WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology mobile laboratory

  1. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  2. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ''past practice'' technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable

  3. Mobile spectrometric laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isajenko, K.A.; Lipinski, P.

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the Mobile Spectrometric Laboratory used by Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection since year 2000. The equipment installed in the Mobile Laboratory and its uses is described. The results of international exercises and intercalibrations, in which the Laboratory participated are presented. (author)

  4. Perceptions of a mobile technology on learning strategies in the anatomy laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Chandler H; Ohara, Peter T; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer new opportunities to improve dissection learning. This study examined the effect of using an iPad-based multimedia dissection manual during anatomy laboratory instruction on learner's perception of anatomy dissection activities and use of time. Three experimental dissection tables used iPads and three tables served as a control for two identical sessions. Trained, non-medical school anatomy faculty observers recorded use of resources at two-minute intervals for 20 observations per table. Students completed pre- and post-perception questionnaires. We used descriptive and inferential analyses. Twenty-one control and 22 experimental students participated. Compared with controls, experimental students reported significantly (P learning anatomy. Experimental students indicated that the iPad helped them in dissection. We observed experimental students more on task (93% vs. 83% of the time) and less likely to be seeking an instructor (2% vs. 32%). The groups received similar attention from instructors (33% vs. 37%). Fifty-nine percent of the time at least one student was looking at the iPad. Groups clustered around the iPad a third of their time. We conclude that the iPad-manual aided learner engagement, achieved instructional objectives, and enhanced the effectiveness and efficiency of dissection education. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. Mobile Workforce, Mobile Technology, Mobile Threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies' introduction into the world of safeguards business processes such as inspection creates tremendous opportunity for novel approaches and could result in a number of improvements to such processes. Mobile applications are certainly the wave of the future. The success of the application ecosystems has shown that users want full fidelity, highly-usable, simple purpose applications with simple installation, quick responses and, of course, access to network resources at all times. But the counterpart to opportunity is risk, and the widespread adoption of mobile technologies requires a deep understanding of the threats and vulnerabilities inherent in mobile technologies. Modern mobile devices can be characterized as small computers. As such, the threats against computing infrastructure apply to mobile devices. Meanwhile, the attributes of mobile technology that make it such an obvious benefit over traditional computing platforms all have elements of risk: pervasive, always-on networking; diverse ecosystems; lack of centralized control; constantly shifting technological foundations; intense competition among competitors in the marketplace; the scale of the installation base (from millions to billions); and many more. This paper will explore the diverse and massive environment of mobile, the number of attackers and vast opportunities for compromise. The paper will explain how mobile devices prove valuable targets to both advanced and persistent attackers as well as less-skilled casual hackers. Organized crime, national intelligence agencies, corporate espionage are all part of the landscape. (author)

  6. Establishing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD diagnostics using GeneXpert technology at a mobile laboratory in Liberia: Impact on outbreak response, case management and laboratory systems strengthening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philomena Raftery

    2018-01-01

    costs and can be integrated into other national diagnostic algorithms. The technology has on average a 2-hour sample-to-result time and allows for single specimen testing to overcome potential delays of batching. This model of a mobile laboratory equipped with Xpert Ebola test, staffed by local laboratory technicians, could serve to strengthen outbreak preparedness and response for future outbreaks of EVD in Liberia and the region.

  7. Establishing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) diagnostics using GeneXpert technology at a mobile laboratory in Liberia: Impact on outbreak response, case management and laboratory systems strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condell, Orla; Wasunna, Christine; Kpaka, Jonathan; Zwizwai, Ruth; Nuha, Mahmood; Fallah, Mosoka; Freeman, Maxwell; Harris, Victoria; Miller, Mark; Baller, April; Massaquoi, Moses; Katawera, Victoria; Saindon, John; Bemah, Philip; Hamblion, Esther; Castle, Evelyn; Williams, Desmond; Gasasira, Alex; Nyenswah, Tolbert

    2018-01-01

    be integrated into other national diagnostic algorithms. The technology has on average a 2-hour sample-to-result time and allows for single specimen testing to overcome potential delays of batching. This model of a mobile laboratory equipped with Xpert Ebola test, staffed by local laboratory technicians, could serve to strengthen outbreak preparedness and response for future outbreaks of EVD in Liberia and the region. PMID:29304039

  8. Establishing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) diagnostics using GeneXpert technology at a mobile laboratory in Liberia: Impact on outbreak response, case management and laboratory systems strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Philomena; Condell, Orla; Wasunna, Christine; Kpaka, Jonathan; Zwizwai, Ruth; Nuha, Mahmood; Fallah, Mosoka; Freeman, Maxwell; Harris, Victoria; Miller, Mark; Baller, April; Massaquoi, Moses; Katawera, Victoria; Saindon, John; Bemah, Philip; Hamblion, Esther; Castle, Evelyn; Williams, Desmond; Gasasira, Alex; Nyenswah, Tolbert

    2018-01-01

    integrated into other national diagnostic algorithms. The technology has on average a 2-hour sample-to-result time and allows for single specimen testing to overcome potential delays of batching. This model of a mobile laboratory equipped with Xpert Ebola test, staffed by local laboratory technicians, could serve to strengthen outbreak preparedness and response for future outbreaks of EVD in Liberia and the region.

  9. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  10. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  11. Mobile teleoperator research at Savannah River Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A Robotics Technology Group was organized at Savannah River Laboratory to employ modern automation and robotics for applications at the Savannah River site. Several industrial robots have been installed in plant processes. Other robotics systems are under development in the laboratories, including mobile teleoperators for general remote tasks and emergency response operations. This paper discusses present work on a low-cost wheeled mobile vehicle, a modular light duty manipulator arm, a large gantry telerobot system, and a high technology six-legged walking robot with a teleoperated arm

  12. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  13. Exploration of mobile educational technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosny, W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in mobile and wireless technology could be utilised to enhance the delivery of educational programmes. The use of this technology is known as “Mobile Education”. Mobile education technology provides unique opportunities for educators to flexibly deliver their educational material to learners via mobile services anywhere at any time. Moreover, the material delivered could be adapted to the learners’ needs and preferences. Examples of mobile devices which could be used in mobile...

  14. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  15. Mobile technologies for every library

    CERN Document Server

    Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2015-01-01

    If you are wondering what mobile technology adoption means for your library or how to get started, Mobile Technologies for Every Library will answer your questions! This book will detail the opportunities and pitfalls in using mobile technology in libraries. It will also address platforms, options, security, and best practices for starting new mobile services programs or improving existing services. Gleason previews many useful apps for libraries. Web links and resources are also included.

  16. Mobile devices tools and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Mobile Devices: Tools and Technologies provides readers with an understanding of the mobile landscape available to app developers, system and network engineers, and the avid techie. As the trend of mobile technology has enabled the continuous development of ubiquitous applications, this book offers insights into tools and technologies critical to evaluating and implementing mobile strategies.The book is organized into four parts of 18 contributed chapters written by engineers in the areas of application and database development, mobile enterprise strategy, and networking and security. Througho

  17. Mobile Radiological Laboratories Intercomparison Measurements - Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Glavic-Cindro, D.; Korun, M.; Pucelj, B.; Vodenik, B.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In last decade different institutions in European countries have organised periodic intercomparison exercises of mobile radiological laboratories to improve the preparedness of emergency monitoring teams. The 12th Regular Workshop on Mobile Radiological Laboratories was held in Exclusion Zone of the Chernobyl NPP, Ukraine from September 13 to September 18, 1999 under the acronym MORAL-12. The European Centre of Technological Safety (TESEC), Kiev, Ukraine and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia organised Intercomparison Measurements 99 jointly under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Nineteen teams from 9 countries and IAEA participated in the Workshop. Six field and personal and equipment contamination control exercises were prepared and conducted at two measuring sites with very different ambient dose rate levels. The Workshop pointed out that such exercises are very valuable for rapid, efficient and harmonised emergency response in case of nuclear or radiological emergency. The teams had an opportunity to test their ability to perform field measurements in the contaminated environment, and to report results on the spot, as well as to test their emergency preparedness and persistence. They gained new experiences for fieldwork under stress conditions. An overview and results of these intercomparison measurements are presented and lessons learned are discussed. (author)

  18. Mobile infostation network technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappan, Gowri; Acharya, Joydeep; Liu, Hongbo; Mandayam, Narayan; Seskar, Ivan; Yates, Roy

    2006-05-01

    Inefficient use of network resources on the battlefield is a serious liability: if an asset communicates with the network command for data-a terrain map, for instance-it ties up the end-to-end network resources. When many such assets contend for data simultaneously, traffic is limited by the slowest link along the path from the network command to the asset. A better approach is for a local server, known as an infostation, to download data on an anticipated-need basis when the network load is low. The infostation can then dump data when needed to the assets over a high-speed wireless connection. The infostation serves the local assets over an OFDM-based wireless data link that has MIMO enhancements for high data rate and robustness. We aim for data rate in excess of 100 Mbps, spectral efficiency in excess of 5 bits/sec/Hz, and robustness to poor channel conditions and jammers. We propose an adaptive physical layer that determines power levels, modulation schemes, and the MIMO enhancements to use based on the channel state and the level of interference in the system. We also incorporate the idea of superuser: a user who is allowed preferential use of the high data rate link. We propose a MAC that allows for this priority-based bandwidth allocation scheme. The proposed infostation MAC is integrated tightly with the physical layer through a cross-layer design. We call the proposed infostation PHY, MAC, and network technology, collectively, as the Mobile Infostation Network Technology (MINT).

  19. Why to use mobile technology?

    OpenAIRE

    Bolat, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    No holistic portrayal exists to map and discuss values deriving from mobile technology use. This empirical paper addresses this gap. To address research purpose adapted grounded theory approach is applied to collect and analyse in-depth interviews with twenty-eight SME managers. This study concludes that mobile technology represents novel and unique category of technology. Whether MT is a simple mean to advanced communication with no physical boundaries of time and location or a business tool...

  20. Oklahoma's Mobile Computer Graphics Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Gerald R.

    This Computer Graphics Laboratory houses an IBM 1130 computer, U.C.C. plotter, printer, card reader, two key punch machines, and seminar-type classroom furniture. A "General Drafting Graphics System" (GDGS) is used, based on repetitive use of basic coordinate and plot generating commands. The system is used by 12 institutions of higher education…

  1. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  2. Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 22 November). Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies. Presentation given at the Workshop "Blended Learning an Hochschulen" at the Fakultätentag Informatik at the Universität Jena, Jena, Germany.

  3. Mobile Networking Technology Within INSC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macker, Joseph P

    2003-01-01

    We provide an overview of the INSC Mobility Task area efforts including: a brief overview of technology areas investigated, a discussion of research developments, and example results from experimentation and demonstration...

  4. New Mobile Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Su-En; Henten, Anders

    2006-01-01

    This paper takes a look at Clayton Christensen 's theory of disruptive technologies and how Christensen's theory relates to other innovation theories. It also proposes a new layer of analysis to this theory to better link the technology analysis to the market analysis of any given technology...... product. This layer suggests that complementarity and substitutability are important criteria for technologies to be market disruptions or sustaining changes....

  5. Development of mobile radiological assessment laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, R.N.; Saindane, Shashank S.; Jain, Amit; Parmar, Jayesh; Narsaiah, M.V.R.; Pote, M.B.; Murali, S.; Chaudhury, Probal

    2018-01-01

    During any emergency situations real-time radiation measurements and the fast analysis of the measured radiological data are of crucial importance. The newly developed mobile vehicle based laboratory known as 'Radiological Assessment Laboratory' (RAL) can be used for real time measurements in different radiation emergency scenarios, such as the release of radioactive materials from a radiological/nuclear incident, during search of an orphan source or during radioisotope transportation. RAL is equipped with several high sensitive detectors/systems such as NaI(Tl) gamma spectrometers, large size plastic scintillators and air-sampler, along with GPS and data transfer capability through GSM modem

  6. Mobile User Objective Systems (MUOS) Reference Implementation Laboratory (MRIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mobile User Objective Systems (MUOS) Reference Implementation Laboratory (MRIL) performs verification and validation testing of various MUOS terminals. MRIL also...

  7. Security Problems of Mobile Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Beltov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of security problems which exist in the mobile devices. The main technologies aimed to protect the phones from various types of attacks are considered. The authors justify the necessity of developing new improved tools and methods to ensure the safety of such devices.

  8. Mobile Technologies and Public Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-05

    In this podcast, Erin Edgerton, CDC, and Eric Holman, President of SmartReply, discuss why mobile technologies are an important communications tool for disseminating health messages.  Created: 9/5/2008 by National Center for Health Marketing (NCHM), Division of eHealth Marketing (DeHM).   Date Released: 1/12/2009.

  9. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  10. Mobile biometric device (MBD) technology :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, Chris D.

    2013-06-01

    Mobile biometric devices (MBDs) capable of both enrolling individuals in databases and performing identification checks of subjects in the field are seen as an important capability for military, law enforcement, and homeland security operations. The technology is advancing rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate through an Interagency Agreement with Sandia sponsored a series of pilot projects to obtain information for the first responder law enforcement community on further identification of requirements for mobile biometric device technology. Working with 62 different jurisdictions, including components of the Department of Homeland Security, Sandia delivered a series of reports on user operation of state-of-the-art mobile biometric devices. These reports included feedback information on MBD usage in both operational and exercise scenarios. The findings and conclusions of the project address both the limitations and possibilities of MBD technology to improve operations. Evidence of these possibilities can be found in the adoption of this technology by many agencies today and the cooperation of several law enforcement agencies in both participating in the pilot efforts and sharing of information about their own experiences in efforts undertaken separately.

  11. MOBILE TELEVISION: UNDERSTANDING THE TECHNOLOGY AND OPPORTUNITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Omar AlSheikSalem

    2015-01-01

    Television have converged the technologies of movies and radio and now being converged with mobile phones. Mobile TV is the result of the convergence between mobile devices and television. Mobile TV is a key device and service that enrich civilization with applications, vast market and great investment. Mobile TV is an important subject that has a potential impact on leading edge technologies for promising future. In the time being Mobile TV is still in its early stages and has many potential...

  12. INTEGRATING MOBILE TECHNOLOGY IN ESL CLASSROOMS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Manigandan; N. Santha Kumar; B. Devi

    2017-01-01

    It’s the right time to know more about mobile technology and mobile learning in the present digital era where mobile phones have become an integral part of everyone’s life. In recent years there have been amazing advances in mobile technology. Mobile learning has enabled various institutions, colleges and schools throughout the world in order to modernize aspects of teaching, learning and training. The key words in mobile learning are “facilitate, support, enhance, extend”.

  13. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  14. Mobile technology in clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, B J; Anderson, J; Harding, T

    2017-01-01

    Technology is having a profound effect on education in the 21st century and nurse educators are being challenged to integrate technological innovation to assist students in their learning. This paper reports a study on the introduction of smart mobile technology to support student learning in the clinical environment. In a climate of collaborative inquiry, clinical lecturers and two researchers from the same department carried out a project in three phases: formation, implementation and analysis. Following the formation phase, six clinical lecturers adopted iPads to support their clinical teaching (implementation phase). At this time they also kept reflective journals. In the analysis phase a thematic analysis of the data from the journals and from a focus group found both enabling and constraining factors influenced the use of iPads by clinical lecturers. The themes categorised as enablers were: resources and technology; and, management and technology support. Those identified as barriers or constraining factors were: clinical staff engagement; and lecturer experience with technology. Student engagement and learning, and connectivity were both enabling and constraining factors. This paper concludes that the use of a mobile device such as an iPad can enhance teaching in clinical settings but that in order for such devices to be successfully integrated into clinical teaching consideration needs to be given to professional development needs, adequate resourcing and technology support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Smiecinski, A.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report for the Analytical Laboratory and Mobile Sampling Platform project. This report contains only major findings and conclusions resulting from this project. Detailed reports of all activities performed for this project were provided to the Project Office every quarter since the beginning of the project. This report contains water chemistry data for samples collected in the Nevada section of Death Valley National Park (Triangle Area Springs), Nevada Test Site springs, Pahranagat Valley springs, Nevada Test Site wells, Spring Mountain springs and Crater Flat and Amargosa Valley wells

  16. Mobile phone technology in chronic disease management

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Mobile phones are being used to improve nurse-patient communication and monitor health outcomes in chronic disease. Innovative applications of mobile technology are expected to increase over time in community management of cancer, heart disease, asthma and diabetes. This article focuses on mobile phone technology and its contribution to health care.

  17. Mobile technology: streamlining practice and improving care

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The use of mobile phones in care delivery has the potential to improve the way in which care is delivered. When implemented effectively, mobile technologies can empower patients and enhance communication between patients and their health-care providers. When barriers are recognised and addressed, mobile technologies can change working lives, facilitating rapid access to information and supporting efficiency in practice.

  18. Mobile Sensor Technologies Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    2003-01-01

    central command location. Web-based control and interrogation of similar mobile sensor platforms have also been demonstrated. Expected applications of this technology include robotic planetary exploration, astronaut-to-equipment communication, and remote aerospace engine inspections.

  19. NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory is a 2005 Wheeled Coach Type III ambulance mounted on a Ford E-450 cut-away van chassis....

  20. Introducing Mobile Technology in Graduate Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gopesh; Chhajed, Dilip; Hong, Seung Won; Scagnoli, Norma

    2014-01-01

    The insertion of mobile technology in educational settings is becoming more prevalent, making it important to understand the effectiveness of such technology in enhancing students' learning and engagement. This article is based on research conducted to study the effects of the use of mobile technology--specifically iPads--by students in a graduate…

  1. International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon; Joukov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the peer-reviewed contributions of ICMWT2016, an international conference devoted to mobile and wireless technology. Researchers and professionals from academia and industry met to discuss the cutting-edge developments in the field. The book includes papers on mobile and wireless networks, the increasingly important security issues, data management, as well as the latest developments in mobile software development.

  2. Mobility management principle, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shanzhi; Hu, Bo; Ai, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This is the first book devoted to mobility management, covering the important principles, technologies and applications of mobility management based on years of academic research and industry experiences. The content is organized according to the reference models proposed by the authors, and emphasizes on technical principles rather than protocol details; a systematic and comprehensive introduction is presented yet without losing focuses; the existing technologies in cellular system, mobile Internet and IMS/SIP are also extensively compared. This book can be an indispensable reference for mobile communication engineers, computer network engineers, researchers and anyone else involved in academic, industrial and standardization activities on mobility management.

  3. Mobile Technology Affinity in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, S; Scheel, J; Stoessel, L; Schieber, K; Jank, S; Lüker, C; Vitinius, F; Grundmann, F; Eckardt, K-U; Prokosch, H-U; Erim, Y

    Medication nonadherence is a common problem in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Mobile health approaches to improve medication adherence are a current trend, and several medication adherence apps are available. However, it is unknown whether RTRs use these technologies and to what extent. In the present study, the mobile technology affinity of RTRs was analyzed. We hypothesized significant age differences in mobile technology affinity and that mobile technology affinity is associated with better cognitive functioning as well as higher educational level. A total of 109 RTRs (63% male) participated in the cross-sectional study, with an overall mean age of 51.8 ± 14.2 years. The study included the Technology Experience Questionnaire (TEQ) for the assessment of mobile technology affinity, a cognitive test battery, and sociodemographic data. Overall, 57.4% of the patients used a smartphone or tablet and almost 45% used apps. The TEQ sum score was 20.9 in a possible range from 6 (no affinity to technology) to 30 (very high affinity). Younger patients had significantly higher scores in mobile technology affinity. The only significant gender difference was found in having fun with using electronic devices: Men enjoyed technology more than women did. Mobile technology affinity was positively associated with cognitive functioning and educational level. Young adult patients might profit most from mobile health approaches. Furthermore, high educational level and normal cognitive functioning promote mobile technology affinity. This should be kept in mind when designing mobile technology health (mHealth) interventions for RTRs. For beneficial mHealth interventions, further research on potential barriers and desired technologic features is necessary to adapt apps to patients' needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mobile Perspectives: On Websites. Mobile Matters--Communication Trumps Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technology is a favorite discussion topic among senior IT leaders and higher education administrators. Mobile is the future for content delivery. Colleges and universities need to establish a strategy now and make the decisions necessary to take advantage of this communication opportunity. In this article, the author recommends making…

  5. Advances in mobile mapping technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tao; Li, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing availability of low-cost and portable sensors, mobile mapping has become more dynamic, and even pervasive. The book addresses a wide variety of research issues in the mobile mapping community, ranging from system development to sensor integration, imaging algorithms and mobile GIS applications.

  6. Connecting Learning Spaces Using Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenli; Seow, Peter; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2010-01-01

    The use of mobile technology can help extend children's learning spaces and enrich the learning experiences in their everyday lives where they move from one context to another, switching locations, social groups, technologies, and topics. When students have ubiquitous access to mobile devices with full connectivity, the in-situ use of the mobile…

  7. Mobile Technology for the Practice of Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Douglas J

    2016-03-01

    Recently, several technological advances have been introduced to mobile phones leading some people to refer to them as "smartphones." These changes have led to widespread consumer adoption. A similar adoption has occurred within the medical field and this revolution is changing the practice of medicine, including pathology. Several mobile applications have been published for dermatology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and clinical pathology. The applications are wide ranging, including mobile technology to increase patient engagement, self-monitoring by patients, clinical algorithm calculation, facilitation between experts to resource-poor environments. These advances have been received with mixed reviews. For anatomic pathology, mobile technology applications can be broken into 4 broad categories: (a) educational uses, (b) microscope with mobile phone, (c) mobile phone as microscope/acquisition device, and (d) miscellaneous. Using a mobile phone as an acquisition device paired with a microscope seems to be the most interesting current application because of the need for expert consultation with resource-poor environments. However, several emerging uses for mobile technology may become more prominent as the technology matures including image analysis, alternative light sources, and increased opportunities for clinician and patient engagement. The flexibility represented by mobile technology represents a burgeoning field in pathology informatics.

  8. Mobile Technologies for Parent/Child Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Davis, Hilary; Modlitba, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    Children are one of the largest new user groups of mobile technology -- from phones to micro-laptops to electronic toys. These products are both lauded and criticized, especially when it comes to their role in education and learning. The need has never been greater to understand how...... these technologies are being designed and to evaluate their impact worldwide. Mobile Technology for Children brings together contributions from leaders in industry, non-profit organizations, and academia to offer practical solutions for the design and the future of mobile technology for children....

  9. [Laboratory of technology of biopreparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, Z M

    1995-01-01

    The main scientific direction of the Laboratory is the development of new biochemical technologies for obtaining various biopreparations based on animal and plant raw materials, especially on that of the sea organisms. Fundamental investigations of the preparations of animal and microorganism hydrolysis have enabled the researchers to develop technologies for obtaining Str. griseus and Ceph. acremonium proteolytic complexes and to study their properties for the latter could be used as reagents in chemistry of proteins. Immobilized polyenzyme systems of proteases with silicagel and activated carbon fibre material as a matrix were created on the basis of investigations of immobilized enzymes. The advantages of immobilized biocatalysts possessing highest stability and a possibility of repeated application are described. Biotechnological isolation of bioactive preparations (BAP) of lipid-protein nature that are the structure components of cells membranes is the key problem at present. Biochemical principles of BAP metabolisms regulation in cell membranes and the role of the obtained biopreparations in correction of pathological conditions are also studied. These investigations promoted development of technologies for two new biopreparations from sea organisms (Calmar's gonades) for medicine. The first one is a set of surface active phospholipids and the second one is a set of nucleopeptides affecting the secretion of sex hormones. It has been found that surface active preparations show an antioxidative and membrane-stabilizing properties as well. It has also been shown that the preparation corrects the effect of pathology conditions in case of experimental hepatitis-induced by CCl4. The preparation influences the antioxidative system and thus the rate of lipid peroxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. USE OF MOBILE TECHNOLOGY IN BANKING SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIN ISAC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology and applications of mobile phones offer many opportunities for businesses, they also presenting a continuous development and new challenges. Although this service is currently viewed with reluctance by customers, banks need to overcome this drawback and understand how this service can be combined with other alternative channels such as social media, to create value for customers. In this paper I presented information about present and perspectives in mobile applications industry, what can a mobile application do in banking, banking mobile applications in Romania, mobile banking applications worldwide.

  11. Clinical Simulation: A Protocol for Evaluation of Mobile Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Jensen, Sanne; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    For mobile technology to be accepted at point of care in healthcare environments there is a need to demonstrate benefits whilst ameliorating the risks and challenges. To provide a standardised approach to evaluation of mobile technology a simulation protocol was developed to provide guidance for its use in healthcare environments. Simulated conditions provide the opportunity to assess intended and unintended consequences and identify potential workarounds when using technology. The protocol can also be used to demonstrate the importance of the development of digital professionalism by end-users prior to students entering the clinical practice setting. The mobile technology protocol was adapted from a health information systems protocol developed and used at the ITX Lab, Denmark for use in other simulation laboratories. Use case scenarios were developed to enable evaluation of mobile technology for mobile learning of nurses, nurse supervisors, students and patients. The scenarios can be used in a range of simulated environments including hospital bedside, outpatient clinic or community settings. A case study exemplar of a nurse and patient is included to demonstrate how the mobile technology protocol can be applied.

  12. Financial Technologies: A Note on Mobile Payment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yee Leng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The financial market is currently disrupted by the rise of new technologies "FinTech” a short form for financial technology, which profoundly reshapes the financial intermediary structure and makes financial services more efficient. Mobile technology with Internet-enabled devices are the next logical phase of the World Wide Web campaign such as mobile phone taking over the mass market and will fundamentally change the way products are buy and sell as well as financial services especially the mobile payment system. This research examines changes payment method in financial services, particularly those involving mobile payments that can create new channels for consumers to purchase goods and services using mobile phone. Mobile payment application is ready to replace traditional cash, checks, credit and debit card throughout the country. In this stage of development, the current situation of mobile payment market, review the previous literature on mobile payment services, analysis use of mobile payment worldwide and various initiatives use mobile phones to offer financial services for those ‘unbanked’.

  13. Financial Technologies: A Note on Mobile Payment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yee Leng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The financial market is currently disrupted by the rise of new technologies “FinTech” a short form of financial technology, which profoundly reshapes the financial intermediary structure and makes financial services more efficient. Mobile technology with Internet-enabled devices are the next logical phase of the World Wide Web a campaign such as mobile phone taking over the mass market and will fundamentally change the way products are bought and sold as well as financial services especially the mobile payment system. This research examines changes payment method in financial services, particularly those involving mobile payments that can create new channels for consumers to purchase goods and services using a mobile phone. Mobile payment application is ready to replace traditional cash, checks, credit and debit card throughout the country. In this stage of development, the current situation of mobile payment market, review the previous literature on mobile payment services, analysis use of mobile payment worldwide and various initiatives use mobile phones to offer financial services for those ‘unbanked’.

  14. The state of ergonomics for mobile computing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Jack T

    2015-01-01

    Because mobile computing technologies, such as notebook computers, smart mobile phones, and tablet computers afford users many different configurations through their intended mobility, there is concern about their effects on musculoskeletal pain and a need for usage recommendations. Therefore the main goal of this paper to determine which best practices surrounding the use of mobile computing devices can be gleaned from current field and laboratory studies of mobile computing devices. An expert review was completed. Field studies have documented various user configurations, which often include non-neutral postures, that users adopt when using mobile technology, along with some evidence suggesting that longer duration of use is associated with more discomfort. It is therefore prudent for users to take advantage of their mobility and not get stuck in any given posture for too long. The use of accessories such as appropriate cases or riser stands, as well as external keyboards and pointing devices, can also improve postures and comfort. Overall, the state of ergonomics for mobile technology is a work in progress and there are more research questions to be addressed.

  15. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-Design of Mobile Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Gronvall, Erik; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    . Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two European countries, and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens in co-design work as they have manifested themselves and influenced the Give......This paper disseminates work from the European Give&Take project, which aims at co-designing service sharing among senior citizens based on a mobile and distributed platform. With this project as a frame, our paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in co-design for ageing......&Take project. Challenges for mobilization are identified, based on an analysis of attitudes and values among design researchers and senior citizens. This analysis lead us to identify and discuss three strategies for mobilizing senior citizens in co-design of mobile technology: 1) Understanding being ‘elderly...

  16. Mobile technologies in progress of teaching and learning: teaching mobility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Hélio Alves Araújo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is a survey of basic education teachers in the municipality of Iguatu/CE and aimed to verify if teachers use mobile technology in the classroom as an educational resource, as well as investigate to what extent the professional qualifications of these professionals drives an authentic, autonomous teaching action before the harvest of mobile technologies. The subjects are teachers who work in elementary school. Methodologically, constitutes in a field research, with retaining the qualitative approach, aiming to enhance the school in contemporary times is addressed by changes brought to the company by the technological revolution, especially the proliferation of mobile technologies, which are driving changes in processes teaching and learning. We used semi structured and reflective interview as a technique for data collection. They have as the theoretical studies of Alarcão (2001, Freire (1987, 1992, 2001, Libâneo (2001, 2002, 2005, 2011, Nóvoa (2009, Tardif (2001 UNESCO (2013, Veen and Vrakking (2009. The results of the research showed that teachers, for the most part, do not use the apparatus of mobile technologies in pedagogical practice, and point to the picture of insufficient professional qualification for a teaching practice in the context of safe and educationally effectively technologies. However, this split ends, so in need of a continuous training process that deepens also in reality and knowledge that teachers have. As regard as pillars the changes that the current social context has experienced, among which we highlight the technological changes that proliferate dramatically.

  17. NAMMA SMART-COMMIT MOBILE LABORATORIES V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA SMART-COMMIT Mobile Laboratories dataset consists of data obtained from a suite of in situ and remote sensing instruments which measure parameters that...

  18. Technologies of Mobility in the Americas: Introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Budd, Lucy; Jensen, Ole B.

    2012-01-01

    Technics, technicians, and techniques form the three basic cornerstones of what this book is about. Whether it is cell phones or airplanes, passengers or magazine advertisements, what the chapters collected here have in common is a basic orientation towards technology as a set of relations....... This relational approach to technology demonstrates that technology is neither a utopian nor a dystopian force driving the universe towards progress or involution. For all the contributors to this book, what mobile communication technologies like smart phones and spatial mobility technologies like cars and ferry...

  19. Mobile communications technology: The singular factor responsible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the factors responsible for the growth of Internet usage on the African continent. The principal finding was that increasing growth of Internet usage is also down to one singular factor: mobile communications technology. The proliferation of mobile phone usage in Africa has resulted in the sustained ...

  20. Discovering magic of mobile technology in business: strategic marketing perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bolat, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology penetrated all aspects of social and business existence. Studies around mobile technology mostly address the use and adoption process of mobile marketing or mobile commerce from a consumer perspective rather than from a business perspective. Another concern of majority of studies on the use of mobile technology is a focus on technical nature of mobile devices despite the fact that true magic of technology resides in its mobilisation and usage – the deployment of mobile techn...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Microsystems Science & Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History 60 impacts Diversity Locations Facts & Figures Programs Nuclear Weapons About Nuclear Weapons Safety & Security Weapons Science & Technology Robotics R&D 100 Awards Laboratory Directed Research & Development Technology Deployment Centers

  2. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  3. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, RE; Fregly, BJ; Boninger, ML; Chan, L; Rodgers, MM; Reinkensmeyer, DJ

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observ ed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved int...

  4. Laboratory experiments in mobile robot navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Asim; Pal, Prabir K.

    1997-01-01

    Mobile robots have potential applications in remote surveillance and operation in hazardous areas. To be effective, they must have the ability to navigate on their own to desired locations. Several experimental navigational runs of a mobile robot developed have been conducted. The robot has three wheels of which the front wheel is steered and the hind wheels are driven. The robot is equipped with an ultrasonic range sensor, which is turned around to get range data in all directions. The range data is fed to the input of a neural net, whose output steers the robot towards the goal. The robot is powered by batteries (12V 10Ah). It has an onboard stepper motor controller for driving the wheels and the ultrasonic setup. It also has an onboard computer which runs the navigation program NAV. This program sends the range data and configuration parameters to the operator''s console program OCP, running on a stationary PC, through radio communication on a serial line. Through OCP, an operator can monitor the progress of the robot from a distant control room and intervene if necessary. In this paper the control modules of the mobile robot, its ways of operation and also results of some of the experimental runs recorded are reported. It is seen that the trained net guides the mobile robot through gaps of 1m and above to its destination with about 84% success measured over a small sample of 38 runs

  5. Using Mobile Devices for Motor-Learning Laboratory Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kory

    2014-01-01

    When teaching motor-learning concepts, laboratory experiments can be valuable tools for promoting learning. In certain circumstances, traditional laboratory exercises are often impractical due to facilities, time, or cost. Inexpensive or free applications (apps) that run on mobile devices can serve as useful alternatives. This article details…

  6. Contributions of mobile technologies to addiction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendsen, Joel

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies are revolutionizing the field of mental health, and particular progress has been made in their application to addiction research and treatment. The use of smartphones and other mobile devices has been shown to be feasible with individuals addicted to any of a wide range of substances, with few biases being observed concerning the repeated monitoring of daily life experiences, craving, or substance use. From a methodological point of view, the use of mobile technologies overcomes longstanding limitations of traditional clinical research protocols, including the more accurate assessment of temporal relationships among variables, as well as the reduction in both contextual constraints and discipline-specific methodological isolation. The present article presents a conceptual review of these advances while using illustrations of research applications that are capable of overcoming specific methodological barriers. Finally, a brief review of both the benefits and risks of mobile technology use for the treatment of patients will be addressed.

  7. Elckerlyc goes mobile: enabling technology for ECAs in mobile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Randy; Hendrix, J.; Reidsma, Dennis; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The fast growth of computational resources and speech technology available on mobile devices makes it pos- sible for users of these devices to interact with service sys- tems through natural dialogue. These systems are sometimes perceived as social agents and presented by means of an animated

  8. Survey on Multimedia Technologies for Mobile Learning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul POCATILU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies are developing very fast. This paper presents a survey on multimedia technologies for mobile learning applications, focusing on multimedia programming techniques for Windows Mobile, Symbian, and Java ME.

  9. Project inspection using mobile technology - phase II : assessing the impacts of mobile technology on project inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As mobile technology becomes widely available and affordable, transportation agencies can use this : technology to streamline operations involved within project inspection. This research, conducted in two : phases, identified opportunities for proces...

  10. Exploring Mobile Technologies for Learning Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to reveal how learners of Chinese as a foreign language use mobile technology to study Chinese outside the classroom. Researchers used sociocultural perspectives to frame the study and grounded theory to analyze data. Eleven English-speaking students who had learned Chinese for different years at a midwestern university participated in the study. They answered 23 major questions by submitting journal entries and participating in an interview. Compared with computer assisted language learning, mobile devices bring changes to tutorial functions, social computing, and gaming. Participants heavily explored tutorial functions, used mobile devices differently from computers for social computing, and showed interest in gaming. Although participants were enthusiastic about using mobile devices to learn Chinese, the number of applications they used and the variety of activities they engaged in were limited. Findings suggest that the effective incorporation of mobile devices to learn Chinese depends on collaboration and scaffolding

  11. Mobilizing technology for developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, C Jr

    1979-10-01

    Mr. Weiss says that the 15 years since the UN Conference on Science, Technology, and Development in Geneva have taught us that what seem at first to be technological obstacles to development frequently turn out on closer examination to have been policy failures; that introduction of technologies into developing countries must be accompanied by institutional and policy changes if the technologies are to benefit the countries. He points out that choice of alternative technology for a developing country should depend on careful overall assessment of local techno-economic, geographical, ecological, and social factors, as well as the desired balance between growth and equity. Such a technology assessment, a key element in the choice of appropriate (i.e., locally suitable) technology for particular investment projects, should be built into procedures for project preparation and appraisal in governments and development assistance agencies. Turning to technologists, Mr. Weiss says they face a double challenge: (1) to recognize potential for new efforts to harness science and technology for the benefit of the developing countries; and (2) by understanding the social, institutional, and economic framework into which an innovation is to operate, to ease its application and diffusion, and thus speed and increase its practical impact. 25 references.

  12. Intercomparison Measurements Exercises of Mobile Radiological Laboratories (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.

    2000-01-01

    After the reactor accident in Chernobyl, the importance of mobile radiological laboratories became evident and in situ gamma spectrometry became a common method for the rapid detection of gamma emitters in the environment. Since then different institutions in European countries have organised periodic intercomparison exercises of mobile radiological laboratories to improve the measurement methods and the preparedness of emergency monitoring teams. The general objectives of these workshops are to promote the knowledge and to exchange the experiences of emergency monitoring teams that use mobile radiological laboratories, as well as to foster the international harmonisation of emergency monitoring procedures and cooperation among teams. Finally, the results of intercomparison measurements have shown that such exercises are mandatory for rapid, efficient and correct environmental monitoring in nuclear or radiological emergencies. An overview of these intercomparison measurements is given, results from the 1999 intercomparison workshop are presented and lessons learned are discussed. (author)

  13. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design...... and understanding of audio-based mobile systems are evolving to offer new perspectives on interaction and design and support such systems to be applied in areas, such as the humanities....

  14. Mobile Technology Applications in Cancer Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire de Castro Silva, Sandro Luís; Gonçalves, Antônio Augusto; Cheng, Cezar; Fernandes Martins, Carlos Henrique

    2018-01-01

    Mobile devices frequently used in other specialties can find great utility in palliative care. For healthcare professionals, the use of mobile technology not only can bring additional resources to the care, but it can actually radically change the cancer remote care practices. The Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) has developed the largest cancer home care program in Latin America, which currently benefits more than 500 patients. The purpose of this paper is to show the development of an ICT environment of mobile applications developed to support the palliative cancer care program at INCA.

  15. Fertilizers mobilization in alluvial aquifer: laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrocicco, M.; Colombani, N.; Palpacelli, S.

    2009-02-01

    In alluvial plains, intensive farming with conspicuous use of agrochemicals, can cause land pollution and groundwater contamination. In central Po River plain, paleo-channels are important links between arable lands and the underlaying aquifer, since the latter is often confined by clay sediments that act as a barrier against contaminants migration. Therefore, paleo-channels are recharge zones of particular interest that have to be protected from pollution as they are commonly used for water supply. This paper focuses on fertilizer mobilization next to a sand pit excavated in a paleo-channel near Ferrara (Italy). The problem is approached via batch test leaking and columns elution of alluvial sediments. Results from batch experiments showed fast increase in all major cations and anions, suggesting equilibrium control of dissolution reactions, limited availability of solid phases and geochemical homogeneity of samples. In column experiments, early elution and tailing of all ions breakthrough was recorded due to preferential flow paths. For sediments investigated in this study, dispersion, dilution and chemical reactions can reduce fertilizers at concentration below drinking standards in a reasonable time frame, provided fertilizer loading is halted or, at least, reduced. Thus, the definition of a corridor along paleo-channels is recommended to preserve groundwater quality.

  16. National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation: technologic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Rodrigues, A.R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The technological or industrial developments based on the accumulated experience by research group of condensed matter physics, in Brazil, are described. The potential of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation for personnel training, absorption and adaptation of economically important technologies for Brazil, is presented. Examples of cooperations between the Laboratory and some national interprises, and some industrial applications of the synchrotron radiation are done. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. A Laboratory Course in Technological Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, P.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory course taught at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (United Kingdom) which focuses on the preparation, properties, and applications of end-use products of the chemical industry. Outlines laboratory experiments on dyes, fibers, herbicides, performance testing, antioxidants, and surface active…

  18. 1.2 million kids and counting-Mobile science laboratories drive student interest in STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda L; Stapleton, Mary K

    2017-05-01

    In today's increasingly technological society, a workforce proficient in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills is essential. Research has shown that active engagement by K-12 students in hands-on science activities that use authentic science tools promotes student learning and retention. Mobile laboratory programs provide this type of learning in schools and communities across the United States and internationally. Many programs are members of the Mobile Lab Coalition (MLC), a nonprofit organization of mobile and other laboratory-based education programs built on scientist and educator collaborations. A recent survey of the member programs revealed that they provide an impressive variety of programming and have collectively served over 1.2 million students across the US.

