WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology medical

  1. [Medical technology and medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  2. Skylab medical technology utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonesifer, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    To perform the extensive medical experimentation on man in a long-term, zero-g environment, new medical measuring and monitoring equipment had to be developed, new techniques in training and operations were required, and new methods of collecting and analyzing the great amounts of medical data were developed. Examples of technology transfers to the public sector resulted from the development of new equipment, methods, techniques, and data. This paper describes several of the examples that stemmed directly from Skylab technology.

  3. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  4. Nuclear medical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daga, Avinash; Sharma, Smita; Sharma, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medical technology helps to use radiopharmaceuticals (drugs that give off radiation) to diagnose and treat illness. A more recent development is Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which is a more precise and sophisticated technique that uses isotopes produced in a cyclotron. F-18 in FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) is one such positron-emitting radionuclide. Chemically, it is 2-deoxy-2-( 18 F) fluoro-D-glucose, a glucose analog with the positron-emitting radioactive isotope fluorine-18 substituted for the normal hydroxyl group at the 2' position in the glucose molecule. It is introduced, usually by injection, and then it gets accumulated in the target tissue. As it decays it emits a positron, which promptly combines with a nearby electron resulting in the simultaneous emission of two identifiable gamma rays in opposite directions. These are detected by a PET camera when the patient is placed in the PET scanner for a series of one or more scans which may take from 20 minutes to as long as an hour. It gives very precise indication of their origin. 18 F in FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) has become very important in detection of cancers and the monitoring of progress in their treatment, using PET. (author)

  5. [Information technology in medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramić, A

    1999-01-01

    The role of information technology in educational models of under-graduate and post-graduate medical education is growing in 1980's influenced by PC's break-in in medical practice and creating relevant data basis, and, particularly, in 1990's by integration of information technology on international level, development of international network, Internet, Telemedicin, etc. The development of new educational information technology is evident, proving that information in transfer of medical knowledge, medical informatics and communication systems represent the base of medical practice, medical education and research in medical sciences. In relation to the traditional approaches in concept, contents and techniques of medical education, new models of education in training of health professionals, using new information technology, offer a number of benefits, such as: decentralization and access to relevant data sources, collecting and updating of data, multidisciplinary approach in solving problems and effective decision-making, and affirmation of team work within medical and non-medical disciplines. Without regard to the dynamics of change and progressive reform orientation within health sector, the development of modern medical education is inevitable for all systems a in which information technology and available data basis, as a base of effective and scientifically based medical education of health care providers, give guarantees for efficient health care and improvement of health of population.

  6. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  7. Frontiers in medical imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    At present many medical images are used for diagnostics and treatment. After the advent of X-ray computer tomography (XCT), the violent development of medical images has continued. Medical imaging technology can be defined as the field of technology that deals with the production, processing, display, transmission, evaluation and so on of medical images, and it can be said that the present development of medical imaging diagnostics has been led by medical imaging technology. In this report, the most advanced technology of medical imaging is explained. The principle of XCT is shown. The feature of XCT is that it can image the delicate difference in the X-ray absorption factor of the cross section being measured. The technical development has been advanced to reduce the time for imaging and to heighten the resolution. The technology which brings about a large impact to future imaging diagnostics is computed radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of imaging the distribution of protons in human bodies. Positron CT is the method of measurement by injecting a positron-emitting RI. These methods are explained. (K.I.)

  8. Commercializing medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Kevin J; Lieberman, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880's, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical industries. The impact of those new employees and their groundbreaking compounds had a profound influence on medicine and medical education in Germany between 1880 and 1930. Germany dominated international science during this period and was a training center for scientists worldwide. This model of synergy between education and business was envied and admired in Europe, Asia and America. British science soon after evolved to dominate the field of science during the prewar and post World War (1930's-1970's) because the German scientists fled Hitler's government. These expatriated scientists had a profound influence on the teaching and training of British scientists, which lead to advances in medicine such as antibiotics. After the Second World War, the US government wisely funded the development of the medical infrastructure that we see today. British and German scientists in medicine moved to America because of this bountiful funding for their research. These expatriated scientists helped drive these medical advances into commercialized products by the 1980's. America has been the center of medical education and advances of biotechnology but will it continue? International scientists trained in America have started to return to Europe and Asia. These American-trained scientists and their governments are very aware of the commercial potential of biotechnology. Those governments are now more prepared to play an active role this new science. Germany, Ireland, Britain, Singapore

  9. Educational technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  10. Medical technology: a Pandora's box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewa, Soma

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the development of medical technology in terms of Max Weber's theory of rationalization. It argues that medical technology is a part of the general process of social, political and economic changes in modern Western societies. Medical technology today keeps many people alive who, in the past, would have died from their illness. In recent years, burgeoning technological achievements in medicine have been regarded as a threat to the individual's freedom to die. Many people believe that the prolongation of life only adds to the suffering of the patient and to the emotional distress of the family. They argue that a quiet death is preferable to the indignities inflicted by mechanical life support. This paper addresses these issues in light of Weber's theoretical arguments.

  11. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  12. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  13. Nuclear medicine. Medical technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, H.; Jigalin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim, method: the scientific publications in the 2003 and 2004 issues of the journal Nuklearmedizin were analyzed retrospectively with regard to the proportion of medical technology research. Results: out of a total of 73 articles examined, 9 (12%) were classified as medical technology research, that is, 8/15 of the original papers (16%) and one of the case reports (5%). Of these 9 articles, 44% (4/9) focused on the combination of molecular and morphological imaging with direct technical appliance or information technology solutions. Conclusion: medical technology research is limited in the journal's catchment area. The reason for this is related to the interdependency between divergent development dynamics in the medical technology industry's locations, the many years that the area of scintigraphic technology has been underrepresented, research policy particularly in discrepancies in the promotion of molecular imaging and a policy in which health is not perceived as a predominantly good and positive economic factor, but more as a curb to economic development. (orig.)

  14. Biological and medical sensor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Biological and Medical Sensor Technologies presents contributions from top experts who explore the development and implementation of sensors for various applications used in medicine and biology. Edited by a pioneer in the area of advanced semiconductor materials, the book is divided into two sections. The first part covers sensors for biological applications. Topics include: Advanced sensing and communication in the biological world DNA-derivative architectures for long-wavelength bio-sensing Label-free silicon photonics Quartz crystal microbalance-based biosensors Lab-on-chip technologies fo

  15. 78 FR 52579 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-608; NRC-2013-0053] SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc... application for a construction permit, submitted by SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc. (SHINE). ADDRESSES... of a two-part application for a construction permit for a medical radioisotope production facility in...

  16. 78 FR 73897 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-608; NRC-2013-0053] SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc... construction permit, submitted by SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc. (SHINE) is acceptable for docketing... permit would allow SHINE to construct a medical radioisotope production facility in Janesville, Wisconsin...

  17. 78 FR 39342 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-608; NRC-2013-0053] SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc...: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 26, 2013, SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE... has determined that the partial application for a construction permit, submitted by SHINE Medical...

  18. 78 FR 39343 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-608; NRC-2013-0053] SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc... entering the comment submissions into ADAMS. II. Discussion SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc. (SHINE) has... sites, and alternative technologies to produce radioisotopes. This notice is being published in...

  19. Recent progress in medical imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    Medical imaging is name of methods for diagnosis and therapy, which make visible with physical media such as X-ray, structures and functions of man's inside those are usually invisible. These methods are classified by the physical media into ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine imaging and X-ray imaging etc. Having characteristics different from one another, these are used complementarily in medical fields though in some case being competitive. Medical imaging is supported by highly progressed technology, which is called medical imaging technology. This paper describes a survey of recent progress of medical imaging technology in magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine imaging and X-ray imaging. (author)

  20. Patient safety and technology-driven medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Keinicke Fabricius, Pia

    2015-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. AIM: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. METHODS: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient...

  1. Emergency Medical Service (EMS): Rotorcraft Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchspies, J. S.; Adams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A lead organization on the national level should be designated to establish concepts, locations, and the number of shock trauma air medical services. Medical specialists desire a vehicle which incorporates advances in medical technology trends in health care. Key technology needs for the emergency medical services helicopter of the future include the riding quality of fixed wing aircraft (reduced noise and vibration), no tail rotor, small rotor, small rotor diameter, improved visibility, crashworthy vehicle, IFR capability, more affordability high reliability, fuel efficient, and specialized cabins to hold medical/diagnostic and communications equipment. Approaches to a national emergency medical service are discussed.

  2. Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Moyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often unexpected ways in which medical technologies are appropriated by diverse actors in homes, clinics and communities. The authors highlight key

  3. Handbook of medical and healthcare technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2013-01-01

    This book equips readers to understand a complex range of healthcare products that are used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases or medical conditions affecting humans. The first part of the book presents medical technologies such as medical information retrieval, tissue engineering techniques, 3D medical imaging, nanotechnology innovations in medicine, medical wireless sensor networks, and knowledge mining techniques in medicine. The second half of the book focuses on healthcare technologies including prediction hospital readmission risk, modeling e-health framework, personal Web in healt

  4. Modelling in Medical Technology Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Michel (Bowine)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractHealth care is a rapidly developing field in which new technologies are introduced continuously. Not all new technologies have the same impact however: most represent only small changes in existing technologies, whereas only a few - like organ transplants - really are revolutionary new

  5. Medical students' online learning technology needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Nelson, Erica; Wetter, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated medical students' online learning technology needs at a medical school. The study aimed to provide evidence-based guidance for technology selection and online learning design in medical education. The authors developed a 120-item survey in collaboration with the New Technology in Medical Education (NTIME) committee at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM). Overall, 123 of 290 medical students (42%) at the medical school participated in the survey. The survey focused on five major areas: students' hardware and software use; perception of educational technology (ET) in general; online behaviours; perception of ET use at the school; and demographic information. Students perceived multimedia tools, scheduling tools, communication tools, collaborative authoring tools, learning management systems and electronic health records useful educational technologies for their learning. They did not consider social networking tools useful for their learning, despite their frequent use. Third-year students were less satisfied with current technology integration in the curriculum, information sharing and collaborative learning than other years. Students in clerkships perceived mobile devices as useful for their learning. Students using a mobile device (i.e. a smartphone) go online, text message, visit social networking sites and are online during classes more frequently than non-users. Medical students' ET needs differ between preclinical and clinical years. Technology supporting ubiquitous mobile learning and health information technology (HIT) systems at hospitals and out-patient clinics can be integrated into clerkship curricula. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Unmet needs: relevance to medical technology innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avril D; Sproson, Lise; Wells, Oliver; Tindale, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the role of unmet needs in the innovation of new medical technologies using the National Institute for Health Research Devices for Dignity (D4D) Healthcare Technology Co-operative as a case study. It defines an unmet need, providing a spectrum of classification and discusses the benefits and the challenges of identifying unmet need and its influence on the innovation process. The process by which D4D has captured and utilized unmet needs to drive technology innovation is discussed and examples given. It concludes by arguing that, despite the challenges, defining and reviewing unmet need is a fundamental factor in the success of medical technology innovation.

  7. [The characteristics of medical technologies in emergency medical care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakhovskiĭ, A G; Babenko, A I; Bravve, Iu I; Tataurova, E A

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the implementation of major 12 diagnostic and 17 treatment technologies applied during medical care of patients with 12 key nosology forms of diseases in departments of the emergency medical care hospital No 2 of Omsk. It is established that key groups of technologies in the implementation of diagnostic process are the laboratory clinical diagnostic analyses and common diagnostic activities at reception into hospital and corresponding departments. The percentage of this kind of activities is about 78.3% of all diagnostic technologies. During the realization of treatment process the priority technologies are common curative and rehabilitation activities, intensive therapy activities and clinical diagnostic monitoring activities. All of them consist 80.1% of all curative technologies.

  8. St. Luke's Medical Center: technologizing health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanguil, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The computerization of the St. Luke's Medical Center improved the hospital administration and management, particularly in nuclear medicine department. The use of computer-aided X-ray simulator machine and computerized linear accelerator machine in diagnosing and treating cancer are the most recent medical technological breakthroughs that benefited thousands of Filipino cancer patients. 4 photos

  9. Medical technology advances from space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

  10. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyî, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  11. Space Technology for Medical Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Under one of the earliest contracts awarded in the Apollo lunar landing program, Parker Hannifin Corporation developed and produced equipment for controlling the flow of propellants into the mammoth engines of the Saturn moonbooster. Today, Parker is supplying the huge valves that control propellant flow from the Space Shuttle's external fuel tank to the engines of the Shuttle Orbiter as well as the "peanut valve," named for its small size. In 1977, NASA, recognizing the company's special expertise in miniature systems, asked Parker to participate in the development of an implantable artificial sphincter for control of urinary incontinence. The company's peanut valve experience provided an ideal base for a new biomedical project, the Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) for continuous, computer-directed delivery of precisely metered medication -- insulin, for example -- within a patient's body. The work on PIMS also inspired development of Micromed, a related programmable medication device for external, rather than implantable use. The Biomedical Products Division has also applied its fluid handling expertise to a drugless therapy system called Cryomax for the treatment of such disorders as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

  12. Ethics, Deafness, and New Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermair, Manfred; Albertini, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 50 years, several new technologies have become enormously important within the Deaf community and have helped significantly to improve deaf people's lives in a hearing world. Current public attention and admiration, however, seems unduly focused on medical technologies that promise to solve "the problem" of being deaf. One reason for…

  13. Medical education and information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has brought many changes in medical education and practice in the last couple of decades. Teaching and learning medicine particularly has gone under profound changes due to computer technologies, and medical schools around the world have invested heavily either in new computer technologies or in the process of adapting to this technological revolution. In order to catch up with the rest of the world, developing countries need to research their options in adapting to new computer technologies. This descriptive survey study was designed to assess medical students' computer and Internet skills and their attitude toward ICT. Research findings showed that the mean score of self-perceived computer knowledge for male students in general was greater than for female students. Also, students who had participated in various prior computer workshops, had access to computer, Internet, and e-mail, and frequently checked their e-mail had higher mean of self-perceived knowledge and skill score. Finally, students with positive attitude toward ICT scored their computer knowledge higher than those who had no opinion. The results have confirmed that the medical schools, particularly in developing countries, need to bring fundamental changes such as curriculum modification in order to integrate ICT into medical education, creating essential infrastructure for ICT use in medical education and practice, and structured computer training for faculty and students.

  14. Advances in medical diagnostic technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Khin Wee; Mohamad Salim, Maheza Irna; Ong, Sang-Bing; Utama, Nugraha Priya; Myint, Yin Mon; Mohd Noor, Norliza; Supriyanto, Eko

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the most recent findings and knowledge in advanced diagnostics technology, covering a wide spectrum including brain activity analysis, breast and lung cancer detection, echocardiography, computer aided skeletal assessment to mitochondrial biology imaging at the cellular level. The authors explored magneto acoustic approaches and tissue elasticity imaging for the purpose of breast cancer detection. Perspectives in fetal echocardiography from an image processing angle are included. Diagnostic imaging in the field of mitochondrial diseases as well as the use of Computer-Aided System (CAD) are also discussed in the book. This book will be useful for students, lecturers or professional researchers in the field of biomedical sciences and image processing.

  15. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  16. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  17. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The ethics of an ordinary medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Some routinely applied hospital technologies may have unintended consequences for patients and their families. The neonatal cardiorespiratory monitor, a computer-like display used to show an infant's vital functions, is one such technology that may become part of a parent's day-to-day being with his or her hospitalized child. In this phenomenological study, I explored how the monitor may mediate parental sensibilities, reshaping the contact of parent and child. This exploration speaks to understanding the relational ethics of even the seemingly most ordinary of medical technologies in clinical contexts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Assessing medical technologies in development; a new paradigm of medical technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, J. Marjan; van Rossum, Wouter; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to provide a practical contribution to the field of medical technology assessment within a new paradigm. This paradigm indicates the need for more comprehensive technology assessments in the development stage of a new technology. - Method: We introduce a method, based on

  20. Assessing medical technologies in development - A new paradigm of medical technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, MJM; van Rossum, W; Verkerke, GJ; Rakhorst, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to provide a practical contribution to the field of medical technology assessment within a new paradigm. This paradigm indicates the need for more comprehensive technology assessments in the development stage of a new technology. Method: We introduce a method, based on

  1. Medical technology management: from planning to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Y; Jahnke, E

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate deployment of technological innovation contributes to improvement in the quality of healthcare delivered, the containment of cost, and access to the healthcare system. Hospitals have been allocating a significant portion of their resources to procuring and managing capital assets; they are continuously faced with demands for new medical equipment and are asked to manage existing inventory for which they are not well prepared. To objectively manage their investment, hospitals are developing medical technology management programs that need pertinent information and planning methodology for integrating new equipment into existing operations as well as for optimizing costs of ownership of all equipment. Clinical engineers can identify technological solutions based on the matching of new medical equipment with hospital's objectives. They can review their institution's overall technological position, determine strengths and weaknesses, develop equipment-selection criteria, supervise installations, train users and monitor post procurement performance to assure meeting of goals. This program, together with cost accounting analysis, will objectively guide the capital assets decision-making process. Cost accounting analysis is a multivariate function that includes determining the amount, based upon a strategic plan and financial resources, of funding to be allocated annually for medical equipment acquisition and replacement. Often this function works closely with clinical engineering to establish equipment useful life and prioritization of acquisition, upgrade, and replacement of inventory within budget confines and without conducting time consuming, individual financial capital project evaluations.

  2. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education.

  3. Mobile technology use in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luanrattana, Rattiporn; Win, Khin Than; Fulcher, John; Iverson, Don

    2012-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the PDA functionalities for a problem-based learning (PBL) medical curriculum at the Graduate School of Medicine (GSM), the University of Wollongong (UOW). The study determines the factors/aspects of incorporating PDAs, and the attitudes of stakeholders regarding the use of PDAs in such a PBL-based medical curriculum. In-depth interviews were designed and conducted with medical faculty, the medical education technology team and honorary medical academics. Four major PDA functionalities were identified, these being: clinical-log, reference, communication, and general functions. Two major aspects for the incorporation of PDAs into the PBL-medical curriculum at the UOW were determined from the interviews, these being technical and practical aspects. There is a potential for PDAs to be incorporated into the PBL-medical curricula at the UOW. However, a clear strategy needs to be defined as to how best to incorporate PDAs into PBL-medical curricula with minimal impact on students, as well as financial and resource implications for the GSM.

  4. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  5. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  6. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities

  7. Medical technology update - a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.

    2005-01-01

    Major advances in medical equipment and the expanding utility of clinical applications have contributed to imaging procedures fast becoming an integral part of standard patient care in hospitals and clinics worldwide. The medical imaging market is based on the integration of at least three critical market segments using cutting-edge technologies: Image-generating equipment; contrast agents and imaging labels, including radionuclides; and associated hardware and software to process, evaluate, store, and transmit the images, which are either digitally generated or digitized from conventional film. (author)

  8. HEP technologies to address medical imaging challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developments in detector technologies aimed at solving challenges in present and future CERN experiments, particularly at the LHC, have triggered exceptional advances in the performance of medical imaging devices, allowing for a spectacular progress in in-vivo molecular imaging procedures, which are opening the way for tailored therapies of major diseases. This talk will briefly review the recent history of this prime example of technology transfer from HEP experiments to society, will describe the technical challenges being addressed by some ongoing projects, and will present a few new ideas for further developments and their foreseeable impact.

  9. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  10. 78 FR 19537 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0053] SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.; Exemption AGENCY... Technologies, Inc. (SHINE) intends to submit an application to construct a medical isotope production facility... grants SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc. an exemption from the requirement of 10 CFR 2.101(a)(5) limiting...

  11. Introducing information technologies into medical education: activities of the AAMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, A A; Anderson, M B

    1997-03-01

    Previous articles in this column have discussed how new information technologies are revolutionizing medical education. In this article, two staff members from the Association of American Medical College's Division of Medical Education discuss how the Association (the AAMC) is working both to support the introduction of new technologies into medical education and to facilitate dialogue on information technology and curriculum issues among AAMC constituents and staff. The authors describe six AAMC initiatives related to computing in medical education: the Medical School Objectives Project, the National Curriculum Database Project, the Information Technology and Medical Education Project, a professional development program for chief information officers, the AAMC ACCESS Data Collection and Dissemination System, and the internal Staff Interest Group on Medical Informatics and Medical Education.

  12. 78 FR 29390 - Applications; SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Proj-0792; NRC-2013-0053] Applications; SHINE Medical Technologies... (ADAMS) Accession No. ML13088A192), SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) filed with the U.S. Nuclear... for a medical radioisotope production facility in Janesville, Wisconsin. An exemption from certain...

  13. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  14. A needs assessment for mobile technology use in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrzad Vafa; Diane E. Chico

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated how medical students perceived mobile technology as a component of their learning experience and identified barriers to the use of mobile technology in education. Methods: An anonymous survey developed by EDUCAUSE was distributed to 1000 first year medical students (M1s) at two separate medical schools during three consecutive academic years, 2010 to 2013. The 25-item questionnaire assessed student use of mobile devices, student interest in mobile technolog...

  15. Technology for Improving Medication Monitoring in Nursing Homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapane, Kate L; Cameron, Kathleen; Feinberg, Janice

    2005-01-01

    .... While clinical informatics systems have focused on the reduction of medication errors at the point of prescribing, dispensing, or administration, few have proposed the use of information technology...

  16. Knowledge network for medical technology management in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Fabiola Martínez; Leehan, Joaquín Azpiroz; Méndez, Miguel Cadena; Yuriar, Salvador Duarte; Salazar, Raúl Molina; Gilmore, Amador Terán

    2009-10-01

    The role of biomedical engineers (BMEs) has changed widely over the years, from managing a group of technicians to the planning of large installations and the management of medical technology countrywide. As the technology has advanced, the competence of BMEs has been challenged because it is no longer possible to be an expert in every component of the technology involved in running a hospital. Our approach has been to form a network of professionals that are experts in different fields related to medical technology, where work is coordinated to provide high quality services at the planning and execution stages of projects related to medical technology. A study of the procedures involved in the procurement of medical technology has been carried out over the years. These experiences have been compared with several case studies where the approach to problem solving in this area has been multidisciplinary. Planning and execution phases of projects involving medical technology management have been identified. After several instances of collaboration among experts from different fields, a network for management of healthcare technology has been formed at our institution that incorporates the experience from different departments that were dealing separately with projects involving medical technology. This network has led us to propose this approach to solve medical technology management projects, where the strengths of each subgroup complement each other. This structure will lead to a more integrated approach to healthcare technology management and will ensure higher quality solutions.

  17. Mineral-PET Kimberlite sorting by nuclear-medical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, S; Cafferty, L; Caveney, R; Connell, SH; Cook, M; Dalton, M; Gopal, H; Ives, N; Lee, C A; Mampe, W; Phoku, M; Roodt, A; Sibande, W; Sellschop, J P F; Topkin, J; Unwucholaa, D A

    2010-01-01

    A revolutionary new technology for diamond bearing rock sorting which has its roots in medical-nuclear physics has been taken through a substantial part of the R&D phase. This has led to the construction of the technology demonstrator. Experiments using the technology demonstrator and experiments at a hospital have established the scientific and technological viability of the project.

  18. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  19. Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel H; Topps, David; Archibald, Douglas; Hogue, Rebecca J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies (including handheld and wearable devices) have the potential to enhance learning activities from basic medical undergraduate education through residency and beyond. In order to use these technologies successfully, medical educators need to be aware of the underpinning socio-theoretical concepts that influence their usage, the pre-clinical and clinical educational environment in which the educational activities occur, and the practical possibilities and limitations of their usage. This Guide builds upon the previous AMEE Guide to e-Learning in medical education by providing medical teachers with conceptual frameworks and practical examples of using mobile technologies in medical education. The goal is to help medical teachers to use these concepts and technologies at all levels of medical education to improve the education of medical and healthcare personnel, and ultimately contribute to improved patient healthcare. This Guide begins by reviewing some of the technological changes that have occurred in recent years, and then examines the theoretical basis (both social and educational) for understanding mobile technology usage. From there, the Guide progresses through a hierarchy of institutional, teacher and learner needs, identifying issues, problems and solutions for the effective use of mobile technology in medical education. This Guide ends with a brief look to the future.

  20. 75 FR 52472 - Spectrum Requirements for Advanced Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... medical devices. Under this framework, the rules for MedRadio service incorporates the MICS ``core'' band... Requirements for Advanced Medical Technologies AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule.... (Medtronic) regarding rules for the Medical Device Radiocommunication (MedRadio) service. The Commission...

  1. Teaching Biochemistry to Medical Technology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Silva, Benito; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the biochemistry component of study to become a medical technologist in a Chilean university. Provides details of program structure, course content descriptions, and teaching strategies. (DDR)

  2. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  3. The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

  4. Implications of WWW technologies for exchanging medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Dixon

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses some of the implications for medical record exchange of very recent developments in technology and tools that support the World Wide Web. It argues that XML (Extensible Mark-up Language is a very good enabling technology for medical record exchange. XML provides a much cheaper way of executing the exchange of medical information that circumvents the need for proprietary software. Use of XML can also simplify solutions to the problems associated with coping with the evolution of medical systems in time. However XML on its own does not resolve all the semantic heterogeneities.

  5. Encapsulation Technology for Delivery of Medical Therapeutics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Biocapsule technology is a novel drug deilivery system that uses living cells contained in a specialized biocompatible container that can be implanted into...

  6. The user's view of commercially available medical technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    The potential user of new medical equipment for imaging the cardiovascular system is often faced with the problem of deciding whether or not to accept a new piece of equipment or a new technological concept into the practice of cardiology. Considerations for acquiring new medical technology are discussed in some detail. Acquisition of new technology should depend on whether the equipment provides more and relevant clinical data, is for research or for limited use, is properly engineered for patient use, presents information in easily storable and retrievable form, is tested and validated clinically, is fabricated by a reliable manufacturer, is cost effective, and may be readily replaced by a new technology.

  7. Perception of medical students for utility of mobile technology use in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Sushama Subhash Thakre; Subhash Bapurao Thakre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mobile technology is changing the way we live, and it is beginning to change the way we learn. Current literature reviews have shown that research on mobile technology in medical education primarily focused on efficacy, of mobile devices as an educational tool and resource, infrastructure to support m-learning, benefits, challenges, and appropriate use. Objectives: To assess the perception of medical student for the utility of mobile technology in their learning experience and t...

  8. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed......The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy...

  9. Medical simulation technology: educational overview, industry leaders, and what's missing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Nicholas; Hurst, Stephen; Khadra, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Modern medical simulation technology (MST) debuted in 1960 with the development of Resusci Annie (Laerdal 2007), which assisted students in the acquisition of proper ventilation and compression techniques used during basic life support. Following a steady stream of subsequent technological advances and innovations, MST manufacturers are now able to offer training aids capable of facilitating innovative learning in such diverse areas as human patient simulators, simulated clinical environments, virtual procedure stations, virtual medical environments, electronic tutors, and performance recording. The authors list a number of the most popular MSTs presently available while citing evaluative efforts undertaken to date regarding the efficacy of MST to the medical profession. They conclude by proposing a variety of simulation innovations of prospective interest to both medical and technology personnel while offering healthcare administrators a series of recommended considerations when planning to integrate MST into existing medical systems.

