WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology nuclear medical

  1. Nuclear medical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daga, Avinash; Sharma, Smita; Sharma, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medical technology helps to use radiopharmaceuticals (drugs that give off radiation) to diagnose and treat illness. A more recent development is Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which is a more precise and sophisticated technique that uses isotopes produced in a cyclotron. F-18 in FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) is one such positron-emitting radionuclide. Chemically, it is 2-deoxy-2-( 18 F) fluoro-D-glucose, a glucose analog with the positron-emitting radioactive isotope fluorine-18 substituted for the normal hydroxyl group at the 2' position in the glucose molecule. It is introduced, usually by injection, and then it gets accumulated in the target tissue. As it decays it emits a positron, which promptly combines with a nearby electron resulting in the simultaneous emission of two identifiable gamma rays in opposite directions. These are detected by a PET camera when the patient is placed in the PET scanner for a series of one or more scans which may take from 20 minutes to as long as an hour. It gives very precise indication of their origin. 18 F in FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) has become very important in detection of cancers and the monitoring of progress in their treatment, using PET. (author)

  2. Nuclear medicine. Medical technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, H.; Jigalin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim, method: the scientific publications in the 2003 and 2004 issues of the journal Nuklearmedizin were analyzed retrospectively with regard to the proportion of medical technology research. Results: out of a total of 73 articles examined, 9 (12%) were classified as medical technology research, that is, 8/15 of the original papers (16%) and one of the case reports (5%). Of these 9 articles, 44% (4/9) focused on the combination of molecular and morphological imaging with direct technical appliance or information technology solutions. Conclusion: medical technology research is limited in the journal's catchment area. The reason for this is related to the interdependency between divergent development dynamics in the medical technology industry's locations, the many years that the area of scintigraphic technology has been underrepresented, research policy particularly in discrepancies in the promotion of molecular imaging and a policy in which health is not perceived as a predominantly good and positive economic factor, but more as a curb to economic development. (orig.)

  3. Medical isotopes and emerging nuclear medicine technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbain, J-L.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation discusses medical isotopes and the emerging nuclear medicine technologies as well as the impact of Chalk River reactor shutdown on patient management and diseases. It outlines the chain of supply of isotopes across the globe and isotope shortage impact. It recommends the following mitigating strategies: modifications of scanning techniques, adjustment of patient scheduling, optimization of Tc-99m generator use, patient prioritization, alternate procedures and PET scanning.

  4. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  5. Nuclear Medical Technology. Curriculum for a Two Year Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buatti, A.; Rich, D.

    Objectives of the project briefly described here were (1) to develop curriculum for a two-year nuclear medical technology program based on a working relationship between three institutions (community college, university health center, and hospital) and (2) to develop procedures for the operation of a medical imaging and radiation technology core…

  6. Dissemination of medical applications of nuclear energy with virtual reality technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Felipe M.; Oliveira, Beatriz A.R.

    2007-01-01

    This work makes use of Virtual Reality technology to disseminate medical applications of nuclear energy, with educational purposes. Virtual Reality is an effective learning tool, since navigation and interaction in virtual worlds can improve motivation in the learning process. With this technology, learning can be achieved in a clearer, joyful and more objective way. Among the existing medical applications of nuclear energy, this work focuses on the use of radiopharmaceuticals. The goal is to simulate this application in a virtual environment, for educational purposes, and to show the absorption of a radiopharmaceutical by the human body, during a diagnostics or treatment procedure. An example has been chosen, for Iodine radiopharmaceutical, which has affinity with the thyroid, and then concentrates in this organ. During the simulation, the concentration of the radioactive Iodine in the thyroid can be emphasized, and in the sequence, the virtual patient can be shown during the imaging procedure. (author)

  7. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book has sixteen peer-reviewed papers divided into four sections that reflect changes in the nuclear power industry occurring since 1981, including escalating capital requirements and a growing worldwide dependence on nuclear power for electricity production. The four sections of this book are: Overview of National Programs; Surveillance and Other Radiation Embrittlement Studies; Pressure Vessel Integrity and Regulatory Considerations; and Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement

  8. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Nuclear Medicine Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0905 - Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boney, Linda; Lee, Joanne; Pyles, Alice; Whitfield, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  9. Nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daud Mohamad; Abd Khalik Wood; Azali Muhammad; Idris Besar; Jaafar Abdullah; Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman; Muhammad Lebai Juri; Noriah Mod Ali; Samsurdin Ahamad; Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain; Zaharudin Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Science and Technology contains valuable information on many aspects of nuclear sciences and technology particularly, its application in various socio-economic sectors, presented in 26 chapters. In general, the book addresses 5 main subjects, covering the following: 1] Introduction; contains basic information on ionising radiation and radioactivity including the what of ionising radiation is all about, interaction with matter and sources of radiation. 2] Detection and measurements; describes detection system and methods capable of detecting specific type of radiation and exposure rate. The QA/QC aspects are also given due consideration in this segment. 3] Safety and health. Outlines the effects of radiation on man, proper working procedures and the organisational radiation protection programme required in accordance to the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304) and its subsidiaries. 4] Techniques and applications; as the nucleus of the book, focussing on the various applications and some success stories; power production (for electricity) and other utilizations from both sealed and unsealed sources used in industry, medical and non-medical sectors for the benefit of mankind. 5] Prospects; provides information on the current situation and status of nuclear technology, and prominent organisations responsible in the development of the technology. The direction and future outlook of the technology are also presented to gauge the position and possible contribution that the nuclear technology can play a significant role for the socio-economic progress and nation, well being. Each, chapter in this book is developed around three pillars - basic principle, equipment and system, techniques and operational aspects - as a backbone of the chapter, to ease the understanding of the readers, step by step. Those dealing, with ionising radiation related matters, be it a researcher, a scientist, a laboratory worker or even a member of the public would find this book

  10. Nuclear technology review 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    The viability and credibility of a wide range of nuclear-based technologies require ready access to high-quality atomic, molecular and nuclear data. The demands of new nuclear technologies continue to determine the direction(s) of future data development, including the requirements for data that address innovative fuel cycles, accelerator-driven systems, nuclear incineration, fusion devices, diagnostic and therapeutic medical treatment by radiation, optimization of medical isotope production, non-destructive materials testing, radiation analytical techniques, minerals exploration and land-mine detection. Some recent data development projects with diverse applications are a search engine for Atomic and Molecular data to permit simultaneous data retrieval from a number of different sources for both numerical and bibliographic databases to aid designers. For over 50 years, research reactors have made valuable contributions to the development of nuclear power, basic science, materials development, radioisotope production for medicine and industry, and education and training. They remain core experimental instruments. As of June 2004, 672 research reactors are recorded in the IAEA's Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB), of which 274 are operational in 56 countries (85 in 39 developing countries), 214 are shut down, 168 have been decommissioned and 16 are planned or under construction. Nuclear power supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, and as of 31 December 2003 there were 439 NPPs operating worldwide. Their global energy availability factor has risen steadily from 74.2% in 1991 to approximately 84% in 2003. In 2003 two new NPPs were connected to the grid, a 665 MW(e) pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) in China and a 960 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the Republic of Korea. In addition Canada restarted two units that had been shutdown. Construction started on one new NPP in India. Four 50 MW(e) units in the UK were retired, as were one 640 MW

  11. Proceedings of the 9th national conference on nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    It is the proceedings of the 9th national conference on nuclear electronics and nuclear technology. 114 theses are collected in this proceedings. It includes nuclear electronics, nuclear detector, radiation hardened electronics, computer application in nuclear sciences and technology, nuclear instruments and its application, nuclear monitoring and nuclear explosion measurement, nuclear medical electronics and liquid scintillation counting technology

  12. Nuclear Technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibils Machado, W. E- mail: wrcibils@adinet.com.uy

    2002-01-01

    The present work tries on the applications of the nuclear technology in the life daily, such as agriculture and feeding, human health, industry, non destructive essays, isotopic hydrology, and the nuclear power stations for electricity production and radioisotopes production

  13. [Medical technology and medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  14. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  15. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  16. Nuclear technology in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with the Nuclear Energy in Peru. It consists of ten chapters. In the first chapter is presented a rapid overview on nuclear science history. The second chapter describes the nuclear proliferation and the nuclear competition in South America. The nuclear organization in Peru, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, and the main centers are described in the third chapter. The following chapters deals with peruvian advances in nuclear medicine, agriculture and food, nuclear application to industry, hydrology, earth sciences and environmental considerations. In the last chapter, the perspectives for nuclear science and technology in Peru are described from the inter institutional cooperation point of view. This book also includes appendix and bibliography. (author)

  17. Medical imaging technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The book has two intentions. First, it assembles the latest research in the field of medical imaging technology in one place. Detailed descriptions of current state-of-the-art medical imaging systems (comprised of x-ray CT, MRI, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine) and data processing techniques are discussed. Information is provided that will give interested engineers and scientists a solid foundation from which to build with additional resources. Secondly, it exposes the reader to myriad applications that medical imaging technology has enabled.

  18. Nuclear technology and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru

    1997-01-01

    After the confrontation of East and West, and the problem of North and South, we are now facing the era of Globalization in the presence of twenty-first century. Tracing the history of civilization, human being has progressed along with the accumulation of experience, and the development of science and technology. Science and technology bloomed in modern ages, especially, energy technology showed the giant leap in this century. Nuclear science and technology has been developed for peaceful purposes, and for the benefit of humanity. As a result, today, its progress led nuclear science and technology to have the great applicability to the development of the society. Toward the twenty-first century and Globalization, the science and technology developed in nuclear field is hoped to play a great contribution in various area of the society. (author)

  19. Chemistry and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear sciece and technology as based on the two basic phenomena, namely, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, with their relatively large associated energy changes, are outlined. The most important contributions by chemists in the overall historical development are mentioned and the strong position chemistry has attained in these fields is indicated. It is concluded that chemistry as well as many other scientific discplines (apart from general benefits) have largely benefitted from these nuclear developments [af

  20. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  1. High social impact of medical applications in nuclear technology: gynecological brachitherapy remote control in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubizarreta, E.

    1996-01-01

    In the present article is studied many systems for uterine carcinoma therapy. Among modern therapy systems it was found Fletcher applicator compound with Cesium and Iridium sources. This new technology by remote control has improved radioprotection levels in the exposition workers and disappear radioactive sources mislead, increasing sources activities and decreasing the exposition time

  2. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokujo, Hiroki; Kawahara, Hiroaki; Komatani, Ryosuke; Morishita, Misaki; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Otsuka, Naoto; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015) The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  3. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokujo Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015 The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  4. Nuclear medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    This three-volume set covers the physical basis of nuclear medicine, and is intended as a source of data for practicing scientists and physicians as well as those beginning their careers or simply studying nuclear medical physics. It leads the reader from quantum theory to the production and attenuation of ionizing radiation; considers dosimetry and the most recent assessment of biological effects of such particles; describes in detail detector materials, signal analysis, and gamma cameras; includes extensive discussions of bone mineral measurement as well as magnetic resonance imaging; covers limited angle, rotating camera, and positron tomography; presents quality assurance and statistical theory with an eye toward enhanced departmental operations; and features descriptions of functional imaging and the psychophysical basis of diagnosis

  5. Recent progress in medical imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    Medical imaging is name of methods for diagnosis and therapy, which make visible with physical media such as X-ray, structures and functions of man's inside those are usually invisible. These methods are classified by the physical media into ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine imaging and X-ray imaging etc. Having characteristics different from one another, these are used complementarily in medical fields though in some case being competitive. Medical imaging is supported by highly progressed technology, which is called medical imaging technology. This paper describes a survey of recent progress of medical imaging technology in magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine imaging and X-ray imaging. (author)

  6. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  7. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  8. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Oyama, Kosuke

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  9. Proceedings of the 12th national conference on nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The 12th national conference on nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology were hold by Nuclear Electronics and Nuclear Detection Technology Branch Society on November, 6th-11th 2004 in Kunming of Yunnan province. 158 articles is collected in the proceedings. The contents involved nuclear electronics and its application, nuclear detector and its application, nuclear instruments and its application, nuclear medical electronics and its application, nuclear monitoring technology and nuclear explosion detection, radiation hardened electronics and electromagnetic pulse technology and its application, liquid scintillation detection technology and its application, computer applications in sciences and technology and so on

  10. Nuclear technology in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This pamphlet provides a summary of the research being carried out by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The design and development of the CANDU type reactor are highlighted and the contribution of nuclear technology to medicine, agriculture and the Canadian economy is briefly discussed

  11. Nuclear technology and societal needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    This volume aims to review the present status of development of nuclear technologies and their applications in the country and also to make projections for future requirements. This will also cover state-of-the-art technologies in these areas. The following topics are covered in detail: nuclear technologies for water desalination, water resources development and management using nuclear technology, industrial applications of isotopes and radiation technology, radiation technology in health care, nuclear technology for food preservation, agricultural applications of nuclear technology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Why nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson J.; Ishiguro, Yuji; Urbina, Ligia M. Soto

    1996-01-01

    The importance of nuclear energy in the global society implies the nacional need to give priority and maintain an effective technology policy for nuclear science. In this work, it is considered three points that, although do not represent all the problems in the nuclear sector, were chosen because of their importance and need of change that require: evaluation of the Brazilian scientific policy, which is directed towards the publication in international periodicals, yielding more benefits to the developed countries; evaluation of the few and small investment in laboratories and research institutes, which are the natural producers of technology for the industry and service sectors; evaluation of the lack of concrete of concrete objectives in the universities and research institutes, whose policies are elaborated with-out the due consideration of the collective benefits. It is necessary a national plan for the nuclear are that makes investments in technology development, investments in the laboratories and research institutes, and that makes these universities and research institutes accountable for the success or failure to accomplish the proposed objectives. (author)

  13. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  14. Nuclear Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  15. Nuclear technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  16. Nuclear technology options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Different strategies and motivations in different countries have led to diverse options. In Europe the SNETP (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform) has the objective of developing R&D supporting GEN-II (present) and GEN-III nuclear systems under development; allowing sustainability and minimisation of waste burden, promoting advanced Gen-IV Fast Reactors; and accounting for a Nuclear Cogeneration Industrial Initiative. A remarkable initiative in the USA has been the promotion of small modular reactors (SMRs) – at less than 300 MWe in capacity, much smaller than typical reactors – which can be an ideal choice for (remote) areas which cannot support a larger reactor. Compact scalable design offers a host of potential safety, construction and economic benefits. More “upbeat” strategies are expected in other areas of the world where significant increase in nuclear energy demand is predicted in the next decades. If this growth materialises, future fuel cycles characteristics, feasibility and acceptability will be crucial. This paper will discuss different scenarios for future fuel cycles, resources optimisation and/or waste minimization, the range from full fast reactor deployment to phase-out, management of spent nuclear fuel and the significant potential benefits of advanced cycles. The next 45 years will be dominated by deployment of standard large or medium size plants operating for 60 years. Available resources do allow it. However, fuel cycle will be a growing and most challenging issue and early assessments will be needed for public acceptance and policy decisions.

  17. Nuclear technology review 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    The unifying theme of the Nuclear Technology Review 2002 (NTR-2002) is the importance of innovation. Innovation makes it possible to step beyond incremental evolutionary improvements constrained by diminishing returns. For crop production and public health, for example, the sterile insect technique created a whole new path for future improvements, distinctly different from applying ever larger amounts of pesticides. Nuclear techniques offer a new and safer approach to removing the world's estimated 60,000,000 abandoned land mines. New precision techniques create the potential for ever less intrusive and more effective radiation treatments for cancer. For nuclear power continuing innovation will be a key factor in closing the projection gap between long term global energy scenarios in which nuclear power expands substantially and near term scenarios with only modest expansion or even decline. While the NTR-2002 presents a worldwide review of the state-of-the-art of nuclear science and technology, and not an annual report on IAEA activities, it notes areas where the Agency has a particularly important role to play. Part I of the NTR-2002 'Fundamentals of Nuclear Development', reviews developments in the field of nuclear, atomic and molecular data. Research reactors remain essential to progress in nuclear science and technology. Part I reviews advances in radioisotope production, the use of accelerators and neutron activation analysis relevant to applications ranging from medicine particularly the light against cancer to industry. Part I also reviews developments in nuclear instrumentation and nuclear fusion, particularly in connection with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Part II begins with a summary of nuclear power production in 2001. At the end of 2001 there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, corresponding to a total capacity of 353 GW(e), more than 10000 reactor-years of cumulative operating experience and about 16% of global

  18. Medical aspects of nuclear armament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janse, M.J.; Schene, A.; Koch, K.

    1983-01-01

    The authors highlight a few medical, biological and psycological aspects of the use of nuclear weapons, drawing attention to their viewpoint that doctors should actively participate in the fight against nuclear armament. The short and long-term radiation effects on man and ecology are presented based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences. The danger of human error within this framework is emphasised and it is suggested that it is the medical profession's duty to point out how the effect of stress and boredom can lead to a nuclear catastrophe. Medical expertise may also help in the identification of unstable personalities among those who have access to nuclear weapons and in the understanding of the psycology of international conflicts and the psychopathology of those leaders who would use nuclear war as an instrument of national policy. Finally the effects of the nuclear war threat on children and teenagers are considered. (C.F.)

  19. Medical aspects of nuclear armament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janse, M.J.; Schene, A.; Koch, K.

    1983-06-18

    The authors highlight a few medical, biological and psycological aspects of the use of nuclear weapons, drawing attention to their viewpoint that doctors should actively participate in the fight against nuclear armament. The short and long-term radiation effects on man and ecology are presented based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki experiences. The danger of human error within this framework is emphasised and it is suggested that it is the medical profession's duty to point out how the effect of stress and boredom can lead to a nuclear catastrophe. Medical expertise may also help in the identification of unstable personalities among those who have access to nuclear weapons and in the understanding of the psycology of international conflicts and the psychopathology of those leaders who would use nuclear war as an instrument of national policy. Finally the effects of the nuclear war threat on children and teenagers are considered.

  20. Nuclear technology review 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-08-01

    Cadarache, France.The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 24 members, with the addition in 2005 of Ukraine and the United States of America. Current INPRO activities include completion of a user manual on the INPRO methodology, application of the methodology to assessing innovative nuclear energy systems (INSs) in national and multinational studies, analyses of the role and structure of INSs in meeting energy demands in a sustainable manner, and selection of the most suitable areas for collaborative development. Developments in accelerator based techniques, production of radioisotopes and some novel uses of nanotechnology are also reported. Nuclear technologies continue to play key and often unique roles in food production and safety, in human and animal health, in water resource management and in the environment. Mutation breeding of crops, for example, has led to the use of previously unusable land in many countries for rice production. In human health, the use of stable isotopes is becoming an accepted tool for the development of nutrition programmes. Nuclear medicine is benefiting from technological advances in computing. Sustainable water management and desalination remain high on the international agenda. New developments in isotopic analysis of hydrological samples hold promise for increasing the use of isotopes in water resources management. Advances in sampling and analytical techniques have assisted in better understanding of the environment. Developments in all these areas are also reported

  1. Nuclear Technology Review 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The year 2006 saw increasing activities in the field of nuclear power. Significant plans for expansion were announced in some countries and plans for introducing nuclear power in some others. The year began with announcements by both the Russian Federation and the United States of America of international fuel cycle proposals in anticipation of a substantial expansion of nuclear power worldwide. In January, Russian President Vladimir Putin outlined a proposal to create 'a system of international centres providing nuclear fuel cycle services, including enrichment, on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA'. In February, the USA proposed a Global Nuclear Energy Partnership to develop advanced recycling technologies that would not separate pure plutonium; international collaboration in supplying fuel for States which agree not to pursue enrichment and reprocessing; advanced reactors to consume recycled spent fuel while providing energy; and safe and secure small reactors suited to the needs of developing countries. New medium-term projections by the IAEA and the International Energy Agency present a picture with opportunities for substantial nuclear expansion, but still with notable uncertainty. A number of countries have announced plans for significant expansion: China, India, Japan, Pakistan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Korea. Announcements of planned license applications by US companies and consortia mentioned approximately 25 new reactors. Two site preparation applications were submitted in Canada. A major energy review by the United Kingdom concluded that new nuclear power stations would make a significant contribution to meeting the UK's energy policy goals. Utilities from Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia launched a joint feasibility study of a new nuclear power plant to serve all three countries, and Belarus, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey made announcements of steps they are taking toward their first nuclear power plants

  2. Space technology needs nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leidinger, B.J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Space technology needs nuclear power to solve its future problems. Manned space flight to Mars is hardly feasible without nuclear propulsion, and orbital nuclear power lants will be necessary to supply power to large satellites or large space stations. Nuclear power also needs space technology. A nuclear power plant sited on the moon is not going to upset anybody, because of the high natural background radiation level existing there, and could contribute to terrestrial power supply. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Nuclear technology in research and everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    The paper.. discusses the impact of nuclear technology in research and everyday life covering the following issues: miniaturization of memory devices, neutron radiography in material science, nuclear reactions in the universe, sterilization of food, medical applies, cosmetics and packaging materials using beta and gamma radiation, neutron imaging for radioactive waste analysis, microbial transformation of uranium (geobacter uraniireducens), nuclear technology knowledge preservation, spacecrafts voyager 1 and 2, future fusion power plants, prompt gamma activation analysis in archeology, radiation protection and radioecology and nuclear medicine (radiotherapy).

  4. Nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Science and Technology comprehends Nuclear and Condensed Matter Physics, Neutron Activation Analysis, Radiation Metrology, Radioprotection and Radioactive Waste Management. These activities are developed at the Research Reactor Center, the Radiation Metrology Center and the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory. The Radioprotection activities are developed at all radioactive and nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The Research Reactor Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Research Reactor IEA-R1 and has a three-fold mission: promoting basic and applied research in nuclear and neutron related sciences, providing educational opportunities for students in these fields and providing services and applications resulting from the reactor utilization. Specific research programs include nuclear structure study from beta and gamma decay of radioactive nuclei and nuclear reactions, nuclear and neutron metrology, neutron diffraction and neutron multiple-diffraction study for crystalline and magnetic structure determination, perturbed -angular correlation (PAC) using radioactive nuclear probes to study the nuclear hyperfine interactions in solids and instrumental neutron activation analysis, with comparative or ko standardization applied to the fields of health, agriculture, environment, archaeology, reference material production, geology and industry. The research in the areas of applied physics includes neutron radiography, scientific computation and nuclear instrumentation. During the last several years a special effort was made to refurbish the old components and systems of the reactor, particularly those related with the reactor safety improvement, in order to upgrade the reactor power. The primary objective was to modernize the IEA-R1 reactor for safe and sustainable operation to produce primary radioisotopes, such as 99 Mo and 131 I, among several others, used in nuclear medicine, by operating the reactor

  5. Nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Science and Technology comprehends Nuclear and Condensed Matter Physics, Neutron Activation Analysis, Radiation Metrology, Radioprotection and Radioactive Waste Management. These activities are developed at the Research Reactor Center, the Radiation Metrology Center and the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory. The Radioprotection activities are developed at all radioactive and nuclear facilities of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The Research Reactor Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Research Reactor IEA-R1 and has a three-fold mission: promoting basic and applied research in nuclear and neutron related sciences, providing educational opportunities for students in these fields and providing services and applications resulting from the reactor utilization. Specific research programs include nuclear structure study from beta and gamma decay of radioactive nuclei and nuclear reactions, nuclear and neutron metrology, neutron diffraction and neutron multiple-diffraction study for crystalline and magnetic structure determination, perturbed -angular correlation (PAC) using radioactive nuclear probes to study the nuclear hyperfine interactions in solids and instrumental neutron activation analysis, with comparative or ko standardization applied to the fields of health, agriculture, environment, archaeology, reference material production, geology and industry. The research in the areas of applied physics includes neutron radiography, scientific computation and nuclear instrumentation. During the last several years a special effort was made to refurbish the old components and systems of the reactor, particularly those related with the reactor safety improvement, in order to upgrade the reactor power. The primary objective was to modernize the IEA-R1 reactor for safe and sustainable operation to produce primary radioisotopes, such as {sup 99}Mo and {sup 131}I, among several others, used in nuclear medicine, by operating

  6. Nuclear Technology Review 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    , on a non-discriminatory basis and under the control of the IAEA. Nineteen countries signed a statement of principles of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, which aims at accelerating development and deployment of advanced fuel cycle technologies to foster development, improve the environment, and reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. The NRC approved the release of most of the Big Rock Point nuclear power plant site and most of the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant site for unrestricted public use. Thus, ten power plants around the world have been completely decommissioned with their sites released for unconditional use. Seventeen plants have been partially dismantled and safely enclosed. Thirty-two are being dismantled prior to eventual site release, and thirty-four reactors are undergoing minimum dismantling prior to long term enclosure. In September, the IAEA launched a new Network of Centres of Excellence for Decommissioning to improve the flow of knowledge and experience among those engaged in decommissioning and to encourage organizations in developed Member States to contribute to the activities of Member States requiring decommissioning assistance. Nuclear and isotopic techniques continue to make substantive contributions in agriculture, human health, the marine and terrestrial environments as well as in water resource management. In food and agriculture, plant mutation breeding is supporting the development of new varieties of crops that bring enhanced yields while also providing significant environmental benefits through reduced requirements for fertilizers and increased resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The genetic enhancement of biomass crops is useful in responding to increasing demands for biofuels. In addition to the continuing use of irradiation for sanitary purposes, the use of irradiation for phytosanitary applications, especially those applications related to quarantine measures, is increasing.

  7. St. Luke's Medical Center: technologizing health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanguil, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The computerization of the St. Luke's Medical Center improved the hospital administration and management, particularly in nuclear medicine department. The use of computer-aided X-ray simulator machine and computerized linear accelerator machine in diagnosing and treating cancer are the most recent medical technological breakthroughs that benefited thousands of Filipino cancer patients. 4 photos

  8. Nuclear medicine technology study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Dee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Technology Study Guide presents a comprehensive review of nuclear medicine principles and concepts necessary for technologists to pass board examinations. The practice questions and content follow the guidelines of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT), allowing test takers to maximize their success in passing the examinations. The book is organized by sections of increasing difficulty, with over 600 multiple-choice questions covering all areas of nuclear medicine, including radiation safety; radi

  9. International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Conference Nuclear technology has played an important role in many aspects of our lives, including agriculture, medicine and healthcare, materials, environment, forensics, energy, and frontier advancement. The International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference (INST) aims to bring together scientists, engineers, academics and students to share knowledge and experiences about all aspects of nuclear sciences. INST2016 was the second of the INST conference series organized by Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology. INST has evolved from a national conference series on nuclear science and technology that was held every two years in Bangkok for over a twenty-year period. INST2016 was held from 4 - 6 August 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand, under the central theme “Nuclear for Better Life”. The conference working language was English. The oral and poster research presentations covered seven major topics: • Nuclear physics and engineering (PHY) • Nuclear and radiation safety (SAF) • Medical and nutritional applications (MED) • Environmental applications (ENV) • Radiation processing and industrial applications (IND) • Agriculture and food applications (AGR) • Instrumentation and other related topics (INS) The welcome addresses, committees, program of the conference and the list of presentations can be found in the PDF. (paper)

  10. Nuclear Technology Review 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    With 434 nuclear power reactors in operation worldwide at the end of 2013, nuclear energy had a global generating capacity of 371.7 GW(e). There were four new grid connections and ten construction starts on new reactors. Belarus became the second nuclear ‘newcomer’ State in three decades to start building its first nuclear power plant. Near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia, particularly in China. The 72 reactors under construction in 2013 represented the highest number since 1989. Of these, 48 were in Asia, as were 42 of the last 52 new reactors to have been connected to the grid since 2000. Thirty States currently use nuclear power and about the same number are considering including it as part of their energy mix. Of the 30 States already operating nuclear power plants, 13 are either constructing new plants or actively completing previously suspended constructions, and 12 are planning to either construct new plants or to complete suspended constructions. The IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century, held in June 2013, reaffirmed that nuclear power remains an important option for many States to improve energy security, reduce the impact of volatile fossil fuels prices and mitigate the effects of climate change. The Concluding Statement said that “nuclear power, as a stable base-load source of electricity in an era of ever increasing global energy demands, complements other energy sources including renewables.” In the IAEA’s 2013 projections, nuclear power is expected to grow by between 17% as the low projection and 94% as the high projection by 2030. These figures are slightly lower than projected in 2012, reflecting the continued impact of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the low prices of natural gas and the increasing use of renewable energy. Additional information focuses on the linkages between nuclear power and climate change, as nuclear power, hydropower and wind energy have the lowest life cycle

  11. Nuclear Forensics Technologies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, N.; Kimura, Y.; Okubo, A.; Tomikawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of intercepted illicit nuclear or radioactive material and any associated material to provide evidence for nuclear attribution by determining origin, history, transit routes and purpose involving such material. Nuclear forensics activities include sampling of the illicit material, analysis of the samples and evaluation of the attribution by comparing the analysed data with database or numerical simulation. Because the nuclear forensics methodologies provide hints of the origin of the nuclear materials used in illegal dealings or nuclear terrorism, it contributes to identify and indict offenders, hence to enhance deterrent effect against such terrorism. Worldwide network on nuclear forensics can lead to strengthening global nuclear security regime. In the ESARDA Symposium 2015, the results of research and development of fundamental nuclear forensics technologies performed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency during the term of 2011-2013 were reported, namely (1) technique to analyse isotopic composition of nuclear material, (2) technique to identify the impurities contained in the material, (3) technique to determine the age of the purified material by measuring the isotopic ratio of daughter thorium to parent uranium, (4) technique to make image data by observing particle shapes with electron microscope, and (5) prototype nuclear forensics library for comparison of the analysed data with database in order to evaluate its evidence such as origin and history. Japan’s capability on nuclear forensics and effective international cooperation are also mentioned for contribution to the international nuclear forensics community.

  12. The future of nuclear (science and) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the future of nuclear science and technology. It discusses the implications of nuclear renaissance, nuclear social contract and Fukushima for nuclear science and technology. Nuclear science and technology priorities for Canada are to understand and address the fear of radiation, reduce the threats and address the fear of nuclear proliferation and terrorism, preclude core melt and make used fuel an asset.

  13. Nuclear Technology Review 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    In 2011, nuclear energy continued to play an important role in global electricity production despite the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP). Total generating nuclear power capacity was slightly lower than in previous years due to the permanent shutdown of 13 reactors in 2011, including 8 in Germany and 4 in Japan in the wake of the accident. However, there were 7 new grid connections compared to 5 in 2010, 2 in 2009 and none in 2008. Significant growth in the use of nuclear energy worldwide is still anticipated - between 35% and 100% by 2030 - although the Agency projections for 2030 are 7-8% lower than projections made in 2010. The factors that have contributed to an increased interest in nuclear power did not change: an increasing global demand for energy, concerns about climate change, energy security and uncertainty about fossil fuel supplies. Most of the growth is still expected in countries that already have operating NPPs, especially in Asia, with China and India remaining the main centres of expansion while the Russian Federation will also remain a centre of strong growth. The 7-8% drop in projected growth for 2030 reflects an accelerated phase-out of nuclear power in Germany, some immediate shutdowns and a government review of the planned expansion in Japan, as well as temporary delays in expansion in several other countries. Measures taken by countries as a result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident have been varied. A number of countries announced reviews of their programmes. Belgium, Germany and Switzerland took additional steps to phase out nuclear power entirely while others re-emphasized their expansion plans. Many Member States carried out national safety assessment reviews in 2011 (often called 'stress tests'), and commitments were made to complete any remaining assessments promptly and to implement the necessary corrective action. In countries considering the introduction of nuclear power, interest remained strong

  14. Technology of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1973-01-01

    This Article is the Note of a lecture, which was hold by Engelbert Borda at the Catholic-Theological Faculty of the University of Vienna in 27. 03. 1973. The author describes the development of modern nuclear weapon systems and the resulting war strategies. He is concerned about a possible end of the ‚balance of terror’ and the development in automation of nuclear strike back strategies. (rössner) [de

  15. Nuclear Technology Review 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    With 438 reactors operating at the end of 2014, nuclear energy had a global generating capacity of 376.2 GW(e). There was only one permanent shutdown. There were five new grid connections and three construction starts on new reactors. Near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia, particularly in China. Of the 70 reactors under construction, 46 were in Asia, as were 32 of the last 40 reactors that have been connected to the grid since 2004. Thirty countries currently use nuclear power and about the same number are considering, planning or actively working to include it as part of their energy mix. Of the 30 operating countries, 13 are either constructing new plants or actively completing previously suspended construction projects, and 12 are planning either to construct new plants or to complete suspended construction projects. Several countries that have decided to introduce nuclear power are at advanced stages of infrastructure preparation. The IAEA’s 2014 projections show a growth between 8% and 88% in nuclear power capacity by the year 2030. Growth of population and demand for electricity in the developing world, recognition of the role nuclear power plays in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the importance of security of energy supply and the volatility of fossil fuel prices point to nuclear energy playing an important role in the energy mix in the long run. Safety improvements have continued to be made at nuclear power plants (NPPs) throughout the world. These have included identifying and applying lessons learned from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, improving the effectiveness of defence in depth, strengthening emergency preparedness and response capabilities, enhancing capacity building, and protecting people and the environment from ionizing radiation

  16. New nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Thomas, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of nuclear energy for sustainable development is based on its competitiveness, environmental friendliness and sustainability of natural resources. The improvements to be achieved relate to cleanliness (by reducing the production of long lived radioactive waste), safety demonstration and sobriety which contributes to minimise the consumption of natural resources. The current level of competitiveness, which is fairly good, has to be maintained. The required improvements benefit from a high efficiency and a simpler architecture of industrial systems; they imply the recycling of nuclear materials and a high efficiency of nuclear combustion. The latter requires a hardened spectrum using fast neutrons, which makes the nuclear core 'omnivorous' as for transuranics. The studies must take into account reactor design, nuclear fuel and fuel cycle. Diverse coolants (water, gas, liquid metals) are considered, with solid fuel (pins, particles) and reprocessing by hydrometallurgical or pyrochemical processes, as well as liquid fuel reactors. Several ways of combining options look promising. The required time before industrial implementation is highly variable. A nuclear fleet can include diversified, specialized components and new applications (hydrogen production) can be envisaged. The R and D programme will rely on the development of simulation power and will imply a strong international cooperation. (authors)

  17. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  18. Nuclear Technology Review 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In 2009, construction started on 12 new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985, and projections of future nuclear power growth were once again revised upwards. However, only two new reactors were connected to the grid, and, with three reactors retired during the year, the total nuclear power capacity around the world dropped slightly for the second year in a row. Current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Ten of the 12 construction starts were in Asia, as were both of the new grid connections. Although the global financial crisis that started in the second half of 2008 did not dampen overall projections for nuclear power, it was cited as a contributing factor in near-term delays or postponements affecting nuclear projects in some regions of the world. In some European countries where previously there were restrictions on the future use of nuclear power, there was a trend towards reconsidering these policies. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high. Over 60 Member States have expressed to the IAEA interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power, and, in 2009, the IAEA conducted its first Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions in Jordan, Indonesia and Vietnam. Estimates of identified conventional uranium resources (at less than $130/kg U) increased slightly, due mainly to increases reported by Australia, Canada and Namibia. Uranium spot prices declined, and final data for 2009 are expected to show a consequent decrease in uranium exploration and development. The Board of Governors has authorized the IAEA Director General to sign an agreement with the Russian Federation to establish an international reserve of low enriched uranium (LEU). It would contain 120 tonnes of LEU that could be made available to a country affected by a non-commercial interruption of its LEU supply. The agreement between the IAEA and the Russian Federation was signed in March 2010