  19. An indoor positioning technology in the BLE mobile payment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiantian; Ding, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Mobile payment system for large supermarkets, the core function is through the BLE low-power Bluetooth technology to achieve the amount of payment in the mobile payment system, can through an indoor positioning technology to achieve value-added services. The technology by collecting Bluetooth RSSI, the fingerprint database of sampling points corresponding is established. To get Bluetooth module RSSI by the AP. Then, to use k-Nearest Neighbor match the value of the fingerprint database. Thereby, to help businesses find customers through the mall location, combined settlement amount of the customer's purchase of goods, to analyze customer's behavior. When the system collect signal strength, the distribution of the sampling points of RSSI is analyzed and the value is filtered. The system, used in the laboratory is designed to demonstrate the feasibility.

  20. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Medić; Nataša Pavlović

    2014-01-01

    In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of t...

  1. Environmental monitoring systems: a new type of mobile laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, L.; Langmueller, G.; Tuerschmann, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear facilities are obligated to monitor the environmental radiation in their vicinity, which is often fulfilled by monitoring cars, combined with fixed monitoring stations. The MOLAR Mobile Laboratory for Environmental Radiation Monitoring as described here is being used under normal and accident conditions as a spot check monitoring system or to perform continuous measurements along a driving track. The mobile laboratories are continuously connected with the control centre's CRCS Central Radiological Computer System, where the RIS Radiological Information System provides corresponding evaluation functions. The mobile labs contain measuring and controlling units like γ-dose rate monitors, γ-spectrometer with a HpGe High Purity Germanium detector, a lead shielded measuring cell and MCA Multi-Channel Analyser, portable β-contamination monitor, α/β/γ multipurpose quick measuring unit, aerosol and iodine sampling units. The collected samples are safely stored for the transport to the environmental laboratory for being analysed later. The geographical location of the moving car is continuously determined by the satellite based GPS Global Positioning System and transferred in the on-board rack mounted computer system for being stored and locally displayed. Real-time data transmission via radio and mobile phone is continuously performed to supply the RIS Radiological Information System in the control centre via radio and mobile phone. The latter also serves for voice communication. Currently three MOLAR systems can be operated parallel and independent from the control centre. The system is ready to be extended to more mobile labs. This combination of mobile monitoring, sample analysis and radiological assessment of environmental data in combination with process occurrences has turned out to be a powerful instrument for emergency preparedness and environmental supervising. (orig.) [de

  2. Mobile Seamless Technology Enhanced CSL Oral Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ju; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at investigating how mobile seamless technology can be used to enhance the pragmatic competence of learners of Chinese as a second language (CSL). 34 overseas CSL learners participated in this study. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the classroom group, executing language tasks in fake contexts in a traditional…

  3. Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Verpoorten, Dominique; Ternier, Stefaan; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and

  4. Mobile Haptic Technology Development through Artistic Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how artistic explorations can be useful for the development of mobile haptic technology. It presents an alternative framework of design for wearable haptics that contributes to the building of haptic communities outside specialized research contexts. The paper also present...

  5. Proceedings of symposium on technology in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on both 10th and 11th March 2008 at Ceratopia Toki in Toki city, Gifu Prefecture, Japan, which hosted by the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). 287 people participated and 97 papers were presented from many universities, national laboratories, technical colleges, and some industries in Japan. Technical experience and new techniques were reported and discussed in four fields: technology of fabrication and cryogenics', 'device technology', 'diagnostic and control system', and 'computer and processing'. The 37 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Laboratory automation: trajectory, technology, and tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, R S; Whalen, S A

    2000-05-01

    Laboratory automation is in its infancy, following a path parallel to the development of laboratory information systems in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Changes on the horizon in healthcare and clinical laboratory service that affect the delivery of laboratory results include the increasing age of the population in North America, the implementation of the Balanced Budget Act (1997), and the creation of disease management companies. Major technology drivers include outcomes optimization and phenotypically targeted drugs. Constant cost pressures in the clinical laboratory have forced diagnostic manufacturers into less than optimal profitability states. Laboratory automation can be a tool for the improvement of laboratory services and may decrease costs. The key to improvement of laboratory services is implementation of the correct automation technology. The design of this technology should be driven by required functionality. Automation design issues should be centered on the understanding of the laboratory and its relationship to healthcare delivery and the business and operational processes in the clinical laboratory. Automation design philosophy has evolved from a hardware-based approach to a software-based approach. Process control software to support repeat testing, reflex testing, and transportation management, and overall computer-integrated manufacturing approaches to laboratory automation implementation are rapidly expanding areas. It is clear that hardware and software are functionally interdependent and that the interface between the laboratory automation system and the laboratory information system is a key component. The cost-effectiveness of automation solutions suggested by vendors, however, has been difficult to evaluate because the number of automation installations are few and the precision with which operational data have been collected to determine payback is suboptimal. The trend in automation has moved from total laboratory automation to a

  7. Detection of falls using accelerometers and mobile phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Y W; Carlisle, Alison J

    2011-11-01

    to study the sensitivity and specificity of fall detection using mobile phone technology. an experimental investigation using motion signals detected by the mobile phone. the research was conducted in a laboratory setting, and 18 healthy adults (12 males and 6 females; age = 29 ± 8.7 years) were recruited. each participant was requested to perform three trials of four different types of simulated falls (forwards, backwards, lateral left and lateral right) and eight other everyday activities (sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, level walking, walking up- and downstairs, answering the phone, picking up an object and getting up from supine). Acceleration was measured using two devices, a mobile phone and an independent accelerometer attached to the waist of the participants. Bland-Altman analysis shows a higher degree of agreement between the data recorded by the two devices. Using individual upper and lower detection thresholds, the specificity and sensitivity for mobile phone were 0.81 and 0.77, respectively, and for external accelerometer they were 0.82 and 0.96, respectively. fall detection using a mobile phone is a feasible and highly attractive technology for older adults, especially those living alone. It may be best achieved with an accelerometer attached to the waist, which transmits signals wirelessly to a phone.

  8. Technology evaluation: adalimumab, Abbott laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Hanns M

    2002-04-01

    Adalimumab (D2E7), a human monoclonal antibody that binds to and neutralizes TNFa, is being developed by Abbott (formerly Knoll), under license from Cambridge Antibody Technology (CAT), for the potential treatment of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. It is also being investigated for the potential treatment of coronary heart disease. Phase II studies for Crohn's disease and phase III for RA were ongoing throughout 2001. Limited data are only available for RA. In January 2002, it was reported that phase III trials of adalimumab for RA had been completed, but details have not been published in the primary literature so far. At this time CAT and Abbott expected to file for US approval in the second quarter of 2002 with a launch date anticipated for 2003. Phase III data are expected to be presented at the European League Against Rheumatism meeting in June 2002. In November 2000, Lehman Brothers predicted a US launch in June 2002 with peak US sales of $600 million in 2007 and a launch in non-US markets in 2003 with peak sales in these markets of $300 million in 2008. In December 2000, Merrill Lynch predicted regulatory clearance in the second half of 2003. The probability of adalimumab reaching the market is estimated to be 70%. In December 2000, Merrill Lynch predicted a 2003 launch, with estimated sales of pounds sterling 3.65 million in that year rising to pounds sterling 30.14 million in 2010. In March 2001, ABN AMRO predicted sales of $73 million in 2003 rising to $392 million in 2007.

  9. Cab technology integration laboratory demonstration with moving map technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-31

    A human performance study was conducted at the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) using a locomotive research simulatorthe Cab Technology Integration Laboratory (CTIL)that was acquired by the Federal Railroad Ad...

  10. 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art in the fields of mobile and wireless technology, security and applications.  The proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology (ICMWT2015), it represents the outcome of a unique platform for researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to share cutting-edge developments in the field of mobile and wireless science technology, including those working on data management and mobile security.   The contributions presented here describe the latest academic and industrial research from the international mobile and wireless community.  The scope covers four major topical areas: mobile and wireless networks and applications; security in mobile and wireless technology; mobile data management and applications; and mobile software.  The book will be a valuable reference for current researchers in academia and industry, and a useful resource for graduate-level students working on mobile and wireless technology...

  11. 5G technologies boosting efficient mobile learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leligou Helen C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The needs for education, learning and training proliferate primarily due to the facts that economy becomes more and more knowledge based (mandating continuous lifelong learning and people migrate among countries, which introduces the need for learning other languages, for training on different skills and learning about the new cultural and societal framework. Given that in parallel, time schedules continuously become tighter, learning through mobile devices continuously gains in popularity as it allows for learning anytime, anywhere. To increase the learning efficiency, personalisation (in terms of selecting the learning content, type and presentation and adaptation of the learning experience in real time based on the experienced affect state are key instruments. All these user requirements challenge the current network architectures and technologies. In this paper, we investigate the requirements implied by efficient mobile learning scenarios and we explore how 5G technologies currently under design/testing/validation and standardisation meet these requirements.

  12. TABLET (MOBILE TECHNOLOGY FOR PROFESSIONAL MUSIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights issues associated with the introduction of cloud-centric and tablet (mobile devices in music education, use of which confronts the teacher-musician fundamentally new challenges. So, it's a development of practical teaching skills with the assistance of modern technology, a search of approaches to the organization of educational process, a creation of conditions for the continuity between traditional music learning and information technologies in educational process. Authors give the characteristics of cloud computing and the perspective of its use in music schools (distance learning, sharing, cloud services, etc.. Also you can see in this article the overview of some mobile applications (for OS Android and iOS and their use in the educational process.

  13. Technology transfer in the national laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonas, G.

    1991-08-01

    The title of this paper might unfairly provoke readers if it conjures up visions of vast stores of high-tech gadgets in several hundred technology warehouses'' (also known as federal laboratories) around the country, open for browsing by those in search of a bargain. That vision, unfortunately, is a mirage. The term technology transfer'' is not really as accurate as is the term technology team-work,'' a process of sharing ideas and knowledge rather than widgets. In addition, instead of discussing the efforts of more than 700 federal labs in the US, I mean to address only those nine government-owned, contractor-operated multiprogram labs run by the Department of Energy. Nevertheless, the topic of technology team-work opportunities with DOE multiprogram national lab is of significance to those concerned with increasing economic competitiveness and finding technological solutions to a host of national problems. A significant fraction of US R D capabilities rests in the nine DOE multiprogram national laboratories -- and these labs have only just begun to join the other federal laboratories in these efforts due to the passage and recent implementation of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989.

  14. Mobile technologies as a health care tool

    CERN Document Server

    Arslan, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a state-of-the-art overview of the available and emerging mobile technologies and explores how these technologies can serve as support tools in enhancing user participation in health care and promoting well-being in the daily lives of individuals, thereby reducing the burden of chronic disease on the health care system. The analysis is supported by presentation of a variety of case studies on the ways in which mobile technologies can be used to increase connectivity with health care providers and relevant others in order to promote healthy lifestyles and improve service provision. Detailed information is also provided on a sample project in which a set of tools has been used by teens at risk of obesity to record their sociopsychological environment and everyday health routines. Specifically, it is evaluated whether video diaries, created using a mobile platform and shared in real time via a social network, assist subjects in confronting obesity as a chronic disease. The book will be of inte...

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D ampersand D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D ampersand D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2

  16. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  17. MUSICAL-COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY: THE LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with musically-computer technology in the educational system on example of the Educational and Methodical Laboratory Music & Computer Technologies at the Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, St. Petersburg. Interdisciplinary field of professional activities relates to the creation and application of specialized music software and hardware tools and the knowledges in music and informatics. A realization of the concept of musical-computer education in preparing music teachers is through basic educational programs of vocational training, supplementary education, professional development of teachers and methodical support via Internet. In addition, the laboratory Music & Computer Technologies engaged in scientific activity: it is, above all, specialized researches in the field of pedagogy and international conferences.

  18. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Evans, W.; MacEwan, J.R.; Melvin, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D ampersand D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA

  20. A needs assessment for mobile technology use in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrzad Vafa; Diane E. Chico

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated how medical students perceived mobile technology as a component of their learning experience and identified barriers to the use of mobile technology in education. Methods: An anonymous survey developed by EDUCAUSE was distributed to 1000 first year medical students (M1s) at two separate medical schools during three consecutive academic years, 2010 to 2013. The 25-item questionnaire assessed student use of mobile devices, student interest in mobile technolog...

  1. Mobile health a technology road map

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive report on the technological aspects of Mobile Health (mHealth) and discusses the main challenges and future directions in the field. It is divided into eight parts:  (1) preventive and curative medicine;  (2) remote health monitoring; (3) interoperability; (4) framework, architecture, and software/hardware systems;  (5) cloud applications; (6) radio technologies and applications; (7) communication networks and systems; and (8) security and privacy mechanisms. The first two parts cover sensor-based and bedside systems for remotely monitoring patients’ health condition, which aim at preventing the development of health problems and managing the prognosis of acute and chronic diseases. The related chapters discuss how new sensing and wireless technologies can offer accurate and cost-effective means for monitoring and evaluating behavior of individuals with dementia and psychiatric disorders, such as wandering behavior and sleep impairments. The following two parts focus on a...

  2. Mobile technology in health information systems - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-Y; Zhang, P-Y

    2016-05-01

    Mobile technology is getting involved in every sphere of life including medical health care. There has been an immense upsurge in mobile phone-based health innovations these days. The expansion of mobile phone networks and the proliferation of inexpensive mobile handsets have made the digital information and communication technology capabilities very handy for the people to exploit if for any utility including health care. The mobile phone based innovations are able to transform weak and under performing health information system into more modern and efficient information system. The present review article will enlighten all these aspects of mobile technology in health care.

  3. Mobile Technologies Enhance the E-Learning Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Keh-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the mobile technologies that enhance the E-Learning opportunity, examine the educational benefits and implementation issues in mobile learning, discuss the guidelines for implementing effective mobile learning, identify the current application and operation of mobile learning, and discuss the future of…

  4. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D.

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID's technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID

  5. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  6. Prospects for the Use of Mobile Technologies in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2008-01-01

    During the past few years there have been great strides in the advancement of technology with the rise of mobile devices leading to an era characterized by the instant access to and mobility of information. Mobile technologies have more recently been used in a variety of educational settings for a variety of purposes and educational goals.…

  7. Mobile technology for health care in rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the proliferation of mobile technologies in China, the Chinese mobile medical applications market is growing rapidly. This may be particularly useful for Chinese rural populations who have limited access to quality medical care where mobile technologies can reach across geographic and socioeconomic boundaries and potentially increase access to care and improve health outcomes.

  8. Patterns of Mobile Technology Use in Teaching: The Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tami

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile learning spaces is an opportunity to break the boundaries of the classroom and to prepare teacher-educators and pre-service teachers for future school classes. The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of mobile technology and usage patterns in the mobile technology space among lecturers in a teacher education…

  9. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  10. Emerging Technologies for the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Blake W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this review we examine the literature related to emerging technologies that will help to reshape the clinical microbiology laboratory. These topics include nucleic acid amplification tests such as isothermal and point-of-care molecular diagnostics, multiplexed panels for syndromic diagnosis, digital PCR, next-generation sequencing, and automation of molecular tests. We also review matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry methods and their role in identification of microorganisms. Lastly, we review the shift to liquid-based microbiology and the integration of partial and full laboratory automation that are beginning to impact the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:25278575

  11. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  12. Computer technology forecasting at the National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Office of ADP Management organized a group of scientists and computer professionals, mostly from their own national laboratories, to prepare an annually updated technology forecast to accompany the Department's five-year ADP Plan. The activities of the task force were originally reported in an informal presentation made at the ACM Conference in 1978. This presentation represents an update of that report. It also deals with the process of applying the results obtained at a particular computing center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Computer technology forecasting is a difficult and hazardous endeavor, but it can reap considerable advantage. The forecast performed on an industry-wide basis can be applied to the particular needs of a given installation, and thus give installation managers considerable guidance in planning. A beneficial side effect of this process is that it forces installation managers, who might otherwise tend to preoccupy themselves with immediate problems, to focus on longer term goals and means to their ends

  13. Dental students' uptake of mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, B; Hill, K B; Walmsley, A D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how new mobile technologies, such as smartphones and laptops, are used by dental students. A questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students from years 1 to 4, at the University of Birmingham Dental School. Questionnaires were completed between February and April 2013. Two hundred and seventy questionnaires were completed. Laptops 55% (145) and smartphones 34% (88) were the most popular choice of device for connecting to the net and searching information. Laptops were preferred in first and second year. Students in year 3 preferred mobile phones, and by year 4 the use of mobile phones and laptops was similar. The top two application ideas chosen by students as the most useful on their smart phones were a dictionary for dental education (56%) and multiple choice questions (50%). Students who chose smartphones as their first choice or second choice of device strongly agreed that having the Internet on their smartphones had a positive impact on their dental education (55%). With laptops (48%), students preferred to be at home when using them while for smartphones (31%) they used them anywhere with a connection. E-mail (47%) and social networks (44%) were the top two Internet communication tools used most on laptops. Instant messaging was popular on smartphones (17%). Depending on the year in the course, laptops and smartphones are the most popular choice of device and desktop computers are the least popular. Applications on smartphones are very popular and instant messaging is an upcoming form of communication for students.

  14. Mobile Assisted Language Learning: Review of the Recent Applications of Emerging Mobile Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-01-01

    As mobile computing technologies have been more powerful and inclusive in people's daily life, the issue of mobile assisted language learning (MALL) has also been widely explored in CALL research. Many researches on MALL consider the emerging mobile technologies have considerable potentials for the effective language learning. This review study…

  15. User driven innovation in mobile technologies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper Schultz; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    by systems already in function. Stories of prior business successes can be an important tool to ensure further innovative investments since lack of enterprise strategies is often an obstacle for innovation, especially user driven. Both small and large software houses develops dedicated software for coupling...... technology systems relying on the concept of affordance. This paper examines how innovation processes mediate between user orientations and technology offers. There is a great potential for mobile handheld ICT-systems to support numerous work processes in the AEC-industry and this can be substantiated...... site practises, and headquarters - inspired by specific user needs for optimizing work processes. The most important mechanisms evoked for creating the mediating found in the paper are ‘hybrids’ where professionals from AEC establishes a software house, developing ICT-products for specific on...

  16. Mobile Work Platform - A Fluor Fernald innovative dismantlement technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Mark S.; Cromer, Paul R.; Danner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D andD) Focus Area, led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been charged with finding new and innovative D and D technologies and then validating through field demonstration that the technologies are safer, faster and/or more cost-effective. The D and D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D and D technologies is to use them at DOE sites in large-scale demonstration and deployment (LSDD) projects. The DOE's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati Ohio, was host for a LSDD Project overseen by the D and D Focus Area. The FEMP was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal; and is now currently undergoing active environmental restoration, including removal of major process facilities. As observed during the D and D of Fernald's Plant 1, the baseline method for removing piping required laborers to work above the floor on ladders, scaffolding, ardor man-lifts with hand-held power tools. The pipe must first be rigged to prevent falling when cut. After cutting, the pipe is manually lowered to the ground and placed in a storage/disposal container. The Mobile Work Platform (MWP) consists of a mobile chassis, telescoping arm and a dual crimper/shear ''end-effecter''. It has the capability to grab and hold a pipe, crimp and shear the pipe (up to a ten-foot section) on either side of where it is being held and then lower and place the pipe section into a storage/disposal container. The MWP can crimp/shear up to a 6-inch diameter, schedule 401, carbon steel pipe. A single operator using a radio remote control operates the MWP. The paper will describe the results (productivity, safety advantages and lessons learned) during the Mobile Work Platform demonstration at Fernald

  17. Japanese Mobile Phone Usage in Sweden - Technological and Social Prerequisites

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Susanne; Hillerdal, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Japan is an advanced country when it comes to mobile phone technology. This thesis firstly investigates the mobile phone usage in Japan. Secondly it describes the prerequisites for implementation of some distinguished Japanese mobile phone functions in Sweden. This is done from a social as well as a technological aspect. The Japanese mobile phone usage is investigated on three levels; governmental, industrial and consumer. The governmental level is characterised by an ICT policy which strives...

  18. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great co...

  19. A CHAT Perspective on Mobile Technology in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenild, Kåre; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    The body of research within the design of mobile technology for use in k-12 education has primarily focused on the features and thereby new options that are brought about when utilizing mobile technologies in education. However, the theoretical concern for mobile technology’s effect on the child......’s development is not yet fully covered. In this paper we argue that mobile technology is a valuable resource in K-12 education. Based on CHAT theory, we argue that mobile technology potentially mediates subject matter knowledge and everyday knowledge and thereby supports the child to acquire valuable......Bag) in a participatory design context involving both teachers and students in the process. A four-month evaluation of the final version of the eBag was conducted to make a preliminary evaluation of the possibilities of mobile supported education. The result of this preliminary evaluation indicates that mobile technology...

  20. Advanced technology mobile robotics vehicle fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGovern, D.E.

    1987-03-01

    A fleet of vehicles is being developed and maintained by Sandia National Laboratories for studies in remote control and autonomous operation. The vehicles range from modified commercial vehicles to specially constructed mobile platforms and are utilized as testbeds for developing concepts in the areas of remote control (teleoperation) and computer control (autonomy). Actuators control the vehicle speed, brakes, and steering via manual input from a remote driving station or through some level of digital computer control. On-board processing may include simple vehicle control functions or may allow for unmanned, autonomous operation. Communication links are provided for digital communication between control computers, television transmission for vehicle vision, and voice for local control. SNL can develop, test, and evaluate sensors, processing requirements, various methods of actuator implementation, operator controlled feedback requirements, and vehicle operations. A description of the major features and uses for each of the vehicles in the fleet is provided

  1. Mobile technology and the digitization of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Narula, Jagat; Sengupta, Partho P

    2016-05-07

    The convergence of science and technology in our dynamic digital era has resulted in the development of innovative digital health devices that allow easy and accurate characterization in health and disease. Technological advancements and the miniaturization of diagnostic instruments to modern smartphone-connected and mobile health (mHealth) devices such as the iECG, handheld ultrasound, and lab-on-a-chip technologies have led to increasing enthusiasm for patient care with promises to decrease healthcare costs and to improve outcomes. This 'hype' for mHealth has recently intersected with the 'real world' and is providing important insights into how patients and practitioners are utilizing digital health technologies. It is also raising important questions regarding the evidence supporting widespread device use. In this state-of-the-art review, we assess the current literature of mHealth and aim to provide a framework for the advances in mHealth by understanding the various device, patient, and clinical factors as they relate to digital health from device designs and patient engagement, to clinical workflow and device regulation. We also outline new strategies for generation and analysis of mHealth data at the individual and population-based levels. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Using Video Modeling and Mobile Technology to Teach Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Todd; Musti-Rao, Shobana; McCune, Ashley; Clouse, Diane E.; McCoy, Dacia M.; Kalra, Hilary D.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2017-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the field of education regarding the use of technology in classrooms to improve student outcomes. Specifically, researchers have demonstrated positive outcomes for using mobile technology with students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Fewer studies have used mobile technology with students with emotional and…

  3. Does Mobile Technology Matter? A Student Centric Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wenshin

    2010-01-01

    Based on a student-centric perspective, this study seeks to understand how mobile technology influences students’ learning experiences. Our research motivation is driven by the increasing attention paid to mobile technology in the research and business community. Set in a public university setting, our investigation seeks to shed light on how teaching and learning could be reshaped by mobile technology, most specifically, emerging tablet PCs. The findings, based on two MIS (Management Informa...

  4. Students' Use of Mobile Technologies: Motivational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytiyeh, Hoda

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technologies are all-pervasive in the current digital generation, and college students rely on their mobile phones to communicate on a daily basis. In the midst of the myriad of applications available to download on the mobile, some tools have become more well-known and more often adopted than others. An example of such a tool is WhatsApp,…

  5. Individual and Technological Factors Affecting Undergraduates' Use of Mobile Technology in University of Ilorin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilola Ogulande, Oyeronke; Oladimeji Olafare, Festus; Ayuba Sakaba, Dabo

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and utilization of handheld mobile technology among undergraduates for mobile learning cannot be underestimated. This study was geared towards investigating individual and technological factors affecting the perceived usefulness of mobile technology by undergraduates in university of Ilorin, Nigeria. The study was a descriptive…

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory's Mobile Real Time Radiography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Mendez, J.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.

    1997-01-01

    A 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph greater than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes. It has three independent X-Ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12 in. image intensifier, the second is a 36 in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53 ft long X 8 ft. wide X 14 ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only a easily obtainable overweight permit because it weighs approximately 38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility

  7. TSC mobile mining and extraction technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavender, W.J. [TSC Company Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-11-01

    This Power-Point presentation described an innovative mining and extraction technology developed by Calgary-based TSC Company Ltd. that has provided a major breakthrough in bitumen production from mineable oil sands. The presentation described the process and key mechanical components as demonstrated on oil sands leases. It also described the step change in cost structure and profitability. Oil sands mining provide a hugh resource base with no exploration costs and no decline in production. Despite these advantages, oil sands mining faces the challenge of high capital and operating costs and materials handling. Other challenges include the variability of the ore and environmental impacts. This paper described the fundamentals of the new technology called the Tar Sand Combine (TSC), a continuous mining machine, crusher, cyclone, tailings filter and stacker all in one mobile module. Several viewgraphs were included with the presentation to depict the recovery process as successfully demonstrated at a pilot project. Patent is pending on the process and components. The advantages of the TSC are reduced materials handling, and no tailings ponds are generated since tailings remain where they are mined. The final product is clean bitumen. The specifications of a commercial TSC are: 2000 ton/stream hour mining produce 25,000 bpsd bitumen at 12 per cent ore grade; mined ore bitumen recovery is greater than 95 per cent and the availability factor is 85 per cent. It was concluded that the TSC can maximize oil sands reserves, while providing significant cost savings and environmental benefits. 2 tabs., 24 figs.

  8. Mobile technology in nursing education: where do we go from here? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Janet

    2015-05-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN), Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (STTI), and many National Nurses Associations (NNAs), have called for the integration of information technology into nursing curriculums to prepare nursing students for the current practice environment which requires access to large amounts of information to provide evidence-based patient care. Nurse educators have begun to address the integration of technology in nursing curriculum, but are the available tools, in particular, mobile devices loaded with informational applications, being maximized? Literature Review Aims The aims of this literature review are to 1) explore the literature written on the use of mobile technology in nursing education; 2) methodically discuss the benefits and concerns involved in using mobile technology in nursing education; and 3) consider strategies for enhancing the use of mobile technology in nursing education. Review Methods A search was conducted on the use of mobile technology in nursing programs in Academic Search Complete, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline with Full Text, and Medline Journals. Seventeen studies, published within the last five years in peer-reviewed journals regarding the mobile technology in nursing programs were identified. Findings Although many nursing programs have implemented the use of mobile technology in the clinical, classroom, and laboratory settings, more work needs to be done to overcome the concerns related to: cost, lack of IT support, lack of faculty acceptance and role-modeling, lack of structured assignments and/or activities designed to encourage the implementation of mobile devices; and constraints on their use in clinical settings. While much has been done to incorporate the use of mobile technology in nursing curriculum, nurse educators are encouraged to develop strategies to overcome the concerns noted. Possible strategies to overcome the concerns are

  9. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G B; Currie, J W

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

  10. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies

  11. Educating Urban Designers using Augmented Reality and Mobile Learning Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Redondo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an educational experience using augmented reality (AR on mobile devices as a  tool for learning urban design concepts and specifically for architecture degree students. In a real project-based exercise, the participants had to design a sculpture to be placed in a public space, checking the suitability of the object as for example the form, scale, location, materials, etc., and taking into account the surroundings. The project is controlled on-site using AR on mobile platforms, encouraging collaborative learning by sharing the 3D models of their proposals, and acting both as producers and consumers of AR content in the process. To assess both the usability of technology, as well as the learning improvement, the class was divided into two groups with equivalent pre-course grades: a control group, who followed the conventional course in the laboratory, and a test group, who used AR technology. At the end of the course, the AR-using group showed a significant increase in academic performance, higher motivation and satisfaction compared to the control group.

  12. Mobile technology in radiology resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbage, Aiham C; Bedi, Harprit S

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that ownership of a mobile electronic device would result in more time spent learning radiology. Current trends in radiology residents' studying habits, their use of electronic and printed radiology learning resources, and how much of the funds allotted to them are being used toward printed vs electronic education tools were assessed in this study. A survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011. Program directors listed in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology e-mail list server received an e-mail asking for residents to participate in an online survey. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents, and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents' study habits, access to portable devices, and use of printed and electronic radiology resources. Radiology residents are adopters of new technologies, with 74% owning smart phones and 37% owning tablet devices. Respondents spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with tablet devices. There is considerable use of online and electronic resources and mobile devices among the current generation of radiology residents. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobile home automation-merging mobile value added services and home automation technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rosendahl, Andreas; Hampe, Felix J.; Botterweck, Goetz

    2007-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed In this paper we study mobile home automation, a field that emerges from an integration of mobile application platforms and home automation technologies. In a conceptual introduction we first illustrate the need for such applications by introducing a two-dimensional conceptual model of mobility. Subsequently we suggest an architecture and discuss different options of how a user might access a mobile home automation service and the controlled devices. As another contrib...

  14. Push technology at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R. E.; Woell, Y. N.

    1999-04-06

    Selective dissemination of information (SDI) services, also referred to as current awareness searches, are usually provided by periodically running computer programs (personal profiles) against a cumulative database or databases. This concept of pushing relevant content to users has long been integral to librarianship. Librarians traditionally turned to information companies to implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. This paper describes how a push technology was implemented on a large scale for scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory, explains some of the challenges to designers/maintainers, and identifies the positive effects that SDI seems to be having on users. Argonne purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents data (all subject areas except Humanities), and scientists no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. Argonne's database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne-University of Chicago Current Contents Electronic Search Service).

  15. Project inspection using mobile technology - phase I : an investigation into existing business processes and areas for improvement using mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    As mobile technology becomes widely available and affordable, transportation agencies can use this technology to : streamline operations involved within project inspection. This research, conducted in two phases, identified : opportunities for proces...

  16. Disaster mobile health technology: lessons from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, David W; Peabody, Christopher R; Hoffman, Ari; Cote, Elizabeth; Moulton, Seth; Baez, Amado Alejandro; Nathanson, Larry

    2012-04-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technology can play a critical role in improving disaster victim tracking, triage, patient care, facility management, and theater-wide decision-making. To date, no disaster mHealth application provides responders with adequate capabilities to function in an austere environment. The Operational Medicine Institute (OMI) conducted a qualitative trial of a modified version of the off-the-shelf application iChart at the Fond Parisien Disaster Rescue Camp during the large-scale response to the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti. The iChart mHealth system created a patient log of 617 unique entries used by on-the-ground medical providers and field hospital administrators to facilitate provider triage, improve provider handoffs, and track vulnerable populations such as unaccompanied minors, pregnant women, traumatic orthopedic injuries and specified infectious diseases. The trial demonstrated that even a non-disaster specific application with significant programmatic limitations was an improvement over existing patient tracking and facility management systems. A unified electronic medical record and patient tracking system would add significant value to first responder capabilities in the disaster response setting.

  17. Mobile Work Platform - A Fluor Fernald innovative dismantlement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark S. Peters; Paul R. Cromer; Robert Danner

    2000-06-16

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been charged with finding new and innovative D&D technologies and then validating through field demonstration that the technologies are safer, faster and/or more cost-effective. The D&D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D&D technologies is to use them at DOE sites in large-scale demonstration and deployment (LSDD) projects. The DOE's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati Ohio, was host for a LSDD Project overseen by the D&D Focus Area. The FEMP was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal; and is now currently undergoing active environmental restoration, including removal of major process facilities. As observed during the D&D of Fernald's Plant 1, the baseline method for removing piping required laborers to work above the floor on ladders, scaffolding, ardor man-lifts with hand-held power tools. The pipe must first be rigged to prevent falling when cut. After cutting, the pipe is manually lowered to the ground and placed in a storage/disposal container. The Mobile Work Platform (MWP) consists of a mobile chassis, telescoping arm and a dual crimper/shear ''end-effecter''. It has the capability to grab and hold a pipe, crimp and shear the pipe (up to a ten-foot section) on either side of where it is being held and then lower and place the pipe section into a storage/disposal container. The MWP can crimp/shear up to a 6-inch diameter, schedule 401, carbon steel pipe. A single operator using a radio remote control operates the MWP. The paper will describe the results (productivity, safety advantages and lessons learned) during the Mobile Work Platform demonstration at Fernald.

  18. Perceived Convenience in an Extended Technology Acceptance Model: Mobile Technology and English Learning for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Yan, Chi-Fang; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Since convenience is one of the features for mobile learning, does it affect attitude and intention of using mobile technology? The technology acceptance model (TAM), proposed by David (1989), was extended with perceived convenience in the present study. With regard to English language mobile learning, the variables in the extended TAM and its…

  19. The Westinghouse Series 1000 Mobile Phone: Technology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Mobile satellite communications will be popularized by the North American Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the overall system is dependent upon the quality of the mobile units. Westinghouse is designing our unit, the Series 1000 Mobile Phone, with the user in mind. The architecture and technology aim at providing optimum performance at a low per unit cost. The features and functions of the Series 1000 Mobile Phone have been defined by potential MSAT users. The latter portion of this paper deals with who those users may be.

  20. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  1. Exploring technology acceptance for mobile services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Phan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mobile phone industries are no longer relying on voice services. It is predicted that data services are expected to be a remediation for the declining of average revenue per user (ARPU in telecommunication market. The purpose of this paper is to find the factors that influence the acceptance/adoption of mobile services.Design/methodology/approach: This paper utilizes quantitative method. Questionnaire were distributed to collect the data. The questionnaires are designed specifically to address the factors related to mobile services. Later on, this paper uses Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP and Cluster analysis to identify the factors that influence the adoption of mobile services.Findings: The results show that ease of use and usefulness are top two factors that influence the adoption of mobile services.Research limitations/implications: The sample for the study is relatively small. For future research, the sample should be increased. The data collection should also look into different devices and operating system of mobile phones to find if there is any significant difference in adopting mobile services.Practical implications: This framework is expected to be able to help the mobile services provider to design better mobile services that can attract users to adopt them. Originality/value: This is the follow on research on the previous study that employed different method. This study is to confirm and support the findings from previous study.

  2. A Feasibility Study for Mobile Marketing and Distribution Occupational Laboratories in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohns, Donald P.

    A study determined the feasibility of a mobile laboratory for marketing and distribution in North Dakota. It attempted to answer four questions: (1) What types of staffing, equipment, curriculum, and delivery systems are presently being utilized in mobile laboratories throughout the nation? (2) What significant information obtained from mobile…

  3. Web Environment for Programming and Control of a Mobile Robot in a Remote Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Lopes, Maísa Soares; Gomes, Iago Pacheco; Trindade, Roque M. P.; da Silva, Alzira F.; de C. Lima, Antonio C.

    2017-01-01

    Remote robotics laboratories have been successfully used for engineering education. However, few of them use mobile robots to to teach computer science. This article describes a mobile robot Control and Programming Environment (CPE) and its pedagogical applications. The system comprises a remote laboratory for robotics, an online programming tool,…

  4. Soft ware upgrade for Mobile Laboratories in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim; Andersen, Frank

    1998-01-01

    In July-August 1998 the soft ware for controlling the measurements in the mobile laboratories have been upgraded. The mobile laboratories are sponsored by Danish east aid projects in cooperation with Rotaray Denmark.The equipment used is 4 L NaI(Tl) detectors mounted on the roof of the cars toget...

  5. Examining the Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mobile Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Toinette M.

    Understanding how mobile devices can enhance parent/teacher communication is important because parents play an important part in their children's learning. Research on parents' use of mobile devices to communicate with their children's teachers is limited. The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational study was to determine the relationships between parents' (a) knowledge of using mobile devices, (b) general use of mobile devices, (c) purpose for using mobile devices, (d) perceived ease of using mobile devices, (e) perceived usefulness of mobile devices, (f) attitude toward using mobile devices, and (g) use of mobile devices to communicate with teachers. The study was informed by the technology acceptance model and used a participant pool of 73 parents of high school students attending a Title I high school in a large Midwestern city in the United States. Data were collected using an online survey and analyzed using Pearson's correlations. The study results indicate significant correlations between parents' use of mobile devices to communicate with teachers and knowledge of using mobile devices, purpose for using mobile devices, perceived ease of using mobile devices, perceived usefulness of mobile devices, and attitudes toward using mobile devices. These findings suggest that parental use of mobile devices to communicate with teachers can be enhanced by administrators and school personnel using strategies that consider parents' and the school culture. Social implication includes sharing the results of this study with district and school administrators who have the power to implement programs that encourage and support the use of mobile devices as a communication tool between parents and teachers, therefore increasing parental involvement and ultimately student academic success.

  6. Mobile Computing: The Emerging Technology, Sensing, Challenges and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezboruah, T.

    2010-12-01

    The mobile computing is a computing system in which a computer and all necessary accessories like files and software are taken out to the field. It is a system of computing through which it is being able to use a computing device even when someone being mobile and therefore changing location. The portability is one of the important aspects of mobile computing. The mobile phones are being used to gather scientific data from remote and isolated places that could not be possible to retrieve by other means. The scientists are initiating to use mobile devices and web-based applications to systematically explore interesting scientific aspects of their surroundings, ranging from climate change, environmental pollution to earthquake monitoring. This mobile revolution enables new ideas and innovations to spread out more quickly and efficiently. Here we will discuss in brief about the mobile computing technology, its sensing, challenges and the applications. (author)

  7. "Design for Somebody" - Approach Enabling Mobile Technology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkka, Andrew; Merilampi, Sari; Koivisto, Antti; Tommiska, Janika; Saarinen, Tatu-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents case examples of Design for Somebody (DfS) philosophy used both in developing novel technologies and modifying existing main stream technologies applicable for users with special needs. DfS embodies variety of mobile technology approaches to generate personalised means to enable and motivate physical, cognitive and social skills development.

  8. The Impact of Mobile Technologies on Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuegen, Shauna'h

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the growing amount of research on using mobile technologies in education. As mobile devices become increasingly more prevalent, it is imperative to study their use and effect on the growing field of distance education. This brief review of existing literature indicates that traditional theories of learning, in both…

  9. Mobility of Labour, Technological Transformations and the Right to Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ettore

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses the macro level of analysis and focuses on the nature of work within the world economy. He examines the cultural characteristics of work, the dynamics of international economic relations, the transformation of international relations, geographical mobility, technological transformation and immigration, professional mobility,…

  10. Mobile internet technologies and their application to intelligent transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The worlds of mobile communication and the Internet are rapidly converging. This new domain, which is being touted as the "Wireless Web" or "Mobile Internet", is in its infancy and will require a number of complex technologies to mature and converge ...

  11. [A wireless mobile monitoring system based on bluetooth technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-jun; Wu, Kai; Wu, Xiao-Ming

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a wireless mobile monitoring system based on Bluetooth technology. This system realizes the remote mobile monitoring of multiple physiological parameters, and has the characters of easy use, low cost, good reliability and strong capability of anti-jamming.