  10. Engagement of the medical-technology sector with society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Edelman, Elazer R; Radisic, Milica; Laurencin, Cato; Untereker, Darrel

    2017-04-12

    The medical-technology sector must educate society in an unbiased rational way about the successes and benefits of biotechnology innovation. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. DICOM standard in computer-aided medical technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, A.V.; Prilutskij, D.A.; Selishchev, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    The paper outlines one of the promising standards to transmit images in medicine, in radiology in particular. the essence of the standard DICOM is disclosed and promises of its introduction into computer-aided medical technologies

  12. Globalization and the trends of medical technology trade in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, Semih; Güldal, Dilek; Demiral, Yücel

    2007-05-01

    Medical technology trade is one of the most affected health areas by global regulations in the developing countries. The aim of the study is to examine recent changes in medical technology import and export and their results in Turkey. Data show that the total medical technology imports (MTI) increased from $ 34.6 million to $ 3427.9 million between 1970 and 2003. While MTI constituted 3.6% of total imports in 1970 and 1.3% in 1980, this ratio raised up to 4.9% in 2003. The ratio of MTI in total health expenditures were also increased from 7.6% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2003. Medical technology exports (MTE) have been increased from $ 0.9 million in 1970 to $ 303.2 million in 2003. The ratio of MTE to MTI increased from 2.7% to 13.9% between 1970 and 1990 and decreased after 1990, to 8.8%. Our study implied that the medical technology trade in Turkey has been negatively affected and in some respects differs from some other important industries in the globalization era. Nevertheless, detailed comparative studies in different developing countries such as China, Brazil, Mexico and India, are needed to explore the real state of medical technology trade, use and the effects of globalization on these topics.

  13. Adaptive and perceptual learning technologies in medical education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Philip J

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in the learning sciences offer remarkable potential to improve medical education and maximize the benefits of emerging medical technologies. This article describes 2 major innovation areas in the learning sciences that apply to simulation and other aspects of medical learning: Perceptual learning (PL) and adaptive learning technologies. PL technology offers, for the first time, systematic, computer-based methods for teaching pattern recognition, structural intuition, transfer, and fluency. Synergistic with PL are new adaptive learning technologies that optimize learning for each individual, embed objective assessment, and implement mastery criteria. The author describes the Adaptive Response-Time-based Sequencing (ARTS) system, which uses each learner's accuracy and speed in interactive learning to guide spacing, sequencing, and mastery. In recent efforts, these new technologies have been applied in medical learning contexts, including adaptive learning modules for initial medical diagnosis and perceptual/adaptive learning modules (PALMs) in dermatology, histology, and radiology. Results of all these efforts indicate the remarkable potential of perceptual and adaptive learning technologies, individually and in combination, to improve learning in a variety of medical domains. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Medically relevant ElectroNeedle technology development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Thomas, Michael Loren; McClain, Jaime L.; Harper, Jason C.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2008-11-01

    ElectroNeedles technology was developed as part of an earlier Grand Challenge effort on Bio-Micro Fuel Cell project. During this earlier work, the fabrication of the ElectroNeedles was accomplished along with proof-of-concept work on several electrochemically active analytes such as glucose, quinone and ferricyanide. Additionally, earlier work demonstrated technology potential in the field of immunosensors by specifically detecting Troponin, a cardiac biomarker. The current work focused upon fabrication process reproducibility of the ElectroNeedles and then using the devices to sensitively detect p-cresol, a biomarker for kidney failure or nephrotoxicity. Valuable lessons were learned regarding fabrication assurance and quality. The detection of p-cresol was accomplished by electrochemistry as well as using fluorescence to benchmark ElectroNeedles performance. Results from these studies will serve as a guide for the future fabrication processes involving ElectroNeedles as well as provide the groundwork necessary to expand technology applications. One paper has been accepted for publication acknowledging LDRD funding (K. E. Achyuthan et al, Comb. Chem. & HTS, 2008). We are exploring the scope for a second paper describing the applications potential of this technology.

  15. Health Instruction Packages: Medical Technologies--EEG, Radiology, & Biomedical Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittenham, Dorothea; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct medical technology students in a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "EEG Technology: Measurement Technique of the 'International 10-20 System'" by Dorothea Brittenham, describes a procedure used by electroencephalograph…

  16. The Use of Technology in the Medical Assisting Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    The growing presence of technology in health care has infiltrated educational institutions. Numerous software and hardware technologies have been designed to improve student learning; however, their use in the classroom is unclear. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the experiences of medical assisting faculty using…

  17. Review of early assessment models of innovative medical technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Krahn, Murray D; Kidholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hospitals increasingly make decisions regarding the early development of and investment in technologies, but a formal evaluation model for assisting hospitals early on in assessing the potential of innovative medical technologies is lacking. This article provides an overview of models...

  18. Web-Based Medical Service: Technology Attractiveness, Medical Creditability, Information Source, and Behavior Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan Huei

    2017-08-02

    Web-based medical service (WBMS), a cooperative relationship between medical service and Internet technology, has been called one of the most innovative services of the 21st century. However, its business promotion and implementation in the medical industry have neither been expected nor executed. Few studies have explored this phenomenon from the viewpoint of inexperienced patients. The primary goal of this study was to explore whether technology attractiveness, medical creditability, and diversified medical information sources could increase users' behavior intention. This study explored the effectiveness of web-based medical service by using three situations to manipulate sources of medical information. A total of 150 questionnaires were collected from people who had never used WBMS before. Hierarchical regression was used to examine the mediation and moderated-mediation effects. Perceived ease of use (P=.002) and perceived usefulness (P=.001) significantly enhance behavior intentions. Medical credibility is a mediator (P=.03), but the relationship does not significantly differ under diverse manipulative information channels (P=.39). Medical credibility could explain the extra variation between technology attractiveness and behavior intention, but not significant under different moderating effect of medical information sources. ©Shan Huei Wang. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 02.08.2017.

  19. Production Situation and Technology Prospect of Medical Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Feng;LIN Li;LIU Yu-hao;MA Xing-jun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotope production technology was overviewed, including traditional and newest technology. The current situation of medical isotope production was introduced. The problems faced by isotope supply and demand were analyzed. The future development trend of medical isotopes and technology prospect were put forward. As the most populous country, nuclear medicine develops rapidly, however, domestic isotope mainly relies on imports. The highly productive and relatively safe MIPR is expected to be an effective way to breakthrough the bottleneck of the development of nuclear medicine. Traditional isotope production technologies with reactor can be improved. It's urgent to research and promote new isotope production technologies with reactor. Those technologies which do not depend on reactor will have a bright market prospects.

  20. Bar Code Medication Administration Technology: Characterization of High-Alert Medication Triggers and Clinician Workarounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel F; Fortier, Christopher R; Garrison, Kelli L

    2011-02-01

    Bar code medication administration (BCMA) technology is gaining acceptance for its ability to prevent medication administration errors. However, studies suggest that improper use of BCMA technology can yield unsatisfactory error prevention and introduction of new potential medication errors. To evaluate the incidence of high-alert medication BCMA triggers and alert types and discuss the type of nursing and pharmacy workarounds occurring with the use of BCMA technology and the electronic medication administration record (eMAR). Medication scanning and override reports from January 1, 2008, through November 30, 2008, for all adult medical/surgical units were retrospectively evaluated for high-alert medication system triggers, alert types, and override reason documentation. An observational study of nursing workarounds on an adult medicine step-down unit was performed and an analysis of potential pharmacy workarounds affecting BCMA and the eMAR was also conducted. Seventeen percent of scanned medications triggered an error alert of which 55% were for high-alert medications. Insulin aspart, NPH insulin, hydromorphone, potassium chloride, and morphine were the top 5 high-alert medications that generated alert messages. Clinician override reasons for alerts were documented in only 23% of administrations. Observational studies assessing for nursing workarounds revealed a median of 3 clinician workarounds per administration. Specific nursing workarounds included a failure to scan medications/patient armband and scanning the bar code once the dosage has been removed from the unit-dose packaging. Analysis of pharmacy order entry process workarounds revealed the potential for missed doses, duplicate doses, and doses being scheduled at the wrong time. BCMA has the potential to prevent high-alert medication errors by alerting clinicians through alert messages. Nursing and pharmacy workarounds can limit the recognition of optimal safety outcomes and therefore workflow processes

  1. Technology and medication errors: impact in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; St-Pierre, Liette; Lagacé, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study a medication distribution technology's (MDT) impact on medication errors reported in public nursing homes in Québec Province. The work was carried out in six nursing homes (800 patients). Medication error data were collected from nursing staff through a voluntary reporting process before and after MDT was implemented. The errors were analysed using: totals errors; medication error type; severity and patient consequences. A statistical analysis verified whether there was a significant difference between the variables before and after introducing MDT. The results show that the MDT detected medication errors. The authors' analysis also indicates that errors are detected more rapidly resulting in less severe consequences for patients. MDT is a step towards safer and more efficient medication processes. Our findings should convince healthcare administrators to implement technology such as electronic prescriber or bar code medication administration systems to improve medication processes and to provide better healthcare to patients. Few studies have been carried out in long-term healthcare facilities such as nursing homes. The authors' study extends what is known about MDT's impact on medication errors in nursing homes.

  2. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists.

  3. A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: educational environment in medical information education, content of a lecture in medical information, problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: motivation of the students is low, the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists. (author)

  4. Development of technology for medical image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Amano, Daizou

    2012-01-01

    With entry into a field of medical diagnosis in mind, we have developed positron emission tomography (PET) ''MIP-100'' system, of which spatial resolution is far higher than the conventional one, using semiconductor detectors for preclinical imaging for small animals. In response to the recently increasing market demand to fuse functional images by PET and anatomical ones by CT or MRI, we have been developing software to implement image fusion function that enhances marketability of the PET Camera. This paper describes the method of fusing with high accuracy the PET images and anatomical ones by CT system. It also explains that a computer simulation proved the image overlay accuracy to be ±0.3 mm as a result of the development, and that effectiveness of the developed software is confirmed in case of experiment to obtain measured data. Achieving such high accuracy as ±0.3 mm by the software allows us to present fusion images with high resolution (<0.6 mm) without degrading the spatial resolution (<0.5 mm) of the PET system using semiconductor detectors. (author)

  5. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  6. Advancing medication infusion safety through the clinical integration of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, Donald; O'Shea, Kristen; Muller, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug events resulting from errors in prescribing or administering medications are preventable. Within a hospital system, numerous technologies are employed to address the common sources of medication error, including the use of electronic medical records, physician order entry, smart infusion pumps, and barcode medication administration systems. Infusion safety is inherently risky because of the high-risk medications administered and the lack of integration among the stand-alone systems in most institutions. Intravenous clinical integration (IVCI) is a technology that connects electronic medical records, physician order entry, smart infusion pumps, and barcode medication administration systems. It combines the safety features of an automatically programmed infusion pump (drug, concentration, infusion rate, and patient weight, all auto-programmed into the device) with software that provides visibility to real-time clinical infusion data. Our article describes the characteristics of IVCI at WellSpan Health and its impact on patient safety. The integrated infusion system has the capability of reducing medication errors, improving patient care, reducing in-facility costs, and supporting asset management. It can enhance continuous quality improvement efforts and efficiency of clinical work flow. After implementing IVCI, the institution realized a safer patient environment and a more streamlined work flow for pharmacy and nursing.

  7. Educational technology infrastructure and services in North American medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, Carol; Souza, Kevin H; Heestand, Diane; Moses, Anna; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    To describe the current educational technology infrastructure and services provided by North American allopathic medical schools that are members of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), to present information needed for institutional benchmarking. A Web-based survey instrument was developed and administered in the fall of 2004 by the authors, sent to representatives of 137 medical schools and completed by representatives of 88, a response rate of 64%. Schools were given scores for infrastructure and services provided. Data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance, chi-square, and correlation coefficients. There was no difference in the number of infrastructure features or services offered based on region of the country, public versus private schools, or size of graduating class. Schools implemented 3.0 (SD = 1.5) of 6 infrastructure items and offered 11.6 (SD = 4.1) of 22 services. Over 90% of schools had wireless access (97%), used online course materials for undergraduate medical education (97%), course management system for graduate medical education (95%) and online teaching evaluations (90%). Use of services differed across the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education continuum. Outside of e-portfolios for undergraduates, the least-offered services were for services to graduate and continuing medical education. The results of this survey provide a benchmark for the level of services and infrastructure currently supporting educational technology by AAMC-member allopathic medical schools.

  8. The application of wiki technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Andrew; Lewis, Melanie; White, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND, AIMS AND METHODS: Recent years have seen the introduction of web-based technologies such as the 'wiki', which is a webpage whose content can be edited in real time using a web browser. This article reviews the current state of knowledge about the use of wikis in education, and considers whether wiki technology has features that might prove useful in medical education. Advantages and challenges of the technology are discussed, and recommendations for use are provided. We believe that wiki technology offers a number of potential benefits for administrators, students and instructors, including the ability to share information online, to construct knowledge together, to facilitate collaboration and to enable social learning and peer feedback. We believe that with proper planning and instructional design, wiki technology can be usefully employed in medical education. We intend to continue to study the impact of wiki technology in our own programme, and we encourage others to evaluate the application of wiki technology in other areas of medical education.

  9. Technology in postgraduate medical education: a dynamic influence on learning?

    OpenAIRE

    Bullock, Alison; Webb, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The influence of technology in medical workplace learning is explored by focusing on three uses: m-learning (notably apps), simulation and social media. Smartphones with point-of-care tools (such as textbooks, drug guides and medical calculators) can support workplace learning and doctors’ decision-making. Simulations can help develop technical skills and team interactions, and ‘in situ’ simulations improve the match between the virtual and the real. Social media (wikis, blogs, networking, Yo...

  10. How medical technologies shape the experience of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Svenaeus, Fredrik

    2018-02-03

    In this article we explore how diagnostic and therapeutic technologies shape the lived experiences of illness for patients. By analysing a wide range of examples, we identify six ways that technology can (trans)form the experience of illness (and health). First, technology may create awareness of disease by revealing asymptomatic signs or markers (imaging techniques, blood tests). Second, the technology can reveal risk factors for developing diseases (e.g., high blood pressure or genetic tests that reveal risks of falling ill in the future). Third, the technology can affect and change an already present illness experience (e.g., the way blood sugar measurement affects the perceived symptoms of diabetes). Fourth, therapeutic technologies may redefine our experiences of a certain condition as diseased rather than unfortunate (e.g. assisted reproductive technologies or symptom based diagnoses in psychiatry). Fifth, technology influences illness experiences through altering social-cultural norms and values regarding various diagnoses. Sixth, technology influences and changes our experiences of being healthy in contrast and relation to being diseased and ill. This typology of how technology forms illness and related conditions calls for reflection regarding the phenomenology of technology and health. How are medical technologies and their outcomes perceived and understood by patients? The phenomenological way of approaching illness as a lived, bodily being-in-the-world is an important approach for better understanding and evaluating the effects that medical technologies may have on our health, not only in defining, diagnosing, or treating diseases, but also in making us feel more vulnerable and less healthy in different regards.

  11. Establishment of a Quantitative Medical Technology Evaluation System and Indicators within Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suo-Wei; Chen, Tong; Pan, Qi; Wei, Liang-Yu; Wang, Qin; Li, Chao; Song, Jing-Chen; Luo, Ji

    2018-06-05

    The development and application of medical technologies reflect the medical quality and clinical capacity of a hospital. It is also an effective approach in upgrading medical service and core competitiveness among medical institutions. This study aimed to build a quantitative medical technology evaluation system through questionnaire survey within medical institutions to perform an assessment to medical technologies more objectively and accurately, and promote the management of medical quality technologies and ensure the medical safety of various operations among the hospitals. A two-leveled quantitative medical technology evaluation system was built through a two-round questionnaire survey of chosen experts. The Delphi method was applied in identifying the structure of evaluation system and indicators. The judgment of the experts on the indicators was adopted in building the matrix so that the weight coefficient and maximum eigenvalue (λ max), consistency index (CI), and random consistency ratio (CR) could be obtained and collected. The results were verified through consistency tests, and the index weight coefficient of each indicator was conducted and calculated through analytical hierarchy process. Twenty-six experts of different medical fields were involved in the questionnaire survey, 25 of whom successfully responded to the two-round research. Altogether, 4 primary indicators (safety, effectiveness, innovativeness, and benefits), as well as 13 secondary indicators, were included in the evaluation system. The matrix is built to conduct the λ max, CI, and CR of each expert in the survey, and the index weight coefficients of primary indicators were 0.33, 0.28, 0.27, and 0.12, respectively, and the index weight coefficients of secondary indicators were conducted and calculated accordingly. As the two-round questionnaire survey of experts and statistical analysis were performed and credibility of the results was verified through consistency evaluation test, the

  12. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  13. Towards the systematic development of medical networking technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Oliver; Shetty, Ravindra; Sree, S Vinitha; Acharya, Sripathi; Acharya U, Rajendra; Ng, E Y K; Poo, Chua Kok; Suri, Jasjit

    2011-12-01

    Currently, there is a disparity in the availability of doctors between urban and rural areas of developing countries. Most experienced doctors and specialists, as well as advanced diagnostic technologies, are available in urban areas. People living in rural areas have less or sometimes even no access to affordable healthcare facilities. Increasing the number of doctors and charitable medical hospitals or deploying advanced medical technologies in these areas might not be economically feasible, especially in developing countries. We need to mobilize science and technology to master this complex, large scale problem in an objective, logical, and professional way. This can only be achieved with a collaborative effort where a team of experts works on both technical and non-technical aspects of this health care divide. In this paper we use a systems engineering framework to discuss hospital networks which might be solution for the problem. We argue that with the advancement in communication and networking technologies, economically middle class people and even some rural poor have access to internet and mobile communication systems. Thus, Hospital Digital Networking Technologies (HDNT), such as telemedicine, can be developed to utilize internet, mobile and satellite communication systems to connect primitive rural healthcare centers to well advanced modern urban setups and thereby provide better consultation and diagnostic care to the needy people. This paper describes requirements and limitations of the HDNTs. It also presents the features of telemedicine, the implementation issues and the application of wireless technologies in the field of medical networking.

  14. Technology in postgraduate medical education: a dynamic influence on learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Alison; Webb, Katie

    2015-11-01

    The influence of technology in medical workplace learning is explored by focusing on three uses: m-learning (notably apps), simulation and social media. Smartphones with point-of-care tools (such as textbooks, drug guides and medical calculators) can support workplace learning and doctors' decision-making. Simulations can help develop technical skills and team interactions, and 'in situ' simulations improve the match between the virtual and the real. Social media (wikis, blogs, networking, YouTube) heralds a more participatory and collaborative approach to knowledge development. These uses of technology are related to Kolb's learning cycle and Eraut's intentions of informal learning. Contentions and controversies with these technologies exist. There is a problem with the terminology commonly adopted to describe the use of technology to enhance learning. Using learning technology in the workplace changes the interaction with others and raises issues of professionalism and etiquette. Lack of regulation makes assessment of app quality a challenge. Distraction and dependency are charges levelled at smartphone use in the workplace and these need further research. Unless addressed, these and other challenges will impede the benefits that technology may bring to postgraduate medical education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. How Consumers and Physicians View New Medical Technology: Comparative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeldt, Debra L; Wineinger, Nathan E; Waalen, Jill; Gollamudi, Shreya; Grossberg, Adam; Steinhubl, Steven R; McCollister-Slipp, Anna; Rogers, Marc A; Silvers, Carey; Topol, Eric J

    2015-09-14

    As a result of the digital revolution coming to medicine, a number of new tools are becoming available and are starting to be introduced in clinical practice. We aim to assess health care professional and consumer attitudes toward new medical technology including smartphones, genetic testing, privacy, and patient-accessible electronic health records. We performed a survey with 1406 health care providers and 1102 consumer responders. Consumers who completed the survey were more likely to prefer new technologies for a medical diagnosis (437/1102, 39.66%) compared with providers (194/1406, 13.80%; P<.001), with more providers (393/1406, 27.95%) than consumers (175/1102, 15.88%) reporting feeling uneasy about using technology for a diagnosis. Both providers and consumers supported genetic testing for various purposes, with providers (1234/1406, 87.77%) being significantly more likely than consumers (806/1102, 73.14%) to support genetic testing when planning to have a baby (P<.001). Similarly, 91.68% (1289/1406) of providers and 81.22% (895/1102) of consumers supported diagnosing problems in a fetus (P<.001). Among providers, 90.33% (1270/1406) were concerned that patients would experience anxiety after accessing health records, and 81.95% (1149/1406) felt it would lead to requests for unnecessary medical evaluations, but only 34.30% (378/1102; P<.001) and 24.59% (271/1102; P<.001) of consumers expressed the same concerns, respectively. Physicians (137/827, 16.6%) reported less concern about the use of technology for diagnosis compared to medical students (21/235, 8.9%; P=.03) and also more frequently felt that patients owned their medical record (323/827, 39.1%; and 30/235, 12.8%, respectively; P<.001). Consumers and health professionals differ significantly and broadly in their views of emerging medical technology, with more enthusiasm and support expressed by consumers.

  16. Introducing technology into medical education: two pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Dumenco, Luba; Dollase, Richard; Taylor, Julie Scott; Wald, Hedy S; Reis, Shmuel P

    2013-12-01

    Educators are integrating new technology into medical curriculum. The impact of newer technology on educational outcomes remains unclear. We aimed to determine if two pilot interventions, (1) introducing iPads into problem-based learning (PBL) sessions and (2) online tutoring would improve the educational experience of our learners. We voluntarily assigned 26 second-year medical students to iPad-based PBL sessions. Five students were assigned to Skype for exam remediation. We performed a mixed-method evaluation to determine efficacy. Pilot 1: Seventeen students completed a survey following their use of an iPad during the second-year PBL curriculum. Students noted the iPad allows for researching information in real time, annotating lecture notes, and viewing sharper images. Data indicate that iPads have value in medical education and are a positive addition to the curriculum. Pilot 2: Students agreed that online tutoring is at least or more effective than in-person tutoring. In our pilot studies, students experienced that iPads and Skype are beneficial in medical education and can be successfully employed in areas such as PBL and remediation. Educators should continue to further examine innovative opportunities for introducing technology into medical education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Supporting medical technology development with the analytic hierarchy process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Janna Marchien

    2001-01-01

    This thesis aims to develop an adequate method of CTA to influence decision making about the development and clinical application of a medical technology. The adequacy of this method is related to the timing of its application, the information used in the assessment, the consensus formation about,

  18. Using Technology to Meet the Challenges of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guze, Phyllis A

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly changing, influenced by many factors including the changing health care environment, the changing role of the physician, altered societal expectations, rapidly changing medical science, and the diversity of pedagogical techniques. Changes in societal expectations put patient safety in the forefront, and raises the ethical issues of learning interactions and procedures on live patients, with the long-standing teaching method of "see one, do one, teach one" no longer acceptable. The educational goals of using technology in medical education include facilitating basic knowledge acquisition, improving decision making, enhancement of perceptual variation, improving skill coordination, practicing for rare or critical events, learning team training, and improving psychomotor skills. Different technologies can address these goals. Technologies such as podcasts and videos with flipped classrooms, mobile devices with apps, video games, simulations (part-time trainers, integrated simulators, virtual reality), and wearable devices (google glass) are some of the techniques available to address the changing educational environment. This article presents how the use of technologies can provide the infrastructure and basis for addressing many of the challenges in providing medical education for the future.

  19. Health information technology and the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triola, Marc M; Friedman, Erica; Cimino, Christopher; Geyer, Enid M; Wiederhorn, Jo; Mainiero, Crystal

    2010-12-01

    Medical schools must teach core biomedical informatics competencies that address health information technology (HIT), including explaining electronic medical record systems and computerized provider order entry systems and their role in patient safety; describing the research uses and limitations of a clinical data warehouse; understanding the concepts and importance of information system interoperability; explaining the difference between biomedical informatics and HIT; and explaining the ways clinical information systems can fail. Barriers to including these topics in the curricula include lack of teachers; the perception that informatics competencies are not applicable during preclinical courses and there is no place in the clerkships to teach them; and the legal and policy issues that conflict with students' need to develop skills. However, curricular reform efforts are creating opportunities to teach these topics with new emphasis on patient safety, team-based medical practice, and evidence-based care. Overarching HIT competencies empower our students to be lifelong technology learners.

  20. Establishment of a Quantitative Medical Technology Evaluation System and Indicators within Medical Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suo-Wei Wu

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: As the two-round questionnaire survey of experts and statistical analysis were performed and credibility of the results was verified through consistency evaluation test, the study established a quantitative medical technology evaluation system model and assessment indicators within medical institutions based on the Delphi method and analytical hierarchy process. Moreover, further verifications, adjustments, and optimizations of the system and indicators will be performed in follow-up studies.

  1. Judicious use of simulation technology in continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael T; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to address their training needs, it is important to highlight concepts of simulation technology that can help to optimize learning outcomes. This article discusses the role of fidelity in medical simulation. It provides support from a cross section of simulation training domains for determining the appropriate levels of fidelity, and it offers guidelines for creating an optimal balance of skill practice and realism for efficient training outcomes. After defining fidelity, 3 dimensions of fidelity, drawn from the human factors literature, are discussed in terms of their relevance to medical simulation. From this, research-based guidelines are provided to inform CME providers regarding the use of simulation in CME training. Copyright © 2012 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  2. Medical and surgical applications of space biosensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers in space life sciences are rapidly approaching a technology impasse. Many of the critical questions on the impact of spaceflight on living systems simply cannot be answered with the limited available technologies. Research subjects, particularly small animal models like the rat, must be allowed to function relatively untended and unrestrained for long periods to fully reflect the impact of microgravity and spaceflight on their behavior and physiology. These requirements preclude the use of present hard-wired instrumentation techniques and limited data acquisition systems. Implantable sensors and miniaturized biotelemetry are the only means of capturing the fundamental and critical data. This same biosensor and biotelemetry technology has direct application to Earth-based medicine and surgery. Continuous, on-line data acquisition and improved measurement capabilities combined with the ease and flexibility offered by automated, wireless, and portable instruments and data systems, should provide a boon to the health care industry. Playing a key role in this technology revolution is the Sensors 2000! (S2K!) Program at NASA Ames Research Center. S2K!, in collaboration with space life sciences researchers and managers, provides an integrated capability for sensor technology development and applications, including advanced biosensor technology development, spaceflight hardware development, and technology transfer and commercialization. S2K! is presently collaborating on several spaceflight projects with dual-use medical applications. One prime example is a collaboration with the Fetal Treatment Center (FTC) at the University of California at San Francisco. The goal is to develop and apply implantable chemical sensor and biotelemetry technology to continuously monitor fetal patients during extra-uterine surgery, replacement into the womb, through birth and beyond. Once validated for ground use, the method will be transitioned to spaceflight applications to

  3. Medical and surgical applications of space biosensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, John W.

    1996-02-01

    Researchers in space life sciences are rapidly approaching a technology impasse. Many of the critical questions on the impact of spaceflight on living systems simply cannot be answered with the limited available technologies. Research subjects, particularly small animal models like the rat, must be allowed to function relatively untended and unrestrained for long periods to fully reflect the impact of microgravity and spaceflight on their behavior and physiology. These requirements preclude the use of present hard-wired instrumentation techniques and limited data acquisition systems. Implantable sensors and miniaturized biotelemetry are the only means of capturing the fundamental and critical data. This same biosensor and biotelemetry technology has direct application to Earth-based medicine and surgery. Continuous, on-line data acquisition and improved measurement capabilities combined with the ease and flexibility offered by automated, wireless, and portable instruments and data systems, should provide a boon to the health care industry. Playing a key role in this technology revolution is the Sensors 2000! (S2K!) Program at NASA Ames Research Center. S2K!, in collaboration with space life sciences researchers and managers, provides an integrated capability for sensor technology development and applications, including advanced biosensor technology development, spaceflight hardware development, and technology transfer and commercialization. S2K! is presently collaborating on several spaceflight projects with dual-use medical applications. One prime example is a collaboration with the Fetal Treatment Center (FTC) at the University of California at San Francisco. The goal is to develop and apply implantable chemical sensor and biotelemetry technology to continuously monitor fetal patients during extra-uterine surgery, replacement into the womb, through birth and beyond. Once validated for ground use, the method will be transitioned to spaceflight applications to

  4. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed.

