model. Correlations and linear multiple regression were utilized to analyze the data. Jordanian nurses demonstrated a positive perception of the usefulness and ease-of-use of EHRs, and subsequently accepted the technology. Significant positive correlations were found between these two constructs. The variables that predict usefulness were the gender, professional rank, EHR experience, and computer skills of the nurses. The perceived ease-of-use was affected by nursing and EHR experience, and computers skills. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge on issues related to the acceptance of technology in the health informatics field, focusing on nurses' acceptance of EHRs.

  20. Telecommuting: Occupational health considerations for employee health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, M L

    2000-06-01

    1. Information technology has moved "work" out of a centralized location. Employees who telecommute pose significant challenges and considerations for the practice of occupational health nursing. 2. Employer and employee benefits associated with telecommuting are reportedly associated with high levels of job satisfaction. However, the occupational health and safety risks of this new work environment need to be fully assessed and understood. 3. The ergonomic controls to minimize the risk of repetitive motion injuries are the same for both office and home locations. Additional attention need to be paid to implementing risk controls for other physical hazards and psychosocial considerations, as well as personal safety and security issues. 4. The scope of occupational health nursing practice needs to remain dynamic, recognizing the impact new technologies have on the workplace, to continue to meet the needs of the changing workplace.

  1. Effectiveness of using WiFi technologies to detect and predict building occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouf Mohamed M.

    2017-01-01

    Implications and influences: Given the large contribution of HVAC systems to overall buildings' energy consumption, this study presents a new method for efficiently operating HVAC systems. Results highlighted the accuracy of using WiFi connections as predictors for occupancy patterns to be used for controlling HVAC systems instead of CO2 sensors. These findings provide a foundation for further research on using WiFi networks to manage and operate HVAC systems in new buildings. Efficient operation of these systems based on real-time occupancy as opposed to static schedules provides facility managers with an opportunity for significant energy savings at a relatively low cost.

  2. Integration of Parent and Nurse Perspectives of Communication to Plan Care for Technology Dependent Children: The Theory of Shared Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Barbara K; Broome, Marion E; Sabourin, Teresa; Buelow, Janice; Stiffler, Deborah

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to expand our understanding of the process of communication between parents of hospitalized technology dependent children and their nurses originally detailed in the Theory of Shared Communication (TSC). This grounded theory study was conducted with five parents of technology dependent children hospitalized in a large Midwestern children's hospital and nine nurses who care for technology dependent children admitted to the same hospital during July and August 2013. Semi-structured interviews and journals (parents only), field notes and a demographic survey were used to collect data which was analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Parents verified the concepts of the TSC and relationships among them. Nurses' perceptions of communication with parents reflected the same parent identified and verified concepts upon which the TSC was originally grounded including respect for own and other's expertise, asking, listening, explaining, advocating, verifying understanding and negotiating roles to achieve mutual understanding of the child's plan of care. The nurses' perceptions differed stylistically but not categorically from those of the parents. The addition of the nurse's perspectives to the verified TSC expands our understanding of this process of communication. With the integration of nurse and parent perspectives, the TSC can be used to enhance communication and care for hospitalized technology dependent children and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Task-technology fit of video telehealth for nurses in an outpatient clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Finkelstein, Stanley M

    2014-07-01

    Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task-technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task-technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time-motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task-technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task-technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task-technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology.

  4. Doctor/Nurse, Teacher/Caretaker: Children's Gendered Choice of Adult Occupation in Interviews and Role Plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Becky

    1996-01-01

    In interviews, 81 British girls and 64 boys aged 7-11 chose a diverse, less gender-stereotyped selection of jobs. There were differences in the types and attributes of jobs chosen by girls and boys, and few children chose jobs traditional for the opposite sex. In role playing, a majority chose gender-stereotypical occupational roles. (SK)

  5. Infographic Development by Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Students: An Innovative Technology-Based Approach to Public Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nancy L

    Health communications and baccalaureate nursing education are increasingly impacted by new technological tools. This article describes how an Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program incorporates an infographic assignment into a graduate-level online health information and technology course. Students create colorful, engaging infographics using words and visuals to communicate public health information. The assignment, which incorporates the use of data and evidence, provides students the opportunity to acquire new research and technology skills while gaining confidence creating and innovating. The finished products may be disseminated, serving as vehicles to influence public health and well-being.

  6. Nursing home staff members' attitudes and knowledge about urinary incontinence: the impact of technology and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlman, Katie; Wilson, Amy; Dugger, Renee; Eggleston, Brandon; Coudret, Nadine; Mathis, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) poses challenges for nursing home personnel. The authors of this study explored differences in attitude and knowledge about UI among registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants working in skilled nursing homes before and after study interventions.

  7. Social representations of nurses about professional autonomy and the use of technologies in the care of patients with wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érick Igor dos Santos

    Full Text Available Objective.To identify the social representations by nurses about professional autonomy in the care of patients with wounds and analyze their interfaces with the constant incorporation of technologies in this care. Methods. This is a qualitative research, outlined from the Theory and method of social representations in its procedural approach and performed with 31 nurses. The interviews were submitted to thematic content analysis software NVivo instrumentalized by 10. Results. The representational content on autonomy is linked mainly to the level of knowledge, power of decision, vocational training and institutional factors. The subjects are positioned favorably to the incorporation of care technologies in professional practice, which involves elements such as cost-effective structure, training, and other resources. Conclusion. It is concluded that autonomy is configured as a prerequisite for the full use of technology and technology is configured as a facilitator for nurses to become more autonomous

  8. Social representations of nurses about professional autonomy and the use of technologies in the care of patients with wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Érick Igor; Grativol Aguiar Dias de Oliveira, Jéssica

    2016-06-01

    To identify the social representations by nurses about professional autonomy in the care of patients with wounds and analyze their interfaces with the constant incorporation of technologies in this care. This is a qualitative research, outlined from the Theory and method of social representations in its procedural approach and performed with 31 nurses. The interviews were submitted to thematic content analysis software NVivo instrumentalized by 10. The representational content on autonomy is linked mainly to the level of knowledge, power of decision, vocational training and institutional factors. The subjects are positioned favorably to the incorporation of care technologies in professional practice, which involves elements such as cost-effective structure, training, and other resources. It is concluded that autonomy is configured as a prerequisite for the full use of technology and technology is configured as a facilitator for nurses to become more autonomous.

  9. Quality of life of nursing-home residents with dementia subject ot surveillance technology versus physical restraints: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Boekhorst, S.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Francke, A.L.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Zwijsen, S.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective As physical restraints should only be used in exceptional cases, there is an urgent need for alternatives to restraint use. Surveillance technology could be such an alternative. This study explored whether nursing-home residents with dementia subjected to surveillance technology had better

  10. Quality of life of nursing-home residents with dementia subject to surveillance technology versus physical restraints: an explorative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, S. te; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Francke, A.L.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Zwijsen, S.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: As physical restraints should only be used in exceptional cases, there is an urgent need for alternatives to restraint use. Surveillance technology could be such an alternative. This study explored whether nursing-home residents with dementia subjected to surveillance technology had

  11. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    OpenAIRE

    Dooremalen, A.M.C.; van Hoof, J.; Weffers, H.T.G.; Wetzels, M.H.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in Science & Technology 1(3): 90-105

  12. Managing employee creativity and health in nursing homes : the moderating role of matching job resources and matching occupational rewards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, J.; Gevers, J.M.P.; Dollard, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Health care staff in nursing homes are facing increasingly high job demands at work, which can have a detrimental impact on their health and work motivation. The Demand-Induced Strain Compensation (DISC) Model offers a theoretical framework to study how matching job resources and matching

  13. The occupational exposure of dermatology nurses to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - evaluating the effectiveness of better skin protection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Houtum, J.L.M. van; Anzion, R.B.M.; Champmartin, C.; Hertsenberg, S.; Bos, R.P.; Valk, P. van der

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in nurses who apply ointments containing coal tar to patients and investigated the effectiveness of skin protection methods. METHODS: We determined gas-phase PAH on XAD-2 and particle-associated PAH on filters. We also used