  12. Learning Bridges: A Role for Mobile Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoula, Giasemi; Sharples, Mike; Lonsdale, Peter; Rudman, Paul; Meek, Julia

    2007-01-01

    MyArtSpace is a service for children to spread their learning between schools and museums using mobile phones linked to a personal Web space. Using MyArtSpace as an example, the authors discuss the possibilities for mobile technology to form bridges between formal and informal learning. They also offer guidelines for designing such bridges.…

  13. Socioeconomic Strata, Mobile Technology, and Education: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Hagashi, Teresita; Carillo, Laura; Gonzales, Irina; Makany, Tamas; Lee, Bommi; Garate, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Mobile devices are highly portable, easily distributable, substantially affordable, and have the potential to be pedagogically complementary resources in education. This study, incorporating mixed method analyses, discusses the implications of a mobile learning technology-based learning model in two public primary schools near the Mexico-USA…

  14. Mobile cell-phones (M-phones in telemicroscopy: increasing connectivity of isolated laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missoni Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of modern information telecommunication (ITC technology and its use in telemedicine plays an increasingly important role in facilitating access to some diagnostic services even to people living in the most remote areas. However, physical and economical constraints in the access to broad band data-transmission network, still represent a considerable obstacle to the transmission of images for the purpose of tele-pathology. Methods Indifferently using m-phones of different brands, and a variety of microscopic preparations, images were taken without the use of any adaptor simply approaching the lens of the mobile cell phone camera to the ocular of common optical microscopes, and subsequently sent via Multimedia Messaging Services (MMS to distant reference centres for tele-diagnosis. Access to MMS service was reviewed with specific reference to the African information communication technology (ICT market. Results Images of any pathologic preparation could be captured and sent over the mobile phone with an MMS, without being limited by appropriate access to the internet for transmission (i.e. access to broad-band services. The quality of the image was not influenced by the brand or model of the mobile-phone used, but only by its digital resolution, with any resolution above 0.8 megapixel resulting in images sufficient for diagnosis. Access to MMS services is increasingly reaching remote disadvantaged areas. Current penetration of the service in Africa was mapped appearing already available in almost every country, with penetration index varying from 1.5% to 92.2%. Conclusion The use of otherwise already widely available technologies, without any need for adaptors or otherwise additional technology, could significantly increase opportunities and quality diagnostics while lowering costs and considerably increasing connectivity between most isolated laboratories and distant reference center.

  15. New Trends in Mobile Technology Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Cojocaru

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mobile device market proved one of the most dynamic, with the leader in intelligent phones changing at least four times during the last decade. At least one important acquisition was registered during 2013 (when Microsoft bought Nokia’s mobile phone division and this event is slated to induce major shifts within the structure of this market. With this story we aim to provide information related to trends foreseen for this market.

  16. Readiness Factors and Consumer Acceptance of Technology in Mobile Telephony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilla Andrade Sousa Cunha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the variables of use and contact of users regarding to products and services of mobile phone technology. Technological innovation stands in the enterprise, enabling growth and creation of new products and services. In the theoretical framework, we used the technology readiness model, from users beliefs and feelings represented by four dimensions: optimism, innovativeness, discomfort and insecurity. It also highlights the technology acceptance model and presents two important constructs as perceived usefulness and ease of use. In short, the factors that support the technology readiness model could be preceding the technology acceptance model. To conduct this study, a field survey of students at the Federal University of Uberlândia / Campus FACIP was carried out. Results indicate optimism as the main factor to accept new mobile technology, due to the fact that the mobile devices provide benefits to people's lives and prompt them a positive attitude toward mobile technology. The perception of the user to purchase a mobile device is directly related to its usefulness and ease of handling of the technology.

  17. The potential use of mobile technology: enhancing accessibility and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential use of mobile technology: enhancing accessibility and communication in a blended ... South African Journal of Education ... Recommendations, limitations of the present study, and suggestions for future research were made.

  18. Online Learning for Mobile Technology Applications in Health Surveys

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Online Learning for Mobile Technology Applications in Health Surveys. In light of ... to develop a globally accessible asynchronous Internet-based training packaged backed by a real-time coaching service. Project ID. 105932. Project status.

  19. A Pedagogical Framework for Mobile Learning: Categorizing Educational Applications of Mobile Technologies into Four Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonjeong Park

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Instructional designers and educators recognize the potential of mobile technologies as a learning tool for students and have incorporated them into the distance learning environment. However, little research has been done to categorize the numerous examples of mobile learning in the context of distance education, and few instructional design guidelines based on a solid theoretical framework for mobile learning exist. In this paper I compare mobile learning (m-learning with electronic learning (e-learning and ubiquitous learning (u-learning and describe the technological attributes and pedagogical affordances of mobile learning presented in previous studies. I modify transactional distance (TD theory and adopt it as a relevant theoretical framework for mobile learning in distance education. Furthermore, I attempt to position previous studies into four types of mobile learning: 1 high transactional distance socialized m-learning, 2 high transactional distance individualized m-learning, 3 low transactional distance socialized m-learning, and 4 low transactional distance individualized m-learning. As a result, this paper can be used by instructional designers of open and distance learning to learn about the concepts of mobile learning and how mobile technologies can be incorporated into their teaching and learning more effectively.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: CRISPR genome-editing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History 60 impacts Diversity Locations Facts & Figures Programs Nuclear Weapons About Nuclear Weapons Safety & Security Weapons Science & Technology Robotics R&D 100 Awards Laboratory Directed Research & Development Technology Deployment Centers

  1. A Pedagogical Framework for Mobile Learning: Categorizing Educational Applications of Mobile Technologies into Four Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonjeong

    2011-01-01

    Instructional designers and educators recognize the potential of mobile technologies as a learning tool for students and have incorporated them into the distance learning environment. However, little research has been done to categorize the numerous examples of mobile learning in the context of distance education, and few instructional design…

  2. Improving vaccine registries through mobile technologies: a vision for mobile enhanced Immunization information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine M; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    Immunization registries or information systems are critical to improving the quality and evaluating the ongoing success of immunization programs. However, the completeness of these systems is challenged by a myriad of factors including the fragmentation of vaccine administration, increasing mobility of individuals, new vaccine development, use of multiple products, and increasingly frequent changes in recommendations. Mobile technologies could offer a solution, which mitigates some of these challenges. Engaging individuals to have more control of their own immunization information using their mobile devices could improve the timeliness and accuracy of data in central immunization information systems. Other opportunities presented by mobile technologies that could be exploited to improve immunization information systems include mobile reporting of adverse events following immunization, the capacity to scan 2D barcodes, and enabling bidirectional communication between individuals and public health officials. Challenges to utilizing mobile solutions include ensuring privacy of data, access, and equity concerns, obtaining consent and ensuring adoption of technology at sufficiently high rates. By empowering individuals with their own health information, mobile technologies can also serve as a mechanism to transfer immunization information as individuals cross local, regional, and national borders. Ultimately, mobile enhanced immunization information systems can help realize the goal of the individual, the healthcare provider, and public health officials always having access to the same immunization information. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Daily allergic multimorbidity in rhinitis using mobile technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J.; Devillier, P.; Anto, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    impact on work productivity using a mobile technology, the Allergy Diary. Methods: We undertook a 1-year prospective observational study in which 4 210 users and 32 585 days were monitored in 19 countries. Five visual analogue scales (VAS) assessed the daily burden of the disease (i.e., global evaluation...... approach examining daily symptoms with mobile technology, we found considerable intra-individual variability of allergic multimorbidity including a previously unrecognized extreme pattern of uncontrolled multimorbidity....

  4. Mobil/Badger to market zeolite-based cumene technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotman, D.

    1993-01-01

    Badger (Cambridge, MA) and Mobil (Fairfax, VA) are ready to jointly license a new cumene technology that they say achieves higher yields and product purity than existing processes. The zeolite-based technology is scheduled to be introduced at next month's DeWitt Petrochemical Review in Houston. The Mobil/Badger technology aims to challenge the dominant position of UOP's (Des Plaines, IL) solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalyst process - which accounts for 80%-90% of the world's cumene production. In addition, Monsanto/Kellogg's aluminum chloride-based technology has gained significant momentum since its introduction in the 1980s. And late last year, ABB Lummus Crest (Bloomfield, NJ) also began marketing a zeolite-based cumene technology. While all the technologies make cumene via the alkylation of benzene with propylene, the Mobil/Badger process uses a zeolite-containing catalyst designed by Mobil to selectively catalyze the benzene/propylene reaction, avoiding unwanted propylene oligomerization. Because the olefin reactions are so fast, says Frank A. Demers, Badger's v.p./technology development and marketing, other zeolite technologies are forced to use complex reactor arrangements to stop the propylene-propylene reactions. However, he says, 'Mobil has designed a catalyst that wants to react benzene with propylene to make cumene.'

  5. Cost comparison of laboratory methods and four field screening technologies for uranium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.

    1994-01-01

    To address the problem of characterizing uranium-contaminated surface soil at federal facilities, the Department of Energy has the development of four uranium field screening technologies, under the direction of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) Program. These four technologies include: a long-range alpha detector a beta scintillation detector, an in situ gamma detector, and a mobile laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP/AES) laboratory. As part of the performance assessment for these field screening technologies, cost estimates for the development and operation of each technology were created. A cost study was conducted to compare three of the USID field screening technologies to the use of traditional field surveying equipment to adequately characterize surface soils of a one-acre site. The results indicate that the use of traditional equipment costs more than the in situ gamma detector, but less than the beta scintillation detector and LRAD. The use of traditional field surveying equipment results in cost savings of 4% and 34% over the use of the beta scintillation and LRAD technologies, respectively. A study of single-point surface soil sampling and laboratory analysis costs was also conducted. Operational costs of the mobile LA-ICP/AES laboratory were compared with operational costs of traditional sampling and analysis, which consists of collecting soil samples and conducting analysis in a radiochemical laboratory. The cost study indicates that the use of the mobile LA-ICP/AES laboratory results in cost savings of 23% and 40% over traditional field sampling and laboratory analysis conducted by characterization groups at two DOE facilities

  6. Robotic and Sensor Technologies for Mobility in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteridis, Lazaros; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Sancarlo, Daniele; Giuliani, Francesco; Ricciardi, Francesco; Cavallo, Filippo; Greco, Antonio; Trochidis, Ilias; Gkiokas, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Maintaining independent mobility is fundamental to independent living and to the quality of life of older people. Robotic and sensor technologies may offer a lot of potential and can make a significant difference in the lives of older people and to their primary caregivers. The aim of this study was to provide a presentation of the methods that are used up till now for analysis and evaluation of human mobility utilizing sensor technologies and to give the state of the art in robotic platforms for supporting older people with mobility limitations. The literature was reviewed and systematic reviews of cohort studies and other authoritative reports were identified. The selection criteria included (1) patients with age ≥60 years; (2) patients with unstable gait, with or without recurrent falls; (3) patients with slow movements, short strides, and little trunk movement; (4) sensor technologies that are currently used for mobility evaluation; and (5) robotic technologies that can serve as a supporting companion for older people with mobility limitations. One hundred eighty-one studies published up until February 2017 were identified, of which 36 were included. Two categories of research were identified from the review regarding the robot and sensor technologies: (1) sensor technologies for mobility analysis and (2) robots for supporting older people with mobility limitations. Potential for robotic and sensor technologies can be taken advantage of for evaluation and support at home for elder persons with mobility limitations in an automated way without the need of the physical presence of any medical personnel, reducing the stress of caregivers.

  7. Mobile Technology in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Min, Haeyoung; Oh, Su-Mi; Shim, Kaka

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to identify and systematically review the literature on the use of mobile technology in nursing education. The research findings could evidence the effectiveness of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing students' learning outcomes. Computerized searches were conducted using the Ovid-MEDLINE, Ovid-EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases for relevant primary studies and limited to those between 2000 and February 2018. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies published in either English or Korean were included and critically appraised using Joanna Briggs Institute tools. Seven RCTs and 7 quasi-experimental studies were identified. The mobile device and intervention applied varied throughout all the studies. Studies published earlier in the 2000s found that immediate access to clinical and pharmacological referencing information through the mobile device increased students' efficacy in clinical practice. Later studies, which were mostly conducted in Korea, reported that smartphone-based applications could promote nursing students' learning motivation and satisfaction but not their clinical skills and knowledge. We still seem to be in the beginning stage of implementing mobile technology in nursing education due to the limited implication of mobile technology and inconsistent research conclusions. In the future, rigorous primary empirical studies are needed to suggest the effective use of mobile devices in nursing education.

  8. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  9. Laboratory simulation studies of uranium mobility in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giblin, A.M.; Swaine, D.J.; Batts, B.D.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of imposed variations of pH and Eh on aqueous uranium mobility at 25 0 C have been studied in three simulations of natural water systems. Constituents tested for their effect on uranium mobility were: (a) hydrous ferric oxide, to represent adsorptive solids which precipitate or dissolve in response to variations in pH and Eh; (b) kaolinite, representing minerals which, although modified by pH and Eh changes, are present as solids over the pH-Eh range of natural waters; and (c) carbonate, to represent a strong uranium-complexing species. Uranium mobility measurements from each simulation were regressed against pH and Eh within a range appropriate to natural waters. Hydrous ferric oxide and kaolinite each affected uranium mobility, but in separate pH-Eh domains. Aqueous carbonate increased mobility of uranium, and adsorption of UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- caused colloidal dispersion of hydrous ferric oxide, possibly explaining the presence of 'hydrothermal hematite' in some uranium deposits. Enhanced uranium mobility observed in the pH-Eh domains of thermodynamically insoluble uranium oxides could be explained if the oxides were present as colloids. Uranium persisting as a mobile species, even after reduction, has implications for the near surface genesis of uranium ores. (author)

  10. Mobile Technologies in Schools: The Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Emma-Leigh; Robertson, Neville; Sargisson, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate and high school students spend a large amount of time using mobile devices (Lauricella, Cingel, Blackwell, Wartella, & Conway, 2014), and such devices are increasingly being integrated into our school system. We conducted a series of student-led focus groups, with this early adolescent cohort, in order to better understand their…

  11. Mobile Technology to Support the Interactive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardoun, Habib M.; Awada, Hachem

    2017-01-01

    At the current classrooms, teachers continue using traditional techniques for monitoring the class. However, there are more participation of mobile devices, and concretely, the tablets. In addition, the network access by both students and teachers in daily life is something usual and a routine work. For this reason, the authors propose the…

  12. The Role of Mobile Technology in Tourism: Patents, Articles, News, and Mobile Tour App Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwook Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to identify the status and role of mobile technology in achieving sustainable and smart tourism, and to suggest future research and strategy directions for academia and managers in practice. This research utilized multiple sources, such as patents, academic articles, and news, and selected methodologies optimized for the purpose of each study. Study 1 used Netminer, a social network analysis program, to analyze the relationships between patent’s International Patent Classification (IPC codes. Study 2 used the T-LAB program for content analysis to analyze the texts of patents, journal articles, and news. Study 3 used the Leximancer program, which utilizes relative frequency to analyze mobile app consumer reviews. In study 1, we identified various forms of data related technologies and mobile technologies for smart city systems and maps. In study 2, we found the environment, sustainability, business, and market themes to be related to mobile technology. In study 3, we explored consumers’ attitudes and preferences for mobile travel app using their reviews. Advances in mobile technology are expected to create innovative experiences for consumers, foster a sustainable competitive advantage for tourism destinations and tourism-related suppliers, and create sustainable competencies for smart tourism.

  13. Leveraging mobile computing and communication technologies in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annan, Nana Kofi

    education and technology have evolved in tandem over the past years, this dissertation recognises the lapse that there is, in not being able to effectively leverage technology to improve education delivery by most educators. The study appreciates the enormousness of mobile computing and communication...... technologies in contributing to the development of tertiary education delivery, and has taken keen interest to investigate how the capacities of these technologies can be leveraged and incorporated effectively into the pedagogic framework of tertiary education. The purpose is to research into how...... of the results conducted after rigorous theoretical and empirical research unveiled the following: Mobile technologies can be incorporated into tertiary education if it has a strong theoretical underpinning, which links technology and pedagogy; the technology would not work if the user’s concerns in relation...

  14. Mobile Technologies & Academics: Do Students Use Mobile Technologies in Their Academic Lives and are Librarians Ready to Meet this Challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Dresselhaus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on two surveys and offer an introductory plan that librarians may use to begin implementing mobile access to selected library databases and services. Results from the first survey helped us to gain insight into where students at Utah State University (USU in Logan, Utah, stand regarding their use of mobile devices for academic activities in general and their desire for access to library services and resources in particular. A second survey, conducted with librarians, gave us an idea of the extent to which responding libraries offer mobile access, their future plans for mobile implementation, and their opinions about whether and how mobile technologies may be useful to library patrons. In the last segment of the paper, we outline steps librarians can take as they “go mobile.”

  15. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great convenience to those off-campus students who do not always have time to find Internet enabled computers to get the important educational information from their academic institutions. With the mobile or M-educational services, both the students and the instructors can access the services anytime and anywhere they want. This paper discusses those M-educational services that can be moved to the mobile platform and then presents the system prototype and architecture that integrate these services into the mobile technology platform. The paper will conclude with a description of the formative evaluation of the system prototype.

  16. Leaders' Perceptions of Mobile Technology in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kristin R.

    2012-01-01

    Leaders have limited understanding regarding mobile technology (Ramo & Edenius, 2008). However, with over 1 billion users (Meeker, Devitt & Wu, 2011), managers are tasked with making leadership decisions regarding technology adoption, management and use. Leaders may find this difficult to undertake given the limited body of knowledge in…

  17. [Exploration of Recent Mobile Technologies Applied in Nursing Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Lu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Lei

    2017-12-01

    The development of science and technology has fundamentally changed people's lives and the way that medical systems function. Increasingly, mobile technologies are being introduced and integrated into classroom teaching and clinical applications, resulting in healthcare providers introducing innovative applications into health education. These applications enhance the clinical, education, and research expertise of medical staffs and nurses, while improving quality of care and providing new experiences for patients. In order to understand the current situation and trends in nursing education, the present study adopted literature analysis to explore the influence and effect of mobile technologies that have been introduced into nursing education from the school and clinical environments. The results found that students hold positive attitudes toward introducing these technologies into their curricula. Although these technologies may increase the work efficiency of nurses in the workplace, questions remain user perceptions and professional expression. Therefore, securing patient agreement and healthcare system approval were major turning points in the introduction of mobile technologies into nursing education. In the future, adapting mobile technologies for use in teaching materials and courses may be further developed. Moreover, empirical studies may be used in future research in order to facilitate the increasingly successful integration of relevant technologies into nursing education.

  18. Mobile Complex For Rapid Diagnosis of the Technological System Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilin Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the up-to-dateness of the new informing and measuring tools and technologies development. It is reviewed the mobile complex for runtime diagnostics of technological system “machine-toolinstrument- detail”. It was found that the use of the complex allows to identify the frequency area in which the appearance of resonance of the technological system elements is possible, and thus to draw a conclusion on the technical state of the diagnosed object. It is concluded that there is the prospects for the use of the above mentioned mobile complex for vibration diagnostics.

  19. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  20. Mobile Technology and CAD Technology Integration in Teaching Architectural Design Process for Producing Creative Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Hassan, Isham Shah; Ismail, Mohd Arif; Mustafa, Ramlee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of integrating the mobile and CAD technology on teaching architectural design process for Malaysian polytechnic architectural students in producing a creative product. The website is set up based on Caroll's minimal theory, while mobile and CAD technology integration is based on Brown and…

  1. Mobile laboratory-based environmental radioactivity analysis capability of the US Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, G.; Poppell, S.

    1999-01-01

    This poster presentation will highlight the capability of the US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air to process and analyze environmental and emergency response samples in mobile radiological laboratories. Philosophy of use, construction, analytical equipment, and procedures will be discussed in the poster presentation. Accompanying the poster presentation, EPA will also have a static display of its mobile laboratories at the meeting site. (author)

  2. Supporting University Learning Through Mobile Technologies: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitumu Mugo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The workplace in the modern world continues to demand higher qualifications and refined competencies. In the recent past, workers would respond to such demands through learning by correspondence. When the Internet and e-Learning emerged, it received widespread accolade as a solution to the challenges experienced by distant learners. The technology was also seen as an opportunity for educational institutions to leverage their technological uptake to benefit regular students. However, desktop computers and Internet connectivity, which were the drivers of e-learning technologies, were expensive, bulky and scarce. So when mobile technologies emerged, educationist saw an opportunity for addressing the limitations associated with correspondence, “e” and tethered learning. Mobile devices being cheap, portable and reliable received widespread acceptance and possession. So, educators, hardware designers and program developers started to design hardware and applications that would infuse learning content into the devices. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the potential of mobile technologies in the education market place, highlighting global initiatives and trends. The paper will also review how universities around the world, Africa and in Kenya have oriented themselves for learning with mobile technologies. The study was a documentary analysis of virtual documents stored electronically for access through the Internet, text books, archival repositories and encyclopedias. The study observed a significant high global mobile ownership and usage rates, but was able to demonstrate that despite its pedagogical advantages, the use of the technology for learning purposes at university level is still at the infantry. Keywords: Mobile, Technologies, Universities, adoption, ICT, eLearning

  3. Mobile robot worksystem (Rosie). Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. Rosie is a mobile robot worksystem developed for nuclear facilities D and D. Rosie performs mechanical dismantlement of radiologically contaminated structures by remotely deploying other tools or systems. At the CP-5 reactor site, Rosie is a mobile platform used to support reactor assembly demolition through its long reach, heavy lift capability and its deployment and positioning of a Kraft Predator dexterous manipulator arm. Rosie is a tethered, 50 m (165 ft) long, robotic system controlled via teleoperation from a control console that is located outside of the radiological containment area. The operator uses Rosie to move, lift or offload radioactive materials using its integral lifting hook or to position the Kraft Predator arm in locations where the arm can be used to dismantle parts of the CP-5 reactor. The specific operating areas were concentrated in two high radiation areas, one at the top of the reactor structure atop and within the reactor tank assembly and the second at a large opening on the west side of the reactor's biological shield called the west thermal column. In the first of these areas, low level radioactive waste size previously segmented or dismantled by the Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP) and placed into a steel drum or transfer can were moved to a staging area for manual packaging. In the latter area, the manipulator arm removed and transferred shielding blocks from the west thermal column area of the reactor into waste containers. Rosie can also deploy up to twelve remotely controlled television cameras, some with microphones, which can be used

  4. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  5. Technology transfer from accelerator laboratories (challenges and opportunities)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, V.K.; Gardner, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that technology transfer from research laboratories must be a key element of their comprehensive strategic plans. Technology transfer involves using a verified and organized knowledge and research to develop commercially viable products. Management of technology transfer is the art of organizing and motivating a team of scientists, engineers and manufacturers and dealing intelligently with uncertainties. Concurrent engineering is one of the most effective approaches to optimize the process of technology transfer. The challenges, importance, opportunities and techniques of transferring technology from accelerator laboratories are discussed. (author)

  6. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than......The world is on the move. This is a widespread understanding by many inhabitants of contemporary society across the Globe. But what does it actually mean? During over one decade the ‘mobilities turn’ within the social sciences have provided a new set of insights into the repercussions of mobilities...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion...

  7. Mobile technology for expansion of service range medan public library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, A. R.; Dewiyana, H.

    2018-03-01

    The information society, especially library users, expects an easier and faster way to get information and share knowledge. The library also implements the best way to provide the best service and the easiest way to disseminate and share information with its users. One technology that allows libraries more closely with their users is mobile technology. This paper aims to determine the basic conditions of mobile technology services and mobile services most needed library users, as well as constraints faced by libraries and users in the application of mobile technology. This paper will help libraries to develop better M-Library services in expanding the reach of library services. Methods of data collection were conducted through surveys through questionnaires, interviews, and direct observation. The results of the use of mobile technology applications in libraries bring great advantages to provide better library services and to improve accessibility of library resources in the easiest way, but due to lack of funds, lack of skills and lack of staff, many libraries are unable to provide this service with very successful.

  8. Designing Mobile Health Technology for Bipolar Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, JE; Frost, Mads; Szántó, Károly

    2013-01-01

    usefulness of the system was high. Based on this study, the paper discusses three HCI questions related to the design of personal health technologies; how to design for disease awareness and self-treatment, how to ensure adherence to personal health technologies, and the roles of different types...

  9. Mobile Data Technology for Small Businesses: needs, uses and adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Harker

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The technological environment in which Australian SMEs operate can be best described as dynamic and vital. The rate of technological change provides the SME owner/manger a complex and challenging operational context. Wireless applications are being developed that provide mobile devices with Internet content and E-business services. In Australia, the adoption of commerce by large organisations has been relatively high, however, the same cannot be said for SMEs, where adoption has been slower than other developed countries. In contrast, however, mobile telephone adoption and diffusion is relatively high by SMEs. Will SMEs who have been reluctant to adopt ecommerce technologies in the past be more ready to go on-line with the merging of the Internet and mobile data technologies? This exploratory study identifies attitudes, perceptions and issues for mobile data technologies by regional SME owner/managers across a range of industry sectors. The major issues include the sector the firm belongs to, the current adoption status of the firm, the level of mistrust of the IT industry, the cost of the technologies, and the applications and attributes of the technologies.

  10. Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel H; Topps, David; Archibald, Douglas; Hogue, Rebecca J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies (including handheld and wearable devices) have the potential to enhance learning activities from basic medical undergraduate education through residency and beyond. In order to use these technologies successfully, medical educators need to be aware of the underpinning socio-theoretical concepts that influence their usage, the pre-clinical and clinical educational environment in which the educational activities occur, and the practical possibilities and limitations of their usage. This Guide builds upon the previous AMEE Guide to e-Learning in medical education by providing medical teachers with conceptual frameworks and practical examples of using mobile technologies in medical education. The goal is to help medical teachers to use these concepts and technologies at all levels of medical education to improve the education of medical and healthcare personnel, and ultimately contribute to improved patient healthcare. This Guide begins by reviewing some of the technological changes that have occurred in recent years, and then examines the theoretical basis (both social and educational) for understanding mobile technology usage. From there, the Guide progresses through a hierarchy of institutional, teacher and learner needs, identifying issues, problems and solutions for the effective use of mobile technology in medical education. This Guide ends with a brief look to the future.

  11. Tamper-Resistant Mobile Health Using Blockchain Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Makiko; Ueno, Taro

    2017-01-01

    Background Digital health technologies, including telemedicine, mobile health (mHealth), and remote monitoring, are playing a greater role in medical practice. Safe and accurate management of medical information leads to the advancement of digital health, which in turn results in a number of beneficial effects. Furthermore, mHealth can help lower costs by facilitating the delivery of care and connecting people to their health care providers. Mobile apps help empower patients and health care p...

  12. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R ampersand D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  13. Use of Mobile Phone Technology in Educa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    2015-04-14

    Apr 14, 2015 ... Information and communication technology has opened up such tremendous vistas for modern ... information processing systems, including hardware, software, organizational and human aspects, and ... fiber optics. Moreover ...

  14. Seamless access to OER with mobile technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides insight on how ubiquitous technology can support lifelong learners facilitating access across context. The 3LHub tool is presented as suitable tool to scaffold personal learning ecologies.

  15. Pharmacy students' use and perceptions of Apple mobile devices incorporated into a basic health science laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jennifer E; Richard, Craig A H

    To describe pharmacy students' use of mobile devices in a basic health science laboratory and to report the students' perceptions on how solving cases with their mobile devices influenced their attitudes, abilities, and view on the use of mobile devices as tools for pharmacists. First-year pharmacy students utilized mobile devices to solve clinical case studies in a basic health sciences laboratory. A pre-survey and two post-surveys were administered to assess the students' comfort, awareness, use, and perceptions on the use of their mobile devices and apps. The pre-survey and first post-survey each had a response rate of 99%, and the second post-survey had a response rate of 100%. In comparing the pre-survey and first post-survey data, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of students that agreed or strongly agreed that they were more comfortable utilizing their mobile device (p = 0.025), they were more aware of apps for pharmacists (p mobile devices, to be more aware of apps that can be useful for pharmacists, and to be more agreeable with mobile device utilization by pharmacists in improving patient care. In addition, the second post-survey also demonstrated that 84% of students responded that using their mobile devices to solve the cases influenced them to either use their mobile device in a clinical setting for a clinical and/or pharmacy-related purpose for the first time or to use it more frequently for this purpose. The use of mobile devices to solve clinical cases in a first-year basic health science laboratory course was perceived as beneficial by students and influenced them to utilize their mobile device even more in a pharmacy practice setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing clinical presence of mobile communication technology: avoiding the pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, Akila; Gibb, Alan P; Brady, Richard R W

    2011-10-01

    Mobile communication technologies are employed in many diverse areas of healthcare delivery to provide improved quality and efficiency of communication and facilitate increased rapidity of data or information transfer. Mobile phones enable healthcare professionals to possess a portable platform from which to provide many healthcare-related applications and are a popular means to directly communicate with colleagues and patients. As involvement of mobile communication technology in healthcare delivery continues to rapidly expand, there are also important considerations of relevance to patient safety and security as a result. Here, we review the previous evidence of reported clinical risks associated with mobile communication technology, such as electromagnetic interference, confidentiality and data security, distraction/noise, infection control, and cross contamination. In conclusion, although mobile phones provide much putative potential improvement to healthcare delivery, further evaluation and research are required to both inform and protect health professionals and users of such technology in the healthcare environment and provide the evidence base to support the provision of clear and comprehensive guidelines.

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

  19. Mobile-Based Dictionary of Information and Communication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liando, O. E. S.; Mewengkang, A.; Kaseger, D.; Sangkop, F. I.; Rantung, V. P.; Rorimpandey, G. C.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to design and build mobile-based dictionary of information and communication technology applications to provide access to information in the form of glossary of terms in the context of information and communication technologies. Applications built in this study using the Android platform, with SQLite database model. This research uses prototype model development method which covers the stages of communication, Quick Plan, Quick Design Modeling, Construction of Prototype, Deployment Delivery & Feedback, and Full System Transformation. The design of this application is designed in such a way as to facilitate the user in the process of learning and understanding the new terms or vocabularies encountered in the world of information and communication technology. Mobile-based dictionary of Information And Communication Technology applications that have been built can be an alternative to learning literature. In its simplest form, this application is able to meet the need for a comprehensive and accurate dictionary of Information And Communication Technology function.

  20. Technology for the Next-Generation-Mobile User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagi, Greg

    The current mobile-handset market is a vital and growing one, being driven by technology advances, including increased bandwidth and processing performance, as well as reduced power consumption and improved screen technologies. The 3G/4G handsets of today are multimedia internet devices with increased screen size, HD video and gaming, interactive touch screens, HD camera and camcorders, as well as incredible social, entertainment, and productivity applications. While mobile-technology advancements to date have made us more social in many ways, new advancements over the next decade will bring us to the next level, allowing mobile users to experience new types of "virtual" social interactions with all the senses. The mobile handsets of the future will be smart autonomous-lifestyle devices with a multitude of incorporated sensors, applications and display options, all designed to make your life easier and more productive! With future display media, including 3D imaging, virtual interaction and conferencing will be possible, making every call feel like you are in the same room, providing an experience far beyond today's video conferencing technology. 3D touch-screen with integrated image-projection technologies will work in conjunction with gesturing to bring a new era of intuitive mobile device applications, interaction, and information sharing. Looking to the future, there are many challenges to be faced in delivering a smart mobile companion device that will meet the user demands. One demand will be for the availability of new and compelling services, and features on the "mobile companion". These mobile companions will be more than just Internet devices, and will function as on-the-go workstations, allowing users to function as if they were sitting in front of their computer in the office or at home. The massive amounts of data that will be transmitted through, to and from these mobile companions will require immense improvements in system performance, including

  1. Proceedings of the symposium on technology in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on March 29 and 30, 1988 at Toyota Auditorium in Nagoya University. This symposium was hosted by Institute of Plasma Physics. Participants were about 210 and 54 papers were presented from many of Japanese universities and laboratories. Technical experience and new technics were reported and discussed divided into five sessions; technologies of manufacture, cryogenic, diagonostic and control system, computer and experimental apparatus. (author)

  2. Using Mobile Phone Technology in EFL Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sad, Süleyman Nihat

    2008-01-01

    Teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) who want to develop successful lessons face numerous challenges, including large class sizes and inadequate instructional materials and technological support. Another problem is unmotivated students who refuse to participate in class activities. According to Harmer (2007), uncooperative and…

  3. Mobile technologies in teaching a foreign language to non-linguistic major students

    OpenAIRE

    KAPRANCHIKOVA KSENIYA

    2014-01-01

    The paper addresses methodological potential of mobile technologies in teaching a foreign language to non-linguistic students. The author a) gives definition of the term "mobile education", b) suggests a list of mobile technologies used in foreign language teaching; c) develops a list of non-linguistic major students'' language abilities and language skills, which can be developed via mobile technologies.

  4. The technology of mobile robot with articulated crawler mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Hwang, Suk Yong; Suh, Yong Chil; Lee, Yung Kwang; Sin, Jae Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    The main application of a mobile robot are to do the inspection and maintenance tasks in the primary and auxiliary building, and to meet with the radiological emergency response in nuclear power plant. Our project to develop crawler-type mobile robot has been divided into 3 phases. In 1 st phase, the-state-of-the-arts of mobile robot technology were studied and analyzed. And then the technical report `development of mobile robot technology for the light work` was published on July, 1993. In current phase, the articulated crawler type mobile robot named as ANDROS Mark VI was purchased to evaluate deeply its mechanism and control system. Then we designed the autonomous track surface, to get the inclination angle of robot, and to control the front and rear auxiliary track autonomously during climbing up and down stairs. And also, the autonomous stair-climbing algorithm has been developed to going over stairs with high stability. For the final phase, the advanced model of articulated crawler type mobile robot is going to be developed. (Author) 13 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. The technology of mobile robot with articulated crawler mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Hwang, Suk Yong; Suh, Yong Chil; Lee, Yung Kwang; Sin, Jae Ho

    1995-01-01

    The main application of a mobile robot are to do the inspection and maintenance tasks in the primary and auxiliary building, and to meet with the radiological emergency response in nuclear power plant. Our project to develop crawler-type mobile robot has been divided into 3 phases. In 1 st phase, the-state-of-the-arts of mobile robot technology were studied and analyzed. And then the technical report 'development of mobile robot technology for the light work' was published on July, 1993. In current phase, the articulated crawler type mobile robot named as ANDROS Mark VI was purchased to evaluate deeply its mechanism and control system. Then we designed the autonomous track surface, to get the inclination angle of robot, and to control the front and rear auxiliary track autonomously during climbing up and down stairs. And also, the autonomous stair-climbing algorithm has been developed to going over stairs with high stability. For the final phase, the advanced model of articulated crawler type mobile robot is going to be developed. (Author) 13 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs

  6. Missed Opportunity? Leveraging Mobile Technology to Reduce Racial Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Rashawn; Sewell, Abigail A; Gilbert, Keon L; Roberts, Jennifer D

    2017-10-01

    Blacks and Latinos are less likely than whites to access health insurance and utilize health care. One way to overcome some of these racial barriers to health equity may be through advances in technology that allow people to access and utilize health care in innovative ways. Yet, little research has focused on whether the racial gap that exists for health care utilization also exists for accessing health information online and through mobile technologies. Using data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we examine racial differences in obtaining health information online via mobile devices. We find that blacks and Latinos are more likely to trust online newspapers to get health information than whites. Minorities who have access to a mobile device are more likely to rely on the Internet for health information in a time of strong need. Federally insured individuals who are connected to mobile devices have the highest probability of reliance on the Internet as a go-to source of health information. We conclude by discussing the importance of mobile technologies for health policy, particularly related to developing health literacy, improving health outcomes, and contributing to reducing health disparities by race and health insurance status. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  7. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Layton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy.

  8. Can Mobile Technology Enable Knowledge Communication in a Learning Environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance; Islas Sedano, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    this mobile phone game to help next years' students navigated the CampusNet system in order to study for the exam.  The CampusNet system can be seen as a knowledge management technology situated within the social context of the Project Management course, and so the examples offered, in effect, demonstrate...... To be effective, knowledge management systems need to encompass both social processes and technical components (McDermott 2000),   On the other hand, knowledge communication as a concept has emerged not from the inspiration of technology, but partly from the social-technical challenge of dealing...... with technology in knowledge management systems.  So, is knowledge communication a process that can be technologically enabled?  In this presentation, we explore the possibilities of socio-technical interaction for knowledge communication through the use of a mobile phone game as a knowledge communication tool...

  9. Mobile Technology: Students Perceived Benefits of Apps for Learning Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N.P.; Lambe, J.; Ciccone, J.; Swinnerton, B.

    2016-01-01

    Technology-enhanced learning is expanding rapidly because of research showing the benefits for learners in terms of engagement, convenience, attainment and enjoyment. Mobile learning approaches are also gaining in popularity, particularly during practical classes and clinical settings. However, there are few systematic studies evaluating the…

  10. Mobile Inverted Constructivism: Education of Interaction Technology in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jia-Xiang; Fan, Kuo-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    The combination of social media and invert teaching is a new path to inverting interation technology education and reconstructing the curriculum of context. In this paper, based on the theory of constructivism learning, a model named Mobile Inverted Constructivism (MIC) is provided. Moreover, in view of the functional quality of social media in…

  11. Handheld Libraries 101: Using Mobile Technologies in the Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosturski, Kate; Skornia, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 "Horizon Report" called mobile technologies "an opportunity for higher education to reach its constituents in new and compelling ways." The report implied that academic libraries would find them to be the ideal tools for bringing reluctant researchers to the library, mainly for their convenience. It's not hard to see why--in 2008, mobile…

  12. Mobile technologies for preservation of indigenous knowledge in rural communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Rodil, Kasper; Zaman, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the opportunities of mobile technologies in three of our own development endeavors with rural communities, promoting the preservation of indigenous knowledge. We reflect upon and recognize the fact that the representation of indigenous knowledge will be transformed within...

  13. The use of mobile technologies amongst South African commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organisations offering extension services provide services to farmers which include the provision of relevant and current information pertaining to agriculture. The increased use of mobile technologies is changing the way farmers access information, specifically by using the Internet. This paper focuses on South African (SA) ...

  14. Use of Mobile Phone Technology in Education for Easy Accessibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and communication technology has opened up such tremendous vistas for modern societies that any failure to master it would mean a life of permanent subordination. The evolution of Mobile phone makes it possible to work with distance learning, achieve a closer collaboration among teachers and students ...

  15. Efficency of mobile authentication service technology on phase 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that some brands antimalarial and antibacterial drugs available in the Nigeria drug market still do not have MAS technology inscribed on them and efficiency of Mobile Authentication Service is directly a function of the competence of the service providers authorized to manage ...

  16. Mobile Payment Technology and Competitiveness In the Credit Card Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Guilherme Silveira; FGV-EAESP; Martins, Michele Esteves; FGV-EAESP; Di Serio, Luiz Carlos; FGV-EAESP; Csillag, João Mário; FGV-EAESP; Santos, Camila Aparecida; Freeddom Tecnologia e Serviços S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the value creation sources of Mobile Payment concept into the Credit Card Chain. A case-study was developed based on the Transaction Cost Theory, Value Chain Analysis, RB V, Schumpeterian Innovation, and Strategic Network Theory. The results illustrate the technology potential to modify the configuration of Credit Card chain.