  5. Diffusion of medical technology: the role of financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellaro, Giulia; Ghislandi, Simone; Anessi-Pessina, Eugenio

    2011-04-01

    In the last decade the pace of innovation in medical technology has accelerated: hence the need to better identify and understand the real forces behind the adoption and diffusion of medical technology innovations in clinical practice. Among these forces, financial incentives may be expected to play a major role. The purpose of this paper was to assess the influence of financing mechanisms for new medical devices and correlated procedures on their diffusion. The analysis was carried out in the Italian inpatient cardiovascular area and applied to drug eluting stents over the period 2003-07. The paper's main hypothesis, that higher levels of reimbursement encourage technology diffusion, was rejected. So was the hypothesis that private hospitals may be more sensitive to tariff levels than public hospitals. A statistically significant difference was found only between hospitals that are funded on a Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs) basis and those that are not, with the former showing higher levels of technology diffusion. These results warn policy makers against excessive reliance on specific reimbursement fee changes as a way of steering provider behaviour. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about

  7. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  8. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-06-24

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new

  9. Optimize Use of Space Research and Technology for Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnifield, Nona K.

    2012-01-01

    systems, and cutting-edge component technologies to conduct a wide range of scientific observations and measurements. These technologies are also considered for practical applications that benefit society in remarkable ways. At NASA Goddard, the technology transfer initiative promotes matching technologies from Earth and space science needs to targeted industry sectors. This requires clear knowledge of industry needs and priorities and social demands. The process entails matching mature technologies where there are known innovation challenges and good opportunities for matching technology needs. This requires creative thinking and takes commitment of time and resources. Additionally, we also look at applications for known hot industry or societal needs. Doing so has given us occasion to host discussions with representatives from industry, academia, government organizations, and societal special interest groups about the application of NASA Goddard technologies for devices used in medical monitoring and detection tools. As a result, partnerships have been established. Innovation transpired when new products were enabled because of NASA Goddard research and technology programs.

  10. 42 CFR 412.87 - Additional payment for new medical services and technologies: General provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment for new medical services and technologies: General provisions. (a) Basis. Sections 412.87 and 412... establish a mechanism to recognize the costs of new medical services and technologies under the hospital... that are new medical services and technologies, if the following conditions are met: (1) A new medical...

  11. [Guidelines for blood transfusion teaching to medical laboratory technology students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, P; Tourlourat, M; Fourcade, C; Julien, E; Peyrard, T; Cabaud, J-J

    2012-02-01

    The new French law about clinical laboratory medicine, the requirements of the ISO/CEI 15189 standard, the numerous abilities expected from the medical laboratory technologists and their involvement in blood bank management has led the working group "Recherche et démarche qualité" of the French Society of Blood Transfusion to initiate an inventory of blood transfusion teaching syllabus for medical laboratory technology students and to propose transfusion medicine teaching guidelines. Seven worksheets have been established for that purpose including red blood cell antigen typing and antibody screening, blood sampling in immunohaematology, automation, clinical practices, blood products, blood delivery and haemovigilance. These guidelines aim at contributing to the harmonization of transfusion medicine teaching and at providing objective elements to the medical laboratory managers regarding the practical and theoretical skills of theirs collaborators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of Mobile Dose-Tracking Technology on Medication Distribution at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Matthew; Campbell, Udobi

    2016-05-01

    Medication dose-tracking technologies have the potential to improve efficiency and reduce costs associated with re-dispensing doses reported as missing. Data describing this technology and its impact on the medication use process are limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of dose-tracking technology on pharmacy workload and drug expense at an academic, acute care medical center. Dose-tracking technology was implemented in June 2014. Pre-implementation data were collected from February to April 2014. Post-implementation data were collected from July to September 2014. The primary endpoint was the percent of re-dispensed oral syringe and compounded sterile product (CSP) doses within the pre- and post-implementation periods per 1,000 discharges. Secondary endpoints included pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses, labor costs, and staff satisfaction with the medication distribution process. We observed an average 6% decrease in re-dispensing of oral syringe and CSP doses from pre- to post-implementation (15,440 vs 14,547 doses; p = .047). However, when values were adjusted per 1,000 discharges, this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = .074). Pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses was significantly reduced from pre- to post-implementation ($834,830 vs $746,466 [savings of $88,364]; p = .047). We estimated that $2,563 worth of technician labor was avoided in re-dispensing missing doses. We also saw significant improvement in staff perception of technology assisting in reducing missing doses (p = .0003), as well as improvement in effectiveness of resolving or minimizing missing doses (p = .01). The use of mobile dose-tracking technology demonstrated meaningful reductions in both the number of doses re-dispensed and cost of pharmaceuticals dispensed.

  13. Medical technology assessment : the use of the Analytic Hierarchy Process as a tool for multidisciplinary evaluation of medical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, JM; Van Rossum, W; Verkerke, GJ; Rakhorst, G

    2000-01-01

    Most types of medical technology assessment are performed only after the technology has been developed. Consequently, they have only minor effects on changes in clinical practice. Our study introduces a new method of constructive medical technology assessment that can change the development and

  14. Transferability of economic evaluations of medical technologies: a new technology for orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Lotte; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Young, Terry; Buxton, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Transferring results of economic evaluations across countries or jurisdictions can potentially save scarce evaluation resources while helping to make market access and reimbursement decisions in a timely fashion. This article points out why transferring results of economic evaluations is particularly important in the field of medical technologies. It then provides an overview of factors that are previously identified in the literature as affecting transferability of economic evaluations, as well as methods for transferring results in a scientifically sound way. As the current literature almost exclusively relates to transferability of pharmacoeconomic evaluations, this article highlights those factors and methodologies that are of particular relevance to transferring medical technology assessments. Considering the state-of-the-art literature and a worked, real life, example of transferring an economic evaluation of a product used in orthopedic surgery, we provide recommendations for future work in this important area of medical technology assessment.

  15. Improving patient access to novel medical technologies in Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, Peter

    2012-02-03

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) organized a one-day workshop with clinicians, health economic experts, and health technology appraisal experts to discuss the equity of patient access to novel medical technologies in Europe. Two index technologies were considered: implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and drug-eluting stents (DES). The use of ICDs range from 35 implants\\/million population in Portugal to 166 implants\\/million population in Germany, whereas for implants of DES (as percentage of total stents) it is lowest in Germany at 14% and high in Portugal at 65%. These differences can in part be explained by a lack of structured implementation of guidelines, the direct cost in relation to the overall healthcare budget, and to differences in procedures and models applied by Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies in Europe. The workshop participants concluded that physicians need to be involved in a more structured way in HTA and need to become better acquainted with its methods and terminology. Clinical guidelines should be systematically translated, explained, disseminated, updated, and adopted by cardiologists in Europe. Clinically appropriate, consistent and transparent health economic models need to be developed and high-quality international outcome and cost data should be used. A process for funding of a technology should be developed after a positive recommendation from HTA agencies. Both the ESC and the national cardiac societies should build-up health economic expertise and engage more actively in discussions with stakeholders involved in the provision of healthcare.

  16. Near field communications technology and the potential to reduce medication errors through multidisciplinary application

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Connell, Emer

    2016-07-01

    Patient safety requires optimal management of medications. Electronic systems are encouraged to reduce medication errors. Near field communications (NFC) is an emerging technology that may be used to develop novel medication management systems.

  17. Uncertainties in real-world decisions on medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C Y

    2014-08-01

    Patients, clinicians, payers and policy makers face substantial uncertainties in their respective healthcare decisions as they attempt to achieve maximum value, or the greatest level of benefit possible at a given cost. Uncertainties largely come from incomplete information at the time that decisions must be made. This is true in all areas of medicine because evidence from clinical trials is often incongruent with real-world patient care. This article highlights key uncertainties around the (comparative) benefits and harms of medical technologies. Initiatives and strategies such as comparative effectiveness research and coverage with evidence development may help to generate reliable and relevant evidence for decisions on coverage and treatment. These efforts could result in better decisions that improve patient outcomes and better use of scarce medical resources. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The use of web internet technologies to distribute medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deller, A.L.; Cheal, D.; Field, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In the past, internet browsers were considered ineffective for image distribution. Today we have the technology to use internet standards for picture archive and communication systems (PACS) and teleradiology effectively. Advanced wavelet compression and state-of-the-art JAVA software allows us to distribute images on normal computer hardware. The use of vendor and database neutral software and industry-standard hardware has many advantages. This standards base approach avoids the costly rapid obsolescence of proprietary PACS and is cheaper to purchase and maintain. Images can be distributed around a hospital site, as well as outside the campus, quickly and inexpensively. It also allows integration between the Hospital Information System (HIS) and the Radiology Information System (RIS). Being able to utilize standard internet technologies and computer hardware for PACS is a cost-effective alternative. A system based on this technology can be used for image distribution, archiving, teleradiology and RIS integration. This can be done without expensive specialized imaging workstations and telecommunication systems. Web distribution of images allows you to send images to multiple places concurrently. A study can be within your Medical Imaging Department, as well as in the ward and on the desktop of referring clinicians - with a report. As long as there is a computer with an internet access account, high-quality images can be at your disposal 24 h a day. The importance of medical images for patient management makes them a valuable component of the patient's medical record. Therefore, an efficient system for displaying and distributing images can improve patient management and make your workplace more effective

  19. Patient safety and technology-driven medication - A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia; Lefevre, Rikke S; Møller, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 30331 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies By Notice dated March 7, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on March 13, 2013, 78 FR 15974, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis... that the registration of Meridian Medical Technologies to import the basic class of controlled...

  1. 77 FR 31388 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies By Notice dated March 23, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on April 2, 2012, 77 FR 19716, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...) and 952(a), and determined that the registration of Meridian Medical Technologies to import the basic...

  2. 77 FR 39559 - In The Matter of China Medical Technologies, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] In The Matter of China Medical Technologies... Medical Technologies, Inc. (``China Medical'') because of questions regarding the accuracy and adequacy of disclosures by China Medical concerning, among other things: (1) The status of the company's officers and...

  3. 42 CFR 412.88 - Additional payment for new medical service or technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for new medical service or technology. (a) For discharges involving new medical services or... medical service or technology. [66 FR 46924, Sept. 7, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 50111, Aug. 1, 2002; 69 FR... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional payment for new medical service or...

  4. The National Medical Cyclotron - An Australian experience in technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, R K [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). National Medical Cyclotron

    1998-12-31

    The establishment of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in the early 1990`s was the practical outcome of a vision, held by nuclear medicine professionals, to complement the available neutron-rich radionuclides produced in Australia, with neutron-deficient radionuclides. The NMC is operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney where the PET department is able to use the short-lived radiotracers to good advantage. Neutron-deficient radionuclides, are also produced by the NMC laboratories. The cyclotron-generated radionuclides are used in over 70,000 patient studies per year. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  5. The National Medical Cyclotron - An Australian experience in technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in the early 1990's was the practical outcome of a vision, held by nuclear medicine professionals, to complement the available neutron-rich radionuclides produced in Australia, with neutron-deficient radionuclides. The NMC is operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney where the PET department is able to use the short-lived radiotracers to good advantage. Neutron-deficient radionuclides, are also produced by the NMC laboratories. The cyclotron-generated radionuclides are used in over 70,000 patient studies per year

  6. Information technology and medical missteps: evidence from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitt, Jonathan C; Rebitzer, James B; Reisman, Lonny

    2008-05-01

    We analyze the effect of a decision support tool designed to help physicians detect and correct medical "missteps". The data comes from a randomized trial of the technology on a population of commercial HMO patients. The key findings are that the new information technology lowers average charges by 6% relative to the control group. This reduction in resource utilization was the result of reduced in-patient charges (and associated professional charges) for the most costly patients. The rate at which identified issues were resolved was generally higher in the study group than in the control group, suggesting the possibility of improvements in care quality along measured dimensions and enhanced diffusion of new protocols based on new clinical evidence.

  7. Medical Representatives' Intention to Use Information Technology in Pharmaceutical Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Eun-Seon; Chang, Hyejung

    2016-10-01

    Electronic detailing (e-detailing), the use of electronic devices to facilitate sales presentations to physicians, has been adopted and expanded in the pharmaceutical industry. To maximize the potential outcome of e-detailing, it is important to understand medical representatives (MRs)' behavior and attitude to e-detailing. This study investigates how information technology devices such as laptop computers and tablet PCs are utilized in pharmaceutical marketing, and it analyzes the factors influencing MRs' intention to use devices. This study has adopted and modified the theory of Roger's diffusion of innovation model and the technology acceptance model. To test the model empirically, a questionnaire survey was conducted with 221 MRs who were working in three multinational or eleven domestic pharmaceutical companies in Korea. Overall, 28% and 35% of MRs experienced using laptop computers and tablet PCs in pharmaceutical marketing, respectively. However, the rates were different across different groups of MRs, categorized by age, education level, position, and career. The results showed that MRs' intention to use information technology devices was significantly influenced by perceived usefulness in general. Perceived ease of use, organizational and individual innovativeness, and several MR characteristics were also found to have significant impacts. This study provides timely information about e-detailing devices to marketing managers and policy makers in the pharmaceutical industry for successful marketing strategy development by understanding the needs of MRs' intention to use information technology. Further in-depth study should be conducted to understand obstacles and limitations and to improve the strategies for better marketing tools.

  8. ``Low Power Wireless Technologies: An Approach to Medical Applications''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido O., Francisco J.; González R., Miguel; Moreno M., Antonio; de La Cruz F, José Luis

    Wireless communication supposed a great both -quantitative and qualitative, jump in the management of the information, allowing the access and interchange of it without the need of a physical cable connection. The wireless transmission of voice and information has remained in constant evolution, arising new standards like BluetoothTM, WibreeTM or ZigbeeTM developed under the IEEE 802.15 norm. These newest wireless technologies are oriented to systems of communication of short-medium distance and optimized for a low cost and minor consume, becoming recognized as a flexible and reliable medium for data communications across a broad range of applications due to the potential that the wireless networks presents to operate in demanding environments providing clear advantages in cost, size, power, flexibility, and distributed intelligence. About the medical applications, the remote health or telecare (also called eHealth) is getting a bigger place into the manufacturers and medical companies, in order to incorporate products for assisted living and remote monitoring of health parameteres. At this point, the IEEE 1073, Personal Health Devices Working Group, stablish the framework for these kind of applications. Particularly, the 1073.3.X describes the physical and transport layers, where the new ultra low power short range wireless technologies can play a big role, providing solutions that allow the design of products which are particularly appropriate for monitor people’s health with interoperability requirements.

  9. Classification of medication incidents associated with information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van der Veen, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L; Wensing, Michel; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; de Smet, Peter A G M

    2014-02-01

    Information technology (IT) plays a pivotal role in improving patient safety, but can also cause new problems for patient safety. This study analyzed the nature and consequences of a large sample of IT-related medication incidents, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. The medication incidents submitted to the Dutch central medication incidents registration (CMR) reporting system were analyzed from the perspective of the healthcare professional with the Magrabi classification. During classification new terms were added, if necessary. The principal source of the IT-related problem, nature of error. Additional measures: consequences of incidents, IT systems, phases of the medication process. From March 2010 to February 2011 the CMR received 4161 incidents: 1643 (39.5%) from community pharmacies and 2518 (60.5%) from hospitals. Eventually one of six incidents (16.1%, n=668) were related to IT; in community pharmacies more incidents (21.5%, n=351) were related to IT than in hospitals (12.6%, n=317). In community pharmacies 41.0% (n=150) of the incidents were about choosing the wrong medicine. Most of the erroneous exchanges were associated with confusion of medicine names and poor design of screens. In hospitals 55.3% (n=187) of incidents concerned human-machine interaction-related input during the use of computerized prescriber order entry. These use problems were also a major problem in pharmacy information systems outside the hospital. A large sample of incidents shows that many of the incidents are related to IT, both in community pharmacies and hospitals. The interaction between human and machine plays a pivotal role in IT incidents in both settings.

  10. Integrating medical, assistive, and universally designed products and technologies: assistive technology device classification (ATDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen; Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne

    2012-09-01

    ISO26000:2010 International Guidance Standard on Organizational Social Responsibility requires that effective organizational performance recognize social responsibility, including the rights of persons with disabilities (PWD), engage stakeholders and contribute to sustainable development. Millennium Development Goals 2010 notes that the most vulnerable people require special attention, while the World Report on Disability 2011 identifies improved data collection and removal of barriers to rehabilitation as the means to empower PWD. The Assistive Technology Device Classification (ATDC), Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM) and Matching Person and Technology models provide an evidence-based, standardized, internationally comparable framework to improve data collection and rehabilitation interventions. The ATDC and ATSM encompass and support universal design (UD) principles, and use the language and concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Use ATDC and ICF concepts to differentiate medical, assistive and UD products and technology; relate technology "types" to markets and costs; and support provision of UD products and technologies as sustainable and socially responsible behavior. Supply-side and demand-side incentives are suggested to foster private sector development and commercialization of UD products and technologies. Health and health-related professionals should be knowledgeable of UD principles and interventions.

  11. Geographic Medical History: Advances in Geospatial Technology Present New Potentials in Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, F. S.; Finley, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes) and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour), but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, "Airs, Waters, Places", yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient's medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient's "Geographic Medical History". In order to accomplish this we need information on: a) relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b) location of the individual in that person's dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual's location can be tracked in real time if

  12. GEOGRAPHIC MEDICAL HISTORY: ADVANCES IN GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY PRESENT NEW POTENTIALS IN MEDICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Faruque

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour, but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, “Airs, Waters, Places”, yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient’s medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient’s “Geographic Medical History”. In order to accomplish this we need information on: a relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b location of the individual in that person’s dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual’s location

  13. Estimating costs in the economic evaluation of medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, B R; Elixhauser, A

    1990-01-01

    The complexities and nuances of evaluating the costs associated with providing medical technologies are often underestimated by analysts engaged in economic evaluations. This article describes the theoretical underpinnings of cost estimation, emphasizing the importance of accounting for opportunity costs and marginal costs. The various types of costs that should be considered in an analysis are described; a listing of specific cost elements may provide a helpful guide to analysis. The process of identifying and estimating costs is detailed, and practical recommendations for handling the challenges of cost estimation are provided. The roles of sensitivity analysis and discounting are characterized, as are determinants of the types of costs to include in an analysis. Finally, common problems facing the analyst are enumerated with suggestions for managing these problems.

  14. Managing medical equipment used by technology-dependent children: evaluation of an instructional tool for pediatric residents and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer M; Radulovic, Andrea; Nageswaran, Savithri

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a workshop on managing medical devices used in technology-dependent children. Study participants included residents and medical students rotating in the pediatrics department at the time of the study. A workshop was conducted consisting of learning stations for common medical devices, including brief presentations and opportunities for hands-on practice with each device. Participants completed surveys before and after the workshop assessing their perceived ability to manage medical equipment before and after the workshop and their ongoing learning needs. All participants indicated a substantial need for training on how to manage medical devices used by technology-dependent patients. Scores for perceived ability to manage the devices improved significantly after workshop participation for nearly all devices taught. Medical trainees have significant learning needs for managing devices used by technology-dependent patients. Hands-on, small-group training can be an effective instructional tool for improving confidence in these skills.

  15. Development of key technology for the medical isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Soo Youl; Kim, I. S.; Kim, W. W.; Rhee, C. K.; Park, K. B.; Park, S. J.; Shin, H. S.; Shin, Y. J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to experimentally verify and enhance Mo-99 and Sr-89 recovery/purification processes as the key technologies for the medical isotope production from a solution fuel reactor. A joint experiment was planned between KAERI and Kurchatov Institute (KI), Russia. The kinds of experiments planed are, a series of Mo-99 recovery/purification experiments from the ARGUS reactor which uses High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel, a series of the same experiments but from the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) solution target, a demonstration of the mechanism of Sr-89 delivery from the air medium in the reactor vessel. Meanwhile, the survey and legalistic interpretation of relevant patents shows a possibility of infringement of TCI Inc.'s patents in case of exporting medical isotopes produced at the MIP to Japan and the US so far as the MIP adopts the concept of the Russian ARGUS and recovery/purification process. Eliminating, not minor changing, step(s) or condition(s) of patent processes would help to avoid the patent infringement. Because of a difficulty in the KAERI-KI full-time co-experiments at KI labs, a different idea between two parties about the depth of background information to be provided to KAERI, and other reasons, the experiment plan was not executed

  16. The integration of Information and Communication Technology into medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Hardey, Michael; Torrent, Joan; Ficapal, Pilar

    2010-07-01

    To identify doctors' utilization of ICT; to develop and characterise a typology of doctors' utilization of ICT and to identify factors that can enhance or inhibit the use of these technologies within medical practice. An online survey of the 16,531 members of the Physicians Association of Barcelona who had a registered email account in 2006 was carried out. Factor analysis, cluster analysis and binomial logit model were undertaken. Multivariate statistics analysis of the 2199 responses obtained revealed two profiles of adoption of ICT. The first profile (38.61% of respondents) represents those doctors who place high emphasis on ICT within their practice. This group is thus referred to as 'integrated doctors'. The second profile (61.39% of respondents) represents those doctors who make less use of ICT so are consequently labelled 'non-integrated doctors'. From the statistical modelling, it was observed that an emphasis on international information; emphasis on ICT for research and medical practice; emphasis on information systems to consult and prescribe; undertaking teaching/research activities; a belief that the use of the Internet improved communication with patients and practice in both public and private health organizations play a positive and significant role in the probability of being an 'integrated doctor'. The integration of ICT within medical practice cannot be adequately understood and appreciated without examining how doctors are making use of ICT within their own practice, organizational contexts and the opportunities and constraints afforded by institutional, professional and patient expectations and demands. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Incorporation of medical informatics and information technology as core components of undergraduate medical education - time for change!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Anthony; Kushniruk, Andre

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Information Technology (IT) is a highly desirable and a very necessary ingredient of modern health care. Review of available literature reveals a paucity of medical informatics and information technology courses in undergraduate medical curricula and a lack of research to assess the effectiveness of medical informatics in undergraduate medical education. The need for such initiatives is discussed and a pilot project is described that evaluated the effectiveness of education in the use of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) applications. Educational activities, for example, could be medical students conducting virtual medical encounters or interacting with EMR applications. An EMR application, which was used in several related projects, has been adapted to the educational environment: standardized patient records can be created and cloned so that individual students can interact with a "standard" patient and alter the patient's data.

  18. Review of early assessment models of innovative medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Krahn, Murray; Kidholm, Kristian; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller

    2017-08-01

    Hospitals increasingly make decisions regarding the early development of and investment in technologies, but a formal evaluation model for assisting hospitals early on in assessing the potential of innovative medical technologies is lacking. This article provides an overview of models for early assessment in different health organisations and discusses which models hold most promise for hospital decision makers. A scoping review of published studies between 1996 and 2015 was performed using nine databases. The following information was collected: decision context, decision problem, and a description of the early assessment model. 2362 articles were identified and 12 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. An additional 12 studies were identified and included in the review by searching reference lists. The majority of the 24 early assessment studies were variants of traditional cost-effectiveness analysis. Around one fourth of the studies presented an evaluation model with a broader focus than cost-effectiveness. Uncertainty was mostly handled by simple sensitivity or scenario analysis. This review shows that evaluation models using known methods assessing cost-effectiveness are most prevalent in early assessment, but seems ill-suited for early assessment in hospitals. Four models provided some usable elements for the development of a hospital-based model. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Technology-related medication errors in a tertiary hospital: a 5-year analysis of reported medication incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, N R; Cheung, S T D; Chui, W C M; Cheung, B M Y

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare technology is meant to reduce medication errors. The objective of this study was to assess unintended errors related to technologies in the medication use process. Medication incidents reported from 2006 to 2010 in a main tertiary care hospital were analysed by a pharmacist and technology-related errors were identified. Technology-related errors were further classified as socio-technical errors and device errors. This analysis was conducted using data from medication incident reports which may represent only a small proportion of medication errors that actually takes place in a hospital. Hence, interpretation of results must be tentative. 1538 medication incidents were reported. 17.1% of all incidents were technology-related, of which only 1.9% were device errors, whereas most were socio-technical errors (98.1%). Of these, 61.2% were linked to computerised prescription order entry, 23.2% to bar-coded patient identification labels, 7.2% to infusion pumps, 6.8% to computer-aided dispensing label generation and 1.5% to other technologies. The immediate causes for technology-related errors included, poor interface between user and computer (68.1%), improper procedures or rule violations (22.1%), poor interface between user and infusion pump (4.9%), technical defects (1.9%) and others (3.0%). In 11.4% of the technology-related incidents, the error was detected after the drug had been administered. A considerable proportion of all incidents were technology-related. Most errors were due to socio-technical issues. Unintended and unanticipated errors may happen when using technologies. Therefore, when using technologies, system improvement, awareness, training and monitoring are needed to minimise medication errors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Information technology for medication administration: assessing bedside readiness among nurses in Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marini, Sana Daya; Hasman, Arie; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad

    2009-01-01

    Medication errors continue to be of great concern to hospitals. The use of Information technology (IT) for medication administration was recommended to assist nurses to administer medications safely, decrease the chance of medication errors, and contribute to patient safety. Such IT will be

  1. Institutionalising health technology assessment: establishing the Medical Technology Assessment Board in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura E; Mehndiratta, Abha; Grover, Ashoo; Gauba, Vijay; Sheikh, Kabir; Prinja, Shankar; Singh, Ravinder; Cluzeau, Francoise A; Dabak, Saudamini; Teerawattananon, Yot; Kumar, Sanjiv; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    India is at crossroads with a commitment by the government to universal health coverage (UHC), driving efficiency and tackling waste across the public healthcare sector. Health technology assessment (HTA) is an important policy reform that can assist policy-makers to tackle inequities and inefficiencies by improving the way in which health resources are allocated towards cost-effective, appropriate and feasible interventions. The equitable and efficient distribution of health budget resources, as well as timely uptake of good value technologies, are critical to strengthen the Indian healthcare system. The government of India is set to establish a Medical Technology Assessment Board to evaluate existing and new health technologies in India, assist choices between comparable technologies for adoption by the healthcare system and improve the way in which priorities for health are set. This initiative aims to introduce a more transparent, inclusive, fair and evidence-based process by which decisions regarding the allocation of health resources are made in India towards the ultimate goal of UHC. In this analysis article, we report on plans and progress of the government of India for the institutionalisation of HTA in the country. Where India is home to one-sixth of the global population, improving the health services that the population receives will have a resounding impact not only for India but also for global health.

  2. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0705 TITLE: “Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Sept 2016 – 20 Sept 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Standards and Technology ...efficiency through interoperable medical technologies . We played a leadership role on interoperability safety standards (AAMI, AAMI/UL Joint

  3. Unnatural birth? : medical pain management technology and the naturalness of birth

    OpenAIRE

    Gihle, Marte

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to explore how medical pain management technology affects the concept of natural birth.The relationship between medical pain management technology and natural birth is discussed in a structural framework in which medicalization, risk, and identity are acknowledged as important issues within the current childbirth paradigm. The analysis is based on thirteen in-depth interviews with Norwegian midwives and mothers on their perceptions of medical pain management technolo...