  14. Simulation and rubrics: technology and grading student performance in nurse anesthesia education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Maria; McCarver, Lewis; Shields, John; Patterson, Jordan

    2015-06-01

    The use of simulation technology has introduced a challenge for simulation nurse educators: evaluation of student performance. The subjectivity of student performance evaluation has been in need of improvement. It is imperative to provide clear and consistent information to the learner of expectations for their performance. Educators use objectives to define for the learner what the primary focus will be in the learning activities. Creation of rubrics to replace checklists to evaluate learner performance is a team task. Improved rubrics assist instructors in providing valuable, immediate, and postactivity feedback and consistency among instructors, and improved inter-rater reliability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Technology-Aided Program to Support Basic Occupational Engagement and Mobility in Persons with Multiple Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio E. Lancioni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPersons with severe/profound intellectual and multiple disabilities tend to be passive and sedentary. Promoting their occupational engagement and mobility (i.e., indoor walking can help to modify their condition and improve their environmental input, health, and social image.AimThis study assessed whether a technology-aided program was suitable to (a support independent occupation and mobility in eight participants with intellectual and sensory disabilities and (b eventually increase the participants’ heart rates to levels considered beneficial for them.MethodThe program, which involved a computer system regulating the presentation of auditory or visual cues and the delivery of preferred stimulation, was introduced according to a non-concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. The auditory or visual cues guided the participants to collect objects from different desks and to transport them to a final destination (i.e., depositing them into a carton. Preferred stimulation was available to the participants for collecting and for depositing the objects.ResultsDuring the program, all participants had an increase in their independent responses of collecting objects and transporting them to the final destination. Their heart rates also increased to levels reflecting moderate-intensity physical exercise, potentially beneficial for their health.ConclusionA program, such as that used in this study, can promote occupational engagement and mobility in persons with multiple disabilities.

  16. Knowledge of preventive measures against occupational risks and spread of healthcare-associated infections among nursing students. An epidemiological prevalence study from Ferrara, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamini, M; Cucchi, A; Stefanati, A; Cavallaro, A; Gabutti, G

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to biological agents is the most common occupational risk for nursing staff. This study verified changes in attitudes and knowledge occurred in the nursing students after the first year of degree. The survey was conducted in academic year 2006/07 among the students of the Professional Nursing Course at University of Ferrara (Italy) using a structured questionnaire. Students were 85 at the beginning and 80 at the end of the courses. The rate of subjects using gloves for intramuscular injections and fingertip puncture was unsatisfactory. A high percentage of students performed recap of needles. The use of gloves in case of washing of surgical instruments was high. The compliance in the use of gloves in handling test tubes remained low. Only 2/3 of the students washes their hands coming in ward. Incorrect attitudes have been observed in changing or wearing gloves. The students considered vaccination against hepatitis-B necessary, vaccination against flu unnecessary. A high percentage of students had not performed any prophylaxis for tuberculosis. Students intend the use of gloves mainly to perform self-protection. The concept of self-protection is contradicted by the large percentage of students that recap used needles. A significant percentage of students have not yet gained the critical thinking necessary to consider the importance of universal precautions as a means not only of self-protection but also of prevention of hospital infections. Students consider the basic standard measures for the control of infectious diseases only like self-protection and not to prevent hospital infections.

  17. Demographic and occupational predictors of stress and fatigue in French intensive-care registered nurses and nurses' aides: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gabrielle; Hocine, Mounia; Salomon, Jérôme; Dab, William; Temime, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) working in intensive-care units (ICUs) are exposed to high physical and mental demands potentially affecting their health or having repercussions on patient care. Although several studies have explored the links between some aspects of working conditions in hospitals and HCW health, the complex dynamics at play are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the impact of a wide array of demographic, employment and organizational factors related to fatigue and stress of French ICU HCWs. A cross-sectional study was conducted in ICUs of Paris-area hospitals between January 18, 2013 and April 2, 2013. All types of adult ICUs were included (medical, surgical and polyvalent). Included in the study were HCWs with patient contact (doctors, residents, registered nurses, nurse's aides and physical therapists). Participation was proposed to all eligible HCWs present during on-site visits. Temporary staff not typically assigned to the given ICU was excluded. Data were collected using an individual questionnaire administered in interviews during day and night shifts (N=682). Stress and fatigue outcomes included the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10), the Nottingham Health Profile sleep and energy level rubrics and the current fatigue state at the interview. Multivariate analysis was restricted to nurse and nurse's aide data (n=536). Doctors and residents reported fewer sleep difficulties but were more likely to report a tired current state. Female gender was associated with higher stress levels and greater fatigue for all outcomes, while greater social support of supervisor or colleagues decreased stress and fatigue. At the organizational level, longer shifts (12 h vs. 8 h) were associated with tired current state and greater sleep difficulties. Personnel on rotating shifts had lower stress and a better current state, while those on night shifts had greater sleep and energy level difficulties. Even when controlling for demographic factors

  18. Assessing the impact of previous experience, and attitudes towards technology, on levels of engagement in a virtual reality based occupational therapy intervention for spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaughey, Manus Dr.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current research project was to determine if there were significant differences between patients with higher or lower levels of experience with technology in terms of their level of engagement with virtual reality (VR) in occupational therapy, their future uptake of VR technology in therapy, and their attitudes towards technology. Patients’ experience of technology was also examined in relation to demographic characteristics such as age and education level.\\r\

  19. Regulating the unknown: Managing the occupational health risks of nanomedical technologies and nanopharmaceuticals in the research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersin, Ozlem Hacer

    Novel technologies and their resultant products demand fresh ways of thinking about pre-market risk analysis and post-market surveillance. A regulatory framework that is responsive to emerging knowledge about the hazards of novel technologies offers repeatable and transparent processes and remains economically and socially feasible. Workers are an especially vulnerable population who are exposed to unknown hazards of novel technologies and serve often as unwitting sentinels of impending risks. This Grounded Theory-based case study identifies gaps in our current ability to regulate novel technologies so as to minimize occupational health risks and offers necessary modifications for an environment that is conducive to proper regulation. Nanopharmaceuticals and the nano-based technologies at their base are used by way of exemplar technologies that are currently taxing the ability of the regulatory system to provide adequate oversight. Ambiguities of definition, absence of a tracking system (of who is doing nanotechnology research), and the paucity of scientific evidence to support risk management efforts are among the findings of the study and need to be addressed as ameliorative steps toward an effective regulatory structure.

  20. Virtual reality simulation: using three-dimensional technology to teach nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Carole E; Forsyth, Diane McNally

    2012-06-01

    The use of computerized technology is rapidly growing in the classroom and in healthcare. An emerging computer technology strategy for nursing education is the use of virtual reality simulation. This computer-based three-dimensional educational tool simulates real-life patient experiences in a risk-free environment, allows for repeated practice sessions, requires clinical decision making, exposes students to diverse patient conditions, provides immediate feedback, and is portable. The purpose of this article was to review the importance of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy. In addition, a project to explore readiness of nursing faculty at one major Midwestern university for the use of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy is described where faculty thought virtual reality simulation would increase students' knowledge of an intravenous line insertion procedure. Faculty who practiced intravenous catheter insertion via virtual reality simulation expressed a wide range of learning experiences from using virtual reality simulation that is congruent with the literature regarding the barriers to student learning. Innovative teaching strategies, such as virtual reality simulation, address barriers of increasing patient acuity, high student-to-faculty ratio, patient safety concerns from faculty, and student anxiety and can offer rapid feedback to students.

  1. Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayim, Nese; Ozel, Deniz

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current usage of mobile devices, preferences of mobile learning environments and examine the readiness of nursing students in a public university. In order to investigate preferences and attitudes with respect to mobile technology use in nursing education, 387 students at a state university have been surveyed. It has been observed that while students preferred their current portable laptops, those in higher classes were more inclined to favor mobile phones. The common problems of battery life and high cost of communication, both in smartphones and tablet systems, suggest that hardware quality and financial constraints seem to be two main factors in determining these technologies. While more than half of students expressed readiness for mobile learning, one quarter indicated indecision. Through multivariate regression analysis, readiness to use mobile learning can be described in terms of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, personal innovativeness, self-management of learning, perceived device limitation, and availability. Class level, perceived ease of use, personal innovativeness, and self-management of learning explain intention to use mobile learning. Findings obtained from these results can provide guidance in the development and application of mobile learning systems.