  17. Mobile Technologies and Augmented Reality in Open Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun, Ed.; Altinpulluk, Hakan, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Novel trends and innovations have enhanced contemporary educational environments. When applied properly, these computing advances can create enriched learning opportunities for students. "Mobile Technologies and Augmented Reality in Open Education" is a pivotal reference source for the latest academic research on the integration of…

  18. Using Mobile Technology to Support Literacy Coaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. C.; Martin, Aqueasha

    2013-01-01

    This article examines literacy coaches' (n = 7) digital note-taking practices using mobile technology and their influence on reflective practice. The study, which employed a design-based approach, investigated the coaches' transition from note-taking by paper and pencil to the note-taking application Evernote. Data included interviews with the…

  19. Using mobile technology to conduct epidemiological investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onicio Batista Leal Neto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : The aim of this study was to report the experience of an epidemiological field survey for which data were collected and analyzed using tablets. METHODS : The devices used Epi Info 7 (Android version, which has been modeled a database with variables of the traditional form. RESULTS : Twenty-one households were randomly selected in the study area; 75 residents were registered and completed household interviews with socioeconomic and environmental risk variables. CONCLUSIONS : This new technology is a valuable tool for collecting and analyzing data from the field, with advantageous benefits to epidemiological surveys.

  20. Space matters: the relational power of mobile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Odendaal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of mobile telephony and proliferation of digital networks imply a critical role for these technologies in overcoming the constraints of space in fragmented cities. Academic literature draws from a range of disciplines but fails to address the significance of new technologies for African and South African cities. Debates on technologies and urban spaces reflect a Northern bias and case literature that dwells on the developmental aspects of ICT do not engage with the broader significance with regards to urban change in African cities. This research addresses these gaps by examining the local transformative qualities of mobile telephony in a South African city, Durban. It focuses on the ways in which informal traders active in the city use technology. Actor-network theory was used in the analysis of the field work, uncovering material and human actors, network stabilization processes and agency in determining the transformative potential of this form of digital networking at city and local scales. Findings indicate that appropriation of technology is informed by livelihood strategies. Innovation is enabled when translation extends to appropriation. More in-depth research is needed on how technology is molded and appropriated to suit livelihoods. Throughout the research the spatial dimensions of the relationship between mobile telephony and networks were considered. The network spaces that emerge from actor relations do not correspond with the physical spaces usually considered in policy.

  1. Technological advances in the hemostasis laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2014-03-01

    Automation is conventionally defined as the use of machines, control systems, and information technologies to optimize productivity. Although automation is now commonplace in several areas of diagnostic testing, especially in clinical chemistry and immunochemistry, the concept of extending this process to hemostasis testing has only recently been advanced. The leading drawbacks are still represented by the almost unique biological matrix because citrated plasma can only be used for clotting assays and few other notable exceptions, and by the highly specific pretreatment of samples, which is particularly distinct to other test systems. Despite these important limitations, a certain degree of automation is also now embracing hemostasis testing. The more relevant developments include the growing integration of routine hemostasis analyzers with track line systems and workcells, the development of specific instrumentation tools to enhance reliability of testing (i.e., signal detection with different technologies to increase test panels, plasma indices for preanalytical check of interfering substances, failure patterns sensors for identifying insufficient volume, clots or bubbles, cap-piercing for enhancing operator safety, automatic reflex testing, automatic redilution of samples, and laser barcode readers), preanalytical features (e.g., positive identification, automatic systems for tube(s) labeling, transillumination devices), and postphlebotomy tools (pneumatic tube systems for reducing turnaround time, sample transport boxes for ensuring stability of specimens, monitoring systems for identifying unsuitable conditions of transport). Regardless of these important innovations, coagulation/hemostasis testing still requires specific technical and clinical expertise, not only in terms of measurement procedures but also for interpreting and then appropriately utilizing the derived information. Thus, additional and special caution has to be used when designing projects of

  2. Emerging technologies for sustainable individual mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, A [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    In the long term, sustainable transport technology must be based on renewable fuel supplies. Waste biomass and solar energy may be used for the CO{sub 2}-neutral production of gases with high calorific value (syngas, hydrogen). For power generation, low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells and hybrid vehicles are particularly promising as they combine an attractive cruising range with ultra-low emissions. In view of transport logistics, the production of synthetic liquid fuels, and the possibility of recovering hydrogen from these liquid by on-board fuel processing, are key issues for the successful introduction of both renewable fuels and of zero emission converters. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 24 refs.

  3. Proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Network and Technology Concepts for Mobile, Micro, and Personal Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lori (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Workshop on Advanced Network and Technology Concepts for Mobile, Micro, and Personal Communications was held at NASA's JPL Laboratory on 30-31 May 1991. It provided a forum for reviewing the development of advanced network and technology concepts for turn-of-the-century telecommunications. The workshop was organized into three main categories: (1) Satellite-Based Networks (L-band, C-band, Ku-band, and Ka-band); (2) Terrestrial-Based Networks (cellular, CT2, PCN, GSM, and other networks); and (3) Hybrid Satellite/Terrestrial Networks. The proceedings contain presentation papers from each of the above categories.

  4. History of Antenna Technology for Mobile Communications in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyeong-Sik; Park, Chul-Keun; Kang, Suk-Youb

    In this paper, we discuss the development of wireless and mobile communications in Korea, current technological trends, and the future outlook on technological developments. Since the introduction of the telegraph and the telephone in September 1885, Korea's wired and wireless communications industry has consistently developed for over 100 years. Since 1984, upon the provision of the mobile telecommunications service, the industry has seen drastic qualitative and quantitative growth in terms of both technical and economic aspects, which played a crucial role in the rapid growth of the digital industry in Korea. After the era of the analog cellular service based on the Advanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS), a precursor to the modern mobile service, Korea became the world's first country to commercialize Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) in 1996 and succeeded in commercializing CDMA 2000 lx (IMT 2000) in 2001. With further developments in the mobile communication technology, the technology for antennas also saw drastic advancements. As the mobile antennas moved from the second to the third generation, they grew from external models to very small internal models. At the same time, they evolved into highly functional and high performance multiple band and wide band antennas. Furthermore, Korea was the first country to commercialize and offer the Wireless Broadband Internet (WiBro) service in 2006. By leading the wireless communications standardization and exerting remarkable efforts in research and development, Korea is consolidating its status as an Information Technology (IT) leader in the global market. The antenna's inherent importance will be further emphasized in the near future as it satisfies the performance and structural needs of portable terminals necessary for realizing the projected establishment of the ubiquitous world. It is thought that antenna technologies will not be limited to simple concepts as previously experienced but will utilize various kinds

  5. Final report, Ames Mobile Laboratory Project: The development and operation of instrumentation in a mobile laboratory for in situ, real-time screening and characterization of soils using the laser ablation sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.S.; Braymen, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    The main focus of the Ames Laboratory's Technology Integration Program, TIP, from May 1991 through December 1994 was the development, fabrication, and demonstration of a mobile instrumentation laboratory incorporating rapid in situ sampling systems for safe, rapid, and cost effective soil screening/characterization. The Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies, MDLEST, containing the analysis instrumentation, along with surface and subsurface sampling probe prototypes employing the laser ablation sampling technique were chosen to satisfy the particular surface and subsurface soil characterization needs of the various Department of Energy facilities for determining the extent of heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The MDLEST, a 44 foot long 5th wheel trailer, is easily configured for the analysis instrumentation and sampling system required for the particular site work. This mobile laboratory contains all of the utilities needed to satisfy the operating requirements of the various instrumentation installed. These utilities include, an electric generator, a chilled water system, process gases, a heating/air conditioning system, and computer monitoring and automatic operating systems. Once the MDLEST arrives at the job site, the instrumentation is aligned and calibration is completed, sampling and analysis operations begin. The sample is acquired, analyzed and the results reported in as little as 10 minutes. The surface sampling probe is used in two modes to acquire samples for analysis. It is either set directly on the ground over the site to be sampled, in situ sampling, or in a special fixture used for calibrating the sampling analysis system with standard soil samples, having the samples brought to the MDLEST. The surface sampling probe was used to in situ sample a flat concrete surface (nondestructively) with the ablated sample being analyzed by the instrumentation in the MDLEST

  6. Solving Real-Life Problems: Future Mobile Technology Sophistication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARHAN SHAFIQ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all the human being real life concerned domains are taking advantage of latest technologies for enhancing their process, procedures and operations. This integration of technological innovations provides ease of access, flexibility, transparency, reliability and speed for the concerned process and procedures. Rapid growth of ICT (Information and Communication Technology and MT (Mobile Technology provides opportunity to redesign and reengineered the human routines? life activities process and procedures. Technology integration and adoption in routine life activities may serves compensatory mechanism to assist the population in different manner such as monitoring older adults and children at homes, provides security assistance, monitoring and recording patients vital signs automatically, controlling and monitoring equipments and devices, providing assistance in shopping, banking and education as well. Disasters happened suddenly, destroy everything indiscriminately. Adoption and integration of latest technologies including ICT and MT can enhance the current disaster management process, procedures and operations. This research study focuses the impacts of latest and emerging technology trends in routine life activities and surrounds their potential strength to improve and enhance disaster management activities. MT is providing a promising platform for facilitating people to enhance their routine life activities. This research argue that integration and adoption of mobile computing in disaster management domain can enhance disaster management activities with promising minimizing error, quick information assembling, quick response based on technology manipulation and prioritizing action.

  7. Solving real-life problems: future mobile technology sophistication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, F.; Ahsan, K.; Nadeem, A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all the human being real life concerned domains are taking advantage of latest technologies for enhancing their process, procedures and operations. This integration of technological innovations provides ease of access, flexibility, transparency, reliability and speed for the concerned process and procedures. Rapid growth of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) and MT (Mobile Technology) provides opportunity to redesign and re-engineered the human routines life activities process and procedures. Technology integration and adoption in routine life activities may serves compensatory mechanism to assist the population in different manner such as monitoring older adults and children at homes, provides security assistance, monitoring and recording patients vital signs automatically, controlling and monitoring equipments and devices, providing assistance in shopping, banking and education as well. Disasters happened suddenly, destroy everything indiscriminately. Adoption and integration of latest technologies including ICT and MT can enhance the current disaster management process, procedures and operations. This research study focuses the impacts of latest and emerging technology trends in routine life activities and surrounds their potential strength to improve and enhance disaster management activities. MT is providing a promising platform for facilitating people to enhance their routine life activities. This research argue that integration and adoption of mobile computing in disaster management domain can enhance disaster management activities with promising minimizing error, quick information assembling, quick response based on technology manipulation and prioritizing action. (author)

  8. NFC technology acceptance for mobile payments: A Brazilian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iviane Ramos de Luna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This study investigates the acceptance of NFC technology for payment through mobile in a Brazilian context, which allow knowing the factors that influence directly or indirectly in that acceptance. Design/methodology/approach – Through an online and selfadministered questionnaire and using the snowball sampling procedure on social networks, the final sample consisted of 423 mobile phone users in Brazil and the technique used to prove the hypotheses was the Structural Equation Model. Findings – The results show that attitude, personal innovation in IT and perceived usefulness are determinants of future intention to use the NFC technology for payments in Brazil. Originality/value – The proposed model has a predictive power of intention to use NFC payment of 71%, demonstrating that it includes background with a large predictive power of acceptance of NFC technology which led us to highlight the main implications for the management and development of new studies in this field.

  9. Benefits of Mobile Phone Technology for Personal Environmental Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Valentín, Antònia; de Nazelle, Audrey; Ambros, Albert; Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Seto, Edmund; Jerrett, Michael; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2016-11-10

    Tracking individuals in environmental epidemiological studies using novel mobile phone technologies can provide valuable information on geolocation and physical activity, which will improve our understanding of environmental exposures. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of one of the least expensive mobile phones on the market to track people's travel-activity pattern. Adults living and working in Barcelona (72/162 bicycle commuters) carried simultaneously a mobile phone and a Global Positioning System (GPS) tracker and filled in a travel-activity diary (TAD) for 1 week (N=162). The CalFit app for mobile phones was used to log participants' geographical location and physical activity. The geographical location data were assigned to different microenvironments (home, work or school, in transit, others) with a newly developed spatiotemporal map-matching algorithm. The tracking performance of the mobile phones was compared with that of the GPS trackers using chi-square test and Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. The minute agreement across all microenvironments between the TAD and the algorithm was compared using the Gwet agreement coefficient (AC1). The mobile phone acquired locations for 905 (29.2%) more trips reported in travel diaries than the GPS tracker (Pmobile phones running the CalFit app provides better information on which microenvironments people spend their time in than previous approaches based only on GPS trackers. The improvements of mobile phone technology in microenvironment determination are because the mobile phones are faster at identifying first locations and capable of getting location in challenging environments thanks to the combination of assisted-GPS technology and network positioning systems. Moreover, collecting location information from mobile phones, which are already carried by individuals, allows monitoring more people with a cheaper and less burdensome method than deploying GPS trackers. ©David Donaire-Gonzalez, Ant

  10. Mobile technology use in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luanrattana, Rattiporn; Win, Khin Than; Fulcher, John; Iverson, Don

    2012-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the PDA functionalities for a problem-based learning (PBL) medical curriculum at the Graduate School of Medicine (GSM), the University of Wollongong (UOW). The study determines the factors/aspects of incorporating PDAs, and the attitudes of stakeholders regarding the use of PDAs in such a PBL-based medical curriculum. In-depth interviews were designed and conducted with medical faculty, the medical education technology team and honorary medical academics. Four major PDA functionalities were identified, these being: clinical-log, reference, communication, and general functions. Two major aspects for the incorporation of PDAs into the PBL-medical curriculum at the UOW were determined from the interviews, these being technical and practical aspects. There is a potential for PDAs to be incorporated into the PBL-medical curricula at the UOW. However, a clear strategy needs to be defined as to how best to incorporate PDAs into PBL-medical curricula with minimal impact on students, as well as financial and resource implications for the GSM.

  11. Biomedical sensor technologies on the platform of mobile phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Liu, Jing

    2011-06-01

    Biomedical sensors have been widely used in various areas of biomedical practices, which play an important role in disease detection, diagnosis, monitoring, treatment, health management, and so on. However, most of them and their related platforms are generally not easily accessible or just too expensive or complicated to be kept at home. As an alternative, new technologies enabled from the mobile phones are gradually changing such situations. As can be freely available to almost everyone, mobile phone offers a unique way to improve the conventional medical care through combining with various biomedical sensors. Moreover, the established systems will be both convenient and low cost. In this paper, we present an overview on the state-of-art biomedical sensors, giving a brief introduction of the fundamental principles and showing several new examples or concepts in the area. The focus was particularly put on interpreting the technical strategies to innovate the biomedical sensor technologies based on the platform of mobile phones. Some challenging issues, including feasibility, usability, security, and effectiveness, were discussed. With the help of electrical and mechanical technologies, it is expected that a full combination between the biomedical sensors and mobile phones will bring a bright future for the coming pervasive medical care.

  12. Secure, Mobile, Wireless Network Technology Designed, Developed, and Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip E.

    2004-01-01

    The inability to seamlessly disseminate data securely over a high-integrity, wireless broadband network has been identified as a primary technical barrier to providing an order-of-magnitude increase in aviation capacity and safety. Secure, autonomous communications to and from aircraft will enable advanced, automated, data-intensive air traffic management concepts, increase National Air Space (NAS) capacity, and potentially reduce the overall cost of air travel operations. For the first time ever, secure, mobile, network technology was designed, developed, and demonstrated with state-ofthe- art protocols and applications by a diverse, cooperative Government-industry team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center. This revolutionary technology solution will make fundamentally new airplane system capabilities possible by enabling secure, seamless network connections from platforms in motion (e.g., cars, ships, aircraft, and satellites) to existing terrestrial systems without the need for manual reconfiguration. Called Mobile Router, the new technology autonomously connects and configures networks as they traverse from one operating theater to another. The Mobile Router demonstration aboard the Neah Bay, a U.S. Coast Guard vessel stationed in Cleveland, Ohio, accomplished secure, seamless interoperability of mobile network systems across multiple domains without manual system reconfiguration. The Neah Bay was chosen because of its low cost and communications mission similarity to low-Earth-orbiting satellite platforms. This technology was successfully advanced from technology readiness level (TRL) 2 (concept and/or application formation) to TRL 6 (system model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment). The secure, seamless interoperability offered by the Mobile Router and encryption device will enable several new, vehicle-specific and systemwide technologies to perform such things as remote, autonomous aircraft performance monitoring and early detection and

  13. Virtual Laboratory Enabling Collaborative Research in Applied Vehicle Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    The virtual laboratory is a new technology, based on the internet, that has had wide usage in a variety of technical fields because of its inherent ability to allow many users to participate simultaneously in instruction (education) or in the collaborative study of a common problem (real-world application). The leadership in the Applied Vehicle Technology panel has encouraged the utilization of this technology in its task groups for some time and its parent organization, the Research and Technology Agency, has done the same for its own administrative use. This paper outlines the application of the virtual laboratory to those fields important to applied vehicle technologies, gives the status of the effort, and identifies the benefit it can have on collaborative research. The latter is done, in part, through a specific example, i.e. the experience of one task group.

  14. NOAA Mobile Laboratory Measures Oil and Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, J. D.; Petron, G.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P. M.; Brown, S. S.; Geiger, F.; Patrick, L.; Crepinsek, S.; Chen, H.; Miller, B. R.; Montzka, S. A.; Lang, P. M.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Sweeney, C.; Guenther, D.; Karion, A.; Wolter, S.; Williams, J.; Jordan, A.; Tans, P. P.; Schnell, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    A van capable of continuous real time measurements of CH4 , CO2, CO, Water Vapor, Ozone, NO, NO2, Volatile Organic Compounds VOCs including aromatics and other traces gases was driven in the oil and gas fields of the Uintah Basin in northeastern Utah. Compressor Stations, processing plants, oil and gas well heads. Separators, condensate tanks, evaporation pond disposal facilities, holding tanks, hydraulic fracturing sites, gas pipelines and more were studied using the van. The mobile measurements provide a powerful tool to get to the source of the emissions and reveal the unique chemical signature of each of the stages and components of oil and gas production as well as the overall basin and background gas concentrations. In addition to a suite of gas analyzers, the van includes a meteorological system (temperature, humidity, and wind speed and direction), GPS tracking, flask sampling system and a batter power system. Aspects of the vans hardware, sampling methods and operations are discussed along with a few highlights of the measurements.

  15. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology. This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for

  16. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2) reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2) examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2) biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2) personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  17. Dental laboratory technology education in China: current situation and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liwei; Yue, Li; Zhou, Min; Yu, Haiyang

    2013-03-01

    Modern dentistry and dental education in China were first introduced from abroad by Dr. Lindsay in 1907. However, advancements in the field of dental laboratory technology did not occur to the same degree in specialties such as prosthodontics and orthodontics. Since the 1990s, orders from abroad demanding dental appliances surged as the image of China as the "world's factory" strengthened. The assembly line model, in which technicians work like simple procedure workers, was rapidly applied to denture production, while the traditional education system and apprenticeship systems demonstrated little progress in these years. The lack of advancement in dental laboratory technology education caused insufficient development in China's dental technology industry. In order to alter the situation, a four-year dental laboratory technology undergraduate educational program was established in 2005 by West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University (WCSS, SCU). This program was based on SCU's undergraduate education and WCSS's junior college education systems. The program introduced scientific methods in relevant subjects into laboratory technicians' training and made many improvements in the availability of trained faculty, textbooks, laboratory facilities, and curriculum.

  18. A Multi-Technology Communication Platform for Urban Mobile Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Rui; Luís, Miguel; Senna, Carlos; Sargento, Susana

    2018-04-12

    A common concern in smart cities is the focus on sensing procedures to provide city-wide information to city managers and citizens. To meet the growing demands of smart cities, the network must provide the ability to handle a large number of mobile sensors/devices, with high heterogeneity and unpredictable mobility, by collecting and delivering the sensed information for future treatment. This work proposes a multi-wireless technology communication platform for opportunistic data gathering and data exchange with respect to smart cities. Through the implementation of a proprietary long-range (LoRa) network and an urban sensor network, our platform addresses the heterogeneity of Internet of Things (IoT) devices while conferring communications in an opportunistic manner, increasing the interoperability of our platform. It implements and evaluates a medium access communication (MAC) protocol for LoRa networks with multiple gateways. It also implements mobile Opportunistic VEhicular (mOVE), a delay-tolerant network (DTN)-based architecture to address the mobility dimension. The platform provides vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication with support for highly reliable and actionable information flows. Moreover, taking into account the high mobility pattern that a smart city scenario presents, we propose and evaluate two forwarding strategies for the opportunistic sensor network.

  19. A Multi-Technology Communication Platform for Urban Mobile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Almeida

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A common concern in smart cities is the focus on sensing procedures to provide city-wide information to city managers and citizens. To meet the growing demands of smart cities, the network must provide the ability to handle a large number of mobile sensors/devices, with high heterogeneity and unpredictable mobility, by collecting and delivering the sensed information for future treatment. This work proposes a multi-wireless technology communication platform for opportunistic data gathering and data exchange with respect to smart cities. Through the implementation of a proprietary long-range (LoRa network and an urban sensor network, our platform addresses the heterogeneity of Internet of Things (IoT devices while conferring communications in an opportunistic manner, increasing the interoperability of our platform. It implements and evaluates a medium access communication (MAC protocol for LoRa networks with multiple gateways. It also implements mobile Opportunistic VEhicular (mOVE, a delay-tolerant network (DTN-based architecture to address the mobility dimension. The platform provides vehicle-to-everything (V2X communication with support for highly reliable and actionable information flows. Moreover, taking into account the high mobility pattern that a smart city scenario presents, we propose and evaluate two forwarding strategies for the opportunistic sensor network.

  20. A Multi-Technology Communication Platform for Urban Mobile Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Rui

    2018-01-01

    A common concern in smart cities is the focus on sensing procedures to provide city-wide information to city managers and citizens. To meet the growing demands of smart cities, the network must provide the ability to handle a large number of mobile sensors/devices, with high heterogeneity and unpredictable mobility, by collecting and delivering the sensed information for future treatment. This work proposes a multi-wireless technology communication platform for opportunistic data gathering and data exchange with respect to smart cities. Through the implementation of a proprietary long-range (LoRa) network and an urban sensor network, our platform addresses the heterogeneity of Internet of Things (IoT) devices while conferring communications in an opportunistic manner, increasing the interoperability of our platform. It implements and evaluates a medium access communication (MAC) protocol for LoRa networks with multiple gateways. It also implements mobile Opportunistic VEhicular (mOVE), a delay-tolerant network (DTN)-based architecture to address the mobility dimension. The platform provides vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication with support for highly reliable and actionable information flows. Moreover, taking into account the high mobility pattern that a smart city scenario presents, we propose and evaluate two forwarding strategies for the opportunistic sensor network. PMID:29649175

  1. Use of mobile technology in a community mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Gretl; Druss, Benjamin; Pina, Jamie; Lally, Cathy; Conde, Mark

    2016-10-01

    mHealth holds promise in transforming care for people with serious mental illness (SMI) and other disadvantaged populations. However, information about the rates of smartphone ownership and usage of mobile health apps among people with SMI is limited. The objective of this research is to examine the current ownership, usage patterns, and existing barriers to mobile health interventions for people with SMI treated in a public sector community mental health setting and to compare the findings with national usage patterns from the general population. A survey was conducted to determine rates of ownership of smartphone devices among people with SMI. Surveys were administered to 100 patients with SMI at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Results were compared with respondents to the 2012 Pew Survey of mobile phone usage. A total of 85% of participants reported that they owned a cell phone; of those, 37% reported that they owned a smartphone, as compared with 53% of respondents to the Pew Survey and 44% of socioeconomically disadvantaged respondents to the Pew Survey. While cell phone ownership is common among people with SMI, their adoption of smartphone technology lags behind that of the general population primarily due to cost barriers. Efforts to use mHealth in these populations need to recognize current mobile ownership patterns while planning for anticipated expansion of new technologies to poor populations as cost barriers are reduced in the coming years. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Novel miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory for critical cardiovascular disease following natural disasters: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ya-ling; Liang, Zhuo; Yao, Tian-ming; Sun, Jing-yang; Liang, Ming; Huo, Yu; Wang, Geng; Wang, Xiao-zeng; Liang, Yan-chun; Meng, Wei-hong

    2012-03-01

    Natural disasters have been frequent in recent years. Effective treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease following natural disasters is an unsolved problem. We aimed to develop a novel miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory (Mini Mobile Cath Lab) to provide emergency interventional services for patients with critical cardiovascular disease following natural disasters. A feasibility study was performed by testing the Mini Mobile Cath Lab on dogs with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) model in a hypothetical natural-disaster-stricken area. The Mini Mobile Cath Lab was transported to the hypothetical natural-disaster-stricken area by truck. Coronary angiography and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were performed on six dogs with STEMI model. The transportation and transformation of the Mini Mobile Cath Lab were monitored and its functioning was evaluated through the results of animal experiments. The Mini Mobile Cath Lab could be transported by truck at an average speed of 80 km/h on mountain roads during daytime in the winter, under conditions of light snow (-15°C to -20°C/-68°F to -59°F). The average time required to prepare the Mini Mobile Cath Lab after transportation, in a wetland area, was 30 minutes. Coronary angiography, and primary PCI were performed successfully. This preliminary feasibility study of the use of the Mini Mobile Cath Lab for emergency interventional treatment of dogs with STEMI indicated that it may perform well in the rescue of critical cardiovascular disease following natural disasters.

  3. Mobile Technology in the Lives of Thai Immigrants in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirima Thongsawang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of mobile technology in the lives of Thai immigrants in Berlin. By using qualitative research methods, this research investigates how new digital and social media applications have affected the organization of Thai immigrants on both individual and institutional levels, with a particular focus on the Royal Thai Embassy in Berlin. Mobile technologies today are widely used in the diaspora, by both individuals and social institutions, to maintain relationships with the homeland and to promote national affairs. Both individual Thai immigrants and official staff of the embassy rely significantly on Internet sites, particularly on social networking sites such as Facebook, to gain information on Thailand and to expand their networks. This paper explores changes in communication and their implications for Thais and their respective institutions in Germany.

  4. Governing risks and benefits: Mobile communication technologies in British universities

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth, Anita; Fernández, Gemma Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Mobile communication technologies (MCTs) pose new opportunities and challenges to university governance. Not only are the devices widespread, they have particular capabilities and constantly changing uses which makes any governing of them difficult. Furthermore most devices are individually owned. Thus universities are unable to directly control how they are used but do have a duty of care towards those learning and teaching within their spaces. This article outlines preliminary findings on h...

  5. Parents' Mobile Technology Adoption Influences on Elementary Children's Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutsler, Lauren

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: With a high rate of mobile technology ownership in the home, it is unknown how parents' behavioral intention influences mobile technology adoption and children's informal use to support reading. The purpose of this paper is to identify 120 parents' intentions to adopt mobile technology and gather in-depth perceptions about mobile…

  6. A Living Laboratory Exploring Mobile Support for Everyday Life with Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bjerge, Kim; Kristensen, Jens E.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the set up of a Living Laboratory in a city of North Denmark exploring mobile support for everyday life with diabetes. Background and definitions of the living lab method is presented together with descriptions of the technical setup, applications and explorations. The living l...

  7. Intelligence Context Aware Mobile Navigation using Augmented Reality Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hoirul Basori

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the technologies of today’s world, which are enriched with various powerful features and amazing quality characteristics, enables software developers to come up with best possible software solutions, no matter what the context of the particular issue. Technologies such as Augmented Reality (AR, is utilized almost every kind of fields in today’s society. As computers become more advanced through mobile devices and wearable technology, augmented reality will become a seamless experience that is a part of our everyday lives. In the context of this work, an Intelligence mobile navigation application for the King Abdul Aziz University Rabigh is developed enabling the user to find specific locations on campus and offers the ability to explore the campus environment via AR. Furthermore, the system, Mobile Campus Navigation with Augmented Reality application is capable of giving guidance in outdoor location navigating and retrieving details of campus officials and lecturers. With the proposed system, it is expected to serve as a useful and informative navigate helper for both students of King Abdul Aziz University and for the visitors, at outdoor locations and to use as an application to check officials and lecturer availability and retrieve detail about them when they are not available at the office at any time.

  8. Parent Scaffolding of Young Children When Engaged With Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen eWood

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shared parent-child experiences while engaged with an iPad™ were examined to determine if and then how parents interact with their children when using mobile digital devices. In total, 104 parent-child dyads participated in an observation session where parent-child interactions using the touchscreen tablet device were video recorded in order to observe first-hand the supports and exchanges between parent and child (age range 46.21- 75.9 months. Results indicate that parents provide a great deal of support to their children while interacting with the touchscreen tablet device including verbal, emotional-verbal, physical and emotional-physical supports. The types of support offered did not differ as a function of parent gender or experience with mobile devices (users versus non-users. Overall, parents rated their own experience engaging with the touchscreen tablet and that of their child’s positively. Additional survey measures assessed parents’ perceptions of their child’s technology use and attitudes regarding optimal ages and conditions for introducing and using technology. Most parents indicated a preference for very early introduction to mobile technologies. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Parent Scaffolding of Young Children When Engaged with Mobile Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eileen; Petkovski, Marjan; De Pasquale, Domenica; Gottardo, Alexandra; Evans, Mary Ann; Savage, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Shared parent-child experiences while engaged with an iPad(TM) were examined to determine if and then how parents interact with their children when using mobile digital devices. In total, 104 parent-child dyads participated in an observation session where parent-child interactions using the touchscreen tablet device were video recorded in order to observe first-hand the supports and exchanges between parent and child (age range 46.21-75.9 months). Results indicate that parents provide a great deal of support to their children while interacting with the touchscreen tablet device including verbal, emotional-verbal, physical and emotional-physical supports. The types of support offered did not differ as a function of parent gender or experience with mobile devices (users versus non-users). Overall, parents rated their own experience engaging with the touchscreen tablet and that of their child's positively. Additional survey measures assessed parents' perceptions of their child's technology use and attitudes regarding optimal ages and conditions for introducing and using technology. Most parents indicated a preference for very early introduction to mobile technologies. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Robotic Mobile System's Performance-Based MIMO-OFDM Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a predistortion neural network (PDNN architecture has been imposed to the Sniffer Mobile Robot (SNFRbot that is based on spatial multiplexed wireless Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM transmission technology. This proposal is used to improve the system performance by combating one of the main drawbacks that is encountered by OFDM technology; Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR. Simulation results show that using PDNN resulted in better PAPR performance than the previously published work that is based on linear coding, such as Low Density Parity Check (LDPC codes and turbo encoding whether using flat fading channel or a Doppler spread channel.

  11. Mobile technologies and the spatiotemporal configurations of institutional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Troshynski, Emily; Dourish, Paul

    2015-01-01

    are specifically concerned with what happens to institutional roles, power relationships, and decision-making processes when a particular type of information—that of spatiotemporal location of people—is made into a technologically tradable object through the use of location-based systems. We examine...... in which broad adoption of location-based and mobile technologies has the capacity to radically reconfigure the spatiotemporal arrangement of institutional processes. The presence of digital location traces creates new forms of institutional accountability, facilitates a shift in the understood relation...... between location and action, and necessitates new models of interpretation and sense making in practice....

  12. Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    AND SUBTITLE Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle...Center program to be able to expose Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) space-inspired science centers for DC Metro beltway schools

  13. Emerging vehicle technologies & the search for urban mobility solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra N. Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of the ongoing innovations to make vehicles driverless, carbon free and accessible on ‘as needed’ basis, is evolving fast. A review of available information suggests that these technologies have substantial potential to generate positive externalities by improving road safety, lowering of fuel consumption and emissions in vehicles, and providing mobility options for vulnerable population including young, old and persons with disability. However, given the limited commercialization it is difficult to discern the nature of impact these technologies will have in reducing the two negative travel externalities, road congestion and low density expansion of cities. Gradual mainstreaming of these technologies will offer opportunities for further research in understanding the behavioral responses of their end users, and the risks that these technologies may pose to manufacturers, consumers, and stakeholders.

  14. Mobile laboratory for near real-time measurements of very low-level radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Tracking Radioactive Atmospheric Contaminants (TRAC) System is a mobile laboratory, developed by Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to improve emergency response and environmental research capabilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In the event of an atmospheric release, the TRAC laboratory can confirm the location and radionuclide composition of the downwind cloud by analyzing samples in near real-time in the field. Specialized monitoring systems were developed to analyze most radionuclides produced in SRP's diverse operations. Sensitivities are radionuclide dependent and can be below maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values by factors as large as one hundred thousand. 6 references, 6 figures

  15. Factors of adoption of mobile information technology by homecare nurses: a technology acceptance model 2 approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiying; Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2010-01-01

    Pervasive healthcare support through mobile information technology solutions is playing an increasing role in the attempt to improve healthcare and reduce costs. Despite the apparent attractiveness, many mobile applications have failed or have not been implemented as predicted. Among factors possibly leading to such outcomes, technology adoption is a key problem. This must be investigated early in the development process because healthcare is a particularly sensitive area with vital social implications. Moreover, it is important to investigate technology acceptance using the support of scientific tools validated for relevant information systems research. This article presents an empirical study based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 in mobile homecare nursing. The study elicited the perceptions of 91 Canadian nurses who used personal digital assistants for 1 month in their daily activities. A partial least squares modeling data analysis revealed that nurse's perception of usefulness is the main factor in the adoption of mobile technology, having subjective norm and image within the organization as significant antecedents. Overall, this study was the first attempt at investigating scientifically, through a pertinent information systems research model, user adoption of mobile systems by homecare nursing personnel.

  16. Influence of Self-emissions on a Mobile Laboratory and Implications for Urban Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, L. P.

    2017-12-01

    The importance of urban systems as a large source of greenhouse gases has led to an increase in ground-based campaigns designed to identify and quantify sources. However, plume emissions from vehicle tailpipes can affect emissions for a stationary vehicle or if a tailwind lofts the plume over the car particularly in an urban canyons where wind flow is constrained [1]. Advances in battery technology allow for electric vehicles to sample without self-emissions. Chevrolet has released the Bolt with an estimated range of 238 miles per charge. We are designing a mobile lab using a Chevrolet Bolt with the sensors 5 ft above the ground to reduce drag. Here we investigate the occurrence of self-emissions from a gasoline mobile laboratory set-up that has been optimized to reduce self-emissions and the potential benefits of switching to an electric vehicle for urban sampling. A 2002 Toyota Sienna van and a Licor 7500 CO2/H2O analyzer were deployed to quantify self-emissions. A custom-designed rack elevated the sensors to a height of 8 feet above the tailpipe to minimize self-emission samples [1]. Emissions were sampled over 5 intervals near a relatively isolated field with the van oriented in five directions. A south-easterly wind ( 131o) provided a self-sample opportunity by orienting the car with the tailpipe between the oncoming wind and the sensors. Over 1.5 hours of measurement, 7.8 % of CO2 measurements exceeded 420 ppmv. Of these, four possible self-sample events were observed, or less than 1% with other enhancements attributed to passing cars. These were observed in mild wind conditions averaging 2.8 m/s and only with the tail pipe directly facing into the wind. Results suggest that self-sampling is small in an environment with mild sustained winds and open surroundings. Given the challenge of identifying self-emissions in an isolated environment, urban self-sampling could impact the overall sample especially as these signals may be hard to distinguish from the

  17. A systems approach to the commercialization of space communications technology - The NASA/JPL Mobile Satellite Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, William J., III; Gray, Valerie W.; Jackson, Byron; Steele, Laura C.

    1991-10-01

    This paper discusss the systems approach taken by NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the commercialization of land-mobile satellite services (LMSS) in the United States. As the lead center for NASA's Mobile Satellite Program, JPL was involved in identifying and addressing many of the key barriers to commercialization of mobile satellite communications, including technical, economic, regulatory and institutional risks, or uncertainties. The systems engineering approach described here was used to mitigate these risks. The result was the development and implementation of the JPL Mobile Satellite Experiment Project. This Project included not only technology development, but also studies to support NASA in the definition of the regulatory, market, and investment environments within which LMSS would evolve and eventually operate, as well as initiatives to mitigate their associated commercialization risks. The end result of these government-led endeavors was the acceleration of the introduction of commercial mobile satellite services, both nationally and internationally.

  18. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  19. [Guidelines for blood transfusion teaching to medical laboratory technology students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, P; Tourlourat, M; Fourcade, C; Julien, E; Peyrard, T; Cabaud, J-J

    2012-02-01

    The new French law about clinical laboratory medicine, the requirements of the ISO/CEI 15189 standard, the numerous abilities expected from the medical laboratory technologists and their involvement in blood bank management has led the working group "Recherche et démarche qualité" of the French Society of Blood Transfusion to initiate an inventory of blood transfusion teaching syllabus for medical laboratory technology students and to propose transfusion medicine teaching guidelines. Seven worksheets have been established for that purpose including red blood cell antigen typing and antibody screening, blood sampling in immunohaematology, automation, clinical practices, blood products, blood delivery and haemovigilance. These guidelines aim at contributing to the harmonization of transfusion medicine teaching and at providing objective elements to the medical laboratory managers regarding the practical and theoretical skills of theirs collaborators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Laboratory 3.0: Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory Virtualization with a Student-Centred Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat-Sanjuan, Albert; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Ferrando Piera, Francesc; De la Flor López, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a blended-learning strategy for improving the teaching method applied in the laboratory subject Manufacturing Technologies. The teaching method has been changed from a predominantly teacher-centred to an active learning system with a student-centred focus and e-learning activities. In face-to-face classes, a game-based learning…

  1. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Keith McInnes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT, especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans’ IT use. This study examines homeless veterans’ access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness.Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used.Results. Most participants (90% had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting, the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging.Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care.

  2. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, D Keith; Fix, Gemmae M; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Sawh, Leon; Smelson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT), especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans' IT use. This study examines homeless veterans' access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness. Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results. Most participants (90%) had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting), the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging. Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care.

  3. Integration of Pneumatic Technology in Powered Mobility Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveler, Brandon; Wang, Hongwu; Gebrosky, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G; Schneider, Urs; Cooper, Rory A

    2017-01-01

    Advances in electric motors, electronics, and control systems have enhanced the capability and drivability of electric power mobility devices over the last 60 years. Yet, battery technologies used in powered mobility devices (PMDs) have not kept pace. Recent advances in pneumatic technology, primarily the high torque, low speed design of rotary piston air motors, directly align with the needs of PMD. Pneumatic technology has advantages over battery-powered technology, including lighter weight, lower operating costs, decreased environmental impact, better reliability, and increased safety. Two prototypes were created that incorporated rotary piston air motors, high-pressure air tanks, and air-pressure regulators. Prototype 1 was created by modifying an existing electric PMD. Range tests were performed to determine the feasibility of pneumatic technology and the optimal combination of components to allow the longest range possible at acceptable speeds over ideal conditions. Using a 1.44 L air tank for feasibility testing, prototype 1 was capable of traveling 800 m, which confirmed the feasibility of pneumatic technology usage in PMDs. Prototype 2 was designed based on the testing results from prototype 1. After further optimization of prototype 2, the average maximum range was 3,150 m. Prototype 2 is up to 28.3% lighter than an equivalent size electric PMD and can be fully recharged in approximately 2 minutes. It decreases the cost of PMDs by approximately $1,500, because batteries do not need to be replaced over the lifetime of the device. The results provide justification for the use of pneumatic technology in PMDs.