  4. Enabling medication management through health information technology (Health IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbon, K Ann; Lokker, Cynthia; Handler, Steve M; Dolovich, Lisa R; Holbrook, Anne M; O'Reilly, Daria; Tamblyn, Robyn; J Hemens, Brian; Basu, Runki; Troyan, Sue; Roshanov, Pavel S; Archer, Norman P; Raina, Parminder

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research. We searched peer-reviewed electronic databases, grey literature, and performed hand searches. Databases searched included MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Compendex, Inspec (which includes IEEE Xplore), Library and Information Science Abstracts, E-Prints in Library and Information Science, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Business Source Complete. Grey literature searching involved Internet searching, reviewing relevant Web sites, and searching electronic databases of grey literatures. AHRQ also provided all references in their e-Prescribing, bar coding, and CPOE knowledge libraries. Paired reviewers looked at citations to identify studies on a range of health IT used to assist in the medication management process (MMIT) during multiple levels of screening (titles and abstracts, full text and final review for assignment of questions and data abstrction). Randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and case series studies were independently assessed for quality. All data were abstracted by one reviewer and examined by one of two different reviewers with content and methods expertise. 40,582 articles were retrieved. After duplicates were removed, 32,785 articles were screened at the title and abstract phase. 4,578 full text articles were assessed and 789 articles were included in the final report. Of these, 361 met only content criteria and were listed without further abstraction. The final report included data from 428 articles across the seven key

  5. The Promise of E-Platform Technology in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawd, Siraj

    2016-03-01

    Increasing the number as well as improving the capacity and quality of medical professionals to achieve an equitable health care for all is a global priority and a global challenge. In developing countries, which are facing the largest burden of disease, to achieve the above stated objective, there is a big need for more well-trained, competent and dedicated health care providers. Currently, there is a well-documented shortage of trained health workers globally, with the poorest countries having the greatest shortfalls. The time tested, traditional approach of training health care force by importing professionals from overseas is not only prohibitively expensive but also not sufficient to achieve the scale and pace of the required human capacity building. Considering this fact, distance learning programs, which include m-Health as well as other information technology (IT) platforms and tools, can provide unique, timely, cost-effective, easily scalable and valuable opportunities to expand access to training health care manpower in developing countries where the shortage is critical.

  6. Medical technology in Japan the politics of regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Altenstetter, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Compared to its American and European counterparts, Japan lags in adopting innovative medical devices and making new treatments and procedures available. Christa Altenstetter examines the contextual conditions of Japan's medical profession and its regulatory framework. Altenstetter looks into how physicians and device companies connect to the government and bureaucracy, the relationships connecting Japanese patients to their medical system and governmental bureaucracy, and how relationships between policymakers and the medical profession are changing.

  7. Role of accelerator science and technology in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Updated status of compact and advanced-compact medical accelerator development is reviewed. In their applications, medical physics and medical physicist are necessary. Their educational programs have started in several universities and institutes. As one important new trend on life-science, the research on the synergy of DDS (Drug Delivery System) and physical energies are proposed. (author)

  8. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  9. Preparing for the changing role of instructional technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Bernard R; McNeil, Sara G; Cook, David A; Agarwal, Kathryn L; Singhal, Geeta R

    2011-04-01

    As part of an international faculty development conference in February 2010, a working group of medical educators and physicians discussed the changing role of instructional technologies and made recommendations for supporting faculty in using these technologies in medical education. The resulting discussion highlighted ways technology is transforming the entire process of medical education and identified several converging trends that have implications for how medical educators might prepare for the next decade. These trends include the explosion of new information; all information, including both health knowledge and medical records, becoming digital; a new generation of learners; the emergence of new instructional technologies; and the accelerating rate of change, especially related to technology. The working group developed five recommendations that academic health leaders and policy makers may use as a starting point for dealing with the instructional technology challenges facing medical education over the next decade. These recommendations are (1) using technology to provide/support experiences for learners that are not otherwise possible-not as a replacement for, but as a supplement to, face-to-face experiences, (2) focusing on fundamental principles of teaching and learning rather than learning specific technologies in isolation, (3) allocating a variety of resources to support the appropriate use of instructional technologies, (4) supporting faculty members as they adopt new technologies, and (5) providing funding and leadership to enhance electronic infrastructure to facilitate sharing of resources and instructional ideas. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  10. Global Budgets and Technology-Intensive Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zirui; Fendrick, A Mark; Safran, Dana Gelb; Landon, Bruce; Chernew, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    In 2009-2010, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts entered into global payment contracts (the Alternative Quality contract, AQC) with 11 provider organizations. We evaluated the impact of the AQC on spending and utilization of several categories of medical technologies, including one considered high value (colonoscopies) and three that include services that may be overused in some situations (cardiovascular, imaging, and orthopedic services). Approximately 420,000 unique enrollees in 2009 and 180,000 in 2010 were linked to primary care physicians whose organizations joined the AQC. Using three years of pre-intervention data and a large control group, we analyzed changes in utilization and spending associated with the AQC with a propensity-weighted difference-in-differences approach adjusting for enrollee demographics, health status, secular trends, and cost-sharing. In the 2009 AQC cohort, total volume of colonoscopies increased 5.2 percent (p=0.04) in the first two years of the contract relative to control. The contract was associated with varied changes in volume for cardiovascular and imaging services, but total spending on cardiovascular services in the first two years decreased by 7.4% (p=0.02) while total spending on imaging services decreased by 6.1% (pservices, these decreases were also attributable to shifting care to lower-priced providers. No effect was found in orthopedics. As one example of a large-scale global payment initiative, the AQC was associated with higher use of colonoscopies. Among several categories of services whose value may be controversial, the contract generally shifted volume to lower-priced facilities or services.

  11. 78 FR 15974 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Meridian Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Meridian Medical Technologies Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on January 8, 2013, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...

  12. The Integration of Children Dependent on Medical Technology into Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jill A.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in medicine have increased the survival rates of children with complex medical conditions, including those who are dependent on technology such as ventilators and tracheostomies. The process of integrating children dependent on medical technology into public schools requires the collaboration of a multidisciplinary team to ensure that…

  13. 77 FR 19716 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Meridian Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Meridian Medical Technologies Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall, prior to... is notice that on January 4, 2012, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...

  14. The application of radiation technology in the field of medical biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Huanyu; An Yan; Yin Hua

    2011-01-01

    The radiation technology has been applied extensively in the fields of biological engineering, tissue engineering, medical industry and so on. It also plays an important role in the sterilization and modification of biomaterials. This work reviews the development of irradiation technology and absorbed doses for the sterilization and modification of medical biomaterials. (authors)

  15. iMedEd: the role of mobile health technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglani, Shiv M; Topol, Eric J

    2014-09-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have experienced a recent surge in attention because of their potential to transform the delivery of health care. This enthusiasm is partly due to the near ubiquity of smartphones and tablets among clinicians, as well as to the stream of mobile medical apps and devices being created. While much discussion has been devoted to how these tools will impact the practice of medicine, surprisingly little has been written on the role these technologies will play in medical education. In this commentary the authors describe the opportunities, applications, and challenges of mHealth apps and devices in medical education and argue that medical schools should make efforts to integrate these technologies into their curricula. By not doing so, medical educators risk producing a generation of clinicians underprepared for the changing realities of medical practice brought on by mHealth technologies.

  16. Evaluating and Predicting Patient Safety for Medical Devices With Integral Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    323 Evaluating and Predicting Patient Safety for Medical Devices with Integral Information Technology Jiajie Zhang, Vimla L. Patel, Todd R...errors are due to inappropriate designs for user interactions, rather than mechanical failures. Evaluating and predicting patient safety in medical ...the users on the identified trouble spots in the devices. We developed two methods for evaluating and predicting patient safety in medical devices

  17. [Mobile phone-computer wireless interactive graphics transmission technology and its medical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Liu, Jing

    2010-05-01

    Application of clinical digital medical imaging has raised many tough issues to tackle, such as data storage, management, and information sharing. Here we investigated a mobile phone based medical image management system which is capable of achieving personal medical imaging information storage, management and comprehensive health information analysis. The technologies related to the management system spanning the wireless transmission technology, the technical capabilities of phone in mobile health care and management of mobile medical database were discussed. Taking medical infrared images transmission between phone and computer as an example, the working principle of the present system was demonstrated.

  18. Purchasing medical innovation the right technology, for the right patient, at the right price

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, James C

    2015-01-01

    Innovation in medical technology generates a remarkable supply of new drugs, devices, and diagnostics that improve health, reduce risks, and extend life. But these technologies are too often used on the wrong patient, in the wrong setting, or at an unaffordable price. The only way to moderate the growth in health care costs without undermining the dynamic of medical innovation is to improve the process of assessing, pricing, prescribing, and using new technologies. Purchasing Medical Innovation analyzes the contemporary revolution in the purchasing of health care technology, with a focus on th

  19. [Undergraduate education of medical technologists to promote scientific and technological literacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Akizawa, Hirotsugu

    2010-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's medical technologists to receive proper training on the safety of medical treatment and healthcare in order to accommodate the rapid changes and advancement in medical technology. In particular, because of the increase of hospital-acquired infections, the role of medical technologists involved in infection control has become much more important. In addition, particularly in Japan, the career options available to students graduating with a degree in medical technology have become much more diverse, ranging from research laboratories to clinical services; however, undergraduate education for medical technologists is limited. It is therefore deemed necessary for undergraduate students to be provided with adequate training from their universities by offering a wider selection of classes in this subject area. In this paper, we summarize our preliminary findings on the trial lessons that are offered to medical technology students in their microbiology class. These lessons are designed to enhance students' academic potential and to engage their interest.

  20. Medical photography: current technology, evolving issues and legal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, M T; DeWees, J M; Vela, K M; Khirallah, R T

    2015-04-01

    Medical photographic image capture and data management has undergone a rapid and compelling change in complexity over the last 20 years. This is because of multiple factors, including significant advances in ease of photograph capture, alongside an evolution of mechanisms of data portability/dissemination, combined with governmental focus on health information privacy. Literature to guide medical, legal, governmental and business professionals when dealing with issues related to medical photography is virtually nonexistent. Herein, we will address the breadth of uses of medical photography, device properties/specific devices utilised for image capture, methods of data transfer and dissemination and patient perceptions and attitudes regarding photography in a medical setting. In addition, we will address the legal implications, including legal precedent, copyright and privacy law, informed consent, protected health information and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as they pertain to medical photography. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Technology-assisted education in graduate medical education: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Jwayyed, Sharhabeel; Stiffler, Kirk A; Wilber, Scott T; Southern, Alison; Weigand, John; Bare, Rudd; Gerson, Lowell W

    2011-01-01

    Studies on computer-aided instruction and web-based learning have left many questions unanswered about the most effective use of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. Objective We conducted a review of the current medical literature to report the techniques, methods, frequency and effectiveness of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. Methods A structured review of MEDLINE articles dealing with "Computer-Assisted Instruction," "Internet or World W...

  2. Medical Information Technology in Support of the Operational Commander

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, James

    1999-01-01

    .... DoD is aggressively pursuing a unified force health protection strategy to protect service members from medical hazards associated with their military service from accession through retirement...

  3. Visualizing the future: technology competency development in clinical medicine, and implications for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Keenan, Craig R; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors ask three questions. First, what will physicians need to know in order to be effective in the future? Second, what role will technology play in achieving that high level of effectiveness? Third, what specific skill sets will physicians need to master in order to become effective? Through three case vignettes describing past, present, and potential future medical practices, the authors identify trends in major medical, technological and cultural shifts that will shape medical education and practice. From these cases, the authors generate a series of technology-related competencies and skill sets that physicians will need to remain leaders in the delivery of medical care. Physicians will choose how they will be end-users of technology, technology developers, and/or the interface between users and developers. These choices will guide the types of skills each physician will need to acquire. Finally, the authors explore the implications of these trends for medical educators, including the competencies that will be required of educators as they develop the medical curriculum. Examining historical and social trends, including how users adopt current and emerging technologies, allows us to anticipate changes in the practice of medicine. By considering market pressures, global trends and emerging technologies, medical educators and practicing physicians may prepare themselves for the changes likely to occur in the medical curriculum and in the marketplace.

  4. Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Program HHQ Health History Questionnaire National Marrow Donor Program® N00014-16-1-2020 Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) DEC 2015 -November 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow...immunobiologic and clinical research activities promote studies to advance the science and technology of HCT to improve outcomes and quality of life for

  5. Using Technology, Clinical Workflow Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home LTC Nicole Kerkenbush, MHA, MN Army Medical Department, Office of the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using Technology, Clinical Workflow Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home 5a. CONTRACT...Describe how these tools are being used to implement the Patient Centered Medical Home care model 2 2011 MHS Conference MEDCOM AHLTA Provider Satisfaction

  6. Does applying technology throughout the medication use process improve patient safety with antineoplastics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubalo, Joseph; Warden, Bruce A; Wiegel, Joshua J; Nishida, Tess; Handel, Evelyn; Svoboda, Leanne M; Nguyen, Lam; Edillo, P Neil

    2014-12-01

    Medical errors, in particular medication errors, continue to be a troublesome factor in the delivery of safe and effective patient care. Antineoplastic agents represent a group of medications highly susceptible to medication errors due to their complex regimens and narrow therapeutic indices. As the majority of these medication errors are frequently associated with breakdowns in poorly defined systems, developing technologies and evolving workflows seem to be a logical approach to provide added safeguards against medication errors. This article will review both the pros and cons of today's technologies and their ability to simplify the medication use process, reduce medication errors, improve documentation, improve healthcare costs and increase provider efficiency as relates to the use of antineoplastic therapy throughout the medication use process. Several technologies, mainly computerized provider order entry (CPOE), barcode medication administration (BCMA), smart pumps, electronic medication administration record (eMAR), and telepharmacy, have been well described and proven to reduce medication errors, improve adherence to quality metrics, and/or improve healthcare costs in a broad scope of patients. The utilization of these technologies during antineoplastic therapy is weak at best and lacking for most. Specific to the antineoplastic medication use system, the only technology with data to adequately support a claim of reduced medication errors is CPOE. In addition to the benefits these technologies can provide, it is also important to recognize their potential to induce new types of errors and inefficiencies which can negatively impact patient care. The utilization of technology reduces but does not eliminate the potential for error. The evidence base to support technology in preventing medication errors is limited in general but even more deficient in the realm of antineoplastic therapy. Though CPOE has the best evidence to support its use in the

  7. Implementing technology to improve medication safety in healthcare facilities: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidle, Unn

    Medication errors remain one of the most common causes of patient injuries in the United States, with detrimental outcomes including adverse reactions and even death. By developing a better understanding of why and how medication errors occur, preventative measures may be implemented including technological advances. In this literature review, potential methods of reducing medication errors were explored. Furthermore, technology tools available for medication orders and administration are described, including advantages and disadvantages of each system. It was found that technology can be an excellent aid in improving safety of medication administration. However, computer technology cannot replace human intellect and intuition. Nurses should be involved when implementing any new computerized system in order to obtain the most appropriate and user-friendly structure.

  8. Medical implants by using RP and investment casting technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Horacek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the production technology of knee joint replacement by using rapid prototyping technology. The aim of the work is to outline the manufacturing technology intended for prototype production with the use of rapid prototyping and investment casting technology for use in orthopaedics and the surgery of knee joint replacement. The research results should make an effective contribution in the attempts to minimize the invasive surgical procedure, shorten the production of knee joint replacement as well as reduce the cost. At present, the research is focused on the preparation of STL data from CT (Computed Tomography and verification of the production technology of prototypes made using available RP technology and its evaluation.

  9. Space Technology - Game Changing Development NASA Facts: Autonomous Medical Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David E.

    2018-01-01

    The AMO (Autonomous Medical Operations) Project is working extensively to train medical models on the reliability and confidence of computer-aided interpretation of ultrasound images in various clinical settings, and of various anatomical structures. AI (Artificial Intelligence) algorithms recognize and classify features in the ultrasound images, and these are compared to those features that clinicians use to diagnose diseases. The acquisition of clinically validated image assessment and the use of the AI algorithms constitutes fundamental baseline for a Medical Decision Support System that will advise crew on long-duration, remote missions.

  10. Formation of a New Entity to Support Effective Use of Technology in Medical Education: The Student Technology Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenson, Jared Andrew; Adams, Ryan Christopher; Ahmed, S Toufeeq; Spickard, Anderson

    2015-09-17

    As technology in medical education expands from teaching tool to crucial component of curricular programming, new demands arise to innovate and optimize educational technology. While the expectations of today's digital native students are significant, their experience and unique insights breed new opportunities to involve them as stakeholders in tackling educational technology challenges. The objective of this paper is to present our experience with a novel medical student-led and faculty-supported technology committee that was developed at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine to harness students' valuable input in a comprehensive fashion. Key lessons learned through the initial successes and challenges of implementing our model are also discussed. A committee was established with cooperation of school administration, a faculty advisor with experience launching educational technologies, and a group of students passionate about this domain. Committee membership is sustained through annual selective recruitment of interested students. The committee serves 4 key functions: acting as liaisons between students and administration; advising development of institutional educational technologies; developing, piloting, and assessing new student-led educational technologies; and promoting biomedical and educational informatics within the school community. Participating students develop personally and professionally, contribute to program implementation, and extend the field's understanding by pursuing research initiatives. The institution benefits from rapid improvements to educational technologies that meet students' needs and enhance learning opportunities. Students and the institution also gain from fostering a campus culture of awareness and innovation in informatics and medical education. The committee's success hinges on member composition, school leadership buy-in, active involvement in institutional activities, and support for committee initiatives. Students

  11. How children and young people construct and negotiate living with medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Susan

    2010-11-01

    Increasing numbers of children need the support of medical technology for their survival and wellbeing, yet little is known about their experiences of living technology-assisted lives. This study aimed to explore how this group of children experience and construct medical technology and its influence on their identity and social relationships. Using a Grounded Theory approach, 28 children/young people aged between 8 and 19 years old and using different types of medical devices were recruited via nursing services in England. Data were collected by in-depth interviews conducted in children's homes. The medical technology occupied an ambivalent position in children's lives being seen as having both an enabling and disabling presence. Children actively engaged in work to incorporate the technology into their lives and bodies by developing strategies to manage their condition, the technology and their identities. This body work appeared to be driven by a desire to 'normalise' their bodies and their lives. Technologies were shaped to integrate them into everyday life and children managed their self-presentation and controlled information about their condition. This work was ongoing, responding to changing social contexts and relationships. For these children the process of 'growing up' involves incorporating disability, illness and technology. This study contributes to knowledge by examining how medical technology is constructed by children whose lives are dependent on it and illuminating the resources and strategies they use to manage their identity and negotiate peer culture interactions and norms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The importance of educational theories for facilitating learning when using technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, John; Patel, Rakesh S; Goh, Poh Sun; Kokatailo, Patricia K; Lafferty, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing use of technology for teaching and learning in medical education but often the use of educational theory to inform the design is not made explicit. The educational theories, both normative and descriptive, used by medical educators determine how the technology is intended to facilitate learning and may explain why some interventions with technology may be less effective compared with others. The aim of this study is to highlight the importance of medical educators making explicit the educational theories that inform their design of interventions using technology. The use of illustrative examples of the main educational theories to demonstrate the importance of theories informing the design of interventions using technology. Highlights the use of educational theories for theory-based and realistic evaluations of the use of technology in medical education. An explicit description of the educational theories used to inform the design of an intervention with technology can provide potentially useful insights into why some interventions with technology are more effective than others. An explicit description is also an important aspect of the scholarship of using technology in medical education.

  13. The diffusion of medical technology, local conditions, and technology re-invention: a comparative case study on coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Noguchi, Haruko; Heidenreich, Paul; Saynina, Olga; Moreland, Abigail; Miyazaki, Shunichi; Ikeda, Shunya; Kaneko, Yoshihiro; Ikegami, Naoki

    2006-12-01

    Innovation of medical technology is a major driving force behind the increase in medical expenditures in developed countries. Previous studies identified that the diffusion of medical technology varied across countries according to the characteristics of regulatory policy and payment systems. Based on Roger's diffusion of innovation theory, this study purported to see how local practice norms, the evolving nature of diffusing technology, and local clinical needs in addition to differences in politico-economic systems would affect the process of innovation diffusion. Taking a case of coronary stenting, an innovative therapeutic technology in early 1990s, we provided a case study of hospital-based data between two teaching high-tech hospitals in Japan and the US for discussion. Stenting began to be widely used in both countries when complementary new technology modified its clinical efficacy, but the diffusion process still differed between the two hospitals due to (1) distinctive payment systems for hospitals and physicians, (2) practice norms in favor of percutaneous intervention rather than bypass surgery that was shaped by payment incentives and cultural attitudes, and (3) local patient's clinical characteristics that the technology had to be tailored for. The case study described the diffusion of stent technology as a dynamic process between patients, physicians, hospitals, health care systems, and technology under global and local conditions.

  14. On Heidegger, medicine, and the modernity of modern medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines medicine's use of technology in a manner from a standpoint inspired by Heidegger's thinking on technology. In the first part of the paper, I shall suggest an interpretation of Heidegger's thinking on the topic, and attempt to show why he associates modern technology with danger. However, I shall also claim that there is little evidence that medicine's appropriation of modern technology is dangerous in Heidegger's sense, although there is no prima facie reason why it mightn't be. The explanation for this, I claim, is ethical. There is an initial attraction to the thought that Heidegger's thought echoes Kantian moral thinking, but I shall dismiss this. Instead, I shall suggest that the considerations that make modern technology dangerous for Heidegger are simply not in the character - the ethos - of medicine properly understood. This is because there is a distinction to be drawn between chronological and historical modernity, and that even up-to-date medicine, empowered by technology, retains in its ethos crucial aspects of a historically pre-modern understanding of technology. A large part of the latter half of the paper will be concerned with explaining the difference.

  15. Technology in hospitals: medical advances and their diffusion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1978-05-01

    This study examines the diffusion of seven major hospital technologies -- intensive care, respiratory therapy, diagnostic radioisotopes, the electroencephalograph, cobalt teletherapy, open heart surgery, and renal dialysis -- in order to contribute to a better understanding of the growth of hospital costs. Case studies of the uses, resource requirements, and benefits of each technology are combined with statistical analysis, based on hospital survey data for the years 1961-75, of the influences that have been important in the adoption of these technologies by individual hospitals

  16. Trends and Technological Developments in Medical X-ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacobovici, E.; Ben-Shlomo, A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the very beginning of X-rays discovery, about one hundred years ago, there has been an ongoing development of technological means, focusing on image quality and imaging capabilities improvement, as well as on awareness and radiation dosage reduction

  17. Making medical treatments resilient to technological disruptions in telemedicine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; Widya, I.A.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Telemedicine depends on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to support remote treatment of patients. This dependency requires the telemedicine system design to be resilient for ICT performance degradation or subsystem failures. Nevertheless, using telemedicine systems create a dependency

  18. #Nomoretextbooks? The impact of rapid communications technologies on medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Ameer; White, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    This paper was selected as the 2013 student essay winner by the Canadian Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee. The essay was in response to the question "How does rapid communications technology affect learning?"

  19. To the point: medical education, technology, and the millennial learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Hampton, Brittany S; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Craig, LaTasha B; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Graziano, Scott C; McKenzie, Margaret L; Pradham, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M

    2018-02-01

    This article, from the "To The Point" series that was prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides an overview of the characteristics of millennials and describes how medical educators can customize and reframe their curricula and teaching methods to maximize millennial learning. A literature search was performed to identify articles on generational learning. We summarize the importance of understanding the attitudes, ideas, and priorities of millennials to tailor educational methods to stimulate and enhance learning. Where relevant, a special focus on the obstetrics and gynecology curriculum is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sustainable Public Procurement of Medical Technology and Green Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vettorato, Giovanna; Hsuan, Juliana

    This paper investigates design for remanufacture in terms of both detailed new product design and the environmental performance in which modularization and reversed production may operate. We examine the medical equipment industry and their potential contributions to the implementation of green...... supply chain in the healthcare sector. An exploratory case study of medical equipment supply chain is presented when considering the life cycle of the product can be managed through the modularization strategies. Preliminary findings indicate that design-for-disassembly of modules make equipment easier...

  1. Technology of forming a positive attitude to physical training students of special medical group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamediarov N.N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Defined effective technology stages of forming a positive attitude towards physical education of students in special medical groups, stimulate motivation, epistemologically, informative, content-procedural, analytical and adjustment. For each stage technology offered special tools: lectures, seminars, analysis articles, mini conference on improving technique, racing games, mini-competitions, diagnostic interviews, questionnaires, analysis of log data on attendance. Selected criteria forming positive attitudes towards physical education: theoretical and practical, formed groups for research: experimental and control, analyzed results introduction of technology, efficiency of the proposed technology and means forming a positive attitude towards physical education students in special medical groups.

  2. Information and communication technology in medical education: an experience from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-03-01

    This literature review was conducted using PubMed-Medline, PubMed-Central and ERIC databases, 1979- 2010, for research studies and pertinent theoretical publications including journals and texts. Key search words included general terms such as: "medical education," "information and communication technology in medical education," "medical students' computer skills" and "ICT use among medical students". Theoretical approaches were included to place the review within an educational and social context, and selected studies to demonstrate use of ICT in medical education through time and in different countries.

  3. The impact of medical technology on sense of security in the palliative home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Berit; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The increase in the use of medical devices in palliative home care requires that patients and next-of-kin feel secure. Therefore, the aim was to describe medical technology's impact on the sense of security for patients, next-of-kin and district nurses. Deductive content analysis was conducted on data from three previous studies, using the theoretical framework 'palliative home care as a secure base'. The use of medical technology was shown to have an impact on the sense of security for all involved. A sense of control was promoted by trust in staff and their competence in managing the technology, which was linked to continuity. Inner peace and being in comfort implied effective symptom relief facilitated by pain pumps and being relieved of responsibility. Health care professionals need to have practical knowledge about medical technology, but at the same time have an awareness of how to create and maintain a sense of security.

  4. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev A.R.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  5. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev A.R.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with chronic heart failure based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  6. Artist concept of Mercury program study of medical effects and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    Artist concept of Mercury program study of medical effects and technology development. Drawing depicts cut-away view of Mercury capsule orbiting the Earth, showing the astronaut and his capsule's hardware.

  7. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova Y.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with coronary heart disease based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  8. Quality assessment of medical education and use of information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Ciric, Damir; Pulja, Artan; Kulasin, Igor; Pandza, Haris

    2009-01-01

    Extensive and fast advancements in biomedical sciences created a significant delay in receiving relevant and updated information in medical practice - physicians use old techniques and treat patients incorrectly. Bosnia and Herzegovina signed the Bologna Declaration on 18 September 2003, and in the light of this new approach to university education, and the process of joining The European Union, the authors set the following aims: to determine the current level of knowledge among medical students at the Medical Faculty of the University of Sarajevo, to determine the level of knowledge among medical students before their enrolment at the faculty, and to find out students opinion on their needs for further education. Students also left their suggestions on what should be changed in the curriculum. 203 students were included in the survey and results show that they demand more practical work, direct contact with patients and presentation of interesting clinical cases. Many of them use the internet as professional education means. Professional papers are rarely used. At present, the availability of learning material is insufficient at the faculty library.

  9. [Display technologies for augmented reality in medical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Ulrich; Winkler, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    One of the main challenges for modern surgery is the effective use of the many available imaging modalities and diagnostic methods. Augmented reality systems can be used in the future to blend patient and planning information into the view of surgeons, which can improve the efficiency and safety of interventions. In this article we present five visualization methods to integrate augmented reality displays into medical procedures and the advantages and disadvantages are explained. Based on an extensive literature review the various existing approaches for integration of augmented reality displays into medical procedures are divided into five categories and the most important research results for each approach are presented. A large number of mixed and augmented reality solutions for medical interventions have been developed as research prototypes; however, only very few systems have been tested on patients. In order to integrate mixed and augmented reality displays into medical practice, highly specialized solutions need to be developed. Such systems must comply with the requirements with respect to accuracy, fidelity, ergonomics and seamless integration into the surgical workflow.