  2. Radiation nursery and occupational exposure: state-of-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, J.A.C.; Huhn, A.; Viana, E.; Rosa, G.; Luz, K.R.; Derech, R.

    2015-01-01

    Documentary research with the aim to reflect on the state of the art in radiological nursing, on the nursing work and occupational hazards they are exposed, from articles produced in Brazil. The survey was conducted in the BVS, the study consisted of seven articles published from 2002 to 2012. Regarding the main variables studied in the articles, issues emerged related to working conditions and biosafety, performance of nurses, legislation, continuing education and difficulties and needs of nursing staff . It was noticed that is recent the interest in the field, but the work of nurses in radiological technologies must be grounded in current scientific knowledge and with proper technique, to the achievement of the desired clinical outcome and to promote their safety, the team and also the patient. (author)

  3. 78 FR 48683 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Personal Protective Technology (PPT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Technology (PPT) Program; Framework Document for the Healthcare Worker Personal Protective Equipment Action... titled ``Framework for Setting the NIOSH PPT Program Action Plan for Healthcare Worker Personal... NIOSH personal protective technology (PPT) program publishes and periodically updates its research...

  4. Use of Social Media and Web 2.0 Technologies to Increase Knowledge and Skills of British Columbia Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Frisch, Noreen C.; Borycki, Elizabeth M.; Mickelson, Grace; Atherton, Pat; Novak-Lauscher, Helen; Hooker, Daniel; Ho, Kendall

    2012-01-01

    Health professionals’ use of social media and Web 2.0 technologies are emerging as a new area of research. We present the experiences of a province-wide network in Canada that was developed using such technologies as a means to increase nurses’ capacity in nursing health services research. Our network is based on a model of electronic communities of practice (eCoPs). Network evaluation affirms that nurses do respond to social media, as membership has grown to over 1,400 members in two years. ...

  5. Assessing the Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-Educational Needs of Nursing Students at Millikin University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folami, Florence; Adeoye, Blessing F.

    2012-01-01

    While the leading edge between nursing and information provides an opportunity to expand the limitations of nursing knowledge and practice and creates new leadership roles for nurses, it also requires special competencies for safe and effective nursing practice. This study, therefore, assesses informatics competencies and examines the pedagogic…

  6. Study on a model for future occupational health: proposal for an occupational health service model in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Toshiaki

    2006-10-01

    The Study Model for Future Occupational Health (funded by a research grant from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Labor) is a joint research project involving various organizations and agencies undertaken from 2002 to 2004. Society has undergone a dramatic transformation due to technological developments and internationalization. At the same time a low birth rate and an aging population have resulted in an increase in both the percentage of workers experiencing strong anxiety and stress in relation to their jobs and the working environment and the number of suicides. As a natural consequence, occupational health services are now expected to provide EAP, consulting and other functions that were formerly considered outside the realm of occupational health. In consideration of this background, the present study propose the following issues to provide a model for future occupational health services that meet the conditions presently confronted by each worker. 1. How to provide occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: 1) a basic time of 20 minutes of occupational health services per year should be allotted to each worker and to all workers; 2) the obligatory regulations should be revised to expand the obligation from businesses each with 50 or more employees under the present laws to businesses each with 30 or more employees. 2. Providers of occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: (1) reinforcement of outside occupational health agencies; (2) fostering occupational health consultant firms; (3) development of an institute of occupational safety and health; (4) support of activities by authorized occupational physicians in the field; (5) expanding of joint selection of occupational physicians including subsidy increase and the extension of a period of subsidy to five hears; (6) licensing of new entry into occupational health undertaking. 3. Introduction of new report system: (1) establishment of the obligation to

  7. Establishing a sustainable nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Judie

    2010-07-01

    Occupational sustainability in healthcare services involves meeting the demands of a changing NHS without compromising the health and wellbeing of nurses. This article examines occupational sustainability in the nursing profession, focusing on issues of nursing workload, employee health and recruitment issues, and workforce diversity.

  8. Occupational accidents among nursing professionals in a home care service in the state of São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Jéssica Fernanda Corrêa Cordeiro; Amanda Pavinsk Alves; Emília Maria Paulina Campos Chayamiti; Diego Oliveira Miranda; Elucir Gir; Silvia Rita Marin da Silva Canini

    2016-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional study whose objective is to identify and describe accidents with biological material as told by nursing professionals in a home care service in a city in the state of São Paulo. Of the 30 subjects who provided that service in the data collection period, 28 agreed to participate and 12 (42.8%) claimed to have suffered at least one accident with biological material while carrying out professional procedures for that service. Most of the exposures were percutaneous (91....

  9. Information and communication technology (ICT) use in child and family nursing: what do we know and where to now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Lael; Mitchell, Creina; Sheean, Frances

    2011-12-01

    Whilst the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in acute care services has been well documented, less is known about the impact of computerising community-based primary care such as child and family health nursing services. This self-complete survey of 606 nurses working in the Victorian Maternal and Child Health (MCH) service (response rate 60%) found that the predominantly older workforce were confident with the use of ICT. This contrasts with findings from the acute sector where older nurses had lower ICT confidence. The survey revealed a variation in ICT support and a lack of data collection system compatibility. Professional education resources were not able to be effectively used in all locally supplied computers. Although MCH nurses have adapted well to computerisation, there is room for improvement. Appropriate resourcing, education and infrastructure support are areas that need to be addressed and would benefit from an overarching body responsible for development and quality assurance.

  10. Occupational Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  11. Comprehensive evaluation of occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel from 18F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Sarikaya, Ismet; Hall, Nathan C.; Knopp, Michael V.; White, William C.; Marsh, Steven G.; Hinkle, George H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to comprehensively evaluate occupational radiation exposure to all intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in radioguided surgical procedures utilizing 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Radiation exposure to surgeon, anesthetist, scrub technologist, circulating nurse, preoperative nurse, and postoperative nurse, using aluminum oxide dosimeters read by optically stimulated luminescence technology, was evaluated during ten actual radioguided surgical procedures involving administration of 18 F-FDG. Mean patient dosage of 18 F-FDG was 699 ± 181 MBq (range 451-984). Mean time from 18 F-FDG injection to initial exposure of personnel to the patient was shortest for the preoperative nurse (75 ± 63 min, range 0-182) followed by the circulating nurse, anesthetist, scrub technologist, surgeon, and postoperative nurse. Mean total time of exposure of the personnel to the patient was longest for the anesthetist (250 ± 128 min, range 69-492) followed by the circulating nurse, scrub technologist, surgeon, postoperative nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per case was received by the surgeon (164 ± 135 μSv, range 10-580) followed by the anesthetist, scrub technologist, postoperative nurse, circulating nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per hour of exposure was received by the preoperative nurse (83 ± 134 μSv/h, range 0-400) followed by the surgeon, anesthetist, postoperative nurse, scrub technologist, and circulating nurse. On a per case basis, occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in 18 F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures is relatively small. Development of guidelines for monitoring occupational radiation exposure in 18 F-FDG cases will provide reassurance and afford a safe work environment for such personnel. (orig.)