  4. Nosql Technology In Android Based Mobile Chat Application Using Mongodb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yovita Tunardi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of data storage technology which previously using relational concept began to change to the non-relational concept or sometimes referred to as the term NoSQL technology. Data storage in NoSQL is no longer based on the relations between tables but using another methods, one of them is document-oriented. This method was applied specifically in MongoDB. This concept brings new hope because oftheir superiority that can handle very large data with promising performance and is perfect for agile system development. The purpose of this research was to measure the performance NoSQL, especially MongoDB with implemented it in a Android based mobile chat application. This research uses three methods, analysis method including literature study, analysis of similar application, questionnaires, design method using Agile SofwareDevelopment, and evaluation method including eight golden rules, analysis of similar application, questionnaires, and interview. The results of this research is a mobile chat application that uses MongoDB as the data storage technology. Through this research can be drawn the conclusion that NoSQL technology implementation, MongoDB, give special advantages like lighter data storage and faster data access.

  5. Location-aware mobile technologies: historical, social and spatial approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Souza e Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With the popularization of smartphones, location-based services are increasingly part of everyday live. People use their cell phones to find nearby restaurants, friends in the vicinity, and track their children. Although location-based services have received sparse attention from mobile communications cholars to date, the ability of locating people and things with one’s cell phone is not new. Since the removal of GPS signal degradation in 2000, artists and researchers have been exploring how location-awareness influences mobility, spatiality and sociability. Besides exploring the historical antecedents of today’s location-based services, this paper focuses on the main social issues that emerge when location-aware technologies leave the strict domain of art and research and become part of everyday life: locational privacy, sociability, and spatiality. Finally, this paper addresses two main topics that future mobile communication research that focus on location-awareness should take into consideration: a shift in the meaning of location, and the adoption and appropriation of location-aware technologies in the global south.

  6. Technology Provisioning in the Mobile Industry: a Strategic Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ghezzi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a strategic clustering for Mobile Middleware Technology Providers (MMTPs, shedding light on the business models and the strategic positioning currently adopted by this actor typology. The paper combines a literature review and a multiple case study approach – 24 in‐depth cases based on 72 semi‐ structured interviews were performed – to deal with a significant and relatively new issue, i.e., the role of technology providers in the mobile value network. Through the creation of a system of strategic clustering matrices, four key business models currently adopted by MMTPs – “Pure Play”, “Full Asset”, “Third Parties Relationship‐focused” and “Platform and Content Management” – are identified, and insightful conclusions on the impact of this actor’s newly emerging influence on the market’s competitive dynamics are drawn. The framework created supports a wide set of mobile communications stakeholders – both incumbent and new entrants – in their decision making and strategy analysis process.

  7. Perception of medical students for utility of mobile technology use in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Sushama Subhash Thakre; Subhash Bapurao Thakre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mobile technology is changing the way we live, and it is beginning to change the way we learn. Current literature reviews have shown that research on mobile technology in medical education primarily focused on efficacy, of mobile devices as an educational tool and resource, infrastructure to support m-learning, benefits, challenges, and appropriate use. Objectives: To assess the perception of medical student for the utility of mobile technology in their learning experience and t...

  8. A systematic review approach of mobile technology adoption in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Arokiasamy, Anantha Raj A.

    2017-01-01

    Many educators agree that mobile technology has great potential not only to improve our educational practices but also to change traditional learning platforms and classroom learning environments. There are also many advantages to integrating mobile technology into the 21st century classrooms to support teaching and learning. Mobile technology tools such as iPads, iPad mini, mobile applications, tablets, palm devices, e-readers and smartphones are becoming real-world tools that should be inte...

  9. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  10. Mobile technologies and the holistic management of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Farhaan; Norris, Tony; Stockdale, Rosemary

    2008-12-01

    Ageing populations and unhealthy lifestyles have led to some chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease reaching epidemic proportions in many developed nations. This paper explores the potential of mobile technologies to improve this situation. The pervasive nature of these technologies can contribute holistically across the whole spectrum of chronic care ranging from public information access and awareness, through monitoring and treatment of chronic disease, to support for patient carers. A related study to determine the perceptions of healthcare providers to m-health confirmed the view that attitudes were likely to be more important barriers to progress than technology. A key finding concerned the importance of seamless and integrated m-health processes across the spectrum of chronic disease management.

  11. Social psychological determinants of mobile communication technology use and adoption. A comparison of three models to explain and predict mobile communication technology behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, O.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the social psychological determinants of mobile communication technology use and adoption in an attempt to better understand people’s behavior for adopting and using innovative information and communication technologies. In particular, this study emphasizes the

  12. SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated the In-Situ Electrokinetic Extraction (ISEE) system at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.The SITE demonstration results show ...

  13. Electronic Reading and Digital Library Technologies: Understanding Learner Expectation and Usage Intent for Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Jack A.; Moser, Mary T.; Segala, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile information technology is changing the education landscape by offering learners the opportunity to engage in asynchronous, ubiquitous instruction. While there is a proliferation of mobile content management systems being developed for the mobile Web and stand-alone mobile applications, few studies have addressed learner expectations and…

  14. Learners' Perceptions of the Use of Mobile Technology in a Task-Based Language Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrich, Simone L.

    2016-01-01

    This research explored perceptions of learners studying English in private language schools regarding the use of mobile technology to support language learning. Learners were first exposed to both a mobile assisted and a mobile unassisted language learning experience, and then asked to express their thoughts on the incorporation of mobile devices…

  15. Motivation and innovation: Mobile technology acceptance among student teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Sánchez-Prieto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies constitute a didactic resource with great potential. However, their incorporation process to the classroom is not being implemented in a satisfying way. The future teachers will play a key role in the integration process of these technologies’ integration process in formal education contexts and, therefore, it is essential to know the factors that condition their decision-making process.This article presents the results of a research which analyzes the influence of motivational factors on the behavioral intention to use mobile technologies in the future teaching practice of the students from the Pre-primary Education Degree from the University of Salamanca. With this purpose, we have developed a TAM-based technology adoption model including the following constructs: perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived enjoyment, resistance to change and behavioral intention. The employed PLS-SEM analysis confirms the validity and reliability of the model. The results of the analysis of the structural model reflect the importance of perceived enjoyment and perceived usefulness in the adoption process, as well as the low relevance of perceived ease of use. In total, the motivational factors enable the prediction of a high percentage of the variance of behavioral intention, which reveals the need to design educational programmes that emphasize on these elements.

  16. Mobile health technology evaluation: the mHealth evidence workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Nilsen, Wendy J; Abernethy, Amy; Atienza, Audie; Patrick, Kevin; Pavel, Misha; Riley, William T; Shar, Albert; Spring, Bonnie; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Hedeker, Donald; Honavar, Vasant; Kravitz, Richard; Lefebvre, R Craig; Mohr, David C; Murphy, Susan A; Quinn, Charlene; Shusterman, Vladimir; Swendeman, Dallas

    2013-08-01

    Creative use of new mobile and wearable health information and sensing technologies (mHealth) has the potential to reduce the cost of health care and improve well-being in numerous ways. These applications are being developed in a variety of domains, but rigorous research is needed to examine the potential, as well as the challenges, of utilizing mobile technologies to improve health outcomes. Currently, evidence is sparse for the efficacy of mHealth. Although these technologies may be appealing and seemingly innocuous, research is needed to assess when, where, and for whom mHealth devices, apps, and systems are efficacious. In order to outline an approach to evidence generation in the field of mHealth that would ensure research is conducted on a rigorous empirical and theoretic foundation, on August 16, 2011, researchers gathered for the mHealth Evidence Workshop at NIH. The current paper presents the results of the workshop. Although the discussions at the meeting were cross-cutting, the areas covered can be categorized broadly into three areas: (1) evaluating assessments; (2) evaluating interventions; and (3) reshaping evidence generation using mHealth. This paper brings these concepts together to describe current evaluation standards, discuss future possibilities, and set a grand goal for the emerging field of mHealth research. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  17. Augmenting Space Technology Program Management with Secure Cloud & Mobile Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Robert F.; Munk, Christopher; Helble, Adelle; Press, Martin T.; George, Cory; Johnson, David

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Game Changing Development (GCD) program manages technology projects across all NASA centers and reports to NASA headquarters regularly on progress. Program stakeholders expect an up-to-date, accurate status and often have questions about the program's portfolio that requires a timely response. Historically, reporting, data collection, and analysis were done with manual processes that were inefficient and prone to error. To address these issues, GCD set out to develop a new business automation solution. In doing this, the program wanted to leverage the latest information technology platforms and decided to utilize traditional systems along with new cloud-based web services and gaming technology for a novel and interactive user environment. The team also set out to develop a mobile solution for anytime information access. This paper discusses a solution to these challenging goals and how the GCD team succeeded in developing and deploying such a system. The architecture and approach taken has proven to be effective and robust and can serve as a model for others looking to develop secure interactive mobile business solutions for government or enterprise business automation.

  18. 47 CFR 22.409 - Developmental authorization for a new Public Mobile Service or technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Mobile Service or technology. 22.409 Section 22.409 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Developmental Authorizations § 22.409 Developmental authorization for a new Public Mobile Service or technology. The FCC may grant applications for...

  19. Renewable energy technology development at Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, P. C.

    1994-02-01

    The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earth's present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing many of these technologies over the last two decades. This paper describes innovative solar, wind and geothermal energy systems and components that Sandia is helping to bring to the marketplace. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are conducted in partnership with non-federal government entities. A number of these partners are from New Mexico.

  20. In-situ measurement of environment radioactivity by mobile nuclear field laboratory (MNFL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalani, Deepak; Mathur, A.P.; Rawat, D.K.; Barala, S.S.; Singhal, K.P.; Singh, G.P.; Samant, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    In-situ measurement of environment radioactivity is useful tool for determine the unusual increase of radioactivity at any place due to any nuclear eventuality take place. A mobile nuclear field laboratory has been designed and developed for in-situ measurement of environment radioactivity at any desired location. This vehicle is equipped with different monitoring and analysis instruments. These equipment can be operated while vehicle is moving. The measured data can be stored in computer. This vehicle has the space for storage of various environmental matrices of affected area and these can analysis in laboratory. (author)

  1. Governing mobile technology use for continuing professional development in the Australian nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey Ann; Gale, Fred; Cummings, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth in the use of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance, especially in healthcare settings. Whilst some Australian professional bodies and organisations have developed standards and guidelines to direct appropriate use of social media and mobile technology, clear governance arrangements regarding when, where and how to use mobile technology at point of care in nursing are currently lacking. This paper analyses how the use of mobile technology by nurses at point of care is governed. It highlights the existence of a mobile technology paradox: an identified inability of nurses to access mobile technology in a context where it is increasingly recognised that its use in situ can enhance nursing practice while contributing to mobile learning and continuing professional development. While the recent release of the Registered Nurse Standards for Practice and accompanying Standard for Continuing Professional Development provides some direction regarding professional standards to support the use of mobile technology for mobile learning, we argue a more inclusive approach is required if emerging technologies are to be fully embraced. We describe how an implementation framework, underpinned by more detailed standards, guidelines and codes, could enable the nursing profession to be leaders in embedding mobile technology in healthcare environments nationally and globally. The prevalence of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance in healthcare environments. Its limited availability at point of care is hindering nursing practice, mobile learning and continuing professional development. We discuss the emergence of mobile technology and impediments for its use by nurses in situ. We analyse the professional codes governing nursing, outlining potential reforms to enable implementation of mobile technology at point of care by nurses.

  2. Cell Phones, Tablets, and Other Mobile Technology for Users with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research. Share: Email Print Like (218 Likes) Cell Phones, Tablets, and Other Mobile Technology Touchscreen Smartphone Accessibility for People with Visual Impairments and Blindness The Benefits of Accessible Touchscreen Mobile Devices for People with ...

  3. The clinical application of mobile technology to disaster medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Timothy; Morrison, Cecily; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2012-10-01

    Mobile health care technology (mHealth) has the potential to improve communication and clinical information management in disasters. This study reviews the literature on health care and computing published in the past five years to determine the types and efficacy of mobile applications available to disaster medicine, along with lessons learned. Five types of applications are identified: (1) disaster scene management; (2) remote monitoring of casualties; (3) medical image transmission (teleradiology); (4) decision support applications; and (5) field hospital information technology (IT) systems. Most projects have not yet reached the deployment stage, but evaluation exercises show that mHealth should allow faster processing and transport of patients, improved accuracy of triage and better monitoring of unattended patients at a disaster scene. Deployments of teleradiology and field hospital IT systems to disaster zones suggest that mHealth can improve resource allocation and patient care. The key problems include suitability of equipment for use in disaster zones and providing sufficient training to ensure staff familiarity with complex equipment. Future research should focus on providing unbiased observations of the use of mHealth in disaster medicine.

  4. Influence of Mobile Learning Training on Pre-Service Social Studies Teachers' Technology and Mobile Phone Self-Efficacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Adedoja; Oluwadara, Abimbade

    2016-01-01

    Current instructional deliveries favour the use of mobile technology because of its inherent potentials and benefits such as portability, ease of use cost and others. Despite these benefits, many teachers especially in Sub-Saharan Africa still prefer the conventional method and use mobile phones for social engagements such as texting, chatting,…

  5. The Rise of Mobile Technology on the Financial Sector in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Mupfiga; Tafadzwa Padare

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of technology has revolted the way that the financial industry operates and the increasing use of mobile gadgets has changed the banking system from the traditional brick and mortar building to a virtual system. The sudden rise in use and innovation of smart mobile phones, mobile personal computers, tablets and various other mobile electronic gadgets has resulted in the rise of mobile financial products. Rapid quickening innovative headways are making completely new business sug...

  6. Mobile laboratories: An innovative and efficient solution for radiological characterization of sites under or after decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeau, V; Daniel, B; Dubot, D

    2017-04-21

    During the operation and the decommissioning of a nuclear site the operator must assure the protection of the workers and the environment. It must furthermore identify and classify the various wastes, while optimizing the associated costs. At all stages of the decommissioning radiological measurements are performed to determine the initial situation, to monitor the demolition and clean-up, and to verify the final situation. Radiochemical analysis is crucial for the radiological evaluation process to optimize the clean-up operations and to the respect limits defined with the authorities. Even though these types of analysis are omnipresent in activities such as the exploitation, the monitoring, and the cleaning up of nuclear plants, some nuclear sites do not have their own radiochemical analysis laboratory. Mobile facilities can overcome this lack when nuclear facilities are dismantled, when contaminated sites are cleaned-up, or in a post-accident situation. The current operations for the characterization of radiological soils of CEA nuclear facilities, lead to a large increase of radiochemical analysis. To manage this high throughput of samples in a timely manner, the CEA has developed a new mobile laboratory for the clean-up of its soils, called SMaRT (Shelter for Monitoring and nucleAR chemisTry). This laboratory is dedicated to the preparation and the radiochemical analysis (alpha, beta, and gamma) of potentially contaminated samples. In this framework, CEA and Eichrom laboratories has signed a partnership agreement to extend the analytical capacities and bring on site optimized and validated methods for different problematic. Gamma-emitting radionuclides can usually be measured in situ as little or no sample preparation is required. Alpha and beta-emitting radionuclides are a different matter. Analytical chemistry laboratory facilities are required. Mobile and transportable laboratories equipped with the necessary tools can provide all that is needed. The main

  7. Integrating cell phones and mobile technologies into public health practice: a social marketing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Mobile communications are being used for many purposes, from instant messaging (IM), mobile or microblogging (Twitter), social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace), e-mail to basic voicemail. A brief background on cell phone and mobile technology use in public health is reviewed. The focus of the article is framing the use of mobile technologies in public health from a social marketer's perspective--using the 4 Ps marketing mix as a guide.

  8. Mobile technologies and supply chain management - lessons for the hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Car, Tomislav; Pilepić, Ljubica; Šimunić, Mislav

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to define preconditions and integration capabilities of the mobile business in supply chain management (SCM) in the hospitality industry via mobile devices and mobile applications. The aims of this paper are to reflect on what mobile technology has to offer and to draw attention to the role of mobile applications and their use in the SCM. Although mobile technologies are present in almost all areas, they are not used to their full potential. Design – The...

  9. Load Disaggregation Technologies: Real World and Laboratory Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Butner, Ryan S.; Johnson, Erica M.

    2016-09-28

    Low cost interval metering and communication technology improvements over the past ten years have enabled the maturity of load disaggregation (or non-intrusive load monitoring) technologies to better estimate and report energy consumption of individual end-use loads. With the appropriate performance characteristics, these technologies have the potential to enable many utility and customer facing applications such as billing transparency, itemized demand and energy consumption, appliance diagnostics, commissioning, energy efficiency savings verification, load shape research, and demand response measurement. However, there has been much skepticism concerning the ability of load disaggregation products to accurately identify and estimate energy consumption of end-uses; which has hindered wide-spread market adoption. A contributing factor is that common test methods and metrics are not available to evaluate performance without having to perform large scale field demonstrations and pilots, which can be costly when developing such products. Without common and cost-effective methods of evaluation, more developed disaggregation technologies will continue to be slow to market and potential users will remain uncertain about their capabilities. This paper reviews recent field studies and laboratory tests of disaggregation technologies. Several factors are identified that are important to consider in test protocols, so that the results reflect real world performance. Potential metrics are examined to highlight their effectiveness in quantifying disaggregation performance. This analysis is then used to suggest performance metrics that are meaningful and of value to potential users and that will enable researchers/developers to identify beneficial ways to improve their technologies.

  10. Innovations in technology: social media and mobile technology in the care of adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Andrew; Dimov, Vesselin

    2012-12-01

    This literature review analyzed technological interventions in the adolescent asthmatic population. A PubMed search was performed with terms of asthma, adolescents, social media, Internet, website, mobile phone, text messaging, SMS, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and Technology during a 2.5-year period and identified 64 abstracts. Three studies fulfilled the criteria for adolescent intervention using Internet-based sites but did not provide evidence for effectiveness. Two studies focused on mobile technology. One study included text message reminders for controller medication use in asthma patients. Perceived usefulness, satisfaction, and ease of use of text messages were high, but there was no improvement in asthma control. The literature search did not find any studies exploring the use of smartphone applications or social media services. Current studies of technology use in adolescents with asthma do not provide consistent evidence of effectiveness. The positive attitude toward use of social media or mobile technology opens the possibility for future studies to further explore the potential benefits of such interventions.

  11. Remote participation technologies in the EFDA Laboratories - status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, V.; How, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    More than 25 laboratories of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) have been increasingly using remote participation (RP) technologies for collaborative work on several experiments. We present an overview of the technologies that are employed to provide remote data access, remote computer access, and tele-conference. We also deal with computer network requirements, and support and documentation needs. The biggest application of these tools has been the joint scientific exploitation of the JET Facilities. Increasingly other experiments are operated as shared facilities, and the RP tools are being used in this context. For remote data access there is a clear trend towards MDSplus as common data access layer for multi-experiment data access. Secure Remote Computer access is converging on two different solutions. Video-conference is also converging on two partially inter-operable solutions, whereas the sharing of presentation material is converging on one solution. Remote Control Room participation is being used in two laboratories. Network monitoring has been developed and is now in routine use. The RP work is being done at many laboratories and is co-ordinated by EFDA. A number of items in several fields need still to be tackled and an overview of these is presented. (authors)

  12. Remote participation technologies in the EFDA Laboratories - status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); How, J.A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    More than 25 laboratories of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) have been increasingly using remote participation (RP) technologies for collaborative work on several experiments. We present an overview of the technologies that are employed to provide remote data access, remote computer access, and tele-conference. We also deal with computer network requirements, and support and documentation needs. The biggest application of these tools has been the joint scientific exploitation of the JET Facilities. Increasingly other experiments are operated as shared facilities, and the RP tools are being used in this context. For remote data access there is a clear trend towards MDSplus as common data access layer for multi-experiment data access. Secure Remote Computer access is converging on two different solutions. Video-conference is also converging on two partially inter-operable solutions, whereas the sharing of presentation material is converging on one solution. Remote Control Room participation is being used in two laboratories. Network monitoring has been developed and is now in routine use. The RP work is being done at many laboratories and is co-ordinated by EFDA. A number of items in several fields need still to be tackled and an overview of these is presented. (authors)

  13. Innovative environmental restoration and waste management technologies at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Cleanup of contaminated sites and management of wastes have become major efforts of the US Department of Energy. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing several new technologies to meet the needs of this national effort. Some of these efforts are being done in collaboration with private sector firms. An overview of the ANL and private sector efforts will be presented. The following four specific technologies will be discussed in detail: (1) a minimum additive waste stabilization (MAWS) system for treating actinide-contaminated soil and groundwater; (2) a magnetic separation system, also for cleanup of actinide-contaminated soil and groundwater; (3) a mobile evaporator/concentrator system for processing aqueous radioactive and mixed waste; and (4) a continuous emission monitor for ensuring that waste incineration meets environmental goals

  14. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Niedermuller, Josef [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the “benefit” side of the analysis—as opposed to the cost side—and how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the “benefits” side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are

  15. Patient and tissue identification in the assisted reproductive technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Kimball O; Racowsky, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Several high-profile cases involving in vitro fertilization have recently received considerable media attention and highlight the importance of assuring patient and tissue identification. Within the assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratory, there are many steps where wrong patient or tissue identity could have drastic results. Erroneous identity can result in tragic consequences for the patient, the laboratory, and for those working in the program as a whole. Such errors can result in enormous psychological and financial costs, as well as a loss in confidence. There are several critical steps that should be taken every single time and for each specific procedure performed in the ART laboratory to ensure the correct identification of patients and their tissue. These steps should be detailed in protocols that include the method of identification, the two unique identifiers that will be used, the sources of these identifiers, and often a system in which more than one person is involved in the identification. Each protocol should ideally include a checklist that is actively used for the implementation of each procedure. The protocol should also indicate what to do if the identification does not match up, including rapid handling and notification of the patient involved in the error. All ART laboratories should instill in their employees an atmosphere of full and open disclosure for cases where mistakes are made. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. The Mobile Laboratory for Personnel Spectrometry of the SCPRI; Le Laboratoire Mobile de Spectrometrie Humaine du SCPRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerin, P.; Moroni, J. P. [Service Central de Protection Contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, Ministere des Affaires Sociales, Le Vesinet (France)

    1969-10-15

    In the event of a nuclear accident involving the risk of activation or radioactive contamination of a widespread population, the Service central de protection contre les rayonnements ionisants (Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiations) would immediately be able to send out its new mobile laboratory, which from 1969 onwards will be in routine use for personnel monitoring. The laboratory in question is a 33-ton trailer-type vehicle carrying four fully-shielded whole-body counters, each fitted with two 8 x 4-inch Nal(Tl) crystals, the pulses being analysed by two 400-channel spectrometers. The layouts of the unit and the electronic safety devices installed make it possible to carry out monitoring very rapidly, using only two trained technicians. Under conditions such as may arise at the time of a nuclear accident, as many as several hundred persons a day could be monitored. (author) [French] En cas d'accident nucleaire pouvant impliquer un risque d'activation ou de contamination radioactive pour une population etendue, le Service central de protection contre les rayonnements ionisants pourrait sans difficulte mettre en oeuvre le nouveau laboratoire mobile qu'il va utiliser en routine des 1969 pour le controle de la contamination des travailleurs. Il s'agit d'un vehicule semi-remorque de 33 tonnes comportant quatre anthropogamma- metres a blindage complet, equipes chacun de deux cristaux Nal(Tl) de 8 x 4 pouces, exploites par deux spectrometres a 400 canaux. La disposition de l'ensemble et les dispositifs de securite electroniques permettent un debit tres rapide avec seulement deux techniciens entraines. Dans les conditions qui peuvent se presenter lors d'un accident nucleaire, ce debit pourrait atteindre plusieurs centaines de personnes controlees par jour. (author)

  17. Factors Influencing Agricultural Leadership Students' Behavioral Intentions: Examining the Potential Use of Mobile Technology in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Robert; Irby, Travis L.; Dooley, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is pervasive at institutions across the U.S. The study was framed with self-efficacy theory, self-directed learning theory, and the unified theory for acceptance and use of technology. The purpose of this study was to assess undergraduate students' behavioral intention towards mobile technology acceptance in agricultural…

  18. 75 FR 56651 - ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology... Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition (TIMTC) Annual [[Page 56652...: Beating Gridlock with a Smart Grid; U.S. DOT Truck Technology Initiatives; and State and Federal...

  19. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  20. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R ampersand D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  1. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R&D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  2. Design and development of the mobile game based on the J2ME technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, JunHua

    2012-01-01

    With the continuous improvement of mobile performance, mobile entertainment applications market trend has been increasingly clear, mobile entertainment applications will be after the PC entertainment applications is another important business growth. Through the full analysis of the current mobile entertainment applications market demand and trends, the author has accumulated a lot of theoretical knowledge and practical experience. Rational, using of some new technology for a mobile entertainment games design, and described the development of key technologies required for mobile game an analysis and design of the game, and to achieve a complete game development. Light of the specific mobile game project - "Battle City", detailed the development of a mobile game based on the J2ME platform, the basic steps and the various key elements, focusing on how to use object-oriented thinking on the role of mobile phones in the abstract and Game Animation package, the source code with specific instructions.

  3. Field and laboratory evaluation of the mobility of cobalt-60/EDTA in an arid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.L.; Gee, G.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Kirkham, R.R.

    1983-02-01

    The ability of the organic complexant EDTA to enhance the mobility of cobalt-60 was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. Laboratory tests consisted of short term (approximately 7 day) column and batch adsorption tests using soil from the Hanford site as well as long term (approximately 70 day) batch tests with Hanford soil and soils from Oak Ridge and Savannah River. In addition, two large scale tracer tests were conducted using Hanford soil. One used a large (1.6 m) laboratory column, spiked with cobalt-60/EDTA and the other was a field test conducted in an 8 m deep lysimeter. Enhanced mobility decreased sorption were observed in both column and batch tests when the cobalt-60/EDTA solutions contacted Hanford and Oak Ridge soil for only a few days. When long contact times were allowed (months) the Hanford soil showed large increases in sorption with time. The low sorption exhibited initially by the Oak Ridge soil increased slightly over time, however, the high sorption observed with the Savannah River soil remained constant with time. The reduced mobility, with time, observed in Hanford soils was confirmed in both the large scale laboratory and breaking down when contacted with Hanford and Savannah River soil and to a lesser extent, the Oak Ridge soil. It is not known at this time why the complex is breaking down or why the kinetics are different among the soils tested. The implication to waste management is that the potential for transport of cobalt by EDTA complexation may not be as serious as once thought

  4. Mobile technology and academic libraries innovative services for research and learning

    CERN Document Server

    Canuel, Robin

    2017-01-01

    In seventeen chapters ranging from A Mobile-First Library Site Redesign to Mobile Technology Support for Field Research to Virtual Reality Library Environments, Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries explores how librarians around the world are working to adapt their spaces, collections, teaching, and services to the new possibilities presented by mobile technology. This is a detailed and thorough examination of technology that's emerging now and how to incorporate it into your library to help the students and researchers of both today and tomorrow.

  5. Examining Preservice Elementary Teachers' Technology Self-Efficacy: Impact of Mobile Technology-Based Physics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Chandrasekhar, Meera; Kosztin, Dorina; Steinhoff, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    While iPads and other mobile devices are gaining popularity in educational settings, challenges associated with teachers' use of technology continue to hold true. Preparing preservice teachers within teacher preparation programs to gain experience learning and teaching science using mobile technologies is critical for them to develop positive…

  6. Laboratory 3.0: Manufacturing technologies laboratory virtualization with a student-centred methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Fabregat-Sanjuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a blended-learning strategy for improving the teaching method applied in the laboratory subject Manufacturing Technologies. The teaching method has been changed from a predominantly teacher-centred to an active learning system with a student-centred focus and e-learning activities. In face-to-face classes, a game-based learning platform has been used. This methodology ensured engaging classes at the same time that provided a useful live feedback for students and teachers. The virtualization of the laboratory was achieved by two different e-learning activities, self-assessment tasks and video clips. These e-learning tools have been used not only to improve the students’ learning but also to enhance their motivation. The results from academic outputs show a significant improvement after the new blended learning method is applied. Moreover, a student satisfaction survey shows the positive impact of the methodology on the students’ engagement and motivation.

  7. An innovation diffusion model for new mobile technologies acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkoczia Nadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to approach the diffusion model developed in 1960 by Frank Bass has been utilized to study the distribution of different types of new products and services. The Bass Model helps by describing the process in which new products are adopted in a market. This model is a useful tool for predicting the first purchase of an innovative product for which there are competing alternatives on the market. It also provides the innovator with information regarding the size of customers and the adoption time for the product. The second part of the paper is dedicated to a monographic study of specific conceptual correlations between the diffusion of technology and marketing management that emphasizes technological uncertainty and market uncertainty as major risks to innovative projects. In the final section, the results of empirical research conducted in Baia-Mare, Romania will be presented in a way that uses diffusion Bass model to estimate the adoption period for new mobile technologies.

  8. 78 FR 32637 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ..., Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project, Department of... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project, Department of the Army, Army Research, Development and...

  9. Using Technological Advances to Improve Surgery Curriculum: Experience With a Mobile Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Courtney A; Kim, Edward H; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Chern, Hueylan

    2018-01-31

    Our previous home-video basic surgical skills curriculum required substantial faculty time and resources, and was limited by delayed feedback and technical difficulties. Consequently, we integrated that curriculum with a mobile application platform. Our purpose is to describe this application and learner satisfaction. The mobile platform incorporates a patented pedagogical design based on Ericsson's deliberate practice and Bandura's social learning theory. Instructors built step-wise skills modules. During the challenge phase, learners watched a video of surgical tasks completed by experts and uploaded a video of themselves performing the same task. In the Peer Review phase, they used a grading rubric to provide feedback. In the Recap stage, learners received individual feedback and could review their own videos. Two groups of learners, graduating medical students and matriculating surgical residents, participated in this independent learning platform, along with 2 to 4 laboratory sessions, and completed a survey about their experience. Survey responses were summarized descriptively and comments analyzed using content analysis. Fifty learners submitted videos of assigned tasks and completed peer reviews. Learners reported positive experiences specifically for the Peer Review Stage, structured home practice, ease of mobile access to submit and review videos, and ongoing immediate feedback. Over half of the learners reported spending at least 10 to 30 minute practicing skills before recording their videos and over 80% rerecorded at least 2 times before submission. Content analysis revealed learners engaged with the educational concepts designed into the platform. Learners easily used and were satisfied with a mobile-technology teaching platform that maintained the fundamental content, educational theories, and organizational structure of our previously effective surgical skills curriculum. Prior challenges were directly addressed through the mobile application's ease

  10. Personal computer versus personal computer/mobile device combination users' preclinical laboratory e-learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Haruka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Naoki; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yamaga, Yoshiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between personal computer (PC)/mobile device combination and PC-only user patterns. We analyzed access frequency and time spent on a complete denture preclinical website in order to maximize website effectiveness. Fourth-year undergraduate students (N=41) in the preclinical complete denture laboratory course were invited to participate in this survey during the final week of the course to track login data. Students accessed video demonstrations and quizzes via our e-learning site/course program, and were instructed to view online demonstrations before classes. When the course concluded, participating students filled out a questionnaire about the program, their opinions, and devices they had used to access the site. Combination user access was significantly more frequent than PC-only during supplementary learning time, indicating that students with mobile devices studied during lunch breaks and before morning classes. Most students had favorable opinions of the e-learning site, but a few combination users commented that some videos were too long and that descriptive answers were difficult on smartphones. These results imply that mobile devices' increased accessibility encouraged learning by enabling more efficient time use between classes. They also suggest that e-learning system improvements should cater to mobile device users by reducing video length and including more short-answer questions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Re-designing Retail Stores with Mobile and Wireless Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Mangiaracina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile and wireless (M&W technologies have great potential to improve process efficiency and effectiveness within retail stores, but their application is still very limited. One of the main reasons explaining this situation is considered to be the lack of confidence in the actual benefits and, therefore, in the return on investment. As a matter of facts, activities in this context are characterised by great variety and non‐standardised execution and as such the assessment of the costs and benefits of M&W solutions is more difficult than for the upstream tiers of the fast moving consumer goods supply chain (e.g., distribution centres. This paper attempts to provide a contribution for researchers and practitioners by presenting an analytical model to assess the profitability related to investments in multiple M&W solutions for retail stores, thus supporting the decision‐ making process.

  12. North Slope mobile technology and its application to spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabile, N.J.; Helinski, R.

    1992-01-01

    At ARCO Alaska's Prudhoe Bay operation, improved preparedness for oil spill response has been achieved by applying mobile technology according to an innovative concept. To ensure safe and efficient deployment of resources during a spill response, a rapid deployment equipment delivery system was developed. This multi-functional, modularized system was based on a previously developed chemical delivery system consisting of a primary transport truck equipped with a Dempsey Dumpster Dinosaur skid. This same modularized concept was used for spill response with the substitution of function-specific spill response vans in place of chemical transport tanks. Within this concept, skid-mounted mission-specific vans are rapidly deployed to multiple sites in a fire brigade type of response. Skid-mounted units include land and water containment, recovery, boom deployment, command center, generator skid, restroom facility, and skimmer units. 4 figs

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part B, Remedial Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1. and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. Remedial action is the focus of Vol. 2, Pt. B, which has been divided into the three necessary subelements of the RA: characterization, RA, and robotics and automation. Each of these sections address general ORNL problems, which are then broken down by problem area/constituents and linked to potential remedial technologies. The diagrams also contain summary information about a technology`s status, its science and technology needs, and its implementation needs.

  14. A Review of Research on Technology-Assisted School Science Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Wu, Hsin-Ka; Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Ying-Tien; Chiou, Guo-Li; Chen, Sufen; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Lin, Jing-Wen; Lo, Hao-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Studies that incorporate technologies into school science laboratories have proliferated in the recent two decades. A total of 42 studies published from 1990 to 2011 that incorporated technologies to support school science laboratories are reviewed here. Simulations, microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs), and virtual laboratories are commonly…

  15. An Introduction to Current Trends and Benefits of Mobile Wireless Technology Use in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyun; Mims, Clif; Holmes, Kerry P.

    2006-01-01

    The development of mobile wireless technologies has generated a considerable amount of excitement among practitioners and academics because it results in shifting the academic environment from traditional settings to mobile learning (m-learning) settings. Increasing numbers of institutions of higher education offer courses using mobile wireless…

  16. One-to-One Mobile Technology in High School Physics Classrooms: Understanding Its Use and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaoming; Zhang, Meilan; Li, Min

    2018-01-01

    This study examined ways in which high school students used mobile devices in physics classrooms and after school, and the impact of in-class and after-school mobile technology use on their physics learning performance and interest. We collected data from 803 high school freshmen in China after they had used mobile devices for over five months. A…

  17. Evaluating a mobile application for improving clinical laboratory test ordering and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ashley N D; Thompson, Pamela J; Khanna, Arushi; Desai, Samir; Mathews, Benji K; Yousef, Elham; Kusnoor, Anita V; Singh, Hardeep

    2018-04-20

    Mobile applications for improving diagnostic decision making often lack clinical evaluation. We evaluated if a mobile application improves generalist physicians' appropriate laboratory test ordering and diagnosis decisions and assessed if physicians perceive it as useful for learning. In an experimental, vignette study, physicians diagnosed 8 patient vignettes with normal prothrombin times (PT) and abnormal partial thromboplastin times (PTT). Physicians made test ordering and diagnosis decisions for 4 vignettes using each resource: a mobile app, PTT Advisor, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Clinical Laboratory Integration into Healthcare Collaborative (CLIHC); and usual clinical decision support. Then, physicians answered questions regarding their perceptions of the app's usefulness for diagnostic decision making and learning using a modified Kirkpatrick Training Evaluation Framework. Data from 368 vignettes solved by 46 physicians at 7 US health care institutions show advantages for using PTT Advisor over usual clinical decision support on test ordering and diagnostic decision accuracy (82.6 vs 70.2% correct; P < .001), confidence in decisions (7.5 vs 6.3 out of 10; P < .001), and vignette completion time (3:02 vs 3:53 min.; P = .06). Physicians reported positive perceptions of the app's potential for improved clinical decision making, and recommended it be used to address broader diagnostic challenges. A mobile app, PTT Advisor, may contribute to better test ordering and diagnosis, serve as a learning tool for diagnostic evaluation of certain clinical disorders, and improve patient outcomes. Similar methods could be useful for evaluating apps aimed at improving testing and diagnosis for other conditions.

  18. Not a Technology Person: Motivating Older Adults Toward the Use of Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zuñiga, Gabriela Villalobos; Cherubini, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Older users population is rapidly increasing all over the World. Presently, we observe efforts in the human-computer interaction domain aiming to improve life quality of age 65 and over through the use of mobile apps. Nonetheless, these efforts focus primary on interface and interaction de- sign. Little work has focused on the study of motivation to use and adherence to, of elderly to technology. Developing specific design guidelines for this population is relevant, however it should be paral...

  19. Social Media and Mobile Technology for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Coughlin, Steven S.; Lyons, Elizabeth J.

    2018-01-01

    OVERVIEW Given the number of lives affected by cancer and the great potential for optimizing well-being via lifestyle changes, patients, providers, health care systems, advocacy groups, and entrepreneurs are looking to digital solutions to enhance patient care and broaden prevention efforts. Thousands of health-oriented mobile websites and apps have been developed, with a majority focused upon lifestyle behaviors (e.g., exercise, diet, smoking). In this review, we consider the use and potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention, cancer treatment, and survivorship. We identify key principles in research and practice, summarize prior reviews, and highlight notable case studies and patient resources. Further, with the potential for scaled delivery and broad reach, we consider application of social media and mHealth technologies in low-resource settings. With clear advantages for reach, social media and mHealth technologies offer the ability to scale and engage entire populations at low cost, develop supportive social networks, connect patients and providers, encourage adherence with cancer care, and collect vast quantities of data for advancing cancer research. Development efforts have been rapid and numerous, yet evaluation of intervention effects on behavior change and health outcomes are sorely needed, and regulation around data security issues is notably lacking. Attention to broader audiences is also needed, with targeted development for culturally diverse groups and non-English speakers. Further investment in research to build the evidence base and identify best practices will help delineate and actualize the potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:28561647

  20. Social Media and Mobile Technology for Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J; Coughlin, Steven S; Lyons, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Given the number of lives affected by cancer and the great potential for optimizing well-being via lifestyle changes, patients, providers, health care systems, advocacy groups, and entrepreneurs are looking to digital solutions to enhance patient care and broaden prevention efforts. Thousands of health-oriented mobile websites and apps have been developed, with a majority focused upon lifestyle behaviors (e.g., exercise, diet, smoking). In this review, we consider the use and potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention, cancer treatment, and survivorship. We identify key principles in research and practice, summarize prior reviews, and highlight notable case studies and patient resources. Further, with the potential for scaled delivery and broad reach, we consider application of social media and mHealth technologies in low-resource settings. With clear advantages for reach, social media and mHealth technologies offer the ability to scale and engage entire populations at low cost, develop supportive social networks, connect patients and providers, encourage adherence with cancer care, and collect vast quantities of data for advancing cancer research. Development efforts have been rapid and numerous, yet evaluation of intervention effects on behavior change and health outcomes are sorely needed, and regulation around data security issues is notably lacking. Attention to broader audiences is also needed, with targeted development for culturally diverse groups and non-English speakers. Further investment in research to build the evidence base and identify best practices will help delineate and actualize the potential of social media and mHealth technologies for cancer prevention and treatment.

  1. Enhancing Chemical Inventory Management in Laboratory through a Mobile-Based QR Code Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukran, M. A. M.; Ishak, M. S.; Abdullah, M. N.