  19. Advanced technology for nuclear powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohm, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced technology offers significant potential benefit to the nuclear industry. Improvements can be anticipated in plant performance, reliability, and overall plant safety as well as reduced life cycle costs. Utilizing artificial intelligence and expert systems, robotics, advanced instruments and controls, and modularization technologies can enhance plant operations and provide new insights and perspectives to plant risk and thus focus resources to areas of importance. Plant reliability, operability, availability, accident interdiction and limitation, and plant recovery are expected to improve. However, utilizing these technologies is not an automatic process. In addition to the actual costs associated with developing and implementing the technologies, operator training and acceptance represents a potential significant problem. Traditional plant operators have little or no experience with computer technology. There has already been some difficulty getting nuclear plant operators to accept and use the new technologies that have been implemented to accept and use the new technologies that have been implemented thus far

  20. Nuclear Technology Review 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-08-01

    The year 2008 was paradoxical for nuclear power. Projections of future growth were revised upwards, but no new reactors were connected to the grid. It was the first year since 1955 without at least one new reactor coming on-line. There were, however, ten construction starts, the most since 1985. At least until the global financial crisis, cost estimates reported for new nuclear reactors were often higher than those in previous years, particularly in regions with less recent experience in new construction. However, growth targets for nuclear power were raised in the Russian Federation, and similar considerations were under review in China. India negotiated a safeguards agreement with the Agency in August, and the Nuclear Suppliers Group subsequently exempted India from previous restrictions on nuclear trade, which should allow India to accelerate its planned expansion of nuclear power. In the USA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) received combined licence (COL) applications for 26 new reactors. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) received 19 'Part I applications' for Federal loan guarantees to build 21 new reactors. Nonetheless, current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Of the ten construction starts in 2008, eight were in Asia. Twenty-eight of the 44 reactors under construction at the end of the year were in Asia, as were 28 of the last 39 new reactors to have been connected to the grid. Armenia joined the Russian Federation and Kazakhstan as members of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre in Angarsk, Siberia. The Ukrainian Government announced that Ukraine would also join. AREVA and USEC applied to the USDOE for loan guarantees for the construction of AREVA's proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility and USEC's American Centrifuge Plant. Construction of an underground repository for low and medium level radioactive waste began at the former Konrad iron mine in Germany. The USDOE submitted a formal

  1. Industrial applications of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Celso

    2010-01-01

    Industrial applications of nuclear technology have been very diverse worldwide. This type of technology has begun to introduce in Costa Rica to evaluate and improve different industrial processes. These applications have been classified into two or three categories, according to the criteria used. Nucleonic control systems, the gamma logging and radiotracers are determined. (author) [es

  2. Church - Technology - Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to cope with the problems causing a great deal of trouble today, i.e. with fear and with the ethical substantiation of technology, the author considers an integration model necessary which is to link science and technology and religion and philosophy. (RW) [de

  3. Nuclear safeguards technology handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to present to United States industrial organizations the Department of Energy's (DOE) Safeguards Technology Program. The roles and missions for safeguards in the U.S. government and application of the DOE technology program to industry safeguards planning are discussed. A guide to sources and products is included

  4. Nuclear Technology Review 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, caused by the extraordinary natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunamis that struck Japan on 11 March 2011, continues to be assessed. As this report focuses on developments in 2010, the accident and its implications are not addressed here, but will be addressed in future reports of the Agency. In 2010, construction started on sixteen new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985. With five new reactors connected to the grid and only one reactor retired during the year, total nuclear power capacity around the world increased to 375 GW(e). Revised projections in 2010 of future nuclear power growth still indicated high expectations for nuclear power expansion. Expansion and near and long term growth prospects remained centred in Asia. Two thirds of the reactors currently under construction are in Asia, as were thirteen of the sixteen construction starts. Of these, ten construction starts were in China alone. Trends of uprates and renewed or extended licences for operating reactors continued in 2010, particularly in some European countries where the trend towards reconsidering policies that restricted the future use of nuclear power continued. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high, with over 60 Member States having indicated to the Agency their interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power. In the 2010 edition of the OECD/NEA-IAEA 'Red Book', estimates of identified conventional uranium resources at less than $130/kg U decreased slightly compared to the previous edition, but uranium production worldwide significantly increased due largely to increased production in Kazakhstan. Uranium spot prices, which declined in 2009, reached at the end of 2010 their highest levels in over two years topping $160/kg U, despite early and mid-year prices fluctuating between $105/kg U and $115/kg U. The Board of Governors, in December 2010, approved the establishment of an

  5. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  6. Innovation in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its future. For the continued safe and economically effective operation and maintenance of existing nuclear systems, and to meet the goals set out by projects aiming at designing and implementing advanced systems for the future, efficient innovation systems are needed. Consequently, analysing innovation systems is essential to understand their characteristics and enhance their performance in the nuclear sector. Lessons learnt from innovation programmes that have already been completed can help enhance the effectiveness of future programmes. The analysis of past experience provides a means for identifying causes of failure as well as best practices. Although national and local conditions are important factors, the main drivers for the success of innovative endeavors are common to all countries. Cooperation and coordination among the various actors are major elements promoting success. All interested stakeholders, including research organisations, industrial actors, regulators and civil society, have a role to play in supporting the success of innovation, but governments are an essential trigger, especially for projects with long durations and very ambitious objectives. Governments have a major role to play in promoting innovation because they are responsible for the overall national energy policy which sets the stage for the eventual deployment of innovative products and processes. Moreover, only governments can create the stable legal and regulatory framework favourable to the undertaking and successful completion of innovation programmes. International organisations such as the NEA may help enhance the effectiveness of national policies and innovation programmes by providing a forum for exchanging information, facilitating multilateral collaboration and joint endeavors, and offering technical support for the management of innovative programmes

  7. Economic evaluation of medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Alon; Shemer, Joshua

    2005-02-01

    Innovation in medical science is progressing at a rapid pace. As a result, new medical technologies that offer to improve upon or completely replace existing alternatives are continually appearing. These technologies--which include pharmaceuticals, devices, equipment, supplies, medical and surgical procedures, and administrative and support systems--are changing the way medicine can be practiced and delivered, forcing healthcare providers and policymakers to consistently evaluate and adapt to new treatment options. Meanwhile, society is becoming more demanding of new medical technologies. Emerging medical technology, however, has been viewed as a significant factor in increasing the cost of healthcare. The abundance of new medical alternatives, combined with scarcity of resources, has led to priority setting, rationing and the need for more technology management and assessment. Economic evaluation of medical technologies is a system of analysis used to formally compare the costs and consequences of alternative healthcare interventions. EEMT can be used by many healthcare entities, including national policymakers, manufacturers, payers and providers, as a tool to aid in resource allocation decisions. This paper discusses the four current popular methodologies for EEMT (cost-minimization, cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility), and describes the industry environment that has shaped their development.

  8. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases

  9. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  10. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  11. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  12. Graduate diplomas in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.

    2009-01-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) offers a graduate diploma program in nuclear technology that consists of a suite of six sub-specialties: Fuel, Materials and Chemistry; Reactor Systems; Operation and Maintenance; Safety, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs; Health Physics; and Radiological Applications. Four courses selected from a list that covers the knowledge and skill set of each sub-specialty have to be completed in order to gain a graduate diploma in the specific area. The program is designed to accommodate the needs of people working in the nuclear industry to upgrade their knowledge and skills, to promote career advancement and to provide a framework for lifelong learning. (author)

  13. Graduate diplomas in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) offers a graduate diploma program in nuclear technology that consists of a suite of six sub-specialties: Fuel, Materials and Chemistry; Reactor Systems; Operation and Maintenance; Safety, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs; Health Physics; and Radiological Applications. Four courses selected from a list that covers the knowledge and skill set of each sub-specialty have to be completed in order to gain a graduate diploma in the specific area. The program is designed to accommodate the needs of people working in the nuclear industry to upgrade their knowledge and skills, to promote career advancement and to provide a framework for lifelong learning. (author)

  14. Frontiers in medical imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    At present many medical images are used for diagnostics and treatment. After the advent of X-ray computer tomography (XCT), the violent development of medical images has continued. Medical imaging technology can be defined as the field of technology that deals with the production, processing, display, transmission, evaluation and so on of medical images, and it can be said that the present development of medical imaging diagnostics has been led by medical imaging technology. In this report, the most advanced technology of medical imaging is explained. The principle of XCT is shown. The feature of XCT is that it can image the delicate difference in the X-ray absorption factor of the cross section being measured. The technical development has been advanced to reduce the time for imaging and to heighten the resolution. The technology which brings about a large impact to future imaging diagnostics is computed radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of imaging the distribution of protons in human bodies. Positron CT is the method of measurement by injecting a positron-emitting RI. These methods are explained. (K.I.)

  15. Educational technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  16. Nuclear methods in medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, R.

    2003-01-01

    A common ground for both, reactor and medical physics is a demand for high accuracy of particle transport calculations. In reactor physics, safe operation of nuclear power plants has been asking for high accuracy of calculation methods. Similarly, dose calculation in radiation therapy for cancer has been requesting high accuracy of transport methods to ensure adequate dosimetry. Common to both problems has always been a compromise between achievable accuracy and available computer power leading into a variety of calculation methods developed over the decades. On the other hand, differences of subjects (nuclear reactor vs. humans) and radiation types (neutron/photon vs. photon/electron or ions) are calling for very field-specific approach. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to see drift of researches from one field to another. Several examples from both fields will be given with the aim to compare the problems, indicating their similarities and discussing their differences. As examples of reactor physics applications, both deterministic and Monte Carlo calculations will be presented for flux distributions of the VENUS and TRIGA Mark II benchmark. These problems will be paralleled to medical physics applications in linear accelerator radiation field determination and dose distribution calculations. Applicability of the adjoint/forward transport will be discussed in the light of both transport problems. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as an example of the close collaboration between the fields will be presented. At last, several other examples from medical physics, which can and cannot find corresponding problems in reactor physics, will be discussed (e.g., beam optimisation in inverse treatment planning, imaging applications). (author)

  17. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  18. Geology behind nuclear fission technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhana Raju, R.

    2005-01-01

    Geology appears to have played an important role of a precursor to Nuclear Fission Technology (NFT), in the latter's both birth from the nucleus of an atom of and most important application as nuclear power extracted from Uranium (U), present in its minerals. NFT critically depends upon the availability of its basic raw material, viz., nuclear fuel as U and/ or Th, extracted from U-Th minerals of specific rock types in the earth's crust. Research and Development of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) depends heavily on 'Geology'. In this paper, a brief review of the major branches of geology and their contributions during different stages of NFC, in the Indian scenario, is presented so as to demonstrate the important role played by 'Geology' behind the development of NFT, in general, and NFC, in particular. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennenbaum, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Nuclear technology and anthroposophic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leben, S.

    1982-01-01

    The construction of nuclear power plants as a solution to the current energy, crisis is controversial. That was not so in the beginning of the 'peaceful' utilization of nuclear power; with thousands of millions to promote it given as subsidies by the governments it was developing fast, until citizens' initiatives asked ecologic and moral questions delaying the further extension of this energy production. Both positions can be substantiated. But can a first judgement, too, be given with any degree of safety. And what cognitive aids are provided by the anthroposophic theory. This is demonstrated in some aspects. From the contents: The energy crisis and its apparent way out; of the causes: modern scientific methods; New forces: some facts and phenomena; Destructive powers as viewed by ancient mysteries; Of desirable states of conscience and technical forms; spelling their distortion; Nuclear powers and morality; Untimeliness in historicity; 'What's the stance of anthroposophic theory with regard to nuclear technology'. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Impact of Nuclear Technology to the National Socio-Economy: Technical Support by Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazmimi Kasim; Ainul Hayati Daud; Jamal Khaer Ibrahim; Alawiah Musa

    2011-01-01

    In Malaysia, the development of nuclear technology began in the year 1972. More than 30 years of application, today, the technology made impact to the national socio-economy through contribution to GDP and; improving quality of life and enhanced societal well-being. The application of nuclear technology both in public and private agencies in industrial, medical and agricultural sectors were considered. In 2008, the impact of nuclear technology shows the contribution of 0.032% to the total GDP. Industry sector shows an increasing trend and is the highest contributor, while agriculture sector remains the lowest. In this regard, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) played an important role as a technical support agency in nuclear technology, as a supplier and provider for the service, training and research for the industrial, medical and agricultural sectors. (author)

  2. The development of nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nack-chung Sung

    1987-01-01

    Korea, as a recipient of nuclear technology transfer, has good experience of progressively building up its indigeneous capability of nuclear technology through three stages of technology transfer, namely: technology transfer under the turnkey approach, component approach, and integrated technology transfer with a local prime contractor. Here, each stage of experience of technology transfer, with Korea as a recipient, is presented. (author)

  3. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  4. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  5. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente Josce; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-01-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems

  6. The Application of Nuclear Technology for a Better World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Technology is widely used in different areas and sector of our economy to better man kind and his environment. Peaceful applications of nuclear technology have several benefits to the world today. It is widely believed that nuclear technology is mainly used mainly for the production of electricity (Nuclear Power Plants – NPPs). Many are not aware of the other numerous benefits of nuclear technology. Nuclear technology can be applied in different fields for numerous benefits. Different sectors Nuclear Technology application can improve the living standard of man and his environment: – Food and Agriculture; – Medicine; – Industrial; – Energy; – Education; — Research and Development; – Environment. The benefits of the application of nuclear technology cannot be over emphasised. These benefits range from the improved quality of purified water we drink, the textiles we wear, improved quality of stored grains for preservation of foods, water analyses, improved transportation system work, drugs production, medical tests and analysis, clean environment through radioisotope techniques etc. The application of nuclear technology also gives a safer, greener, healthier and pollution free environment and atmosphere for human habitation. In my poster, the numerous benefits of the various applications of Nuclear Technology will be clearly enumerated and heighted. (author)

  7. Medical assistance in case of nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodig, D.; Tezak, S.; Kasal, B.; Huic, D.; Medvedec, M.; Loncaric, S.; Grosev, D.; Rozman, B.; Popovic, S.

    1996-01-01

    Medical service is a prerequisite for work license of nuclear installation. Every nuclear installation incorporate in their safety procedure also medical emergency plan. Usually the medical emergency plan consists of several degrees of action: 1. First aid, 2. First medical treatment, 3. Treatment in regional hospital, 4. Treatment in special institution (centre for radiation medicine). This paper discusses organization and activities of Centre for Radiation Medicine and Protection - Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb

  8. Nuclear fuel manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power accounts for approximately 17% of the world's total electrical energy production. Over 30 countries operate in excess of 430 nuclear power plants with a combined generating capacity of more than 340 000 MWe. BNFL is a leading force in the international nuclear industry, supplying products and services across the complete fuel cycle business spectrum. These services and products include fuel and intermediate products manufacture, reprocessing, transport, waste management and decommissioning. This paper describes the processes involved in taking uranium ore as a raw material through to the production of advanced fuels and focuses on the manufacture and technology for both uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. As a light water reactor (LWR) fuel fabricator, BNFL is able to manufacture MOX or UO 2 fuel utilizing recycled uranium. This paper discusses the technology involved in the use of plutonium or uranium oxide recovered from reprocessing and other advanced fuel technical issues. Improved production methods and the application of advanced engineering permits the next generation of fuel fabrication plants to capitalize on advances in technology. The long-term research and development (R and D) commitments by BNFL are outlined in this paper, indicating the levels of investment needed in R and D to accommodate a high technology company in an international market. (author)

  9. Nuclear technology for the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen papers and abstracts are presented under the following session headings: space nuclear power, health physics and dosimetry, nuclear design and thermal hydraulics, nuclear diagnostics, and fusion technology and plasma physics. The papers were processed separately for the data base

  10. The medical consequences of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphrey, J.; Hartog, M.; Middleton, H.

    1982-01-01

    A pamphlet has been produced by the Medical Campaign Against Nuclear Weapons (MCANW) and by the Medical Association for the Prevention of War (MAPW) to bring the catastrophic effects that the use of nuclear weapons would entail to the attention of the general public, politicians and members of the medical profession. It describes the medical consequences of the effects of blast, heat and ionizing radiation from nuclear weapons, including details from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. The medical consequences of a nuclear attack including consideration of the casualties, care of the injured, psychological effects and the outcome are also discussed. It is concluded that if for none other than purely medical reasons, nuclear warfare must never be allowed to happen. (UK)

  11. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, J. H

    2007-02-15

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposals for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology R and D programs. To do this, environmental changes of international nuclear energy policy and trends of nuclear technology development were surveyed and analyzed. This Study analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategy in a viewpoint of analyzing the changes in the global policy environment associated with nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy.

  12. Image processing technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Beom; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Young

    1993-05-01

    Digital image processing technique is being actively studied since microprocessors and semiconductor memory devices have been developed in 1960's. Now image processing board for personal computer as well as image processing system for workstation is developed and widely applied to medical science, military, remote inspection, and nuclear industry. Image processing technology which provides computer system with vision ability not only recognizes nonobvious information but processes large information and therefore this technique is applied to various fields like remote measurement, object recognition and decision in adverse environment, and analysis of X-ray penetration image in nuclear facilities. In this report, various applications of image processing to nuclear facilities are examined, and image processing techniques are also analysed with the view of proposing the ideas for future applications. (Author)

  13. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  14. Nuclear Systems (NS): Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nuclear Systems Project demonstrates nuclear power technology readiness to support the goals of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate. To this end, the...

  15. Interviews concerning topical questions in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segatz, U.; Schatz, A.; Stephany, M.; Michaelis, H.

    1978-01-01

    On the occasion of the Nuclex meeting, October 3-7, 1978, Basle/Switzerland, the editorial department of 'Atom und Strom' questioned some leading scientists in nuclear technology on particularly relevant topics. The following subjects were discussed: - How long can we do without nuclear energy, - Modern technology for nuclear power plants, - Nuclear fuel cycle and environment, - Nuclear energy and European Communities, - Nuclear energy and its risks (reflections on incidents). (orig./UA) [de

  16. Fusion of Nuclear and Emerging Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khaer Alang Rashid

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: emerging technology; nuclear technology; fusion emerging and nuclear technology; progressive nature of knowledge; optically stimulated luminescence - application of luminescence technology to sediments; Biosystemics technology -convergence nanotechnology, ecological science, biotechnology, cognitive science and IT - prospective impact on materials science, the management of public system for bio-health, eco and food system integrity and disease mitigation

  17. Reexamining the Ethics of Nuclear Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Andrei; Kanke, Victor; Kuptsov, Ilya; Murogov, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    This article analyzes the present status, development trends, and problems in the ethics of nuclear technology in light of a possible revision of its conceptual foundations. First, to better recognize the current state of nuclear technology ethics and related problems, this article focuses on presenting a picture of the evolution of the concepts and recent achievements related to technoethics, based on the ethics of responsibility. The term 'ethics of nuclear technology' describes a multidisciplinary endeavor to examine the problems associated with nuclear technology through ethical frameworks and paradigms. Second, to identify the reasons for the intensification of efforts to develop ethics in relation to nuclear technology, this article presents an analysis of the recent situation and future prospects of nuclear technology deployment. This includes contradictions that have aggravated nuclear dilemmas and debates stimulated by the shortcomings of nuclear technology, as well as the need for the further development of a nuclear culture paradigm that is able to provide a conceptual framework to overcome nuclear challenges. Third, efforts in the field of nuclear technology ethics are presented as a short overview of particular examples, and the major findings regarding obstacles to the development of nuclear technology ethics are also summarized. Finally, a potential methodological course is proposed to overcome inaction in this field; the proposed course provides for the further development of nuclear technology ethics, assuming the axiological multidisciplinary problematization of the main concepts in nuclear engineering through the basic ethical paradigms: analytical, hermeneutical, and poststructuralist.

  18. Medical consequences of a nuclear plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, S.E.; Reizenstein, P.; Stenke, L.

    1987-01-01

    The report gives background information concerning radiation and the biological medical effects and damages caused by radiation. The report also discusses nuclear power plant accidents and efforts from the medical service in the case of a nuclear power plant accident. (L.F.)

  19. Innovation in nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Th.; Bertel, E.; Kwang Seok, Lee; Foskolos, K.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its sustainable future. Many research and development programmes focus on enhancing the performance of power plants in operation, current fuel design and characteristics, and fuel cycle processes used in existing facilities. Generally performed under the leadership of the industry. Some innovation programmes focus on evolutionary reactors and fuel cycles, derived from systems of the current generation. Such programmes aim at achieving significant improvements, in the field of economics or resource management for example, in the medium term. Often, they are undertaken by the industry with some governmental support as they require basic research together with technological development and adaptation. Finally, large programmes, often undertaken in an international, intergovernmental framework are devoted to design and development of a new generation of systems meeting the goals of sustainable development in the long term. Driving forces for nuclear innovation vary depending on the target technology, the national framework and the international context surrounding the research programme. However, all driving factors can be grouped in three categories: market drivers, political drivers and technology drivers. Globally, innovation in the nuclear energy sector is a success story but is a lengthy process that requires careful planning and adequate funding to produce successful outcomes

  20. Public Health and Medical Preparedness for a Nuclear Detonation: The Nuclear Incident Medical Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C. Norman; Sullivan, Julie M.; Bader, Judith L.; Murrain-Hill, Paula; Koerner, John F.; Garrett, Andrew L.; Weinstock, David M.; Case, Cullen; Hrdina, Chad; Adams, Steven A.; Whitcomb, Robert C.; Graeden, Ellie; Shankman, Robert; Lant, Timothy; Maidment, Bert W.; Hatchett, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Resilience and the ability to mitigate the consequences of a nuclear incident are enhanced by (1) effective planning, preparation and training; (2) ongoing interaction, formal exercises, and evaluation among the sectors involved; (3) effective and timely response and communication; and (4) continuous improvements based on new science, technology, experience and ideas. Public health and medical planning require a complex, multi-faceted systematic approach involving federal, state, local, tribal and territorial governments, private sector organizations, academia, industry, international partners, and individual experts and volunteers. The approach developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Nuclear Incident Medical Enterprise (NIME) is the result of efforts from government and nongovernment experts. It is a “bottom-up” systematic approach built on the available and emerging science that considers physical infrastructure damage, the spectrum of injuries, a scarce resources setting, the need for decision making in the face of a rapidly evolving situation with limited information early on, timely communication and the need for tools and just-in-time information for responders who will likely be unfamiliar with radiation medicine and uncertain and overwhelmed in the face of the large number of casualties and the presence of radioactivity. The components of NIME can be used to support planning for, response to, and recovery from the effects of a nuclear incident. Recognizing that it is a continuous work-in-progress, the current status of the public health and medical preparedness and response for a nuclear incident is provided. PMID:25551496

  1. Public health and medical preparedness for a nuclear detonation: the nuclear incident medical enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C Norman; Sullivan, Julie M; Bader, Judith L; Murrain-Hill, Paula; Koerner, John F; Garrett, Andrew L; Weinstock, David M; Case, Cullen; Hrdina, Chad; Adams, Steven A; Whitcomb, Robert C; Graeden, Ellie; Shankman, Robert; Lant, Timothy; Maidment, Bert W; Hatchett, Richard C

    2015-02-01

    Resilience and the ability to mitigate the consequences of a nuclear incident are enhanced by (1) effective planning, preparation and training; (2) ongoing interaction, formal exercises, and evaluation among the sectors involved; (3) effective and timely response and communication; and (4) continuous improvements based on new science, technology, experience, and ideas. Public health and medical planning require a complex, multi-faceted systematic approach involving federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial governments; private sector organizations; academia; industry; international partners; and individual experts and volunteers. The approach developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Nuclear Incident Medical Enterprise (NIME) is the result of efforts from government and nongovernment experts. It is a "bottom-up" systematic approach built on the available and emerging science that considers physical infrastructure damage, the spectrum of injuries, a scarce resources setting, the need for decision making in the face of a rapidly evolving situation with limited information early on, timely communication, and the need for tools and just-in-time information for responders who will likely be unfamiliar with radiation medicine and uncertain and overwhelmed in the face of the large number of casualties and the presence of radioactivity. The components of NIME can be used to support planning for, response to, and recovery from the effects of a nuclear incident. Recognizing that it is a continuous work-in-progress, the current status of the public health and medical preparedness and response for a nuclear incident is provided.

  2. China nuclear science and technology reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    114 abstracts of nuclear science and technology reports, which were published in 1986-1987 in China, are collected. The subjects inclucled are: nuclear physics, nuclear medicine, radiochemistry, isotopes and their applications, reactors and nuclear power plants, radioactive protection, nuclear instruments etc... They are arranged in accordance with the INIS subject categories, and a report number index is annexed

  3. The recent status of nuclear technology development in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Sumitra, Tatchai; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Chankow, Nares; Tiyapan, Kanokrat; Onjun, Thawatchai; Bhanthumnavin, Duangduen

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has started the peaceful utilization of nuclear program in 1961. The program has developed considerably in various aspects. Laws and regulations were established while applications in medical, agriculture, industry as well as research and education have been accomplished successfully in the country. As for the energy production, Thailand has realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. However, the implementation has been delayed. There are four main nuclear organizations namely The Thai Atomic Energy Commission - the country's policy holder, the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) - the nuclear regulatory bodies, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT: Public Organization) - the research and services provider in nuclear field and the Nuclear Society of Thailand the non-governmental organization. Major research in nuclear technology is actively carried out at TINT. Filed of research include medical and public health, agricultural, material and industrial, environmental and advanced technology like neutron scattering and nuclear fusion. Nuclear density gauge has been utilized in many industries including petrochemical production and refineries. TINT is also providing services on nuclear radiography to industrial and clients. Additionally, x-ray techniques have been utilized in many manufacturers for quality and process control. Nuclear applications for medical purpose have been utilized in Thailand several years back both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. To ensure safe and peaceful use of nuclear technology and for the safety of the general public in Thailand, OAP has launched laws, regulations and ministerial announcements. Thailand has only one multi-purposes nuclear research reactor and no NPP. Yet we have realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. (N.T.)

  4. Pakistan's experience in transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Khan, Nunir

    1977-01-01

    Of all technologies, nuclear technology is perhaps the most interdisciplinary in character as it encompasses such varied fields as nuclear physics, reactor physics, mechanical, electrical electronics controls, metallurgical and even civil and geological engineering. When we speak of transfer of acquisition of nuclear technology we imply cumulative know-how in many fields, most of which are not nuclear per se but are essential for building the necessry infrastructure and back-up facilities for developing and implementing any nuclear energy program. In Pakistan, efforts on utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful applications were initiated about twenty years ago. During these years stepwise development of nuclear technology has taken place. The experience gained by Pakistan so far in transfer of nuclear technology is discussed. Suggestions have been made for continuing the transfer of this most essential technology from the advanced to the developing countries while making sure that necessary safeguard requirements are fullfilled

  5. The Technology of Nuclear Warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    The present technical status of the nuclear weapon system and of the systems for their delivery is explained. All these systems have made tremendous progress since the 1960s. Available destructive power now is literally millions of times larger than at the time of Hiroshima. Moreover, technical progress has had, especially through the MIRV principle and the cruise missile, a destabilizing influence and threatens the equilibrium of terror. New strategy doctrines for winning rather than preventing nuclear war are developed. According to the counterforce strategy the retaliation capacity of the opponent is to be destroyed by a surprise attack. Moreover, plans for the tactical first-use of nuclear weapons have been accepted. In a nuclear conflict, the commanders-in-chief are overburdened by the need for ultra-urgent decisions. As a consequence tendencies in the direction of increasing automatization become ever more conspicuous. In the extreme case, decisions may be entirely left to machines, and man would not any more be included in decision-making. The increasing automatization leads to further escalation of insecurity for the whole world. A solution cannot be found on the level of technology, but only on that of practical peace policy. (author)

  6. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu, E-mail: yamashita.kiyonobu@jaea.go.jp [Visiting Professor, at the Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering, University Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); General Advisor Nuclear HRD Centre, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, TOKAI-mura, NAKA-gun, IBARAKI-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  7. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident

  8. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy crisis, high fuel costs and slow progress in the development of alternative energy sources, e.g. solar energy have given further impetus to nuclear power generation. The Swiss nuclear energy programme is discussed and details are given of nuclear station in operation, under construction, in the project stage and of Swiss participation in foreign nuclear stations. Reference is made to the difficulties, delays and resulting cost increases caused by local and regional opposition to nuclear power stations. The significant contributions made by Swiss industry and Swiss consulting engineers are discussed. (P.G.R.)

  9. Public fear of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.M.; Radford, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Excessive fear of nuclear technology (EFONT) is estimated to affect from 35-50 percent of the U.S. public, EFONT is defined as an unpleasant state of fear with components of stress and anxiety, threat to security, and anger. The cognitive aspect of EFONT involves perception of risks, benefits, and values which reinforce and perpetuate the fear. EFONT can be reduced through communications and outreach programs by providing basic information, encouraging participation, and targeting misinformation. Risks need to be put in perspective and benefits made explicit. Safety messages should be combined with other information. Understanding and patience are indispensable in dealing with those who are afraid

  10. Biological and medical sensor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Biological and Medical Sensor Technologies presents contributions from top experts who explore the development and implementation of sensors for various applications used in medicine and biology. Edited by a pioneer in the area of advanced semiconductor materials, the book is divided into two sections. The first part covers sensors for biological applications. Topics include: Advanced sensing and communication in the biological world DNA-derivative architectures for long-wavelength bio-sensing Label-free silicon photonics Quartz crystal microbalance-based biosensors Lab-on-chip technologies fo

  11. Nuclear Science and Technology for Thai Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Bangkok

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Full text: The 11th conference on the nuclear science and technology was held on 2-3 July 2009 in Bangkok. This conference contain paper on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for the infestation tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  12. Nuclear technology for global markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Energy fuels the future. It powers economic and social advances that drive the progress of nations. In Canada, we've been in the business of nuclear energy for fifty years. Our CANDU reactors are consistently in the world's top ten for lifetime performance. Established in 1952 by the Canadian Government, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) leads Canada's nuclear export industry which comprises the utilities operating CANDU plants, private sector consulting engineering and construction companies and more than 100 large, medium and small manufacturers and equipment suppliers. AECL-led activities are anticipated to contribute $3.5 billion to Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) over the next five years. Moreover, between 1962 and 1992, the Canadian nuclear industry contributed at least $23 billion to Canada's GDP, with substantive economic benefits in electricity and other goods and services. AECL develops and markets CANDU power reactors and MAPLE research reactors, supplies power and research reactor support services, and offers radioactive waste management products and services. An important component of AECL's success has been its ability to transfer technology to clients. The CANDU reactor comprises components that can be manufactured in other countries, under appropriate agreements. (author)

  13. Development of nuclear analytical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, W. H.; Park, Yeong J.; Park, Yong J.; Sohn, S. C.; Song, B. C.; Jeon, Y. S.; Pyo, H. Y.; Ha, Y. K.

    2004-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop the technology for the determination of isotopic ratios of nuclear particles detected from swipe samples and to develop the NIPS system. The R and D contents and results of this study are firstly the production of nuclear micro particle(1 ∼ 20 μm) and standardization, the examination of variation in fission track characteristic according to nuclear particle size and enrichment( 235 U: 1-50%), the construction of database and the application of this technique to swipe samples. If this technique is verified its superiority by various field tests and inter-laboratory comparison program with other institutes in developed countries, it can be possible to join NWAL supervised under IAEA and to export our technology abroad. Secondly, characteristics of alpha track by boron (n, α) nuclear reaction were studied to measure both total boron concentration and 10B enrichment. The correlation of number of alpha tracks and various 10B concentration was studied to evaluate the reliability of this method. Especially, cadmium shielding technique was introduced to reduce the background of alpha tracks by covering the solid track detector and the multi-dot detector plate was developed to increase the reproducibility of measurement by making boron solution dried evenly in the plate. The results of the alpha track method were found to be well agreed with those of mass spectroscopy within less than 10 % deviation. Finally, the NIPS system using 252 Cf neutron source was developed and prompt gamma spectrum and its background were obtained. Monte Carlo method using MCNP-4B code was utilized for the interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray shielding condition as well as the moderation of a fast neutron. Gamma-gamma coincidence was introduced to reduce the prompt gamma background. The counting efficiency of the HPGe detector was calibrated in the energy range from 50 keV to 10 MeV using radio isotope standards and prompt gamma rays of Cl for the

  14. Nuclear technology review 2005 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    The year 2004 marked the 50th anniversary of civilian nuclear power generation. While the current outlook for nuclear energy remains mixed, there is clearly a sense of rising expectations. Both the OECD International Energy Agency and the IAEA adjusted their medium-term projections for nuclear power upwards. The IAEA now projects 423 - 592 GW(e) of nuclear power installed worldwide in 2030, compared to 366 GW(e) at the end of 2004. This is driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by new environmental constraints including entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several key countries. National research on advanced reactor designs continues on all reactor categories - water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. Five members of the US-initiated Generation IV International Forum (GIF) signed a framework agreement on international collaboration in research and development on Generation IV nuclear energy systems in February 2005. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 23 members. It completed a series of case studies testing its assessment methodology and the final report on the updated INPRO methodology was published in December. The realization of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, came closer with the announcement on 28 June 2005 by the ITER parties. The aim of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy by constructing a functional fusion power plant. Nuclear technology developments are rapid and cover many fields of application. Not all can be covered in this update review, but certain key areas and trends are covered where these are seen to be of significant interest to IAEA Member States, and which are of relevance to and have

  15. Nuclear medical examinations in Marfan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'haene, E.G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Four patients of one family with the Marfan's syndrome have been examined with nuclear medical techniques. A combination of isotopes, angiography and ECG triggered bloodpoolscintigraphy with echocardiography are very suitable to examine the course of the disease. (Auth.)

  16. Teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienstbier, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties in the CSSR is analyzed. It is shown that the teaching conditions are different at the individual faculties of medicine and the respective conditions are exemplified. (author). 4 tabs

  17. Japan's contribution to nuclear medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.; Sakamoto, Junichi; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the degree of Japan's contribution to the nuclear medical research in the last decade. Articles published in 1991-2000 in highly reputed nuclear medical journals were accessed through the MEDLINE database. The number of articles having affiliation with a Japanese institution was counted along with publication year. In addition, shares of top-ranking countries were determined along with their trends over time. Of the total number of articles (7,788), Japan's share of articles in selected nuclear medical journals was 11.4% (889 articles) and ranked 2nd in the world after the USA (2,645 articles). The recent increase in the share was statistically significant for Japan (p=0.02, test for trend). Japan's share in nuclear medical research output is much higher than that in other biomedical fields. (author)

  18. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C. Y.; Lee, K. S.; Jeong, I.; Lee, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, recent changes of international nuclear energy policy and trends of nuclear technology R and D was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed the trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) discussed the mid and long term strategy of nuclear energy R and D. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) analyzed the trends of nuclear technology policies - Trend and prospects of the international and domestic nuclear policies - Investigation of development of small and medium sized policies - International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies (2) discussed the mid and long term strategy of nuclear energy R and D - The long term development plan for future nuclear energy system - The facilitation of technology commercialization

  19. Commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning is presented as a step in the commercialization of nuclear energy. Opportunities for technology application advances are identified. Utility planning needs are presented

  20. New nuclear technology; International developments. Review 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.; Aggeryd, I.; Hultgren, Aa.; Lundell, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1995-09-01

    A summary review of the development of new nuclear rector technology is presented in this report. Fuel cycle strategies and waste handling developments are also commented. Different plans for dismantling nuclear weapons are presented. 18 refs

  1. Medical applications of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugarte, Valentin E.

    2001-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine School Foundation, in Mendoza (Argentina) was created in 1986 by the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and is supported by the Government of the Mendoza Province, the CNEA, and the National University of Cuyo. The main activities of the school are medical diagnosis using nuclear techniques and the training of physicians and technicians in nuclear medicine. Teletherapy and brachytherapy are also performed. The use of the PET is described in some detail

  2. Pseudo-color processing in nuclear medical image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqian; Jin Yongjie

    1992-01-01

    The application of pseudo-color technology in nuclear medical image processing is discussed. It includes selection of the number of pseudo-colors, method of realizing pseudo-color transformation, function of pseudo-color transformation and operation on the function

  3. Nuclear techniques and new technology revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongxian; Qian Junlong; Yang Fujia

    1990-01-01

    As a high technique, nuclear techniques play specific roles in the new technological revolution. Technological developments have been enhanced by a number of nuclear techniques, such as industrial applications of computed tomography systems in non-destructive inspections and tests, ion implantation in electronical device manufacturing, analytial nuclear techniques in elemental and sub-surface analysis, nuclear logging in surveying energy resources and radiation processing in developing new polymeric materials

  4. Nuclear energy technology transfer: the security barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The problems presented by security considerations to the transfer of nuclear energy technology are examined. In the case of fusion, the national security barrier associated with the laser and E-beam approaches is discussed; for fission, the international security requirements, due to the possibility of the theft or diversion of special nuclear materials or sabotage of nuclear facilities, are highlighted. The paper outlines the nuclear fuel cycle and terrorist threat, examples of security barriers, and the current approaches to transferring technology. (auth)

  5. Non-nuclear power application of nuclear technology in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I.I.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Technology applications are found in Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Environment, Education and Research.There are more potentials for the deployment of nuclear technology in more aspects of our life with needed economic development in Nigeria.Nuclear Technology plays and would continue to play vital role in Agriculture, Human health, Water resources and industry in Nigeria.Nuclear technologies have been useful in developmental efforts worldwide and for these to take hold, capacity building programmes must be expanded and the general public must have informed opinions about the benefits and risk associated with the technologies.This presentation gives an overview of nuclear technology applications in Nigeria in the following areas: Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Education and Research

  6. Development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Kang, Young Hwan; Jung, Jin Gone; Hwang, Won; Park, Zoo Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Il Gone

    1987-04-01

    The objectives of the project are mainly to develope both design and manufacturing technologies for 600 MWe-CANDU-PHWR-type high burnup nuclear fuel, and secondly to build up the foundation of PWR high burnup nuclear fuel technology on the basis of KAERI technology localized upon the standard 600 MWe-CANDU- PHWR nuclear fuel. So, as in the first stage, the goal of the program in the last one year was set up mainly to establish the concept of the nuclear fuel pellet design and manufacturing. The economic incentives for high burnup nuclear fuel technology development are improvement of fuel utilization, backend costs plant operation, etc. Forming the most important incentives of fuel cycle costs reduction and improvement of power operation, etc., the development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology and also the research on the incore fuel management and safety and technologies are necessary in this country

  7. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Yang, M. H.