  12. Simulated human patients and patient-centredness: The uncanny hybridity of nursing education, technology, and learning to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Aileen V

    2017-01-01

    Positioned within a hybrid of the human and technology, professional nursing practice has always occupied a space that is more than human. In nursing education, technology is central in providing tools with which practice knowledge is mobilized so that students can safely engage with simulated human patients without causing harm to real people. However, while there is an increased emphasis on deploying these simulated humans as emissaries from person-centred care to demonstrate what it is like to care for real humans, the nature of what is really going on in simulation-what is real and what is simulated-is very rarely discussed and poorly understood. This paper explores how elements of postcolonial critical thought can aid in understanding the challenges of educating nurses to provide person-centred care within a healthcare culture that is increasingly reliant on technology. Because nursing education is itself a hybrid of real and simulated practice, it provides an appropriate case study to explore the philosophical question of technology in healthcare discourse, particularly as it relates to the relationship between the human patient and its uncanny simulated double. Drawing on postcolonial elements such as the uncanny, diaspora, hybridity, and créolité, the hybrid conditions of nursing education are examined in order to open up new possibilities of thinking about how learning to care is entangled with this technological space to assist in shaping professional knowledge of person-centred care. Considering these issues through a postcolonial lens opens up questions about the nature of the difficulty in using simulated human technologies in clinical education, particularly with the paradoxical aim of providing person-centred care within a climate that increasingly characterized as posthuman. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Using principal components analysis to explore competence and confidence in student nurses as users of information and communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, Fern

    2015-07-01

    To report on the relationship between competence and confidence in nursing students as users of information and communication technologies, using principal components analysis. In nurse education, learning about and learning using information and communication technologies is well established. Nursing students are one of the undergraduate populations in higher education required to use these resources for academic work and practice learning. Previous studies showing mixed experiences influenced the choice of an exploratory study to find out about information and communication technologies competence and confidence. A 48-item survey questionnaire was administered to a volunteer sample of first- and second-year nursing students between July 2008-April 2009. The cohort ( N  =   375) represented 18·75% of first- and second-year undergraduates. A comparison between this work and subsequent studies reveal some similar ongoing issues and ways to address them. A principal components analysis (PCA) was carried out to determine the strength of the correlation between information and communication technologies competence and confidence. The aim was to show the presence of any underlying dimensions in the transformed data that would explain any variations in information and communication technologies competence and confidence. Cronbach's alpha values showed fair to good internal consistency. The five component structure gave medium to high results and explained 44·7% of the variance in the original data. Confidence had a high representation. The findings emphasized the shift towards social learning approaches for information and communication technologies. Informal social collaboration found favour with nursing students. Learning through talking, watching and listening all play a crucial role in the development of computing skills.

  14. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Dooremalen; J. van Hoof; H.T.G. Weffers; M.H. Wetzels; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in

  15. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Partnered Development of Cryogenic Life Support Technologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic life support technology, used by NASA to protect crews working around hazardous gases soon could be called on for a number of life-saving applications as...

  16. Berlin in Motion: Interprofessional teaching and learning for students in the fields of medicine, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and nursing (INTER-M-E-P-P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Annerose; Heinze, Cornelia; Höppner, Heidi; Behrend, Ronja; Czakert, Judith; Hitzblech, Tanja; Kaufmann, Ina; Maaz, Asja; Räbiger, Jutta; Peters, Harm

    2016-01-01

    The Berlin project "Interprofessional teaching and learning in medicine, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and nursing" (INTER-M-E-P-P) pursues the goal of developing and testing interprofessional courses in an exemplary manner, and then implement these into their regular study programs. Under the direction of a steering committee of the participating institutions, professions and status groups, interprofessional courses were designed, carried out and evaluated. Specific to this project are the participation of students in the steering committee, and the accompanying of external supervision. The evaluation integrates the perspectives of all project participants, and combines quantitative and qualitative methods. INTER-M-E-P-P established cooperative structures between the participating universities and programs. Three courses were designed, taught and evaluated in an interprofessional manner. The various curricula, organizational patterns and locations of the study paths led to a great need for resources in regard to planning and implementation. This process can be made difficult by any stereotypes or preconceptions inherent to those doing the planning; however, under external supervision, the individual professional viewpoints can still be broadened and enriched. A sustainable implementation of interprofessional education into the curricula of health science study programs is currently complicated by barriers such as different geographical locations and differing university regulations concerning study and testing. Implementation will require long-term support at the university as well as at political levels.

  17. [Self-images and perceptions of other professions among students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy and their importance for interprofessional cooperation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggatz, Thomas; Altmeppen, Sandra; Unger, Angelika

    2010-07-01

    Interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to provide effective and high quality treatment for clients of the health care system. Interaction between professional groups depends on how their members perceive their self-image and the image of other professions. Within the framework of the project "Quality in the education of health-professionals" a qualitative study with 23 nurses, 24 physiotherapists and 15 occupational therapists in the second or third year of training was conducted. Participants were asked to report their self-image and the image of the other two professions. A qualitative content analysis according to Mayring was used for data analysis. Four categories emerged that allowed describing the self image and the image of the other professions: roles of the respective health professions, relation of the health professionals to their clients, attributes that typically characterized members of a particular profession, and relationship between the health professions. Latent conflicts between professional groups became apparent. Contradicting perceptions are due to subjective bias in favour of the own professional group. Interdisciplinary collaboration requires a new culture of co-operation.

  18. Barriers to the use of Information and Communication Technology by occupational therapists working in a rural area of New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedid, Rebecca Jean; Dew, Angela; Veitch, Craig

    2013-06-01

    This qualitative study formed part of a large-scale, multi-phase study into the delivery of therapy services to people with a disability, living in one rural area of New South Wales, Australia. The study's purpose was to identify the impact of Information and Communication Technology on the workforce practices of occupational therapists' working in a rural area of New South Wales. Individual semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 13 occupational therapists working in disability, health and private practice in a rural area of New South Wales. Participants were asked about access to, skills and limitations of using Information and Communication Technology. A modified grounded theory approach, based on thematic analysis and constant comparison, was used to analyse the interview transcripts. This study found widespread use of technology by rurally based occupational therapists working in the disability sector in New South Wales. However, Information and Communication Technology was primarily used for client contact, professional development and professional networking rather than therapy provision. The study identified individual, workplace and community barriers to greater uptake of Information and Communication Technology by this group. The individual barriers included: age cohort, knowledge and personal preferences. The workplace barriers included: support and training and availability of resources. The community barriers included: infrastructure and perceptions of clients' acceptance. The potential exists for Information and Communication Technology to supplement face-to-face therapy provision, enhance access to professional development and reduce professional isolation thereby addressing the rural challenges of large distances, travel times and geographic isolation. To overcome these challenges, individual, workplace and community Information and Communication Technology barriers should be addressed concurrently. © 2012 The Authors Australian

  19. Vocational Instructional Materials for Health Occupations Education Available from Federal Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This annotated bibliography lists curriculum materials for health occupations education which were produced by Federal agencies and are appropriate for these subject matter areas: (1) dentistry, (2) medical laboratory technology, (3) nursing, (4) rehabilitation, (5) radiology, (6) opthalmology, (7) environmental health, and (8) mental health…

  20. Using simulation technology to identify gaps between education and practice among new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett-Thomas, Ruth; Valdes, Beatriz; Valdes, Guillermo R; Shekhter, Ilya; Fitzpatrick, Maureen; Rosen, Lisa F; Arheart, Kristopher L; Birnbach, David J

    2015-01-01

    Applied knowledge was observed among nurse groups from a medical-surgical residency program to measure clinical performance during simulation training. Twenty groups of new graduate nurses were observed during five simulated clinical scenarios, and their performances were scored on a 24-item checklist. Nurse groups showed significant improvement (p new graduate nurses, and standardized training during the residency program may help instructors recognize specific factors to address during the transition from education to practice. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Occupational accidents among nursing professionals in a home care service in the state of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Fernanda Corrêa Cordeiro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a cross-sectional study whose objective is to identify and describe accidents with biological material as told by nursing professionals in a home care service in a city in the state of São Paulo. Of the 30 subjects who provided that service in the data collection period, 28 agreed to participate and 12 (42.8% claimed to have suffered at least one accident with biological material while carrying out professional procedures for that service. Most of the exposures were percutaneous (91.7% and blood was the most often involved fluid (75%. Regarding procedures, 75% of the individuals were administering drugs when the accident happened and 50% admitted that they were recapping hollow needles. The current study enabled the identification of situations described by the professionals and which led to the occurrence of accidents with biological material during home care. These findings can support preventive measures and guide future studies that involve this type of accident at homes.