  10. Introduction and uptake of new medical technologies in the Australian health care system: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Gisselle; Casey, Robert; Norman, Richard; Goodall, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the views and perceptions of stakeholders about the current national health technology assessment process conducted by the Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC) and its role in the uptake and diffusion of new medical technologies in Australia. Data collection occurred over a nine month period (August 2008-April 2009). Twenty in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals from four stakeholders groups: (i) MSAC members and evaluators, (ii) academic and health technology assessment experts, (iii) medical industry representatives and (iv) medical specialists. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded using a constant comparative method. Respondents expressed a consensus opinion that the MSAC process is generally fair and transparent, and has been increasingly so over time. The process was described as "flexible" and "intuitive" yet also "idiosyncratic" due to the nature of the technologies being appraised. Approval by MSAC was generally reported to be increasingly important once a technology becomes more widely used. While successful MSAC approval was felt to be important for widespread distribution of a new technology, it was viewed more as a "facilitator of the uptake of new technologies" as opposed to a primary "driver" of technology uptake. Instead, other factors were identified as providing the actual impetus for the uptake of new technologies, with MSAC approval and reimbursement eventually helping facilitate more widespread diffusion. MSAC's decision making process is perceived as fair but with room for improvement. Its role in the uptake and diffusion of new medical technologies in Australia is limited. MSAC does not act as a barrier to significant market penetration of new procedures and medical technologies. However reimbursement is a trigger for increased use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perspectives of radiological protection facing the development of new medical technologies with ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arranz, L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of medical technologies with ionizing radiations is always showing a parallel effort on risks control. These technologies are a safe tool for accurate diagnosis and the elaboration of effective treatments. However it is not foreseen to achieve a decrease of the equivalent effective annual dose person due to medical irradiation (1.06 m Sv for OECD countries), because of the population growing and aging

  12. [Study of the Application of Mobile Medical Technology in Construction of Grading Diagnosis and Treatment System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenwu; Shen, Yihong; Zhen, Hui; Yang, Xiaohe; Hu, Kai

    2018-02-08

    The combination of mobile medical technology and the grading diagnosis and treatment system (GDTS) can stimulate the allocation of medical resources, reduce medical cost and improve public health significantly. Firstly we summarize development features of mobile medical technology in foreign and domestic market, then we study the application model of mobile medical application in GDTS with field research data and analyzes its advantage and shortage. Finally, we propose four measures for further developing mobile medical application in the GDTS:the government departments should formulate policies and industry standards of products as soon as possible to meet requirement of market; service providers should take the hospitals as core role to achieve mutual benefit and win-win situation; take the daily monitoring of chronic diseases as an entry point to build profitable business model; enhance publicity to promote public health awareness.

  13. Mobile technology for medication adherence in people with mood disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rootes-Murdy, Kelly; Glazer, Kara L; Van Wert, Michael J; Mondimore, Francis M; Zandi, Peter P

    2018-02-01

    Medication non-adherence is a critical challenge for many patients diagnosed with mood disorders (Goodwin and Jamison, 1990). There is a need for alternative strategies that improve adherence among patients with mood disorders that are cost-effective, able to reach large patient populations, easy to implement, and that allow for communication with patients outside of in-person visits. Technology-based approaches to promote medication adherence are increasingly being explored to address this need. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the use of mobile technologies to improve medication adherence in patients with mood disorders. A total of nine articles were identified as describing mobile technology targeting medication adherence in mood disorder populations. Results showed overall satisfaction and feasibility of mobile technology, and reduction in mood symptoms; however, few examined effectiveness of mobile technology improving medication adherence through randomized control trials. Given the limited number of studies, further research is needed to determine long term effectiveness. Mobile technologies has the potential to improve medication adherence and can be further utilized for symptom tracking, side effects tracking, direct links to prescription refills, and provide patients with greater ownership over their treatment progress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation: Locations and Knowings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-ee Ahn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT. ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practices. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.Keywords: simulation, locations, knowings, actor-network theory, collaborate learning, multiprofessional learning.

  15. Medical support and technology for long-duration space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, S.; Nicogossian, A.; Buchanan, P.; Pool, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    The current philosophy and development directions being taken towards realization of medical systems for use on board space stations are discussed. Data was gained on the performance of physical examinations, venipuncture and blood flow, blood smear and staining, white blood cell differential count, throat culture swab and colony count, and microscopy techniques during a 28-day period of the Skylab mission. It is expected that the advent of Shuttle flights will rapidly increase the number of persons in space, create a demand for in-space rather than on-earth medical procedures, and necessitate treatments for disorders without the provision for an early return to earth. Attention is being given to pressurized environment and extravehicular conditions of treatment, the possibilities of the use of the OTV for moving injured or ill crewmembers to other space stations, and to isolation of persons with communicable diseases from station crews.

  16. Health smart cards: merging technology and medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sherry R

    2003-01-01

    Smart cards are credit card-sized plastic cards, with an embedded dime-sized Integrated Circuit microprocessor chip. Smart cards can be used for keyless entry, electronic medical records, etc. Health smart cards have been in limited use since 1982 in Europe and the United States, and several barriers including lack of infrastructure, low consumer confidence, competing standards, and cost continue to be addressed.

  17. Medical technology as a key driver of rising health expenditure: disentangling the relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Corinna; Drummond, Michael; Bhuiyan Khan, Beena

    2013-01-01

    Health care spending has risen steadily in most countries, becoming a concern for decision-makers worldwide. Commentators often point to new medical technology as the key driver for burgeoning expenditures. This paper critically appraises this conjecture, based on an analysis of the existing literature, with the aim of offering a more detailed and considered analysis of this relationship. Several databases were searched to identify relevant literature. Various categories of studies (eg, multivariate and cost-effectiveness analyses) were included to cover different perspectives, methodological approaches, and issues regarding the link between medical technology and costs. Selected articles were reviewed and relevant information was extracted into a standardized template and analyzed for key cross-cutting themes, ie, impact of technology on costs, factors influencing this relationship, and methodological challenges in measuring such linkages. A total of 86 studies were reviewed. The analysis suggests that the relationship between medical technology and spending is complex and often conflicting. Findings were frequently contingent on varying factors, such as the availability of other interventions, patient population, and the methodological approach employed. Moreover, the impact of technology on costs differed across technologies, in that some (eg, cancer drugs, invasive medical devices) had significant financial implications, while others were cost-neutral or cost-saving. In light of these issues, we argue that decision-makers and other commentators should extend their focus beyond costs solely to include consideration of whether medical technology results in better value in health care and broader socioeconomic benefits. PMID:23807855

  18. Medical education for rural areas: Opportunities and challenges for information and communications technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargeant Joan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Resources in medical education are not evenly distributed and access to education can be more problematic in rural areas. Similar to telemedicine′s positive influence on health care access, advances in information and communications technologies (ICTs increase opportunities for medical education. This paper provides a descriptive overview of the use of ICTs in medical education and suggests a conceptual model for reviewing ICT use in medical education, describes specific ICTs and educational interventions, and discusses opportunities and challenges of ICT use, especially in rural areas. The literature review included technology and medical education, 1996-2005. Using an educational model as a framework, the uses of ICTs in medical education are, very generally, to link learners, instructors, specific course materials and/or information resources in various ways. ICTs range from the simple (telephone, audio-conferencing to the sophisticated (virtual environments, learning repositories and can increase access to medical education and enhance learning and collaboration for learners at all levels and for institutions. While ICTs are being used and offer further potential for medical education enhancement, challenges exist, especially for rural areas. These are technological (e.g., overcoming barriers like cost, maintenance, access to telecommunications infrastructure, educational (using ICTs to best meet learners′ educational priorities, integrating ICTs into educational programs and social (sensitivity to remote needs, resources, cultures. Finally, there is need for more rigorous research to more clearly identify advantages and disadvantages of specific uses of ICTs in medical education.

  19. The 'economics' of medical technology | Járos | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The word 'economics' is used in this paper in its widest sense, referring to issues that 'influence the management, regulation and government of an enterprise'. In addition to the obvious monetary issues in health-care technology, social, ethical, legal and cultural issues are also discussed. The eventual, generally high cost ...

  20. Managing Information Technology in Academic Medical Centers: A "Multicultural" Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Charles P.; Corn, Milton; Krumrey, Arthur; Perry, David R.; Stevens, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect management of information technology. Two scenarios, one dealing with standardization of desktop personal computers and the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet, form the basis for an exercise in which four prototypical members…

  1. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse Filip

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can be improved, and to analyse the costs of this improvement. Methods Qualitative and quantitative methods are deployed to outline how nutritional care of medical inpatients is performed at three Danish hospitals. The practices observed are compared with official recommendations for nutritional care of inpatients. Factors extraneous and counterproductive to optimal nutritional care are identified from the perspectives of patients and professional staff. A review of the literature illustrates the potential for optimal nutritional care. A health economic analysis is performed to elucidate the savings potential of improved nutritional care. Results The prospects for improvements in nutritional care are ameliorated if hospital management clearly identifies nutritional care as a priority area, and enjoys access to management tools for quality assurance. The prospects are also improved if a committed professional at the ward has the necessary time resources to perform nutritional care in practice, and if the care staff can requisition patient meals rich in nutrients 24 hours a day. At the kitchen production level prospects benefit from a facilitator contact between care and kitchen staff, and if the kitchen staff controls the whole food path from the kitchen to the patient. At the patient level, prospects are improved if patients receive information about the choice of food and drink, and have a better nutrition dialogue with the care staff. Better nutritional care of

  2. Ethical evaluation model for technologies. the role of medical technology in the development of autonomy in diabetes patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Simona; Necula, Roxana; Sandu, A; Iliescu, Maria Liliana; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-01-01

    Romanian Government Decision (GD) No. 8/2012 amending and supplementing GD No. 144/2010 regarding the function and organization structures of the Ministry of Health defines health technology assessment (HTA) as "a systematic and multidisciplinary analysis of the existing and new medical technologies, through which medical, economic, social, ethical and organizational information are synthesized so that medical technologies to be used in a transparent and unbiased manner". We propose an ethical assessment model of technologies used in the care of diabetic patients. The nature of this research was exploratory, giving the novelty of this approach to the clinical and social context of Romania. The assessment of health technologies used in the care of diabetic patients was based on the following research question: What is the role of health technology in developing autonomy and responsibility in patients suffering from chronic diseases? Individual interviews and focus groups were held from June, 2011 to November, 2012 in Iasi. The criterion for selecting the participants was belonging to the target groups: family doctors or diabetes specialist, patients with type 1 (TID) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), caregivers and other professionals involved in diabetes patient care. The diabetic patient benefits from a specific treatment and has the privilege of self-administering it, his life expectancy and quality of life depending upon the compliance and responsibility he demonstrates.

  3. Disruptive Technologies: A Credible Threat to Leading Programs in Continuing Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M.; Armstrong, Elizabeth G.

    1998-01-01

    Disruptive technologies are simple convenient innovations that have triggered failures of some well-managed companies. They may threaten continuing medical-education programs so focused on leading-edge technology they lose sight of the very different educational needs of growing numbers of health care providers, who are turning to consultants, the…

  4. Value of research and value of development in early assessments of new medical technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retèl, Valesca P.; Grutters, Janneke P.C.; van Harten, Wim H.; Joore, Manuela A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In early stages of development of new medical technologies, there are conceptually separate but related societal decisions to be made concerning adoption, further development (i.e., technical improvement), and research (i.e., clinical trials) of new technologies. This article presents a

  5. National priorities for the assessment of clinical conditions and medical technologies: report of a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lara, María Elena; Goodman, Clifford

    1990-01-01

    ... and Medical Technologies Report of a Pilot Study Maria Elena Lara and Clifford Goodman, editors Priority-Setting Group Council on Health Care Technology Institute of Medicine NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS WASHINGTON, D.C. 1990 i Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the typese...

  6. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  7. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  8. Rethinking agency and medical adherence technology: applying Actor Network Theory to the case study of Digital Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2015-12-01

    Much literature surrounding medical technology and adherence posits that technology is a mechanism for social control. This assumes that the medical establishment can take away patients' agency. Although power relationships and social control can play a key role, medical technology can also serve as an agentive tool to be utilized. We (1) offer the alternative framework of Actor Network Theory to view medical technology, (2) discuss the literature on medication adherence and technology, (3) delve into the ramifications of looking at adherence as a network and (4) use Digital Pills as a case study of dispersed agency. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The use of advanced medical technologies at home: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Haken, Ingrid; Ben Allouch, Somaya; van Harten, Wim H

    2018-02-26

    The number of medical technologies used in home settings has increased substantially over the last 10-15 years. In order to manage their use and to guarantee quality and safety, data on usage trends and practical experiences are important. This paper presents a literature review on types, trends and experiences with the use of advanced medical technologies at home. The study focused on advanced medical technologies that are part of the technical nursing process and 'hands on' processes by nurses, excluding information technology such as domotica. The systematic review of literature was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE, Scopus and Cinahl. We included papers from 2000 to 2015 and selected articles containing empirical material. The review identified 87 relevant articles, 62% was published in the period 2011-2015. Of the included studies, 45% considered devices for respiratory support, 39% devices for dialysis and 29% devices for oxygen therapy. Most research has been conducted on the topic 'user experiences' (36%), mainly regarding patients or informal caregivers. Results show that nurses have a key role in supporting patients and family caregivers in the process of homecare with advanced medical technologies and in providing information for, and as a member of multi-disciplinary teams. However, relatively low numbers of articles were found studying nurses perspective. Research on medical technologies used at home has increased considerably until 2015. Much is already known on topics, such as user experiences; safety, risks, incidents and complications; and design and technological development. We also identified a lack of research exploring the views of nurses with regard to medical technologies for homecare, such as user experiences of nurses with different technologies, training, instruction and education of nurses and human factors by nurses in risk management and patient safety.

  10. Medical technology as a key driver of rising health expenditure: disentangling the relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorenson C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Corinna Sorenson,1,2 Michael Drummond,2,3 Beena Bhuiyan Khan1 1LSE Health, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 2European Health Technology Institute for Socioeconomic Research, Brussels, Belgium; 3Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK Abstract: Health care spending has risen steadily in most countries, becoming a concern for decision-makers worldwide. Commentators often point to new medical technology as the key driver for burgeoning expenditures. This paper critically appraises this conjecture, based on an analysis of the existing literature, with the aim of offering a more detailed and considered analysis of this relationship. Several databases were searched to identify relevant literature. Various categories of studies (eg, multivariate and cost-effectiveness analyses were included to cover different perspectives, methodological approaches, and issues regarding the link between medical technology and costs. Selected articles were reviewed and relevant information was extracted into a standardized template and analyzed for key cross-cutting themes, ie, impact of technology on costs, factors influencing this relationship, and methodological challenges in measuring such linkages. A total of 86 studies were reviewed. The analysis suggests that the relationship between medical technology and spending is complex and often conflicting. Findings were frequently contingent on varying factors, such as the availability of other interventions, patient population, and the methodological approach employed. Moreover, the impact of technology on costs differed across technologies, in that some (eg, cancer drugs, invasive medical devices had significant financial implications, while others were cost-neutral or cost-saving. In light of these issues, we argue that decision-makers and other commentators should extend their focus beyond costs solely to include consideration of whether medical technology results in

  11. The final technical report of the CRADA, 'Medical Accelerator Technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Rawls, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Under this CRADA, Berkeley Lab and the industry partner, General Atomics (GA), have cooperatively developed hadron therapy technologies for commercialization. Specifically, Berkeley Lab and GA jointly developed beam transport systems to bring the extracted protons from the accelerator to the treatment rooms, rotating gantries to aim the treatment beams precisely into patients from any angle, and patient positioners to align the patient accurately relative to the treatment beams. We have also jointly developed a patient treatment delivery system that controls the radiation doses in the patient, and hardware to improve the accelerator performances, including a radio-frequency ion source and its low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system. This project facilitated the commercialization of the DOE-developed technologies in hadron therapy by the private sector in order to improve the quality of life of the nation

  12. [MEDICAL SOCIAL MODELING TECHNOLOGIES FOR ACTIVE AGING IN KAZAKHSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benberin, V V; Akhetov, A A; Tanbaeva, G Z

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses a new model for active ageing in Republic of Kazakhstan with participation the state, population and medical social services. Achieving active longevity will lead to positive trends in the development of human capital of the state, because it enables to use experience and knowledge of senior generation in enhancing the effectiveness of socio-economic transformation in health care. The study was carried out on the base of the Central clinical hospital of the President's affairs administration in Republic of Kazakhstan, with the participation of 147 admitted patients of elderly and senile age.

  13. Hybrid laser technology for composite coating and medical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Mikšovský, Jan; Remsa, Jan; Mihailescu, I. N.; Kopeček, Jaromír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-8 ISSN 1823-3430 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA MŠk LD12069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hybrid technology * pulsed laser deposition * biocompatible composites * doped coating * composite coating Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://web.usm.my/jes/pastIssue.html

  14. U.S. Experiences and Regulatory Challenges with New Medical Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elee, J.

    2016-01-01

    There are many challenges in regulating new medical technologies in the United States. In the US, there are fifty different state agencies, several local and city agencies, and eleven federal agencies which all delve into some aspects of regulating the use of radiation. It also can take several years to promulgate new regulations for new technologies. Additionally, some technologies are used outside of their original approved/intended use which causes issues for regulators. Finally, many of our regulating agencies have limited resources to learn and train on the new technologies that are on the market. All of these reasons combine to make regulating new technologies and uses of radiation difficult. (author)

  15. [Analysis of medical cost of atlantoaxial disorders in patients receiving innovated treatment technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunxia; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-19

    To explore the effects of innovated technologies and products on improving outcomes and decreasing medical costs by analyzing a total and subtotal medical costs of patients with atlantoaxial disorders. The medical costs of 1 489 patients with atlantoaxial disorders from Peking University Third Hospital from 2005 to 2014, who received innovated technologies and products treatment were retrospectively analyzed and compared.Descriptive analysis and ANOVA were used for statistical analysis, and SPSS 19.0 was used to analyze data. From 2005 to 2014, under the situation of a general increase in medical cost by 327%, the total medical costs were stable for patients who used innovated technologies and products for treatment, fluctuating from 20 851 in 2005 to 20 878 in 2014; however, the cases of operation increased year by year, from 88 in 2005 to 163 in 2014; the average length of stay decreased from 21 in 2005 to 10 in 2014; the total cases of transfusion were 22 from 2005 to 2014; the safety, stability and feasibility of the innovated technologies and products were illustrated through the decrease of average length of stay, the reduction of bleeding and the significance of outcomes. It is illustrated that the innovated technologies and products not only decrease patients' suffering and medical costs but also are safe, stable and feasible.

  16. Patient safety and technology-driven medication e A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia

    2014-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. Aim: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. Methods: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient...

  17. A survey of clinical performance skills requirements in medical radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowntree, P.A.; Veitch, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper outlines the reasons behind carry out a study of clinical performance skills requirements and the method being used to gather data. It describes the changes which have occurred in radiographer education in Queensland, the broader impact brought about by changes in professional body requirements and the development of a Competency based Standards Document for the profession. The paper provides examples of the survey design and layout being developed for distribution to third year students in the Medical Imaging Technology major of the Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Radiation Technology) Queensland University of Technology, graduates and clinical departments in Queensland. 1 tab., 1 fig

  18. The Effects of Health Information Technology on the Costs and Quality of Medical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Agha, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Information technology has been linked to productivity growth in a wide variety of sectors, and health information technology (HIT) is a leading example of an innovation with the potential to transform industry-wide productivity. This paper analyzes the impact of health information technology (HIT) on the quality and intensity of medical care. Using Medicare claims data from 1998-2005, I estimate the effects of early investment in HIT by exploiting variation in hospitals’ adoption statuses ov...

  19. Scanning Micromirror Platform Based on MEMS Technology for Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eakkachai Pengwang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This topical review discusses recent development and trends on scanning micromirrors for biomedical applications. This also includes a biomedical micro robot for precise manipulations in a limited volume. The characteristics of medical scanning micromirror are explained in general with the fundamental of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS for fabrication processes. Along with the explanations of mechanism and design, the principle of actuation are provided for general readers. In this review, several testing methodology and examples are described based on many types of actuators, such as, electrothermal actuators, electrostatic actuators, electromagnetic actuators, pneumatic actuators, and shape memory alloy. Moreover, this review provides description of the key fabrication processes and common materials in order to be a basic guideline for selecting micro-actuators. With recent developments on scanning micromirrors, performances of biomedical application are enhanced for higher resolution, high accuracy, and high dexterity. With further developments on integrations and control schemes, MEMS-based scanning micromirrors would be able to achieve a better performance for medical applications due to small size, ease in microfabrication, mass production, high scanning speed, low power consumption, mechanical stable, and integration compatibility.

  20. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  1. Development of Rural Emergency Medical System (REMS) with Geospatial Technology in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, W. H.; Shahrizal, I. M.; Noordin, A.; Nurulain, M. I.; Norhan, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Emergency medical services are dedicated services in providing out-of-hospital transport to definitive care or patients with illnesses and injuries. In this service the response time and the preparedness of medical services is of prime importance. The application of space and geospatial technology such as satellite navigation system and Geographical Information System (GIS) was proven to improve the emergency operation in many developed countries. In collaboration with a medical service NGO, the National Space Agency (ANGKASA) has developed a prototype Rural Emergency Medical System (REMS), focusing on providing medical services to rural areas and incorporating satellite based tracking module integrated with GIS and patience database to improve the response time of the paramedic team during emergency. With the aim to benefit the grassroots community by exploiting space technology, the project was able to prove the system concept which will be addressed in this paper.

  2. An Empirical Assessment of a Technology Acceptance Model for Apps in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briz-Ponce, Laura; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José

    2015-11-01

    The evolution and the growth of mobile applications ("apps") in our society is a reality. This general trend is still upward and the app use has also penetrated the medical education community. However, there is a lot of unawareness of the students' and professionals' point of view about introducing "apps" within Medical School curriculum. The aim of this research is to design, implement and verify that the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) can be employed to measure and explain the acceptance of mobile technology and "apps" within Medical Education. The methodology was based on a survey distributed to students and medical professionals from University of Salamanca. This model explains 46.7% of behavioral intention to use mobile devise or "apps" for learning and will help us to justify and understand the current situation of introducing "apps" into the Medical School curriculum.

  3. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  4. Technology update on fast plastic scintillators for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic scintillators appear to have potential utility in three research areas related to nuclear medicine: (1) high count rate applications in general, (2) positron camera applications, and (3) positron source localization through measurement of relative arrival times of annihilation quanta at two co-linear detectors. These three areas of applicability depend on improvement in three specific areas of plastic scintillator technology: (a) development of plastics with very fast decay times, (b) development of plastics with greatly improved high energy photon detection efficiencies (high-Z loaded plastics), and (c) improvement of fast timing system capabilities. The three preceding areas of improvement are discussed

  5. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a a data acquisition device (DAD at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  6. Biodesign process and culture to enable pediatric medical technology innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Wynne, Elizabeth; Krummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Innovation is the process through which new scientific discoveries are developed and promoted from bench to bedside. In an effort to encourage young entrepreneurs in this area, Stanford Biodesign developed a medical device innovation training program focused on need-based innovation. The program focuses on teaching systematic evaluation of healthcare needs, invention, and concept development. This process can be applied to any field of medicine, including Pediatric Surgery. Similar training programs have gained traction throughout the United States and beyond. Equally important to process in the success of these programs is an institutional culture that supports transformative thinking. Key components of this culture include risk tolerance, patience, encouragement of creativity, management of conflict, and networking effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Health Information Technology (HIT) in disability determinations: when medical records become medical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulu, Bengisu; Daniels, Susan; Feldman, Sue; Horan, Thomas A

    2008-11-06

    This exploratory study investigated the impact of incomplete medical evidence on the SSA disability determination process and the role of HIT as a solution. We collected qualitative data from nineteen expert-interviews. Findings indicate that HIT can lead to innovative solutions that can significantly improve the determination process.

  8. Medical image digital archive: a comparison of storage technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunn, Timothy; Hutchings, Matt

    1998-07-01

    A cost effective, high capacity digital archive system is one of the remaining key factors that will enable a radiology department to eliminate film as an archive medium. The ever increasing amount of digital image data is creating the need for huge archive systems that can reliably store and retrieve millions of images and hold from a few terabytes of data to possibly hundreds of terabytes. Selecting the right archive solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, conformance to open standards, archive availability and reliability, security, cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, and more. This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. New technologies will be discussed, such as DVD and high performance tape. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on random and pre-fetch retrieval time will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, RAID disk storage devices to high capacity, NearlineR storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive.

  9. Decreasing medication turnaround time with digital scanning technology in a canadian health region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Heather; Nodwell, Lisa; Alsharif, Sahar

    2014-11-01

    Reducing medication turnaround time can improve efficiency, patient safety, and quality of care in the hospital setting. Digital scanning technology (DST) can be used to electronically transmit scanned prescriber orders to a pharmacy computer queue for verification and processing, which may help to improve medication turnaround time. To evaluate medication turnaround time before and after implementation of DST for all medications and for antibiotics only. Medication turnaround times were evaluated retrospectively for periods before (June 6-10, 2011) and after (September 26-30, 2011) implementation of DST at 2 hospital sites in 1 health region. Medication turnaround time was defined as the time from composition of a medication order by the prescriber to its verification by the pharmacy (phase 1) and the time from prescriber composition to administration to the patient by a nurse (total). Median turnaround times were analyzed with SPSS software using the Mann-Whitney U test. In total, 304 and 244 medication orders were audited before and after DST implementation, respectively. Median phase 1 turnaround time for all medications declined significantly, from 2 h 23 min before DST implementation to 1 h 33 min after DST implementation (p < 0.001). Antibiotics were also processed significantly faster (1 h 51 min versus 1 h 9 min, p = 0.015). However, total turnaround time for all medications did not differ significantly (5 h 15 min versus 5 h 0 min, p = 0.42). Implementation of DST was associated with a 50-min decrease in medication turnaround time for the period from when an order was prescribed to the time it was processed by the pharmacy. Regular evaluation of medication turnaround times is recommended to compare with benchmarks, to ensure that hospital standards are being met, and to measure the effects of policy changes and implementation of new technology on medication-use processes.

  10. Educating medical students as competent users of health information technologies: the MSOP data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Julie J; Passiment, Morgan; Hoffman, Helene M

    2007-01-01

    As more health information technologies become part of the health care environment, the need for physicians with medical informatics competencies is growing. In 2006, a survey was created to determine the degree to which the Association of American Medical College's Medical School Objectives Project (MSOP) medical informatics competencies had been incorporated into medical school curricula in the United States. a web-based tool was used to create the survey; medical education deans or their designees were requested to complete the survey. Analysis focused on the clinician, researcher, and manager roles of physicians. Seventy usable surveys were returned. Many of the objectives were stated in the schools' respective curricula and the competencies were being evaluated. However, only a few schools taught and assessed the medical informatics objectives that required interaction with health information. To insure that physicians have the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to effectively and efficiently interact with today's health information technologies, more medical informatics concepts need to be included and assessed in all undergraduate medical education curricula in the United States.

  11. Near field communications technology and the potential to reduce medication errors through multidisciplinary application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Emer; Pegler, Joe; Lehane, Elaine; Livingstone, Vicki; McCarthy, Nora; Sahm, Laura J; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Driscoll, Aoife; Corrigan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety requires optimal management of medications. Electronic systems are encouraged to reduce medication errors. Near field communications (NFC) is an emerging technology that may be used to develop novel medication management systems. An NFC-based system was designed to facilitate prescribing, administration and review of medications commonly used on surgical wards. Final year medical, nursing, and pharmacy students were recruited to test the electronic system in a cross-over observational setting on a simulated ward. Medication errors were compared against errors recorded using a paper-based system. A significant difference in the commission of medication errors was seen when NFC and paper-based medication systems were compared. Paper use resulted in a mean of 4.09 errors per prescribing round while NFC prescribing resulted in a mean of 0.22 errors per simulated prescribing round (P=0.000). Likewise, medication administration errors were reduced from a mean of 2.30 per drug round with a Paper system to a mean of 0.80 errors per round using NFC (PNFC based medication system may be used to effectively reduce medication errors in a simulated ward environment.