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, changes of international nuclear energy policy environment and trends of nuclear technology development was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy environment surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) themes to analyze trends of nuclear policies: nuclear Renaissance and forecast for nuclear power plant, International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies in GIF, INPRO and I-NERI, The present situation and outlook for world uranium market (2) themes to develop of nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies: The mid-term strategy plan of the KAERI, The technological innovation case of the KAERI

  8. A Study on the Nuclear Technology Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Yang, M. H. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The objective of the study was to make policy-proposes for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of national nuclear technology development programs. To do this, changes of international nuclear energy policy environment and trends of nuclear technology development was surveyed and analyzed. In the viewpoint of analysis of the changes in the global policy environment surrounding nuclear technology development and development of national nuclear R and D strategy, this study (1) analyzed trends of nuclear technology policies and (2) developed the nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies. To put it in more detail, each subject was further explored as follows; (1) themes to analyze trends of nuclear policies: nuclear Renaissance and forecast for nuclear power plant, International collaboration for advanced nuclear technologies in GIF, INPRO and I-NERI, The present situation and outlook for world uranium market (2) themes to develop of nuclear energy R and D innovation strategies: The mid-term strategy plan of the KAERI, The technological innovation case of the KAERI.

  9. Physics and technology of nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ursu, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Physics and Technology of Nuclear Materials presents basic information regarding the structure, properties, processing methods, and response to irradiation of the key materials that fission and fusion nuclear reactors have to rely upon. Organized into 12 chapters, this book begins with selectively several fundamentals of nuclear physics. Subsequent chapters focus on the nuclear materials science; nuclear fuel; structural materials; moderator materials employed to """"slow down"""" fission neutrons; and neutron highly absorbent materials that serve in reactor's power control. Other chapters exp

  10. Membrane processes in nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of radioactive wastes is necessary taking into account the potential hazard of radioactive substances to human health and surrounding environment. The choice of appropriate technology depends on capital and operational costs, wastes amount and their characteristics, appointed targets of the process, e.g. the values of decontamination factors and volume reduction coefficients. The conventional technologies applied for radioactive waste processing, such as precipitation coupled with sedimentation, ion exchange and evaporation have many drawbacks. These include high energy consumption and formation of secondary wastes, e.g. the sludge from sediment tanks, spent ion exchange adsorbents and regeneration solutions. There are also many limitations of such processes, i.e. foaming and drop entrainment in evaporators, loses of solvents and production of secondary wastes in solvent extraction or bed clogging in ion exchange columns. Membrane processes as the newest achievement of the process engineering can successfully supersede many non-effective, out-of-date methods. But in some instances they can also complement these methods whilst improving the parameters of effluents and purification economy. This monograph presents own research data on the application of recent achievements in the area of membrane processes for solving selected problems in nuclear technology. Relatively big space was devoted to the use of membrane processing of low and intermediate radioactive liquid wastes because of numerous applications of these processes in nuclear centres over the world and also because of the interests of the author that was reflected by her recent research projects and activity. This work presents a review on the membrane methods recently introduced into the nuclear technology against the background of the other, commonly applied separation techniques, with indications of the possibilities and prospects for their further developments. Particular attention was paid

  11. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  12. Korean experiences on nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Yang, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the outstanding performance of the indigenous development program of nuclear power technology such as the design and fabrication of both CANDU and PWR fuel and in the design and construction of nuclear steam supply system in Korea. The success has been accomplished through the successful technology transfer from foreign suppliers and efficient utilization of R and D manpower in the design and engineering of nuclear power projects. In order to implement the technology transfer successfully, the joint design concept has been introduced along with effective on-the-job training and the transfer of design documents and computer codes. Korea's successful development of nuclear power program has resulted in rapid expansion of nuclear power generation capacity in a short time, and the nuclear power has contributed to the national economy through lowering electricity price by about 50 % as well as stabilizing electricity supply in 1980s. The nuclear power is expected to play a key role in the future electricity supply in Korea. Now Korea is under way of taking a step toward advanced nuclear technology. The national electricity system expansion plan includes 18 more units of NPPs to be constructed by the year 2006. In this circumstance, the country has fixed the national long-term nuclear R and D program (lgg2-2001) to enhance the national capability of nuclear technology. This paper also briefly describes future prospects of nuclear technology development program in Korea

  13. Production Situation and Technology Prospect of Medical Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Feng;LIN Li;LIU Yu-hao;MA Xing-jun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotope production technology was overviewed, including traditional and newest technology. The current situation of medical isotope production was introduced. The problems faced by isotope supply and demand were analyzed. The future development trend of medical isotopes and technology prospect were put forward. As the most populous country, nuclear medicine develops rapidly, however, domestic isotope mainly relies on imports. The highly productive and relatively safe MIPR is expected to be an effective way to breakthrough the bottleneck of the development of nuclear medicine. Traditional isotope production technologies with reactor can be improved. It's urgent to research and promote new isotope production technologies with reactor. Those technologies which do not depend on reactor will have a bright market prospects.

  14. Application of nuclear physics in medical physics and nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear physics has a long history of influencing and advancing medical fields. At TRIUMF we use the applications of nuclear physics to diagnose several diseases via medical isotopes and treat cancer by using proton beams. The Life Science division has a long history of producing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes but we are also investigating the production of SPECT and PET isotopes with a potential shortage for clinical operation or otherwise limited access to chemists, biologists and medical researchers. New targets are being developed, aided by a simulation platform investigating the processes inside a target under proton irradiation - nuclear, thermodynamic, and chemical. Simulations also aid in the development of new beam-shaping devices for TRIUMF's Proton Therapy facility, Canada's only proton therapy facility, as well as new treatment testing systems. Both promise improved treatment delivery for cancer patients.

  15. A study on the nuclear technology policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Maeng Ho; Eom, T. Y.; Ham, C. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Lee, B. O.; Yun, S. W.

    1997-01-01

    Work scopes and major contents carried out by nuclear technology policy analysis project in 1996, are as follows: First, reviews and provisions of recommendations for the revision draft of Atomic Energy Act, the national long-tem plan of use and development of nuclear technologies forward the 21st century, and KAERI vision for the next 10 years have been undertaken as parts of division`s role to support the implementation and set-up of national nuclear policy. Second, the trends of nuclear policy, research and development activities of nuclear institutes and the nuclear industries of the major advanced countries, were analyzed. Nuclear development trends in the East-Asia region emerging as a new nuclear market in the near future, were also analyzed including China. Finally, as the research works for the development of nuclear technology policy, a comparative analyses of the forecasted future nuclear technologies of nuclear advanced countries and a study for the improvement of spin-off effectiveness of nuclear research and development activities were undertaken respectively. (author). 19 refs., 29 tabs., 19 figs.

  16. Nuclear technology for the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen papers and abstracts are presented under the following session headings: space nuclear power, health physics and dosimetry, nuclear design and thermal hydraulics, nuclear diagnostics, and fusion technology and plasma physics. The papers were processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  17. The nuclear materials control technology briefing book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

  18. Annual meeting on nuclear technology 2011. Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The program of annual meeting on nuclear technology 2011 included plenary sessions, topical sessions, a workshop and technical sessions. The topical sessions covered the following topics: the final waste disposal, from scientific basis to application; nuclear competence in Germany and Europe; sodium cooled fast reactors; characteristics of a high reliability organization (HRO) considering experience gained from events at nuclear power stations; CFD simulations for safety related tasks. The workshop concerned the issue preserving competence in nuclear technology. The technical sessions covered the following issues: reactor physics and methods of calculations; Thermo- and fluid dynamics; radioactive waste management - storage; fusion technology; safety of nuclear installations - methods, analyses, results; operation of nuclear installations; decommissioning of nuclear installations; education, expert knowledge, know-how transfer; new build and innovations; front end of the fuel cycle, fuel elements and core components, radiation protection; energy industry and economics.

  19. EPRI nuclear power plant decommissioning technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Karen S.; Bushart, Sean P.; Naughton, Michael; McGrath, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Technology Program conducts research and develops technology for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  20. Canadian Experience in Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1987-01-01

    Technology transfer has and will continue to play a major role in the development of nuclear power programs. From the early beginnings of the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear power by just a few nations in the mid-1940s there has been a considerable transfer of technology and today 34 countries have nuclear programs in various stages of development. Indeed, some of the major nuclear vendors achieves their present position through a process of technology transfer and subsequent development. Canada, one of the early leaders in the development of nuclear power, has experience with a wide range of programs bout within its own borders and with other countries. This paper briefly describes this experience and the lessons learned from Canada's involvement in the transfer of nuclear power technology. Nuclear technology is complex and diverse and yet it can be assimilated by a nation given a fire commitment of both suppliers and recipients of technology to achieve success. Canada has reaped large benefits from its nuclear program and we believe this has been instrumentally linked to the sharing of goals and opportunity for participation over extended periods of time by many interests within the Canadian infrastructure. While Canada has accumulated considerable expertise in nuclear technology transfer, we believe there is still much for US to learn. Achieving proficiency in any of the many kinds of nuclear related technologies will place a heavy burden on the financial and human resources of a nation. Care must be taken to plan carefully the total criteria which will assure national benefits in industrial and economic development. Above all, effective transfer of nuclear technology requires a long term commitment by both parties

  1. Overview of Nuclear Reactor Technologies Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Office of Nuclear Energy Roadmap R&D Objectives: • Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; • Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; • Develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; • Develop capabilities to reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism

  2. Non power applications of nuclear technology: The case of Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaumotte, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The historical review and oversight of Belgium activities in applications of nuclear technologies has been presented. Especially attention have been paid on industrial applications as sterilization of surgical tools, medical supplies, drugs, food; radiation induced polymerization and composite materials production; nondestructive testing and application of sealed sources in industry. The detailed review has been done on nuclear medicine development in Belgium covering the range of therapeutic applications as well as diagnostic techniques

  3. Medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaohua; Nie Suifeng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear or radiologic emergencies are defined as incidents that are caused by radioactive substance or by other sources of radiation and can pose a serious hazard to public health. In case of nuclear or radiologic emergencies, radioactive rays will damage the human body and bring about psychological and mental stress, resulting in a series of social psychological effects. The key to medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies is to take effective measures which can minimize the body harm resulting from nuclear or radiologic emergencies and maintain social stability. This article reviews the personnel protection, on-the-spot salvage, treatments of various harm, and prevention of public psychological effect following nuclear or radiologic emergencies. (authors)

  4. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Masahiko

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 9 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book discusses the safe and beneficial development of land-based nuclear power plants.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the possible consequences of a large-scale release of radioactivity from a nuclear reactor in the event of a serious accident. This text then discusses the extension of conventional perturbation techniques to multidimensional systems and to high-order approximations of the Boltzmann equation.

  6. JAERI Nuclear Engineering School and technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Kawaguchi, Chiyoji

    1978-01-01

    A method is introduced to evaluate the degree of nuclear technology transfer; that is, the output powers of Japanese nuclear reactors constructed in these 20 years are chronologically plotted in a semi-log figure. All reactors plotted are classified into imported and domestic ones according to a value of domestication factor. A space between two historical trajectories of reactor construction may be interpreted as one of the measures indicating the degree of nuclear technology transfer. In connection with this method, historical change of educational and training courses in Nuclear Engineering School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is reviewed in this report. (author)

  7. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1972-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 6 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book covers a variety of topics, including nuclear steam generator, oscillations, fast reactor fuel, gas centrifuge, thermal transport system, and fuel cycle.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the high standards of technical safety for Europe's first nuclear-propelled merchant ship. This text then examines the state of knowledge concerning qualitative results on the behavior of the solutions of the nonlinear poin

  8. MSFC nuclear thermal propulsion technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swint, Shane

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on non-nuclear materials assessment, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) turbomachinery technologies, and high temperature superconducting magnetic bearing technology are presented. The objective of the materials task is to identify and evaluate candidate materials for use in NTP turbomachinery and propellant feed system applications. The objective of the turbomachinery technology task is to develop and validate advanced turbomachinery technologies at the component and turbopump assembly levels. The objective of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) task is to develop and validate advanced technology for HTS passive magnetic/hydrostatic bearing.

  9. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Evans, W.; MacEwan, J.R.; Melvin, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  10. Nuclear fuel technology - Administrative criteria related to nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    An effective nuclear criticality-safety programme includes cooperation among management, supervision, and the nuclear criticality-safety staff and, for each employee, relies upon conformance with operating procedures. Although the extent and complexity of safety-related activities may vary greatly with the size and type of operation with fissile material, certain safety elements are common. This International Standard represents a codification of such elements related to nuclear criticality safety. General guidance for nuclear criticality safety may be found in ISO 1709. The responsibilities of management, supervision, and the nuclear criticality-safety staff are addressed. The Objectives and characteristics of operating and emergency procedures are included in this International Standard. ISO 14943 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear fuel technology

  11. Nuclear technology in Germany in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    On 28-29 January 1993, the Nuclear Safety Department of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection in co-operation with the Office of the Nuclear Safety Standards Commission organized a winter seminar on 'Nuclear technology in the Federal Republic in 1993 - tasks, problems, perspectives from the point of view of those concerned'. Main topics were the practical aspects of nuclear safety regulations and the application of the nuclear safety rules. This volume includes the welcome and opening addresses and the 12 papers presented; the views expressed remain, however the responsibility of the named authors and are not necessarily those of the editor. (orig.) [de

  12. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 1 provides an authoritative, complete, coherent, and critical review of the nuclear industry. This book covers a variety of topics, including nuclear power stations, graft polymerization, diffusion in uranium alloys, and conventional power plants.Organized into seven chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the three stages of the operation of a power plant, either nuclear or conventionally fueled. This text then examines the major problems that face the successful development of commercial nuclear power plants. Other chapters consider

  13. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J., E-mail: Tony.Maselli@Invensys.com [Invensys Operations Management, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  14. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  15. An Effective Method For Nuclear Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jan Pung

    1987-01-01

    Three basic entities involved in the implementation of nuclear projects are the Owner, Regulatory Authority and Nuclear Industry. Their ultimate objective is to secure the safe, reliable and economical nuclear energy. For s successful nuclear power program, the owner should maintain a good relationship with the other entities and pursue an optimization of the objectives. On the other hand, he should manage projects along the well - planned paths in order to effectively learn the nuclear technology. One of the problems in the nuclear projects of developing countries was the absence of long - term technology development program, a limited local participation and the technical incapability. For the effective technology transfer, a motivation of the technology supplier and a readiness of the recipient to accommodate such technologies are required. Advanced technology is usually developed at considerable expense with the expectation that the developer will use it in furthering his own business. Therefore, he tends to be reluctant to transfer it to the others, particularly, to the potential competitors. There is a disinclination against further technology transfer beyond the minimum contractual obligation or the requirements by Government Regulatory. So, an additional commercial incentive must be provided to the developer

  16. Medical technology in India: Tracing policy approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Indira

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices and equipment have become an indispensable part of modern medical practice. Yet these medical technologies receive scant attention in the Indian context, both at the health policy level and as an area of study. There has been little attempt to systematically address the issue of equipment based medical technologies and how to regulate their use. There is paucity of primary data on the kind of medical equipment and techniques being introduced, on their need and relative usefulness, reliability, patterns of utilization, on their production, procurement, distribution, costs, and accessibility. This article reviews some of the policy issues relating to equipment based medical technology in India, in light of the specific choices and policies made during and after the colonial period in favour of modern medicine and a technology-based public health system, attempts at self-sufficiency and the current international environment with respect to the medical equipment and health-care industry.

  17. Russian youth for nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiboulia, A.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear industry has a half-century of history, but its development today depends on the young scientists and specialists, who have decided to devote themselves to work in this area. Unfavorable public opinion and insufficient support from state authorities in the last years have led to the fact that the professions of nuclear specialty have become less popular. Nuclear professionals leave their field in search of more lucrative jobs. Therefore, the real problem today is how to attract the youth to the industry and transfer the industry's years of accrued experience to the youth. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear technology and the export control laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munroe, J.L.; Pankratz, M.C.; Hogsett, V.H.; Lundy, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three basic US laws regulate the export of commodities, services, and technical data. People working in nuclear fields need to know of these laws and their impact on professional endeavors. Export of technical data means the communication of any information by oral, written, or any other means to foreign nationals within or outside the US. The medium for the communication may be a model, blueprint, sketch, or any other device that can convey information. If the data relates to items on one of the control lists, a license must be sought from the appropriated federal agency. The Militarily Critical Technologies List (MCTL), though not itself a control list, plays a major role in determining what technical data will require a validated license. The US Department of Energy (DOE), through Technical Working Gorup (TWG) 11, is responsible for the Nuclear Technology chapter of the MCTL. TWG 11 also prepares the Nuclear Technology Reference Book (NTRB), a classified guide to sensitive nuclear technology

  19. Nuclear technology and human civilization in interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This lecture was held by E. Broda during a series of lectures “Wiener Internationale Hochschulkurse”, organized by the University of Vienna in 1979. The lecture is about nuclear technology and human civilization in interplay. (nowak)

  20. China's nuclear technology for economy growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yanxiao

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of nuclear technology to practical applications in energy, agriculture, food, industries and others has made important contributions to the prosperity of the national economy and the improvement of living standard of Chinese people in the past 40 years. Facing the great challenges in upcoming years, sustained efforts are needed to promote industrialization, commercialization and internationalization of nuclear technology. Rapid economic growth is providing the golden opportunities for the development of nuclear technology in China. With the trends to globalization of economic development, civilian applications of nuclear technology will have to be involved in international co-operation and competitive world markets to narrow the gap between China and other developed countries in the world in the next century. (author)

  1. Nuclear Science and Technology in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Hlaing

    2001-01-01

    This article is about the Establishment of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) and its historical background. The department is organized under the Ministry of Science and Technology. It is the only national nuclear institution in Myanmar

  2. Nuclear energy technology: theory and practice of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Nuclear Energy Technology: Theory and Practice of Commercial Nuclear Power by Ronald Allen Knief, whose contents include an overview of the basic concepts of reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle; the basics of nuclear physics; reactor theory; heat removal; economics; current concerns at the front and back ends of the fuel cycle; design descriptions of domestic and foreign reactor systems; reactor safety and safeguards; Three Mile Island; and a brief overview of the basic concepts of nuclear fusion. Both magnetic and inertial confinement techniques are clearly outlined. Also reviews Nuclear Fuel Management by Harry W. Graves, Jr., consisting of introductory subjects (e.g. front end of fuel cycle); core physics methodology required for fuel depletion calculations; power capability evaluation (analyzes physical parameters that limit potential core power density); and fuel management topics (economics, loading arrangements and core operation strategies)

  3. Wireless Technology Application to Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Kweon; Jeong, See Chae; Jeong, Ki Hoon; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Jae Hack

    2009-01-01

    Wireless technologies are getting widely used in various industrial processes for equipment condition monitoring, process measurement and other applications. In case of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), it is required to review applicability of the wireless technologies for maintaining plant reliability, preventing equipment failure, and reducing operation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors, mobile technology and two-way radio communication may satisfy these needs. The application of the state of the art wireless technologies in NPPs has been restricted because of the vulnerability for the Electromagnetic Interference and Radio Frequency Interference (EMI/RFI) and cyber security. It is expected that the wireless technologies can be applied to the nuclear industry after resolving these issues which most of the developers and vendors are aware of. This paper presents an overview and information on general wireless deployment in nuclear facilities for future application. It also introduces typical wireless plant monitoring system application in the existing NPPs

  4. Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Moyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often unexpected ways in which medical technologies are appropriated by diverse actors in homes, clinics and communities. The authors highlight key

  5. Effective Methods of Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shave, D. F.; Kent, G. F.; Giambusso, A.

    1987-01-01

    An effective technology transfer program is a necessary and significant step towards independence in nuclear power technology. Attaining success in the conduct of such a program is a result of a) the donor and recipient jointly understanding the fundamental concepts of the learning process, b) sharing a mutual philosophy involving a partnership relationship, c) joint and careful planning, d) rigorous adherence to proven project management techniques, and e) presence of adequate feedback to assure continuing success as the program proceeds. Several years ago, KEPCO President Park, Jung-KI presented a paper on technology in which he stated, 'Nuclear technology is an integration of many unit disciplines, and thus requires extensive investment and training in order to establish the base for efficient absorption of transferred technology.' This paper addresses President Park's observations by discussing the philosophy, approach, and mechanisms that are necessary to support an efficient and effective process of nuclear power technology transfer. All technical content and presentation methods discussed are based on a technology transfer program developed by Stone and Webster, as an Engineer/Constructor for nuclear power plants, and are designed and implemented to promote the primary program goal - the ability of the trainees and the organization to perform specific nuclear power related multi-discipline function independently and competitively

  6. Nuclear power economics and technology: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Intended for the non-specialist reader interested in energy and environmental policy matters, this report presents an overview of the current expert consensus on the status of nuclear power technology and its economic position. It covers the potential demand for nuclear energy, its economic competitivity, and the relevant aspects of reactor performance and future technological developments. The report provides an objective contribution to the ongoing scientific and political debate about what nuclear power can offer, now and in the future, in meeting the world's growing demand for energy and in achieving sustainable economic development. 24 refs., 18 figs;, 12 tabs., 5 photos

  7. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 7 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book discusses the safe and beneficial development of land-based nuclear power plants.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of irradiation-induced void swelling in austenitic stainless steels. This text then examines the importance of various transport processes for fission product redistribution, which depends on the diffusion data, the vaporization properties, and the solubility in the fuel matrix. Other chapters co

  8. A study on nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, I.

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of institutional activities of KAERI, and the objective of the study is to survey and analyze the change of international environment in nuclear use and research and development environment, and to propose systematic alternatives on technology policy for efficiency and effectiveness of research and development through national R and D program while timely responding to the environmental change in local and global sense. Acknowledging the importance of the relationship between the external environment and the national nuclear R and D strategic planning, this study focused on the two major subjects: (1) the international environmental and technological change attached to the development of nuclear power; (2) the direction and strategy of nuclear R and D to improve effectiveness through national R and D programs as role of electricity in the future society, strategic environment of nuclear use and R and D in the future society, energy environment and nuclear technology development scenario in the future, strategic study on future vision of KAERI and technological road-mapping of national nuclear R and D for enhancing competitiveness

  9. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  10. Technology transfer in the Spanish nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Naredo, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes the process of technology transfer under the Spanish nuclear programme and its three generations of nuclear power plants during the last 20 years, with special reference to the nine new plants equipped with Westinghouse pressurized water reactors and the rising level of national involvement in these stations. It deals with the development of Westinghouse Nuclear's organization in Spain, referring to its staff and to the manufacturers who supply equipment for the programme, going into particular detail where problems of quality assurance are concerned. In conclusion, it summarizes the present capacity of Spanish industry in various areas connected with the design, manufacture and construction of nuclear power plants. (author)

  11. Technology transfer from nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A number of processes, components and instruments developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, (BARC), Bombay, find application in industry and are available for transfer to private or public sector undertakings for commercial exploitation. The Technology Transfer Group (TTG) constituted in January 1980 identifies such processes and prototypes which can be made available for transfer. This catalogue contains brief descriptions of such technologies and they are arranged under three groups, namely, Group A containing descriptions of technologies already transferred, Group B containing descriptions of technologies ready for transfer and Group C containing descriptions of technology transfer proposals being processed. The position in the above-mentioned groups is as on 1 March 1989. The BARC has also set up a Technology Corner where laboratory models and prototypes of instruments, equipment and components are displayed. These are described in the second part of the catalogue. (M.G.B.)

  12. Modelling in Medical Technology Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Michel (Bowine)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractHealth care is a rapidly developing field in which new technologies are introduced continuously. Not all new technologies have the same impact however: most represent only small changes in existing technologies, whereas only a few - like organ transplants - really are revolutionary new

  13. Handbook of medical and healthcare technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2013-01-01

    This book equips readers to understand a complex range of healthcare products that are used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases or medical conditions affecting humans. The first part of the book presents medical technologies such as medical information retrieval, tissue engineering techniques, 3D medical imaging, nanotechnology innovations in medicine, medical wireless sensor networks, and knowledge mining techniques in medicine. The second half of the book focuses on healthcare technologies including prediction hospital readmission risk, modeling e-health framework, personal Web in healt

  14. A study on nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Kim, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out as a part of institutional activities of KAERI. Major research area are as follows; Future directions and effects for national nuclear R and D to be resulted from restructuring of electricity industry are studied. Comparative study was carried out between nuclear energy and other energy sources from the point of views of environmental effects by introducing life cycle assessment(LCA) method. Japanese trends of reestablishment of nuclear policy such as restructuring of nuclear administration system and long-term plan of development and use of nuclear energy are also investigated, and Russian nuclear development program and Germany trends for phase-out of nuclear electricity generation are also investigated. And trends of the demand and supply of energy in eastern asian countries in from the point of view of energy security and tension in the south china sea are analyzed and investigation of policy trends of Vietnam and Egypt for the development and use of nuclear energy for the promotion of nuclear cooperation with these countries are also carried out. Due to the lack of energy resources and high dependence of imported energy, higher priority should be placed on the use of localized energy supply technology such as nuclear power. In this connection, technological development should be strengthened positively in order to improve economy and safety of nuclear energy and proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycle and wide ranged use of radiation and radioisotopes and should be reflected in re-establishment of national comprehensive promotion plan of nuclear energy in progress

  15. Medical students' online learning technology needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Nelson, Erica; Wetter, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated medical students' online learning technology needs at a medical school. The study aimed to provide evidence-based guidance for technology selection and online learning design in medical education. The authors developed a 120-item survey in collaboration with the New Technology in Medical Education (NTIME) committee at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM). Overall, 123 of 290 medical students (42%) at the medical school participated in the survey. The survey focused on five major areas: students' hardware and software use; perception of educational technology (ET) in general; online behaviours; perception of ET use at the school; and demographic information. Students perceived multimedia tools, scheduling tools, communication tools, collaborative authoring tools, learning management systems and electronic health records useful educational technologies for their learning. They did not consider social networking tools useful for their learning, despite their frequent use. Third-year students were less satisfied with current technology integration in the curriculum, information sharing and collaborative learning than other years. Students in clerkships perceived mobile devices as useful for their learning. Students using a mobile device (i.e. a smartphone) go online, text message, visit social networking sites and are online during classes more frequently than non-users. Medical students' ET needs differ between preclinical and clinical years. Technology supporting ubiquitous mobile learning and health information technology (HIT) systems at hospitals and out-patient clinics can be integrated into clerkship curricula. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nonproliferation criteria for assessing civilian nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowen, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    Two trends are affecting the spread of nuclear weapons. One is the growing access to readily fissionable materials as a by-product of the spread of civilian nuclear technology. The second is the fact that many countries acquiring easier access also have an increased incentive to acquire nuclear explosives, or at least to shorten the lead time to them. Nonproliferation strategies might seek to influence the demand for nuclear explosives through improved alliance ties, regional security associations, and nuclear free zones, as well as the ease of access to explosives through agreement on increasing the difficulty of each access through changes in international agreements on technologies, or through a mix of such measures. The discussion focuses on a supply-oriented strategy, not because such a strategy by itself is likely to be optimal, but because it would be a significant component of a broad strategy, and it is the one that has been central to the nonproliferation efforts of the United States in the past several years. A supply-oriented strategy could have two components: 1. A set of incentives for choosing less dangerous nuclear systems instead of more dangerous ones (and in some cases the choosing of non-nuclear rather than nuclear technologies); 2. A set of political agreements restricting especially dangerous systems or components of systems. For such a strategy to have a prospect of being effective, it should encompass all the paths to a bomb from a legitimate safeguarded state. Specifically, it should include: 1. Paths starting from large plutonium reactors, including those labeled research reactors; 2. Isotope separation technologies; 3. Power-reactors-related paths, based on using either a. Material available at the front end, or b. Material available at the back end; and 4 Various possible future technologies, such as accelerator breeders or fusion-fission technology. Some illustrative cases are discussed

  17. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  18. Nuclear technology for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Introduces three of the IAEA's current programmes: Promoting food security - use of the sterile insect technique to eradicate the tsetse fly in Sub-Saharan Africa; Managing water resources - use of isotope hydrology to check water for traces of arsenic in Bangladesh; Improving human health - use of nuclear techniques for diagnosis, imaging and cancer treatment in developing countries

  19. Dissemination of opportunities in nuclear science and technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcocer Gomez, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, activities in the fields of nuclear science are increasing in Mexico. Notwithstanding the existence of just one nuclear power plant in the country, the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station, young people (ages from 18 to 25) show a significant interest in areas such as environmental protection, nuclear safety, nuclear regulation, food irradiation, materials science, medical and industrial uses of ionising radiation, but this interest is heterogeneous and poorly grounded. Several schools provide formation of professionals in Physics, Chemistry, and Engineering. On the other hand, there are research institutes dedicated to specialized industrial activities which provide post-graduate courses and specific training in nuclear technology and related fields, and in radiation protection. However, there is a lack of a proper bond between schools and research institutes, and young people. Must of the students without a career orientation simply make their choice considering geographic and economic aspects. This kind of student is the focus of our interest in constructing the required proper bond between young people and nuclear technology. This paper evaluates the concept of a fair-festival event, and examines the possibility of it's use to promote the nuclear field in Mexico. Other current dissemination activities are considered too. (author)

  20. Nuclear technology review 2003 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    Worldwide there were 441 nuclear power plants (NPPs) operating at the end of 2002.These supplied 16% of global electricity generation in 2002, down slightly from 16.2% in 2001.1 Table 1 summarizes world nuclear experience as of the end of 2002. The global energy availability factor for NPPs rose to 83.4% in 2001, from 82.1% in 2000 and 74.2% in 1991. In 2002, upratings calculated from data on the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) totalled approximately 672 MW(e), of which the United States of America accounted for 574 MW(e) and the United Kingdom accounted for 98 MW(e).The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expects applications for 2270 MW(e) worth of upratings over the next five years. Six new NPPs were connected to the grid in 2000, three in 2001, and six in 2002. There were three retirements in 2000: Chernobyl-3 in Ukraine and two units at Hinkley Point A in the United Kingdom.There were no retirements in 2001 and four in 2002:Kozloduy-1 and -2 in Bulgaria and Bradwell units A and B in the UK. In 2002, construction started on seven new NPPs: six in India and one in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. This issue covers the following topics: Medium-Term Projections; Sustainable Development; Resources And Fuel; Decommissioning; Advanced Designs; Research Reactors; Waste From Non-Power Applications; Nuclear Knowledge; Matters Of Interest To The IAEA Arising From The World Summit On Sustainable Development; International Project On Innovative Nuclear Reactors And Fuel Cycles (INPRO); Knowledge Management; Key Commitments, Targets And Timetables From The Johannesburg Plan Of Implementation; Management Of The Natural Resource Base

  1. Development of Nuclear Analytical Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Joon; Kim, J. Y.; Sohn, S. C. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The pre-treatment and handling techniques for the micro-particles in swipe samples were developed for the safeguards purpose. The development of screening technique for the swipe samples has been established using the nuclear fission track method as well as the alpha track method. The laser ablation system to take a nuclear particle present in swipe was designed and constructed for the determination of the enrichment factors for uranium or plutonium, and its performance was tested in atmosphere as well as in vacuum. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of silica based micro-particles were obtained for mass production. The optimum ion exchange resin was selected and the optimum conditions for the uranium adsorption in resin bead technique were established for the development of the enrichment factor for nuclear particles in swipe. The established technique was applied to the swipe taken directly from the nuclear facility and also to the archive samples of IAEA's environmental swipes. The evaluation of dose rate of neutron and secondary gamma-ray for the radiation shields were carried out to design the NIPS system, as well as the evaluation of the thermal neutron concentration effect by the various reflectors. D-D neutron generator was introduced as a neutron source for the NIPS system to have more advantages such as easier control and moderation capability than the {sup 252}Cf source. Simulated samples for explosive and chemical warfare were prepared to construct a prompt gamma-ray database. Based on the constructed database, a computer program for the detection of illicit chemical and nuclear materials was developed using the MATLAB software.

  2. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-01-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  3. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology

  5. Patient safety and technology-driven medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Keinicke Fabricius, Pia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new...... ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. AIM: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. METHODS: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. CONCLUSION: Having an unclear nursing role model...

  6. Medical support to a disabled nuclear platform at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kansal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian Navy has recently joined the select band of countries that are operating nuclear powered platforms. Despite the fact, that the present day nuclear technology is quite advanced and safe; accidents on board can still happen. An accident on board a Nuclear Platform at sea can result in ‘Radiation Exposure and Contamination’ to the crew members; which can prove catastrophic. Management of casualties on board a Nuclear platform at sea presents a formidable challenge. The distressed platform being at sea will also bring in many other operational variables like distance from shore, geographical location, weather conditions, availability of rescue assets and trained manpower etc. Consequently, there is a necessity to have a well defined ‘Medical Contingency Plan’ to deal with any such eventuality happening at sea. The successful execution of the contingency plan will depend upon close coordination among diverse authorities like local Service Hospital, Command Medical & Operational Authorities, Naval Dockyard, Radiation Safety Organisations and the Rescue/Hospital Ship crew. The need is to have a holistic review of our existing medical set up and integrate new equipment, training methodologies, operating procedures to have a credible response capability.