    2017-08-01

    The demand for a greater inventory management system which can provide a lot of useful information from a single scan has made laboratory inventory management using barcode technology more difficult. Since the barcode technology lacks the ability to overcome the problem and is not capable of providing information needed to manage the chemicals in the laboratory, thus employing a QR code technology is the best solution. In this research, the main idea is to develop a standalone application running with its own database that is periodically synchronized with the inventory software hosted by the computer and connected to a specialized network as well. The first process required to establish this centralized system is to determine all inventory available in the chemical laboratory by referring to the documented data in order to develop the database. Several customization and enhancement were made to the open source QR code technology to ensure the developed application is dedicated for its main purposes. As the end of the research, it was proven that the system is able to track the position of all inventory and showing real time information about the scanned chemical labels. This paper intends to give an overview about the QR tag inventory system that was developed and its implementation at the National Defence University of Malaysia’s (NDUM) chemical laboratory.

  2. The Integration of a Small Thermal Desorption (TD) System for Air Monitoring into a Mobile Analytical Laboratory in France Used by the NRBC Emergency First Responder Police Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    A mobile analytical laboratory has been developed in France by Thales Security Systems in conjunction with the French department of defense (DGA) to rapidly identify the composition of toxic substances released accidentally or by terrorist activity at a location of high civilian population density. Accurate and fast identification of toxic material is critical for first responder teams that attend an incident site. Based on this analysis defined decontamination protocols for contaminated people can be implemented, and specific medical treatment can be administered to those worst affected. Analysing samples with high technology instrumentation close to the point of release is therefore highly advantageous and is only possible with mobile analytical platforms. Transporting samples back to a central laboratory for analysis is not realistic due to time limitations. This paper looks at one particular aspect of analysis performed in this mobile multi-technique laboratory namely air monitoring for CW or TIC compounds. Air sampling and pre concentration is achieved using a small, innovative Thermal Desorption system (Unitytm) in combination with a gas chromatograph-mass spectroscopy system for the detection and identification of specific analytes. Implementation of the Unity TD system in the confines of this small mobile environment will be reviewed in this paper. (author)

  3. Evaluating driver reactions to new vehicle technologies intended to increase safety and mobility across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Personal vehicle manufactures are introducing a wide range of new technologies that are : intended to increase the safety, comfort, and mobility of drivers of all ages. Examples range from : semi-autonomous technologies such as adaptive cruise contro...

  4. Mobile technology aids law enforcement in identifying forgeries in record management systems

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2010-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, OUT OF THE CLASSROOM Download the paper: Arizona Law Enforcement Mobile Identification Technology for Law Enforcement” As the technology program manager with the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, Bill Kalaf is using his time at...

  5. Use of Computer and Mobile Technologies in the Treatment of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Judith A; Wright, Jesse; Siegle, Greg J; Howland, Robert H; Kepler, Britney B

    2017-06-01

    Major depression (MDD) is a common and disabling disorder. Research has shown that most people with MDD receive either no treatment or inadequate treatment. Computer and mobile technologies may offer solutions for the delivery of therapies to untreated or inadequately treated individuals with MDD. The authors review currently available technologies and research aimed at relieving symptoms of MDD. These technologies include computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy (CCBT), web-based self-help, Internet self-help support groups, mobile psychotherapeutic interventions (i.e., mobile applications or apps), technology enhanced exercise, and biosensing technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tamper-Resistant Mobile Health Using Blockchain Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Digital health technologies, including telemedicine, mobile health (mHealth), and remote monitoring, are playing a greater role in medical practice. Safe and accurate management of medical information leads to the advancement of digital health, which in turn results in a number of beneficial effects. Furthermore, mHealth can help lower costs by facilitating the delivery of care and connecting people to their health care providers. Mobile apps help empower patients and health care providers to proactively address medical conditions through near real-time monitoring and treatment, regardless of the location of the patient or the health care provider. Additionally, mHealth data are stored in servers, and consequently, data management that prevents all forms of manipulation is crucial for both medical practice and clinical trials. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a tamper-resistant mHealth system using blockchain technology, which enables trusted and auditable computing using a decentralized network. Methods We developed an mHealth system for cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia using a smartphone app. The volunteer data collected with the app were stored in JavaScript Object Notation format and sent to the blockchain network. Thereafter, we evaluated the tamper resistance of the data against the inconsistencies caused by artificial faults. Results Electronic medical records collected using smartphones were successfully sent to a private Hyperledger Fabric blockchain network. We verified the data update process under conditions where all the validating peers were running normally. The mHealth data were successfully updated under network faults. We further ensured that any electronic health record registered to the blockchain network was resistant to tampering and revision. The mHealth data update was compatible with tamper resistance in the blockchain network. Conclusions Blockchain serves as a tamperproof system for m

  7. Tamper-Resistant Mobile Health Using Blockchain Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Makiko; Ueno, Taro

    2017-07-26

    Digital health technologies, including telemedicine, mobile health (mHealth), and remote monitoring, are playing a greater role in medical practice. Safe and accurate management of medical information leads to the advancement of digital health, which in turn results in a number of beneficial effects. Furthermore, mHealth can help lower costs by facilitating the delivery of care and connecting people to their health care providers. Mobile apps help empower patients and health care providers to proactively address medical conditions through near real-time monitoring and treatment, regardless of the location of the patient or the health care provider. Additionally, mHealth data are stored in servers, and consequently, data management that prevents all forms of manipulation is crucial for both medical practice and clinical trials. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a tamper-resistant mHealth system using blockchain technology, which enables trusted and auditable computing using a decentralized network. We developed an mHealth system for cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia using a smartphone app. The volunteer data collected with the app were stored in JavaScript Object Notation format and sent to the blockchain network. Thereafter, we evaluated the tamper resistance of the data against the inconsistencies caused by artificial faults. Electronic medical records collected using smartphones were successfully sent to a private Hyperledger Fabric blockchain network. We verified the data update process under conditions where all the validating peers were running normally. The mHealth data were successfully updated under network faults. We further ensured that any electronic health record registered to the blockchain network was resistant to tampering and revision. The mHealth data update was compatible with tamper resistance in the blockchain network. Blockchain serves as a tamperproof system for mHealth. Combining mHealth with blockchain technology may

  8. Report on a Workshop on mobile laboratories for monitoring environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrasi, A,; Nemeth, I.; Zombori, P.; Urban, J.

    1992-01-01

    The international Workshop organized by the Health Physics Department of the Central Research Institute for Physics and by the Radiation Protection Department of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant was presented in this paper. The aims of the Workshop were the introduction of the mobile laboratories and the demonstration of the applied methods for monitoring environmental radiation in accidental situation. The intercomparison measurements showed that the results given by different participating laboratories (9 institutions from the middle and east European region) agreed well within an acceptable error margin. The demonstration, measurements and discussions were very useful for the participants and this could be a good basis for further developments and cooperations among the participating institutions. (author) 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. A systematic review approach of mobile technology adoption in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Raj Arokiasamy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many educators agree that mobile technology has great potential not only to improve our educational practices but also to change traditional learning platforms and classroom learning environments. There are also many advantages to integrating mobile technology into the 21st century classrooms to support teaching and learning. Mobile technology tools such as iPads, iPad mini, mobile applications, tablets, palm devices, e-readers and smartphones are becoming real-world tools that should be integrated into modern instructional practices to support digital learners and to promote meaningful learning. Educators are harnessing mobile devices within and beyond the classroom due to the flexibility, portability, affordability and popularity of those devices. This study explores the effectiveness of mobile technology adoption within 21st century classrooms processes and outcomes.

  10. Avanços tecnológicos em hematologia laboratorial Technological advances in laboratorial haematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Naoum

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available O recente avanço científico e tecnológico direcionado à identificação imuno-hematológica de produtos celulares (ex.: citocinas, interleucinas, interferons, entre outros sintetizados por determinadas células sanguíneas, bem como na identificação de antígenos de membrana de leucócitos e células progenitoras hematopoiéticas, promoveram excepcional desenvolvimento no diagnóstico laboratorial de diversas doenças hematológicas. Somam-se a esse fato as aplicações das técnicas de biologia molecular que se tornam cada vez mais instrumentos laboratoriais de grande definição no diagnóstico e na prevenção de doenças hematológicas, notadamente aquelas de origem hereditária. O presente artigo teve o objetivo de expor as principais aplicações de novas tecnologias que deverão ser adotadas rapidamente pela moderna hematologia laboratorial, bem como a de sensibilizar os profissionais hematologistas, clínicos e laboratoriais, para a necessidade de se atualizarem numa nova ciência, a dos produtos celulares.Recent progress towards the identification of products synthesised by some blood cells (ex.: cytokines, interleukins, interferons, etc as well as the identification of white blood cell and stem cell membrane antigens, has aided the exceptional development of laboratory diagnostics of several haematological diseases. In addition to this there has been a great development in the use of molecular biology techniques which have become instrumentals of high definition in the diagnosis and prevention of haematological diseases, specifically those of hereditary origin. This article has the aim of disclosing the main applications of the new technologies that will soon be used widely in laboratory haematology.

  11. Applying Technology Management concepts in analyzing e Waste, sustainability and technology development in Mobile Industry: A conceptual perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Agnihothri, Subodh; Lugmayr, Artur

    2013-01-01

    In the highly globalized, competitive and technocrat world, mobile industry is heavily focused on making itself sustainable. In order to achieve this focus should be on improving the e waste management in the industry. Currently the industry is advanced beyond market demand in delivery services to customers in terms of ICT and smart phones. This research paper is trying to conceptualize the aspect of technology management by comparing technology advancement of mobile phone technology and the ...

  12. Monsanto Mound Laboratory tritium waste control technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Kershner, C.J.; Rhinehammer, T.B.

    1975-01-01

    Over the past four years, implementation of tritium waste control programs has resulted in a 30-fold reduction in the gaseous tritium effluents from Mound Laboratory. However, to reduce tritium waste levels to the ''as low as practicable'' guideline poses problems that are beyond ready solution with state-of-the-art tritium control technology. To meet this advanced technology need, a tritium waste control technology program was initiated. Although the initial thrust of the work under this program was oriented toward development of gaseous effluent treatment systems, its natural evolution has been toward the liquid waste problem. It is thought that, of all the possible approaches to disposal of tritiated liquid wastes, recovery offers the greatest advantages. End products of the recovery processes would be water detritiated to a level below the Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) or detritiated to a level that would permit safe recycle in a closed loop operation and enriched tritium. The detritiated water effluent could be either recycled in a closed loop operation such as in a fuel reprocessing plant or safely released to the biosphere, and the recovered tritium could be recycled for use in fusion reactor studies or other applications

  13. Technological capability at the Brazilian official pharmaceutical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Bomtempo Martins

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the technological capability in the Brazilian Official Pharmaceutical Laboratories [OPL]. The technological capability analysis could contribute to organization strategies and governmental actions in order to improve OPL basic tasks as well to incorporate new ones, particularly concerning the innovation management. Inspired in Figueiredo (2000, 2003a, 2003b and Figueiredo and Ariffin (2003, a framework was drawn and adapted to pharmaceutical industry characteristics and current sanitary and health legislation. The framework allows to map different dimensions of the technological capability (installations, processes, products, equipments, organizational capability and knowledge management and the level attained by OPL (ordinary or innovating capability. OPL show a good development of ordinary capabilities, particularly in Product and Processes. Concerning the other dimensions, OPL are quite diverse. In general, innovating capabilities are not much developed. In the short term, it was identified a dispersion in the capacitating efforts. Considering their present level and the absorption efforts, good perspectives can be found in Installations, Processes and Organizational Capability. A lower level of efforts in Products and Knowledge Management could undermine these capabilities in the future.

  14. Mobile technologies for disease surveillance in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwabukusi, Mpoki; Karimuribo, Esron D; Rweyemamu, Mark M; Beda, Eric

    2014-04-23

    A paper-based disease reporting system has been associated with a number of challenges. These include difficulties to submit hard copies of the disease surveillance forms because of poor road infrastructure, weather conditions or challenging terrain, particularly in the developing countries. The system demands re-entry of the data at data processing and analysis points, thus making it prone to introduction of errors during this process. All these challenges contribute to delayed acquisition, processing and response to disease events occurring in remote hard to reach areas. Our study piloted the use of mobile phones in order to transmit near to real-time data from remote districts in Tanzania (Ngorongoro and Ngara), Burundi (Muyinga) and Zambia (Kazungula and Sesheke). Two technologies namely, digital and short messaging services were used to capture and transmit disease event data in the animal and human health sectors in the study areas based on a server-client model. Smart phones running the Android operating system (minimum required version: Android 1.6), and which supported open source application, Epicollect, as well as the Open Data Kit application, were used in the study. These phones allowed collection of geo-tagged data, with the opportunity of including static and moving images related to disease events. The project supported routine disease surveillance systems in the ministries responsible for animal and human health in Burundi, Tanzania and Zambia, as well as data collection for researchers at the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania. During the project implementation period between 2011 and 2013, a total number of 1651 diseases event-related forms were submitted, which allowed reporters to include GPS coordinates and photographs related to the events captured. It was concluded that the new technology-based surveillance system is useful in providing near to real-time data, with potential for enhancing timely response in rural remote areas of

  15. Learning on the move: the potential impact of new mobile technologies on students’ learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Alp Idil

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the potential use of mobile learning in higher education with a focus on student and academic staff requirements of a potential mobile application. The research examines the stakeholders’ new technology acceptance behaviour within a post-1992 university and examines how new mobile technologies are able to contribute to enhancement of the learning experience of students and additionally the roles of educators in facilitating enhancement of the learning experience.\\ud \\ud A ...

  16. The ARIA score of allergic rhinitis using mobile technology correlates with quality-of-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Arnavielhe, S; Bedbrook, A

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technology has been used to appraise allergic rhinitis control but more data are needed. In order to better assess the importance of mobile technologies in rhinitis control, the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) score ranging from 0 to 4 of the Allergy Diary was compared wi...

  17. Role of Mobile Technology in Promoting Campus-Wide Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Adeeb, Muhammad Aslam

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines the role of mobile technology in promoting campus-wide learning environment. Its main objectives were to a) evaluate the role of mobile technology in higher education in terms of its i). appropriateness ii). flexibility iii). Interactivity, & iv). availability & usefulness and to b). identify the problems of…

  18. Relationship of Mobile Learning Readiness to Teacher Proficiency in Classroom Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Mobile learning readiness as a new aspect of technology integration for classroom teachers is confirmed through the findings of this study to be significantly aligned with well-established measures based on older information technologies. The Mobile Learning Readiness Survey (MLRS) generally exhibits the desirable properties of step-wise increases…

  19. The role of mobile phone technology in understanding and preventing suicidal behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D. de; Kirtley, O.; Kerkhof, A.; Portzky, G.; O'Connor, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, we discuss how mobile phone technology has the potential to move the field forward in terms of understanding suicide risk as well as laying foundations for the development of effective treatments/interventions. We have focused on mobile health technology given the rapid growth of

  20. Embodied Experiences of Place: A Study of History Learning with Mobile Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, S.; Jewitt, C.; Sakr, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an empirical study that takes a multimodal analytical approach to examine how mobile technologies shape students' exploration and experience of place during a history learning activity in situ. In history education, mobile technologies provide opportunities for authentic experiential learning activities that have the potential…

  1. Use of Mobile Technology for Monitoring and Evaluation in International Health and Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mobile phones and other technologies are widely used in health programming in developing countries, many introduced by international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) to accelerate data collection. This research examined: How are INGOs adopting the innovation of mobile technology into M&E systems for health care programs in…

  2. Comparative Study of Elementary and Secondary Teacher Perceptions of Mobile Technology in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Anderson, Chad

    2018-01-01

    More and more schools are implementing a 1:1 mobile device initiative for their students because the future of learning will have technology embedded within the curriculum. Teachers are often given the direction to utilize mobile devices in the classroom, but quite often educators do not understand the significance of this technology or agree with…

  3. Expanding Horizons for Students with Dyslexia in the 21st Century: Universal Design and Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gavin; Strnadova, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of mobile technology in supporting people with dyslexia within the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning. The authors discuss how students with dyslexia can use mobile technology to address a diverse range of academic needs (such as reading, composing text, notetaking, metacognition and studying…

  4. Determinants of Mobile Wireless Technology for Promoting Interactivity in Lecture Sessions: An Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Chin Lay; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify adoption factors of mobile wireless technology to increase interactivity between lecturers and students during lectures. A theoretical framework to ascertain lecturers' intentions to use mobile wireless technology during lectures (dependent variable) is proposed with seven independent variables. The…

  5. Evaluating Teleworkers' Acceptance of Mobile Technology: A Study Based on the Utaut Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jamia Sharie

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology has provided flexible methods for employees to complete work-related tasks without being tied to an office. Research has predicted the level of training on mobile technology may impact a user's ability to complete work responsibilities accurately. This study intended to examine what behavior factors from the unified theory of…

  6. Factors Influencing the Use of Mobile Technologies in a University Environment: A Case from Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Peter; Delgado, Carlos; Díaz, Esperanza; Garayar, Erik; Laguna, Hedda

    2013-01-01

    The use of mobile technologies in higher education seem to be lagging those in other service sectors, which have been quick to utilize the advantages that mobile communications have to offer. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), this study analyzes the range factors and the level of influence on undergraduate intention to use a proposed…

  7. Characterizing Learning Mediated by Mobile Technologies: A Cultural-Historical Activity Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Jalal; Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have not yet triggered the knowledge revolution in schools anticipated, in particular, by the telecommunications industry. On the contrary, mobile technologies remain extensively used outside the frontiers of formal education. The reasons for this are many and varied. In this paper, we concentrate on those associated with the…

  8. The Design and Implementation of Authentic Learning with Mobile Technology in Vocational Nursing Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ying-Hung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chiu, Po-Sheng; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, along with the development of mobile technology, vocational nursing education has improved greatly. In light of this emerging mobile technology, it brings the clinical practice of vocational nursing education closer to authentic learning than ever. In fact, some studies revealed that learners' learn states and learning outcomes…

  9. Technologies for Learning? An Actor-Network Theory Critique of "Affordances" in Research on Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steve; Parchoma, Gale

    2011-01-01

    How is the link between learner and technology made in mobile learning? What is the value of the concept of "affordances"? And how does research articulating this concept act to position mobile devices as "technologies for learning"? This literature review used both unstructured and structured search samples of published research on mobile…

  10. A locally designed mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring in qatar. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Leila, H.; El-Samman, H.; Mahmoud, H.

    1996-01-01

    A description of a mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring, completely designed in qatar and equipped at qatar university, is given. It consists of a van equipped with three scintillation detectors mounted on the front bumper. The detectors can monitor gamma radiations along the path of the laboratory over an angle range 120 degree. One Eberline radiation monitoring station is mounted on the roof. The laboratory is also equipped with several, and neutron survey meters in addition to some sampling equipment. All equipment used are powered with solar panels. The characteristics and performance of solar power/stabilized A C conversion is given. Data acquisition from the three scintillation detectors is performed by adding the outputs of the three detectors and storing the total as a function of time in a computer based multi-channel analyzer (MCA) operated in the MSC mode. The acquisition can be switched easily to the PHA mode to analyze gamma spectra from any possible contamination source. The laboratory was used in several environmental and possible contamination missions. Some results obtained during some of these missions are given. 4 figs

  11. A locally designed mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring in qatar. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Leila, H; El-Samman, H; Mahmoud, H [Physics Department, University of qatar, Doha (Qatar)

    1996-03-01

    A description of a mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring, completely designed in qatar and equipped at qatar university, is given. It consists of a van equipped with three scintillation detectors mounted on the front bumper. The detectors can monitor gamma radiations along the path of the laboratory over an angle range 120 degree. One Eberline radiation monitoring station is mounted on the roof. The laboratory is also equipped with several, and neutron survey meters in addition to some sampling equipment. All equipment used are powered with solar panels. The characteristics and performance of solar power/stabilized A C conversion is given. Data acquisition from the three scintillation detectors is performed by adding the outputs of the three detectors and storing the total as a function of time in a computer based multi-channel analyzer (MCA) operated in the MSC mode. The acquisition can be switched easily to the PHA mode to analyze gamma spectra from any possible contamination source. The laboratory was used in several environmental and possible contamination missions. Some results obtained during some of these missions are given. 4 figs.

  12. Cognitive functioning is more closely related to real-life mobility than to laboratory-based mobility parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannouli, Eleftheria; Bock, Otmar; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that mobility depends on cognitive resources, but the exact relationships between various cognitive functions and different mobility parameters still need to be investigated. This study examines the hypothesis that cognitive functioning is more closely related to

  13. Tungsten alloy research at the US Army Materials Technology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that recent research into tungsten heavy alloys at the U. S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) has explored many areas of processing and process development. The recrystallization and respheroidization of tungsten grains in a heavily cold worked heavy alloy has been examined and resulted in the identification of a method of grain refinement. Another area of investigation has been lightly cold worked. It was determined that it was possible to increase the strength and hardness of the tungsten grains by proper hat treatment. MTL has been involved in the Army's small business innovative research (SBIR) program and several programs have been funded. Included among these are a method of coating the tungsten powders with the alloying elements and the development of techniques of powder injection molding of heavy alloys

  14. Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

  16. Mobile System for the Measurement of Dose Rates with locations determined by means of satellite positioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, A.; Rio, L.M. del; Macias, J.A.; Vasco, J.

    1998-01-01

    Our laboratory has been developing and implementing a Real Time Radiological Warning Network around the Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant since 1990. It consists of six gamma dosimetry stations, two devices for the detection of radio-iodines and alpha, beta, and gamma emissions in air, a monitor for the continuous measurement of gamma radiation in water, and two basic meteorological stations. In this context, we have developed a mobile station endowed with a device for the measurement of dose rates which uses satellite positioning technology (GPS) so that it can be located remotely. The information gathered is sent back to our central laboratory in real/or deferred time through the digital mobile telephone network. A twofold utility is foreseen for this station: (a) action in the case of a radiological alert situation detected by our network, and (b) the performance of radiological-dosimetric studies of distant geographical zones. (Author)

  17. Development of excavation technologies at the Canadian underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzyk, Gregory W.; Martino, Jason B.

    2008-01-01

    Several countries, Canada being among them, are developing concepts for disposal of used fuel from power generating nuclear reactors. As in underground mining operations, the disposal facilities will require excavation of many kilometres of shafts and tunnels through the host rock mass. The need to maintain the stability of excavations and safety of workers will be of paramount importance. Also, excavations required for many radioactive waste repositories will ultimately need to be backfilled and sealed to maintain stability and minimize any potential for migration of radionuclides, should they escape their disposal containers. The method used to excavate the tunnels and shafts, and the rock damage that occurs due to excavation, will greatly affect the performance characteristics of repository sealing systems. The underground rock mechanics and geotechnical engineering work performed at the Canadian Underground Research Laboratory (URL) has led to the development of excavation technologies that reduce rock damage in subsurface excavations. This paper discusses the excavation methods used to construct the URL and their application in planning for the construction of similar underground laboratories and repositories for radioactive wastes. (author)

  18. The Use of the Agency's Two Mobile Radioisotope Laboratories during the Period 1958-1965. Memorandum by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Two mobile laboratories, specially equipped for training courses on the use of radioisotopes, were donated by the Government of the United States of America to the Agency in 195 8. The first one was exhibited in Geneva at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in September of that year, and was subsequently taken over by the Agency; the second laboratory was taken over at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1959 and sent directly to Mexico

  19. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56

  20. Grasping and Placing Operation for Labware Transportation in Life Science Laboratories using Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Myasar Ali

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In automated working environments, mobile robots can be used for different purposes such as material handling, domestic services, and objects transportation. This work presents a grasping and placing operation for multiple labware and tube racks in life science laboratories using the H20 mobile robots. The H20 robot has dual arms where each arm consists of 6 revolute joints with 6-DOF and 2-DOF grippers. The labware, which have to be manipulated and transported, contain chemical and biological components. Therefore, an accurate approach for object recognition and position estimation is required. The recognition and pose estimation of the desired objects are very essential to guide the robotic arm in the manipulation tasks. In this work, the problem statement of H20 transportation system with the proposed methodology are presented. Different strategies (visual and non-visual of labware manipulation using mobile robots are described. The H20 robot is equipped with a Kinect V2 sensor to identify and estimate the position of the target. The local features recognition based on SURF algorithm (Speeded-Up Robust Features is used. The recognition process is performed for the required labware and holder to perform the grasping and placing operation. A strategy is proposed to find the required holder and to check its emptiness for the placing tasks. Different styles of grippers and labware containers are used to manipulate different weights of labware and to realize a safe transportation. The parts of mobile robot transportation system are communicated with each other using Asynchronous socket Channels.

  1. Environmental Audit at Santa Barbara Operations, Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, North Las Vegas Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Audit of selected facilities under the jurisdiction of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (NV) that are operated by EG and G Energy Measurements, Incorporated (EG and G/EM). The facilities included in this Audit are those of Santa Barbara Operation (SBO) at Goleta, California; the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) at Santa Barbara, California; and Las Vegas Area Operations (LVAO) including the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, and the North Las Vegas Facilities (NLVF) at North Las Vegas, Nevada. The Environmental Audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Audit, commencing on January 28, 1991 and ending on February 15, 1991. The scope of the Audit was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. Also assessed was compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations and requirements; internal operating requirements; DOE Orders; and best management practices. 8 tabs

  2. Using mobile technologies to give health students access to learning resources in the UK community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Graham; Childs, Susan; Blenkinsopp, Elizabeth

    2005-12-01

    This article describes a project which explored the potential for mobile technologies to give health students in the community access to learning resources. The purpose included the need to identify possible barriers students could face in using mobile technologies. Another focus was to assess the students perceptions of the importance of being able to access learning resources in the community. This 1-year project used two main approaches for data collection. A review of the literature on mobile technologies in the health context was conducted. This was used in a systematic way to identify key issues and trends. The literature review was used to inform the design and production of a questionnaire. This was distributed to and completed by a group of community health students at Northumbria University, UK. The questionnaire was piloted and there was a 100% completion rate with 49 returned forms. The literature review indicated that most mobile technology applications were occurring in the US. At the time of the review the most prevalent mobile technologies were PDAs, laptops, WAP phones and portable radios with use being concentrated around doctors in the acute sector. A range of advantages and disadvantages to the technology were discovered. Mobile technologies were mainly being used for clinical rather than learning applications. The students showed a low level of awareness of the technology but placed great importance to accessing learning resources from the community. Significant development and changes are taking place in mobile technologies. Since the data collection for this work was completed in 2004 podcasting and videocasting have become significant in mobile learning for health professionals. Librarians will need to address the relevance and implications of m-learning for their practice. Care and consideration needs to be given on the time and resources librarians allocate for the necessary development work around mobile technologies. Collaboration and

  3. Autostereoscopic display technology for mobile 3DTV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Jonathan; Woodgate, Graham J.

    2007-02-01

    Mobile TV is now a commercial reality, and an opportunity exists for the first mass market 3DTV products based on cell phone platforms with switchable 2D/3D autostereoscopic displays. Compared to conventional cell phones, TV phones need to operate for extended periods of time with the display running at full brightness, so the efficiency of the 3D optical system is key. The desire for increased viewing freedom to provide greater viewing comfort can be met by increasing the number of views presented. A four view lenticular display will have a brightness five times greater than the equivalent parallax barrier display. Therefore, lenticular displays are very strong candidates for cell phone 3DTV. Selection of Polarisation Activated Microlens TM architectures for LCD, OLED and reflective display applications is described. The technology delivers significant advantages especially for high pixel density panels and optimises device ruggedness while maintaining display brightness. A significant manufacturing breakthrough is described, enabling switchable microlenses to be fabricated using a simple coating process, which is also readily scalable to large TV panels. The 3D image performance of candidate 3DTV panels will also be compared using autostereoscopic display optical output simulations.

  4. Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs

  5. Use and Acceptance of Mobile Technology by Hospital Nurses in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Regina; Behrends, Marianne; Kupka, Thomas; Meyenburg-Altwarg, Iris; Marschollek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and describe user behavior, information and communication technology (ICT) competence and technology acceptance of hospital nurses. 36 nurses received for six weeks a mobile phone or a tablet pc with mobile application and answered one questionnaire before and after the six weeks. The participating nurses show a high technology acceptance and private daily use of technologies. Younger participants judge their ICT competency higher than older nurses. The perceived ease of use is significantly higher in younger participants. The perceived usefulness was evaluated heterogeneously. Despite the barriers mobile technology is perceived as useful for nurses in their daily work. Factors influencing personal, institutional and device acceptance were determined in this study and can be helpful to facilitate the process of implementation of mobile technology.

  6. CLOUD PRINTING: AN INNOVATINE TECHNOLOGY USING MOBILE PHONE

    OpenAIRE

    Shammi Mehra*1, Azad Singh2 & Sandeep Boora3

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, cloud printing is becoming a popular topic in the field of communication and the organizations (public or private) are shifting their physical infrastructure to cloud storage. Mobile phones are the dominant access device for consumer and have been an essential part of life. Mobile phones with smart features are the recent driver behind the cloud printing. Now mobile phones can be attached wirelessly to the printers from any location and anytime in the world via cloud technolo...

  7. A mobile water analysis laboratory for the study of stream nutrient and DOC dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria Roman, Y.; Pullin, M. J.; Schwingle, R.; Gabrielsen, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of nutrient and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) quantity and composition in streams vary with season and in response to hydrologic events. Periodic grab sampling can capture some of this variation, but has also been shown to miss high flow events. Sampling during winter, during thunderstorms, and at night is difficult and sometimes hazardous. For these reasons, we have developed a mobile laboratory that autonomously determines pH, Eh, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate, phosphate, DOC, DIC, as well as DOC fluorescence and absorbance continuously on a minutes timescale. The laboratory includes a Labview operated computer system that allows remote control and interaction with pumps, pressure, temperature, and flow sensors as well as the analytical instruments. Climate control allows for operation in winter. The design and operation of this laboratory will be presented. We will also discuss example data showing diurnal changes and responses to hydrologic events in DOC quantity and quality in the East Fork of the Jemez River, New Mexico.

  8. Mobile technology boosts the effectiveness of psychotherapy and behavioral interventions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B; Rosen, Dana; Silk, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of mobile technology on treatment outcome for psychotherapy and other behavioral interventions. Our search of the literature resulted in 26 empirical articles describing 25 clinical trials testing the benefits of smartphone applications, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or text messaging systems either to supplement treatment or substitute for direct contact with a clinician. Overall, mobile technology use was associated with superior treatment outcome across all study designs and control conditions, effect size (ES) = .34, p mobile technology using a rigorous "Treatment" versus "Treatment + Mobile" design, effect sizes were only slightly more modest (ES = .27) and still significant (p mobile technology for the delivery of psychotherapy and other behavioral interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Influence of bacteria on Pb and Zn speciation, mobility and bioavailability in soil: A laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.C.; Luo, Y.M.; Cheung, K.C.; Wong, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    A soil column experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of inoculation of bacteria on metal bioavailability, mobility and potential leachability through single chemical extraction, consequential extraction and in situ soil solution extraction technologies. Results showed that bacteria inoculated, including Azotobacter chroococcum, Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus mucilaginosus, may pose both positive and negative impacts on bioavailability and mobility of heavy metals in soil, depending on the chemical nature of the metals. The activities of bacteria led to an increase of water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and a decrease of pH value, which enhanced metal mobility and bioavailability (e.g. an increase of water-soluble and HOAc-soluble Zn). On the other hand, bacteria could immobilize metals (e.g. a great reduction of water-soluble Pb) due to the adsorption by bacterial cell walls and possible sedimentation reactions with phosphate or other anions produced through bacterial metabolism. - Influence of bacterial activities on heavy metal is two-edged

  10. Deep learning enhanced mobile-phone microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Rivenson, Yair; Koydemir, Hatice Ceylan; Wang, Hongda; Wei, Zhensong; Ren, Zhengshuang; Gunaydin, Harun; Zhang, Yibo; Gorocs, Zoltan; Liang, Kyle; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    Mobile-phones have facilitated the creation of field-portable, cost-effective imaging and sensing technologies that approach laboratory-grade instrument performance. However, the optical imaging interfaces of mobile-phones are not designed

  11. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-04-19

    There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with higher rates of chronic diseases such as obesity

  12. Mobile Urban Drama - Setting the Stage with Location Based Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan; Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the novel concept of location-based Mobile Urban Dramas. In a Mobile Urban Drama the user become the main character in a play where actors’ voices appear in the mobile phone headset linked to the physical setting in the city as the stage for the drama. The paper describes...... the dramaturgical concept and introduces a software framework supporting drama writers in developing such Mobile Urban Dramas. Experiences with use of the framework are discussed with successful examples of real dramas that have been developed and performed by a Danish theatre group, Katapult....

  13. Consumption dynamics and technological change - exemplified by the mobile phone and related technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2003-01-01

    The present paper deals with the dynamics underlying the consumption of new commodities, especially mobile phones, which are among the fastest growing categories of consumption goods in recent years. The paper is based on a research project regarding households' first-time acquisition of new...... consumer goods. The project was basically motivated by environmental and distributional concerns, and the purpose is first to reveal some important consumption dynamics at work on the micro level, and second to investigate how respondent families use new technologies, and how these are eventually...

  14. Customer Relationship Management through Mobile Technologies: Exploratory Study on Indian Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Arpita Khare; Sapna Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Companies are increasingly using technology to target their customers and build relationship with them. Customer relationship management is perceived as a strategy which harnesses technology for providing more value to customers through customized products and services. However, technology now extends beyond the peripheries of Internet to mobile-based systems. The research was directed towards understanding the viability and scope of mobile marketing strategies in India. The acceptance of mob...

  15. A sustainability framework for mobile technology integration in schools: The case of resourceconstrained environments in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabila, J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of mobile technology integration in schools has been widely researched. However, only a few studies have extensively examined the sustainability of mobile technology integration in resource-constrained environments. Diverse contexts...

  16. Mobile technologies for disease surveillance in humans and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpoki Mwabukusi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A paper-based disease reporting system has been associated with a number of challenges. These include difficulties to submit hard copies of the disease surveillance forms because of poor road infrastructure, weather conditions or challenging terrain, particularly in the developing countries. The system demands re-entry of the data at data processing and analysis points, thus making it prone to introduction of errors during this process. All these challenges contribute to delayed acquisition, processing and response to disease events occurring in remote hard to reach areas. Our study piloted the use of mobile phones in order to transmit near to real-time data from remote districts in Tanzania (Ngorongoro and Ngara, Burundi (Muyinga and Zambia (Kazungula and Sesheke. Two technologies namely, digital and short messaging services were used to capture and transmit disease event data in the animal and human health sectors in the study areas based on a server–client model. Smart phones running the Android operating system (minimum required version: Android 1.6, and which supported open source application, Epicollect, as well as the Open Data Kit application, were used in the study. These phones allowed collection of geo-tagged data, with the opportunity of including static and moving images related to disease events. The project supported routine disease surveillance systems in the ministries responsible for animal and human health in Burundi, Tanzania and Zambia, as well as data collection for researchers at the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania. During the project implementation period between 2011 and 2013, a total number of 1651 diseases event-related forms were submitted, which allowed reporters to include GPS coordinates and photographs related to the events captured. It was concluded that the new technology-based surveillance system is useful in providing near to real-time data, with potential for enhancing

  17. Geometry Laboratory (GEOLAB) surface modeling and grid generation technology and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Patricia A.; Smith, Robert E.; Posenau, Mary-Anne K.

    1995-01-01

    The facilities and services of the GEOmetry LABoratory (GEOLAB) at the NASA Langley Research Center are described. Included in this description are the laboratory functions, the surface modeling and grid generation technologies used in the laboratory, and examples of the tasks performed in the laboratory.

  18. MOBILE CAMPUS: A REFLECTIVE AND COLLECTIVE DIMENSION OF EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES MEDIATED BY MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Yu. Travkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author considers a definition and general characteristics of the mobile campus allowing to ensure a combination of informal and social types of the educational activities with formal learning in a traditional educational institution (institutes of higher education. A fundamental element of the mobile campus is intelligent algorithms providing learning analyst for personalized learning experience. Also the article examines connections between the mobile campus and a learning community, a personal learning network and electronic student profile.

  19. Using mobile phone technology to provide recovery support for women offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christy K; Johnson, Kimberly; Dennis, Michael L

    2013-10-01

    Mobile technology holds promise as a recovery tool for people with substance use disorders. However, some populations who may benefit the most may not have access to or experience with mobile phones. Incarcerated women represent a group at high risk for recidivism and relapse to substance abuse. Cost-effective mechanisms must be in place to support their recovery upon release. This study explores using mobile technology as a recovery management tool for women offenders residing in the community following release from jail. This study surveyed 325 minority women offenders with substance use disorders to determine whether or not they use cell phones, their comfort with texting and search features, and the social networks that they access from mobile phones. We found that 83% of survey subjects had cell phones; 30% of those were smartphones. Seventy-seven percent of the women reported access to supportive friends, and 88% had close family members they contacted regularly using mobile technology. Results indicated that most of the women were comfortable using a mobile phone, although the majority of them had prepaid minutes rather than plans, and most did currently use smartphones or have the capability to download applications or access social networks via their phones. Most women reported that they would be comfortable using a mobile phone to text, e-mail, and answer surveys. The high rate of adoption of mobile technology by women offenders makes them a promising target for recovery support delivered via mobile phone.

  20. The Rise of Mobile Technology on the Financial Sector in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Mupfiga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of technology has revolted the way that the financial industry operates and the increasing use of mobile gadgets has changed the banking system from the traditional brick and mortar building to a virtual system. The sudden rise in use and innovation of smart mobile phones, mobile personal computers, tablets and various other mobile electronic gadgets has resulted in the rise of mobile financial products. Rapid quickening innovative headways are making completely new business suggestions, for example, crowd financing, shared loaning, advanced monetary forms, versatile managing an account, online speculation and new instalment frameworks. Zimbabwe's mobile technology use is currently on the rise too as mobile service providers like Econet are enabling the connection between consumers and financial related products. Despite the fact that innovation without a doubt brings benefits, prominent specialized disappointments in the money related part lately are disturbing and several negative factors are to some extent affecting production. Drawbacks like cybercrime, resistance to change, and compatibility of mobile gadgets are affecting the information technology environment. This paper highlights the rise of mobile technology in the financial sector in Zimbabwe.

  1. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  2. Hand in Glove? Small Building Contractors, Mobile Technology and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian; Tambo, Torben

    2010-01-01

    for construction are developing as well. A recent review shows a small portfolio of systems using mobile computing to support specifically the construction project processes. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the use of mobile computing at small construction contractors. The paper presents a quantitative...

  3. Air Pollutant Mapping with a Mobile Laboratory during the BEE-TEX Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara I. Yacovitch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory was deployed to the Houston Ship Channel and surrounding areas during the Benzene and Other Toxics Exposure field study in February 2015. We evaluated atmospheric concentrations of volatile organic hydrocarbons and other hazardous air pollutants of importance to human health, including benzene, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzenes, styrene, and NO 2 . Ambient concentration measurements were focused on the neighborhoods of Manchester, Harrisburg, and Galena Park. The most likely measured concentration of 1,3-butadiene in the Manchester neighborhood (0.17 ppb exceeds the Environmental Protection Agency's E-5 lifetime cancer risk level of 0.14 ppb. In all the three neighborhoods, the measured benzene concentration falls below or within the E-5 lifetime cancer risk levels of 0.4–1.4 ppb for benzene. Pollution maps as a function of wind direction show the impact of nearby sources.

  4. Non-exhaust emission measurement system of the mobile laboratory SNIFFER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Kupiainen, K. J.; Perhoniemi, P.; Tervahattu, H.; Vesala, H.