  12. The determinants of medical technology adoption in different decisional systems: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Greer, Ann Lennarson; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2017-03-01

    Studies of determinants of adoption of new medical technology have failed to coalesce into coherent knowledge. A flaw obscuring strong patterns may be a common habit of treating a wide range of health care innovations as a generic technology. We postulate three decisional systems that apply to different medical technologies with distinctive expertise, interest, and authority: medical-individualistic, fiscal-managerial, and strategic-institutional decisional systems. This review aims to examine the determinants of the adoption of medical technologies based on the corresponding decision-making system. We included quantitative and qualitative studies that analyzed factors facilitating or inhibiting the adoption of medical technologies. In total, 65 studies published between 1974 and 2014 met our inclusion criteria. These studies contained 688 occurrences of variables that were used to examine the adoption decisions, and we subsequently condensed these variables to 62 determinants in four main categories: organizational, individual, environmental, and innovation-related. The determinants and their empirical association with adoption were grouped and analyzed by the three decision-making systems. Although we did not identify substantial differences across the decision-making systems in terms of the direction of the determinants' influence on adoption, a clear pattern emerged in terms of the categories of determinants that were targeted in different decision-making systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The potential of medical device industry in technological and economical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresova, Petra; Penhaker, Marek; Selamat, Ali; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    The high quality of public health improves not only healthy life expectancy, but also the productivity of labor. The most important part of the health care sector is the medical technology industry. The aim of this study is to analyze the current situation in the medical device industry in Europe, its potential strengths and weaknesses in the context of topical economic and demographic development. The contribution specifies an analysis of the economic state of the medical device industry in the context of demographic development of European Union's macroeconomic indicators and views of experts in the field of medical device development, concerning the opportunities for entities involved in the medical device market. There is fierce competition on the European market. The innovative activity is stable and well regulated by responsible authorities. Worldwide, the medical device market is expected to grow.

  14. Teaching medical humanities in the digital world: affordances of technology-enhanced learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Sandra Joy; Day, Giskin

    2014-12-01

    Medical humanities courses are typically taught in face-to-face teaching environments, but now medical humanities educators, alongside educators from other disciplines, are facing shifts in higher education towards online (and sometimes open) courses. For the medical humanities educator, there is limited guidance regarding how technology-enhanced learning design can support the learning outcomes associated with medical humanities. This article aims to provide useful direction for such educators on how digital technologies can be used through learner-focused pedagogies. Specific examples are provided as to how the affordances of Web 2.0 and other tools can be realised in innovative ways to help achieve skills development within the medical humanities. The guidance, alongside the practical suggestions for implementation, can provide important conceptual background for medical humanities educators who wish to embrace technology-enhanced learning, and reconceptualise or redesign medical humanities for an online or blended teaching environment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  16. Glossary of technical terms for the medical technology professionals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Felipe García Rodríguez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current work is a glossary of technical terms in English language for Medical Health Professionals, has been prepared due to the lack of technical lexicon the students have during and after their university studies, that is, the students have a deficit of technical words which limits their professional competence and accountability. This shortage limits them and makes it a great laboring challenge if they have to work overseas in English-speaking countries. The glossary comprises the main and necessary words which are needed for this type of professional in their field of action. These graduates have a solid knowledge and comprehension of biological, biochemical and biophysical fundamentals in their mother tongue but they do not have the necessary elements in the target language to operate properly. It is a need that they can work appropriately in the spheres of prevention, promotion and health recovery to support a diagnosis, a treatment and a management not only in their mother tongue but in English for their future work.

  17. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  18. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  19. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  20. Adopting new medical technologies in Russian hospitals: what causes inefficiency? (qualitative study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, Sergey; Zasimova, Liudmila

    2018-01-01

    The adoption of new medical technologies often generates losses in efficiency associated with the excess or insufficient acquisition of new equipment, an inappropriate choice (in terms of economic and clinical parameters) of medical equipment, and its poor use. Russia is a good example for exploring the problem of the ineffective adoption of new medical technologies due to the massive public investment in new equipment for medical institutions in 2006-2013. This study examines the procurement of new technologies in Russian hospitals to find the main causes of inefficiency. The research strategy was based on in-depth semistructured interviews with representatives of prominent actors (regional health care authorities, hospital executives, senior physicians). The main result is that inefficiencies arise from the contradiction between hospitals' and authorities' motivation for acquiring new technologies: hospitals tend to adopt technologies which bring benefits to their department heads and physicians and minimize maintenance and servicing costs, while the authorities' main concern is the initial cost of the technology.

  1. Educational Scholarship and Technology: Resources for a Changing Undergraduate Medical Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Brandon N; Corral, Irma; John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G

    2017-06-01

    Returning to the original emphasis of higher education, universities have increasingly recognized the value and scholarship of teaching, and medical schools have been part of this educational scholarship movement. At the same time, the preferred learning styles of a new generation of medical students and advancements in technology have driven a need to incorporate technology into psychiatry undergraduate medical education (UGME). Educators need to understand how to find, access, and utilize such educational technology. This article provides a brief historical context for the return to education as scholarship, along with a discussion of some of the advantages to this approach, as well as several recent examples. Next, the educational needs of the current generation of medical students, particularly their preference to have technology incorporated into their education, will be discussed. Following this, we briefly review the educational scholarship of two newer approaches to psychiatry UGME that incorporate technology. We also offer the reader some resources for accessing up-to-date educational scholarship for psychiatry UGME, many of which take advantage of technology themselves. We conclude by discussing the need for promotion of educational scholarship.

  2. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Medical Assisting Technology. (Program CIP-51.0801 - Medical /Clinical Assisting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Kaye; King, Christine

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  3. Medication safety through information technology: a focus on medication prescribing and administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of hospital care is changing: the aging population results in more patients being admitted to hospitals, but are discharged sooner. As a result, hospitals invest in information technology to assure safe and effective treatment and facilitate rapid patient turnover. In this thesis we

  4. Role of information communication technology in higher education: learners perspective in rural medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tripti K; Waghmare, Lalitbhushan S; Jagzape, Arunita T; Rawekar, Alka T; Quazi, Nazli Z; Mishra, Ved Prakash

    2014-06-01

    Higher education has undergone profound transformation due to recent technological advancements. Resultantly health profession students have a strong base to utilize information technology for their professional development. Studies over recent past reflect a striking change in pattern of technology usage amongst medical students expanding prospects exponentially by e-books, science apps, readymade power-point presentations, evidence based medicine, Wikipedia, etc. Aim & Objectives: The study was undertaken with an aim to explore the general perceptions of medical students and faculties about the role of Information Communication Technology in higher education and to gauge student's dependence on the same for seeking knowledge and information. Cross-sectional, mixed research design. The study was conducted in Department of Physiology, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University). Study population included students (n=150) and teaching faculty (n=10) of I(st) phase of medical curriculum. The survey questionnaire (10 closed ended and 5 open ended items) and Focus group discussion (FGD) captured the perceptions and attitudes of students and faculties respectively regarding the role and relevance of technology in higher education. Quantitative analysis of closed ended responses was done by percentage distribution and Qualitative analysis of open ended responses and FGD excerpts was done by coding and observing the trends and patterns respectively. Overall the observations were in favour of increasing usability and dependability on technology as ready reference tool of subject information. Learners valued text books and technology almost equally and regarded computer training as a desirable incorporation in medical curriculum. Role of technology in education should be anticipated and appropriate measures should be undertaken for its adequate and optimum utilization by proper training of students as well as facilitators.

  5. Awareness and using of medical students about mobile health technology in clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi; Rezazadeh, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test-retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology.

  6. Awareness and Using of Medical Students About Mobile Health Technology in Clinical Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. Method The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test–retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. Findings The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. Conclusion The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology. PMID:24058250

  7. Health Information Technology: Meaningful Use and Next Steps to Improving Electronic Facilitation of Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Hayden B; Zullig, Leah L; Mendys, Phil; Ho, Michael; Trygstad, Troy; Granger, Christopher; Oakes, Megan M; Granger, Bradi B

    2016-03-15

    The use of health information technology (HIT) may improve medication adherence, but challenges for implementation remain. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of HIT as it relates to medication adherence programs, acknowledge the potential barriers in light of current legislation, and provide recommendations to improve ongoing medication adherence strategies through the use of HIT. We describe four potential HIT barriers that may impact interoperability and subsequent medication adherence. Legislation in the United States has incentivized the use of HIT to facilitate and enhance medication adherence. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) was recently adopted and establishes federal standards for the so-called "meaningful use" of certified electronic health record (EHR) technology that can directly impact medication adherence. The four persistent HIT barriers to medication adherence include (1) underdevelopment of data reciprocity across clinical, community, and home settings, limiting the capture of data necessary for clinical care; (2) inconsistent data definitions and lack of harmonization of patient-focused data standards, making existing data difficult to use for patient-centered outcomes research; (3) inability to effectively use the national drug code information from the various electronic health record and claims datasets for adherence purposes; and (4) lack of data capture for medication management interventions, such as medication management therapy (MTM) in the EHR. Potential recommendations to address these issues are discussed. To make meaningful, high quality data accessible, and subsequently improve medication adherence, these challenges will need to be addressed to fully reach the potential of HIT in impacting one of our largest public health issues.

  8. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PARTS OF MEDICAL PRODUCTS PRODUCED USING ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Górski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of tests conducted on the elements of medical devices - slings used with medical lifts - manufactured using additive technologies. Project assumptions were: to produce 100 samples of clips with varying design, material and orientation parameter. Samples were manufactured using FDM and SLA processes and then tested for mechanical strength, load transmission and functionality, using certified equipment. Paper shows full methodology and obtained test results.

  10. Health Information Technology Continues to Show Positive Effect on Medical Outcomes: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Beane, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Background Health information technology (HIT) has been introduced into the health care industry since the 1960s when mainframes assisted with financial transactions, but questions remained about HIT’s contribution to medical outcomes. Several systematic reviews since the 1990s have focused on this relationship. This review updates the literature. Objective The purpose of this review was to analyze the current literature for the impact of HIT on medical outcomes. We hypothesized that there is...

  11. EMITEL: E-Encyclopaedia and E-Dictionary of Medical Imaging Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedec, M.; Kovacevic, N.; Magjarevic, R.

    2011-01-01

    EMITEL (European Medical Imaging Technology e-Encyclopaedia for Lifelong Learning) is an electronic encyclopaedia and multilingual dictionary related to medical imaging technologies. It is a result of the multi-annual international project which involved more than 250 contributors from 35 countries, aiming to foster development of medical physics and biomedical/clinical engineering by a lifelong e-learning web tool for all interested individuals or groups. Currently, the encyclopaedia is equivalent to about 2100 hard copy pages and includes about 3300 terms with an explanatory article for each term. The dictionary provides bidirectional cross-translation of terms between any two among 28 languages from its current database. Dictionary entries are divided into seven groups: diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, radiation protection and general terms. Croatian language was implemented in EMITEL dictionary in April 2010. There were 17 Croatian translators and reviewers from 8 institutions and 3 cities, ranging from medical physics experts to linguist. The basic terminological principles of translation were final intelligibility of terms, desirable Croatian origin and linguistic appropriateness. Croatian contribution in the actual phase of EMITEL project attempted to improve the quality and efficiency of the specific professional, scientific and teaching terminology. A sort of novel, consistent and verified pool of terms of emerging medical imaging technologies was built up, as a one small part of the process of developing information technologies and socio-cultural transition from the industrial society into the society of knowledge. (author)

  12. Better health care: Ghana uses radiation technology to sterilize medical items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2015-01-01

    Infections acquired from improperly sterilized equipment are recognized as a major impediment to safe health care delivery, with consequences that are often deadly for patients. Radiation technology plays a major role in many countries in making medical equipment safer. “The use of nuclear applications, such as exposing medical items to gamma radiation, helps Ghana protect its people from avoidable sicknesses that can occur if items like syringes are not properly sterilized,” said Abraham Adu-Gyamfi, Manager of the Radiation Technology Centre of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission’s Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute in Accra.

  13. [Application Progress of Three-dimensional Laser Scanning Technology in Medical Surface Mapping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Hou, He; Han, Yuchuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Xianfeng; Wang, Mingshi

    2016-04-01

    The booming three-dimensional laser scanning technology can efficiently and effectively get spatial three-dimensional coordinates of the detected object surface and reconstruct the image at high speed,high precision and large capacity of information.Non-radiation,non-contact and the ability of visualization make it increasingly popular in three-dimensional surface medical mapping.This paper reviews the applications and developments of three-dimensional laser scanning technology in medical field,especially in stomatology,plastic surgery and orthopedics.Furthermore,the paper also discusses the application prospects in the future as well as the biomedical engineering problems it would encounter with.

  14. Predictors of Osteopathic Medical Students' Readiness to Use Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robin J; Iqbal, Hassan; Rana, Arif M; Rana, Zaid; Kane, Michael N

    2017-12-01

    The advent of health information technology (HIT) tools can affect the practice of modern medicine in many ways, ideally by improving quality of care and efficiency and reducing medical errors. Future physicians will play a key role in the successful implementation of HIT. However, osteopathic medical students' willingness to learn, adopt, and use technology in a health care setting is not well understood. To understand osteopathic medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding HIT and to identify factors that may be related to their readiness to use HIT. Using a cross-sectional approach, quantitative surveys were collected from students attending a large osteopathic medical school. Multivariate regression modeling was used to determine whether knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and personal characteristics were associated with students' readiness to use HIT in future clinical practice. Six hundred four students responded to at least 70% of the survey and were included in the analysis. Multivariate modeling successfully explained the 26% of variance in predicting students' readiness to use HIT (F8,506=22.6, Ptechnology use, younger age, being male, and prior exposure to technology were associated with readiness to use HIT. Understanding students' level of HIT readiness may help guide medical education intervention efforts to better prepare future osteopathic physicians for HIT engagement and use. Innovative approaches to HIT education in medical school curricula that include biomedical informatics may be necessary.

  15. The application of digital medical 3D printing technology on tumor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Jiang, Yijian; Li, Yangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Digital medical 3D printing technology is a new hi-tech which combines traditional medical and digital design, computer science, bio technology and 3D print technology. At the present time there are four levels application: The printed 3D model is the first and simple application. The surgery makes use of the model to plan the processing before operation. The second is customized operation tools such as implant guide. It helps doctor to operate with special tools rather than the normal medical tools. The third level application of 3D printing in medical area is to print artificial bones or teeth to implant into human body. The big challenge is the fourth level which is to print organs with 3D printing technology. In this paper we introduced an application of 3D printing technology in tumor operation. We use 3D printing to print guide for invasion operation. Puncture needles were guided by printed guide in face tumors operation. It is concluded that this new type guide is dominantly advantageous.

  16. Impact of information technology on the role of medical libraries in information managment: normative background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Rožić-Hristovski

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Exponential growth of biomedical knowledge and information technology development is changing the infrastructure of health care systems, education and research. So medical libraries roles have shifted from managing containers of information toward influencing biomedical information resource content and education. These new tasks are formalised in modem American standards for medical libraries, stressing information management role in evolving environment.In Slovenia medical libraries also are aware of development imperative of information activities for advances in medicine. At one side they are faced with lack of specific guidelines for proactive action and on the other with inadequate assessment in legal documents and insufficient funding.

  17. Uptake and diffusion of medical technology innovation in Europe: what role for funding and procurement policies?

    OpenAIRE

    Torbica, Aleksandra; Cappellaro, Giulia

    2010-01-01

    The producers of medical technology constantly strive to innovate and to improve their products for the benefit of patients. With each new generation of devices enabling less invasive techniques, better clinical outcomes and reduced recovery times, patients are direct beneficiaries of this commitment to innovation. Innovation and patient access to technology are inseparably linked with each national health system's respective coverage, procurement and reimbursement policies. If a particular i...

  18. The potential of medical device industry in technological and economical context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maresova P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Petra Maresova,1 Marek Penhaker,1,2 Ali Selamat,1,3 Kamil Kuca1,41Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic; 2Department of Cybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Technical University of Ostrava, Poruba, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia; 4Center for Biomedical Research, University Hospital Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicAbstract: The high quality of public health improves not only healthy life expectancy, but also the productivity of labor. The most important part of the health care sector is the medical technology industry. The aim of this study is to analyze the current situation in the medical device industry in Europe, its potential strengths and weaknesses in the context of topical economic and demographic development. The contribution specifies an analysis of the economic state of the medical device industry in the context of demographic development of European Union’s macroeconomic indicators and views of experts in the field of medical device development, concerning the opportunities for entities involved in the medical device market. There is fierce competition on the European market. The innovative activity is stable and well regulated by responsible authorities. Worldwide, the medical device market is expected to grow.Keywords: technology context, medical device, Europe, expenditure, review

  19. Evolving provider payment models and patient access to innovative medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Genia; Mortimer, Richard; Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the evolving use and expected impact of pay-for-performance (P4P) and risk-based provider reimbursement on patient access to innovative medical technology. Structured interviews with leading private payers representing over 110 million commercially-insured lives exploring current and planned use of P4P provider payment models, evidence requirements for technology assessment and new technology coverage, and the evolving relationship between the two topics. Respondents reported rapid increases in the use of P4P and risk-sharing programs, with roughly half of commercial lives affected 3 years ago, just under two-thirds today, and an expected three-quarters in 3 years. All reported well-established systems for evaluating new technology coverage. Five of nine reported becoming more selective in the past 3 years in approving new technologies; four anticipated that in the next 3 years there will be a higher evidence requirement for new technology access. Similarly, four expected it will become more difficult for clinically appropriate but costly technologies to gain coverage. All reported planning to rely more on these types of provider payment incentives to control costs, but didn't see them as a substitute for payer technology reviews and coverage limitations; they each have a role to play. Interviews limited to nine leading payers with models in place; self-reported data. Likely implications include a more uncertain payment environment for providers, and indirectly for innovative medical technology and future investment, greater reliance on quality and financial metrics, and increased evidence requirements for favorable coverage and utilization decisions. Increasing provider financial risk may challenge the traditional technology adoption paradigm, where payers assumed a 'gatekeeping' role and providers a countervailing patient advocacy role with regard to access to new technology. Increased provider financial risk may result in an

  20. Designing medical technology for resilience: integrating health economics and human factors approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsci, Simone; Uchegbu, Ijeoma; Buckle, Peter; Ni, Zhifang; Walne, Simon; Hanna, George B

    2018-01-01

    The slow adoption of innovation into healthcare calls into question the manner of evidence generation for medical technology. This paper identifies potential reasons for this including a lack of attention to human factors, poor evaluation of economic benefits, lack of understanding of the existing healthcare system and a failure to recognise the need to generate resilient products. Areas covered: Recognising a cross-disciplinary need to enhance evidence generation early in a technology's life cycle, the present paper proposes a new approach that integrates human factors and health economic evaluation as part of a wider systems approach to the design of technology. This approach (Human and Economic Resilience Design for Medical Technology or HERD MedTech) supports early stages of product development and is based on the recent experiences of the National Institute for Health Research London Diagnostic Evidence Co-operative in the UK. Expert commentary: HERD MedTech i) proposes a shift from design for usability to design for resilience, ii) aspires to reduce the need for service adaptation to technological constraints iii) ensures value of innovation at the time of product development, and iv) aims to stimulate discussion around the integration of pre- and post-market methods of assessment of medical technology.

  1. Application countermeasures of non-incineration technologies for medical waste treatment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Ding, Qiong; Yang, Xiaoling; Peng, Zhengyou; Xu, Diandou; Feng, Qinzhong

    2013-12-01

    By the end of 2012, there were 272 modern, high-standard, centralized medical waste disposal facilities operating in various cities in China. Among these facilities nearly 50% are non-incineration treatment facilities, including the technologies of high temperature steam, chemical disinfection and microwave. Each of the non-incineration technologies has its advantages and disadvantages, and any single technology cannot offer a panacea because of the complexity of medical waste disposal. Although non-incineration treatment of medical waste can avoid the release of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans, it is still necessary to decide how to best meet the local waste management needs while minimizing the impact on the environment and public health. There is still a long way to go to establish the sustainable application and management mode of non-incineration technologies. Based on the analysis of typical non-incineration process, pollutant release, and the current tendency for technology application and development at home and abroad, this article recommends the application countermeasures of non-incineration technologies as the best available techniques and best environmental practices in China.

  2. Understanding the health care utilization of children who require medical technology: A descriptive study of children who require tracheostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratling, Regena

    2017-04-01

    Children who require medical technology have complex chronic illnesses. This medical technology, including ventilators, oximeters, tracheostomy tubes, and feeding tubes, allows children and their families to live at home; however, the management of the children's care by informal caregivers is complex with the need for intensive, specialized care. The purpose of this study was to examine the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics that affect health care utilization in a population of children who require medical technology. A retrospective electronic health record (EHR) review was completed on the EHR records on 171 children who require medical technology, specifically tracheostomies, at an outpatient technology dependent pulmonary clinic over a three year period (January 2010-December 2012). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, including medical diagnoses, and emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. Of the 171 children requiring medical technology studied, there were numerous medical diagnoses (n=791), 99% had chronic illnesses affecting two or more body systems, and 88% required two or more technologies, including a tracheostomy and a feeding tube. In addition, 91% of the children had at least one ED visit or hospitalization and were treated in the ED approximately three times over the three year period. The findings from this study noted an increased utilization of health care by these children, and identified common symptoms and medical technologies for which caregivers may need interventions, focusing on education in managing symptoms and medical technology prior to presentation to the ED or hospital. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Virtual reality and interactive gaming technology for obese and diabetic children: is military medical technology applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Thomas Brett

    2011-03-01

    The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center has pursued a number of technologies that may have application to the problems of obesity and diabetes management in children. Children are getting fatter because of increased caloric intake and less physical activity. Furthermore, technology advances have failed to significantly improve metabolic control of type 1 diabetes. Behavioral strategies should target video games, mobile phones, and other popular items used by children and seen by them as necessities. Exergaming is considerably more active than traditional video gaming and can be equivalent to moderate-intensity exercise. Diabetes equipment such as continuous glucose monitors and insulin pumps lack integration and live connectivity and suffer from a poor user interface. In contrast, mobile phones offer wireless connectivity, an excellent voice-enabled interface, and cloud connectivity that could possibly serve as a motivational and compliance tool for diabetes patients through text messaging to the patient, parents, and physician. Mobile phones have the potential to motivate and educate obese children as well. Exergaming for obese children could also be integrated into award systems of game consoles and game play time. The key to successful implementation of these strategies depends on the ability to integrate and connect the various technologies. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Integrating medical, assistive, and universal design products and technologies: Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne; Bauer, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    ISO26000 provides guidance on effective organizational performance that recognizes social responsibility (including rights of persons with disabilities (PWD)), engages stakeholders, and contributes to sustainable development [1]. Millennium Development Goals 2010 state: while progress has been made, insufficient dedication to sustainable development, and inequalities to the most vulnerable people require attention [2]. World Report on Disability 2011 recommendations includes improved data collection and removal of barriers to rehabilitation that empower PWD [3]. The Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM), Assistive Technology Device Classification (ATDC) and Matching Person and Technology (MPT) provide an evidence-based, standardized, internationally comparable framework to improve rehabilitation interventions [4-6]. The ATSM and ATDC support universal design (UD) principles and provision of universal technology. The MPT assures interventions are effective and satisfactory to end-users [7]. The ICF conceptual framework and common language are used throughout [8]. Research findings on healthcare needs are translated. ATSM applications in support of these findings are presented. National initiatives demonstrate the need and value of the ATSM as an evidence-based, user-centric, interdisciplinary method to improve individual and organizational performance for rehabilitation [including AT] services. Two Disability & Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology articles demonstrate ATSM and ATDC use to strengthen rehabilitation services and integrate Universal Design principles for socially responsible behavior.

  5. [Ten years retrospective review of the application of digital medical technology in general surgery in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C H; Lau, Y Y; Zhou, W P; Cai, W

    2017-12-01

    Digital medical technology is a powerful tool which has forcefully promoted the development of general surgery in China. In this article, we reviews the application status of three-dimensional visualization and three-dimensional printing technology in general surgery, introduces the development situation of surgical navigation guided by optical and electromagnetic technology and preliminary attempt to combined with mixed reality applied to complicated hepatectomy, looks ahead the development direction of digital medicine in the era of artificial intelligence and big data on behalf of surgical robot and radiomics. Surgeons should proactively master these advanced techniques and accelerate the innovative development of general surgery in China.

  6. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  7. [Jurisdictions on the reimbursement of new medical technologies by public health insurance: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ex, Patricia; Felgner, Susanne; Henschke, Cornelia

    2018-04-01

    In Germany reimbursement for new medical technologies is often enforced before a social court. It is likely that these judicial decisions also affect the sickness funds' decisions on requests for reimbursement and thus patient access to new technologies in general. The aim of this study was to identify the technologies that have repeatedly generated court actions and whether these actions have been successful. The focus was on differences between sectors, technology groups and indications. Based on this, we analysed in a case study whether judicial decisions on the reimbursement of the same technologies vary across the years. Based on a systematic review, we identified judicial decisions of German social courts on new technologies for the years 2011 to 2016. The analysis included social court decisions on reimbursements for technologies used in the treatment of individual patients. 284 judicial decisions on new technologies were considered in the analysis. In one third of the cases, the sickness funds were required to reimburse the costs, with a higher percentage in inpatient than in outpatient care. Technologies used in treatment of diseases of the eyes and the ears were granted most frequently. In cases involving similar circumstances the social courts sometimes came to conflicting decisions; these decisions are, in part, contradictory to subsequent assessments by the Joint Federal Committee (G-BA). Decisions as to whether reimbursement for new technologies is granted or not do not appear to follow a systematic approach. In the context of the seemingly innovation-friendly policy in inpatient care, there is uncertainty with regard to the "generally accepted state of medical knowledge." It is problematic for both patients and their treating physicians that over a number of years legal proceedings are being initiated for technologies that have not been subjected to a systematic assessment of their benefit. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Designing medical technology for resilience : integrating health economics and human factors approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsci, Simone; Uchegbu, Ijeoma; Buckle, Peter; Ni, Zhifang; Walne, Simon; Hanna, George B.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The slow adoption of innovation into healthcare calls into question the manner of evidence generation for medical technology. This paper identifies potential reasons for this including a lack of attention to human factors, poor evaluation of economic benefits, lack of understanding of

  9. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Söderholm, Hanna M.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    videoconferencing techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. The 3D telepresence technology does not yet exist, and there is a need to understand its potential before resources are spent on its...

  10. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  11. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  12. Users' Perception of Medical Simulation Training: A Framework for Adopting Simulator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Leili Hayati

    2014-01-01

    Users play a key role in many training strategies, yet some organizations often fail to understand the users' perception after a simulation training implementation, their attitude about acceptance or rejection of and integration of emerging simulation technology in medical training (Gaba, 2007, and Topol, 2012). Several factors are considered to…

  13. The use of advanced medical technologies at home : A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haken, Ingrid; Allouch, Somaya Ben; van Harten, Willem H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The number of medical technologies used in home settings has increased substantially over the last 10-15 years. In order to manage their use and to guarantee quality and safety, data on usage trends and practical experiences are important. This paper presents a literature review on

  14. The use of advanced medical technologies at home : a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haken, ten I. (Ingrid); Ben Allouch, S. (Somaya); Harten, van W.H. (Wim)

    2018-01-01

    https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5123-4 Background: The number of medical technologies used in home settings has increased substantially over the last 10–15 years. In order to manage their use and to guarantee quality and safety, data on usage trends and practical experiences are important.