  7. Maintenance welding technology in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Fukuhisa

    1999-01-01

    Welding technology used for a nuclear power plant greatly differs depending on either when the plant is being constructed or when the plant is in operation. Welding used in plant construction does not much differ, in method and technology, from that used in ordinary thermal power, chemical or other plants. On the other hand, repair welding technology for the reactor section of a nuclear power plant in operation greatly differs from that used for those plants. The recent requests for the prolongation of the life of nuclear power plants have remarkably improved welding technology for maintenance and repair in the nuclear field. Thus, the existing welding technology has been improved and new advanced welding technologies have been created one after another. Problems with the reactor section and welding technology for its maintenance and repair are presented. The temper bead method and the laser beam cladding and modification method for reactor pressure vessels, SCC and irradiation-assisted SCC measures for vessel structures, and SCC measures for heat-exchange tubes and the overall replacement of a steam generator are presented. (N.H.)

  8. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.

  9. Proliferation Persuasion. Coercive Bargaining with Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, Tristan A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Why do states wait for prolonged periods of time with the technical capacity to produce nuclear weapons? Only a handful of countries have ever acquired the sensitive nuclear fuel cycle technology needed to produce fissile material for nuclear weapons. Yet the enduring trend over the last five decades is for these states to delay or forgo exercising the nuclear weapons option provided by uranium enrichment or plutonium reprocessing capabilities. I show that states pause at this threshold stage because they use nuclear technology to bargain for concessions from both allies and adversaries. But when does nuclear latency offer bargaining benefits? My central argument is that challengers must surmount a dilemma to make coercive diplomacy work: the more they threaten to proliferate, the harder it becomes to reassure others that compliance will be rewarded with nuclear restraint. I identify a range of mechanisms able to solve this credibility problem, from arms control over breakout capacity to third party mediation and confidence building measures. Since each step towards the bomb raises the costs of implementing these policies, a state hits a sweet spot when it first acquires enrichment and/or reprocessing (ENR) technology. Subsequent increases in proliferation capability generate diminishing returns at the bargaining table for two reasons: the state must go to greater lengths to make a credible nonproliferation promise, and nuclear programs exhibit considerable path dependency as they mature over time. Contrary to the conventional wisdom about power in world politics, less nuclear latency thereby yields more coercive threat advantages. I marshal new primary source evidence from archives and interviews to identify episodes in the historical record when states made clear decisions to use ENR technology as a bargaining chip, and employ this theory of proliferation persuasion to explain how Japan, North Korea, and Iran succeeded and failed to barter concessions from the

  10. [Medical and biological consequences of nuclear disasters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Lukas J A; van Dullemen, Simon; Franken, N A P Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Medical risks of radiation exaggerated; psychological risks underestimated. The discussion about atomic energy has become topical again following the nuclear accident in Fukushima. There is some argument about the gravity of medical and biological consequences of prolonged exposure to radiation. The risk of cancer following a low dose of radiation is usually estimated by linear extrapolation of the incidence of cancer among survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. The radiobiological linear-quadratic model (LQ-model) gives a more accurate description of observed data, is radiobiologically more plausible and is better supported by experimental and clinical data. On the basis of this model there is less risk of cancer being induced following radiation exposure. The gravest consequence of Chernobyl and Fukushima is not the medical and biological damage, but the psychological and economical impact on rescue workers and former inhabitants.

  11. Development of nuclear theory and computer code for the evaluation of nuclear cross-sections relevant to beam monitoring used in medical radioisotope production and fusion technology. Final report for the period 15 December 1995 - 14 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, K.

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by light charged particles in copper are of importance as monitors in medical radioisotope production. Careful evaluations are needed for the excitation functions of activation reactions in copper with protons, 4-He and 3-He from the point of view of their use as beam flux monitors in the incident energy range below 30 MeV. The method used in the present work was based on theoretical calculations and comparison with experimental data. Calculations were performed using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model and the preequilibrium hybrid model. To this end, the codes HFMOD and PREMOD developed at PINSTECH, Pakistan, were employed. Careful selection of optical model parameters, nuclear level densities as well as discrete levels was performed. Obtained were 10 excitation functions for production of radioactive isotopes on 63-Cu and 65-Cu with p, 4-He and 3-He: Protons in 3-25 MeV range, 63-Cu(p,n) 63-Zn, 63-Cu(p,2n) 62-Zn, 65-Cu(p,n) 65-Zn; Alphas in 8-27 MeV energy range, 63-Cu(a,n) 66-Ga, 63-Cu(a,2n) 65-Ga, 63-Cu(a,np) 65-Zn, 65-Cu(a,n) 68-Ga, 65-Cu(a,2n) 67-Ga; 3-He in 7-20 MeV range, 63-Cu(3He,n) 67-Ga, 65-Cu(3He,2n) 66-Ga. (author)

  12. The European fusion nuclear technology effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvas, J.

    1989-01-01

    The role of fusion technology in the European fusion development strategy is outlined. The main thrust of the present fusion technology programme is responding to development needs of the Next European Torus. A smaller, but important and growing R and D effort is dealing with problems specific to the Demonstration, or Fusion Power, Reactor. The part of the programme falling under the somewhat arbitrarily defined category of 'fusion nuclear technology' is reviewed and an outlook to future activities is given. The review includes tritium technology, blanket technology and breeder materials development, technology and materials for the protection of the first wall and of other plasma facing components, remote handling technology, and safety and environmental impact studies. A few reflections are offered on the future long-term developments in fusion technology. (orig.)

  13. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  14. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  15. Nuclear technologies for Moon and Mars exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies are essential to successful Moon and Mars exploration and settlements. Applications can take the form of nuclear propulsion for transport of crews and cargo to Mars and the Moon; surface power for habitats and base power; power for human spacecraft to Mars; shielding and life science understanding for protection against natural solar and cosmic radiations; radioisotopes for sterilization, medicine, testing, and power; and resources for the benefits of Earth. 5 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Nuclear technologies for Moon and Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies are essential to successful Moon and Mars exploration and settlements. Applications can take the form of nuclear propulsion for transport of crews and cargo to Mars and the Moon; surface power for habitats and base power; power for human spacecraft to Mars; shielding and life science understanding for protection against natural solar and cosmic radiations; radioisotopes for sterilization, medicine, testing, and power; and resources for the benefits of Earth. 5 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  18. The status of nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the present state of development concerning nuclear power technology, and the prospects of a modified future development of nuclear energy in the world are dealt with, modification being necessary on account of altered conditions in the development of the energy economy. Projections are made for the development of the fuel market taking into account the quantities and costs for the various steps of the fuel cycle. (UA) [de

  19. Promoting the acceptance of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckl, E.

    1998-01-01

    Restoring the public acceptance of nuclear technology requires optimized public relations work and an enhanced interaction among the nuclear industry and schools and universities. Thinking in contexts needs to be promoted, also in order to improve knowledge of mass flows. Specific terms often mean different things to experts and to the public. This can be corrected by careful use of language and precision in public relations work. The young generation is more openminded towards technology now than it was in the seventies and eighties. This is a point of departure in winning young people also for nuclear technology. For this to happen, science education in schools needs to be improved and the appropriate courses need to be introduced. (orig.) [de

  20. Unmet needs: relevance to medical technology innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avril D; Sproson, Lise; Wells, Oliver; Tindale, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the role of unmet needs in the innovation of new medical technologies using the National Institute for Health Research Devices for Dignity (D4D) Healthcare Technology Co-operative as a case study. It defines an unmet need, providing a spectrum of classification and discusses the benefits and the challenges of identifying unmet need and its influence on the innovation process. The process by which D4D has captured and utilized unmet needs to drive technology innovation is discussed and examples given. It concludes by arguing that, despite the challenges, defining and reviewing unmet need is a fundamental factor in the success of medical technology innovation.

  1. Qualtity assurance in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, U.

    1977-01-01

    The demand for safety in nuclear power plants is rooted in the Atomic Energy Act of the Federal Republic of Germany, under which 'preplanned safety' is a licensing condition. Moreover, the safety of nuclear power plants is outlined in more precise terms in the guidelines of the German Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (Reaktorsicherheitskommission). The usual approach taken in this country, i.e., to establish quality assurance for each specific product, with supplementary quality assurance measures geared to systems requirements being implemented by industry, has proved to work satisfactorily. Product-based quality assurance mainly stems from the classical quality control concept, whereas systems-based quality assurance primarily is to ensure that both manufacturers and systems suppliers take all measures in advance which are needed for the satisfactory processing of an order and to achieve the quality level required. The special features and the advantages of the joint action of manufacturers, systems suppliers and experts, which are characteristic of the German approach, very clearly emerge from a comparison with practices in the United States. In the further refinement of the quality assurance concept as practised in Germany, qhich will have a particularly great impact on costs and schedules because of the manpower requirement involved, it should be carefully weighed where there are exaggerations and unnecessary complications which can no longer be justified by the demand for more safety. (orig.) [de

  2. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  3. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1970-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 5 presents the underlying principles and theory, as well as the practical applications of the advances in the nuclear field. This book reviews the specialized applications to such fields as space propulsion.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the design and objective of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide fast flux irradiation testing facilities. This text then examines the problem in the design of nuclear reactors, which is the analysis of the spatial and temporal behavior of the neutron and temperature dist

  4. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Greebler, Paul

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 3 provides an authoritative, complete, coherent, and critical review of the nuclear industry. This book presents the advances in the atomic energy field.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the use of pulsed neutron sources for the determination of the thermalization and diffusion properties of moderating as well as multiplying media. This text then examines the effect of nuclear radiation on electronic circuitry and its components. Other chapters consider radiation effects in various inorganic solids, with empha

  5. Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards: Common technologies and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keepin, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards have much in common, including the basic physical phenomena and technologies involved as well as the commitments and challenges posed by expanding nuclear programs in many countries around the world. The unique characteristics of the fission process -- such as prompt and delayed neutron and gamma ray emission -- not only provide the means of sustaining and controlling the fission chain reaction, but also provide unique ''signatures'' that are essential to quantitative measurement and effective safeguarding of key nuclear materials (notably 239 Pu and 235 U) against theft, loss, or diversion. In this paper, we trace briefly the historical emergence of safeguards as an essential component of the expansion of the nuclear enterprise worldwide. We then survey the major categories of passive and active nondestructive assay techniques that are currently in use or under development for rapid, accurate measurement and verification of safe-guarded nuclear materials in the many forms in which they occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. 23 refs., 14 figs

  6. China nuclear science and technology report. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1993 (Report Numbers CNIC-00675∼CNIC-00800) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  7. Applications of nuclear technology in industry, environment and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Ruiz, H.

    1998-01-01

    This article contains information on different applications of nuclear technology, such as: sterilization of single use medical products, radiation serialization of pharmaceutical products,radiation treatment of disposable products, in Europe, radiation treatment of micro-titer plates, several crosslinking processes, radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex, irradiation of polymers to obtain dressings for burns, ulcers bedsores and skin grafts, production of ground water with accelerated electrons in combination with accelerated electrons in combination with ozone, radiation treatment of hospital wastes. (S. Grainger)

  8. Saving Harvests Through Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha; Madsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Crop diseases are one of the most challenging threats we face, affecting everyone on the planet directly or indirectly. Like so many crops, wheat — a key component for bread making — has over periods of time faced horrific destruction from diseases. One such disease, a wheat stem rust caused by a new virulent race (Ug99) can destroy whole wheat crops in a matter of days. Getting into action, the international community has strived over the years to protect crops against plant diseases. Leading in the use of nuclear techniques, the Joint FAO/IAEA Laboratories at Seibersdorf, Austria, irradiate seeds to induce biological variation from which varieties with disease resistance may be developed, thereby helping farmers as well as consumers

  9. Technology of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of the following topics treated at the meeting (invited papers and sessions): international programs (Japanese, Joint European Tokamak, Euratom non-JET, ERDA magnetic, ERDA laser, and Electric Power Research Institute programmes); non-commercial reactor designs; commercial reactor designs; radiation damage; plasma engineering; tritium and neutronics; confinement system technology; environment and safety; blanket engineering and materials testing; fusion-fission hybrid reactors

  10. Frontiers in nuclear medicine and technology. Editorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemahieu, I; Viergever, M.A.; van Rijk, P.P.; Dierckx, R.A.

    This special issue of Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics contains the full length papers of invited oral communications presented at the symposium entitled: “Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Technology” held at the Studie Centrum voor Kernenergie — Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucléaire (SCK —

  11. Information Technology and Undergraduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masys, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    Hewlett-Packard Corporation grant enabled Harvard Medical School to begin using computer technology in medical educational applications. Hardware and software selection, integration into the curriculum, teaching the use of computers, cost, successful applications, knowledge base access, simulations, video and graphics teaching programs, and…

  12. Nuclear technology for a sustainable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The IAEA helps its Member States to use nuclear technology for a broad range of applications, from generating electricity to increasing food production, from fighting cancer to managing fresh water resources and protecting the world's seas and oceans. Despite the Fukushima Daiichi accident in March 2011, nuclear power will remain an important option for many countries. Use of nuclear power will continue to grow in the next few decades, although growth will be slower than was anticipated before the accident. The factors contributing to the continuing interest in nuclear power include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. It will be difficult for the world to achieve the twin goals of ensuring sustainable energy supplies and curbing greenhouse gases without nuclear power. It is up to each country to choose its optimal energy mix. The IAEA helps countries which opt for nuclear power to use it safely and securely. Every day, millions of people throughout the world benefit from the use of nuclear technology. The IAEA helps to make these benefits available to developing countries through its extensive Technical Cooperation programme. For instance, we provide assistance in areas such as human health (through our Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy), animal health (we were active partners in the successful global campaign to eradicate the deadly cattle disease rinderpest), food, water and the environment. The IAEA contributes to the development of global policies to address the energy, food, water and environmental challenges the world faces. We look forward to helping to make Rio+20 a success. This brochure provides an overview of the many ways in which nuclear technology is contributing to building the future we want.

  13. Development of nuclear equipment qualification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heon O; Kim, Wu Hyun; Kim, Jin Wuk; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Yong Han; Jeong, Hang Keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    In order to enhance testing and evaluation technologies, which is one of the main works of the Chanwon branch of KIMM(Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials), in addition to the present work scope of the testing and evaluation in the industrial facilities such as petroleum and chemical, plants, the qualification technologies of the equipments important to safety used in the key industrial facilities such as nuclear power plants should be localized: Equipments for testing and evaluation is to be set up and the related technologies must be developed. In the first year of this study, of vibration aging qualification technologies of equipments important to safety used in nuclear power plants have been performed. (author). 27 refs., 81 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  15. Status of technology for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the area of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes the successful development and application of specific management technologies have been demonstrated over the years. The major area in which technology remains to be effectively implemented is in the management of high-level wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. Research and development specifically directed at the management of high-level radioactive wastes in the USA and other countries is briefly reviewed in the article introduced

  16. Improved Technology To Prevent Nuclear Proliferation And Counter Nuclear Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J; Yuldashev, B; Labov, S; Knapp, R

    2006-06-12

    As the world moves into the 21st century, the possibility of greater reliance on nuclear energy will impose additional technical requirements to prevent proliferation. In addition to proliferation resistant reactors, a careful examination of the various possible fuel cycles from cradle to grave will provide additional technical and nonproliferation challenges in the areas of conversion, enrichment, transportation, recycling and waste disposal. Radiation detection technology and information management have a prominent role in any future global regime for nonproliferation. As nuclear energy and hence nuclear materials become an increasingly global phenomenon, using local technologies and capabilities facilitate incorporation of enhanced monitoring and detection on the regional level. Radiation detection technologies are an important tool in the prevention of proliferation and countering radiological/nuclear terrorism. A variety of new developments have enabled enhanced performance in terms of energy resolution, spatial resolution, passive detection, predictive modeling and simulation, active interrogation, and ease of operation and deployment in the field. For example, various gamma ray imaging approaches are being explored to combine spatial resolution with background suppression in order to enhance sensitivity many-fold at reasonable standoff distances and acquisition times. New materials and approaches are being developed in order to provide adequate energy resolution in field use without the necessity for liquid nitrogen. Different detection algorithms enable fissile materials to be distinguished from other radioisotopes.

  17. Nuclear technology in pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been greatly explored for its use in various disciplines of entomology related to agriculture, medicine and industry. Since the ravages of the insects especially in the tropical and subtropical zones of the world are particularly serious, insect control is essential in the production of crop, animal produce and protection from dreadful communicable diseases. Presently, biological and para-biological control programmes are receiving major prominence due to insecticidal ill effects on health and environment, and due to development of insecticidal resistance in pests. The exposure to ionizing radiation is now the principal method for inducing reproductive sterility in mass-reared insects. Irradiation of insects is a relatively straightforward process with reliable quality control procedures. Using radiation may offer other advantages, such as insignificant increase in temperature during the process, use of treated insects immediately after processing, no addition of any residues harmful to human health or environment, etc. Various pragmatic perspectives of utilization of radiation as a tool in entomological research studies, in relation to noxious insects as well as ecologically beneficial insects, are highlighted. (author)

  18. New technologies for monitoring nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes new technologies for monitoring the continued presence of nuclear materials that are being evaluated in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to reduce the effort, cost, and employee exposures associated with conducting nuclear material inventories. These technologies also show promise for the international safeguarding of process systems and nuclear materials in storage, including spent fuels. The identified systems are based on innovative technologies that were not developed for safeguards applications. These advanced technologies include passive and active sensor systems based on optical materials, inexpensive solid-state radiation detectors, dimensional surface characterization, and digital color imagery. The passive sensor systems use specialized scintillator materials coupled to optical-fiber technologies that not only are capable of measuring radioactive emissions but also are capable of measuring or monitoring pressure, weight, temperature, and source location. Small, durable solid-state gamma-ray detection devices, whose components are estimated to cost less than $25 per unit, can be implemented in a variety of configurations and can be adapted to enhance existing monitoring systems. Variations in detector design have produced significantly different system capabilities. Dimensional surface characterization and digital color imaging are applications of developed technologies that are capable of motion detection, item surveillance, and unique identification of items

  19. Methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. In response to increased international interest in decommissioning and to the needs of Member States, the IAEA's activities in this area have increased during the past few years and will be enhanced considerably in the future. A long range programme using an integrated systems approach covering all the technical, regulatory and safety steps associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is being developed. The database resulting from this work is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe time and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. The report is a review of the current state of the art of the methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities including remote systems technology. This is the first report in the IAEA's expanded programme and was of benefit in outlining future activities. Certain aspects of the work reviewed in this report, such as the recycling of radioactive materials from decommissioning, will be examined in depth in future reports. The information presented should be useful to those responsible for or interested in planning or implementing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  20. Medical education and information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has brought many changes in medical education and practice in the last couple of decades. Teaching and learning medicine particularly has gone under profound changes due to computer technologies, and medical schools around the world have invested heavily either in new computer technologies or in the process of adapting to this technological revolution. In order to catch up with the rest of the world, developing countries need to research their options in adapting to new computer technologies. This descriptive survey study was designed to assess medical students' computer and Internet skills and their attitude toward ICT. Research findings showed that the mean score of self-perceived computer knowledge for male students in general was greater than for female students. Also, students who had participated in various prior computer workshops, had access to computer, Internet, and e-mail, and frequently checked their e-mail had higher mean of self-perceived knowledge and skill score. Finally, students with positive attitude toward ICT scored their computer knowledge higher than those who had no opinion. The results have confirmed that the medical schools, particularly in developing countries, need to bring fundamental changes such as curriculum modification in order to integrate ICT into medical education, creating essential infrastructure for ICT use in medical education and practice, and structured computer training for faculty and students.

  1. Applying Digital Technologies to Strengthen Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffeteau, S.; Roy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper describes how the development of some information technologies can further contribute to the safety of nuclear facilities and their competitiveness. After repositioning the nuclear industry engineering practices in their historical and economic context, the paper describes five engineering practices or use cases widely developed especially in the aerospace industry: requirement management, business process enforcement by digitization of data and processes, facilities configuration management, engineering information unification, and digital licensing. Information technology (IT) plays a mandatory role for driving this change since IT is now mature enough to handle the level of complexity the nuclear industry requires. While the detailed evaluation of the expecting gains in cost decrease or safety increase can be difficult to quantify, the paper presents illustrative benefits reachable by a development of these practices. (author

  2. Localization of nuclear power plant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Rudek, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Asia, and particularly China, has an enormous need for power and must deal with the practicalities of building large base load units. In China, as in other countries, there are limitations on the use of large quantities of fossil fuel. This raises the possibility of turning to nuclear power to satisfy their energy needs. Other issues tend to point to the nuclear option for these growing economies, including economic considerations, environmental concerns, energy independence and raising the technological capabilities of the country. When a country embarks on a nuclear power program with the intention of localizing the technology, a long-term commitment is necessary to achieve this objective. Localization of nuclear technology is not a new phenomenon. The nature of the industry from the early beginnings has always involved transfer of technology when a new country initiated a nuclear power construction program. In fact, most previous experiences with this localization process involved heavy governmental, political and financial support to drive the success of the program. Because of this strong governmental support, only the receiving nation's companies were generally allowed to participate in the local business operations of the technology recipient. What is new and different today is the retreat from heavy financial support by the receiving country's government. This change has created a strong emphasis on cost-effectiveness in the technology transfer process and opportunities for foreign companies to participate in local business activities. ABB is a world-wide company with two parent companies that have been very active over many years in establishing cost-justified local operations throughout the world. Today, ABB has become the largest electrical engineering company in the world with respected local operations in nearly every country. Lessons learned by ABB in their world-wide localization initiatives are being applied to the challenge of cost

  3. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested

  4. Prospective of the nuclear energy, technological tendency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz F, G. De la; Salaices A, M.

    2004-01-01

    The world's concern about the energy supply in the near future, has had as an answer diverse proposals in which two multinational initiatives are highlighted, that of the International Project on Nuclear Innovative Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and that of the Generation-l V International Forum (GIF). Both initiatives direct their efforts to the development of new technologies in nuclear energy that would satisfy the energy requirements of the future. In this article, an analysis based on a) the available information on these technologies, b) a joint study (IEA/OECD/IAEA) on the new technologies regarding its capacity to confront the current challenges of the nuclear energy, and c) the authors' experience and knowledge about the phenomenology, design and security of nuclear facilities, is presented. Moreover, the technologies that, in the authors' opinion, will have the better possibilities to compete successfully in the energy markets and could be one of the viable options to satisfy the energy demands of the future, are described. (Author)

  5. Nuclear energy for technology and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is a sad commentary on the complete lack of informed realism of the Government and people of Australia that, after thirty years of vacillation and political chicanery, nuclear technology, one of this nation's potential ''sunrise industries'' is in its death throes. Whilst our third world neighbours, in particular Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the People's Republic of China and even impoverished Bangladesh are making giant strides to develop an autonomous expertise Australia's potential has been dissipated and its opportunities for leadership and technology transfer lost. By chance this paper was written some weeks before the nuclear accident at Chernobyl (U.S.S.R.) and many years after accidents at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (U.S.A.) and the plutonium production reactor at Windscale (U.K.). None of these incidents alter the basic arguments or conclusions contained in this manuscript. (See Appendix). The year 1986 might represent the final opportunity for concerned professionals to seek to improve the quality of public education and information to end ''the war against the atom''. It will be necessary to re-motivate the public and private sector of a demoralised technology and to launch it on a road of responsible and successful expansion unshackled by beaurocratic interference. It is the purpose of this paper to examine why the first three decades of nuclear technology in Australia have been so singularly unsuccessful and to discuss a coherent and rational implementation of plans and policies for the future. (author)

  6. Future of nuclear energy technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberini, A.; Brogli, R.; Jermann, M.; Alder, H.P.; Stratton, R.W.; Troyon, F.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the present gloom surrounding the nuclear option for electricity and heat generation, there are still people in Switzerland in industry, research, banking and even politics willing and capable to think in terms of long-range projections. The basis for these projections is the belief that a well-functioning and prosperous society always needs large and reliable sources of acceptably priced energy, which must be generated with a high respect for the necessity of a clean environment. Being aware of the current low acceptance level of the nuclear option, efforts to keep this option open are directed to achieving the following goals: to maintain and improve the country's capabilities to safely operate the four existing nuclear power plants of Beznau (twin units), Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt; to keep the capability of extending the applications of nuclear energy technology. In practice, this could be in the fields of district heating, fusion, and advanced power reactors

  7. JENDL. Nuclear databases for science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    It is exactly 50 years since the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee was founded both in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan and in the former Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The committee promoted the development of Japan's own evaluated nuclear data libraries. As a result, we managed to produce a series of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Libraries (JENDLs) to be used in various fields for science and technology. The libraries are categorized into general-purpose and special-purpose ones. The general-purpose libraries have been updated periodically by considering the latest knowledge on experimental and theoretical nuclear physics that was available at the time of the updates. On the other hand, the special-purpose libraries have been issued in order to meet the needs for particular application fields. This paper reviews the research and development for those libraries. (author)

  8. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-08-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use.

  9. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use

  10. Macrosystems management approach to nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Maultsby, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The world of the 1980s will be a world of diminishing resources, shifting economic bases, rapidly changing cultural and societal structures, and an ever increasing demand for energy. A major driving function in this massive redistribution of global power is man's ability to transfer technology, including nuclear technology, to the developing nations. The major task facing policy makers in planning and managing technology transfer is to avoid the difficulties inherent in such technology exploitation, while maximizing the technical, economic, social, and cultural benefits brought about by the technology itself. But today's policy makers, using industrial-style planning, cannot adequately deal with all the complex, closely-coupled issues involved in technology transfer. Yet, policy makers within the developing nations must be capable of tackling the full spectrum of issues associated with technology transfer before committing to a particular course of action. The transfer and acceptance of complex technology would be significantly enhanced if policy makers followed a macrosystems management approach. Macrosystems management is a decision making methodology based on the techniques of macrosystems analysis. Macrosystems analysis combines the best quantitative methods in systems analysis with the best qualitative evaluations provided by multidisciplined task teams. These are focused in a project management structure to produce solution-oriented advice to the policy makers. The general relationships and management approach offered by macrosystems analysis are examined. Nowhere are the nuclear power option problems and issues more complex than in the transfer of this technology to developing nations. Although many critical variables of interest in the analysis are generic to a particular importer/exporter relationship, two specific issues that have universally impacted the nuclear power option, namely the fuel cycle, and manpower and training, are examined in the light of

  11. Development of nuclear technology transfer - Korea as a recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    Korea, as a recipient of nuclear technology transfer, has good experience of progressively building up its indigenous capability of nuclear technology through three stages of technology transfer, namely: technology transfer under the turn-key approach, component approach, and integrated technology transfer with a local prime contractor. Here, each stage of experience of technology transfer, with Korea as a recipient, is presented

  12. Strategies and technologies for nuclear materials stewardship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.; Hanson, E.M.

    1997-10-01

    A strategy for future nuclear materials management and utilization from proliferation and long-term waste perspectives is described. It is aimed at providing flexible and robust responses to foreseeable nuclear energy scenarios. The strategy also provides for a smooth transition, in terms of technology development and facility implementation, to possible future use of breeder reactor technology. The strategy incorporates features that include minimization of stocks of separated plutonium; creation of a network of secure interim, retrievable storage facilities; and development and implementation of a system of Integrated Actinide Conversion Systems (IACS) aimed at near and far-term management of plutonium and other actinides. Technologies applicable to such IACS concepts are discussed as well as a high-level approach for implementation.

  13. Strategies and technologies for nuclear materials stewardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.; Hanson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for future nuclear materials management and utilization from proliferation and long-term waste perspectives is described. It is aimed at providing flexible and robust responses to foreseeable nuclear energy scenarios. The strategy also provides for a smooth transition, in terms of technology development and facility implementation, to possible future use of breeder reactor technology. The strategy incorporates features that include minimization of stocks of separated plutonium; creation of a network of secure interim, retrievable storage facilities; and development and implementation of a system of Integrated Actinide Conversion Systems (IACS) aimed at near and far-term management of plutonium and other actinides. Technologies applicable to such IACS concepts are discussed as well as a high-level approach for implementation

  14. Status of nuclear technology education in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The National University of Mongolia (NUM) is the country's oldest, the only comprehensive university, and a leading center of science, education and culture. The NUM has twelve schools and faculties in the capital city Ulaanbaatar and three branches in provinces. The University offers the widest range of undergraduate and graduate programs in natural and social sciences and humanities. After sixty years of dynamic growth, the University has become a place of sustained innovation, a blend of scholarship and practical realism. The last ten years have been a period of reforms in the structure, financing and governance of Mongolian educational institutions. The NUM has been continuously adjusting its operations and curriculum to deal with new economic conditions, changing labour market demands and altered social aspirations. Committed to human peace, development and welfare in the increasingly globalized world, the NUM promotes equal and mutually beneficial international cooperation. It is a member of the International Association of Universities (IAU), University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific (UMAP), and Euro-Asian University Network (EAUN) and has direct co-operation agreements with more than sixty international academic and research centers in Europe, the USA and the Asia-Pacific Rim. On the threshold of the 21st century, the NUM remains a major center for fundamental and applied research as well as a university that is distinguished by the quality of its teaching. Following its values and traditions, the University strives to be an innovative and dynamic learning community. Requirements for Program Majored in Nuclear Technology: Profession major purpose: The objective is to provide knowledge and skills to use nuclear physics' methodology and nuclear radiation for education, science, health protection, agriculture, geology, mining, nature protection, energy and etc industries. The graduates of this major will become engineer technology staff and researchers in

  15. Science and nuclear technology communication in Cordoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Hugo R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the communication activities conducted nuclear science and technology in 2012 in the scientific, educational and tourist areas of Cordoba. The first is the Promotion of the realization of scientific research school works to present in science and technology fairs. The public exhibitions fairs consist of projects conducted by students from all levels of the education system. To do this, students have the guidance of Advisory Teachers, researchers and technologists of the local scientific community, which involves training them for a period of approximately six months. During this year the courses were conducted in 37 cities in the interior province, which are the sites of Regional Headquarters, which included the promotion of the realization of school scientific research on the peaceful applications of nuclear technology and / or national nuclear activities. During the meetings, made presentations basing pedagogical and didactic aspects to coordination between teaching of conceptual content and activities practical introduction to nuclear scientific methodology. As a result of this initiative, between the months of June and September was reached more than 3,000 teachers, using the infrastructure of the Ministry of Science and Technology and Internet. As a result, a dozen schools have begun to seek assistance to develop projects related to nuclear power. Other activities under the name of Scientific School Research Incursion through Experiences with Natural Radiation, consisted of the design and realization of simple laboratory experiences in laboratory's schools. The objective was to strengthen the curriculum and promote critical thinking about the risks and benefits of nuclear technologies in relation to exposure to ionizing radiation involving them. As a result it has been observed that these activities contribute to a progressive scientific and technological literacy of students, who build original knowledge for themselves and develop

  16. Advances in medical diagnostic technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Khin Wee; Mohamad Salim, Maheza Irna; Ong, Sang-Bing; Utama, Nugraha Priya; Myint, Yin Mon; Mohd Noor, Norliza; Supriyanto, Eko

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the most recent findings and knowledge in advanced diagnostics technology, covering a wide spectrum including brain activity analysis, breast and lung cancer detection, echocardiography, computer aided skeletal assessment to mitochondrial biology imaging at the cellular level. The authors explored magneto acoustic approaches and tissue elasticity imaging for the purpose of breast cancer detection. Perspectives in fetal echocardiography from an image processing angle are included. Diagnostic imaging in the field of mitochondrial diseases as well as the use of Computer-Aided System (CAD) are also discussed in the book. This book will be useful for students, lecturers or professional researchers in the field of biomedical sciences and image processing.

  17. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  18. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  19. Frontier of Advanced Accelerator Applications and Medical Treatments Using Nuclear Techniques. Abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenges of research-based practice, developing advanced accelerator applications, and medical treatments using nuclear tecniqoes, researchers from Rajamakala University of Technology Lanna, Office of Atoms for Peace, and Chiang Mai University have joined in hosting this conference. Nuclear medicine, amedical specialty, diagnoses and treats diseases in a safe and painless way. Nuclear techniques can determine medical information that may otherwise be unavailable, require surgery, or necessitate more expensive and invasive diagnostic tests. Advance in nuclear techniques also offer the potential to detect abnormalities at earlier stages, leasding to earlier treatment and a more successful prognosis.

  20. NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Doherty, Michael P.; Peecook, Keith M.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed.

  1. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  2. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2017-10-15

    On the 19{sup th} workshop ''Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology'' 17 young scientists presented the results from their thesis work for a diploma, mastership or a PhD covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation for the nuclear technology and the significant support by the involved German institutions. The jury awarded Thomas Schaefer (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf) with the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2017.

  3. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1975-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 8 discusses the development of nuclear power in several countries throughout the world. This book discusses the world's largest program of land-based electricity production in the United States.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the phenomenon of quasi-exponential behavior by examining two mathematical models of the neutron field. This text then discusses the finite element method, which is a method for obtaining approximate solutions to integral or differential equations. Other chapters consider the status of

  4. Planning a revolution in nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Approaching the marketing and deployment of small, inherently safe reactors from the standpoint of the legal and financial community, the author suggests various ideal planning criteria that should be adhered to by designers and suppliers in order for the new plants to achieve political and financial acceptability. Although new nuclear technology based on those criteria promise to rekindle the prospects for nuclear fission, neither governments nor suppliers are likely to undertake the requisite investments. Rather, the author proposes a private development initiative between the political community, private investors, and would-be suppliers. (author)

  5. The German competence network on nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Fritz, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The present German energy policy is based on the phase-out of nuclear electricity generation, which means that the last of the currently operating eighteen German nuclear power plants will run until about 2022. While the plants will be shut down one after the other, decommissioning will start together with interim storage of the radioactive waste. The safe waste disposal in a final repository is planned to start around 2030 and may take another two decades, i.e., in Germany nuclear competence is further needed, at least until the mid of this century. Against this background, a high-ranking commission under the direction of the Federal Ministry of Economy and Technology evaluated the publicly funded nuclear safety related research and development (R and D) activities in Germany. One of the recommendations made by the commission was the foundation of a Competence Network on Nuclear Technology for an optimum coordination of the remaining nuclear activities including aspects of future human resources in this area. This Network was established in March 2000 with the following member institutions: Research Centre Juelich, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Research Centre Rossendorf and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) in Munich and their neighbouring Technical Universities. The strategic objectives of the Competence Network include: Trend investigations on job development and on university education capacities in the nuclear technology sector; Enhanced cooperation of the Research Centres with universities in the nuclear field and support of international education initiatives (e.g. ENEN, WNU); Coordination and bundling of the activities in publicly funded reactor safety and waste management R and D programmes; Support of qualified young scientists and engineers (pre-doctoral students) - also by third-party funds; Participation in and collaboration with international projects and activities for advancements of international nuclear safety

  6. Nuclear science and technology: applications for the welfare of mankind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    A short review of used nuclear techniques in the practice is given. Nuclear techniques play an important role in environmental protection by providing assistance in promoting alternate sources of energy, reducing air pollution, managing fresh water resources, controlling water pollution and guarding the oceans and seas. They are also used to analyze minerals, soils, gases, water and other substances used in industry, and the results often influence economic, ecological, medical and legal decisions. The International Atomic Energy Agency works to foster the role of nuclear science and technology in support of sustainable human development. This involves both advancing knowledge and exploiting this knowledge to tackle pressing world-wide challenges - hunger, disease, natural resources management, environmental pollution and industrial quality control. (authors)

  7. Nuclear Systems (NS): Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nuclear Systems Project demonstrates nuclear power technology readiness to support the goals of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. To this end,...