  2. Engineering control technologies to reduce occupational silica exposures in masonry cutting and tuckpointing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Cooper, Michael R; Lefkowitz, Daniel; Susi, Pam

    2009-01-01

    A number of tasks in construction generate worker overexposures to respirable crystalline silica dust, which is a significant contributor to occupational mortality and morbidity. This study evaluated the performance of commercially available engineering controls used in dusty construction tasks commonly performed by bricklayers. Local exhaust ventilation (LEV) controls for a portable abrasive cutter and for tuckpointing grinders were examined at a bricklayers' training center, as were two stationary wet saws. Personal breathing zone air samples were collected with and without the use of LEV or water suppression during simulated concrete block cutting, brick cutting, and tuckpointing. Compared with the use of no exposure control during block and brick cutting, the portable LEV unit significantly reduced mean respirable quartz exposures by 96% for block cutting and 91% for brick cutting (p controls (p control and no-control scenarios. These reductions with commercially available off-the-shelf tools demonstrate the effectiveness of engineering control interventions to reduce crystalline silica exposures in construction. Strategies to further improve control performance and approaches for increasing control interventions in construction are needed.

  3. Marijuana in the Workplace: Guidance for Occupational Health Professionals and Employers: Joint Guidance Statement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennan A; Holland, Michael G; Baldwin, Debra D; Gifford-Meuleveld, Linda; Mueller, Kathryn L; Perkison, Brett; Upfal, Mark; Dreger, Marianne

    2015-04-01

    Employers are often put in a difficult position trying to accommodate state laws that allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes while enforcing federal rules or company drug-use policies based on federal law. To ensure workplace safety as well as compliance with state and federal legislation, employers should review state laws on discrimination against marijuana users and ensure that policies enacted are consistent with the state’s antidiscrimination statutes. Although it appears that in most states that allow medical marijuana use, employers can continue enforcing policies banning or restricting the use of marijuana, this approach may change on the basis of future court decisions. The Joint Task Force recommends that marijuana use be closely monitored for all employees in safety-sensitive positions, whether or not covered by federal drug-testing regulations. Best practice would support employers prohibiting marijuana use at work. Employers, in compliance with applicable state laws, may choose to simply prohibit their employees from working while using or impaired by marijuana. In some states, employers may choose to prohibit marijuana use by all members of their workforce whether on or off duty. Nevertheless, in all cases, a clear policy to guide decisions on when marijuana use is allowed and how to evaluate for impairment must be widely distributed and carefully explained to all workers. Legal consultation during policy development and continual review is imperative to ensure compliance with federal, state, and case law. Drug-use and drug-testing policies should clearly delineate expectations regarding on-the-job impairment and marijuana use outside of work hours. Specific criteria for use by supervisors and HR personnel when referring employees suspected of impairment for an evaluation by a qualified occupational health professional are critical. Detailed actions based on the medical evaluation results must also be clearly delineated for HRs, supervisors

  4. Crossing the gender boundaries: The gender experiences of male nursing students in initial nursing clinical practice in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsing-Yuan; Li, Yun Ling

    2017-11-01

    The initial nursing clinical practice is the necessary practicum required for nursing students. Because of the changing learning style, many of them are under great pressure for environmental change and therefore their daily routine is severe affected. Interacting directly with patients in a female-dominated occupation, along with the general gender stereotypes, the impact is especially significant to male nursing students than to female nursing students. The purpose of this preliminary qualitative study is to explore the gendered experiences of male nursing students during their first initial nursing clinical practice. Both focus group interviews and individual interviews are conducted with twenty-two sophomore nursing students from a university of technology in northern Taiwan, with ten male students and twelve female students. Two main themes emerge from the gendered experiences shared by the nursing students: Gender consciousness awakening and thus maintaining masculinity, and male advantage in the learning environments. The results identify the specific gendered experiences of nursing students, providing implications for future nursing education and counseling service. Further, this study may serve to promote an active yet gender-sensitive nursing education for training nursing professionals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Application of OMICS technologies in occupational and environmental health research; current status and projections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaanderen, J.J.; Moore, L.E.; Smith, M.T.; Lan, Q.; Zhang, L.; Skibola, C.F.; Rothman, N.; Vermeulen, R.

    2010-01-01

    OMICS technologies are relatively new biomarker discovery tools that can be applied to study large sets of biological molecules. Their application in human observational studies (HOS) has become feasible in recent years due to a spectacular increase in the sensitivity, resolution and throughput of

  6. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Occupational Safety and Health Technology. Program CIP: 15.0701

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Walter M.

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  7. Impact of technological innovation on a nursing home performance and on the medication-use process safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; Brouillette, Christel

    2014-03-01

    Despite the fact that since 1985 the government of Québec increased by 5.75 % on average the amount of money spent on healthcare per year, little improvement was noted. It is obvious that an optimal use of resources is essential to reduce waiting times and provide safer and faster services to patients. The use of new technology can contribute to improve the healthcare system efficiency. Our study aims to assess the impact of a medication distribution technology on 1) the performance of a health and social services center's pharmacy, 2) the performance of one care unit in a nursing home and on 3) the medication-use process safety. To measure performance we were inspired by the Lean approach. The results show that medication distribution technology is considered as an effective way to significantly detect medication errors, to allow nurses to focus more on patients and pharmacy to react more rapidly to changes in patient medications.

  8. Analysis of the technology acceptance model in examining hospital nurses' behavioral intentions toward the use of bar code medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lunar; Park, Byeonghwa; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2015-04-01

    Serious medication errors continue to exist in hospitals, even though there is technology that could potentially eliminate them such as bar code medication administration. Little is known about the degree to which the culture of patient safety is associated with behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model, this study evaluated the relationships among patient safety culture and perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration technology among nurses in hospitals. Cross-sectional surveys with a convenience sample of 163 nurses using bar code medication administration were conducted. Feedback and communication about errors had a positive impact in predicting perceived usefulness (β=.26, Pmodel predicting for behavioral intention, age had a negative impact (β=-.17, Pmodel explained 24% (Ptechnology.

  9. Quality of life of nursing-home residents with dementia subject to surveillance technology versus physical restraints: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Boekhorst, S; Depla, M F I A; Francke, A L; Twisk, J W R; Zwijsen, S A; Hertogh, C M P M

    2013-04-01

    As physical restraints should only be used in exceptional cases, there is an urgent need for alternatives to restraint use. Surveillance technology could be such an alternative. This study explored whether nursing-home residents with dementia subjected to surveillance technology had better quality of life scores for mood, behavioral and societal dimensions than residents with physical restraints. Quality of life was assessed longitudinally, with three measurements in six psychogeriatric nursing homes of residents with surveillance technology (n = 170) and residents with physical restraints (n = 22). QUALIDEM subscales were used to measure five dimensions of quality of life. Multilevel longitudinal univariate and multivariate regression techniques were used to analyze the data. Because physical restraints were almost exclusively used in residents with low activities of daily living (ADL) independency (18 of the 22), we restricted the regression analyses to residents with a Barthel Index score ≤ 5 (overall n = 53). Univariate results showed that highly ADL-dependent residents with surveillance technology had significantly more positive affect than highly ADL-dependent residents with physical restraints. However, this difference proved to be no longer significant after adjustment for the confounders: age, sex and stage of dementia. Quality of life of highly ADL-dependent nursing-home residents with dementia seems to be unrelated to the use of surveillance technology as opposed to physical restraints. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A biossegurança ocupacional na perspectiva do estudante de enfermagem | Occupational biosafety from the perspective of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Teresinha Fontana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma pesquisa descritiva que teve como objetivo investigar as não conformidades quanto à biossegurança cometidas pelos profissionais de saúde durante o cuidado, sob a perspectiva do estudante de enfermagem. A coleta de dados foi feita por meio de um questionário autoaplicável junto a 80 estudantes, que foram analisados mediante análise temática. O estudo respeitou os preceitos éticos envolvidos com a pesquisa em seres humanos. A não conformidade prevalente refere-se à negligência quanto ao uso de Equipamentos de Proteção Individual pelos trabalhadores, justificada pela falta de tempo, sobrecarga e desconhecimento do trabalhador. Para melhorar este cenário, os acadêmicos sugeriram educação permanente em saúde. Pode-se inferir que a educação pode ser uma estratégia para a cultura de segurança do usuário e do trabalhador. =================================== This is a descriptive research that aimed to investigate the non-conformities regarding biosafety, committed by health professionals during service delivery, from the perspective of nursing students. Data collection was done through a self-administered questionnaire with 80 students-, and were analyzed through thematic analysis. The study respected the ethical precepts related to human research. The prevalent non-compliance refers to workers’ negligence to use Individual Protection Equipment by, justified by their lack of time, overload and lack of knowledge. Academics suggested permanent health education as a way of improving this scenario. It can be inferred that education can be a strategy for the safety culture of both the user and the worker.