    In this paper we describe and quality assure the sampling system of a mobile research laboratory SNIFFER which was shown to be a useful tool for studying emission levels of respirable dust from street surfaces. The dust plume had bimodal structure; another mode rising to higher altitudes whereas the other mode remained at lower altitudes. The system was tested on a route in Helsinki, Finland, during spring 2005 and 2006. The PM 2.5 and PM 10 were positively correlated and the PM levels increased with the vehicle speed. SNIFFER was able to identify the characteristic emission levels on different streets. A clear downward trend in the concentrations was observed in all street locations between April and June. The composition of the street dust collected by SNIFFER was compared with springtime PM 10 aerosol samples from the air quality monitoring stations in Helsinki. The results showed similarities in the abundance and composition of the mineral fraction but contained significantly more salt particles.

  5. Using a Mobile Laboratory to Study Mental Health, Addictions and Violence: A Research Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Wells

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an innovative new research program, Researching Health in Ontario Communities (RHOC, designed to improve understanding, treatment and prevention of co-occurring mental health, addictions, and violence problems. RHOC brings together a multi-disciplinary team of investigators to implement an integrated series of research studies (including pilot studies and full studies. The project involves use a mobile research laboratory to collect a wide range of biological, behavioral and social data in diverse communities across Ontario, Canada, including remote and rural communities, areas experiencing poverty and social disorganization, urban areas, and Aboriginal communities. This paper describes the project background and research plan as well as the anticipated contributions of the project to participating Ontario communities and to broader scientific knowledge.

  6. Just in time: technology to disseminate curriculum and manage educational requirements with mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenchick, Gary; Fetters, Moses; Carse, A Mervyn

    2008-01-01

    Learning objectives intended to guide clinical education may be of limited usefulness if they are unavailable to students when interacting with patients. We developed, implemented, and evaluated a Web-based process to disseminate the Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine curricular objectives to students via handheld computers and for students to upload patient logs to a central database. We delivered this program to all students in our geographically dispersed system, with minimal technological problems. The total number of "hits" on curricular objectives was 8,932 (averaging 149 per student or approximately 2.7 times daily). The average number of "hits" per problem was 470, ranging from 18 for smoking cessation to 1,784 for chest pain. The total number of patient problems logged by students was 9,579, and 91% of students met our prespecified criteria for numbers and types of patients. Dissemination and use of curricular learning objectives and related tools is enhanced with mobile technology.

  7. Advancing Mobile Learning in Formal and Informal Settings via Mobile App Technology: Where to from Here, and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaddage, Ferial; Müller, Wolfgang; Flintoff, Kim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a brief review of the framework that addressed mobile learning implementation challenges (pedagogical, technological, policy and research) that was developed by Khaddage et al. (2015) is briefly discussed, followed by possible solutions that could be deployed to tackle those challenges. A unique approach is then applied to bridge the…

  8. From Vision to Actuality: Translating the Organizing Vision of Mobile Technology in Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    Empirical evidence from a case study of the diffusion and adoption of mobile technology in a highly structured home care setting in Denmark shows how an organizational field vision of an efficient mobile technology was created and became transformed through diverse translation mechanisms...... the organizing vision for mobile technology in practice. Our findings show that an integration of the translation perspective not only furthers our understanding of the malleability of the organizing vision but also shows how actions at multiple levels interact to enable technology adoption and eventually...... institutionalization. Our study contributes to the increasing research on diffusion and adoption of mobile technologies within healthcare by challenging dominant single level analysis and factor-orientated approaches....

  9. High Purity Germanium Detector as part of Health Canada's Mobile Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocki, Trevor J.; Bouchard, Claude; Rollings, John; Boudreau, Marc-Oliver; McCutcheon- Wickham, Rory; Bergman, Lauren [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, AL6302D, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the event of a nuclear emergency on Canadian soil, Health Canada has designed and equipped two Mobile Nuclear Labs (MNLs) which can be deployed near a radiological accident site to provide radiological measurement capabilities. These measurements would help public authorities to make informed decisions for radiation protection recommendations. One of the MNLs has been outfitted with a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector within a lead castle, which can be used for identification as well as quantification of gamma emitting radioisotopes in contaminated soil, water, and other samples. By spring 2014, Health Canada's second MNL will be equipped with a similar detector to increase sample analysis capacity and also provide redundancy if one of the detectors requires maintenance. The Mobile Nuclear Lab (MNL) with the HPGe detector has been successfully deployed in the field for various exercises. One of these field exercises was a dirty bomb scenario where an unknown radioisotope required identification. A second exercise was an inter-comparison between the measurements of spiked soil and water samples, by two field teams and a certified laboratory. A third exercise was the deployment of the MNL as part of a full scale nuclear exercise simulating an emergency at a Canadian nuclear power plant. The lessons learned from these experiences will be discussed. (authors)

  10. Mobile health technology transforms injury severity scoring in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Richard Trafford; Zargaran, Eiman; Hameed, S Morad; Navsaria, Pradeep; Nicol, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The burden of data collection associated with injury severity scoring has limited its application in areas of the world with the highest incidence of trauma. Since January 2014, electronic records (electronic Trauma Health Records [eTHRs]) replaced all handwritten records at the Groote Schuur Hospital Trauma Unit in South Africa. Data fields required for Glasgow Coma Scale, Revised Trauma Score, Kampala Trauma Score, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Trauma Score-Injury Severity Score calculations are now prospectively collected. Fifteen months after implementation of eTHR, the injury severity scores were compared as predictors of mortality on three accounts: (1) ability to discriminate (area under receiver operating curve, ROC); (2) ability to calibrate (observed versus expected ratio, O/E); and (3) feasibility of data collection (rate of missing data). A total of 7460 admissions were recorded by eTHR from April 1, 2014 to July 7, 2015, including 770 severely injured patients (ISS > 15) and 950 operations. The mean age was 33.3 y (range 13-94), 77.6% were male, and the mechanism of injury was penetrating in 39.3% of cases. The cohort experienced a mortality rate of 2.5%. Patient reserve predictors required by the scores were 98.7% complete, physiological injury predictors were 95.1% complete, and anatomic injury predictors were 86.9% complete. The discrimination and calibration of Trauma Score-Injury Severity Score was superior for all admissions (ROC 0.9591 and O/E 1.01) and operatively managed patients (ROC 0.8427 and O/E 0.79). In the severely injured cohort, the discriminatory ability of Revised Trauma Score was superior (ROC 0.8315), but no score provided adequate calibration. Emerging mobile health technology enables reliable and sustainable injury severity scoring in a high-volume trauma center in South Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving sexually transmitted infection results notification via mobile phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jennifer L; Huppert, Jill S; Taylor, Regina G; Gillespie, Gordon L; Byczkowski, Terri L; Kahn, Jessica A; Alessandrini, Evaline A

    2014-11-01

    To improve adolescent notification of positive sexually transmitted infection (STI) tests using mobile phone technology and STI information cards. A randomized intervention among 14- to 21-year olds in a pediatric emergency department (PED). A 2 × 3 factorial design with replication was used to evaluate the effectiveness of six combinations of two factors on the proportion of STI-positive adolescents notified within 7 days of testing. Independent factors included method of notification (call, text message, or call + text message) and provision of an STI information card with or without a phone number to obtain results. Covariates for logistic regression included age, empiric STI treatment, days until first attempted notification, and documentation of confidential phone number. Approximately half of the 383 females and 201 males enrolled were ≥18 years of age. Texting only or type of card was not significantly associated with patient notification rates, and there was no significant interaction between card and notification method. For females, successful notification was significantly greater for call + text message (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-6.9), and documenting a confidential phone number was independently associated with successful notification (odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.5). We found no significant predictors of successful notification for males. Of patients with a documented confidential phone number who received a call + text message, 94% of females and 83% of males were successfully notified. Obtaining a confidential phone number and using call + text message improved STI notification rates among female but not male adolescents in a pediatric emergency department. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Technological Innovations and Consumer Needs: An Analysis of Mobile Communications Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norlia Ahmad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study combines insights from market diffusion and consumer research to provide an inte-grated framework of mobile communications market in Japan. We base our analysis on data from company interview, focus group discussion and industry reports. Our findings indicate that technology push dominates in the early introduction and consumer needs pull in the maturing stage. Three implications for the marketing area are; first, user needs for mobile communications have evolved from basic mobility and functionality to include aesthetic and experiential benefits, second, innovations of product capabilities co-evolve with user needs, and lead to increases in mobile usage and product-user attachments, and third, in a saturated market, mobile consumption is premised on the utilitarian and hedonic values as perceived by the users. As mobile phone is a universal product, analysis of a saturated market such as Japan provides a deeper understanding of the evolution of technology and consumer in other markets.

  13. An Extended Technology Acceptance Model for Mobile Social Gaming Service Popularity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The games industry has been growing prosperously with the development of information technology. Recently, with further advances in social networks and mobile services, playing mobile social gaming has gradually changed our daily life in terms of social connection and leisure time spending. What are the determinant factors which affect users intention to play such games? Therefore in this research we present an empirical study on WeChat, China’s most popular mobile social network, and apply a technology acceptance model (TAM to study the reasons beneath the popularity of games in mobile social networks. Furthermore, factors from social and mobile perspective are incorporated into the conventional TAM and their influence and relationships are studied. Experimental study on accumulated online survey data reveals several interesting findings and it is believed that this research offers the researchers in the community further insight in analysing the current popularity and future potential of mobile social games.

  14. Thermal treatment technology at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillary, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent surveys of mixed wastes in interim storage throughout the 30-site Department of Energy complex indicate that only 12 of those sites account for 98% of such wastes by volume. Current inventories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) account for 38% of total DOE wastes in interim storage, the largest of any single site. For a large percentage of these waste volumes, as well as the substantial amounts of buried and currently generated wastes, thermal treatment processes have been designated as the technologies of choice. Current facilities and a number of proposed strategies exist for thermal treatment of wastes of this nature at the INEL. High-level radioactive waste is solidified in the Waste Calciner Facility at the Idaho Central Processing Plant. Low-level solid wastes until recently have been processed at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF), a compaction, size reduction, and controlled air incineration facility. WERF is currently undergoing process upgrading and RCRA Part B permitting. Recent systems studies have defined effective strategies, in the form of thermal process sequences, for treatment of wastes of the complex and heterogeneous nature in the INEL inventory. This presentation reviews the current status of operating facilities, active studies in this area, and proposed strategies for thermal treatment of INEL wastes

  15. Incorporating Mobile Phone Technologies to Expand Evidence-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J; Anton, Margaret; Gonzalez, Michelle; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Forehand, Rex; Parent, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Ownership of mobile phones is on the rise, a trend in uptake that transcends age, region, race, and ethnicity, as well as income. It is precisely the emerging ubiquity of mobile phones that has sparked enthusiasm regarding their capacity to increase the reach and impact of health care, including mental health care. Community-based clinicians charged with transporting evidence-based interventions beyond research and training clinics are in turn, ideally and uniquely situated to capitalize on mobile phone uptake and functionality to bridge the efficacy to effectiveness gap. As such, this article delineates key considerations to guide these frontline clinicians in mobile phone-enhanced clinical practice, including an overview of industry data on the uptake of and evolution in the functionality of mobile phone platforms, conceptual considerations relevant to the integration of mobile phones into practice, representative empirical illustrations of mobile-phone enhanced assessment and treatment, and practical considerations relevant to ensuring the feasibility and sustainability of such an approach.

  16. Incorporating Mobile Phone Technologies to Expand Evidence-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J.; Anton, Margaret; Gonzalez, Michelle; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Forehand, Rex; Parent, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Ownership of mobile phones is on the rise, a trend in uptake that transcends age, region, race, and ethnicity, as well as income. It is precisely the emerging ubiquity of mobile phones that has sparked enthusiasm regarding their capacity to increase the reach and impact of health care, including mental health care. Community-based clinicians charged with transporting evidence-based interventions beyond research and training clinics are in turn, ideally and uniquely situated to capitalize on mobile phone uptake and functionality to bridge the efficacy to effectiveness gap. As such, this article delineates key considerations to guide these frontline clinicians in mobile phone-enhanced clinical practice, including an overview of industry data on the uptake of and evolution in the functionality of mobile phone platforms, conceptual considerations relevant to the integration of mobile phones into practice, representative empirical illustrations of mobile-phone enhanced assessment and treatment, and practical considerations relevant to ensuring the feasibility and sustainability of such an approach. PMID:26213458

  17. Research on DTX Technology and Power Consumption Performance of Mobile Communication Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Shui Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the power consumption of GSM and TD-SCDMA mobile communication system terminal, the paper starts with DTX (Discontinuous Transmission technology of GSM and TD-SCDMA systems, offers a detailed analysis of the DTX’s function in optimizing power consumption of GSM and TDSCDMA mobile communication system terminal and reducing system interference, and verifies DTX’s positive role in reducing the power consumption of the mobile terminal by experiment.

  18. Possibilities and acceptance of mobile information technologies for the elderly - first results of an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarvas, Ildikó; Nitsch, Manuela; Lambacher, Oliver; Howe, Jürgen; Reichwaldt, Nina; von Bargen, Tobias; Haux, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a questionnaire-study conducted for the project "Safe and mobile through accompanying assistance systems" (SIMBA) founded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The study analyzes the mobility requirements and obstacles of the 55 yearold and older seniors in three age-groups (N=210) to develop suitable health-enabling technologies. It focuses on the mobility of the elderly on foot, by public transport, by bicycle and by taxi. The usage and the acceptance of existing mobile devices are determined, to select a suitable terminal for assistance systems. The results show, that although public transport is a very important way of travelling for seniors, its role decreases with higher age. Above the age of 65 years only a small fraction of seniors uses new communication technologies. This implies that smartphones as mobility aids are only suitable for the youngest group of seniors and for future, perhaps more technology-friendly generations.

  19. Mobile technology use and desired technology-based intervention characteristics among HIV+ Black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Theresa E; Braksmajer, Amy; Coury-Doniger, Patricia; Urban, Marguerite A; Carey, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    HIV positive Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are retained in HIV medical care at suboptimal rates. Interventions targeted to Black MSM are needed to help to improve their retention in care. The purposes of this study were to investigate the use of mobile technology among HIV+ Black MSM and to explore participants' thoughts about the use of mobile technology for HIV retention in care interventions. Twenty-two HIV+ Black MSM completed a technology use survey and participated in a qualitative interview regarding technology-based interventions. The majority of participants (95%) had access to a cell phone, and used their phones frequently (median 3 hours/day). Men preferred interventions that would allow for anonymous participation and that would provide individually tailored support. Mobile technology is a promising approach to intervention delivery for both younger and older HIV+ Black MSM. These interventions should incorporate features that are desirable to men (i.e., anonymous participation and individual tailoring).

  20. Innovative technology summary report: Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) has been used in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) site and waste characterization and remediation planning at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and is being considered for implementation at other DOE sites, including the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The RTAL laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific analysis needs. The prototype RTAL, deployed at FEMP Operable Unit 1 Waste Pits, has been designed to be synergistic with existing analytical laboratory capabilities, thereby reducing the occurrence of unplanned rush samples that are disruptive to efficient laboratory operations

  1. THE USE OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT AS THE TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL (TAM OF MOBILE BANKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Yokie Radnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology services in banking business which is very dynamic and advanced makes the bankers must adjust to the presence of this technology. In this paper, the authors will explain the role of Mobile banking technology which is provided by CIMB Niaga in servicing its customers for banking transactions. The methodology used in this paper is quantitative with the purposive sampling one. Instrument used the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM as developed by Parasuraman and Davis by modifying them to fit the state of the research object. This research was conducted in Jakarta and several other places. Research and data collection took 6 months from November 2015 to April 2016. The variables included trust, perceived use (PU, perceived ease of use (PEU, attitude toward use (ATU, Intent to use (ITU, and actual use (AU. After the data were collected, the regression analysis was performed. From the analysis result it was found that trust and perceived use (PU variables did not positively and significantly influence the intent to use (ITU variable, as well as the perceived use variables (PU and perceived ease of use (PEU which have no significant and positive effect on attitude variable on usage (ATU. For that case, the authors propose an improvement strategy to maintain and grow this business forward.

  2. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs. Semiannual report, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G. B.; Currie, J. W.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

  3. Implantation of the mobile laboratory of bio analysis for attendance to nuclear and radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, E.A.; Santos, M.S.; Araujo, F.; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Dantas, Bernardo M.

    2005-01-01

    The operation of nuclear power plants, production of radioisotopes and use of unsealed radioactive sources in medicine and research can lead to accidental internal exposure of individuals. Such practices require infrastructure for rapid response in case of emergency. The objective of this project was to design, setup and calibrate a mobile bioassay laboratory installed in a light Truck for the estimation of internal contamination in workers and public members in case of accident. It is used a NaI(Tl)3 x 3 for thyroid monitoring, a NaI(Tl)8 x 4 for whole body measurements and a NaI(Tl)3 3, installed in a cylindrical lead shielding for in vitro assay measurements. The detectors were calibrated with thyroid and whole phantoms and with 1 and 2 liters plastic bottles. The phantoms were produced with radionuclides emitting photons in the energy range of interest. The detectors available in the laboratory are able to identify and quantify photons in the energy range from 100 to 3000 keV, emitted by radionuclides distributed uniformly in the whole body or deposited in organs, specific tissues and in urine samples. (author)

  4. Mobile Technology and Mathematics Learning in the Early Grades. Interactive STEM Research + Practice Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Ashley Lewis; Busey, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This research brief describes the value of using mobile technologies in and out of elementary mathematics classrooms, and investigates the view that teachers may not be getting the guidance they need to best leverage those technologies. The authors explore three areas of concern: How can teachers use technology in developmentally appropriate ways…

  5. Development and Validation of an Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Monitoring Index for Use With Mobile Health Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deen, Welmoed K.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Parekh, Nimisha K.; Kane, Ellen; Zand, Aria; DiNicola, Courtney A.; Hall, Laurin; Inserra, Elizabeth K.; Choi, Jennifer M.; Ha, Christina Y.; Esrailian, Eric; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Hommes, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health technologies are advancing rapidly as smartphone use increases. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) might be managed remotely through smartphone applications, but no tools are yet available. We tested the ability of an IBD monitoring tool, which can be used with mobile

  6. User Acceptance of Mobile Technology: A Campus-Wide Implementation of Blackboard's Mobile™ Learn Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyun; Sivo, Stephen; Seilhamer, Ryan; Sugar, Amy; Mao, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Mobile learning is a fast growing trend in higher education. This study examined how an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) could evaluate and predict the use of a mobile application in learning. A path analysis design was used to measure the mediating effects on the use of Blackboard's Mobile™ Learn application in coursework (N = 77). The…

  7. A social cognitive perspective on mobile communication technology use and adoption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, O.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the triadic relationship between expected outcomes, habit strength, and mobile communication technology use and adoption within the model of media attendance (LaRose & Eastin, 2004). Mobile phone users (N = 644) were divided into two groups using a stratified random sampling

  8. Aligning Learner Preferences for Information Seeking, Information Sharing and Mobile Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Leila A.; Knezek, Gerald; Khaddage, Ferial

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new information communications technology (ICT) learning preference survey, its cross-validation with attitudes towards mobile learning, and new perspectives on information seeking, information sharing, and mobile access derived from the relationships uncovered. The Information and Communications…

  9. Mobile Technology in Second Language Classrooms: Insights into Its Uses, Pedagogical Implications, and Teacher Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Benjamin; Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a multiple-case, multiple-method design, this study investigates mobile technology use in the practices of three experienced second language teachers. The findings, based on an analysis of the teachers' rationales, stated beliefs and classroom actions, show that the teachers tend to prohibit or reluctantly tolerate mobile device usage,…

  10. Establishing a Multidimensional Interaction in Science Instruction: Usage of Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Özkan; Sanalan, Vehbi Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of mobile technology use in university science instruction on students' academic achievement and self-regulation skills. An experimental study is conducted to test the use of mobile in-class interaction system (M-CIS) and to determine the change in students' academic achievement and self-regulation…

  11. Mobile Technologies as a Catalyst for Pedagogic Innovation within Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Helen

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the use of mobile technologies within teacher education at the University of Northampton. In order to develop a strong commitment to digital literacy, the School of Education is using sets of teaching iPads with trainee teachers and has allocated an iPad to every member of the academic staff. Experiences from mobile technology…

  12. The Potential Use of Mobile Technology: Enhancing Accessibility and Communication in a Blended Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayisela, Tabisa

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly being used to support blended learning beyond computer centres. It has been considered as a potential solution to the problem of a shortage of computers for accessing online learning materials (courseware) in a blended learning course. The purpose of the study was to establish how the use of mobile technology…

  13. Adoption of Mobile Technology for Teaching Preparation in Improving Teaching Quality of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawi, Aliff; Hamzah, Mohd Isa; Ren, Chua Chy; Tamuri, Ab Halim

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the readiness of teachers to use mobile phones for the purpose of teaching preparation. The study also reviewed the level of teachers' satisfaction when using the mobile technology applications developed for the purpose of teaching and learning in the classroom. This study used the mix method to collect data. A total of…

  14. Research on mobile electronic commerce security technology based on WPKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo

    2013-07-01

    Through the in-depth study on the existing mobile e-commerce and WAP protocols, this paper presents a security solution of e-commerce system based on WPKI, and describes its implementation process and specific implementation details. This solution uniformly distributes the key used by the various participating entities , to fully ensure the confidentiality, authentication, fairness and integrity of mobile e-commerce payments, therefore has some pract ical value for improving the security of e-commerce system.

  15. Integration of tablet technologies in the e-laboratory of cytology: a health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Daniele; Pochini, Marco; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria

    2014-10-01

    Although tablet systems are becoming a powerful technology, particularly useful in every application of medical imaging, to date no one has investigated the acceptance and performance of this technology in digital cytology. The specific aims of the work were (1) to design a health technology assessment (HTA) tool to assess, in terms of performance and acceptance, the introduction of tablet technologies (wearable, portable, and non portable) in the e-laboratories of cytology and (2) to test the tool in a first significant application of digital cytology. An HTA tool was proposed operating on a domain of five dimensions of investigation comprising the basic information of the product of digital cytology, the perceived subjective quality of images, the assessment of the virtual navigation on the e-slide, the assessment of the information and communication technologies features, and the diagnostic power. Six e-slides regarding studies of cervicovaginal cytology digitalized by means of an Aperio ( www.aperio.com ) scanner and uploaded onto the www.digitalslide.it Web site were used for testing the methodology on three different network connections. Three experts of cytology successfully tested the methodology on seven tablets found suitable for the study in their own standard configuration. Specific indexes furnished by the tool indicated both a high degree of performance and subjective acceptance of the investigated technology. The HTA tool thus could be useful to investigate new tablet technologies in digital cytology and furnish stakeholders with useful information that may help them make decisions involving the healthcare system. From a global point of view the study demonstrates the feasibility of using the tablet technology in digital cytology.

  16. Challenges in the Acceptance/Licensing of a Mobile Ballistic Missile Range Safety Technology (BMRST) System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bartone, Chris

    2001-01-01

    ...), Space Vehicle Directorate, Ballistic Missile Technology program. The BMRST Program is to develop and to demonstrate a "certifiable" mobile launch range tracking and control system based upon the Global Positioning System (GPS...

  17. Stigma of mental and physical illness and the use of mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Robin Marie; Morgan, Megan; Taylor, Katlyn

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown the stigma attached to mental disabilities, yet little research has directly compared the experiences of people with physical disabilities and those with mental disabilities. Not only are both conditions likely perceived as stigmatizing, but the pervasive use of mobile technology may be one means by which people with disabilities can manage and understand their disability. Four hundred and eighty-seven individuals with physical and/or psychological disabilities completed a survey examining whether they would be willing to use mobile technology to manage their disability and how stigmatizing they perceived their disability to be. Willingness to use mobile technology was related to the age of the sample as well as the type of disability. Individuals with psychological disabilities were more likely to use certain forms of mobile technology relative to those with physical disabilities. Observed differences between physical and psychological disabilities are discussed in terms of the symbolic interaction stigma model.

  18. The potential of FBMC over OFDM for the future 5G mobile communication technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. N.; Abdullah, M. F. L.

    2017-09-01

    Fifth Generation (5G) is the new evolution of mobile communication technology and will be launched soon in many countries. The researchers and designers of mobile communication technology have been facing the increasing demand of the mobile consumers, high data rates and mobility requirements needed by new wireless applications. Most of the countries have started research on 5G mobile communication technology that is predictable to be launched on 2020 in conjunction with the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Filterbank Multicarrier (FBMC) is one of the modulation techniques for the future 5G mobile communication technology. It uses the multicarrier techniques that are immune to fading caused by transmission of more than one path at a time and also immune to intersymbol interference besides able to function effectively compared to Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) which is used in Fourth Generation (4G) mobile communications technology. This paper discusses the performance of FBMC over OFDM based on the previous journals that were investigated by researchers.

  19. Innovations in Environmental Monitoring Using Mobile Phone Technology – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Aitkenhead

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of mobile phones and tablets for personal communication has increased dramatically, with over 1 billion smartphones out of a total of 5 billion mobile phones worldwide. The infrastructure and technology underlying these devices has improved to a level where it is now possible to integrate sensor technology directly and use them to acquire new data. Given the available resources and the number of technical challenges that have already been overcome, it would seem a natural progression to use mobile communication technology for field-based environmental monitoring. In this work, we review existing technology for acquiring, processing and reporting on environmental data in the field. The objective is to demonstrate whether or not it is possible to use off-the-shelf technology for environmental monitoring. We show several levels at which this challenge is being approached, and discuss examples of technology that have been produced.

  20. Assessing the Introduction of Mobile Banking in Jordan Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed-issa R Jaradat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuously growing number of mobile users demonstrates that more and more users seek to benefit from the freedom afforded without the need for cables, time and place. The mobility is the driving force behind the new global economy, with mobile banking, banks offer a new revolutionize services and giving their consumers more options than ever before. This study aimed to: (1 Investigate consumers' expectations and attitudes towards mobile banking in Jordan. (2 Identify the problems that organizations and consumers encounter while adopting or using mobile banking. (3 Measure the level of consumers’ perceived usefulness (PU, perceived ease of use (PEOU, attitude towards using (ATU, behavioral intention to use (BI, and the actual use (AU of mobile banking. Data for this study have been collected using a questionnaire containing 44 questions. Out of 325 questionnaires that have been distributed, 275 are returned (84.6%. As a result of this study it appeared that if consumers have positive Attitudes towards mobile banking, they would rely on it to conduct their banking transactions. This study finds that Jordanian consumers rely on wireless devices (Mobile for their banking transactions, which leads to the actual use of this new technology, taking into consideration trust as a factor that could affect the success of using mobile banking in Jordan. This study gives quantified indicators about mobile banking and a model that might help in understanding the mobile banking environment in Jordan.

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation is a generalized planning document that identifies broad categories of issues that keep ORNL outside full compliance with the law and other legally binding agreements. Possible generic paths to compliance, issues, and the schedule for resolution of the issues one identified. The role of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) is then to identify specific site issues (problems), identify specific technologies that can be brought to bear on the issues, and assess the current status and readiness of these remediation technologies within the constraints of the schedule commitment. Regulatory requirements and commitments contained in the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation are also included in the TLD as constraints to the application of immature technological solutions. Some otherwise attractive technological solutions may not be employed because they may not be deployable on the schedule enumerated in the regulatory agreements. The roadmap for ORNL includes a list of 46 comprehensive logic diagrams for WM of low-level, radioactive-mixed, hazardous, sanitary and industrial. and TRU waste. The roadmapping process gives comparisons of the installation as it exists to the way the installation should exist under full compliance. The identification of the issues is the goal of roadmapping. This allows accurate and timely formulation of activities.

  2. The potential use of mobile technology: enhancing accessibility and communication in a blended learning course

    OpenAIRE

    Mayisela, Tabisa

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly being used to support blended learning beyond computer centres. It has been considered as a potential solution to the problem of a shortage of computers for accessing online learning materials (courseware) in a blended learning course. The purpose of the study was to establish how the use of mobile technology could enhance accessibility and communication in a blended learning course. Data were solicitedfrom a purposive convenience sample of 36 students engage...

  3. A Framework for Monitoring Electricity theft in Zimbabwe using Mobile Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Musungwini

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of mobile technology paradigm have indicated that almost every infrastructure, system or device has the potential to capture data and report it to the back-end system in real-time. Utilities need to deliver operational analytics by knowing what is happening across their entire infrastructure. The purpose of the study was to develop a framework for mobile technologies in monitoring electricity theft in Zimbabwe. Using a qualitative research in conjunction with the design scien...

  4. Mobile marketing for mobile games

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Giang

    2016-01-01

    Highly developed mobile technology and devices enable the rise of mobile game industry and mobile marketing. Hence mobile marketing for mobile game is an essential key for a mobile game success. Even though there are many articles on marketing for mobile games, there is a need of highly understanding mobile marketing strategies, how to launch a mobile campaign for a mobile game. Besides that, it is essential to understand the relationship between mobile advertising and users behaviours. There...

  5. Barriers and benefits to using mobile health technology after operation: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Jonathan S; Kaufman, Elinore; Symer, Matthew; Peters, Alexander; Charlson, Mary; Yeo, Heather

    2017-09-01

    Recently, mobile health technology has emerged as a promising avenue for improving physician-patient communication and patient outcomes. The objective of our study was to determine the public's perception of barriers and benefits to using mobile health technology technologies to enhance recovery after operation. We used the Empire State Poll to ask 2 open-ended questions to 800 participants assessing their perceptions of benefits and barriers to use mobile health technology after operation. All responses were coded independently, and any discrepancies were resolved by consensus. We used grounded theory to allow themes to arise from the codes. Interrater reliability was calculated using Cohen's Kappa. Participants identified a range of possible barriers to using mobile health technology apps after operation including: protecting personal health information, technology effectiveness and failure, preference for face-to-face interaction with their surgeon, level of effort required, and ability of the older adults to navigate mobile health technology. Participants identified multiple possible benefits including: better monitoring, improved communication with their surgeon, minimizing follow-up visits, improved convenience, and increased patient knowledge. In the study, 15% of all respondents stated there were no barriers whereas 6% stated there were no benefits. Participants were receptive to the many potential benefits of this technology to enhance not only their relationships with providers and the convenience of access, but also their health outcomes. We must address participants concerns about data security and their fears of losing a personal relationship with their doctor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mobile technology-based interventions for adult users of alcohol: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Lauren A; Holt, Sidney L; Joshi, Deepti

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, 16% of people aged 15 and older engage in harmful use of alcohol. Harmful alcohol use leads to a host of preventable negative social and health consequences. Mobile technology-based interventions provide a particularly promising avenue for the widespread and cost-effective delivery of treatment that is accessible, affordable, individualized, and destigmatized to both alcohol-dependent and nondependent individuals. The present review sought to summarize the current literature on mobile technology-based interventions among adult users of alcohol and determine the efficacy of such interventions. Five databases were searched in December 2015 (Jan. 2004-Dec. 2015). Inclusion criteria were: participants aged 18 or older, interventions delivered through mobile-technology, and outcome measurement of alcohol reduction/cessation. Eight studies met inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies reviewed found positive effects of the intervention, even though the interventions themselves varied in design, length, dosage, and target population, and were pilot or preliminary in nature. Findings from this review highlight the promising, yet preliminary state of research in this area. Studies with adequate power and valid design are necessary to evaluate the potential of mobile technology-based interventions on long-term alcohol behavior outcomes. Furthermore, future research should elucidate what the most effective length of time is for a mobile technology-based intervention, how often individuals should receive messages for maximum benefit, and determine the comparative effectiveness of mobile technology interventions with other efficacious interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using mobile technology with individuals with aphasia: native iPad features and everyday apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Gretchen; Dittelman, Janice

    2014-02-01

    The use of mobile technology, including smartphones and tablet devices, is a growing trend among adults nationwide, and its potential use in aphasia rehabilitation has generated widespread interest. Despite this trend, adults living with disability are less likely than other adults to go online. Complicating things further, most adults living with aphasia come from a generation where computers and technology were not an integral part of their lives. Additionally, training adults with aphasia requires a different approach than training those in the same age bracket without a disability. This article describes the mobile technology program at the Adler Aphasia Center in Maywood, New Jersey. The goal of this program is to improve access to mobile technology for people with aphasia. The use of mobile devices is the focus of the article. Mobile technology concepts and skills needed to establish a strong foundation for successful iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) use are suggested. We discuss how apps may be used to support aphasia therapy with a focus on apps that are native to the iPad and on other apps that were not specifically developed for aphasia rehabilitation. Challenges in implementing a mobile technology program for people with aphasia and individual member success stories are included. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Mobile ECMO - A divine technology or bridge to nowhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Julia; Djorjevic, Ilija; Sabashnikov, Anton; Kuhn, Elmar W; Deppe, Antje-Christin; Eghbalzadeh, Kaveh; Fattulayev, Javid; Hohmann, Christopher; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Kuhn-Régnier, Ferdinand; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Mader, Navid; Wahlers, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Extracorporeal life support emerged as a salvage option in patients with therapy-refractory severe hemodynamic or respiratory failure. However, this promising therapy option has been limited by the use of experienced teams in highly specialized tertiary-care centers. Thus, in order to provide this standard of care in local hospitals and due to increasing evidence on improved outcomes using ECMO devices and setting for patients with heart and lung failure, an increasing number of experienced ECMO centers have launched mobile ECMO retrieval services in recent years. Areas covered: This review provides a summary on the current scientific status concerning use, indications and complications of mobile ECMO devices and services. A scientific literature research was conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane and Web of Science databases using keywords denoted. Expert commentary: Mobile ECMO devices and setting offer severely ill patients refractory to maximal conventional treatment an option of hemodynamic and/or respiratory stabilization and subsequent transportation to specialized care centers for further treatment. Compared to in-hospital ECMO support, out-of-hospital mobile ECMO implantation, transport and retrieval of patients require additional organizational, logistical and clinical efforts. This review provides a summary on the current scientific status concerning use, indications and complications of mobile ECMO services.

  9. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  10. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards

  11. [Mobile phone-computer wireless interactive graphics transmission technology and its medical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Liu, Jing

    2010-05-01

    Application of clinical digital medical imaging has raised many tough issues to tackle, such as data storage, management, and information sharing. Here we investigated a mobile phone based medical image management system which is capable of achieving personal medical imaging information storage, management and comprehensive health information analysis. The technologies related to the management system spanning the wireless transmission technology, the technical capabilities of phone in mobile health care and management of mobile medical database were discussed. Taking medical infrared images transmission between phone and computer as an example, the working principle of the present system was demonstrated.

  12. Employing mobile media technologies as a participatory planning tool in the suburban housing estate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lasse; Knudsen, Anne-Marie Sanvig

    2013-01-01

    an on-going process, informed by mobile citizen generated information loops (open-source), the aim was to move beyond the master plan as a detached expert-driven product and towards an instant master planning process. In order to explore this iterative take on the planning process the research team...... and consulting firm employed mobile media technologies as a tool for creating new forms of citizen engagement. Based on the lessons learned from the research and development project we conclude by looking at what mobile media technologies afforded this planning process and what these experiences might add...

  13. Mobile technology and its use in clinical nursing education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Nursing students face a variety of challenges to learning in clinical practice, from the theory-practice gap, to a lack of clinical supervision and the ad hoc nature of learning in clinical environments. Mobile technology is proposed as one way to address these challenges. This article comprehensively summarizes and critically reviews the available literature on mobile technology used in undergraduate clinical nursing education. It identifies the lack of clear definitions and theory in the current body of evidence; the variety of mobile devices and applications used; the benefits of mobile platforms in nursing education; and the complexity of sociotechnical factors, such as the cost, usability, portability, and quality of mobile tools, that affect their use in undergraduate clinical nursing education. Implications for nursing education and practice are outlined, and recommendations for future research are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Mobile internet and technology for optical teaching reform in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Muchun; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Yanru

    2017-08-01

    There are some problems in optical education such as insufficient flexibility, individuality and adaptability to students who need information and education at present. The development of mobile internet and technology provides support to solve these problems. Basic characteristics, advantages and developments of these techniques used in education are presented in this paper. Mobile internet is introduced to reform the classroom teaching of optical courses. Mobile network tool selection, teaching resources construction and reform in teaching methods are discussed. Academic record and sampling surveys are used to assess intention to adopt mobile internet and learning effect of academic major of students, the results show that high quality optical education can be offered by adopting mobile internet and technologies in traditional instruction.

  15. Review and Identification of DOE Laboratory Technologies for Countermine/Unexploded Ordnance Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.

    2002-04-03

    Several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have worked and/or are working on technologies that are applicable to the detection of landmines and/or unexploded ordnance. This report is a compilation of technical summaries for many of these technologies. For additional information on any technology, appropriate points of contact are provided for each technology.

  16. THE EMPLOYMENT OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES IN LABORATORY COURSE ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla M. Nakonechna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Present paper considers the questions on development of conceptually new virtual physical laboratory, the employment of which into secondary education schools will allow to check the theoretical knowledge of students before laboratory work and to acquire the modern methods and skills of experiment.

  17. Conference on Future Automotive Technology Focus Electro Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The increasing trend towards electric cars leads to several challenges for the automobile industry, research institutes and politics as well as for the society. Research and serial development move closer together to meet automotive standards with new components such as traction batteries integrated into hybrid and electrical drivetrains. Furthermore, the influence of e-mobility on the daily mobility behavior, the effects on the automotive supply chain and the impact on industrial production have to be taken into account. According to these complex aspects it is crucial to not only acquire specific knowledge in the particular fields but also to consider their functional interaction. Therefore, it seems essential to merge competence from science, economy and politics. This year, the annual „Conference on Future Automotive Technology“ as the follow-up of the „2. Automobiltechnisches Kolloquium München” focuses on the economical realization of widespread automotive electro mobility. Contents - Energy St...

  18. Mobile Technology Waiting for the 3G Rush

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAYET SELLAMI

    2006-01-01

    @@ China is potentially the biggest third generation (3G) mobile market in the world, and everyone is eager to grab a piece of the pie. Foreign carriers are still not allowed to apply for licences since China's decision regarding licensing and adoption of 3G mobile services is still pending, but the waiting list is long. Both Chinese officials and industry executives have stated that they want 3G in place in time for the August 2008 Olympic Games held in Beijing. This tight deadline leaves no room for failure.