  8. Radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 ENEA's Department of Nuclear Fusion and Fission, and Related Technologies acted according to national policy and the role assigned to ENEA FPN by Law 257/2003 regarding radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

  9. Consideration on the interaction between society and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Yoshihiko

    2007-01-01

    A social conflict over nuclear technology arises from the different interactions between society and nuclear technology. The purpose of this review is to grasp the essential points of this social conflict from a social viewpoint. These essential points can be discerned by interpreting results of polls about nuclear technology and the future of society in general. As a result, attitudes towards nuclear technology can be explained in terms of differences of general views on society such as social order or social progress. The attitudes of people toward nuclear technology were divided into strong agreement, weak agreement, weak objection and strong objection in order to obtain useful information for clarification of social conflict on this issue. Results of polls of people who have weak agreement for nuclear technology reveal their ambivalence about nuclear technology. This raises concern that further implementation of nuclear technology might cause these people to shift their views to objection. (author)

  10. 2nd Symposium on applied nuclear physics and innovative technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Symposium on Applied Nuclear Physics and Innovative Technologies will be held for the second time at Collegium Maius, the oldest building of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, the same building where Nicolaus Copernicus has studied astronomy. Symposium is organized in the framework of the MPD programme carried out by the Foundation for Polish science based on the European Structural Funds. The aim of this conference is to gather together young scientists and experts in the field of applied and fundamental nuclear as well as particle physics. Aiming at interplay of fundamental and applied science the conference will be devoted to the following topics: * Medical imaging and radiotherapy * New materials and technologies in radiation detection * Fission, fusion and spallation processes * High-performance signal processing and data analysis * Tests of foundations of physics and search for a new kind of sub-atomic matter

  11. Technology of swallowable capsule for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Intzes, I; Meng, H; Cosmas, J

    2014-01-01

    Medical technology has undergone major breakthroughs in recent years, especially in the area of the examination tools for diagnostic purposes. This paper reviews the swallowable capsule technology in the examination of the gastrointestinal system for various diseases. The wireless camera pill has created a more advanced method than many traditional examination methods for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases such as gastroscopy by the use of an endoscope. After years of great innovation...

  12. Y-Notes; Introductory Sessions on Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter is divided into next parts: What is 'Y-Notes ; Young generation opening session; Nuclear education and transfer of know-how; Nuclear technology; Other applications of nuclear technology; Nuclear programs and technical cooperation; Political aspects; Environment and safety; Communication and public perception; Economics; Fuel cycle challenges; Video

  13. Various pressure measurement technologies in nuclear engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aritomi, Masanori (Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors); Hosoma, Takashi; Kawa, Tsunemichi

    1993-02-01

    Pressure measurement is one of major measurements in various plants as well as temperature and flow rate ones. Recently, a new pressure and differential pressure transducers, which can be applied to high temperature and high pressure conditions and have very high accuracy, were needed and have been developed to enhance safety of nuclear plants and reliability of their components. In the present paper, their new pressure measurement technologies, which have been established through using them in fundamental studies, proof testing and plants, are discussed from view points of their application to other nuclear fields. Furthermore, the measuring principle of the new sensors applied for their measurement technologies and the problems of their utilization are presented. (author).

  14. Various pressure measurement technologies in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Hosoma, Takashi; Kawa, Tsunemichi.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure measurement is one of major measurements in various plants as well as temperature and flow rate ones. Recently, a new pressure and differential pressure transducers, which can be applied to high temperature and high pressure conditions and have very high accuracy, were needed and have been developed to enhance safety of nuclear plants and reliability of their components. In the present paper, their new pressure measurement technologies, which have been established through using them in fundamental studies, proof testing and plants, are discussed from view points of their application to other nuclear fields. Furthermore, the measuring principle of the new sensors applied for their measurement technologies and the problems of their utilization are presented. (author)

  15. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Greebler, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology Volume 4 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of advanced reactor concepts. This book discusses the advances in various areas of general applicability, including modern perturbation theory, optimal control theory, and industrial application of ionizing radiations.Organized into seven chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the technology of sodium-cooled fast breeder power reactors and gas-cooled power reactors. This text then examines the key role of reactor safety in the development of fast breeder reactors. Other chapt

  17. Coating technologies in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaae, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Metallic, ceramic, and organic coatings are so commonly used in modern industry that virtually everyone can name several applications in which coatings are employed. Thus, it is no surprise that coating technologies are widely employed in the nuclear industry. Some of these technologies utilize processes that are mature and well developed, and others utilize processes that are new and state of the art. In this paper, five generic coating processes that include almost all vapor deposition processes are described, and then applications of each of these processes for deposition of specific materials in nuclear applications are described. These latter selections, of course, are very subjective, and others will be able to name other applications. Because of their wide range of application, coating technologies are considered to be national critical technologies. The generic coating processes that cover almost all vapor deposition technologies are as follows: (1) stationary substrate chemical vapor deposition; (2) fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition; (3) plasma-assisted chemical deposition; (4) sputtering; (5) evaporation

  18. Biological and medical consequences of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latarjet, R.

    1988-01-01

    The study of the medical and biological consequences of the nuclear accidents is a vast program. The Chernobyl accident has caused some thirty deceases: Some of them were rapid and the others occurred after a certain time. The particularity of these deaths was that the irradiation has been associated to burns and traumatisms. The lesson learnt from the Chernobyl accident is to treat the burn and the traumatism before treating the irradiation. Contrary to what the research workers believe, the first wave of deaths has passed between 15 and 35 days and it has not been followed by any others. But the therapeutic lesson drawn from the accident confirm the research workers results; for example: the radioactive doses band that determines where the therapy could be efficacious or not. the medical cares dispensed to the irradiated people in the hospital of Moscow has confirmed that the biochemical equilibrium of proteinic elements of blood has to be maintained, and the transfusion of the purified elements are very important to restore a patient to health, and the sterilization of the medium (room, food, bedding,etc...) of the patient is indispensable. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an international cooperation for providing enough sterilized rooms and specialists in the irradiation treatment. The genetic consequences and cancers from the Chernobyl accident have been discussed. It is impossible to detect these consequences because of their negligible percentages. (author)

  19. How the radiologic and nuclear medical communities can improve nuclear security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Laura H; von Hippel, Frank

    2007-04-01

    Highly enriched uranium (HEU) is used to manufacture technetium-99m, the most widely used medical radioisotope in the world. Highly enriched uranium is also used to make nuclear bombs; 50 kg of HEU is enough to make a Hiroshima-type bomb. It is generally agreed that this technology is within the reach of a terrorist group; the main obstacle is acquiring HEU. Currently, as a legacy of the US and Soviet Atoms for Peace Program, there are civilian users of HEU in 40 countries, and about 1,000 kg are still being shipped each year. Unfortunately, the major international manufacturers of technetium-99m have been refusing to convert their production facilities to use low-enriched uranium (LEU), which cannot be used to make a nuclear bomb. Only 1% to 2% of the HEU is consumed in the process of producing technetium-99m. The remainder is accumulating in radioactive waste storage facilities. The radiologic and nuclear medical communities could make a tremendous contribution to a safer world by supporting the replacement of HEU with LEU in the production of technetium-99m. Low-enriched uranium is just as cost effective as HEU for the manufacture of technetium-99m and does not contribute to the risk for nuclear terrorism.

  20. Nuclear Technologies Secure Food For Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: For nearly fifty years, applications of nuclear technology have been helping the world's farmers, contributing new varieties of crops, controlling pests, diagnosing livestock disease, improving soil and water management and increasing food safety. The significant role of nuclear technology in supporting agriculture will be the focus of this year's IAEA Scientific Forum in Vienna on 18-19 September. Food for the Future: Meeting the Challenges with Nuclear Applications is the theme of the Forum, which takes place during the annual IAEA General Conference. ''Demand for food is rising significantly as the world's population grows,'' IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said. ''Fighting hunger is a key priority. It is essential not only that the world should produce more food. We must also protect crops and livestock and make sure that food is safe to eat. Nuclear applications can make a real difference in all of these areas.'' ''The goal of the Scientific Forum is to make Member States more aware of the very important work of the IAEA in nuclear applications related to food and to encourage more countries to make use of our services.'' Nuclear technology has many possible uses in food and agriculture. By irradiation, scientists can accelerate natural spontaneous mutation and improve crop varieties to suit particular conditions. Farmers are benefitting from rice that grows in salty conditions, barley that flourishes above 4 000 metres (13 000 feet) and hundreds of other crop varieties. The use of the sterile insect technique, in which males of a targeted species such as the tsetse fly or the Mediterranean fruit fly are sterilised by radiation and released into the wild, is expanding significantly. This effectively combats insect pests that damage crops and spread disease among humans and livestock, while limiting pesticide use. The world was last year declared free of the deadly cattle disease rinderpest after a campaign made possible by nuclear techniques. The

  1. Extended analysis on impact of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    This chapter discusses a number of economic, social and knowledge impacts of the applications of nuclear technology in Malaysia as well as benchmarking with Japan and the Republic of Korea. Under economic impacts, index of gross value of products and services, index of gross value of exports, index of gross value of training expenditures, and index of total number of human resource trained are developed. In addition, the contribution of the application of nuclear technology to both Gross Domestic Products (GDP) and GDP per capita are also highlighted. The impact of the application of nuclear technology to Total Factor Productivity (TFP) is also covered in this chapter. Much of the discussions on economic impacts are based on findings in private companies. That is because many of their operations can be expressed in monetary terms by virtue of them operating in commercial environment. Public agencies, however, play crucial role in enabling the private companies attain the level of development reported in this study. Towards that end, public agencies invested in Research and development activities, human capital development, as well as in the setting-up, operation and maintenance of both technical and administrative infrastructures. The impact of such activities is discussed in the later part of this chapter. (author)

  2. Proceeding of the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Safety Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaemi, Tj.; Sudarno; Sunaryo, G. R.; Supriatna, P.; Antariksawan, A. R.; Sumijanto; Febrianto; Histori; Aliq

    2000-01-01

    The proceedings includes the result of research and development activities on nuclear safety technology that have been done by research Center for Nuclear Safety Technology in 2000 and was presented on June 28, 2000. The proceedings is expected to give illustration of the research result on Nuclear Safety Technology

  3. Nuclear technologies for local energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.; Lynch, G.F.

    1990-03-01

    If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified and appropriate reactors developed. The Canadian program on reactor systems for local energy supply is at the forefront of these developments. This program emphasizes design simplicity, low power density and fuel rating, reliance on natural processes, passive systems, and reduced reliance on operator action. The first product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, is a 10 MW heat source specifically designed to provide hot water to satisfy the needs of local heating systems for building complexes, institutions and municipal district heating systems. A demonstration heating reactor has been constructed at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba and has been undergoing an extensive test program since first operation in 1987 July. Based on the knowledge learned from the design, construction, licensing and operational testing of this facility, the design of the 10 MW commercial-size unit is well advanced, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is prepared to commit the construction of the first commercial unit. Although the technical demonstration of the concept is important, it is recognized that another crucial element is the public and regulatory acceptance of small nuclear systems in urban areas. The decision by a community to commit the construction of a SLOWPOKE Energy System brings to a sharp focus the current public apprehension about nuclear technologies

  4. The ethics of an ordinary medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Some routinely applied hospital technologies may have unintended consequences for patients and their families. The neonatal cardiorespiratory monitor, a computer-like display used to show an infant's vital functions, is one such technology that may become part of a parent's day-to-day being with his or her hospitalized child. In this phenomenological study, I explored how the monitor may mediate parental sensibilities, reshaping the contact of parent and child. This exploration speaks to understanding the relational ethics of even the seemingly most ordinary of medical technologies in clinical contexts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Assessing medical technologies in development; a new paradigm of medical technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, J. Marjan; van Rossum, Wouter; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to provide a practical contribution to the field of medical technology assessment within a new paradigm. This paradigm indicates the need for more comprehensive technology assessments in the development stage of a new technology. - Method: We introduce a method, based on

  6. Assessing medical technologies in development - A new paradigm of medical technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, MJM; van Rossum, W; Verkerke, GJ; Rakhorst, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to provide a practical contribution to the field of medical technology assessment within a new paradigm. This paradigm indicates the need for more comprehensive technology assessments in the development stage of a new technology. Method: We introduce a method, based on

  7. ANENT - a cooperative framework for enhancing education in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatimah Mohd Amin

    2005-01-01

    The issues of emerging shortfall in nuclear expertise due to ageing workforce and declining enrolment in nuclear programmes were discussed. Nuclear options and the IAEA move on nuclear knowledge preservation also were discussed. ANENT established in February 2004 to address concerns on sustainability of nuclear technology in the Asian region

  8. Nuclear Technology Review 2013. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to requests by Member States, the Secretariat produces a comprehensive Nuclear Technology Review each year. Attached is this year's report, which highlights notable developments principally in 2012. The Nuclear Technology Review 2013 covers the following areas: power applications, atomic and nuclear data, accelerators and research reactors, and nuclear sciences and applications. Additional documentation associated with the Nuclear Technology Review 2013 is available on the Agency's website1 in English on nuclear hydrogen production technology and preliminary lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident for advanced nuclear power plant technology development. Information on the IAEA's activities related to nuclear science and technology can also be found in the IAEA's Annual Report 2012 (GC(57)/3), in particular the Technology section, and the Technical Cooperation Report for 2012 (GC(57)/INF/4). The document has been modified to take account, to the extent possible, of specific comments by the Board of Governors and other comments received from Member States. (author)

  9. The impact of nuclear technology to the national socio-economy in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    The Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), in cooperation with the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI) and the International Islamic University Malaysia Enterpreneurship and Consultancies Sdn. Bhd. has conducted a study to evaluate the impact of nuclear technology applications to national socio-economic development in industry, medical and agriculture sectors, under the 9th Malaysia Plan. The study also took stock of progress achieved so far by assessing the impact of its application to national socio-economic development, after more than three decades the technology was developed in the country and also identified issues on the applications of nuclear technology in the country and conducts benchmarking with Japan and The Republic of Korea. The findings of the study indicated clearly that nuclear technology has progressed in Malaysia and has positively contributed towards socio-economic development of the country. It generates employment, creates opportunities for new businesses, enhances human capital development, and uplifts the quality of health care services in the country. The use of nuclear technology exposes Malaysian industries to modern technology; leading to better products and services quality, enhanced diagnosis and therapeutic capabilities in the medical sector, and enriched the agriculture sector with means to produce new and better cultivars. The nuclear technology applications are viewed as one of the prime-mover for further economic growth and enrichment of the technology content of local companies, enhancement of skill of local employees, and enhancement of the value added of local resources. (author)

  10. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education.

  11. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  12. Safety management in nuclear technology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    At the symposium of TueV Sued AG (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany) held in Munich on 28 and 29 October 2008, the following lectures were held: (1) Fundamental requirements of the management system in nuclear technology - Experiences from the international developments at IAEA and WENRA (M. Herttrich); (2) Information from a comparison of requirements of safety management systems (B. Kallenbach-Herbert); (3) Requirements of a modern management system in German nuclear power plants from the view of nuclear safety (D. Majer); (4) Requirements on safety management in module 8 of the regulations project (M. Maqua); (5) Requirements on the management system in nuclear power plants according to GRS-229 and developments at the KTA 1402 ''Integrated management system for safe operation of nuclear power plants (in progress)'' (C. Verstegen); (6) Experiences from the development and implementation of safety management systems in connection with the works management of a nuclear power plant (K. Ramler); (7) Design of a safety management system of a nuclear power plant in consideration of existing management systems (U. Naumann); (8) Experiences in the utilization and evaluation of a safety management system (J. Ritter); (9) Aspects of leadership of safety management systems (S. Seitz); (10) Management of safety or safety management system? Prevailing or administration? (A. Frischknecht); (11) Change management - strategies for successful transfer of new projects: How can I motivate co-workers for a further development of the safety management system? (U. Schnabel); (12) Requirements concerning indicators in integrated management systems and safety management systems (J. Stiller); (13) Integration of proactive and reactive indicators in the safety management system (B. Fahlbruch); (14) What do indicators show? About the use of indicators by regulatory authorities (A. Kern); (15) Safety management and radiation protection in nuclear technology (K. Grantner); (16) Any more

  13. Scenario-based roadmapping assessing nuclear technology development paths for future nuclear energy system scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Durpel, Luc; Roelofs, Ferry; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear energy may play a significant role in a future sustainable energy mix. The transition from today's nuclear energy system towards a future more sustainable nuclear energy system will be dictated by technology availability, energy market competitiveness and capability to achieve sustainability through the nuclear fuel cycle. Various scenarios have been investigated worldwide each with a diverse set of assumptions on the timing and characteristics of new nuclear energy systems. Scenario-based roadmapping combines the dynamic scenario-analysis of nuclear energy systems' futures with the technology roadmap information published and analysed in various technology assessment reports though integrated within the nuclear technology roadmap Nuclear-Roadmap.net. The advantages of this combination is to allow mutual improvement of scenario analysis and nuclear technology roadmapping providing a higher degree of confidence in the assessment of nuclear energy system futures. This paper provides a description of scenario-based roadmapping based on DANESS and Nuclear-Roadmap.net. (author)

  14. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities

  15. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  16. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  17. Nuclear Technologies for Space Exploration Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudenhoefer, J.E.; Winter, J.M.; Alger, D.

    1992-08-01

    A progress update is presented of the NASA LeRC Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Project. This work is being conducted under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power Element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system power output and system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least five fold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss progress toward 1050 K Stirling Space Power Converters. Fabrication is nearly completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC); results of motoring tests of the cold end (525 K), are presented. The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, bearings, superalloy joining technologies, high efficiency alternators, life and reliability testing, and predictive methodologies. This paper will compare progress in significant areas of component development from the start of the program with the Space Power Development Engine (SPDE) to the present work on CTPC

  18. Technology, Effects and Doctrines of Nuclear Warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1981-01-01

    The development and the status of the nuclear weapons systems and of the systems for their delivery are explained. All these systems have made tremendous progress since the 1960s. Available destructive power now is literally millions of times larger than at the time of Hiroshima. Moreover, technical progress has had, especially through the MIRV principle and the cruise missile, a destabilizing influence and threatens the equilibrium of terror. New strategic doctrines for winning rather than preventing nuclear war have come to the foreground. Plans for the tactical first-use of nuclear weapons have been accepted. Alternatively, the retaliation capacity of the opponent could be destroyed by surprise attack - The First Strike. In a nuclear conflict, the commanders-in-chief are overburdened by the need for ultra-urgent decisions. This applies especially to a First Strike situation. As a consequence tendencies in the direction of increasing automatization become ever more conspicuous. In the extreme ease, decisions may be left entirely to machines, and men would not any more be included in decision-making. The increasing automatization leads to further escalation of insecurity for the whole world. Solutions for the principal problem of the world, war or peace, cannot be found On the level of technology, but only on that of practical policy of detente, disarmament, collaboration and reconciliation. (author)

  19. Mass spectrometry in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Takuji

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used and playing a very important role in the field of nuclear science and technology. A major reason for this is that not only the types of element but also its isotopes have to be identified and measured in this field. Thus, some applications of this analytical method are reviewed and discussed in this article. Its application to analytical chemistry is described in the second section following an introductory section, which includes subsections for isotropic dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry and isotopic correlation technique. The isotopic ratio measurement for hydrogen, uranium and plutonium as well as nuclear material control and safeguards are also reviewed in this section. In the third section, mass spectrometry is discussed in relation to nuclear reactors, with subsections on natural uranium reactor and neutron flux observation. Some techniques for measuring the burnup fraction, including the heavy isotopic ratio method and fission product monitoring, are also described. In the fourth section, application of mass spectrometry to measurement of nuclear constants, such as ratio of effective cross-sectional area for 235 U, half-life and fission yield is reviewed. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Nuclear imaging technology and global requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lele, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    After a brief review of the present state of availability of nuclear medicine services in the countries of world, a mention has been made of WHO programme on nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine services in the developing countries are dependent on the availability of appropriate instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals at affordable costs and existence of basic infrastructure required for giving such services. Basic infrastructure requirements are stable power supplies, air-conditioning systems, preventive maintenance and repair facilities. These are discussed. It is pointed out that the use of rectilinear scanners with 113m In instead of costly gamma cameras is still relevant in the third world countries. Need to develop a too low-cost gamma camera is emphasized. Electronics Corporation of India Ltd has plans to manufacture such cameras. Design of this camera is described. Foreign collaboration or technology transfer through concerned governement department needs to be explored so that the benefits of nuclear medicine can be brought to the third world countries by 2000 AD. (M.G.B.). 2 tabs

  1. SNETP – Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aït Abderrahim, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    SNETP is one of the EU’s official European Technology & Innovation Platforms established to implement the SET-Plan. SNETP and its pillars gather more than 120 European stakeholders involved in the research and innovation, deployment and operation of nuclear fission reactors and fuel cycle facilities: industry, research centres, universities, technical safety organisations, small and medium enterprises, service providers, non-governmental organisations. Despite industrial competition, SNETP has achieved efficient collaboration between its stakeholders. It has developed a common vision on the future contribution of nuclear fission energy in Europe, with the publication of a Vision Report, a Strategic Research & Innovation Agenda (two editions) and a Deployment Strategy report. It issued also a dedicated report on the R&D topics related to safety issues triggered by the Fukushima accident.

  2. New developments in nuclear medicine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Pichler, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    During the past few years, there have been new impulses in the development of a number of technologies employed in Nuclear Medicine imaging. These include new scintillation materials, the way of detecting the scintillation light, and completely novel methods to detect gamma rays by means of semiconductor detectors. In addition to combined instrumentation that can be used for SPECT and PET, already in clinical use, combined scintigraphic and anatomic imaging devices are now becoming available, for example SPECT/CT or PET/CT. This review article describes the most important of the new components, part of which have already entered product development and part of which are still in the research phase. The review focus on the employment of modern semiconductor detectors in Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [de

  3. A roadmap for nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofu, Tanju

    2018-01-01

    The prospects for the future use of nuclear energy worldwide can best be understood within the context of global population growth, urbanization, rising energy need and associated pollution concerns. As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges are expected to be concentrated in cities of the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. As these countries continue their trajectory of economic development, their energy need will also outpace their population growth adding to the increased demand for electricity. OECD IEA's energy system deployment pathway foresees doubling of the current global nuclear capacity by 2050 to reduce the impact of rapid urbanization. The pending "retirement cliff" of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet, representing over 60 percent of the nation's emission-free electricity, also poses a large economic and environmental challenge. To meet the challenge, the U.S. DOE has developed the vision and strategy for development and deployment of advanced reactors. As part of that vision, the U.S. government pursues programs that aim to expand the use of nuclear power by supporting sustainability of the existing nuclear fleet, deploying new water-cooled large and small modular reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the energy security and climate change goals, conducting R&D for advanced reactor technologies with alternative coolants, and developing sustainable nuclear fuel cycle strategies. Since the current path relying heavily on water-cooled reactors and "once-through" fuel cycle is not sustainable, next generation nuclear energy systems under consideration aim for significant advances over existing and evolutionary water-cooled reactors. Among the spectrum of advanced reactor options, closed-fuel-cycle systems using reactors with fast-neutron spectrum to meet the sustainability goals offer the most attractive alternatives. However, unless the new public-private partnership models emerge

  4. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, R.; Gasparotto, M.

    2002-01-01

    The fusion nuclear technology programme in the EU is focussed on materials and breeding blankets development, tritium and high heat flux component technologies. A strong effort is also devoted to the validation of the design of an intense 14 MeV neutron source (IFMIF). The material programme includes the development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (EUROFER) to be used as structural material in a DEMO reactor, and potentially more attractive higher performance materials: ODS and SiC/SiC composites. The breeding blanket activities are focussed in the preparation of the two European Test Blanket Moduli to be installed in ITER. The Fuel Cycle activities for ITER include development of the torus exhaust cryopump, fuel storage system, performance characterisation of the torus exhaust processing and design of water detritiation system. High heat flux components have been developed in the framework of ITER R and D programme and based on copper alloy heat sink protected by an armour of beryllium, CFC or tungsten. Studies give an important contribution in defining the nuclear technology programme strategy

  5. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, R. E-mail: roberto.andreani@tech.efda.org; Gasparotto, M. E-mail: maurizio.gasparotto@tech.efda.org

    2002-11-01

    The fusion nuclear technology programme in the EU is focussed on materials and breeding blankets development, tritium and high heat flux component technologies. A strong effort is also devoted to the validation of the design of an intense 14 MeV neutron source (IFMIF). The material programme includes the development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (EUROFER) to be used as structural material in a DEMO reactor, and potentially more attractive higher performance materials: ODS and SiC/SiC composites. The breeding blanket activities are focussed in the preparation of the two European Test Blanket Moduli to be installed in ITER. The Fuel Cycle activities for ITER include development of the torus exhaust cryopump, fuel storage system, performance characterisation of the torus exhaust processing and design of water detritiation system. High heat flux components have been developed in the framework of ITER R and D programme and based on copper alloy heat sink protected by an armour of beryllium, CFC or tungsten. Studies give an important contribution in defining the nuclear technology programme strategy.

  6. Medical technology update - a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.

    2005-01-01

    Major advances in medical equipment and the expanding utility of clinical applications have contributed to imaging procedures fast becoming an integral part of standard patient care in hospitals and clinics worldwide. The medical imaging market is based on the integration of at least three critical market segments using cutting-edge technologies: Image-generating equipment; contrast agents and imaging labels, including radionuclides; and associated hardware and software to process, evaluate, store, and transmit the images, which are either digitally generated or digitized from conventional film. (author)

  7. Nuclear technology in research and everyday life; Kerntechnik in Forschung und Alltag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-12-15

    The paper.. discusses the impact of nuclear technology in research and everyday life covering the following issues: miniaturization of memory devices, neutron radiography in material science, nuclear reactions in the universe, sterilization of food, medical applies, cosmetics and packaging materials using beta and gamma radiation, neutron imaging for radioactive waste analysis, microbial transformation of uranium (geobacter uraniireducens), nuclear technology knowledge preservation, spacecrafts voyager 1 and 2, future fusion power plants, prompt gamma activation analysis in archeology, radiation protection and radioecology and nuclear medicine (radiotherapy).

  8. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Park, J. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production systems, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production cost. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items confirmed to the NHDD concepts. We developed and applied R and D quality management methodology to meet 'Development of Key Technologies for Nuclear Hydrogen' project. And we also distributed R and D QAM and R and D QAP to each teams and are in operation. The preconceptual flow diagrams of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes are introduced and their material and energy balances have been proposed. The hydrogen production thermal efficiencies of not only the SI process as a reference process but also the HTSE and HyS processes were also estimated. Technical feasibility assessments of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes have been carried out by using the pair-wise comparison and analytic hierarchy process, and it is revealed that the experts are considering the SI process as the most feasible process. The secondary helium pathway across the SI process is introduced. Dynamic simulation codes for the H2S04vaporizer, sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide decomposers, and HI decomposer on the secondary helium pathway and for the primary and secondary sulfuric acid distillation columns, HIx solution distillation column, and preheater for HI vapor have been developed and integrated

  9. 2006 annual nuclear technology conference - opening address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlefelder, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Energy Summit organized by Federal Chancellor Merkel set the right course in energy research. The funds to be made available by the federal government for energy research and innovation are to be raised by more than 30% by 2009. However, the Red-Green ban on research into reactor development still needs to be lifted. For Germany, 2005 was a year of change. As far as energy policy is concerned, it was a year more of disenchantment, as the diametrally opposed positions held by CDU/CSU and SPD in matters nuclear mean that, for the time being, the current regulations about residual plant lifetimes will continue to be valid. The Energy Summit as the first round in a process at the end of which, in 2007, there is to be a complete energy policy concept for the next few decades, does raise hopes. Clear emphasis must be given to worldwide developments, however. The assumption that others would follow Germany's 'good' example in opting out of the use of nuclear power has turned out to be naive. Ultimate clarity about which technology will turn out to be a bridge or an interim technology will be obtained in retrospect only. We should buy time now by extending nuclear power plant life so as to be able later to decide more freely about our options. The repository question, which is still considered a point of dispute, is less a technical than a political problem. The sequence of steps to be taken for solution is outlined in great detail and with high precision in the nuclear agreement. Following the ruling by the Lueneburg higher administrative court, Konrad can be installed and commissioned by 2013. After handling the so-called points of doubt, exploration of Gorleben can be completed. Nuclear power is an important building block in the energy mix in peaceful coexistence of various energy resources in accordance with their respective possible uses. For this reason, the renewables and nuclear power should no longer by played off one against the other. Both of them have a

  10. HEP technologies to address medical imaging challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developments in detector technologies aimed at solving challenges in present and future CERN experiments, particularly at the LHC, have triggered exceptional advances in the performance of medical imaging devices, allowing for a spectacular progress in in-vivo molecular imaging procedures, which are opening the way for tailored therapies of major diseases. This talk will briefly review the recent history of this prime example of technology transfer from HEP experiments to society, will describe the technical challenges being addressed by some ongoing projects, and will present a few new ideas for further developments and their foreseeable impact.

  11. Nuclear waste transmutation and related innovative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The main topics of the summer school meeting were 1. Motivation and programs for waste transmutation: The scientific perspective roadmaps; 2. The physics and scenarios of transmutation: The physics of transmutation and adapted reactor types. Impact on the fuel cycle and possible scenarios; 3. Accelerator driven systems and components: High intensity accelerators. Spallation targets and experiments. The sub critical core safety and simulation physics experiments; 4. Technologies and materials: Specific issues related to transmutation: Dedicated fuels for transmutation. Fuel processing - the role of pyrochemistry. Materials of irradiation. Lead/lead alloys. 5. Nuclear data: The N-TOF facility. Intermediate energy data and experiments. (orig./GL)

  12. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Renee G.

    1998-01-01

    This document contains summaries of most of the papers presented at the 1995 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 16 and 17 at San Diego, Ca. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Criticality Safety of Project Sapphire; (2) Relevant Experiments For Criticality Safety; (3) Interactions with the Former Soviet Union; (4) Misapplications and Limitations of Monte Carlo Methods Directed Toward Criticality Safety Analyses; (5) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Execution and Interpretation; (6) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Representation; and (7) Benchmark Comparisons

  13. Proceedings of the 6th nuclear science and technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The 6th conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 2 - 4 December, 1996 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for des infestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  14. Proceedings of the 5th nuclear science and technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 5th conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 21-23 November, 1992 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application including irradiation of food for desinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of the nuclear power industry are also discussed

  15. Half Century and Upcoming Decade of Nuclear Technology in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Bangkok

    2011-06-01

    Full text: The 12 t h conference on the nuclear science and technology was held on 6-7 June 2011 in Bangkok. This conference contain paper on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for the infestation tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  16. Proceedings of the 7. Nuclear Science and Technology Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The 7. conference on nuclear science and technology was held on 1-2 December 1998 in Bangkok. This conference contain papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry. These application include irradiation of food for disinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of nuclear power industry are also discussed

  17. The value of nuclear medical examinations in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixthofer, A.

    1991-02-01

    In 1988 155 children were nuclear medically examined at the university clinic in Innsbruck. The first separations to be made were sex and age. A more precise organization concerning the clinically allocated diagnosis of the patients showed, that nephrological and urological questions were asked in 2/3 of the cases. The second point was the cure of inflammation and tumourous cases of the skeletal system (osteomyelitis, osteosarcoma) followed by the assessment of the practical and morphological disturbances to the thyroid glands. Nuclear medical examinations also, occasionally, used questions from the fields of neurology, gastroenterology, cardiology and pulmonology. Analysis regarding the concordance of nuclear medicine with the clinic expresses the diagnostical precision of nuclear medicine well. Nuclear medical diagnosis corresponded to conclusive clinical diagnosis in 73.75 % of the cases. The classification concerning with clinical relevance of the nuclear medical findings for treatment showed that, in only 7.5 % of all cases there was no influence of the nuclear medical diagnosis on the treatment. The investigation of radiation was done in three age groups (0 to 5 years, 5 to 10 years, 10 to 15 years). The calculations, especially with the kidney examinations, produced definite results, it could be illustrated that the nuclear medical examinations show a smaller amount of radiation as a radiological alternative, on intravenous urogram, for example. (author)

  18. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  19. Advanced pyrochemical technologies for minimizing nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, M.C.; Dodson, K.E.; Riley, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to reduce the size of the current nuclear weapons complex and consequently minimize operating costs. To meet this DOE objective, the national laboratories have been asked to develop advanced technologies that take uranium and plutonium, from retired weapons and prepare it for new weapons, long-term storage, and/or final disposition. Current pyrochemical processes generate residue salts and ceramic wastes that require aqueous processing to remove and recover the actinides. However, the aqueous treatment of these residues generates an estimated 100 liters of acidic transuranic (TRU) waste per kilogram of plutonium in the residue. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing pyrochemical techniques to eliminate, minimize, or more efficiently treat these residue streams. This paper will present technologies being developed at LLNL on advanced materials for actinide containment, reactors that minimize residues, and pyrochemical processes that remove actinides from waste salts

  20. Who works with nuclear fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, H.

    1977-01-01

    Humanity today, and especially the youth in industrial nations, undergoes a trend towards a 'post-industrial society'. This may be due to the resignation of those who think themselves unable to meet the increasing demands made on social production. The paper draws up a concept to give humanity a new interest in life. First, the paradox educational situation in the FRG today is outlined. Nuclear fusion technology and the industrial development necessary for its implementation are offered as a way out of the paradox situation of the present educational system. The demands to be made on an educational system for fusion technology are discussed. This strategy for world-wide economic growth integrates the intelligence potential of the industrial nations and the potential labour force of the Third World. (GG) [de

  1. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region. (author)

  2. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology (ASNT) was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region

  3. Proceeding of the Eighth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Safety Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geni Rina Sunaryo; Sony Tjahjani, D.T.; Anhar Riza Antariksawan; Sudarno; Djoko Hari Nugroho; Roziq Himawan; Ari Satmoko; Histori; Sumijanto

    2003-02-01

    The Proceeding of Scientific Meeting and Presentation is routine activity that held in National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) by Centre for Development of Nuclear Safety Technology for monitoring the research activity which was achieved in BATAN. The aims of the proceeding to able to information and reference for nuclear safety technology. There are 30 papers which separated index. (PPIN)

  4. Application of analysis technology in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoka, Keiko; Miura, Hiromi; Umeda, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    Recently, thanks to the rapid improvement of EWS performance, the authors have been able to carry out design evaluation comparatively, easily, utilizing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. The Nuclear Plant Engineering Department has carried out some analyses in the past several years with the main purpose of evaluating the design of nuclear reactor internals. These studies included ''Thermal Hydraulic Analysis for Top Plenum'' and ''Flow Analysis for Lower Plenum''. It is considered to be a special matter in thermal hydraulic analysis of the top plenum that temperature distribution has been estimated with a relatively small number of meshes by means of an imaginary spray nozzle, and in the flow analysis for the lower plenum that flow distribution has been found to change largely, depending on the reactor internals. One of the ways to confirm the safety of nuclear plants, detailed structural analysis, is required for all possible combinations of transient and load conditions during operation. In particular, it is very important to clarify the thermal stress behavior under operating conditions and to evaluate fatigue analysis in accordance with the Code Requirements. However, it is very complicated and it takes a lot of time. A new system was developed which can operate continuously all of the definitions of the analytical model, the analyzation of pressurized thermal and external stress, and editing reports. In this paper, the authors introduce this system and apply it to a pressurized water reactor

  5. Development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Akira; Matsumoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Kawamura, Fumio

    1995-01-01

    In the long term plan for atomic energy that the Atomic Energy Commission decided the other day, the necessity of the technical development for establishing full scale fuel cycle for future was emphasized. Hitachi Ltd. has engaged in technical development and facility construction in the fields of uranium enrichment, MOX fuel fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing and so on. In uranium enrichment, it took part in the development of centrifuge process centering around Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), and took its share in the construction of the Rokkasho uranium enrichment plant of Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., Ltd. Also it cooperates with Laser Enrichment Technology Research Association. In Mox fuel fabrication, it took part in the construction of the facilities for Monju plutonium fuel production of PNC, for pellet production, fabrication and assembling processes. In spent fuel reprocessing, it cooperated with the technical development of maintenance and repair of Tokai reprocessing plant of PNC, and the construction of spent fuel stores in Rokkasho reprocessing plant is advanced. The centrifuge process and the atomic laser process of uranium enrichment are explained. The high reliability of spent fuel reprocessing plants and the advancement of spent fuel reprocessing process are reported. Hitachi Ltd. Intends to exert efforts for the technical development to establish nuclear fuel cycle which increases the importance hereafter. (K.I.)