  11. New Technology in Health Education: Nursing Students' Application of Mobile Technology in the Classroom in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buabeng-Andoh, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate undergraduate nursing students' use of mobile learning (m-learning) and the factors contributing to their use of m-learning. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 586 nursing students from three universities in Ghana participated in this study. Survey questionnaires were used to collect data.…

  12. How different technologies can fit nursing processes to empower staff and increase quality of care. An Italian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, Giovanna; Lolli, Angela; Zaza, Raffaele; Origgi, Gianni; Bragagia, Silvia; Locatelli, Paolo; Restifo, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    The rapid evolution of healthcare and the need to contain costs, to decrease the time of patients' hospitalization, and to improve the quality of care has led the nursing profession to face new challenges. This paper describes the case study of A.O. Ospedale Niguarda in Milan (Italy), a public healthcare provider where the key role of Nursing is being recognized according to international common practice. Also considering the context of Italian healthcare, attention will be drawn to concrete actions carried out on the organizational side and also for what concerns IT tools supporting nursing activities. This was done aiming with success at rising nurses' knowledge level of the patient, support its activities, increase quality of care, in a precise managerial and methodological framework. We will describe four cases of projects (Intensive Care Unit patient record, First Aid Station care reporting, pressure ulcers management, transfusion traceability) carried out by Niguarda with the support of its partner Fondazione Politecnico di Milano, set up to support bedside nursing activities with the most suitable technology for the purpose.

  13. The use of information technology to enhance patient safety and nursing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tso-Ying; Sun, Gi-Tseng; Kou, Li-Tseng; Yeh, Mei-Ling

    2017-10-23

    Issues in patient safety and nursing efficiency have long been of concern. Advancing the role of nursing informatics is seen as the best way to address this. The aim of this study was to determine if the use, outcomes and satisfaction with a nursing information system (NIS) improved patient safety and the quality of nursing care in a hospital in Taiwan. This study adopts a quasi-experimental design. Nurses and patients were surveyed by questionnaire and data retrieval before and after the implementation of NIS in terms of blood drawing, nursing process, drug administration, bar code scanning, shift handover, and information and communication integration. Physiologic values were easier to read and interpret; it took less time to complete electronic records (3.7 vs. 9.1 min); the number of errors in drug administration was reduced (0.08% vs. 0.39%); bar codes reduced the number of errors in blood drawing (0 vs. 10) and transportation of specimens (0 vs. 0.42%); satisfaction with electronic shift handover increased significantly; there was a reduction in nursing turnover (14.9% vs. 16%); patient satisfaction increased significantly (3.46 vs. 3.34). Introduction of NIS improved patient safety and nursing efficiency and increased nurse and patient satisfaction. Medical organizations must continually improve the nursing information system if they are to provide patients with high quality service in a competitive environment.

  14. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel.

  15. 'It teaches you what to expect in future . . . ': interprofessional learning on a training ward for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott; Freeth, Della; McCrorie, Peter; Perry, David

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents findings from a multimethod evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. Unique in the UK, and following the pioneering work at Linköping, the training ward allowed senior pre-qualification students, under the supervision of practitioners, to plan and deliver interprofessional care for a group of orthopaedic and rheumatology patients. This responsibility enabled students to develop profession-specific skills and competencies in dealing with patients. It also allowed them to enhance their teamworking skills in an interprofessional environment. Student teams were supported by facilitators who ensured medical care was optimal, led reflective sessions and facilitated students' problem solving. Data were collected from all groups of participants involved in the ward: students, facilitators and patients. Methods included questionnaires, interviews and observations. Findings are presented from each participating group, with a particular emphasis placed on the perspective of medicine. The study found that students valued highly the experiential learning they received on the ward and felt the ward prepared them more effectively for future practice. However, many encountered difficulties adopting an autonomous learning style during their placement. Despite enjoying their work on the ward, facilitators were concerned that the demands of their role could result in 'burn-out'. Patients enjoyed their ward experience and scored higher on a range of satisfaction indicators than a comparative group of patients. Participants were generally positive about the training ward. All considered that it was a worthwhile experience and felt the ward should recommence in the near future.

  16. Results of Occupational Monitoring Program in Technologic Navy Center in Sao Paulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Clarice F.A.; Bitelli, Ricardo D.; Oliveira, Rodemir

    2013-01-01

    The CTMSP, Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, is a nuclear research Center located in the State of Sao Paulo. CTMSP headquarters is placed at the Campus of the University of Sao Paulo. Most of CTMSP nuclear facilities are at the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), located 120 km northwest from the Capital city of Sao Paulo. CTMSP has two major nuclear programs. One is the development of a PWR reactor for naval propulsion, and the other is associated with the front end fuel cycle technology comprising enrichment, conversion and reconversion. These activities require an extensive area monitoring program. This paper presents the results of this program covering the years of 2003 to 2011. The results include surface monitoring, dose rates and uranium concentrations in the air. (author)

  17. Using distance technology to learn across borders: a virtual travel course in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Block, Derryl; Rojas, Yrene Esperanza Urbina; Birkholz, Lorri; Melgar Morán, Carlos Christian

    2011-08-01

    A 6-week online course was developed and delivered to nursing students and instructors at universities in two countries. The course exposed students and faculty to nursing and health concerns in both countries. All course communications were conducted in both English and Spanish, with support from online translation software as needed. Course content covered professional nursing, global health issues, and nursing interventions used with clinical problems. Although students were initially intimidated by the course language requirements, students valued the opportunity to learn about cultural and health issues. Faculty experienced a learning curve as well and enjoyed this international experience. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. The State of Nursing Home Information Technology Sophistication in Rural and Nonrural US Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L; Madsen, Richard W; Miller, Erin L; Wakefield, Douglas S; Wise, Keely K; Alexander, Rachel L

    2017-06-01

    To test for significant differences in information technology sophistication (ITS) in US nursing homes (NH) based on location. We administered a primary survey January 2014 to July 2015 to NH in each US state. The survey was cross-sectional and examined 3 dimensions (IT capabilities, extent of IT use, degree of IT integration) among 3 domains (resident care, clinical support, administrative activities) of ITS. ITS was broken down by NH location. Mean responses were compared across 4 NH categories (Metropolitan, Micropolitan, Small Town, and Rural) for all 9 ITS dimensions and domains. Least square means and Tukey's method were used for multiple comparisons. Methods yielded 815/1,799 surveys (45% response rate). In every health care domain (resident care, clinical support, and administrative activities) statistical differences in facility ITS occurred in larger (metropolitan or micropolitan) and smaller (small town or rural) populated areas. This study represents the most current national assessment of NH IT since 2004. Historically, NH IT has been used solely for administrative activities and much less for resident care and clinical support. However, results are encouraging as ITS in other domains appears to be greater than previously imagined. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  19. In the Palm of Your Hand - Normalizing the Use of Mobile Technology for Nurse Practitioner Education and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Kimberley; Park, Caroline; Fraser, Shawn; Rich, Mariann; MacKenzie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile devices by nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet an evolving technological landscape is expanding rapidly. A longitudinal study of the ways NP students "normalize" the use of mobile devices in clinical education was completed. This study used researcher-designed survey tools, including sociodemographic questions, and the numerical picture was augmented and interpreted in light of the textual data in the form of selected interviews. Data indicate that mobile technology is normalized in the social realm but still developing in the clinical realm. Progress is hindered by non-modelling by faculty, inconsistent healthcare policy and lack of understanding of the affordances available through this technology. Overall, mobile technology is utilized and normalized in practice; this in turn has influenced their ability to prepare students for practice. Data presented can assist educators and clinicians alike in developing a more fulsome understanding on how to appropriately incorporate mobile technology into education and practice.