  15. Ethics of emergent information and communication technology applications in humanitarian medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew; Pringle, John; Christen, Markus; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Schwartz, Lisa; Davé, Anushree

    2016-07-01

    New applications of information and communication technology (ICT) are shaping the way we understand and provide humanitarian medical assistance in situations of disaster, disease outbreak or conflict. Each new crisis appears to be accompanied by advancements in humanitarian technology, leading to significant improvements in the humanitarian aid sector. However, ICTs raise ethical questions that warrant attention. Focusing on the context of humanitarian medical assistance, we review key domains of ICT innovation. We then discuss ethical challenges and uncertainties associated with the development and application of new ICTs in humanitarian medical assistance, including avoiding harm, ensuring privacy and security, responding to inequalities, demonstrating respect, protecting relationships, and addressing expectations. In doing so, we emphasize the centrality of ethics in humanitarian ICT design, application and evaluation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Guidelines for the development of scientific texts; path of pedagogical training to the medical technology teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Jacqueline Gaibor-Donoso

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In general, the teacher who works in the process of training the medical technology professional receives training in a medical sense, with emphasis on the subjects related to patient care and from the cognitive perspectives of the human being in their physical and mental integrity. More is not always assured the content with a view to how to write different texts that throughout the exercise of their profession must do and that have a scientific nature and pedagogical basis. In this sense, this article is oriented from which propose guidelines that favor the training in writing scientific texts, with emphasis in the article, related to the work of the medical technology professional.

  17. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route — an example of technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. L.

    1989-04-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates has received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described.

  18. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route - an example of technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience on this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates has received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. (orig.)

  19. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates have received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. 4 refs., 1 fig

  20. Undergraduate medical students' perspectives of skills, uses and preferences of information technology in medical education: A cross-sectional study in a Saudi Medical College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Nehal; Aljumaiah, Rawabi; Alhumaid, Alla; Alraheem, Hiba; Alkadi, Dalal; Koppel, Cristina; Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad

    2018-05-07

    Information technology (IT) is widely used in medical education. However, there are not enough studies about IT uses and preferences among traditional and problem-based learning (PBL) medical students. To compare IT skills, uses and preferences for education between traditional and PBL medical students'. A cross-sectional study; a modified Educause Center for Analysis and Research online survey was sent to traditional curriculum 5th and PBL 4th year medical students of King Saud University. Most of the responding 176 students prefer mobile devices and moderate amount of IT in education. Fourth and fifth year students perceived high academic value of Google (94.2 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.34), YouTube (90.7 vs. 92.2%, p = 0.83) and PubMed (83.7 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.06). More 4th year than 5th year students rated themselves as skilled in learning management system (54.7 vs. 21.1%, p = 0.0001) and Smartboard use (40.7 vs. 23.3%, p = 0.04). Most students rated faculty IT skills as effective. Students agreed that technology helps working faster (95.5%) and make learning creative (85.9%). More integration of information literacy and IT training in medical curricula is needed to enhance better utilization of full features of IT resources available for learning and problem solving. National multi-institutional studies are recommended.

  1. Health-illness transition among persons using advanced medical technology at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fex, Angelika; Flensner, Gullvi; Ek, Anna-Christina; Söderhamn, Olle

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to elucidate meanings of health-illness transition experiences among adult persons using advanced medical technology at home. As an increasing number of persons perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home, knowledge about health-illness transition experiences in this situation may be useful to caregivers in supporting these patients. A qualitative design was used. Five women and five men, all of whom performed self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen therapy from a ventilator or oxygen cylinder, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. Ethics committee approval was obtained. Informed consent was received from all participants, and ethical issues concerning their rights in research were raised. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical methodology, including both an inductive and a deductive structural analysis. This method offers possibilities to obtain an increased understanding by uncovering a deeper meaning of lived experiences through interviews transcribed as texts. The health-illness transition for adult persons in this context was found to mean a learning process of accepting, managing, adjusting and improving daily life with technology, facilitated by realizing the gain from technology at home. Further, the meaning of the health-illness transition experience was interpreted as contentment with being part of the active and conscious process towards transcending into a new state of living, in which the individual and the technology were in tune. The healthy transition experience was characterized by human growth and becoming. This study elucidates one meaning of health-illness transition experiences in relation to the use of advanced medical technology on a more generic level, independent of the specific type of technology used. A positive attitude towards technology at home facilitates the transition. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of

  2. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities.

  3. Health technology assessment to improve the medical equipment life cycle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margotti, Ana E; Ferreira, Filipa B; Santos, Francisco A; Garcia, Renato

    2013-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a tool to support decision making that is intended to assist healthcare managers in their strategic decisions. The use of HTA as a tool for clinical engineering is especially relevant in the domain of the medical equipment once it could improve the performance of the medical equipment. It would be done by their systematically evaluation in several aspects, in their life cycle. In Brazil, the Institute of Biomedical Engineering (IEB-UFSC) through the clinical engineering area has been working on the development of methodologies and improvements on HTA for medical equipment. Therefore, this paper presents the effort to create specific methodologies that will improve the dissemination of HTA, focusing on incorporation and utilization phase of the medical equipment life cycle. This will give a better support to the decision makers in the management of the health care system.

  4. Is a shift from research on individual medical error to research on health information technology underway? A 40-year analysis of publication trends in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlewein, Daniel; Bruni, Tommaso; Gadebusch Bondio, Mariacarla

    2018-06-07

    In 1983, McIntyre and Popper underscored the need for more openness in dealing with errors in medicine. Since then, much has been written on individual medical errors. Furthermore, at the beginning of the 21st century, researchers and medical practitioners increasingly approached individual medical errors through health information technology. Hence, the question arises whether the attention of biomedical researchers shifted from individual medical errors to health information technology. We ran a study to determine publication trends concerning individual medical errors and health information technology in medical journals over the last 40 years. We used the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) taxonomy in the database MEDLINE. Each year, we analyzed the percentage of relevant publications to the total number of publications in MEDLINE. The trends identified were tested for statistical significance. Our analysis showed that the percentage of publications dealing with individual medical errors increased from 1976 until the beginning of the 21st century but began to drop in 2003. Both the upward and the downward trends were statistically significant (P information technology doubled between 2003 and 2015. The upward trend was statistically significant (P information technology in the USA and the UK. © 2018 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Organizational models of educational technology in U.S. and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kevin H; Kamin, Carol; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Moses, Anna; Heestand, Diane

    2008-07-01

    To examine the organizational structure of educational technology units within U.S. and Canadian medical schools in order to (1) identify organization models that support educational technology, (2) describe key attributes of these models, and (3) discuss the strengths and challenges associated with these models. The authors distributed a survey to 88 schools that had previously provided information on their educational technology services and infrastructure. The authors developed the survey through a series of pilots and, then, from the data for each respondent school, created concept maps, which were used to identify organizational models. The authors conducted analyses to determine differences among models. The authors coded the comments about organizational models and identified themes. The authors received adequate data for analysis from 61 schools (69%). Four models for educational technology organizations emerged: (1) centralized units located in the school of medicine, (2) centralized units located at the health science center, (3) centralized units at the comprehensive university, and (4) no centralized unit (Dispersed Model). The majority (75%) of schools relied on some type of centralized organization. Whereas few organization attributes proved to be statistically significant, the centralized models have more resources devoted to educational technology and a closer alignment with the academic mission than the Dispersed Model. Medical schools primarily use central models. The authors recommend that schools structuring their educational technology resources consider exploration of a central model because of its focused use of resources to improve teaching and learning.

  6. Technologies in the patient-centered medical home: examining the model from an enterprise perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Cortney L; Marshall, Capt Robert; Murphy, Edward; Mun, Seong K

    2011-01-01

    Fee-for-service reimbursement has fragmented the healthcare system. Providers are paid based on the number of services rendered instead of quality, leading to the cost of care rising at a faster rate than its value. One approach to counter this is the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a primary care model that emphasizes team-based medicine, a partnership between patients and providers, and expanded access and communication. The transition to PCMH is facilitated by innovative technologies, such as telemedicine for additional services, electronic medical records to document patients' health needs, and online portals for electronic visits and communication between patients and providers. Implementing these technologies involves tremendous investment of funds and time from practices and healthcare organizations. Although PCMH does not require such technologies, they facilitate its success, as care coordination and population management necessitated by the model are difficult to do without. This article argues that there is a paradox in PCMH and technology is at its center. Although PCMH intends to be cost effective by reducing hospital admissions and ER visits through providing better preventative services, it is actually a financial risk due to the very real upfront costs of implementing and sustaining technologies needed to carry out the intent of the PCMH model, which may not be made up immediately, if ever. This article delves into the rationale behind why payers, providers, and patients have adopted PCMH regardless of this risk and in doing so, maps out the roles that innovative technologies play in the conversion to PCMH.

  7. Managing perceived conflicts of interest while ensuring the continued innovation of medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haute, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    If it were not for the ongoing collaboration between vascular surgeons and the medical technology industry, many of these advanced treatments used every day in vascular interventional surgery would not exist. The flip side of this coin is that these vital relationships create multiple roles for surgeons and must be appropriately managed. The dynamic process of innovation, along with factors such as product delivery technique refinement, education, testing and clinical trials, and product support, all make it necessary for ongoing and close collaboration between surgeons and the device industry. This unique relationship sometimes leads to the perception of conflicts of interest for physicians, in part because the competing pressures from the multiple, overlapping roles as clinician/caregiver/investigator/innovator/customer are significant. To address this issue, the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed), the nation's largest medical technology association representing medical device and diagnostics companies, developed a Code of Ethics to guide medical technology companies in their interactions with health care professionals. First introduced in 1993, the AdvaMed Code strongly encourages both industry and physicians to commit to openness and high ethical standards in the conduct of their business interactions. The AdvaMed Code addresses many of the types of interactions that can occur between companies and health care professionals, including training, consulting agreements, the provision of demonstration and evaluation units, and charitable donations. By following the Code, companies send a strong message that treatment decisions must always be based on the best interest of the patient. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Brittany J; Hilton, Tara N; Rivière, Raphaël N; Ferraro, Zachary M; Deonandan, Raywat; Walker, Mark C

    2017-01-01

    This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved. A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical) were included in the review. There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal) complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old). This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a pregnancy with a similar risk profile to that of her younger counterparts when using donated oocytes.

  9. Memorandum on the use of information technology to improve medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammenwerth, E; Aly, A-F; Bürkle, T; Christ, P; Dormann, H; Friesdorf, W; Haas, C; Haefeli, W E; Jeske, M; Kaltschmidt, J; Menges, K; Möller, H; Neubert, A; Rascher, W; Reichert, H; Schuler, J; Schreier, G; Schulz, S; Seidling, H M; Stühlinger, W; Criegee-Rieck, M

    2014-01-01

    Information technology in health care has a clear potential to improve the quality and efficiency of health care, especially in the area of medication processes. On the other hand, existing studies show possible adverse effects on patient safety when IT for medication-related processes is developed, introduced or used inappropriately. To summarize definitions and observations on IT usage in pharmacotherapy and to derive recommendations and future research priorities for decision makers and domain experts. This memorandum was developed in a consensus-based iterative process that included workshops and e-mail discussions among 21 experts coordinated by the Drug Information Systems Working Group of the German Society for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (GMDS). The recommendations address, among other things, a stepwise and comprehensive strategy for IT usage in medication processes, the integration of contextual information for alert generation, the involvement of patients, the semantic integration of information resources, usability and adaptability of IT solutions, and the need for their continuous evaluation. Information technology can help to improve medication safety. However, challenges remain regarding access to information, quality of information, and measurable benefits.

  10. Use of mobile learning technology among final year medical students in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Moses Muia; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas; Natembeya, Dennis Simiyu; Mugane, Ephraim Mwatha; Bosire, Kefa Ogonyo; Kibwage, Isaac Ongubo

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone penetration has increased exponentially over the last decade as has its application in nearly all spheres of life including health and medical education. This study aimed at assessing the use of mobile learning technology and its challenges among final year undergraduate students in the College of Health sciences, University of Nairobi. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among final year undergraduate students at the University of Nairobi, College of Health Sciences. Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were issued to all final year students in their lecture rooms after obtaining informed consent. Data on demographics, mobile device ownership and mobile learning technology use and its challenges was collected. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS(®). Chi-square and t-test were used for bivariate analysis. We had 292 respondents; 62% were medical students, 16% were nursing students, 13% were pharmacy students and 9% were dental surgery students. The majority were female (59%) and the average age was 24 years. Eighty eight percent (88%) of the respondents owned a smart device and nearly all of them used it for learning. 64% of the respondents used medical mobile applications. The main challenges were lack of a smart device, lack of technical know-how in accessing or using apps, sub-optimal internet access, cost of acquiring apps and limited device memory. Mobile learning is increasingly popular among medical students and should be leveraged in promoting access and quality of medical education.

  11. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  12. Performance of technology-driven simulators for medical students--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Michael; Abboudi, Hamid; Ker, Jean; Shamim Khan, Mohammed; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    Simulation-based education has evolved as a key training tool in high-risk industries such as aviation and the military. In parallel with these industries, the benefits of incorporating specialty-oriented simulation training within medical schools are vast. Adoption of simulators into medical school education programs has shown great promise and has the potential to revolutionize modern undergraduate education. An English literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and psychINFO databases to identify all randomized controlled studies pertaining to "technology-driven" simulators used in undergraduate medical education. A validity framework incorporating the "framework for technology enhanced learning" report by the Department of Health, United Kingdom, was used to evaluate the capabilities of each technology-driven simulator. Information was collected regarding the simulator type, characteristics, and brand name. Where possible, we extracted information from the studies on the simulators' performance with respect to validity status, reliability, feasibility, education impact, acceptability, and cost effectiveness. We identified 19 studies, analyzing simulators for medical students across a variety of procedure-based specialities including; cardiovascular (n = 2), endoscopy (n = 3), laparoscopic surgery (n = 8), vascular access (n = 2), ophthalmology (n = 1), obstetrics and gynecology (n = 1), anesthesia (n = 1), and pediatrics (n = 1). Incorporation of simulators has so far been on an institutional level; no national or international trends have yet emerged. Simulators are capable of providing a highly educational and realistic experience for the medical students within a variety of speciality-oriented teaching sessions. Further research is needed to establish how best to incorporate simulators into a more primary stage of medical education; preclinical and clinical undergraduate medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. 78 FR 6167 - Order of Suspension of Trading; In the Matter of Medis Technologies Ltd., Modern Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... of Medis Technologies Ltd., Modern Medical Modalities Corp., National Datacomputer, Inc., New Media... current and accurate information concerning the securities of Medis Technologies Ltd. because it has not... Modern Medical Modalities Corp. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended...

  14. Future Directions in Medical Physics: Models, Technology, and Translation to Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    The application of physics in medicine has been integral to major advances in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. Two primary areas represent the mainstay of medical physics research in the last century: in radiation therapy, physicists have propelled advances in conformal radiation treatment and high-precision image guidance; and in diagnostic imaging, physicists have advanced an arsenal of multi-modality imaging that includes CT, MRI, ultrasound, and PET as indispensible tools for noninvasive screening, diagnosis, and assessment of treatment response. In addition to their role in building such technologically rich fields of medicine, physicists have also become integral to daily clinical practice in these areas. The future suggests new opportunities for multi-disciplinary research bridging physics, biology, engineering, and computer science, and collaboration in medical physics carries a strong capacity for identification of significant clinical needs, access to clinical data, and translation of technologies to clinical studies. In radiation therapy, for example, the extraction of knowledge from large datasets on treatment delivery, image-based phenotypes, genomic profile, and treatment outcome will require innovation in computational modeling and connection with medical physics for the curation of large datasets. Similarly in imaging physics, the demand for new imaging technology capable of measuring physical and biological processes over orders of magnitude in scale (from molecules to whole organ systems) and exploiting new contrast mechanisms for greater sensitivity to molecular agents and subtle functional / morphological change will benefit from multi-disciplinary collaboration in physics, biology, and engineering. Also in surgery and interventional radiology, where needs for increased precision and patient safety meet constraints in cost and workflow, development of new technologies for imaging, image registration, and robotic assistance can leverage

  15. Longitudinal analysis of high-technology medical services and hospital financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengul, Ferhat D; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Ozaydin, Bunyamin; Patrician, Patricia A; OʼConnor, Stephen J

    U.S. hospitals have been investing in high-technology medical services as a strategy to improve financial performance. Despite the interest in high-tech medical services, there is not much information available about the impact of high-tech services on financial performance. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of high-tech medical services on financial performance of U.S. hospitals by using the resource-based view of the firm as a conceptual framework. Fixed-effects regressions with 2 years lagged independent variables using a longitudinal panel sample of 3,268 hospitals (2005-2010). It was hypothesized that hospitals with rare or large numbers (breadth) of high-tech medical services will experience better financial performance. Fixed effects regression results supported the link between a larger breadth of high-tech services and total margin, but only among not-for-profit hospitals. Both breadth and rareness of high-tech services were associated with high total margin among not-for-profit hospitals. Neither breadth nor rareness of high-tech services was associated with operating margin. Although breadth and rareness of high-tech services resulted in lower expenses per inpatient day among not-for-profit hospitals, these lower costs were offset by lower revenues per inpatient day. Enhancing the breadth of high-tech services may be a legitimate organizational strategy to improve financial performance, especially among not-for-profit hospitals. Hospitals may experience increased productivity and efficiency, and therefore lower inpatient operating costs, as a result of newer technologies. However, the negative impact on operating revenue should caution hospital administrators about revenue reducing features of these technologies, which may be related to the payer mix that these technologies may attract. Therefore, managers should consider both the cost and revenue implications of these technologies.

  16. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge

  17. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: learning about computers and applying computer technology to education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M; Hales, Deborah J; Briscoe, Greg; Benjamin, Sheldon; Boland, Robert J; Luo, John S; Chan, Carlyle H; Kennedy, Robert S; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B; Yager, Joel; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of important issues for educators regarding medical education and technology. The literature describes key concepts, prototypical technology tools, and model programs. A work group of psychiatric educators was convened three times by phone conference to discuss the literature. Findings were presented to and input was received from the 2005 Summit on Medical Student Education by APA and the American Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry. Knowledge of, skills in, and attitudes toward medical informatics are important to life-long learning and modern medical practice. A needs assessment is a starting place, since student, faculty, institution, and societal factors bear consideration. Technology needs to "fit" into a curriculum in order to facilitate learning and teaching. Learning about computers and applying computer technology to education and clinical care are key steps in computer literacy for physicians.

  18. Re-engineering the process of medical imaging physics and technology education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprawls, Perry

    2005-09-01

    The extensive availability of digital technology provides an opportunity for enhancing both the effectiveness and efficiency of virtually all functions in the process of medical imaging physics and technology education and training. This includes degree granting academic programs within institutions and a wide spectrum of continuing education lifelong learning activities. Full achievement of the advantages of technology-enhanced education (e-learning, etc.) requires an analysis of specific educational activities with respect to desired outcomes and learning objectives. This is followed by the development of strategies and resources that are based on established educational principles. The impact of contemporary technology comes from its ability to place learners into enriched learning environments. The full advantage of a re-engineered and implemented educational process involves changing attitudes and functions of learning facilitators (teachers) and resource allocation and sharing both within and among institutions.

  19. Use of information technology for medication management in residential care facilities: correlates of facility characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Powell, M Paige; Kim, Jungyoon; Shiyanbola, Olayinka; Zhu, He; Shiyanbola, Oyewale

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of information technology in resolving medication problems has been well documented. Long-term care settings such as residential care facilities (RCFs) may see the benefits of using such technologies in addressing the problem of medication errors among their resident population, who are usually older and have numerous chronic conditions. The aim of this study was two-fold: to examine the extent of use of Electronic Medication Management (EMM) in RCFs and to analyze the organizational factors associated with the use of EMM functionalities in RCFs. Data on RCFs were obtained from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The association between facility, director and staff, and resident characteristics of RCFs and adoption of four EMM functionalities was assessed through multivariate logistic regression. The four EMM functionalities included were maintaining lists of medications, ordering for prescriptions, maintaining active medication allergy lists, and warning of drug interactions or contraindications. About 12% of the RCFs adopted all four EMM functionalities. Additionally, maintaining lists of medications had the highest adoption rate (34.5%), followed by maintaining active medication allergy lists (31.6%), ordering for prescriptions (19.7%), and warning of drug interactions or contraindications (17.9%). Facility size and ownership status were significantly associated with adoption of all four EMM functionalities. Medicaid certification status, facility director's age, education and license status, and the use of personal care aides in the RCF were significantly associated with the adoption of some of the EMM functionalities. EMM is expected to improve the quality of care and patient safety in long-term care facilities including RCFs. The extent of adoption of the four EMM functionalities is relatively low in RCFs. Some RCFs may strategize to use these functionalities to cater to the increasing demands from the market and also to

  20. From theory to practice: integrating instructional technology into veterinary medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Rush, Bonnie R; Wilkerson, Melinda; Herman, Cheryl; Miesner, Matt; Renter, David; Gehring, Ronette

    2013-01-01

    Technology has changed the landscape of teaching and learning. The integration of instructional technology into teaching for meaningful learning is an issue for all educators to consider. In this article, we introduce educational theories including constructivism, information-processing theory, and dual-coding theory, along with the seven principles of good practice in undergraduate education. We also discuss five practical instructional strategies and the relationship of these strategies to the educational theories. From theory to practice, the purpose of the article is to share our application of educational theory and practice to work toward more innovative teaching in veterinary medical education.

  1. The Role of Healthcare Technology Management in Facilitating Medical Device Cybersecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busdicker, Mike; Upendra, Priyanka

    2017-09-02

    This article discusses the role of healthcare technology management (HTM) in medical device cybersecurity and outlines concepts that are applicable to HTM professionals at a healthcare delivery organization or at an integrated delivery network, regardless of size. It provides direction for HTM professionals who are unfamiliar with the security aspects of managing healthcare technologies but are familiar with standards from The Joint Commission (TJC). It provides a useful set of recommendations, including relevant references for incorporating good security practices into HTM practice. Recommendations for policies, procedures, and processes referencing TJC standards are easily applicable to HTM departments with limited resources and to those with no resource concerns. The authors outline processes from their organization as well as best practices learned through information sharing at AAMI, National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center (NH-ISAC), and Medical Device Innovation, Safety, and Security Consortium (MDISS) conferences and workshops.

  2. Dissemination of medical applications of nuclear energy with virtual reality technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Felipe M.; Oliveira, Beatriz A.R.

    2007-01-01

    This work makes use of Virtual Reality technology to disseminate medical applications of nuclear energy, with educational purposes. Virtual Reality is an effective learning tool, since navigation and interaction in virtual worlds can improve motivation in the learning process. With this technology, learning can be achieved in a clearer, joyful and more objective way. Among the existing medical applications of nuclear energy, this work focuses on the use of radiopharmaceuticals. The goal is to simulate this application in a virtual environment, for educational purposes, and to show the absorption of a radiopharmaceutical by the human body, during a diagnostics or treatment procedure. An example has been chosen, for Iodine radiopharmaceutical, which has affinity with the thyroid, and then concentrates in this organ. During the simulation, the concentration of the radioactive Iodine in the thyroid can be emphasized, and in the sequence, the virtual patient can be shown during the imaging procedure. (author)

  3. Definition of information technology architectures for continuous data management and medical device integration in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, M Elena; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Gómez, Enrique J

    2008-09-01

    The growing availability of continuous data from medical devices in diabetes management makes it crucial to define novel information technology architectures for efficient data storage, data transmission, and data visualization. The new paradigm of care demands the sharing of information in interoperable systems as the only way to support patient care in a continuum of care scenario. The technological platforms should support all the services required by the actors involved in the care process, located in different scenarios and managing diverse information for different purposes. This article presents basic criteria for defining flexible and adaptive architectures that are capable of interoperating with external systems, and integrating medical devices and decision support tools to extract all the relevant knowledge to support diabetes care.

  4. A retrospective review of TATRC funding for medical modeling and simulation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Carla M; Bevan, Matthew G; Duve, Rebecca J; White, Heather L; Magee, J Harvey; Wiehagen, Gene B

    2011-08-01

    In February 2000, the U.S. Army's Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) and the U.S. Army's Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation Command cohosted an Integrated Research Team conference in Maryland. The goal of the conference was to enable end users, researchers, materiel developers, and other government agencies to present their conceptions of how modeling and simulation could and should be developed to meet military medical needs. During the past 9 years, TATRC has funded more than 175 projects relating to simulation. This study was a retrospective review of TATRC's Modeling and Simulation Training projects (N = 175). Our results show that most (>75%) of the funded projects in this study involved industry. More than 85% of the projects that involved industry focused on technology development. Industry development projects seemed to meet their deliverables in a timely fashion. However, academia projects using industry-developed technologies and prototypes were delayed largely because the technologies did not meet their needs. There seems to be a measurable gap between industry's definition of a completed product technology and academia's ability to implement and use the technology in interactive learning environments. Our findings support the need for a standardized strategic design process that involves a strong industry-academia collaboration and early end-user testing to better facilitate the development of sound requirements that guide technology development.

  5. Sleep disturbance in family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilty, Krista; Cohen, Eyal; Ho, Michelle; Spalding, Karen; Stremler, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Society relies on family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology (e.g. mechanical ventilation), to provide highly skilled and vigilant care in their homes 24 hours per day. Sleep disturbance is among the most common complaints of these caregivers. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine studies reporting on sleep outcomes in family caregivers of technology dependent children. All relevant databases were systematically searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. Given the heterogeneity of the studies, a qualitative analysis was completed and thus results of this review are presented as a narrative. Thirteen studies were retrieved that met eligibility criteria for inclusion. All of the studies reported on family caregivers of children with medical complexity living at home. Moreover, all of the studies relied entirely on self-report, not objective sleep measures. No intervention studies were found. Sleep disturbance was found to be common (51-100%) along with caregiver reports of poor sleep quality. Sleep quantity was seldom measured, but was found in the few studies that did, to be approximately 6 hours, or less than recommendations for optimal health and daytime function. Multiple caregiver, child and environmental factors were also identified that may negatively influence caregiver sleep, health and daytime function. Findings of this review suggest that family caregivers of children with medical complexity who depend on medical technology achieve poor sleep quality and quantity that may place them at risk of the negative consequences of sleep deprivation. Recommendations for practice include that health care providers routinely assess for sleep disturbance in this vulnerable population. The review also suggests that studies using objective sleep measurement are needed to more fully characterize sleep and inform the development of targeted interventions to promote sleep in family caregivers of technology dependent children.

  6. Information system technologies' role in augmenting dermatologists' knowledge of prescription medication costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Sebastian S; Paul, Ravi; Kilpatrick, Russell J

    2015-12-01

    Despite the recent rising costs of once affordable dermatologic prescription medications, a survey measuring dermatologists' attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of the cost of drugs they commonly prescribe has not been conducted. Awareness of drug costs is hindered by a lack of access to data about the prices of medicines. No surveys of physicians have addressed this issue by proposing new information system technologies that augment prescription medication price transparency and measuring how receptive physicians are to using these novel solutions in their daily clinical practice. Our research aims to investigate these topics with a survey of physicians in dermatology. Members of the North Carolina Dermatology Association were contacted through their electronic mailing list and asked to take an online survey. The survey asked several questions about dermatologists' attitudes and beliefs about drug costs. To measure their knowledge of prescription medications, the National Average Drug Acquisition Cost was used as an authoritative price that was compared to the survey takers' price estimates of drugs commonly used in dermatology. Physicians' willingness to use four distinct information system technologies that increase drug price transparency was also assessed. Dermatologists believe drug costs are an important factor in patient care and believe access to price information would allow them to provide a higher quality of care. Dermatologists' knowledge of the costs of medicines they commonly prescribe is poor, but they want to utilize information system technologies that increase access to drug pricing information. There is an unmet demand for information system technologies which increase price transparency of medications in dermatology. Physicians and IT professionals have the opportunity to create novel information systems that can be utilized to help guide cost conscious clinical decision making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ite Boerema--surgeon and engineer with a double-Dutch legacy to medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopardi, Lisa N; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Forde, Allison; Maddern, Guy J

    2004-01-01

    Ite Boerema, 1902-1978: a Dutchman with a brilliant academic surgical career, and war hero, decorated for resistance to the Germans in World War II. As a man who regarded surgery as "engineering in medicine," we still feel his legacy in medical technology today, specifically with regard to his work on esophageal anastomoses and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This biography places his major contributions to medicine in context of the man himself and of contemporary medicine.