  6. Nuclear Medicine Technology Undergraduate Research Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Cybil J

    2017-12-22

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to introduce nuclear medicine technology (NMT) educators to a method of incorporating research methodologies into the curriculum. Methods: The research methodology in the NMT program at Indiana University (IU) is taught in five steps (1. Introduction to research articles and statistics 2. Mock project and individual project design 3. Data collection 4. Writing the research paper 5. Presenting the abstract and mentoring new students). These steps could be combined for programs of shorter length or with credit hour restrictions. Results: All IU NMT students (100%) presented their research abstracts as part of a continuing education program for technologists. Seventeen of twenty-five (68%) presented their abstracts at a regional professional meeting. Six of twenty-five (24%) presented their research abstracts at a national professional meeting. Three of those six (50%) received travel grants. Two students submitted their research for publication and one was successful. Conclusion: The goal of incorporating a research methodology program into the nuclear medicine program should be to introduce undergraduates to the research process and instill excitement for new technologists to continue participation in research throughout their career. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  7. Environmental assessment report: Nuclear Test Technology Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnessen, K.; Tewes, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) is planning to construct and operate a structure, designated the Nuclear Test Technology Complex (NTTC), on a site located west of and adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NTTC is designed to house 350 nuclear test program personnel, and will accommodate the needs of the entire staff of the continuing Nuclear Test Program (NTP). The project has three phases: land acquisition, facility construction and facility operation. The purpose of this environmental assessment report is to describe the activities associated with the three phases of the NTTC project and to evaluate potential environmental disruptions. The project site is located in a rural area of southeastern Alameda County, California, where the primary land use is agriculture; however, the County has zoned the area for industrial development. The environmental impacts of the project include surface disturbance, high noise levels, possible increases in site erosion, and decreased air quality. These impacts will occur primarily during the construction phase of the NTTC project and can be mitigated in part by measures proposed in this report

  8. Science and technology as strategic way for nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiano, Silvestre

    2000-01-01

    The article brings few instructive examples on the interaction between nuclear energy and other areas of science and technology, Microelectronics, computer technology, and new materials are among the many technologies which are crucial for developing nuclear energy technology. On the other way round, nuclear energy presents also a wide range of new demands and opportunities for several areas of science and technology. The problem is that such a relationship is not well understood by the society, and to a large extent it brings about the very process of legitimating the use of nuclear energy (author)

  9. The transfer of nuclear technology: necessities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haunschild, H.-H.

    1978-01-01

    Political and economical importance of the transfer of nuclear technologies to less developed countries is examined. Energy needs of the world create the necessity of technology transfer. Three levels are distinguished: 1) Basic elements of cooperation are agreed between the two Governments, 2) scientific cooperation and 3) industrial cooperation. Technology transfer is more than mere technology export. Limitations of nuclear technology transfer are: the lack of infrastructure, the high price of a nuclear power station but above all the problem of proliferation. In conclusion the solution of international problems of nuclear energy is the concept of cooperation on the basis of equal rights

  10. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government

  11. Nuclear technology and biotechnology for enhancing agricultural production in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Osman

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: sustainable development, agriculture in Malaysia, role of biotechnology, role of nuclear technology, improving crops through induced mutations with Malaysian experience in rice and roselle, fusion of nuclear and biotechnology challenges and opportunities

  12. Proceedings of the 3. nuclear science and technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Non-power applications of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry are discussed. These applications include irradiation of food for desinfestation; tram technologies used in diagnosis and therapy and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes. Some technologies which evolved from the development of the nuclear power industry are also discussed

  13. 2012 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on 'Preservation of competence in nuclear technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Within the 2-day workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology,' 31 young scientists competed for the 'Competence Prize' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the 14th time. They reported about their papers focusing on nuclear technology, reactor technology, innovative reactor systems, radioactive waste management, radiological protection and energy supply systems. The jury composed of Prof. J. Starflinger (Universitaet Stuttgart, IKE), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, LEE), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2012 Competence Prize is Dipl.-Ing.(M.S.) Thomas M. Fesich (University Stuttgart). Dr.-Ing. Oliver Czaikowski (Techn. University Clausthal) and Dipl.-Ing. Mario Kuschewski (Universitaet Stuttgart) won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  14. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho

    2005-12-01

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate

  15. Economy and technology roles played by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Eiji

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the survey analysis made by Atomic Energy Commission on the roles in economy and technology played in the nuclear energy development and utilization, the following are described: economic roles in nuclear energy development and utilization (the present state of nuclear power industry in Japan and the economy effects); technological roles in the same (the present state of nuclear power technology in Japan and the technology effects). The economy effects in other areas are on higher level than in other industries etc. Then, in the technology effects, system technology and quality control in the nuclear power possess significant effects in other areas. While the nuclear energy development and utilization is important in Japan's energy security, it is contributing largely to the economy and society in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  16. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H.

    2007-06-01

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  17. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  18. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Devell, L.

    1995-01-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  19. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  20. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, O.N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    The Africa Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research Development and Training related to Science and Technology (AFRA) established the AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA-NEST) in order to implement AFRA strategy on Human Resource Development (HRD) and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM). The strategies for implementing the objectives are: to use ICT for web-based education and training; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels and awarding of fellowships/scholarships to young and brilliant students for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines

  1. Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Ruan

    1998-01-01

    FLINS is the acronym for Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science. The main task for FLINS is to solve intricate problems pertaining to the nuclear environment by using modern technologies as additional tools and to bridge the gap between novel technologies and the industrial nuclear world. In 1997, major efforts went to the specific prototyping of Fuzzy Logic Control of SCK-CEN's BR1 research Reactor. Progress and achievements are reported

  2. Nuclear technology transfer adapted to the needs of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Nentwich, D.

    1983-01-01

    The paper explains the build-up of nuclear know-how in the Federal Republic of Germany after 1955, when activities in the nuclear field became permitted. Furthermore, it shows the development of nuclear technology transfer via the increasing number of nuclear power plants exported. The inevitable interrelationship between the efficient transfer of know-how and long-term nuclear co-operation is demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adaptation of nuclear technology transfer to the needs of the recipient countries. Guidelines to achieve the desired goal are given. (author)

  3. Medical Valley. Nuclear medicine in the dunes of Petten, Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keverling Buisman, A.; Heijn, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this brochure an overview is given of the activities and facilities in the dunes of Petten, Netherlands, with regard to nuclear medicine: two research reactors, two cyclotrons, laboratories where radioactive materials are studied and handled, medical-pharmaceutical research- and production facilities, and knowledge in the field of radiochemistry, radiobiology, medical pharmaceuticals, and knowledge in industrial, logistic, nuclear physical and radiation protection fields. 2 figs., 13 ills

  4. American Chemical Society. Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The meeting of the 201st American Chemical Society Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was comprised from a variety of topics in this field including: nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, and nuclear techniques for environmental studies. Particular emphasis was given to fundamental research concerning nuclear structure (seven of the nineteen symposia) and studies of airborne particle monitoring and transport (five symposia). 105 papers were presented

  5. Legal aspects of the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartorelli, C.

    1980-03-01

    The paper stresses the importance of nuclear technology transfer and describes the legal instruments for transfer of technical and scientific technology, particularly from the contractual viewpoint. A description follows of the setting-up of national joint ventures for nuclear power plant projects with emphasis on technological know-how to enable operation of plants in compliance with safety standards. The possibility is discussed of the export of nuclear technology, and finally mention is made of a proposal for a 'code of conduct' on such transfers in the framework of the United Nations, having regard to the 'London agreements' on nuclear exports. (NEA) [fr

  6. Applying RFID technology in nuclear materials management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y.; Norair, J.P.; Bellamy, S.; Shuler, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) of US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM), Office of Safety Management and Operations (EM-60), has developed a radio frequency identification (RFID) system for the management of nuclear materials. Argonne National Laboratory, a PCP supporting laboratory, and Savi Technology, a Lockheed Martin Company, are collaborating in the development of the RFID system, a process that involves hardware modification (form factor, seal sensor and batteries), software development and irradiation experiments. Savannah River National Laboratory and Argonne will soon field test the active RFID system on Model 9975 drums, which are used for storage and transportation of fissile and radioactive materials. Potential benefits of the RFID system are enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real time access of status and history data, and overall cost effectiveness

  7. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  8. Pioneering medical advances through nanofluidic implantable technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R Lyle; Hood, Gold Darr; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    Nanofluidic implantables represent a recent advance in a broad effort for developing personalized, point-of-care medical technologies. Such systems have unprecedented potential when matched with the newest developments in robotics, microprocessing, and tissue engineering. In this review, we present their emergence in medicine within the fields of diagnostics, biosensing, therapeutics, and theranostics. Discussion includes current limitations and future directions for these systems, as commensurate advances in power density and electronic processing are continually redefining the possible. As the research and funding attention coincide with complementary technological breakthroughs, the field is expected to grow into an advanced toolset for preserving human health. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1455. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1455. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Siting technology of underground nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, M.; Hibino, S.

    1989-01-01

    For the site of a nuclear power station, it may be possible to select a seaside mountain area, if the condition is suitable to excavate large rock caverns in which a reactor and other equipments are installed. As the case study on the siting technology for an underground nuclear power station, the following example was investigated. The site is a seaside steep mountain area, and almost all the equipments are installed in plural tunnel type caverns. The depth from the ground surface to the top of the reactor cavern is about 150 m, and the thickness of the rock pillar between the reactor cavern of 33 m W x 82 mH x 79 mD and the neighboring turbine cavern is 60 m. In this paper, the stability of rock caverns in this example, evaluated by numerical analysis, is described. The numerical analysis was carried out on the central cross section of the reactor cavern, taking the turbine cavern, geostress, the mechanical properties of rock mass and the process of excavation works in consideration. By the analysis, the underground caverns in this example were evaluated as stable, if the rock quality is equivalent to C H class or better according to the CRIEPI rock classification. (K.I.)

  10. Department of Nuclear Equipment 'High Technology Center - HITEC' - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopec, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The main activities of the Department for Nuclear Equipment High Technology Centre in 2008 were focused on the development of specialized systems using linear accelerators for medical applications, realized within the frame of the Innovative Economy Operational Program: · Calculations, simulations and design of accelerator structures and beam shaping devices · Design of a model of carrying structures · Building stands for carrying out critical component examinations and tests A new evolutionary algorithm has been implemented in a three-dimensional treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning optimization. A design for a multi leaf collimator, second model, was worked out. The Department received an Award for the Polkam TBI therapeutic table in the first edition of the '' Teraz-Polska '' national contest for the best Polish innovative product. Equipment manufactured by the High Technology Centre and especially for total body irradiation techniques was presented for the first time during the Biennial Meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology in Goeteborg, Sweden. The second edition of the School of Medical Accelerator Physics organized in October 2008 was well received by medical physicists and physicians. (author)

  11. Physical Protection of Nuclear Safeguards Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, Richard

    2004-01-01

    IAEA's Nuclear Security Plan is established to assist Member States in implementing effective measures against nuclear terrorism. Four potential threats were identified: theft of nuclear weapon, nuclear explosive device, radiological dispersal device and an attack on radiation facility. In order to achieve effective protection of nuclear materials and facilities, the IAEA sponsored the Convention of the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials which focuses on the protection of nuclear materials 'in international transport. The IAEA also promoted INFCIRC/255 entitled the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Facilities and published TECDOC/967 for the protection of nuclear materials and facilities against theft and sabotage and during transport. Assistance is available for the Member States through the International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) and the International Nuclear Security Advisory Service (INSServ). (author)

  12. The broad view of nuclear technology for aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David; Angelo, Joseph A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies can directly support advanced space initiatives. For near-Earth missions, nuclear technology can be used to power air traffic control, communications and manufacturing platforms, provide emergency power for manned platforms, provide power for maneuvering units, move asteroids for mining, measure the natural radiation environment, provide radiation protection instruments, and design radiation hardened robotic systems. For the Lunar and Mars surfaces, nuclear technology can be used for base stationary, mobile, and emergency power, energy storage, process heat, nuclear thermal and electric rocket propulsion, excavation and underground engineering, water and sewage treatment and sterilization, food processing and preservation, mineral exploration, self-luminous systems, radiation protection instrumentation, radiation environmental warning systems, and habitat shielding design. Outer planet missions can make use of nuclear technology for power and propulsion. Programs need to be initiated to ensure the full beneficial use of nuclear technologies in advanced space missions.

  13. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Nuclear technology applications in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Junchen; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear technology to material science has led to a new cross subject, nuclear material science (also named nuclear solid physics) which covers material analysis, material modification and new material synthesis. This paper reviews the development of nuclear technical applications in material science and the basic physics involved

  14. Transfer of nuclear technology to the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The increased Agency assistance for transfer of nuclear technology is essential for the developing countries and especially Africa. It would have a beneficial effect on the implementation of training programmes. The introduction of teaching in nuclear physics at universities in Nigeria, Tanzania and Madagascar should be extended to other universities in order further to orientate African students towards nuclear sciences. In the peaceful uses of atomic energy the African States are concentrating their activities in the spheres of agriculture and medicine. The Agency assists these countries in programmes in agriculture and the exploitation of natural resources, including water. The introduction of radioisotope techniques should be accelerated at all existing agricultural research centres. Services of this kind exist in a few countries, including Senegal, Kenya, the Ivory Coast, Morocco and the Sudan. Radioisotopes employed there make it possible, in particular, to trace the movement of fertilizers from soil to plant and to measure soil humidity. Ionizing radiations can be used to produce genetic effects for the purpose of creating hew varieties of important crop plants and selecting varieties requiring less water for their growth. Such activities are naturally of the greatest interest to the African continent which, as a whole, lives basically from agriculture. The guarantee of food supplies during the next decade is a subject of concern for Africa, and the prevention of losses of foodstuffs is one of the main objectives of African policy.Food irradiation projects are being conducted in Ghana (on cocoa beans) and in Nigeria (on sweet potatoes) with the support of Agency research projects. The Agency's project on the radiation preservation of fish, at present being implemented in countries in Asia, could - provided that the results are satisfactory - have important economic repercussions for the African countries.In the medical sphere, the improvement in health

  15. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  16. Transfer of nuclear technology: A designer-contractor's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See Hoye, D.; Hedges, K.R.; Hink, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the successful Canadian experience in developing a nuclear power technology - CANDU - and exporting it. Consideration is paid to technology that has to be transferred, receiver country objectives and mechanisms and organizational framework. (author)

  17. Strategy development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies for nuclear energy program in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    Strategy of technology development includes also development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies required for nuclear energy programme in Yugoslavia. For this reason, it is of interest to take into consideration possible options which would be the basis for long-term strategy of the nuclear fuel technology development in our country. In the paper criteria which could be used in the technology selection and its valorisation are given. Based on postulated criteria priority selection is made which has shown that the highest importance in the selection of nuclear fuel cycle should be given to the uranium enrichment technology and irradiated fuel reprocessing. (author)

  18. 2010 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on ''Preservation of competence in nuclear technology''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Within the two-day workshop on ''Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology'', 21 young scientists competed for the ''Competence Prize'' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the twelfth time. They reported about their term papers, diploma or doctoral theses focusing on reactor technology and reactor safety, the development of innovative reactor systems, and waste management. For the first time, contributions this year were presented also from the field of radiation protection. The jury composed of Prof. T. Schulenberg (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr University, Bochum), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2010 Competence Prize is Heiko Herbell of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Cornelia Heintze of the Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center, and Carola Hartel of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  19. Siemens technology transfer and cooperation in the nuclear fuel area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, H.-P.; Fuchs, J. H.; Rothenbuecher, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Siemens is a full-range supplier in the area of nuclear power generation with broad experience and activities in the field of nuclear fuel. Siemens has developed advanced fuel technology for all types fuel assemblies used throughout the world and has significant experience worldwide in technology transfer in the field of nuclear fuel. Technology transfer and cooperation has ranged between the provision of mechanical design advice for a specific fuel design and the erection of complete fabrication plants for commercial operation in 3 countries. In the following the wide range of Siemens' technology transfer activities for both fuel design and fuel fabrication technologies are shown

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course l: Radiation Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 19: Radiation Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. Current status of Chinese nuclear power industry and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Min; Kim, Min; Jeong, Hee Jong; Hwang, Jeong Ki; Cho, Chung Hee

    1996-10-01

    China has been carrying out active international cooperation aiming to be a country where is to be an economical super power and an advanced country in nuclear power technology by the year early 2000, and China also has begun to be recognized as the largest potential market for the construction of nuclear power plants(NPPs) expecting to construct more than thirty nuclear power units by the year 2020. China has advanced technology in the basic nuclear science including liquid metal breeder reactor technology, nuclear material, medium and small size power plants, and isotope production technology, and also China has complete nuclear fuel cycle technology. However, China still has low NPP technology. Therefore, it is expected that China may have complementary cooperative relationship with China, it is expected that Korea may have an access to the advanced Chinese nuclear science technology, and may have a good opportunity to explore the Chinese market actively exporting excellent Korean NPP technology, and further may have a good position to the neighboring Asian countries' NPP markets. From this perspective, general Chinese social status, major nuclear R and D activity status, and correct NPP and technology status have been analyzed in this report, and this report is expected to be a useful resource for cooperating with China in future. 10 tabs., 6 figs., 16 refs. (Author)

  3. Better health care: Ghana uses radiation technology to sterilize medical items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2015-01-01

    Infections acquired from improperly sterilized equipment are recognized as a major impediment to safe health care delivery, with consequences that are often deadly for patients. Radiation technology plays a major role in many countries in making medical equipment safer. “The use of nuclear applications, such as exposing medical items to gamma radiation, helps Ghana protect its people from avoidable sicknesses that can occur if items like syringes are not properly sterilized,” said Abraham Adu-Gyamfi, Manager of the Radiation Technology Centre of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission’s Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute in Accra.

  4. The challenge of making nuclear technologies acceptable, accessible and affordable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthy, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is more than five decades since the first successful demonstration of nuclear power for commercial electricity production. The same decades have also seen the successful demonstration of several other applications of nuclear technologies that can contribute directly to human development, as for example, in the Food and Agriculture, Human and animal Health, Environment and Water sectors. In spite of several successful demonstrations and applications in these fields, it is somewhat strange that their full potential is yet to be realized. More importantly, their availability to populations across the world is highly skewed. Three barriers have been identified for the wide spread use of nuclear technologies for development- Acceptability, Accessibility and Affordability. It is an unfortunate twist of fate that the first public demonstration of nuclear technology was its destructive power. The following demonization of anything nuclear was further compounded by the discussions on the unresolved questions on tackling long lived radioactive wastes, our inability to arrive at a global consensus on nuclear disarmament and issues of nuclear proliferation. These have certainly had a negative impact on the public acceptance of nuclear technologies across the board. While the recent concerns on the global climate change following the emission of carbon-di-oxide from excessive hydrocarbon burning for meeting our increasing energy needs have revived the interest in nuclear energy, a lot needs to be done to de-demonize nuclear technologies in public mind leading to increased acceptance of nuclear technologies for development. Lack of resources, infrastructure and trained man power also have a negative impact on the accessibility and affordability of the nuclear technologies for development. It is argued that only education holds the key for this. The role of international partnerships is also highlighted in realizing the full potential of nuclear technologies for

  5. Innovations in and by nuclear technology - review and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1984-01-01

    An innovative technology like nuclear technology does not make progress by itself once it has to prove its profitability. It was a long way from technical to economic perfection which took courageous managemental descisions. Since nuclear fission was discovered, its exploitation as an energy source has been perfected. Now it is not only technically safe, reliable and ecological; it has also proved to be economically efficient as compared with the competing primary energies. As with other great innovations, the innovative force of nuclear technology is characterized by two directions: its assimilating capacity and its expanding capacity. Further issues are the so-called technological spin-off of nuclear technology and the fresh impetus nuclear technology gives to other fields. Another aspect beyond technological spin-off affecting all of our society: It was the first large technology requiring risk analyses to be carried out. Discussion broke out in public on the question: ''How safe is nuclear technology''. To sum up, the basic innovation of nuclear technology is now an important economic factor. It came just in time. It is capable of providing relief to the world's energy problems. It is up to us to use it in an intelligent way in the future despite any short-breathed complaints. (orig./HSCH) [de

  6. Proceedings of the 9. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santoso; Lasman, As Natio

    2003-08-01

    The ninth proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities held by National Nuclear Energy Agency and PLN-JTK. The aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about Safety and Nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of Technology High Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development Sustainable and High Technology. This seminar cover all aspects Technology, Power Reactor, Research Reactor High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 20 articles have separated index

  7. Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares: Science and technology for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahumada, J.J.; Zuleta, S.; Lucero, E.; Guzman, O.; Zamora, H.; Briceno de M, C.

    1989-01-01

    On the thirtieth anniversary celebration of the ''Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares'', a historical review of its activities has been made, emphasizing on its politics of development, technological and scientific advances, including the goals and accomplishments attained for the uses and applications of nuclear technology in Colombia. This includes the technical assistance which is being provided by International Organizations. National and international influences are shown for each one of the technical areas: agricultural applications, industrial applications and metallurgy, biochemistry and radiopharmacy, development process, nuclear electronics, solar and non-conventional energies, gamma facility, nuclear physics, hydrology, raw materials, chemistry, health radiophysics, reactor, nuclear documentation and information center and administration

  8. Remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akira; Maekawa, Hiromichi; Ohmura, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    Design and R and D on nuclear fuel cycle facilities has intended development of remote handling and maintenance technology since 1977. IHI has completed the design and construction of several facilities with remote handling systems for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL). Based on the above experiences, IHI is now undertaking integration of specific technology and remote handling technology for application to new fields such as fusion reactor facilities, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, accelerator testing facilities, and robot simulator-aided remote operation systems in the future. (author)

  9. The medical consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The author says no one person can successfully communicate what the reality of a nuclear war would be, let alone something smaller, like the reality of a single or a small number of thermonuclear explosions. The author focuses on the effects of a single explosion and what would happen if it occurred in New York City

  10. ''Perspectives in nuclear technology'': recruiting young scientists and engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasgindt, V.

    2003-01-01

    Securing competence in nuclear technology is a topic of great interest especially because the preservation and promotion of scientific and technical know-how in Germany are particularly important under conditions of an opt-out of the use of nuclear power. In the light of decreasing numbers of graduates from courses in nuclear science and technology, positive action is indicated. For the first time, the Deutsches Atomforum e.V., together with major partners in cooperation, therefore organized a colloquy last year on 'Perspectives in Nuclear Technology'. Young students of various disciplines were given an opportunity to obtain in-depth information about nuclear power as part of the entire field of energy supply by attending lectures, round-table discussions, and on-site events. Because of the positive response elicited by that first event, another 'Perspectives in Nuclear Technology' colloquy will be held in 2003. (orig.)

  11. The Indian nuclear power programme: Challenges in PHWR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    1997-01-01

    The long-term strategy for development of nuclear power generation in India is based on a three-stage programme, formulated by Dr. H.J. Bhabha. This strategy takes into account and is optimally suited for achieving self reliance in nuclear technology; India's technological infrastructure; limited resources of Natural Uranium and abundant availability of Thorium within the country

  12. Nuclear Science and Technology in Human Progress. Inaugural Lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mshelia, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper is a general discourse on the significance and development of nuclear science and technology and the potential peaceful uses to which it may be put. In particular nuclear science and technology and their applications in Nigeria are well discussed

  13. The Proceeding on National Seminar in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duyeh Setiawan; Rochestri Sofyan; Nurlaila Z; Poppy Intan Tjahaja; Efrizon Umar; Muhayatun; Nanny K Oekar; Sudjatmi K Alfa; Dani Gustaman Syarif; Didi Gayani; Djoko Hadi P; Saeful Hidayat; Ari Darmawan Pasek; Nathanel P Tandian; Toto Hardianto

    2009-11-01

    The proceeding on national seminar in nuclear science and technology by National Atomic energy Agency held in Bandung on June 3, 2009. The topic of the seminar is the increasing the role of nuclear science and technology for the welfare. The proceeding consist of the article from BATAN participant as well as outside. (PPIN)

  14. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The INCT 2002 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  15. Safety improvement technologies for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Koji; Adachi, Hirokazu; Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Takeshi, Noriaki; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Itou, Kanta; Kurihara, Takao; Hino, Tetsushi

    2015-01-01

    As the Hitachi Group's efforts in nuclear power generation, this paper explains the safety improvement technologies that are currently under development or promotion. As efforts for the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, the following items have been developed. (1) As for the spent fuel removal of Unit 4, the following items have mainly been conducted: removal of the debris piled up on the top surface of existing reactor building (R/B), removal of the debris deposited in spent fuel pool (SFP), and fuel transfer operation by means of remote underwater work. The removal of all spent fuels was completed in 2014. (2) The survey robots inside R/B, which are composed of a basement survey robot to check leaking spots at upper pressure suppression chamber and a floor running robot to check leaking spots in water, were verified with a field demonstration test at Unit 1. These robots were able to find the leaking spots at midair pipe expansion joint. (3) As the survey robot for reactor containment shells, robots of I-letter posture and horizontal U-letter posture were developed, and the survey on the upper part of first-floor grating inside the containment shells was performed. (4) As the facilities for contaminated water measures, sub-drain purification equipment, Advanced Liquid Processing System, etc. were developed and supplied, which are now showing good performance. On the other hand, an advanced boiling water reactor with high safety of the United Kingdom (UK ABWR) is under procedure of approval for introduction. In addition, a next-generation light-water reactor of transuranic element combustion type is under development. (A.O.)

  16. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The INCT 2001 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators and nuclear analytical methods

  17. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  18. Annual Report 2004 of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Smulek, W.; Godlewska-Para, E.

    2005-06-01

    The INCT 2004 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators, radiobiology and nuclear analytical methods

  19. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  20. Waging nuclear peace: The technology and politics of nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, R.

    1985-01-01

    Since the explosions of the first atomic bombs, a large literature has appeared on the effects and risks of nuclear war. The most widely quoted recent publications have concentrated on the impossibility of any meaningful survival after a superpower nuclear exchange. By contrast, Dr. Ehrlich tries to show both sides of the various arguments involved. As a result, he undoubtedly succeeds in his avowed intention of angering both hawks and doves. He offers a critical analysis of most considerations apposite to the current nuclear-weapon impasse, including the nature of current nuclear arms, the possibility of limited nuclear war, the short-term and long-term effects of nuclear weapons, the value of civil defense, the importance of public opinion, and the feasibility of arms control.

  1. Medical profession and nuclear war: a social history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, B.; Waitzkin, H.

    1985-01-01

    Since World War II, individual physicians and medical organizations in the US have cooperated with the federal government in preparing for nuclear war. While most physicians have maintained a neutral stance, a minority have resisted federal policies. Health professionals participated actively at the wartime laboratories that developed the atomic bomb and in the medical research that followed Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Professional organizations helped with civil defense planning for nuclear conflict during the Cold War of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Medical resistance to nuclear war began in the same period, gained wide attention with the growth of Physicians for Social Responsibility in the early 1960s, declined during the Vietnam War, and vastly increased in the early 1980s. Activism by health professionals usually has responded to government policies that have increased the perceived risk of nuclear conflict. The recent return of civil defense planning has stimulated opposition in medical circles. Ambiguities of medical professionalism limit the scope of activism in the nuclear arena. These ambiguities concern the interplay of organized medicine and government, tensions between science and politics, and the difficulties of day-to-day work in medicine while the arms race continues

  2. Nuclear Science and Technology Branch Report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    A summary is given of research activities. These include: nuclear techniques of analysis, nuclear techniques in hydrology, industrial applications of radioisotopes, biological and chemical applications of irradiation, radiation detection and measurement, environmental studies and biophysics and radiation biology. Patent applications and staff of the nuclear science and applications secretariat are listed. (R.L.)

  3. Introduction into the nuclear safety technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.M.; Pavlenko, A.A.; Pis'mennyj, E.N.; Shirokov, S.V.

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical and practical issues of the power and research nuclear reactor safety existing on the territory of Ukraine, the radwaste and nuclear material management objects, as well as the 'Shelter' object, the aspects of the nuclear and radiation safety regulation are considered

  4. Technology assessment Jordan Nuclear Power Plant Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary regional analysis was carried out for identification of potential sites for NPP, followed by screening of these sites and selecting candidate sites. Aqaba sites are proposed, where it can use the sea water for cooling: i.Site 1; at the sea where it can use the sea water for direct cooling. ii.Site 2; 10 km to the east of Gulf of Aqaba shoreline at the Saudi Arabia borders. iii.Site 3, 4 km to the east of Gulf of Aqaba shoreline. Only the granitic basement in the east of the 6 km²site should be considered as a potential site for a NPP. Preliminary probabilistic seismic hazard assessment gives: Operating-Basis Earthquake-OBE (475 years return period) found to be in the range of 0.163-0.182 g; Safe Shutdown Earthquake-SSE (10,000 years return period) found to be in the range of 0.333-0.502g. The process include also setting up of nuclear company and other organizational matters. Regulations in development are: Site approval; Construction permitting; Overall licensing; Safety (design, construction, training, operations, QA); Emergency planning; Decommissioning; Spent fuel and RW management. JAEC's technology assessment strategy and evaluation methodology are presented

  5. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.7--pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear electronics, nuclear detecting technology, pulse power technology, nuclear fusion and plasma

  6. Atomic Information Technology Safety and Economy of Nuclear Power Plants

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Information Technology revaluates current conceptions of the information technology aspects of the nuclear industry. Economic and safety research in the nuclear energy sector are explored, considering statistical methods which incorporate Monte-Carlo simulations for practical applications. Divided into three sections, Atomic Information Technology covers: • Atomic economics and management, • Atomic safety and reliability, and • Atomic safeguarding and security. Either as a standalone volume or as a companion to conventional nuclear safety and reliability books, Atomic Information Technology acts as a concise and thorough reference on statistical assessment technology in the nuclear industry. Students and industry professionals alike will find this a key tool in expanding and updating their understanding of this industry and the applications of information technology within it.

  7. Strategy of nuclear power technology: learn from Korea experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyana; Nurlaila

    2003-01-01

    Technology is one of the economic and social elements which play an important role in modernization process. When modernity ideas come into society, technology will become fundamental prerequisite for the shake of its form of modem economic social system of the society. Therefore, various effort modernize society involve program of transfer technology in main agenda. Purpose of this study is to choose a process of technology transfer and according to be able to reach for technological ability of nuclear power self-reliance. This research is conducted by study of existing literature, namely learn from experience of Korea which have succeeded to develop nuclear energy technology with self-reliance. While this research scope is to describe the process of technology transfer and according to be able to reach for technological ability of nuclear energy self-reliance. This study conclude that program of technology transfer have to start since nuclear power development pre-project period, project construction of NPP period and also in operation period. To reach for technological ability of self-reliance require to be done by long-term program and require to be build by several units which last for a transfer of technology. Government Commitment to have important role also have to be strong to push the happening of technology transfer. Institutions in concerned should have to be clear and hold responsible according to its interest. National industries as executor of technology transfer require to be given by larger ones opportunity in course of transfer this technology. (author)

  8. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  9. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  10. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  11. Proceedings of the 9th National Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan; Tran Huu Phat; Le Van Hong; Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Mong Sinh; Phan Si An; Le Huy Ham; Le Quang Luan; Trinh Van Giap; Le Ba Thuan; Cao Dinh Thanh; Bui Dang Hanh; Le Thuy Mai

    2011-01-01

    The National Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology is organized every two years to present and summarise results of studies and applications of nuclear energy in Vietnam. Proceedings of the 9 th Conference include following parts: nuclear power and nuclear reactors; nuclear physics and nuclear data; nuclear analytical techniques, radiation measurement and radiation protection; nuclear application in health care; nuclear application in agriculture and biology; nuclear application in industry and hydrology; nuclear fuel cycle, material technology and radioactive waste management. (NHA)

  12. Revolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design Through Digital Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Shi, J.; Chen, W.

    2015-01-01

    In the digital times, digital technology has penetrated into every industry. As the highest safety requirement standard, nuclear power industry needs digital technology more to breed high quality and efficiency. Digital power plant is derived from digital design and the digitisation of power plant transfer is an inevitable trend. This paper introduces the technical solutions and features of digital nuclear power plant construction by Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research & Design Institute, points out the key points and technical difficulties that exist in the process of construction and can serve as references for further promoting construction of digital nuclear power plant. Digital technology is still flourishing. Although many problems will be encountered in construction, it is believed that digital technology will make nuclear power industry more safe, cost-effective and efficient. (author)

  13. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  14. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  15. Electronics in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastidar, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    Electronics plays a vital role in the field of nuclear research and industry. Nuclear instrumentation and control systems rely heavily on electronics for reliable plant operation and to ensure personnel safety from harmful radiations. Rapid developments in electronics have resulted in the gradual phasing out of pneumatic instruments and replacement by solid-state electronic systems. On-line computers are now being used extensively for centralised monitoring and control of large nuclear plants. The paper covers the following main topics: (i) radiation detection and measurement, (ii) systems for nuclear research and design, (iii) nuclear reactor control and safety systems and (iv) modern trends in reactor control and nuclear instrumentation systems. The methods for radiation detection, ionization chambers, self-powdered detectors and semiconductor detectors are discussed in brief, followed by the description of the electronic systems commonly used in nuclear research, namely the pulse height, multichannel, correlation and fourier analysers. NIM and CAMAC, the electronic system standards used in nuclear laboratories/industries are also outlined. Electronic systems used for nuclear reactor control, safety, reactor core monitoring, failed fuel detection and process control instrumentation, have been described. The application of computers to reactor control, plant data processing, better man-machine interface and the use of multiple computer systems for achieving better reliability have also been discussed. Micro-computer based instrumentation systems, computers in reactor safety and advanced nuclear instrumentation techniques are briefly illustrated. (auth.)

  16. Nuclear technology and the developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    through air travel, industry out sourcing, and intangible channels of communication such as the Internet. Simply put, as international borders become more porous as a result of free-trade arrangements, opportunities for proliferators multiply as well. Although the collection of information and intelligence to aid nonproliferation has become easier in a more open and transparent trade environment, efforts to stem proliferation have become more difficult as the means of acquiring and transporting nuclear and other WMD-related technologies have also multiplied. As these examples suggest, existing nonproliferation tools and export control mechanisms are not up to the task of dealing with new global economic realities. IAEA Director noted recently: 'The relative ease with which a multinational illicit network could be set up and operated demonstrates clearly the inadequacy of the present export control system.' Nor is it likely -absent substantial support from authorities in developing countries around the globe - that all of today's new proliferation channels can be effectively plugged. What is needed, therefore (and has long been recognized as essential by nonproliferation advocates) is a universal norm supporting nonproliferation. But how can this goal be achieved? As with much of today's discussion about globalization, the answer may lie in China. A credible proliferation control system is viewed in Beijing as a prerequisite to China becoming a high-tech economy. China also could play a more critical role in promoting international cooperative nonproliferation activities. It is incumbent even more so, however, on the international community to recognize, promote, and engage efforts by China and other developing States to institute improved trade controls, even though these are made in the countries' own national self interest. In this endeavor, the interests of the international community and the state intersect. Support for such activities should be given high priority in

  17. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options

  18. Nuclear science and technology: perspective prospects for Philippine development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleta, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    The paper provides some historical perspectives on nuclear energy utilization and development in the Philippines. Highlights on applications in agriculture, medicine, industry, environment and regulations are mentioned. Current activities include gamma sterilization, food irradiation, sterile insect technique for pest eradication, medical applications, isotope techniques, radiation protection activities and nuclear power. Prospective contribution of national development through the use of radiation and nuclear techniques include those for water resources assessment, environmental and pollution studies, electricity generation and nuclear desalination. The regulatory aspects in support of the nuclear energy development are also discussed. (author)

  19. Technology transfer assessment in the nuclear agreement Brazil-Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    The three main arguments utilized in the Nuclear Brazil-Germany Agreement celebrated in 1975 were the following: a) the low Brazilian hydroelectric potential insufficient to attend the increasing of electrical energy demand; b) the low cost of nuclear energy related to hydroelectric energy: c) and finally, the nuclear technology transfer, involving inclusive the fuel cycle and that could permit to Brazil self-sufficiency in the nuclear energy field. Thus, this work intends to describe and discussing the 'technology transfer strategy' trying to understand and showing which are its main characteristics, and also which are the real actuals results. (author) [pt

  20. Proceedings of the first annual Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    This document represents the published proceedings of the first annual Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Project (NCSTP) Workshop, which took place May 12--14, 1992, in Gaithersburg, Md. The conference consisted of four sessions, each dealing with a specific aspect of nuclear criticality safety issues. The session titles were ''Criticality Code Development, Usage, and Validation,'' ''Experimental Needs, Facilities, and Measurements,'' ''Regulation, Compliance, and Their Effects on Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety,'' and ''The Nuclear Criticality Community Response to the USDOE Regulations and Compliance Directives.'' The conference also sponsored a Working Group session, a report of the NCSTP Working Group is also presented. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  1. A project in support of Nuclear Technology Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Choi, Pyong Hoon; Yi, Ji Ho (and others)

    2005-12-15

    Establish the integrated management system of information resources and to automate business flow and to improve business productivity through efficient information sharing. - Promotion of domestic nuclear energy technology by utilizing nuclear energy informations and computer software developed in the advanced countries. - Establish strategies of international cooperation in an effort to promote our nation's Leading role in international society, to form the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing international nuclear climate.