  20. Physio-psychological Burdens and Social Restrictions on Parents of Children With Technology Dependency are Associated With Care Coordination by Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Seigo; Sato, Iori; Emoto, Shun; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    To determine the association between parental care burdens and care coordination provided by nurses for children with technology dependency, specifically regarding physio-psychological burdens and social restrictions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2015. Participants were recruited via home-visit nursing stations, social worker offices, and special-needs schools. A total of 246 parents of children with technology dependency completed anonymous self-report questionnaires. Parental burden was measured using the Zarit Burden Interview. Care coordination for children with technology dependency was examined using items extracted from focus group interviews involving three nursing administrators at home-visit nursing stations, two social workers, and a coordinator of school education for children with special health care needs. Multiple regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between parental burden and care coordination among 172 parents who contracted with visiting nurses. Parents and children with nursing support were significantly younger and had higher medical care needs and higher parental role strain than those without nursing support. Care coordination from nurses predicted reduced parental burden, role strain, and personal strain (β=-0.247, p=0.002; β=-0.272, p=0.001; β=-0.221, p=0.009, respectively). Nurses' care coordination appears to be associated with a reduction in parents' care burden resulting from home medical care of children with technology dependency, especially the social restrictions and physio-psychological burdens. Strengthening nursing functioning as care coordinators may contribute to reducing care burdens for parents of children with technology dependency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Applying Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) model to develop an online English writing course for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Hung-Cheng; Pan, Mei-Yu; Lee, Bih-O

    2015-06-01

    Learning English as foreign language and computer technology are two crucial skills for nursing students not only for the use in the medical institutions but also for the communication needs following the trend of globalization. Among language skills, writing has long been ignored in the curriculums although it is a core element of language learning. To apply the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge) model to design an online English writing course for nursing students, and to explore the effects of the course to the students' learning progress as well as their satisfactions and perceptions. A single-group experimental study, utilizing the CEEC (College Entrance Examination Center) writing grading criteria and a self-designed course satisfaction questionnaire, is used. Fifty one nursing students who were in their first/four semesters of the two year vocational pre-registration nursing course in a Taiwan university were selected using convenience sampling. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated measure MANOVA. Qualitative data were analyzed by content analysis. Students' writing competence had been improved significantly in every dimension after the instruction. Only half of the learners preferred online writing compared to the traditional way of writing by hand. Additionally, participants reported that they would prefer to receive feedback from the teacher than peers, yet they did not like the indirect feedback. The teacher perceived the course as meaningful but demanding for both learning and teaching sides. To implement the peer review activities and give feedback on time were two major challenges during the cycles. The TPACK model suggests a comprehensive and effective teaching approach that can help enhance nursing students' English writing performance. Teachers are advised to consider its implementation when designing their syllabus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Elective Course Exploring Occupational Justice Through Occupational Storytelling and Story Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bednarski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine whether second-year Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT students who enroll in the elective course “Occupation in Long-Term Care (LTC” would be able to apply concepts of occupational justice in the nursing home environment through engaging residents in occupational storytelling and story making in order to facilitate resident self-advocacy for participation in a valued occupation. The occupational therapy elective course was developed and implemented with students alternating between the classroom and the nursing home environments. Outcome evaluation measurements included analysis of student reflective journaling to obtain qualitative data. The researcher found that students are able to understand the concepts and issues of occupational justice in the nursing home population and apply knowledge to facilitate the resident’s participation in meaningful occupations.

  3. Nurses' Use and Perception of an Information and Communication Technology System for Improving Coordination During Hospital Discharges: A Survey in Swedish Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Line; Fagerström, Cecilia; Nilsson, Lina

    2017-07-01

    To facilitate communications between care levels and improve coordination during hospital discharges, there is great potential in using information and communication technology systems, because they can significantly help to deter unnecessary readmissions. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about how often nurses use information and communication technology and the indicators related to its use. The aims of this study were to describe the indicators related to nurses' use of an information and communication technology system for collaboration between care levels and to estimate whether the level of use can be related to nurses' perceptions of the information and communication technology system's contribution to improve coordination during hospital discharges. A quantitative survey of 37 nurses from 11 primary healthcare centers was performed in a county in southern Sweden. The data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative analyses. The results showed that perceptions concerning the information and communication technology system's usability and time consumption differed between nurses who used the system and those who did not. Simultaneously, the nurses were rather unaware of the ability of the information and communication technology system to improve coordination during patient discharges.

  4. The relationship between supervisor support and registered nurse outcomes in nursing care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Debra S

    2007-01-01

    Workplace social support is a major characteristic related to the Job Demand-Control model of job stress. Organizational and managerial support have an effect on nurse satisfaction and burnout. The relationships between perceived supervisor support and measures of nurse occupation-related outcomes were investigated in 3 nursing units within an academic medical center. Nurses with greater levels of perceived supervisor support experienced more positive job outcomes and less negative outcomes, including less occupational stress, than nurses with less perceived supervisor support. Implications for refocusing the role of the nurse supervisor and its effect on multiple nursing occupation-related outcomes are discussed.

  5. Mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of the role of the Occupational Health Service in the management of work-related stress: how do they self-care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, J; Cameron, I M; Hamilton, R; Murphy, E; Naji, S

    2010-11-01

    Higher rates of stress-related sickness are found in health care professionals when compared with other sectors. The annual direct cost of absence to the National Health Service is £1.7 billion. Increased clinical demand, long hours, low staffing and a lack of support from colleagues and management are contributing to absenteeism, somatic complaints and mental health problems. Mental health work is inherently stressful and levels of work stress experienced by mental health nurses are especially high. The study investigated mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs) awareness and knowledge of the service provided by the Occupational Health Service (OHS) and identified work-related stress and self-care strategies within these two groups. Nurses and AHP staff employed in mental health services in a Scottish healthboard area were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Results demonstrated that staff found their contact with the OHS to be a positive experience. They considered direct patient care to be less stressful than the organizational constraints they work under, and they reported a lack of support from both their peer groups and management. There should be recognition of the increased stress that hospital-based nurses and AHPs experience. These areas should be scrutinized and reviewed further to support staff within these environments in accordance with organizational objectives. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  6. Evaluating the influence of perceived organizational learning capability on user acceptance of information technology among operating room nurse staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ching; Lin, Shih-Pin; Yang, Shu-Ling; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Kuang-Yi

    2013-03-01

    Medical institutions are eager to introduce new information technology to improve patient safety and clinical efficiency. However, the acceptance of new information technology by medical personnel plays a key role in its adoption and application. This study aims to investigate whether perceived organizational learning capability (OLC) is associated with user acceptance of information technology among operating room nurse staff. Nurse anesthetists and operating room nurses were recruited in this questionnaire survey. A pilot study was performed to ensure the reliability and validity of the translated questionnaire, which consisted of 14 items from the four dimensions of OLC, and 16 items from the four constructs of user acceptance of information technology, including performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, and behavioral intention. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied in the main survey to evaluate the construct validity of the questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothetical relationships between the four dimensions of user acceptance of information technology and the second-ordered OLC. Goodness of fit of the hypothetic model was also assessed. Performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence positively influenced behavioral intention of users of the clinical information system (all p < 0.001) and accounted for 75% of its variation. The second-ordered OLC was positively associated with performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence (all p < 0.001). However, the hypothetic relationship between perceived OLC and behavioral intention was not significant (p = 0.87). The fit statistical analysis indicated reasonable model fit to data (root mean square error of approximation = 0.07 and comparative fit index = 0.91). Perceived OLC indirectly affects user behavioral intention through the mediation of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence in the operating room

  7. Persuasive technology in teaching acute pain assessment in nursing: Results in learning based on pre and post-testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ana Graziela; Dal Sasso, Grace T Marcon; Iyengar, M Sriram