  19. A mobile radiological laboratory for rapid response to off-site radiation emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoch, D. S.; Sharma, R. C.; Mehta, D. J.; Raj, V. Venkat [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2002-07-01

    A mobile radiological laboratory (MRL) has been designed and developed primarily for providing a rapid response to radiation emergencies arising as a consequence of nuclear and/or radiological accidents. It is equipped specifically to monitor the environment and provide quick assessment of radiological hazards to the population living within a radius of 30 km around a nuclear facility. In this paper, various design features of an Indian MRL together with the details of installed equipment are presented. The MRL has been designed for a continuous outdoor operation of about two weeks. It is built on a 10.70 m long air suspension Bus Chassis and has four sections : Driver's Cabin, Main Counting Laboratory, Whole Body Monitor and Rear section housing general utilities. The electric power is provided by two diesel generators during field operation and by 230 V AC mains supply at headquarters and wherever possible. The equipment installed in the MRL includes : Alpha, beta and gamma counting systems and low and high volume air samplers for the assessment of radioactive contents in the samples of air, water, soil and vegetation; environment dose rate meters and a variety of survey meters for evaluating any potential increase in radiation levels; personal dosimeters to control external radiation exposure; personal protective equipment for avoiding skin and clothing contamination; a chair type of whole body monitor for the assessment of internal radioactive contamination of the human body, in particular, thyroidal uptake of radioiodine; an automatic weather station for recording continuously the meteorological parameters and a satellite based global positioning system to continuously track and display the geographical location of the MRL. The calibrations of the installed equipment are presently in progress. Preliminary results obtained for the methods needed for rapid detection of gamma emitters in the environment and human body, namely, in situ gamma spectrometry and

  20. Health Information Technology Usability Evaluation Scale (Health-ITUES) for Usability Assessment of Mobile Health Technology: Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Cho, Hwayoung; Liu, Jianfang

    2018-01-05

    Mobile technology has become a ubiquitous technology and can be particularly useful in the delivery of health interventions. This technology can allow us to deliver interventions to scale, cover broad geographic areas, and deliver technologies in highly tailored ways based on the preferences or characteristics of users. The broad use of mobile technologies supports the need for usability assessments of these tools. Although there have been a number of usability assessment instruments developed, none have been validated for use with mobile technologies. The goal of this work was to validate the Health Information Technology Usability Evaluation Scale (Health-ITUES), a customizable usability assessment instrument in a sample of community-dwelling adults who were testing the use of a new mobile health (mHealth) technology. A sample of 92 community-dwelling adults living with HIV used a new mobile app for symptom self-management and completed the Health-ITUES to assess the usability of the app. They also completed the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ), a widely used and well-validated usability assessment tool. Correlations between these scales and each of the subscales were assessed. The subscales of the Health-ITUES showed high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha=.85-.92). Each of the Health-ITUES subscales and the overall scale was moderately to strongly correlated with the PSSUQ scales (r=.46-.70), demonstrating the criterion validity of the Health-ITUES. The Health-ITUES has demonstrated reliability and validity for use in assessing the usability of mHealth technologies in community-dwelling adults living with a chronic illness. ©Rebecca Schnall, Hwayoung Cho, Jianfang Liu. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 05.01.2018.

  1. Enhancing ESL Vocabulary Development through the Use of Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna; Austin, Dayna

    2013-01-01

    Applications, or apps, that are available for both smart phones and tablets can be an effective tool for promoting vocabulary development among adult learners in English as a second language programs. An app is a software program for a mobile phone or computer operating system. Examples of such apps are provided along with practical…

  2. Cloud RAN for Mobile Networks - a Technology Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Yan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture which can address a number of challenges the operators face while trying to support growing end-user’s needs. The main idea behind C-RAN is to pool the Baseband Units (BBUs) from multiple base stations into centralized BBU...

  3. Patterns of Mobile Technology Use in Teaching: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tami

    2015-01-01

    The use of mobile learning spaces is an opportunity to break the boundaries of the classroom and to prepare student-teachers towards teaching classes tailored to the future teaching market, while providing the tools and inspiration to lead change in schools. The purpose of this precursor study is to examine the subject of implementing mobile…

  4. Integrating Mobile Technologies into Very Young Second Language Learners' Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykova, Gulnara; Gimaletdinova, Gulnara; Khalitova, Liliia; Kayumova, Albina

    2016-01-01

    This report is based on an exploratory case study of a private multilingual preschool language program that integrated a Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL) project into the curriculum of five/six year-old children whose native language(s) is/are Russian and/or Tatar. The purpose of the study was to reveal teachers' and parents' perceptions…

  5. Sustainable Mobility: Using a Global Energy Model to Inform Vehicle Technology Choices in a Decarbonized Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Wallington

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of CO2 emissions associated with vehicle use is an important element of a global transition to sustainable mobility and is a major long-term challenge for society. Vehicle and fuel technologies are part of a global energy system, and assessing the impact of the availability of clean energy technologies and advanced vehicle technologies on sustainable mobility is a complex task. The global energy transition (GET model accounts for interactions between the different energy sectors, and we illustrate its use to inform vehicle technology choices in a decarbonizing economy. The aim of this study is to assess how uncertainties in future vehicle technology cost, as well as how developments in other energy sectors, affect cost-effective fuel and vehicle technology choices. Given the uncertainties in future costs and efficiencies for light-duty vehicle and fuel technologies, there is no clear fuel/vehicle technology winner that can be discerned at the present time. We conclude that a portfolio approach with research and development of multiple fuel and vehicle technology pathways is the best way forward to achieve the desired result of affordable and sustainable personal mobility. The practical ramifications of this analysis are illustrated in the portfolio approach to providing sustainable mobility adopted by the Ford Motor Company.

  6. Instrument for assessing mobile technology acceptability in diabetes self-management: a validation and reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandes, Mirela; Deiac, Anca V; Timar, Bogdan; Lungeanu, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, mobile technologies are part of everyday life, but the lack of instruments to assess their acceptability for the management of chronic diseases makes their actual adoption for this purpose slow. The objective of this study was to develop a survey instrument for assessing patients' attitude toward and intention to use mobile technology for diabetes mellitus (DM) self-management, as well as to identify sociodemographic characteristics and quality of life factors that affect them. We first conducted the documentation and instrument design phases, which were subsequently followed by the pilot study and instrument validation. Afterward, the instrument was administered 103 patients (median age: 37 years; range: 18-65 years) diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 DM, who accepted to participate in the study. The reliability and construct validity were assessed by computing Cronbach's alpha and using factor analysis, respectively. The instrument included statements about the actual use of electronic devices for DM management, interaction between patient and physician, attitude toward using mobile technology, and quality of life evaluation. Cronbach's alpha was 0.9 for attitude toward using mobile technology and 0.97 for attitude toward using mobile device applications for DM self-management. Younger patients (Spearman's ρ =-0.429; P higher education level (Kendall's τ =0.51; P mobile assistive applications for DM control. Moreover, patients with a higher quality of life presented a significantly more positive attitude toward using modern technology (Spearman's ρ =0.466; P mobile technology for DM self-management. Additionally, we found that even if most of the patients showed positive attitude toward mobile applications, only a moderate level of intention to indeed use them was observed. Moreover, the study indicated that barriers were truthfulness and easiness to use.

  7. Community health workers and mobile technology: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Rebecca; Catalani, Caricia; Wimbush, Julian; Israelski, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services. Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring. Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to positive program outcomes through operational improvements and

  8. Community health workers and mobile technology: a systematic review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Braun

    Full Text Available In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings.We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services.Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring.Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to positive program outcomes through operational

  9. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Small Crater Repair Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Priddy, Lucy P; Tingle, Jeb S; McCaffrey, Timothy J; Rollings, Ray S

    2007-01-01

    .... This airfield damage repair (ADR) investigation consisted of laboratory testing of selected crater fill and capping materials, as well as full-scale field testing of small crater repairs to evaluate field mixing methods, installation...

  10. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements

  11. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements.

  12. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory's 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory's Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram

  13. Science teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of technology in the laboratories: Implications for science education leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Niveen K.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify science teachers' perceptions concerning the use of technology in science laboratories and identify teachers' concerns and recommendations for improving students' learning. Survey methodology with electronic delivery was used to gather data from 164 science teachers representing Texas public schools. The data confirmed that weaknesses identified in the 1990s still exist. Lack of equipment, classroom space, and technology access, as well as large numbers of students, were reported as major barriers to the implementation of technology in science laboratories. Significant differences were found based on gender, grade level, certification type, years of experience, and technology proficiency. Females, elementary teachers, traditionally trained teachers, and less experienced teachers revealed a more positive attitude toward the use of technology in science laboratories. Participants in this study preferred using science software simulations to support rather than replace traditional science laboratories. Teachers in this study recommended professional development programs that focused on strategies for a technology integrated classroom.

  14. Acceptance of Health Information Technologies, Acceptance of Mobile Health: A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavand, A; Samadbeik, M; Kafashi, M; Abhari, Sh

    2017-12-01

    Mobile health is one of the new technologies for the utilization of health information. For its successful implementation as well as any other system, we must primarily measure the adoption and use of its factors. The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate published articles about the factors affecting the adoption of mobile health and categorizing the factors affecting the adoption of this system. This study is a comprehensive review done by searching major databases such as Google Scholar, Emerald, Science Direct, Iran Medex, SID, Magiran, Pub med, etc. In addition, we use Mobile, mobile Health + adoption, mobile Health + TAM, Health + TAM keywords in the range of 2004 to 2015. Among the studies that use information technology theories to survey the factors affecting the adoption of mobile health, TAM model was used more than other models. Factors such as perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and facilitating condition form TUATU are the most effective in the adoption of mobile health. Results showed that by considering factors such as perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and facilitating condition can increase the adoption of mobile health system. Consequently, these factors are recommended to be considered in planning to run systems.

  15. Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayim, Nese; Ozel, Deniz

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current usage of mobile devices, preferences of mobile learning environments and examine the readiness of nursing students in a public university. In order to investigate preferences and attitudes with respect to mobile technology use in nursing education, 387 students at a state university have been surveyed. It has been observed that while students preferred their current portable laptops, those in higher classes were more inclined to favor mobile phones. The common problems of battery life and high cost of communication, both in smartphones and tablet systems, suggest that hardware quality and financial constraints seem to be two main factors in determining these technologies. While more than half of students expressed readiness for mobile learning, one quarter indicated indecision. Through multivariate regression analysis, readiness to use mobile learning can be described in terms of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, personal innovativeness, self-management of learning, perceived device limitation, and availability. Class level, perceived ease of use, personal innovativeness, and self-management of learning explain intention to use mobile learning. Findings obtained from these results can provide guidance in the development and application of mobile learning systems.

  16. Mobile Health Technology in Late-Life Mental Illness: A Focused Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Yara; Mahdanian, Artin A; Yu, Ching; Segal, Marilyn; Looper, Karl J; Vahia, Ipsit V; Rej, Soham

    2017-08-01

    In an era of rising geriatric mental health care needs worldwide, technological advances can help address care needs in a cost-effective fashion. Our objective in this review was to assess whether mobile health technology, such as tablets and smartphones, are feasible to use in patients with late-life mental and cognitive disorders, as well as whether they were generally reliable modes of mental health/cognitive assessment. We performed a focused literature review of MEDLINE, PsychInfo, and Embase databases, including papers specifically assessing the implementation of mobile health technologies: electronic tablets (e.g., iPad), smartphones, and other mobile computerized equipment in older adults (age ≥65 years) diagnosed with or at risk of a mental and/or cognitive disorder. A total of 2,079 records were assessed, of which 7 papers were of direct relevance. Studies investigated a broad variety of mobile health technologies. Almost all examined samples with dementia/cognitive dysfunction or at risk for those disorders. All studies exclusively examined the use of mobile health technologies for the assessment of cognitive and or mental illness symptoms or disorders. None of the studies reported participants having any difficulties using the mobile health technology assessments and overall reliability was similar to paper-and-pencil modes of assessment. Overall, mobile health technologies were found to be feasible by patients and had promising reliability for the assessment of cognitive and mental illness domains in older adults. Future clinical trials will be necessary to assess whether portable communication interventions (e.g., symptom tracking) can improve geriatric mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes.

  18. Mobile technology for medication adherence in people with mood disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rootes-Murdy, Kelly; Glazer, Kara L; Van Wert, Michael J; Mondimore, Francis M; Zandi, Peter P

    2018-02-01

    Medication non-adherence is a critical challenge for many patients diagnosed with mood disorders (Goodwin and Jamison, 1990). There is a need for alternative strategies that improve adherence among patients with mood disorders that are cost-effective, able to reach large patient populations, easy to implement, and that allow for communication with patients outside of in-person visits. Technology-based approaches to promote medication adherence are increasingly being explored to address this need. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the use of mobile technologies to improve medication adherence in patients with mood disorders. A total of nine articles were identified as describing mobile technology targeting medication adherence in mood disorder populations. Results showed overall satisfaction and feasibility of mobile technology, and reduction in mood symptoms; however, few examined effectiveness of mobile technology improving medication adherence through randomized control trials. Given the limited number of studies, further research is needed to determine long term effectiveness. Mobile technologies has the potential to improve medication adherence and can be further utilized for symptom tracking, side effects tracking, direct links to prescription refills, and provide patients with greater ownership over their treatment progress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Toward A Conceptual Framework Of Technology Adoption Factors Impacting The Acceptance Of The Mobile Technology In The International Business Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Padilla-Vega

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews a research conducted on mobile technology adoption in the international business trade. Accordingly factors were adopted from the framework technology-organization-environment TOE with a set of future research proposals in order to support the suggested model. The paper recommends seven 7 implementation factors that may determine the decision for adopting mobile technology in the international business. These factors have been categorized into the three dimensions of the TOE framework external task amp environment organizational and technological. The results of the investigation revealed that the modern technology supports the efficiency of the business reduce the internal process consuming time and increase communication. On the other hand supports the integration in the long-distance relations.

  20. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Pre-Service Foreign Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Constanza

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service teacher education plays a pivotal role in ensuring that future teachers are prepared to integrate technology effectively to their teaching. One way of improving readiness in future teachers is integrating mobile technologies to discipline-specific teacher education courses. This article presents three case studies drawn from…

  1. Advancing Higher Education with Mobile Learning Technologies: Cases, Trends, and Inquiry-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared, Ed.; Maxfield, Marian B., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advancements in technology are creating new opportunities for educators to enhance their classroom techniques with digital learning resources. Once used solely outside of the classroom, smartphones, tablets, and e-readers are becoming common in many school settings. "Advancing Higher Education with Mobile Learning Technologies: Cases,…

  2. Examining Mobile Technology in Higher Education: Handheld Devices in and out of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julie; Wood, Eileen; De Pasquale, Domenica; Cruikshank, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This study followed an innovative introduction of mobile technology (i.e., BlackBerry® devices) to a graduate level business program and documented students' use of the technology from the time students received the devices to the end of their first term of study. Students found the BlackBerry® device easy to use, and were optimistic regarding its…

  3. Examining the Influence of Educational Mobile Application Software on Students' Technology Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Ming-Lii

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to employ the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards for Students as taxonomy to classify educational mobile application (app) software into seven categories and empirically examine the influence on students' technology literacy. A purposeful sample of fifth grade core subject…

  4. The Need for Mobile Application Development in IS Curricula: An Innovation and Disruptive Technologies Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Jeffry S., Jr.; Abdullat, Amjad

    2012-01-01

    Disruptive technologies, such as mobile applications development, will always present a dilemma for Information Systems educators as dominant paradigms in our environment will tend to favor the existing sustaining technologies that we have become known for in our discipline. In light of this friction, we share our approach in investigating and…

  5. Skills and Knowledge Needed to Serve as Mobile Technology Consultants for Information Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnis, Devendra; Regenstreif-Harms, Reynard; Deosthali, Kanchan; Cortez, Ed; Allard, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Libraries often lack the in-house information technology (IT) expertise required to (1) implement mobile applications and related technologies (MAT); (2) attain maximum return on investment including patron satisfaction for using MAT; and (3) reduce reliance on expensive IT consultants. Based on secondary analysis of the experiences and advice…

  6. What Are the Influences on Teacher Mobile Technology Self-Efficacy in Secondary School Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Jo; Hartnett, Maggie

    2016-01-01

    As digital technologies develop and change, so do the ways these tools are integrated into classrooms. In particular, as mobile digital technologies become ubiquitous there is a need to investigate how teachers engage with these tools--both personally and professionally. Research has consistently shown that teachers' underlying beliefs and…

  7. Mathematics on the Move: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Student Learning (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Catherine; Northcote, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Continuing the series of articles on teaching mathematics with technology, this article furthers the authors' exploration of the use of a range of mobile technologies to enhance teachers' practices in the primary mathematics classroom. In Part 1 of this article, the authors explored the use of the iPod Touch and iPad. In Part 2, they explore…

  8. Teaching via Mobile Phone: a Case Study on Malaysian Teachers’ Technology Acceptance and Readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issham Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the level of technology acceptance among school teachers from the components of awareness and motivation, training and courses, training design, and supports and facilities. This study also aims to investigate whether teachers’ acceptance of technology could influence their readiness for the pedagogical use of mobile phone technology if it is to be implemented in school. A quantitative questionnaire was administered to thirty eight teachers who teach Information and Technology (IT subject from different primary schools in Penang, Malaysia during a program on Teachers’ Development. Data revealed that the level of technology acceptance among respondents in terms of awareness and motivation, training and courses, training design and supports and facilities was generally high. Despite this positive acceptance of technology, teachers’ readiness for the use of mobile phone in teaching and learning was found to be at a considerably low level. However, the study identified a significant correlation between respondents’ awareness and motivation towards technology with their readiness for the pedagogical usage of mobile phone. It was also found that gender is a possible factor influencing the respondents’ readiness. As implication, this paper probes the influence of technology acceptance on teachers’ readiness for the pedagogical usage of mobile phone and the possible implications this influence affords.

  9. Using Mobile Communication Technology in High School Education: Motivation, Pressure, and Learning Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Gao, Qin; Wu, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Motivation and pressure are considered two factors impacting vocational senior high school student learning. New communication technology, especially mobile communication technology, is supposed to be effective in encouraging interaction between the student and the instructor and improving learning efficiency. Social presence and information…

  10. Design on the Go: How African American Youth Use Mobile Technologies for Digital Content Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ronah

    2010-01-01

    The use of mobile technologies has been proposed for increasing access and designing innovative educational activities. Unfortunately, there is limited data on the current uses of cellular phones amongst low-income African American youth. In particular, there is little known about how this population may design on the rapidly adapting technology,…

  11. Up close and very personal – a proposed conceptual framework for mobile technology as a participant

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available characteristics of either a pedagogical or technology focus. Only when the technology that supports a mobile learning event and the pedagogic considerations that underpin it, come together, does it produce a successful initiative. While both reflect a perspective...

  12. Mobile technology for obesity prevention: a randomized pilot study in racial- and ethnic-minority girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollen, Nicole L; Mayo, Matthew S; Carlson, Susan E; Rapoff, Michael A; Goggin, Kathy J; Ellerbeck, Edward F

    2014-04-01

    Mobile technologies have wide-scale reach and disseminability, but no known studies have examined mobile technologies as a stand-alone tool to improve obesity-related behaviors of at-risk youth. To test a 12-week mobile technology intervention for use and estimate effect sizes for a fully powered trial. Fifty-one low-income, racial/ethnic-minority girls aged 9-14 years were randomized to a mobile technology (n=26) or control (n=25) condition. Both conditions lasted 12 weeks and targeted fruits/vegetables (FVs; Weeks 1-4); sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs; Weeks 5-8), and screen time (Weeks 9-12). The mobile intervention prompted real-time goal setting and self-monitoring and provided tips, feedback, and positive reinforcement related to the target behaviors. Controls received the same content in a written manual but no prompting. Outcomes included device utilization and effect size estimates of FVs, SSBs, screen time, and BMI. Data were collected and analyzed in 2011-2012. Mobile technology girls used the program on 63% of days and exhibited trends toward increased FVs (+0.88, p=0.08) and decreased SSBs (-0.33, p=0.09). The adjusted difference between groups of 1.0 servings of FVs (p=0.13) and 0.35 servings of SSBs (p=0.25) indicated small to moderate effects of the intervention (Cohen's d=0.44 and -0.34, respectively). No differences were observed for screen time or BMI. A stand-alone mobile app may produce small to moderate effects for FVs and SSBs. Given the extensive reach of mobile devices, this pilot study demonstrates the need for larger-scale testing of similar programs to address obesity-related behaviors in high-risk youth. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adoption of Mobile Technology for Teaching Preparation in Improving Teaching Quality of Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliff Nawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the readiness of teachers to use mobile phones for the purpose of teaching preparation. The study also reviewed the level of teachers’ satisfaction when using the mobile technology applications developed for the purpose of teaching and learning in the classroom. This study used the mix method to collect data. A total of 31 teachers were involved in answering the questionnaire and seven teachers were interviewed to obtain supportive data. The findings show that the use of applications on mobile phones can help teachers smoothen the lesson preparation. In addition, the use of mobile technology also gives satisfaction to the teachers in enhancing their knowledge in the field of teaching. However, the technical aspects are still a priority and influence the usability aspects of an educational application. The study also revealed that the end users’ age factor is important because it affects the frequency and usage of mobile technology in developing their skills. In conclusion, the use of mobile technology among teachers is appropriate and facilitates the teaching activities.

  14. Energy recovery as a key technology for future mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellbeck, Hans; Risse, Silvio [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungsmotoren

    2011-07-01

    Internal and external combustion engines in both stationary and mobile applications represent an essential, basic module for a functioning economy and society. In ensuring mobility worldwide by land and by sea, the combustion engine plays the dominant role. Customer requirements to be fulfilled are manifold. Accordingly a downward trend in the demand for or indeed the abandonment of the combustion engine in personal or freight transport is in the near future unforeseeable. With regard to the continuously increasing need for mobility subject to limited resources and rising environmental consciousness, the combustion engine and the means to improve its efficiency and sustainability are under intensive investigation. Along with the application of CO{sub 2}-neutral fuels, improvements in the system itself will be valuable to its future. More specifically, compared to many other techniques the recovery of energy losses resulting from the operation of these engines promises a very high degree of optimization. An overview of the current and predicted number of combustion engines in both stationary and mobile applications is given at the beginning of the paper. Furthermore, a differentiation between personal and freight traffic must be made since there is not only a difference in their respective power requirements but also in their lifecycles. The energy losses through exhaust gases and coolants, for example, are quantified and rated in terms of their capabilities on the basis of certain fields of application and utilization profiles. With regard to additional specific boundary conditions, various concepts ranging from recuperation in theory to actual recovery in practice under conditions approximating actual production are analysed in different application scenarios for their efficiency, ecological benefit, and economy. Retroactive or synergistic effects which may follow from their integration into the complete system are considered precisely with the help of examples

  15. Heavy liquid metal technologies at KArlsruhe Lead LAboratory KALLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Mueller, G.; Konys, J.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the research cover: lead-bismuth technologies; corrosion mechanism and corrosion protection; thermal hydraulics; kinetics of oxygen control systems. Detailed experimental results are presented

  16. Awareness and using of medical students about mobile health technology in clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi; Rezazadeh, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test-retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology.

  17. Mobile Technology in the Perioperative Arena: Rapid Evolution and Future Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Brian S; Gupta, Rajnish K; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Throughout the history of medicine, physicians have relied upon disruptive innovations and technologies to improve the quality of care delivered, patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. The implementation of mobile technology in health care is quickly becoming the next disruptive technology. We first review the history of mobile technology over the past 3 decades, discuss the impact of hardware and software, explore the rapid expansion of applications (apps), and evaluate the adoption of mobile technology in health care. Next, we discuss how technology serves as the vehicle that can transform traditional didactic learning into one that adapts to the learning behavior of the student by using concepts such as the flipped classroom, just-in-time learning, social media, and Web 2.0/3.0. The focus in this modern education paradigm is shifting from teacher-centric to learner-centric, including providers and patients, and is being delivered as context-sensitive, or semantic, learning. Finally, we present the methods by which connected health systems via mobile devices increase information collection and analysis from patients in both clinical care and research environments. This enhanced patient and provider connection has demonstrated benefits including reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions, improved perioperative health maintenance coordination, and improved care in remote and underserved areas. A significant portion of the future of health care, and specifically perioperative medicine, revolves around mobile technology, nimble learners, patient-specific information and decision-making, and continuous connectivity between patients and health care systems. As such, an understanding of developing or evaluating mobile technology likely will be important for anesthesiologists, particularly with an ever-expanding scope of practice in perioperative medicine.

  18. Awareness and Using of Medical Students About Mobile Health Technology in Clinical Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. Method The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test–retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. Findings The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. Conclusion The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology. PMID:24058250

  19. Treatment of Laboratory Wastewater by Sequence Batch reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imtiaz, N.; Butt, M.; Khan, R.A.; Saeed, M.T.; Irfan, M.

    2012-01-01

    These studies were conducted on the characterization and treatment of sewage mixed with waste -water of research and testing laboratory (PCSIR Laboratories Lahore). In this study all the parameters COD, BOD and TSS etc of influent (untreated waste-water) and effluent (treated waste-water) were characterized using the standard methods of examination for water and waste-water. All the results of the analyzed waste-water parameters were above the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) set at National level. Treatment of waste-water was carried out by conventional sequencing batch reactor technique (SBR) using aeration and settling technique in the same treatment reactor at laboratory scale. The results of COD after treatment were reduced from (90-95 %), BOD (95-97 %) and TSS (96-99 %) and the reclaimed effluent quality was suitable for gardening purposes. (author)

  20. Integrating mobile technology with routine dietetic practice: the case of myPace for weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harricharan, Michelle; Gemen, Raymond; Celemín, Laura Fernández; Fletcher, David; de Looy, Anne E; Wills, Josephine; Barnett, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The field of Mobile health (mHealth), which includes mobile phone applications (apps), is growing rapidly and has the potential to transform healthcare by increasing its quality and efficiency. The present paper focuses particularly on mobile technology for body weight management, including mobile phone apps for weight loss and the available evidence on their effectiveness. Translation of behaviour change theory into weight management strategies, including integration in mobile technology is also discussed. Moreover, the paper presents and discusses the myPace platform as a case in point. There is little clinical evidence on the effectiveness of currently available mobile phone apps in enabling behaviour change and improving health-related outcomes, including sustained body weight loss. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these apps have been developed in collaboration with health professionals, such as dietitians, and the extent to which apps draw on and operationalise behaviour change techniques has not been explored. Furthermore, presently weight management apps are not built for use as part of dietetic practice, or indeed healthcare more widely, where face-to-face engagement is fundamental for instituting the building blocks for sustained lifestyle change. myPace is an innovative mobile technology for weight management meant to be embedded into and to enhance dietetic practice. Developed out of systematic, iterative stages of engagement with dietitians and consumers, it is uniquely designed to complement and support the trusted health practitioner-patient relationship. Future mHealth technology would benefit if engagement with health professionals and/or targeted patient groups, and behaviour change theory stood as the basis for technology development. Particularly, integrating technology into routine health care practice, rather than replacing one with the other, could be the way forward.

  1. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  2. The potential use of mobile technology: enhancing accessibility and communication in a blended learning course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabisa Mayisela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technology is increasingly being used to support blended learning beyond computer centres. It has been considered as a potential solution to the problem of a shortage of computers for accessing online learning materials (courseware in a blended learning course. The purpose of the study was to establish how the use of mobile technology could enhance accessibility and communication in a blended learning course. Data were solicitedfrom a purposive convenience sample of 36 students engaged in the blended learning course. The case study utilized a mixed-methods approach. An unstructured interview was conducted with the course lecturer and these data informed the design of the students' semi-structured questionnaire. It was found that students with access to mobile technology had an increased opportunity to access the courseware of the blended learning course. Mobile technology further enhanced student-to-student and student-to-lecturer communication by means of social networks. The study concludes that mobile technology has the potential to increase accessibility and communication in a blended learning course. Recommendations, limitations of the present study, and suggestionsforfuture research were made.

  3. WLAN Positioning Methods and Supporting Learning Technologies for Mobile Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonyan, Arsen

    2013-01-01

    Location technologies constitute an essential component of systems design for autonomous operations and control. The Global Positioning System (GPS) works well in outdoor areas, but the satellite signals are not strong enough to penetrate inside most indoor environments. As a result, a new strain of indoor positioning technologies that make use of…

  4. [Study of the Application of Mobile Medical Technology in Construction of Grading Diagnosis and Treatment System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenwu; Shen, Yihong; Zhen, Hui; Yang, Xiaohe; Hu, Kai

    2018-02-08

    The combination of mobile medical technology and the grading diagnosis and treatment system (GDTS) can stimulate the allocation of medical resources, reduce medical cost and improve public health significantly. Firstly we summarize development features of mobile medical technology in foreign and domestic market, then we study the application model of mobile medical application in GDTS with field research data and analyzes its advantage and shortage. Finally, we propose four measures for further developing mobile medical application in the GDTS:the government departments should formulate policies and industry standards of products as soon as possible to meet requirement of market; service providers should take the hospitals as core role to achieve mutual benefit and win-win situation; take the daily monitoring of chronic diseases as an entry point to build profitable business model; enhance publicity to promote public health awareness.

  5. Developing a Mobile Application via Bluetooth Wireless Technology for Enhancing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar A. Idwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Mobile application via Bluetooth wireless technology (MAvBT that enhance the student portal in universities by connecting students' mobile phone devices to a server application that benefit from the devices Bluetooth technology and the storage abilities. MAvBT enables students to retrieve their information with minimum time and anywhere ranging from 100m up to 1Km and it facilitate the communication with instructors outside the office hours. This system consists of computer application (Server Application installed on a Bluetooth enabled computer, Mobile application (client application installed on students’ mobile phone devices, and a website that enable the instructors to edit their materials or enable the demonstrator to get some important reports. Experimental results show that the proposed system is faster, effortless, and cheaper.

  6. Mobile Data Technologies and SME Adoption and Diffusion: an empirical study of barriers and facillitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Van Akkeren

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The technological environment in which Australian SMEs operate can be best described as dynamic and vital. The rate of technological change provides the SME owner/manger a complex and challenging operational context. Wireless applications are being developed that provide mobile devices with Internet content and E-business services. In Australia, the adoption of ecommerce by large organisations has been relatively high, however, the same cannot be said for SMEs, where adoption has been slower than other developed countries. In contrast, however, mobile telephone adoption and diffusion is relatively high by SMEs. Will SMEs who have been reluctant to adopt commerce technologies in the past be more ready to go on-line with the merging of the Internet and mobile data technologies? This exploratory study identifies attitudes, perceptions and issues for mobile data technologies by regional SME owner/managers across a range of industry sectors. The major issues include the sector the firm belongs to, the current adoption status of the firm, the level of mistrust of the IT industry, the cost of the technologies, and the applications and attributes of the technologies.

  7. Effect of affordable technology on physical activity levels and mobility outcomes in rehabilitation: a protocol for the Activity and MObility UsiNg Technology (AMOUNT) rehabilitation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Leanne; van den Berg, Maayken; Lindley, Richard I; Crotty, Maria; McCluskey, Annie; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Smith, Stuart T; Schurr, Karl; Killington, Maggie; Bongers, Bert; Howard, Kirsten; Heritier, Stephane; Togher, Leanne; Hackett, Maree; Treacy, Daniel; Dorsch, Simone; Wong, Siobhan; Scrivener, Katharine; Chagpar, Sakina; Weber, Heather; Pearson, Ross; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-06-06

    People with mobility limitations can benefit from rehabilitation programmes that provide a high dose of exercise. However, since providing a high dose of exercise is logistically challenging and resource-intensive, people in rehabilitation spend most of the day inactive. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of the addition of affordable technology to usual care on physical activity and mobility in people with mobility limitations admitted to inpatient aged and neurological rehabilitation units compared to usual care alone. A pragmatic, assessor blinded, parallel-group randomised trial recruiting 300 consenting rehabilitation patients with reduced mobility will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to intervention or control groups. The intervention group will receive technology-based exercise to target mobility and physical activity problems for 6 months. The technology will include the use of video and computer games/exercises and tablet applications as well as activity monitors. The control group will not receive any additional intervention and both groups will receive usual inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation care over the 6-month study period. The coprimary outcomes will be objectively assessed physical activity (proportion of the day spent upright) and mobility (Short Physical Performance Battery) at 6 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include: self-reported and objectively assessed physical activity, mobility, cognition, activity performance and participation, utility-based quality of life, balance confidence, technology self-efficacy, falls and service utilisation. Linear models will assess the effect of group allocation for each continuously scored outcome measure with baseline scores entered as a covariate. Fall rates between groups will be compared using negative binomial regression. Primary analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation and use an intention-to-treat approach. The

  8. Mobile Technologies and the Incidence of Cyberbullying in Seven European Countries: Findings from Net Children Go Mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O'Neill

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of bullying and harassment on children have long been of concern to parents, educators, and policy makers. The online world presents a new environment in which vulnerable children can be victimized and a space where perpetrators find new ways to perform acts of harassment. While online bullying is often considered to be an extension of persistent offline behavior, according to EU Kids Online (2011, the most common form of bullying is in person, face-to-face. With the rise in use of mobile Internet technologies, this balance is changing. Increased levels of use and more time spent online accessed through a variety of devices has increased children’s exposure to a range of online risks, including cyberbullying. This article presents the findings of the Net Children Go Mobile project, a cross-national study of children aged 9–16 in seven European countries. The research builds on the work of EU Kids Online and supports the identification of new trends in children’s online experiences of risk and safety. The study finds that while overall levels of bullying have remained relatively static, levels of online bullying have increased, particularly among younger teens. The relationship between cyberbullying and the use of mobile Internet technologies is examined and factors contributing to increased levels of cyberbullying are highlighted.

  9. Safety and Liability in the New Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, W. J., III

    2009-01-01

    All laboratories, even modern high-tech ones, have some degree of hazard potential. It is the teacher's responsibility to make the lab as safe as possible and to do all that is reasonable and prudent to prevent accidents. The teacher's goal should be to insure the safety of every student. This goal is met best via well-planned instruction and…

  10. Inclusion strategy for mobile technology in the classroom: experience at the Universidad de Tarapacá

    OpenAIRE

    Bustos Andreu,Hernando; Delgado Almonte,Milagros; Pedraja Rejas,Liliana

    2011-01-01

    Despite the existence of recognized benefits of the use of information and communication technology in education, the employment of such technology is a complex process that needs appropriate planning and structuring to obtain good results. This article shows the results obtained from the application of a consistent strategy to a set of action plans oriented to the incorporation of a mobile technology platform in the classroom. The results obtained in this experience at the Universidad de Tar...

  11. Teaching through mobile technology : a reflection from high school studies in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jantjies, Mmaki; Joy, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The use of mobile technology to support teaching and learning in schools, has extended technology learning tools in schools across different socio economic divides. There have been various studies throughout the world which reflect the improvement of such technology in schools. In this chapter we reflect on a series of studies conducted in developing countries with focus on Jantjies and Joy (2012,2013,2014,2015) studies. The studies were conducted in schools with the objective of providing te...

  12. Teaching via Mobile Phone: a Case Study on Malaysian Teachers’ Technology Acceptance and Readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Issham Ismail; Siti F Bokhare; Siti N Azizan; Nizuwan Azman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the level of technology acceptance among school teachers from the components of awareness and motivation, training and courses, training design, and supports and facilities. This study also aims to investigate whether teachers’ acceptance of technology could influence their readiness for the pedagogical use of mobile phone technology if it is to be implemented in school. A quantitative questionnaire was administered to thirty eight teachers who teach I...

  13. Mobile technology in second language classrooms:insights into its uses, pedagogical implications, and teacher beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Van Praag, Benjamin; Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a multiple-case, multiple-method design, this study investigates mobile technology use in the practices of three experienced second language teachers. The findings, based on an analysis of the teachers' rationales, stated beliefs and classroom actions, show that the teachers tend to prohibit or reluctantly tolerate mobile device usage, while they recognise some of its potential benefits to support their teaching and student learning. They also highlight the incentives and barriers wh...

  14. Analysis of technology and business antecedents for spectrum sharing in mobile broadband networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yrjölä, S. (Seppo)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sharing is emerging as one of the megatrends influencing future business opportunities, and wireless communications is no exception to this development. Future mobile broadband networks will operate on different types of spectrum bands including shared spectrum, which calls for changes in the operation and management of the networks. The creation and capture of value by the different players in the mobile broadband ecosystem is expected to change due to regulation, technology, an...

  15. Phase out Mobile Communication Technology: An Analysis Based on Public Policy and Business Values

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kuang-Chiu; Houng, Ming-Wie

    2017-01-01

    Through the progress of communication technology, the mobile services have broughtlots of benefits for our daily lives. However, with the recent advances in cellular communications and new systems being deployed alongside existing ones, an emerging question aboutwhether there still is someneedsfor the legacy infrastructure, in particular the widely deployed GSMsystemsat this moment.Forthe evolution of mobile communication, we have embrace convenience and efficiency offered bymobile service.We...

  16. Cloud RAN for Mobile Networks - a Technology Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Yan, Ying; Scolari, Lara; Kardaras, Georgios; Berger, Michael Stübert; Dittmann, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture which can address a number of challenges the operators face while trying to support growing end-user’s needs. The main idea behind C-RAN is to pool the Baseband Units (BBUs) from multiple base stations into centralized BBU Pool for statistical multiplexing gain, while shifting the burden to the high-speed wireline transmission of In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) data. C-RAN enables energy efficient network operation and pos...

  17. Mobile facilitation of science and technology awareness for preschool children

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available on the Developing Child. They state that the quality of a child’s early environment and the availability of appropriate experiences at the right stages of development are crucial in determining the strength or weakness of the brain’s architecture, which, in turn... on the Developing Child. Available from: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. Web site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu. Traxler, J. (2007). Making Good Use of Mobile Phone Capabilities, 2nd International Conference on ICT for Development...

  18. A laboratory and field evaluation of the mobility of cobalt-60/EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.L.; Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Swanson, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    We have observed a time and soil type dependence in the ability of the organic complexant EDTA to keep cobalt-60 in solution. Test results indicate that short-term adsorption tests lasting 5 days or less can be misleading. In short-term tests using cobalt-60/EDTA and soil from the Hanford site, low sorption in batch tests and high mobility in column tests were observed. During long-term batch test using cobalt-60/EDTA, the percentage of cobalt remaining in solution decreased from 90% after 7 days to less than 10% after 500 days. In laboratory and field column tests where low water flow rates allowed long contact time, virtually no cobalt movement was observed even though in the field test tritium was transported over 4 meters. Long-term batch tests using cobalt-60/EDTA and soil from Savannah River burial grounds showed that cobalt remainin in solution dropped to 30% of the total cobalt added after 5 days and to less than 1% after 15 days. Batch tests using soil from Oak Ridge burial grounds were less dramatic showing cobalt in solution decreasing from 90% after 5 days to 70% after 35 days. The cobalt-60/EDTA complex appears to be dissociating and leaving uncomplexed cobalt which is readily sorbed. The dissociation seems to be rather complete in Hanford and Savannah River soil but limited in the Oak Ridge soil. The implication to waste management is that the potential for transport of cobalt by EDTA may not be as serious at all burial sites as once thought

  19. Analyzing the mobility in granular forms of P fertilizer in Brazilians soils under laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Robson C. de; Oliveira, Davi Ferreira de; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de; Anjos, Marcelino Jose dos

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for plant growth. Million of tones of P are applied to the soils annually. However, only a small fraction of the P applied with fertilizers is taken up by crops in the year of application, and the effectiveness of any residual P fertilizer declines with time. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this response to P in the field, we have studied the mobility of P from 3 different fertilizes: monoammonium phosphate (MAP), polymer coated monoammonium phosphate (MAPp) and Organomineral phosphate (OMP) applied on high weathered soil samples in a Petri dish experiment. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to determine the P diffusive flux at different distances (0 - 7.5, 7.5 – 13.5, 13.5 – 25.5 and 25.5 – 43 mm) from granular fertilizer. TXRF analyses were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline D09B at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo, using a polychromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation and an Ultra-LEGe detector with resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV. Besides that, the detections were performed in a high vacuum chamber (2.5 x 10-5 mbar) to avoid air absorption. After a period of five weeks, the total P concentration increased in the soil sampled 7.5 to 13.5 mm from the fertilizer showing a diffusive flux of P. About 20% (considering MAP and MAPp) of the total P applied diffused out of the central soil ring. Different sources showed differences in diffusive flux of P. Soil pH also influenced diffusive flux of P showing higher flux on lower pH soils. (author)

  20. Correct coding for laboratory procedures during assisted reproductive technology cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This document provides updated coding information for services related to assisted reproductive technology procedures. This document replaces the 2012 ASRM document of the same name. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.