  2. Development of Operation of Nuclear Technology Education Program for Mutual Technical Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. Y.; Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this project is to provide training opportunities to key personnel from developing countries in the field of nuclear technologies through which it would be possible to expand our nation's role as a technology donor and as a leading country in the international nuclear society. In addition, it is expected that this training course would be useful for building a foundation to enter the international markets of nuclear technology and related products. Through this project, it was possible to obtain the current status of the nuclear industries in the countries with which potential cooperation would be expected in the future. Inviting key manager groups from countries which are interested in technology transfer from other countries could provide them with an opportunity to experience our nation's nuclear industries and technologies. Specifically, this project could open with a seminar in Kazakhstan which has abundant natural resources including uranium. Through this visit, it was possible to enhance the cooperation between the two countries in nuclear technology, and it opened a way to cooperate in the support of the Kazakhstan medical radioisotope center and human resources development

  3. Development of Operation of Nuclear Technology Education Program for Mutual Technical Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. Y.; Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J. (and others)

    2004-12-15

    The objective of this project is to provide training opportunities to key personnel from developing countries in the field of nuclear technologies through which it would be possible to expand our nation's role as a technology donor and as a leading country in the international nuclear society. In addition, it is expected that this training course would be useful for building a foundation to enter the international markets of nuclear technology and related products. Through this project, it was possible to obtain the current status of the nuclear industries in the countries with which potential cooperation would be expected in the future. Inviting key manager groups from countries which are interested in technology transfer from other countries could provide them with an opportunity to experience our nation's nuclear industries and technologies. Specifically, this project could open with a seminar in Kazakhstan which has abundant natural resources including uranium. Through this visit, it was possible to enhance the cooperation between the two countries in nuclear technology, and it opened a way to cooperate in the support of the Kazakhstan medical radioisotope center and human resources development.

  4. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mdoe, S.L.; Kimaro, E.

    2006-01-01

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  5. Success in nuclear technology transfer: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, D.S.; Stevens, J.E.S.; Boulton, J.

    1986-10-01

    Technology transfer has played a significant part in the expansion of nuclear power to many countries of the world. Canada's involvement in nuclear technology transfer spans four decades. The experience gained through technology transfer, initially to Canadian industry and then to other countries in association with the construction of CANDU nuclear power plants, forms a basis from which to assess the factors which contribute to successful technology transfer. A strong commitment from all parties, in terms of both financial and human resources, is essential to success. Detailed planning of both the scope and timing of the technology transfer program is also required together with an assessment of the impact of the introduction of nuclear power on other sectors of the economy. (author)

  6. Reference nuclear data for space technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.W.; Holden, N.E.; Pearlstein, S.

    1977-01-01

    Specialized bibliographic searches, data compilations, and data evaluations help the basic and applied research scientist in his work. The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) collates and analyzes nuclear physics information, and is concerned with the timely production and revision of reference nuclear data. A frequently revised reference data base in computerized form has the advantage of large quantities of data available without publication delays. The information normally handled by coordinated efforts of NNDC consists of neutron, charged-particle, nuclear structure, radioactive decay, and photonuclear data. 2 figures

  7. Nuclear Science and Engineering education at the Delft University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    2009-01-01

    There is a national awareness in the Netherlands for strengthening education in the nuclear sciences, because of the ageing workforce, and to ensure competence as acceptability increases of nuclear power as an option for diversification of the energy supply. This may be reflected by the rapidly increasing number of students at the Delft University of Technology with interest in nuclear science oriented courses, and related bachelor and MSc graduation projects. These considerations formed the basis of the Nuclear Science and Engineering concentration, effectively starting in 2009. The programme can be taken as focus of the Research and Development Specialisation within the Master Programme in Applied Physics or as a Specialisation within the Master's Programme in Chemical Engineering. Both programmes require successful completion of a total of 120 ECTS study points, consisting of two academic years of 60 ECTS (1680 hours of study). Of that total, 100 ECTS are in the field of Nuclear Science and Engineering, depending on students choices within the programme, including a (industrial) internship, to be taken in companies all over the world. In Chemical Engineering, there is a compulsory design project during which a product or process should be developed. Both programmes also require a final graduation project. In both curricula, Nuclear Science and Engineering comprises compulsory and elective courses, which allow students to focus on either health or energy. Examples of courses include Nuclear Science, Nuclear Chemistry, Nuclear Engineering, Reactor Physics, Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Medical Physics and Radiation Technology and Radiological Health Physics. (Author)

  8. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  9. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1979-07-01

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  10. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    Actual edition of Annual Report is a full review of scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1998. The abstracts are presented in the following group of subjects: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies (26); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (25); radiobiology (11); nuclear technologies and methods - process engineering (5); material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics (9); nucleonic control systems (7). The edition also included the list of INCT scientific publications and patents as well as information on conferences organized or co-organized by the INCT in 1998

  11. Technology for Improving Medication Monitoring in Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapane, Kate L; Cameron, Kathleen; Feinberg, Janice

    2005-01-01

    .... While clinical informatics systems have focused on the reduction of medication errors at the point of prescribing, dispensing, or administration, few have proposed the use of information technology...

  12. Nuclear data for science and technology: Centres for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section operates a centre which maintains the world's most comprehensive collection of nuclear and atomic data libraries that are needed for nuclear and radiation technologies in Member States. This article reviews these services, and the particular role of developing countries in this global data network. The availability of various data files to scientists in all IAEA Member States and its sources are mentioned. More recently the world's major data libraries have also become accessible on-line through NDIS, the Nuclear Data Information System, via the Internet or World Wide Web. The availability of various data files to scientists in all IAEA Member States and its sources are mentioned. Examples of nuclear data categories, Nuclear data libraries, Special purpose libraries, Network of nuclear data center and Nuclear data handbooks are given

  13. Implications of health reform for the medical technology industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexon, David; Ubl, Stephen J

    2010-07-01

    Health care reform will greatly affect the medical technology industry in both positive and negative ways. Expanded coverage is a modest benefit that will increase demand for products. But the medical device excise tax authorized by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act could have negative effects on research, profits, and investments. Moreover, limits on Medicare payments could reduce revenues. The largest long-term impact on medical technology will come from measures to improve quality and efficiency. These could improve the health care system and increase opportunities for medical technology, but inappropriate implementation could slow medical progress and limit patients' access to needed care.

  14. Recommended numerical nuclear physics data for cutting-edge nuclear technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.; Srivenkatesan, R.; Anek Kumar; Murthy, C.S.R.C.; Dhekne, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces some aspects of online nuclear data services at Mumbai as part of today's technology of sharing knowledge of the recommended numerical nuclear physics data for nuclear applications. The physics foundation for cutting-edge technology applications is significantly strengthened by such knowledge generation and sharing techniques. A BARC server is presently mirroring the nuclear data services of the IAEA, Vienna. The users can get all the nuclear data information much faster from the BARC nuclear data mirror website that is now fully operational. The nuclear community is encouraged to develop the habit of accessing the website for recommended values of nuclear data for use in research and applications. The URL is: www-nds.indcentre.org.in (author)

  15. Defining nuclear medical file format based on DICOM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Bin; Jin Yongjie; Li Yulan

    2000-01-01

    With the wide using of computer technology in medical area, DICOM is becoming the standard of digital imaging and communication. The author discusses how to define medical imaging file format based on DICOM standard. It also introduces the file format of ANMIS system authors defined and the validity and integrality of this format

  16. Defining nuclear medical file formal based on DICOM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Bin; Jin Yongjie; Li Yulan

    2001-01-01

    With the wide application of computer technology in medical area, DICOM is becoming the standard of digital imaging and communication. The author discusses how to define medical imaging file formal based on DICOM standard. It also introduces the format of ANMIS system the authors defined the validity and integrality of this format

  17. Technology in the policy process - controlling nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingridge, D.

    1983-01-01

    The discussion in this book is built around nuclear power. The technology of nuclear power is shown to have features which make it inflexible in the sense that, once built, it is difficult and expensive to control. If inflexible technology is to be avoided, it is crucially important to be able to identify this failing at an early stage in the technology's development, before it has acquired an immunity to political control. Again, this problem is approached through the example of nuclear power, in particular the breeder reactor. The breeder is shown to be even less flexible than today's nuclear technology, because it will have higher capital costs, be of greater capital intensity, longer lead time, larger unit size, and will require more infrastructure for its operation. If this is developed, the breeder will be even less open to political control than the nuclear plant of the present. To put it another way, its planning will be even more open to errors and whatever errors are made will be even more costly than for existing nuclear technology. It is therefore even less of a socially and economically acceptable technology than today's nuclear power. (author)

  18. A study on the nuclear technology policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Maeng Ho; Ham, C. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Lee, B. O.; Yun, S. W.; Choi, Y. M.; Eom, T. Y.

    1998-01-01

    This study analyzed the major issues as the research activities for the support of establishment and implementation of national policy. The analyses were focused on the recommendations of the responsive direction of national policy in positive and effective manners in accordance with the changes of international nuclear affairs. This study also analyzed the creation of environmental foundation for effective implementation of the national policy and national R and D investment such as securing national consensus and openings of policy information to the public. The major results of the role and position of nuclear policy, trends of nuclear policy and nuclear R and D activities of USA, France, Japan, Asian developing countries etc. and international trends of small- and medium-sized reactor as well as spin-offs of nuclear R and D activities, were analyzed. (author). 66 refs., 27 tabs., 15 figs

  19. Nuclear technology and knowledge management in radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.

    2007-01-01

    The cycle of life of nuclear power plant expands along seven well defined phases lasting about a century and therefore employing three successive generations. Each one of such phases is in need of specific knowledge on radiation protection matters. The nuclear moratorium introduced in Spain in 1983 suspended all those activities related to site selection, design and construction of new units and their commissioning. As it does not seem to be prudent to renounce to nuclear energy on a permanent basis, nuclear utilities, engineering and service companies, academic, research and state organizations agencies should establish programmes to recuperate the radiological knowledge and experience, among other subjects, acquired in the interrupted activities. Likewise, those responsible for the operation of nuclear power plants and the follow up activities should also establish knowledge management activities on radiation protection and other subject matters in line with the IAEA recommendations. (Author) 19 refs

  20. Nuclear data measurement and evaluation activities for nuclear power technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioux, P.; Mouney, H.; Rowlands, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Activity in the field of nuclear data for the fission power technology applications is reviewed. The present situation is of concern to the French nuclear industry because of the few measurement facilities which are now funded for work in the field and the reductions in the number of scientists expert in measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. It is argued that there are requirements which justify work to improve many items of nuclear data. (authors)

  1. Knowledge network for medical technology management in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Fabiola Martínez; Leehan, Joaquín Azpiroz; Méndez, Miguel Cadena; Yuriar, Salvador Duarte; Salazar, Raúl Molina; Gilmore, Amador Terán

    2009-10-01

    The role of biomedical engineers (BMEs) has changed widely over the years, from managing a group of technicians to the planning of large installations and the management of medical technology countrywide. As the technology has advanced, the competence of BMEs has been challenged because it is no longer possible to be an expert in every component of the technology involved in running a hospital. Our approach has been to form a network of professionals that are experts in different fields related to medical technology, where work is coordinated to provide high quality services at the planning and execution stages of projects related to medical technology. A study of the procedures involved in the procurement of medical technology has been carried out over the years. These experiences have been compared with several case studies where the approach to problem solving in this area has been multidisciplinary. Planning and execution phases of projects involving medical technology management have been identified. After several instances of collaboration among experts from different fields, a network for management of healthcare technology has been formed at our institution that incorporates the experience from different departments that were dealing separately with projects involving medical technology. This network has led us to propose this approach to solve medical technology management projects, where the strengths of each subgroup complement each other. This structure will lead to a more integrated approach to healthcare technology management and will ensure higher quality solutions.

  2. 9th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference. Nuclear energy, science and technology - Pacific partnership. Proceedings Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The theme of the 9th Pacific Basin Nuclear conference held in Sydney from 1-6 May 1994, embraced the use of the atom in energy production and in science and technology. The focus was on selected topics of current and ongoing interest to countries around the Pacific Basin. The two-volume proceedings include both invited and contributed papers. They have been indexed separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Pacific partnership; perspectives on nuclear energy, science and technology in Pacific Basin countries; nuclear energy and sustainable development; economics of the power reactors; new power reactor projects; power reactor technology; advanced reactors; radioisotope and radiation technology; biomedical applications

  3. Nuclear power technologies for application in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    The tremendous social and political changes which have occurred during the recent decade in the former USSR made it possible to launch the process of commercialization of defense-related technologies in Russia. The so-called dual-use technologies are meant to be initially developed by the state for defense needs, but having a high commercial potential as well. To date, the process of such technology transfer from the state sector to a private one has been limited primarily by insufficient progress of the national private sector. Essentially, the main economic problem still remains the attraction of private capital for the promotion of dual-use technologies to the point at where they acquire commercially viable. A large number of advanced technologies are waiting to be commercialized. The report presented considers the prospects of civil use of some technologies related to the nuclear power area: space nuclear power systems, nuclear powered submarines and rector-pumped lasers. (author)

  4. Development of pressure boundaries leak detection technology for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Zhang Liming

    2008-01-01

    The leak detection for the pressure boundaries is an important safeguard in nuclear reactor operation. In the paper, the status and the characters on the development of the pressure boundaries leak detection technology for the nuclear reactor were reviewed, especially, and the advance of the radiation leak detection technology and the acoustic emission leak detection technology were analyzed. The new advance trend of the leak detection technology was primarily explored. According to the analysis results, it is point out that the advancing target of the leak detection technology is to enhance its response speed, sensitivity, and reliability, and to provide effective information for operator and decision-maker. The realization of the global leak detection and the whole life cycle health monitoring for the nuclear boundaries is a significant advancing tendency of the leak detection technology. (authors)

  5. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  6. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  7. The nuclear education and staffing challenge: Rebuilding critical skills in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.; Bond, L.J.; Waltar, A.E.; Leber, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of nuclear legacies, global security, nonproliferation, homeland security and national defense, radiobiology and nuclear energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. Current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs are presented. (author)

  8. Measuring Public Acceptance of Nuclear Technology with Big data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Seugkook

    2015-01-01

    Surveys can be conducted only on people in specific region and time interval, and it may be misleading to generalize the results to represent the attitude of the public. For example, opinions of a person living in metropolitan area, far from the dangers of nuclear reactors and enjoying cheap electricity produced by the reactors, and a person living in proximity of nuclear power plants, subject to tremendous damage should nuclear meltdown occur, certainly differs for the topic of nuclear generation. To conclude, big data is a useful tool to measure the public acceptance of nuclear technology efficiently (i.e., saves cost, time, and effort of measurement and analysis) and this research was able to provide a case for using big data to analyze public acceptance of nuclear technology. Finally, the analysis identified opinion leaders, which allows target-marketing when policy is executed

  9. Medical intervention in case of nuclear or radiation event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, J.; Bourguignon, M.; Carli, P.; Carosella, E.; Challeton de Vathaire, C.; Court, L.; Ducousso, R.; Facon, A.; Fleutot, J.B.; Goldstein, P.; Gourmelon, P.; Herbelet, G.; Kolodie, H.; Lallemand, J.; Martin, J.C.; Menthonnex, P.; Masse, R.; Origny, S.; Pasnon, J.; Peton Klein, D.; Rougy, C.; Schoulz, D.; Romet, G.; Telion, C.; Vrousos, C.

    2002-01-01

    This guide aims to be a practical tool for intervenors in case of nuclear or radiation accident. It proposes many sheets to favor the reactivity and the implementing of adapted measures. It concerns the course of action to take in case of irradiation accident or contamination and the reception in medical structure or a hospital. (A.L.B.)

  10. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine | Vangu | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 8 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine. MW Vangu. Abstract.

  11. Catastrophe theory with application in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, Serban Constantin

    2002-01-01

    The monograph is structured on the following seven chapters: 1. Correlation of risk, catastrophe and chaos at the level of polyfunctional systems with nuclear injection; 1.1 Approaching the risk at the level of power systems; 1.2 Modelling the chaos-catastrophe-risk correlation in the structure of integrated classical and nuclear processes; 2. Catastrophe theory applied in ecosystems models and applications; 2.1 Posing the problems in catastrophe theory; 2.2 Application of catastrophe theory in the engineering of the power ecosystems with nuclear injection; 4.. Decision of abatement of the catastrophic risk based on minimal costs; 4.1 The nuclear power systems sensitive to risk-catastrophe-chaos in the structure of minimal costs; 4.2 Evaluating the market structure on the basis of power minimal costs; 4.3 Decisions in power systems built on minimal costs; 5. Models of computing the minimal costs in classical and nuclear power systems; 5.1 Calculation methodologies of power minimal cost; 5.2 Calculation methods of minimal costs in nuclear power sector; 6. Expert and neuro expert systems for supervising the risk-catastrophe-chaos correlation; 6.1 The structure of expert systems; 6.2 Application of the neuro expert program; 7. Conclusions and operational proposals; 7.1 A synthesis of the problems presented in this work; 7.2 Highlighting the novel aspects applicable in the power systems with nuclear injection

  12. 2005 meeting nuclear technology conference: plenary address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlefelder, W.

    2005-01-01

    In retrospect, last year on the whole was a good year for nuclear power in Germany. Nuclear power plants achieved excellent outputs, fuel transports were carried out without any interruptions, construction of interim stores progresses, and there are no more vociferous public exchanges about nuclear power. In view of the more and more urgent questions of future energy supply of the country, the attitude of the German public to nuclear power has changed for a more pragmatic view. As foreseeable, the idea of replacing nuclear power by renewable energy resources more and more turns out to be an illusion. The consequences can be seen, e.g., in the emission balances of the dena Study, and would lead to considerably higher costs, respectively. The stagnation in the final storage area must be ended. Concrete real progress in the field is necessary, and German politics is required to take pragmatic steps. This will be possible only if we stick to the two-repositories concept. The nuclear industry in many ways works to preserve know-how in the field on the long term. Its commitment goes far beyond the commercial interests of any specific company, for instance, in co-financing research projects. Nuclear power is gaining more and more ground in international development. The EPR is under construction in Finland, and a decision to build the EPR has been taken in France. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear data for medical applications: An overview of present status and future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, M. Qaim

    2017-09-01

    A brief overview of nuclear data required for medical applications is given. The major emphasis is on radionuclides for internal applications, both for diagnosis and therapy. The status of the presently available data is discussed and some of the emerging needs are outlined. Most of the needs are associated with the development of non-standard positron emitters and novel therapeutic radionuclides. Some new developments in application of radionuclides, e.g. theranostic approach, multimode imaging, radionanoparticles, etc. are described and the related nuclear data needs are discussed. The possible use of newer irradiation technologies for medical radionuclide production, e.g. intermediate energy charged-particle accelerators, high-power electron accelerators for photon production, and spallation neutron sources, will place heavy demands on nuclear data.

  14. Nuclear data for medical applications: An overview of present status and future needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M.Qaim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview of nuclear data required for medical applications is given. The major emphasis is on radionuclides for internal applications, both for diagnosis and therapy. The status of the presently available data is discussed and some of the emerging needs are outlined. Most of the needs are associated with the development of non-standard positron emitters and novel therapeutic radionuclides. Some new developments in application of radionuclides, e.g. theranostic approach, multimode imaging, radionanoparticles, etc. are described and the related nuclear data needs are discussed. The possible use of newer irradiation technologies for medical radionuclide production, e.g. intermediate energy charged-particle accelerators, high-power electron accelerators for photon production, and spallation neutron sources, will place heavy demands on nuclear data.

  15. A study on international nuclear cooperation and technology self-reliance strategies for nuclear development in other countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Myung; Han, Pil Soon; Park, Yun Sik; Song, Ki Dong; Yang, Mang Ho; Oh, Keun Bae; Jang, Hong Lae; Lee, Dong Jin; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Sung Ki; Ko, Han Suk

    1993-12-01

    This study deals with international nuclear cooperation and technology self-reliance for nuclear development in other countries. This study also analyses the international and domestic nuclear environment such as NPT, nuclear export control, gloval environmental issues, and public acceptance. Finally, a suggestion is made for the future direction of strategy for nuclear technology self-reliance in Korea. (Author)

  16. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. A., Jr.

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth.

  17. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Atoms for peace: Extending the benefits of nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, J.; Rogov, A.

    1995-01-01

    The article focuses on the projects co-operatively undertaken through IAEA mechanisms to extend the reach of beneficial nuclear technologies in response to increasing demands for technical support and assistance from its Member States

  19. Three voices: women working in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear science and technology is a fascinating and growing work area for women. This short video portrays three professional women working within this field for the International Atomic Energy Agency

  20. Annual meeting on nuclear technology '92. Technical session 'Nuclear energy discussion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The report contains the six special papers red at the 1992 annual conference on nuclear engineering at Karlsruhe, all of which are individually retrievable from the database. They deal with the following subjects: historical development of the basic trends of technology criticism; communication problems in connection with the conveying of technical facts; psycho-sociological patterns of technology anxiety-mental infection or risk consciousness; field of tension between technology and journalism; handling of insecurities; ethical justifiability of nuclear energy use. (HSCH) [de

  1. Fallout: the defence, industrial and technological benefits of nuclear deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In the current climate of budgetary restrictions, it is fair to question the weight of military nuclear defence spending. Upon examination, however, nuclear deterrence has numerous military, industrial, and technological benefits. It is, in fact, totally intertwined with the other elements of our defence system. (author)

  2. Radiation protection and safety: for nuclear technology development support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Pedro, A.; Hermida, J.; Fraga, H.

    1996-01-01

    A study about ICRP 60 changes as well as legal aspects and radiation protection activities in Uruguay was reported in this article. Special attention in the personnel dosimetry, radioactive sources control and their national inventory, SSDL, radioactive wastes management and SAMARI system can found among main activities developed in the Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Sector in National Nuclear Technology Direction

  3. Development of a national neutron database for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igantyuk, A.V.; Kononov, V.N.; Kuzminov, B.D.; Manokhin, V.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Furzov, B.I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the stages of a many years activities at the IPPE consisting of the measurement, theoretical description and evaluation of neutron data, and of the establishment of a national data bank of neutron data for nuclear technology. A list of libraries which are stored at the Nuclear Data Centre is given. (author). 16 refs, 14 tabs

  4. Medical management of radiation/nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Aseem

    2014-01-01

    The medical issues in a radioactive fallout eventuality include radioprotectors, radioactivity de corporators, hemopoietic system regenerators, community and individual dosage issues, logistic and scale-up issues, regulatory issues. These issues are further compounded by the fact that published literature is (and will be) sparse and outdated, and pharma majors are unlikely to involve themselves in the R and D as well as in the supply chain. Self-developed out-of-box solutions are therefore needed. INMAS, DRDO has recently made progress on all these fronts. Many of these products have already been approved by DCGI and others are in an advanced development stage. Radioprotector has been and is an Achilles heals for the concerned scientists and a number of state agencies for a long time. However, it is a difficult area to work in for a number of reasons. New research in this area shall be highlighted. Finally, clinical trials, which are considered a norm and the final step before introduction of new drugs, are not strictly possible in case of decorporating agents and radioprotectors. Ways and means to collect safety-efficacy data shall be discussed

  5. Biological aspects of nuclear technology: nuclear technology potent medicine against malignancy care required to guard against harmful aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear technology while producing energy is also used to produce Radioisotopes, so called artificial radioactivity. Radiations emitted by radioisotopes are very helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant diseases. The subject of Radiation Biology developed with the need to study the effects of radiations on specific organs and areas of the human body. Along with the radioisotopes, instruments like Scanners, Cameras and Teletherapy machines were also developed to scan, map, deliver, and treat the specific parts of the body. A very large number of radioisotopes are now made, many of which are used for labeling compounds (radiopharmaceuticals) for targeting specific body organs in the sense that they tend to concentrate in those organs. Thus by scanning the organ, its condition is mapped or seen. This can then be treated by suitable amounts of the radioisotope delivered in a specific manner. Thus new disciplines of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics, developed as it became necessary to mark the cancerous area and calculate precisely the dose to be delivered and map its distribution. The other side of radioisotopes applications is their harmful effects on biological material which are also well known and well documented. Maximum limits of dose have been prescribed by National and International Organs to safeguard the health of the users. (author)

  6. China nuclear science and technology report: Abstracts, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1992 (Report Numbers CNIC-00555 ∼ CNIC-00674) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physics, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  7. Abstracts: China Nuclear Science and Technology Report (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Report published in 1989 (Report Numbers CNIC--00255∼CNIC--00354) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physics, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  8. Abstracts China nuclear science and technology reports (1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1988 (Report Numbers CNIC -00115 ∼ CNIC-00254) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physics, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  9. Abstracts China nuclear science and technology report (1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1999 (Report Numbers CNIC-01331 -CNIC-01430) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  10. 2008 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Pt. 1. Section reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, Ron; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Faber, Wolfgang; Berlepsch, Thilo v.; Spann, Holger; Schaffrath, Andreas; Schubert, Bernd; Rieger, Udo; Christ, Bernhard G.; Gulden, Werner; Bogusch, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    Summary report on these 5 - out of 11 - Sections of the Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology held in Hamburg on May 27-29, 2008: - Reactor Physics and Methods of Calculation - Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics - Safety of Nuclear Installations - Methods, Analysis, Results - Front End and Back End of the Fuel Cycle, Radioactive Waste, Storage - Fusion Technology. Other Sections will be covered in reports in further issues of atw. (orig.)

  11. Abstracts: China Nuclear Science and Technology Report (1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1990 (Report Numbers CNIC--00355 to CNIC-00454) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subjects categories, which mainly are physics, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  12. The social shaping of nuclear energy technology in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rennkamp, Britta; Bhuyan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the question why the South African government intends to procure nuclear energy technology, despite affordable and accessible fossil and renewable energy alternatives. We analyse the social shaping of nuclear energy technology based on the statements of political actors in the public media. We combine a discourse network analysis with qualitative analysis to establish the coalitions in support and opposition of the programme. The central arguments in the debate are cost, s...

  13. Abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Report (1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1998 (Report Numbers CNIC-01231-CNIC-01330) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physical sciences, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  14. China nuclear science and technology report (1991). Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The bibliographies and abstracts of China Nuclear Science and Technology Reports published in 1991 (Report Numbers CNIC-00455 to CNIC-00554) are presented. The items are arranged according to INIS subject categories, which mainly are physics, chemistry, materials, earth sciences, life sciences, isotopes, isotope and radiation applications, engineering and technology, and other aspects of nuclear energy. The numbers on the left corners of the entries are report numbers, and on the right corners the serial numbers. A report number index is annexed

  15. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    The INCT 1999 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  16. The status and prospects of nuclear reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven technology which currently contributes about 16% to the world electricity supply and, to a much lesser extent, to heat supply in some countries. Nuclear Power is economically competitive with fossil fuels for base load electricity generation in many countries, and is one of the commercially proven energy supply options that could be extended in the future to reduce environmental burdens, especially greenhouse gas emissions, from the electricity sector. Over the past five decades, nearly ten thousand reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with current nuclear power plants. However, nuclear power is currently at a cross-road. There are no new nuclear power construction projects in most parts of the world, except some countries in East Asia and Eastern Europe. The main issues are economic competitiveness with cheap gas plants and public concerns on nuclear waste disposal and safety. Strong economic growth and the shrinking of existing electricity over-capacities could favour nuclear power. Since nuclear power emits no greenhouse gases to the environment, its development could be further accelerated by a breakthrough in innovative nuclear reactor technology development. Great attention also needs to be paid to the design of new nuclear reactors, which are modularized and faster to construct, thus reducing capital investment and construction period, and thereby improving their overall economics and their compatibility with the infrastructure of, in particular, developing countries, where new energy demands are expected. This paper discusses the future world energy outlook, challenges for and progresses on nuclear power; overview of new nuclear reactor technology development; and the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the development of new innovative nuclear reactors. (author)

  17. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  18. Overview on Fusion Nuclear Technology Experimental Testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Entler, Slavomír; Kysela, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2016), č. článku 021018. ISSN 2332-8983 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * corrosion * thermohydraulic * LiPb * HHF * ITER Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  19. Nuclear science and technology branch report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    A summary is given of research activities. These include: nuclear techniques of analysis, isotope techniques in hydrology, industrial applications of radioisotopes, biological and chemical applications of radiation, radiation detection and measurement, environmental studies, biophysics and radiation biology. (J.R.)

  20. Innovative technology for safe, sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The report presents the ONET experience many areas related to nuclear energy, such as: new facility design and; construction & plant; revamping; operations support; maintenance; testing and inspection; decontamination, dismantling; waste treatment; asbestos removal; training and other engineering and logistic services

  1. Upgradation of nuclear medical equipment in the developing countries and its impact in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, Saleh Mahmud; Xie, Y.; Uddin, Md. Rokon; Haque, Mohammod Abu Sayid; Hoq, Mahbubul; Mawla, Yasmeen; Alom, Md. Zahangir; Morium, Tasnim

    2002-11-01

    Bangladesh has thirteen Nuclear Medical Centres and one Institute of Nuclear Medicine in the country which are being run and maintained by the physicians scientists and engineers of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission. The peaceful application of atomic energy was initiated through all these Centres with the use of clinical isotopes for thyroid and kidney studies. The equipment used for these purposes were the thyroid uptake system, rectilinear scanner and the multiprobe renogram system. The first gamma camera was installed in the country in 1980 at the Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Dhaka. That was the turning point for the country in the field of nuclear medicine. Presently all the nuclear medical establishments are equipped least with a gamma camera, thyroid uptake system and a renogram system. In the last two decades there has been a tremendous development in the design of nuclear medical equipment. Most of the old equipments were slow and manually operated. In the beginning of nineties of the past century there was an uprising in the computer technology and most of the manually operated machines were brought under computerization. It was basically done with a custom built processor to perform only the specific job and spare the users from doing some extra manual work. But the performances of the recent models of the same computerized equipment are by far the best as compared with the past ones. This report describes the role of the IAEA in the upgradation of medical equipment, PC interfacing, upgrading of old gamma cameras and the technological and socio-economic impact in Bangladesh

  2. Proceeding of the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Sastratenaya, A.S.; Sutarno, D.

    2000-01-01

    The proceeding contains papers presented in the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Element Cycle with theme of Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium, held on 22 February in Jakarta, Indonesia. These papers were divided by three groups that are technology of exploration, processing, purification and analysis of nuclear materials; technology of nuclear fuel elements and structures; and technology of waste management, safety and management of nuclear fuel cycle. There are 35 papers indexed individually. (id)

  3. The project of Esfahan Nuclear Technology Center (ENTEC) and the transfer of nuclear tecnology in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, Reza

    1977-01-01

    In 1974, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) decided to set up a Nuclear Technology Center on Esfahan (ENTEC) in collaboration with France's Technicatome Company and the CEA. This center is scheduled to go into operation during 1976-1980. The purposes for setting up ENTEC are threefold: a. to give scientific and technical support to the operation of nuclear power plants and nuclear industries in Iran. b. to carry out research and development in the area of nuclear technology on an industrial level. c. to give supplementary education and training to the manpower needs for the AEOI. To carry out the program of technology transfer, temporary laboratories have been set up in Tehran for engineers, technicians and training programs have been organized primarily in France. The ENTEC project will also include a school for education of junior scientists and engineers in the field of nuclear technology

  4. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    AFRA-NEST was Conceived at the AFRA Ministerial Conference held in Aswan in 2007. The main objective of AFRA-NEST is to facilitate operation and networking in higher education, training and related research in Nuclear Science (NS&T) in the African Region through: • Sharing of information and materials of nuclear education and training. The strategies for implementing the objectives are: the use ICT for web-based education and training,; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines. The main function of the AFRA-NEST is to; foster sustainable human resource development and nuclear knowledge management; host the Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training for the AFRA region and to integrate all available higher education capabilities in Africa

  5. A study on future nuclear reactor technology and development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, D. S.; Suk, S. D.; Zee, S. K.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Park, W. S

    2000-12-01

    Development of nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technology for future is essential to meet the current issues such as enhancement of nuclear power reactor safety, economically competitive with gas turbine power generation, less production of radioactive waste, proliferation resistant fuel cycle, and public acceptance in consideration of lack of energy resources in the nuclear countries worldwide as well as in Korea. This report deals with as follows, 1) Review the world energy demand and supply perspective and analyse nature of energy and sustainable development to set-up nuclear policy in Korea 2) Recaptitulate the current long term nuclear R and D activities 3) Review nuclear R and D activities and programs of USA, Japan, France, Russia, international organizations such as IAEA, OECD/NEA 4) Recommend development directions of nuclear reactors and fuels.

  6. Nuclear technology centre. Preserving and developing competence and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiren, I.