    2017-03-01

    Thousands of patients seek health services every day with complaints of pain. However, adequate pain assessment is still flawed, a fact that is partly related to gaps in professional learning on this topic. Innovative strategies such as the use of a virtual learning object mediated by persuasive technology in the learning of undergraduate nursing students can help to fill these gaps and to provide different ways of learning to learn. To evaluate the results in learning among undergraduate nursing students about assessment of acute pain in adults and newborns, before and after an online educational intervention. This is a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent study using pre-and post-testing. Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. 75 undergraduate nursing students. Our study was conducted in three steps (pre-test, education intervention, post-test). Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014. The educational intervention was performed using online access to virtual learning object about acute pain assessment, which students accessed on their mobile devices. A significant difference was seen in student learning (ptechnology and method applied. The use of persuasive technology such as small mobile devices as mediators of online educational interventions broadens learning spaces in an innovative, flexible, motivational, and promising manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining the functionality of the DeLone and McLean information system success model as a framework for synthesis in nursing information and communication technology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard G

    2012-06-01

    In this review, studies examining information and communication technology used by nurses in clinical practice were examined. Overall, a total of 39 studies were assessed spanning a time period from 1995 to 2008. The impacts of the various health information and communication technology evaluated by individual studies were synthesized using the DeLone and McLean's six-dimensional framework for evaluating information systems success (ie, System Quality, Information Quality, Service Quality, Use, User Satisfaction, and Net Benefits). Overall, the majority of researchers reported results related to the overall Net Benefits (positive, negative, and indifferent) of the health information and communication technology used by nurses. Attitudes and user satisfaction with technology were also commonly measured attributes. The current iteration of DeLone and McLean model is effective at synthesizing basic elements of health information and communication technology use by nurses. Regardless, the current model lacks the sociotechnical sensitivity to capture deeper nurse-technology relationalities. Limitations and recommendations are provided for researchers considering using the DeLone and McLean model for evaluating health information and communication technology used by nurses.

  9. Nursing informatics and nursing ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer

    2013-01-01

    All healthcare visions, including that of The TIGER (Technology-Informatics-Guiding-Educational-Reform) Initiative envisage a crucial role for nursing. However, its 7 descriptive pillars do not address the disconnect between Nursing Informatics and Nursing Ethics and their distinct communities......-of-(care)-decision. Increased pressure for translating 'evidence-based' research findings into 'ethically-sound', 'value-based' and 'patient-centered' practice requires rethinking the model implicit in conventional knowledge translation and informatics practice in all disciplines, including nursing. The aim is to aid 'how...... nurses and other health care scientists more clearly identify clinical and other relevant data that can be captured to inform future comparative effectiveness research. 'A prescriptive, theory-based discipline of '(Nursing) Decisionics' expands the Grid for Volunteer Development of TIGER's newly launched...

  10. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Fernández-Alemán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. Methodology. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Results. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle. Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. Conclusion. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  11. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Sánchez García, Ana Belén; López Montesinos, María José; Marqués-Sánchez, Pilar; Bayón Darkistade, Enrique; Pérez Rivera, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle). Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  12. Código Europeo Contra el Cáncer y Salud Laboral: Actuación de la Enfermería del Trabajo European Code Against Cancer and Health: Performance of Occupational Health Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús González Sánchez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El cáncer se ha convertido en una de las principales causas de morbi-mortalidad de la sociedad actual, afectando cada vez a un mayor número de personas y a un grupo de edades mucho más amplio, incluyéndose de forma importante la edad laboral. El Código Europeo Contra el Cáncer, constituye una herramienta eficaz para el profesional de la salud laboral, teniendo aplicación dentro de las competencias específicas otorgadas al especialista en Enfermería del Trabajo, y facilitando la realización de estudios e investigaciones epidemiológicas, que permitan obtener una estrategia de actuación preventiva eficaz, ante múltiples factores de riesgo de cáncer laboral presentes en determinadas industrias, contribuyendo a una correcta vigilancia y control de la salud.Cancer has become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in today's society, affecting more and more people and an age group much broader, including a significant working age. The European Code Against Cancer, is an effective tool for occupational health professional, having application within the powers granted to a specialist in Occupational Health Nursing, facilitating studies and epidemiological research that will generate a strategy for preventive action effectively to multiple risk factors for occupational cancer present in certain industries, achieving a proper monitoring and health surveillance.

  13. The iPad: tablet technology to support nursing and midwifery student learning: an evaluation in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Janie; McCrorie, Pamela

    2015-03-01

    This research explored the impact of tablet technology, in the form of Apple iPads, on undergraduate nursing and midwifery students' learning outcomes. In simulated clinical learning environments, first-year nursing students (n = 30) accessed apps and reference materials on iPads. Third-year nursing students (n = 88) referred to clinical guidelines to aid their decision making when problem solving. First-year midwifery students (n = 25) filmed themselves undertaking a skill and then immediately played back the video file. A total of 45 students completed an online questionnaire that allowed for qualitative comments. Students reported finding the use of iPads easy and that iPads provided point-of-care access to resources, ensuring an evidence-based approach to clinical decision making. iPads reportedly improved student efficiency and time management, while improving their ability to provide patient education. Students who used iPads for the purpose of formative self-assessment appreciated the immediate feedback and opportunity to develop clinical skills.

  14. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book aims to review the occurrence and causes of occupational cancer and is aimed at assisting medical and safety staff, management and health and safety representatives. It is presented in the following chapters: 1) Epidemiological method 2) Agents causing occupationally induced cancer, including radiation 3) Occupations associated with risk of cancer 4) Aetiology of cancer 5) Control of occupationally induced cancer, research, prevention, legislation, national and international bodies, control of specific occupational carcinogens, including irradiation. (U.K.)

  15. Using technology to enhance the quality of home health care: three case studies of health information technology initiatives at the visiting nurse service of New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Rosenfeld, Peri; Ames, Sylvia; Rosati, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing recognition among health services researchers and policy makers that Health Information Technology (HIT) has the potential to address challenging issues that face patients and providers of healthcare. The Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), a large not-for-profit home healthcare agency, has integrated technology applications into the service delivery model of several programs. Case studies, including the development and implementation, of three informatics initiatives at VNSNY are presented on: (1) Quality Scorecards that utilize process, outcomes, cost, and satisfaction measures to assess performance among clinical staff and programs; (2) a tool to identify patients at risk of being hospitalized, and (3) a predictive model that identifies patients who are eligible for physical rehabilitation services. Following a description of these initiatives, we discuss their impact on quality and process indicators, as well as the opportunities and challenges to implementation. © 2010 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  16. The Technology Acceptance of a TV Platform for the Elderly Living Alone or in Public Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Mancilla, Pedro C; Anido-Rifón, Luis E

    2017-06-08

    In Mexico, many seniors are alone for most of the day or live in public nursing homes. Simple interaction with computer systems is required for older people. This is why we propose the exploration of a medium well known by seniors, such as the television (TV). The primary objective of this study is to improve the quality of life of seniors through an easier reminder system, using the television set. A technological platform was designed based on interactive television, through which seniors and their caregivers can have a better way to track their daily activities. Finally, an evaluation of the technology adoption was performed with 50 seniors living in two public nursing homes. The evaluation found that the elderly perceived the system as useful, easy to use, and they had a positive attitude and good intention to use it. This helped to generate initial evidence that the system supported them in achieving a better quality of life, by reminding them to take their medications and increasing their rate of attendance to their medical appointments.

  17. Registering Nursing Interventions in Electronic Environments in Accordance with Nursing Process: an Example from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As being a professional occupation, development of nursing is affected by technological advancements in other fields. Aim of nursing is offering a safe, efficient and quality care. In general, lots of data, both quantitive and qualitative, is registered by nurses to the system of health records. Also usage of care plansadapted to computer environment has the benefits like eased risk management and analysis, standardization of given care, establishment of the communication between multi-discipliner care members, eased reading of documents.Aim: To determine the characteristics of electronic records to be able to employ nursing process successfully, a computer software which takes into account and reflects both the thinking process and condition of working places needs to be developed.Results: While computer and care plan usage have many positive ways, generally in Turkey it’s observed that usage of both are not at a desired level in nursing services. The computer software which is used to improve patient care quality must have qualities like being systematic, permanent, enabling diagnosises to be analyzed viadiscussions and to be systematically assessed, and giving guidance to nursing applications.Conclusion: Electronic patient registration system used by nurses should make time-saving possible, be easily used with easy menus, save all applications exactly, have warning and alarm systems, display necessary interventions at appropriate times, be a guide for patient care.

  18. Occupational skin diseases