    1995-01-01

    The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm provides one third of Sweden's capacity for engineering studies and technical research at the post-high-school level. Altogether, the institute includes about 8000 students and 900 active postgraduate students and has a staff of nearly 2500. The research activities cover a broad spectrum of the natural sciences and technology, as well as architecture, industrial economics, urban planning, work science and environmental technology. In 1993, a Nuclear Technology Centre was established at the institute. The purpose of this Centre is to stimulate education and research in nuclear technology in order to contribute to the preservation and development of competence in the nuclear field. The formation of the Centre should be regarded as one of several recent initiatives aimed at maintaining a high level of safety and reliability in the operation of nuclear power plants at a time when there are political manoeuvres to phase out nuclear energy in Sweden. The paper summarizes the motives that led to the formation of the Centre, its goals and organization, and its initial activities and results. The paper may be of interest to similar organizations in other countries which are also faced with uncertainties regarding the future of existing nuclear power plants or of current programmes, and which consider that co-operation between the industry and universities is an important factor in ensuring the quality of technological development. (author). 4 refs

  7. Medical application of nuclear science: nuclear medicine and production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear science in attendance on medicine or from Radium to Radiopharmaceuticals. By a brief historical reminder of the evolution of the radioactivity and development of nuclear science, we could see a very early interest and application of the radioactivity in the medical field. Main steps: Detection of natural radioactivity/Discovery of artificial radioactivity/First treatment of leukaemia and thyroid/First nuclear reactor/First radioisotope laboratory in hospital/First scintigraphy/First radiopharmaceutical/First cyclotron and cyclotron products/First immunoscintigraphy/Biotechnology and radioisotope/Evolution of technics [equipment for diagnosis (imaging, scintigraphy) and therapy]/Evolution of production technics and concept of products (generators of Technetium) and machines, reactor, cyclotron/Evolution of importance and interest of nuclear medicine/Creation of international association of nuclear medicine and producers (example ARPR)/Evolution of safety and pharmaceuticals regulation. After the sixties, period extremely rich in invention of products, characterized by a high fertility specially due to a non-restrictive regulation in terms of safety and pharmaceutical consideration, the evolution of technics, the importance of costs (investment, research, healthcare and the evolution of the regulations) have smoothly but continuously transformed the contexts and different actors. Consequences and facts: Rationalization and standardization of the catalogues, total integration of radiopharmaceuticals into the pharmaceutical laws, stop of nuclear research reactors, increase of number of cyclotrons, transformation of size and role of the producers and nuclear centers, risk in supply of some raw materials like Molybdenum, medical nuclear application as a worldwide business

  8. An approach to human-centered design of nuclear medical equipment: the system of caption of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti; Silva, Carlos Borges da; Santana, Marcos; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Oliveira, Mauro Vitor de; Mol, Antonio Carlos Mol; Grecco, Claudio Henrique; Augusto, Silas Cordeiro

    2005-01-01

    Technology plays an important role in modern medical centers, making health care increasingly complex, relying on complex technical equipment. This technical complexity is particularly noticeable in the nuclear medicine and can increase the risks for human error. Human error has many causes such as performance shaping factors, organizational factors and user interface design. Poorly design human system interfaces of nuclear medical equipment can increase the risks for human error. If all nuclear medical equipment had been designed with good user interfaces, incidents and accidents could be reduced as well as he time required to learn how to use the equipment. Although some manufacturers of nuclear medical equipment have already integrate human factors principles in their products, there is still a need to steer the development of nuclear medical technology toward more human-centered approach. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology that contributes to the design, development and evaluation of nuclear medical equipment and human system interface, towards a human-centered approach. This methodology includes the ergonomic approach, based on the operator activity analysis, together with human factors standards and guidelines, questionnaires and user based testing. We describe a case study in which this methodology is being applied in evaluation of the thyroid uptake system, getting essential information and data, that ill be used in development of a new system. (author)

  9. Semantic Technologies for Nuclear Knowledge Modelling and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Gladyshev, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been engaged in working with Member States to preserve and enhance nuclear knowledge, and in supporting wide dissemination of safety related technical and technological information enhancing nuclear safety. The knowledge organization systems (ontologies, taxonomies, thesauri, etc.) provide one of the means to model and structure a given knowledge domain. The significance of knowledge organization systems (KOS) has been greatly enhanced by the evolution of the semantic technologies, enabling machines to “understand” the concepts described in a KOS, and to use them in a variety of applications. Over recent years semantic technologies have emerged as efficient means to improve access to information and knowledge. The Semantic Web Standards play an important role in creating an infrastructure of interoperable data sources based on principles of Linked Data. The status of utilizing semantic technologies in the nuclear domain is shortly reviewed, noting that such technologies are in their early stage of adoption, and considering some aspects which are specific to nuclear knowledge management. Several areas are described where semantic technologies are already deployed, and other areas are indicated where applications based on semantic technologies will have a strong impact on nuclear knowledge management in the near future. (author

  10. The role of computer simulation in nuclear technologies development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchev, M.Yu.; Shimansky, G.A.; Lebedeva, E.E.; Lichadeev, V. V.; Ryazanov, D.K.; Tellin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    In the report the role and purposes of computer simulation in nuclear technologies development is discussed. The authors consider such applications of computer simulation as nuclear safety researches, optimization of technical and economic parameters of acting nuclear plant, planning and support of reactor experiments, research and design new devices and technologies, design and development of 'simulators' for operating personnel training. Among marked applications the following aspects of computer simulation are discussed in the report: neutron-physical, thermal and hydrodynamics models, simulation of isotope structure change and damage dose accumulation for materials under irradiation, simulation of reactor control structures. (authors)

  11. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations.

  12. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations

  13. 78 FR 39343 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... gather the information necessary to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for construction and.... AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Intent to prepare environmental impact statement and... (NRC) will be preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) related to the review of the...

  14. Technologies for detection of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Detection of smuggled nuclear materials at transit points requires monitoring unknown samples in large closed packages. This review contends that high-confidence nuclear-material detection requires induced fission as the primary mechanism, with passive radiation screening in a complementary role. With the right equipment, even small quantities of nuclear materials are detectable with a high probability at transit points. The equipment could also be linked synergistically with detectors of other contrabond. For screening postal mail and packages, passive monitors are probably more cost-effective. When a suspicious item is detected, a single active probe could then be used. Until active systems become mass produced, this two-stage screening/interrogation role for active/passive equipment is more economic for cargo at border crossings. For widespread monitoring of nuclear smuggling, it will probably be necessary to develop a system for simultaneously detecting most categories of contraband, including explosives and illicit drugs. With control of nuclear materials at known storage sites being the first line of defense, detection capabilities at international borders could establish a viable second line of defense against smuggling

  15. 78 FR 19537 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... Technologies, Inc. (SHINE) intends to submit an application to construct a medical isotope production facility... construct its medical isotope production facility in Rock County, Wisconsin. By letter dated July 10, 2012... action for licensing a medical isotope production facility is not an action identified in 51.20(b...

  16. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare....

  17. Survey of Nuclear Methods in Chemical Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1966-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify nuclear methods on a logical basis to facilitate assimilation by the technologist. The three main groups are: (I) Tracer methods, (II) Methods based on the influence of absorbers on radiations to be measured, and (III) Radiation chemical methods. The variants of the first two groups are discussed in some detail, and typical examples are given. Group I can be subdivided into (1) Indicator methods, (2) Emanation methods, (3) Radioreagent methods, and (4) Isotope dilution methods, Group II into (5) Activation methods, (6) Absorption methods, (7) Induced Nuclear Reaction methods, (8) Scattering methods, and (9) Fluorescence methods. While the economic benefits due to nuclear methods already run into hundreds of millions of dollars annually, owing to radiation protection problems radiochemical methods in the strict sense are not widely used in actual production. It is suggested that more use should be made of pilot plant tracer studies of chemical processes as used in industry. (author)

  18. The NEA Nuclear Education, Skills and Technology (NEST) Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Liudmila; Gulliford, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Since the use of nuclear technology for a wide range of purposes is increasing, with many NEA member countries constructing or planning to construct new generation nuclear power plants, the NEA is developing the NEA Nuclear Education, Skills and Technology (NEST) Framework in partnership with its member countries. This initiative will help address important gaps in nuclear skills capacity building, knowledge transfer and technical innovation in an international context. It will also assist countries examining long-term options to manage high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, as well as better ways to decommission old facilities. The majority of these countries are likewise facing challenging issues in other fields related to nuclear energy, ranging from medicine to the environment. The need to develop and apply innovative technologies in order to meet these challenges is apparent in all these areas. At the same time, advances in fields such as materials science and instrumentation, linked with the availability of high-performance computing, have opened up new avenues ripe for exploitation, which makes for a combination of exciting new areas of innovation alongside longstanding challenges in the nuclear field. The goal of NEST is to energise advanced students, post-doctoral appointees and young professionals to pursue careers in the nuclear field

  19. Towards a nuclear energy technology roadmap. A new service to the nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Durpel, Luc; Thomas, Chris Creighton

    2005-01-01

    The role of nuclear energy in a future sustainable energy mix has been the subject of debates over the past few years. The future for nuclear energy will not only depend on this energy market development and the socio-political environment, but also on the innovation potential of the nuclear community to cope with the ever shorter business cycles in the energy market and the inherently longer term horizon needed in developing nuclear energy at its potential. Today's nuclear R and D community is in a transition phase, i.e. from former 'national' R and D-organisational structure to a truly international research area based on partnerships between organisations and companies creating networks-of-excellence. Several studies in the recent past have indicated the need for a shared vision in guiding this process. Identification of shared R and D-programmes, mergers and acquisitions of organizations and companies, knowledge gap analysis and the strategic mapping for each organization or company active in this nuclear R and D community. Technology Roadmapping is the appropriate tool to respond to these needs. Several stand-alone nuclear roadmap activities have been undertaken but lacked the possibility to analyse and make use of the synergies and interactions inherent to this technology development. The development has started of a master nuclear roadmap portal covering all the roadmap and technology foresight information in one so-called master nuclear roadmap. This master nuclear roadmap is implemented in an electronic online format allowing easy access, easy updating and lots of functionalities which may not be offered by traditional snap-shot roadmap reports. The paper will bring an overview on the role that technology roadmapping is playing in various industry sectors and the added value it may bring in the nuclear technology sector on a organizational as well as technology sector level. The paper will highlight the current status of this new initiative. (author)

  20. Medical resources after nuclear war. Availability v need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, H L

    1984-08-03

    In defining capacity to "survive" a massive nuclear exchange, it is important to assess the medical resources that will be available in the post-nuclear war world. Approximately 80% of these resources--hospital beds and personnel, blood, drugs, and medical supplies--will have been destroyed, since they are located in or near the densely populated areas that constitute primary targets of attack. Casualty estimates published by federal agencies, together with data from the Hiroshima-Nagasaki experience, suggest the numbers and types of injuries that will afflict the US population. With a probable 48,000 surviving physicians to treat 32 million casualties, there will be one physician for every 663 patients. Of the trauma and burn victims, approximately 55% will require hospitalization; this will mean 64 patients for each available hospital bed. Data from recent wars have been utilized to determine the trauma-related blood requirements in the post-nuclear war world. Of the 64 million units of whole blood needed, only 14,000 will be available. Other medical resources will be in equally short supply. This disparity between need and availability indicates the difficulty of developing a meaningful medical response for the surviving injured.

  1. Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    .... The committee examines the currently used "once-through" fuel cycle versus different alternatives of separations and transmutation technology systems, by which hazardous radionuclides are converted...

  2. Developing new products from Canadian nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.; Lyon, R.B.

    1987-06-01

    By 1990, the Federal Government will have reduced its support for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's nuclear R and D from the 1985 level of $200 million, to $100 million (1985 dollars). To meet the need for a broadened funding base, AECL Research Company has been restructured to become more responsive to our sponsors and customers. Although supporting the CANDU nuclear power program remains by far our largest R and D activity, we have put in place a comprehensive process for generating new business and commercial activities. Examples of such business opportunities are presented in the paper

  3. National Blue Ocean Strategy in Nuclear Technology Visibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasfazilah Hassan; Sabariah Kader Ibrahim; Mohamad Radzuan Othman; Abdul Halim Jumat; Abdul Halim Mohd Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the strategic approach taken by Malaysian Nuclear Agency in carrying out public information and public acceptance on nuclear technology activities. The main objective of this study is to ensure that public and stake holders are continuously getting correct information from credible sources. Through the feedback received, comprehensive and holistic approach provides the desired impact. Obtaining the correct information from credible sources culture should always be inculcate to ensure that the benefits of nuclear technologies can be practiced and accepted by civil society without prejudice. Through strategic approach and activities implemented, monitoring and review, and measurement of the effectiveness of ongoing programs are expected to increase public awareness of the importance and contribution of nuclear technology in Malaysia. (author)

  4. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Kim, Sung Ki; Song, Kee Chan

    2010-04-01

    This report is aims to establish design requirements for constructing mock-up system of pyroprocess by 2011 to realize long-term goal of nuclear energy promotion comprehensive plan, which is construction of engineering scale pyroprocess integrated process demonstration facility. The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The detailed contents of research for these are as follows; - Design of Mock-up facility for demonstrate pyroprocess, Construction, Approval, Trial run, Performance test - Development of nuclear material accountancy technology for unit processes of pyroprocess and design of safeguards system - Remote operation of demonstrating pyroprocess / Development of maintenance technology and equipment - Establishment of transportation system and evaluation of pre-safety for interim storage system - Deriving and implementation of a method to improve nuclear transparency for commercialization proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle Spent fuel which is the most important pending problem of nuclear power development would be reduced and recycled by developing the system engineering technology of pyroprocess facility by 2010. This technology would contribute to obtain JD for the use of spent fuel between the ROK-US and to amend the ROK-US Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  5. A Lesson from the Nuclear Industry: Professionalism and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gene L.; Widen, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    Focuses on an innovative approach to instill professionalism in workers such as reactor operators and other nuclear power workers. It may be used by technology instructors to send a message to their students: regardless of the advanced state of technology, the human element provides the key to desirable outcomes. (Author/JOW)

  6. Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, C.R. II.

    1986-07-01

    To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies

  7. Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Hudson, C.R. II.

    1990-03-01

    To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies. 10 refs., 8 figs., 32 tabs

  8. A decade of 3C technologies: insights into nuclear organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, E.; de Laat, W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the development of chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology and the subsequent genomic variants thereof have enabled the analysis of nuclear organization at an unprecedented resolution and throughput. The technology relies on the original and, in hindsight, remarkably

  9. Application of nuclear technology for sustainable development, and IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    1998-01-01

    The role of radiation and isotopes for sustainable development in improving agriculture, industry and environmental conservation is presented. The radiation and isotope technology can increase productivity in a sustainable way. The IAEA programmes encompass mutation breeding, soil fertility and crop production, animal production, food irradiation, agrochemicals and insect pest control using nuclear technology

  10. Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, C.R. II.

    1987-07-01

    To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies

  11. Telerobotic technology for nuclear and space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herndon, J.N.; Hamel, W.R.

    1987-03-01

    Telerobotic development efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are extensive and relatively diverse. Current efforts include development of a prototype space telerobot system for the NASA Langley Research Center and development and large-scale demonstration of nuclear fuel cycle teleoperators in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This paper presents an overview of the efforts in these major programs. 10 refs., 8 figs

  12. Nuclear science and technology branch report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    Research being conducted include: assessment of world energy sources and their utilization, basic information on fission reactors, reactor performance and safety, nuclear marine propulsion, controlled thermonuclear fusion and alternative energy sources. Staff publications and research interests are outlined. (R.L.)

  13. Reviving nuclear requires broad technology fix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyman, L.S.

    1991-01-01

    What will it take to revive nuclear power in this country? For a beginning, nuclear plants must be the lowest-cost alternative to providing additional energy supplies; they must be smaller in size and easier to build and license than in the past, and public confidence in nuclear power must be restored. But even this is not enough to attract investors, he says. Regulatory policies, corporate structures, and financial arrangements must change as well. Hyman offers some ideas for changes that would be attractive to investors: place construction work in progress in the rate base, create a pay-as-you-go approach to construction; federal rather than state regulation of power rates; and ownership and construction by a consortium of electrical equipment manufacturers, engineering and construction firms, utilities, and fuel supplies. But even then, Hyman is not optimistic. Fixing nuclear power is possible only if there is a need for the product, the price is right, the profit is adequate, the people want it, the waste is disposed of, and somebody will take the risk of financing its revival

  14. Canadian nuclear technology faces tough competition abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guard, R.F.W.

    1979-01-01

    The history of Canadian nuclear exports is related, starting with the CIRUS reactor and ending with the Romanian contract. The sale of the Cordoba reactor to Argentina is set in its historical perspective of continuing competition with German vendors. The Wolsung reactor is mentioned. The author considers that political rather than engineering problems hamper exports. (NDH)

  15. Evaluation of nuclear data for R and D projects; development of database for medical nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Tae Suk [Catholic University, Seoul (Korea); Shin, D. O. [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea); Joh, C. W.; Chang, J. S. [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea); Choi, Y. [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, S. H. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea); Park, S. Y. [National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea); Shin, D. H.; Lee, S [Kyonggi University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Medical nuclear data used in the country is not provided by academic associations and organizations concerned and even by government organizations concerned. This is aimed to investigate the diagnostic and therapeutic equipments in the clinical use and the domestic present status of nuclear data and physical properties of sealed or unsealed radioactive isotopes and to establish the nuclear database. About 120 domestic centers take nuclear medicine tests and 52 medical centers do radiotherapy. The 30-odd different kinds of radionuclides are usually used in nuclear medicine in the country. The 30-odd kinds of unsealed sources are used for diagnosis and therapy and 10-odd kinds of sealed sources for brachytherapy in the country. The special radiotherapy includes Gamma-knife, linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery, conformal radiotherapy and Intensity modulated radiotherapy. The nuclear data base has been completed on the basis of these data collected and the web site made is available with ease to anyone who want to get nuclear data. 39 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  16. Innovative waste treatment and conditioning technologies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide Member States with information on the most innovative technologies and strategies used in waste treatment and conditioning. At present, some of those technologies and strategies might not be widely implemented at nuclear power plants (NPP), but they have an important potential for their use as part of the long range NPP, utility, or national strategy. Thus, the target audience is those decision makers at the national and organizational level responsible for selecting waste processing technologies and strategies over a period of three to ten years. Countries and individual nuclear plants have limited financial resources which can be applied toward radioactive waste processing (treatment and conditioning). They are challenged to determine which of the many available technologies and strategies are best suited to meet national or local needs. This publication reduces the selection of processes for wastes generated by nuclear power plants to those technologies and strategies which are considered innovative. The report further identifies the key benefits which may derive from the adoption of those technologies, the different waste streams to which each technology is relevant, and the limitations of the technologies. The technologies and strategies identified have been evaluated to differentiate between (1) predominant technologies (those that are widely practiced in multiple countries or a large number of nuclear plants), and (2) innovative technologies (those which are not so widely used but are considered to offer benefits which make them suitable for broader application across the industry). Those which fall into the second category are the primary focus of this report. Many IAEA publications address the technical aspects of treatment and conditioning for radioactive wastes, covering research, technological advances, and safety issues. These studies and reports primarily target the research and technical staff of a

  17. Promote health, not nuclear weapons: ethical duty of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arun

    2018-03-07

    Despite ongoing tensions in various parts of the world, the year 2017 ended on a positive note. The Treaty Prohibiting Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) was passed by the UN General Assembly on July 7, 2017, which will always be a red-letter day in history. It has raised many hopes for a future world without nuclear weapons and staved off the impending humanitarian catastrophe. Good health is a basic need of every individual. Therefore, each person yearns for a life free of violence and free of man-made catastrophes like the ones at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, which killed over two hundred thousand people and resulted in genetic mutations affecting generations thereafter. Unfortunately, instead of working for nuclear disarmament, the world moved towards an unending nuclear arms race, costing billions which could have been used for healing millions of people living in despair and sickness. This is why on December 10, 2017, Oslo, the capital of Norway, was filled with excitement when the Nobel Peace Prize for this year was bestowed upon the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN). Large numbers of medical professionals from around the globe had gathered there to affirm their commitment to a healthy future through diversion of wasteful expenditure from the nuclear arms race towards universal health.

  18. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  19. Nuclear science and technology in higher education in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernido, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Education and training in nuclear science and technology in the Philippines are obtained from higher education institutions, and from courses offered by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), an institute under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), is the sole government agency in charge of matters pertaining to nuclear science and technology, and the regulation of nuclear energy. The PNRI was tasked with fast-tracking nuclear education and information, together with the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), and some other government agencies which constituted the Subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information, by virtue of Executive Order 243 enacted by then President Ramos on May 12, 1995. This Executive Order created the Nuclear Power Steering Committee; the Subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information was one of the subcommittees under it. The Nuclear Power Steering Committee was created when the government was again considering the feasibility of the nuclear power option; this Committee had since become inactive because the government has not re-embarked on a nuclear power program. The Philippines had a nuclear power program in the 1970's. The first nuclear power plant was nearing completion when Chernobyl and Three Mile Island happened. Due to the change in political climate and strong anti-nuclear sentiment, the first nuclear power plant had been mothballed. However, there is a possibility for the introduction of nuclear power in the country's projected energy sources by the year 2025. The country has one research reactor, a 3 MW Triga reactor, but at the present time it is not operational and is under extended shutdown. In the event that the Philippines will again implement a nuclear power program, there will be a great need for M.S. and Ph.D. holders in nuclear engineering. There are less than five

  20. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.7--Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology

  1. New technologies in nuclear power plant monitoring and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkcan, E.; Verhoef, J.P.; Ciftcioglu, O.

    1996-01-01

    Several representative new technologies being introduce for monitoring and diagnosis in nuclear power plants (NPP) are presented in this paper. In Sec. 2, the Kalman filtering is briefly described and it relevance to conventional time series analysis methods are emphasized. In this respect, its NPP monitoring and fault diagnosis implementations are given and the important features are pointed out. In Sec. 3, the NN technology is briefly described and the scope is focused on the NPP monitoring and fault diagnosis implementations. In Sec. 4, the wavelet technology is briefly described and the utilization of this technology in Nuclear Technology is exemplified. In this respect, also the prospective role of this technology for real-time monitoring and fault diagnosis is revealed. (author). 33 refs, 6 figs

  2. New Technologies for Seawater Desalination Using Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    As seawater desalination technologies are rapidly evolving and more States are opting for dual purpose integrated power plants (i.e. cogeneration), the need for advanced technologies suitable for coupling to nuclear power plants and leading to more efficient and economic nuclear desalination systems is obvious. The Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) New Technologies for Seawater Desalination using Nuclear Energy was organized in the framework of the Technical Working Group on Nuclear Desalination (TWG-ND). The TWGND was established in 2008 with the purpose of advising the IAEA Deputy Director General and promoting the exchange of technical information on national programmes in the field of seawater desalination using nuclear energy. This CRP project was conducted within the Nuclear Power Technology Development Section of the IAEA. It was launched in 2009 and completed by 2011, with research proposals received from nine Member States: Algeria, Egypt, France, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Syrian Arab Republic, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The project aimed to review innovative technologies for seawater desalination which could be coupled to main types of existing nuclear power plant. Such coupling is expected to help making nuclear desalination safer and more economical, and hence more attractive for newcomer States interested in nuclear desalination. The project also aimed to collect ideas and suggestions necessary to update the IAEA desalination economic evaluation program (DEEP) software to become more robust and versatile. The specific objectives of the project were the introduction of innovative technologies and their economic viability, which could help make nuclear desalination a globally viable option for the safe and sustainable production of fresh water. The technologies under scrutiny in this CRP involve the low temperature horizontal tube multi-effect distillation, heat recovery systems using heat pipe based heat exchangers

  3. The sustainable nuclear energy technology platform. A vision report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear fission energy can deliver safe, sustainable, competitive and practically carbon-free energy to Europe's citizens and industries. Within the framework of the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET Plan), the European Commission's stakeholders in this field have formulated a collective vision of the contributions this energy could make towards Europe's transition to a low-carbon energy mix by 2050, with the aim of integrating and expanding R and D capabilities in order to further this objective. The groundwork has been prepared by the stakeholders listed in Annex II, within the framework of two EURATOM FP6 (Sixth Framework Programme) Coordination Actions, namely SNF-TP (Sustainable Nuclear Fission Technology Platform) and PATEROS (Partitioning and Transmutation European Road-map for Sustainable Nuclear Energy), with contributions from Europe's technical safety organisations. This vision report prepares the launch of the European Technology Platform on Sustainable Nuclear Energy (SNE-TP). It proposes a vision for the short-, medium- and long-term development of nuclear fission energy technologies, with the aim of achieving a sustainable production of nuclear energy, a significant progress in economic performance, and a continuous improvement of safety levels as well as resistance to proliferation. In particular, this document proposes road-maps for the development and deployment of potentially sustainable nuclear technologies, as well as actions to harmonize Europe's training and education, whilst renewing its research infrastructures. Public acceptance is also an important issue for the development of nuclear energy. Therefore, research in the fields of nuclear installation safety, protection of workers and populations against radiation, management of all types of waste, and governance methodologies with public participation will be promoted. The proposed road-maps provide the backbone for a strategic research agenda (SRA) to maintain

  4. The sustainable nuclear energy technology platform. A vision report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fission energy can deliver safe, sustainable, competitive and practically carbon-free energy to Europe's citizens and industries. Within the framework of the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET Plan), the European Commission's stakeholders in this field have formulated a collective vision of the contributions this energy could make towards Europe's transition to a low-carbon energy mix by 2050, with the aim of integrating and expanding R and D capabilities in order to further this objective. The groundwork has been prepared by the stakeholders listed in Annex II, within the framework of two EURATOM FP6 (Sixth Framework Programme) Coordination Actions, namely SNF-TP (Sustainable Nuclear Fission Technology Platform) and PATEROS (Partitioning and Transmutation European Road-map for Sustainable Nuclear Energy), with contributions from Europe's technical safety organisations. This vision report prepares the launch of the European Technology Platform on Sustainable Nuclear Energy (SNE-TP). It proposes a vision for the short-, medium- and long-term development of nuclear fission energy technologies, with the aim of achieving a sustainable production of nuclear energy, a significant progress in economic performance, and a continuous improvement of safety levels as well as resistance to proliferation. In particular, this document proposes road-maps for the development and deployment of potentially sustainable nuclear technologies, as well as actions to harmonize Europe's training and education, whilst renewing its research infrastructures. Public acceptance is also an important issue for the development of nuclear energy. Therefore, research in the fields of nuclear installation safety, protection of workers and populations against radiation, management of all types of waste, and governance methodologies with public participation will be promoted. The proposed road-maps provide the backbone for a strategic research agenda (SRA) to maintain Europe's leadership in

  5. Proceedings of the first nuclear science and technology conference no. 1. Nuclear science and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This conference contains papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in agriculture and industry. These applications include irradiation of food for disinfestation and radiopreservation, radiation monitoring, and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes

  6. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Hill

    2007-07-01

    This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

  7. Materials technology applied to nuclear accelerator targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthell, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The continuing requests for both shaped and flat, very low areal density metal foils have led to the development of metallurgical quality, high strength products. Intent of this paper is to show methods of forming structures on various substrates using periodic vapor interruptions, alternating anodes, and mechanical peening to alter otherwise unacceptable grain morphology which both lowers tensile strength and causes high stresses in thin films. The three technologies, physical vapor deposition, electrochemistry, and chemical vapor deposition and their thin film products can benefit from the use of laminate technology and control of grain structure morphology through the use of materials research and technology

  8. Medical imaging. From nuclear medicine to neuro-sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    Nuclear medicine and functional imaging were born of the CEA's ambition to promote and develop nuclear applications in the fields of biology and health. Nuclear medicine is based on the use of radioactive isotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It could never have developed so rapidly without the progress made in atomic and nuclear physics. One major breakthrough was the discovery of artificial radioelements by Irene and Frederic Joliot in 1934, when a short-lived radioactive isotope was created for the first time ever. Whether natural or synthetic, isotopes possess the same chemical properties as their non-radioactive counterparts. The only difference is that they are unstable and this instability causes disintegration, leading to radiation emission. All we need are suitable detection tools to keep track of them. 'The discovery of artificial radioelements is at the root of the most advanced medical imaging techniques'. The notion of tracer dates back to 1913. Invented by George de Hevesy, it lies at the root of nuclear medicine. By discovering how to produce radioactive isotopes, Irene and Frederic Joliot provided biology researchers with nuclear tools of unrivalled efficiency. Today, nuclear medicine and functional imaging are the only techniques capable of giving us extremely precise information about living organisms in a non-traumatic manner and without upsetting their balance. Positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the main imaging techniques used at the CEA in its neuro-imaging research activities. These techniques are now developing rapidly and becoming increasingly important not only in the neuroscience world, but also for innovative therapies and cancer treatment. (authors)

  9. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  10. The terrorist threat nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical - a medical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, M.C. de; Gourmelon, M.C.S.; Vidal, P.C.; Renaudeau, P.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the fear of a large scale nuclear, biological and/or chemical terrorism is taken again into consideration at the highest level of national policies of risk prevention. The advent of international terrorism implies a cooperation between the military defense and the civil defense. The nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical (NRBC) experts of the health service of army and of civil defense will have to work together in case of major terror attack. This book presents this cooperation between civil and military experts in the NRBC domain: risk analysis, national defense plans, crisis management, syndromes and treatments. The different aspects linked with the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are analyzed by the best experts from French medical and research institutes. All topics of each NRBC domain are approached: historical, basic, diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive. (J.S.)

  11. Basic research for nuclear energy. y Study on the nuclear materials technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, I. H.; Lee, H. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Sung, K. W.; Han, J. H.; Lee, J. T.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, S. J.; Kang, H. S.; An, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. D.; Han, C. H.; Jung, M. K.; Oh, Y. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. H.; Back, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lim, K. S.; Kim, Y. Y.; Na, J. W.; Ku, J. H.; Lee, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    A study on the nuclear materials technologies which are necessary to establish the base for alloy development was performed. - The feasibility study on the application of Zircaloy scrap waste for hydrogen storage - The development of metal hydride battery for energy storage system - The establishment of transmission electron microscopy database for nuclear materials - The basic technology for the development of cladding materials for high burnup - The water chemistry technology for secondary system pH control and the photocatalysis technology for decomposition and removal of organics. - Improvement of primary component integrity of PWR by Zinc injection. (author). 175 refs., 58 tabs., 262 figs.

  12. Basic research for nuclear energy. y Study on the nuclear materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, I. H.; Lee, H. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Sung, K. W.; Han, J. H.; Lee, J. T.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, S. J.; Kang, H. S.; An, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. D.; Han, C. H.; Jung, M. K.; Oh, Y. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. H.; Back, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lim, K. S.; Kim, Y. Y.; Na, J. W.; Ku, J. H.; Lee, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    A study on the nuclear materials technologies which are necessary to establish the base for alloy development was performed. - The feasibility study on the application of Zircaloy scrap waste for hydrogen storage - The development of metal hydride battery for energy storage system - The establishment of transmission electron microscopy database for nuclear materials - The basic technology for the development of cladding materials for high burnup - The water chemistry technology for secondary system pH control and the photocatalysis technology for decomposition and removal of organics. - Improvement of primary component integrity of PWR by Zinc injection. (author). 175 refs., 58 tabs., 262 figs

  13. Information Technology for Nuclear Power Plant Configuration Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Configuration management (CM) is an essential component of nuclear power plant design, construction and operation. The application of information technology (IT) offers a method to automate and ensure the timely and effective capture, processing and distribution of key nuclear power plant information to support CM principles and practical processes and procedures for implementation of CM at nuclear power plants. This publication reviews some of the principles established in IAEA-TECDOC-1335, 'Configuration Management in Nuclear Power Plants.' It also recaps tenets laid out in IAEA- TECDOC-1284, 'Information Technology Impact on Nuclear Power Plant Documentation' that supports CM programmes. This publication has been developed in conjunction with and designed to support these other two publications. These three publications combined provide a comprehensive discussion on configuration management, information technology and the relationship between them. An extensive discussion is also provided in this publication on the role of the design basis of the facility and its control through the CM process throughout the facility's lifetime. While this report was developed specifically for nuclear power plants, the principles discussed can be usefully applied to any high hazard nuclear facility

  14. Changing relations between civil and military nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.B.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has inhabited two distinct environments since its inception - the environments of nuclear deterrence and of electricity supply. The relationships between the technologies and institutions inhabiting these environments have been both intimate and troublesome. As both nuclear weapons and nuclear power rely upon the fission energy of uranium and plutonium, and as both generate harmful by-products, they are bound to have technologies, materials and liabilities in common. However, nuclear deterrence belongs in the realm of high politics, whilst electricity production is part of the commercial world rooted in civil society. Establishing a political, industrial and regulatory framework that allows nuclear activities to develop safely and acceptably in both domains has been a difficult and contentious task. In this paper I wish to make some observations about the relations between military and civil nuclear technology at the end of this century, and about their likely character in years ahead. My main contention is that developments in the military sector and in international security will remain influential, but that their consequences will be of a different kind than in the past. (orig.)

  15. International Nuclear Technology Forum: Future prospects of nuclear power plants and Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The document includes 19 papers presented at the 'International Nuclear Technology Forum: Future Prospects of Nuclear Power Plants in Turkey', held between 12-15 October 1993 in Ankara (Turkey). A separate abstract was prepared for each paper prepared for each paper

  16. Annual conference on nuclear technology. Nuclear power 2001: option for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    The Dresden Palace for Culture was the venue of the ANNUAL MEETING ON NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY on May 15-17, 2001, the first to be held in Dresden and the first also to be held in one of the new German federal states. Although no nuclear plant is in operation in East Germany after the Greifswald Nuclear Power Station was decommissioned, nuclear technology continues to play an important role especially in research and university teaching in this part of Germany. The organizers of the conference, Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF) and Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. (KTG), welcomed more than 1000 participants from nineteen countries. The three-day program, with its traditional, proven structure, featured plenary sessions on the first day, and specialized sessions, technical sessions, poster sessions, and other events on the following days. The partner country at the Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology was Russia, with a session specially devoted to selected topics of the country. The conference was accompanied by a technical exhibition with company meeting points of vendors, suppliers, and service industries. A video film forum was arranged for the interested public which featured contributions about nuclear research, nuclear power plant operation, transport and storage as well as decommissioning. Another major event was a workshop on 'Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology'. The plenary day is described in this summary report, while the results of the technical sessions as seen by the rapporteurs are printed elsewhere in this issue of atw 8/9, 2001. (orig.) [de

  17. The recent status of nuclear technology development in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Sumitra, Tatchai; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Chankow, Nares; Tiyapan, Kanokrat; Onjun, Thawatchai; Bhanthumnavin, Duangduen

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has started the peaceful utilization of nuclear program in 1961. The program has developed considerably in various aspects. Laws and regulations were established while applications in medical, agriculture, industry as well as research and education have been accomplished successfully in the country. As for the energy production, Thailand has realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. However, the implementation has been delayed. (J.P.N.)

  18. Maintaining quality control in a nontraditional nuclear technology degree program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSain, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Regents College, created by the Board of Regents of the University of The State on New York in 1971, has been offering, since January 1985, AS and BS degrees in nuclear technology. The impetus for establishing the nuclear technology degrees came from nuclear utility management and had to do with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission proposed rule regarding degreed operators on shift. There are a variety of ways to earn credits in Regents College degree programs: (1) college courses taken for degree-level credit from regionally accredited colleges; (2) courses sponsored by business, industry, or government that have been evaluated and recommended for credit by the New York National or American Council on Education (ACE's) Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI); (3) military education that has been evaluated by ACE PONSI; (4) approved college-proficiency examinations; and (5) special assessment: an individualized examination of college-level knowledge gained from experience or independent study. Nuclear technology students primarily use college course work, evaluated military education, and proficiency examinations to complete degree programs. However, an increasing number of utilities are having training programs PONSI evaluated, resulting in an increased use of these courses in the nuclear technology degrees. Quality control is a function of several factors described in the paper

  19. Communicating with the public: space of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, Patricia Martinez; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues; Gordon, Ana Maria Pinho Leite; Oliveira, Rosana Lagua de; Padua, Rafael Vicente de; Vieira, Martha Marques Ferreira; Vicente, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    For two decades the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) has been developing activities for popularization of its R and D activities in the nuclear field. Some of the initiatives already undertaken by IPEN are lectures at schools, guided visits to IPEN facilities, printed informative material, FAQ page in the Web, and displays in annual meetings and technology fairs highlighting its achievements. In order to consolidate these initiatives, IPEN is planning to have a permanent Space of Nuclear Technology (SNT), aiming at introducing students, teachers and the general public to the current applications of nuclear technology in medicine, industry, research, electric power generation, etc. It is intended as an open room to the public and will have a permanent exhibit with historical, scientific, technical and cultural developments of nuclear technology and will also feature temporary exhibitions about specific themes. The space will display scientific material in different forms to allow conducting experiments to demonstrate some of the concepts associated with the properties of nuclear energy, hands-on programs and activities that can be customized to the students' grade level and curriculum. (author)

  20. Applications of nuclear technique in environmental and medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xianfeng; Shen Hao; Liu Bo; Sun Minde; Yao Huiying; Zhou Shijun; Mi Yong

    2001-01-01

    The serious environmental pollution problem and application of the nuclear technique in environmental and medical sciences were discussed. The analysed results of the elemental distribution of particles in automobile exhaust, the aerosol particle of different size and the effect of Rare Earth on cells were reported. The authors can obtain some information related to element concentration. It offers a convenient method in inspecting the environmental pollution