  8. A network collaboration implementing technology to improve medication dispensing and administration in critical access hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Loes, Jean L; O'Brien, John

    2010-01-01

    We report how seven independent critical access hospitals collaborated with a rural referral hospital to standardize workflow policies and procedures while jointly implementing the same health information technologies (HITs) to enhance medication care processes. The study hospitals implemented the same electronic health record, computerized provider order entry, pharmacy information systems, automated dispensing cabinets (ADC), and barcode medication administration systems. We conducted interviews and examined project documents to explore factors underlying the successful implementation of ADC and barcode medication administration across the network hospitals. These included a shared culture of collaboration; strategic sequencing of HIT component implementation; interface among HIT components; strategic placement of ADCs; disciplined use and sharing of workflow analyses linked with HIT applications; planning for workflow efficiencies; acquisition of adequate supply of HIT-related devices; and establishing metrics to monitor HIT use and outcomes.

  9. Integration of computer technology into the medical curriculum: the King's experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickie Aitken

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there have been major changes in the requirements of medical education which have set the scene for the revision of medical curricula (Towle, 1991; GMC, 1993. As part of the new curriculum at King's, the opportunity has been taken to integrate computer technology into the course through Computer-Assisted Learning (CAL, and to train graduates in core IT skills. Although the use of computers in the medical curriculum has up to now been limited, recent studies have shown encouraging steps forward (see Boelen, 1995. One area where there has been particular interest is the use of notebook computers to allow students increased access to IT facilities (Maulitz et al, 1996.

  10. Integrating heterogeneous databases in clustered medic care environments using object-oriented technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Arun K.; Sauer, Frank

    1994-05-01

    The organization of modern medical care environments into disease-related clusters, such as a cancer center, a diabetes clinic, etc., has the side-effect of introducing multiple heterogeneous databases, often containing similar information, within the same organization. This heterogeneity fosters incompatibility and prevents the effective sharing of data amongst applications at different sites. Although integration of heterogeneous databases is now feasible, in the medical arena this is often an ad hoc process, not founded on proven database technology or formal methods. In this paper we illustrate the use of a high-level object- oriented semantic association method to model information found in different databases into an integrated conceptual global model that integrates the databases. We provide examples from the medical domain to illustrate an integration approach resulting in a consistent global view, without attacking the autonomy of the underlying databases.

  11. Health Information Technology Continues to Show Positive Effect on Medical Outcomes: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Beane, Amanda

    2018-02-05

    Health information technology (HIT) has been introduced into the health care industry since the 1960s when mainframes assisted with financial transactions, but questions remained about HIT's contribution to medical outcomes. Several systematic reviews since the 1990s have focused on this relationship. This review updates the literature. The purpose of this review was to analyze the current literature for the impact of HIT on medical outcomes. We hypothesized that there is a positive association between the adoption of HIT and medical outcomes. We queried the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) by PubMed databases for peer-reviewed publications in the last 5 years that defined an HIT intervention and an effect on medical outcomes in terms of efficiency or effectiveness. We structured the review from the Primary Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA), and we conducted the review in accordance with the Assessment for Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR). We narrowed our search from 3636 papers to 37 for final analysis. At least one improved medical outcome as a result of HIT adoption was identified in 81% (25/37) of research studies that met inclusion criteria, thus strongly supporting our hypothesis. No statistical difference in outcomes was identified as a result of HIT in 19% of included studies. Twelve categories of HIT and three categories of outcomes occurred 38 and 65 times, respectively. A strong majority of the literature shows positive effects of HIT on the effectiveness of medical outcomes, which positively supports efforts that prepare for stage 3 of meaningful use. This aligns with previous reviews in other time frames. ©Clemens Scott Kruse, Amanda Beane. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 05.02.2018.

  12. Information technologies in education of medical students at the university of sarajevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Karcic, Emina; Hodzic, Ajla; Mulic, Smaila

    2014-08-01

    Information and communication technology have brought about many changes in medical education and practice, especially in the field of diagnostics. During the academic year 2013/2014, at Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, students in the final year of the study were subjected to examination which aim was to determine how medical students in Bosnia and Herzegovina subjectively assessing their skills for using computers, have gained insight into the nature of Information Technology's (IT) education and possessive knowledge. The survey was conducted voluntary by anonymous questionnaire consisting of 27 questions, divided into five categories, which are collecting facts about student's: sex, age, year of entry, computer skills, possessing the same, the use of the Internet, the method of obtaining currently knowledge and recommendations of students in order to improve their IT training. According to the given parameters, indicate an obvious difference in the level of knowledge, use and practical application of Information Technology's knowledge among students of the Bologna process to the students educated under the old system in favor of the first ones. Based on a comparison of similar studies conducted in Croatia, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Denmark, it was observed that the level of knowledge of students of the Medical Faculty in Sarajevo was of equal height or greater than in these countries.

  13. Simulation Technology for Skills Training and Competency Assessment in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Vivian T.; Issenberg, S. Barry

    2007-01-01

    Medical education during the past decade has witnessed a significant increase in the use of simulation technology for teaching and assessment. Contributing factors include: changes in health care delivery and academic environments that limit patient availability as educational opportunities; worldwide attention focused on the problem of medical errors and the need to improve patient safety; and the paradigm shift to outcomes-based education with its requirements for assessment and demonstration of competence. The use of simulators addresses many of these issues: they can be readily available at any time and can reproduce a wide variety of clinical conditions on demand. In lieu of the customary (and arguably unethical) system, whereby novices carry out the practice required to master various techniques—including invasive procedures—on real patients, simulation-based education allows trainees to hone their skills in a risk-free environment. Evaluators can also use simulators for reliable assessments of competence in multiple domains. For those readers less familiar with medical simulators, this article aims to provide a brief overview of these educational innovations and their uses; for decision makers in medical education, we hope to broaden awareness of the significant potential of these new technologies for improving physician training and assessment, with a resultant positive impact on patient safety and health care outcomes. PMID:18095044

  14. See one, do one, teach one: advanced technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozenilek, John; Huff, J Stephen; Reznek, Martin; Gordon, James A

    2004-11-01

    The concept of "learning by doing" has become less acceptable, particularly when invasive procedures and high-risk care are required. Restrictions on medical educators have prompted them to seek alternative methods to teach medical knowledge and gain procedural experience. Fortunately, the last decade has seen an explosion of the number of tools available to enhance medical education: web-based education, virtual reality, and high fidelity patient simulation. This paper presents some of the consensus statements in regard to these tools agreed upon by members of the Educational Technology Section of the 2004 AEM Consensus Conference for Informatics and Technology in Emergency Department Health Care, held in Orlando, Florida. Web-based teaching: 1) Every ED should have access to medical educational materials via the Internet, computer-based training, and other effective education methods for point-of-service information, continuing medical education, and training. 2) Real-time automated tools should be integrated into Emergency Department Information Systems [EDIS] for contemporaneous education. Virtual reality [VR]: 1) Emergency physicians and emergency medicine societies should become more involved in VR development and assessment. 2) Nationally accepted protocols for the proper assessment of VR applications should be adopted and large multi-center groups should be formed to perform these studies. High-fidelity simulation: Emergency medicine residency programs should consider the use of high-fidelity patient simulators to enhance the teaching and evaluation of core competencies among trainees. Across specialties, patient simulation, virtual reality, and the Web will soon enable medical students and residents to... see one, simulate many, do one competently, and teach everyone.

  15. Delivering a medical school elective with massive open online course (MOOC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The educational technology of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has been successfully applied in a wide variety of disciplines and are an intense focus of educational research at this time. Educators are now looking to MOOC technology as a means to improve professional medical education, but very little is known about how medical MOOCs compare with traditional content delivery. A retrospective analysis of the course evaluations for the Medicine as a Business elective by fourth-year medical students at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) for the 2012-2015 academic years was conducted. This course was delivered by small group flipped classroom discussions for 2012-2014 and delivered via MOOC technology in 2015. Learner ratings were compared between the two course delivery methods using routinely collected course evaluations. Course enrollment has ranged from 6-19 students per year in the 2012-2015 academic years. Student evaluations of the course are favorable in the areas of effective teaching, accurate course objectives, meeting personal learning objectives, recommending the course to other students, and overall when rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The majority of all student ratings (76-95%) of this elective course are for the highest possible choice (Strongly agree or Excellent) for any criteria, regardless if the course was delivered via a traditional or MOOC format. Statistical analysis of these ratings suggests that the Effective Teacher and Overall Evaluations did not statistically differ between the two delivery formats. Student ratings of this elective course were highly similar when delivered in a flipped classroom format or by using MOOC technology. The primary advantage of this new course format is flexibility of time and place for learners, allowing them to complete the course objectives when convenient for them. The course evaluations suggest this is a change that is acceptable to the target audience. This study suggests that

  16. The effects of health information technology on the costs and quality of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Leila

    2014-03-01

    Information technology has been linked to productivity growth in a wide variety of sectors, and health information technology (HIT) is a leading example of an innovation with the potential to transform industry-wide productivity. This paper analyzes the impact of health information technology (HIT) on the quality and intensity of medical care. Using Medicare claims data from 1998 to 2005, I estimate the effects of early investment in HIT by exploiting variation in hospitals' adoption statuses over time, analyzing 2.5 million inpatient admissions across 3900 hospitals. HIT is associated with a 1.3% increase in billed charges (p-value: 5.6%), and there is no evidence of cost savings even five years after adoption. Additionally, HIT adoption appears to have little impact on the quality of care, measured by patient mortality, adverse drug events, and readmission rates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: how to proceed to evaluate innovative medical devices?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, N; van den Brink, H; Denies, F; Dervaux, B; Germe, A F; Prognon, P; Pineau, J

    2014-01-01

    Innovative medical devices offer solutions to medical problems and greatly improve patients' outcomes. Like National Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies, hospitals face numerous requests for innovative and costly medical devices. To help local decision-makers, different approaches of hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) have been adopted worldwide. The objective of the present paper is to explore HB-HTA models for adopting innovative medical devices in France and elsewhere. Four different models have been conceptualized: "ambassador" model, "mini-HTA" model, "HTA unit" model and "internal committee". Apparently, "HTA unit" and "internal committee" (or a mixture of both models) are the prevailing HB-HTA models in France. Nevertheless, some weaknesses of these models have been pointed out in previous works. Only few examples involving hospital pharmacists have been found abroad, except in France and in Italy. Finally, the harmonization of the assessment of innovative medical devices in France needs a better understanding of HB-HTA practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Development and evaluation of the medical imaging distribution system with dynamic web application and clustering technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokohama, Noriya; Tsuchimoto, Tadashi; Oishi, Masamichi; Itou, Katsuya

    2007-01-20

    It has been noted that the downtime of medical informatics systems is often long. Many systems encounter downtimes of hours or even days, which can have a critical effect on daily operations. Such systems remain especially weak in the areas of database and medical imaging data. The scheme design shows the three-layer architecture of the system: application, database, and storage layers. The application layer uses the DICOM protocol (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) and HTTP (Hyper Text Transport Protocol) with AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript+XML). The database is designed to decentralize in parallel using cluster technology. Consequently, restoration of the database can be done not only with ease but also with improved retrieval speed. In the storage layer, a network RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) system, it is possible to construct exabyte-scale parallel file systems that exploit storage spread. Development and evaluation of the test-bed has been successful in medical information data backup and recovery in a network environment. This paper presents a schematic design of the new medical informatics system that can be accommodated from a recovery and the dynamic Web application for medical imaging distribution using AJAX.

  19. Adoption of high technology medical imaging and hospital quality and efficiency: Towards a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Guillermo A; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Wodchis, Walter P; Anderson, Geoffrey M

    2018-05-17

    Measuring the value of medical imaging is challenging, in part, due to the lack of conceptual frameworks underlying potential mechanisms where value may be assessed. To address this gap, this article proposes a framework that builds on the large body of literature on quality of hospital care and the classic structure-process-outcome paradigm. The framework was also informed by the literature on adoption of technological innovations and introduces 2 distinct though related aspects of imaging technology not previously addressed specifically in the literature on quality of hospital care: adoption (a structural hospital characteristic) and use (an attribute of the process of care). The framework hypothesizes a 2-part causality where adoption is proposed to be a central, linking factor between hospital structural characteristics, market factors, and hospital outcomes (ie, quality and efficiency). The first part indicates that hospital structural characteristics and market factors influence or facilitate the adoption of high technology medical imaging within an institution. The presence of this technology, in turn, is hypothesized to improve the ability of the hospital to deliver high quality and efficient care. The second part describes this ability throughout 3 main mechanisms pointing to the importance of imaging use on patients, to the presence of staff and qualified care providers, and to some elements of organizational capacity capturing an enhanced clinical environment. The framework has the potential to assist empirical investigations of the value of adoption and use of medical imaging, and to advance understanding of the mechanisms that produce quality and efficiency in hospitals. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Acceptability and perceived utility of drone technology among emergency medical service responders and incident commanders for mass casualty incident management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Alexander; Chai, Peter R; Griswold, Matthew K; Lai, Jeffrey T; Boyer, Edward W; Broach, John

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the acceptability and perceived utility of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology to Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) scene management. Qualitative questionnaires regarding the ease of operation, perceived usefulness, and training time to operate UAVs were administered to Emergency Medical Technicians (n = 15). A Single Urban New England Academic Tertiary Care Medical Center. Front-line emergency medical service (EMS) providers and senior EMS personnel in Incident Commander roles. Data from this pilot study indicate that EMS responders are accepting to deploying and operating UAV technology in a disaster scenario. Additionally, they perceived UAV technology as easy to adopt yet impactful in improving MCI scene management.

  1. Connecting Technological Innovation in Artificial Intelligence to Real-world Medical Practice through Rigorous Clinical Validation: What Peer-reviewed Medical Journals Could Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is projected to substantially influence clinical practice in the foreseeable future. However, despite the excitement around the technologies, it is yet rare to see examples of robust clinical validation of the technologies and, as a result, very few are currently in clinical use. A thorough, systematic validation of AI technologies using adequately designed clinical research studies before their integration into clinical practice is critical to ensure patient benefit and safety while avoiding any inadvertent harms. We would like to suggest several specific points regarding the role that peer-reviewed medical journals can play, in terms of study design, registration, and reporting, to help achieve proper and meaningful clinical validation of AI technologies designed to make medical diagnosis and prediction, focusing on the evaluation of diagnostic accuracy efficacy. Peer-reviewed medical journals can encourage investigators who wish to validate the performance of AI systems for medical diagnosis and prediction to pay closer attention to the factors listed in this article by emphasizing their importance. Thereby, peer-reviewed medical journals can ultimately facilitate translating the technological innovations into real-world practice while securing patient safety and benefit.

  2. Connecting Technological Innovation in Artificial Intelligence to Real-world Medical Practice through Rigorous Clinical Validation: What Peer-reviewed Medical Journals Could Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Ho; Kressel, Herbert Y

    2018-05-28

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is projected to substantially influence clinical practice in the foreseeable future. However, despite the excitement around the technologies, it is yet rare to see examples of robust clinical validation of the technologies and, as a result, very few are currently in clinical use. A thorough, systematic validation of AI technologies using adequately designed clinical research studies before their integration into clinical practice is critical to ensure patient benefit and safety while avoiding any inadvertent harms. We would like to suggest several specific points regarding the role that peer-reviewed medical journals can play, in terms of study design, registration, and reporting, to help achieve proper and meaningful clinical validation of AI technologies designed to make medical diagnosis and prediction, focusing on the evaluation of diagnostic accuracy efficacy. Peer-reviewed medical journals can encourage investigators who wish to validate the performance of AI systems for medical diagnosis and prediction to pay closer attention to the factors listed in this article by emphasizing their importance. Thereby, peer-reviewed medical journals can ultimately facilitate translating the technological innovations into real-world practice while securing patient safety and benefit.

  3. Data Processing and Text Mining Technologies on Electronic Medical Records: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, medical institutes generally use EMR to record patient’s condition, including diagnostic information, procedures performed, and treatment results. EMR has been recognized as a valuable resource for large-scale analysis. However, EMR has the characteristics of diversity, incompleteness, redundancy, and privacy, which make it difficult to carry out data mining and analysis directly. Therefore, it is necessary to preprocess the source data in order to improve data quality and improve the data mining results. Different types of data require different processing technologies. Most structured data commonly needs classic preprocessing technologies, including data cleansing, data integration, data transformation, and data reduction. For semistructured or unstructured data, such as medical text, containing more health information, it requires more complex and challenging processing methods. The task of information extraction for medical texts mainly includes NER (named-entity recognition and RE (relation extraction. This paper focuses on the process of EMR processing and emphatically analyzes the key techniques. In addition, we make an in-depth study on the applications developed based on text mining together with the open challenges and research issues for future work.

  4. Building a Smooth Medical Service for Operating Room Using RFID Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Ping Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the information technology advancement, the feasibility for the establishment of mobile medical environments has been strengthened. Using RFID to facilitate the tracing of patients’ mobile position in hospital has attracted more attentions from researchers due to the demand on advanced features. Traditionally, the management of surgical treatment is generally manually operated and there is no consistent operating procedure for patients transferring among wards, surgery waiting rooms, operating rooms, and recovery rooms, resulting in panicky and urgent transferring work among departments and, thus, leading to delays and errors. In this paper, we propose a new framework using radio frequency identification (RFID technology for a mobilized surgical process monitoring system. Through the active tag, an application management system used before, during, and after the surgical processes has been proposed. The concept of signal level matrix, SLM, was proposed to accurately identify patients and dynamically track patients’ location. By updating patient’s information real-time, the preprocessing time needed for various tasks and incomplete transfers among departments can be reduced, the medical resources can be effectively used, unnecessary medical disputes can be reduced, and more comprehensive health care environment can be provided. The feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed system are demonstrated with a number of experimental results.

  5. QUALITY OF HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT REPORTS PREPARED FOR THE MEDICAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Martin; Boonstra, Tristan; Kelly, Patrick J; Wilson, Andrew; Craig, Jonathan C; Webster, Angela C

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC) makes recommendations to the Australian Government for funding health technologies under the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS). Differences in public, clinical, commercial, and political opinions on health expenditure emphasize the importance of defensible funding decisions. We aimed to evaluate the quality of health technology assessment (HTA) reports over time and among health technologies assessed for MSAC. A cohort study was performed of HTA reports prepared for MSAC between 1998 and 2013. We measured the quality of HTA reports using reporting guidelines proposed by the European Collaboration for Assessment of Health Interventions. Individual component scores across eleven domains were calculated, and summed for an overall aggregate score. We used linear regression to investigate any change in quality over time and among the types of technologies assessed. We included 110 HTA reports. The safety (80 percent), effectiveness (84 percent), economic (74 percent), and organizational (99 percent) domains were better reported than the psychological, social, and ethical considerations (34 percent). The basic (75 percent), methodological (62 percent), background (82 percent), contextual (46 percent), status quo (54 percent), and technical information (66 percent) that framed each assessment were inconsistently reported. On average, overall quality scores increased by 2 percent (p technologies (p = 0.22). HTA reports prepared for MSAC are a key tool in allocating scarce health resources. The overall quality of these reports has improved, but the reporting of specific domains and subthemes therein could be better addressed.

  6. Outsourcing medical data analyses: can technology overcome legal, privacy, and confidentiality issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumen, Bostjan; Heričko, Marjan; Sevčnikar, Andrej; Završnik, Jernej; Hölbl, Marko

    2013-12-16

    Medical data are gold mines for deriving the knowledge that could change the course of a single patient's life or even the health of the entire population. A data analyst needs to have full access to relevant data, but full access may be denied by privacy and confidentiality of medical data legal regulations, especially when the data analyst is not affiliated with the data owner. Our first objective was to analyze the privacy and confidentiality issues and the associated regulations pertaining to medical data, and to identify technologies to properly address these issues. Our second objective was to develop a procedure to protect medical data in such a way that the outsourced analyst would be capable of doing analyses on protected data and the results would be comparable, if not the same, as if they had been done on the original data. Specifically, our hypothesis was there would not be a difference between the outsourced decision trees built on encrypted data and the ones built on original data. Using formal definitions, we developed an algorithm to protect medical data for outsourced analyses. The algorithm was applied to publicly available datasets (N=30) from the medical and life sciences fields. The analyses were performed on the original and the protected datasets and the results of the analyses were compared. Bootstrapped paired t tests for 2 dependent samples were used to test whether the mean differences in size, number of leaves, and the accuracy of the original and the encrypted decision trees were significantly different. The decision trees built on encrypted data were virtually the same as those built on original data. Out of 30 datasets, 100% of the trees had identical accuracy. The size of a tree and the number of leaves was different only once (1/30, 3%, P=.19). The proposed algorithm encrypts a file with plain text medical data into an encrypted file with the data protected in such a way that external data analyses are still possible. The results

  7. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  8. Safe Disposal of Medical and Plastic Waste and Energy Recovery Possibilities using Plasma Pyrolysis Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nema, S.K.; Mukherjee, S.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma pyrolysis and plasma gasification are emerging technologies that can provide complete solution to organic solid waste disposal. In these technologies plasma torch is used as a workhorse to convert electrical energy into heat energy. These technologies dispose the organic waste in an environment friendly manner. Thermal plasma provides extremely high temperature in oxygen free or controlled air environment which is required for pyrolysis or gasification reactions. Plasma based medical waste treatment is an extremely complex technology since it has to contend with extreme temperatures and corrosion-prone environment, complex pyro-chemistry resulting in toxic and dangerous products, if not controlled. In addition, one has to take care of complete combustion of pyrolyzed gases followed by efficient scrubbing to meet the emission standards set by US EPA and Central Pollution Control Board, India. In medical waste, high volume and low packing density waste with nonstandard composition consisting of a variety of plastics, organic material and liquids used to be present. The present paper describes the work carried out at Institute for Plasma Research, India, on plasma pyrolysis of (i) medical waste disposal and the results of emission measurement done at various locations in the system and (ii) energy recovery from cotton and plastic waste. The process and system development has been done in multiple steps. Different plasma pyrolysis models were made and each subsequent model was improved upon to meet stringent emission norms and to make the system energy efficient and user friendly. FCIPT, has successfully demonstrated up to 50 kg/ hr plasma pyrolysis systems and have installed plasma pyrolysis facilities at various locations in India . Plastic Waste disposal along with energy recovery in 15 kg/ hr model has also been developed and demonstrated at FCIPT. In future, this technology has great potential to dispose safely different waste streams such as biomass

  9. Tablet technology in medical education in South Africa: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, L; Sookrajh, R; Satyapal, K S

    2017-07-31

    The purpose of this study was to establish the use of mobile devices by learners at a selected medical school. Distribution of mobile devices was an inaugural initiative implemented by our college. A mixed methodology design using a questionnaire comprising both open-ended and close-ended questions was analysed from 179 (60 male; 119 female) second year medical students registered for the Anatomy course. Open-ended questions were analysed using a thematic approach by identifying emergent ideas and concepts. Close-ended questions were analysed using SPSS V.21.0. Second year medical students at a medical school in South Africa. Three main themes emerged, namely, (a) mobile device engagement, (b) advantages and (c) challenges affecting use of mobile devices. A majority of learners accessed their tablets for lecture notes; more females were inclined to access these devices than males. Challenges experienced included poor wifi connectivity on and off the university campus; some students were not keen on the idea of mobile devices and preferred traditional methods of teaching. Mobile devices have been adopted by learners at our university. Uses of technology outlined are related to Eraut's intentions of informal learning. Integrating tablets into classes had a positive effect on student access to course material. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Utilization of information technology in medical education: a questionnaire survey of students in a Malaysian institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjahan, M I; Lim, T A; Yeong, S W; Foong, A L S; Ware, J

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain a self-reported assessment of the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by medical students at the International Medical University, Malaysia. Students' perceived skills and extent of usage of ICT were evaluated using a questionnaire. Chi-square analysis were performed to ascertain the association between variables. Further statistical testing using Chi-square test for trend was done when one of the variables was ordered, and Spearman rank correlation when both variables were ordered. Overall, (98%) of students responded to the questionnaire. Twenty seven students (5.7%) did not use a computer either in the university or at home. Most students surveyed reported adequate skills at word processing (55%), e-mailing (78%) and surfing the internet (67%). The results suggests that in order to increase the level of computer literacy among medical students, positive steps would need to be taken, for example the formal inclusion of ICT instruction in the teaching of undergraduate medicine. This will enhance medical students' ability to acquire, appraise, and use information in order to solve clinical and other problems quickly and efficiently in the course of their studies, and more importantly when they graduate.

  11. Future of X-ray phase imaging in medical imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Weakly absorbing materials, such as biological, soft tissues, can be imaged by generating contrast due to the phase shift of X-rays. In the past decade, several methods for X-ray phase imaging were proposed and demonstrated. The performance of X-ray phase imaging is attractive in the field of medical imaging technology, and its development for practical use is expected. Many methods, however, have been developed under the assumption of the use of synchrotron radiation, which is an obstacle to practical use. The method based on Talbot (-Lau) interferometry enables us to use a compact X-ray source, and its development is expected as a breakthrough for medical applications. (author)

  12. Radiation protection perspectives in developing new medical technologies with ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arranz, L.

    1993-01-01

    The medical technical development with ionizing radiation is and will be followed by an effort to control and reduce their inherent risks and make it a safe tool that offers more exact diagnoses and more effective treatments. However, it is not foreseeable to achieve a decrease on the annual effective dose equivalent per capita due to medical irradiation (1.06 mSv in OECD countries), since the general population will go on increasing, and the same will happen to the elder population (with greater morbidity). The turn of the century will bring a time of major cost savings, but also a higher demand on the quality of life. The high cost technologies help the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and therefore their use and spread are absolutely justified, according to health policy objectives. However, their diffusion should be spread out under efficiency and equity criteria. (author). 32 refs

  13. Impact of technological innovation on a nursing home performance and on the medication-use process safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; Brouillette, Christel

    2014-03-01

    Despite the fact that since 1985 the government of Québec increased by 5.75 % on average the amount of money spent on healthcare per year, little improvement was noted. It is obvious that an optimal use of resources is essential to reduce waiting times and provide safer and faster services to patients. The use of new technology can contribute to improve the healthcare system efficiency. Our study aims to assess the impact of a medication distribution technology on 1) the performance of a health and social services center's pharmacy, 2) the performance of one care unit in a nursing home and on 3) the medication-use process safety. To measure performance we were inspired by the Lean approach. The results show that medication distribution technology is considered as an effective way to significantly detect medication errors, to allow nurses to focus more on patients and pharmacy to react more rapidly to changes in patient medications.

  14. Analysis of the technology acceptance model in examining hospital nurses' behavioral intentions toward the use of bar code medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lunar; Park, Byeonghwa; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2015-04-01

    Serious medication errors continue to exist in hospitals, even though there is technology that could potentially eliminate them such as bar code medication administration. Little is known about the degree to which the culture of patient safety is associated with behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model, this study evaluated the relationships among patient safety culture and perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration technology among nurses in hospitals. Cross-sectional surveys with a convenience sample of 163 nurses using bar code medication administration were conducted. Feedback and communication about errors had a positive impact in predicting perceived usefulness (β=.26, Pmodel predicting for behavioral intention, age had a negative impact (β=-.17, Pmodel explained 24% (Ptechnology.

  15. The protracted demise of medical technology. The case of intermittent positive pressure breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, S Q; Farley, D E

    1992-08-01

    In this study, the effects of hospital, staff, and patient characteristics on the rates of use and abandonment of an outmoded medical technology, intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) are analyzed. The study focuses specifically on the use of IPPB to treat inpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a national sample of more than 500 community hospitals from 1980 to 1987. Cross-sectionally, hospitals with shorter case-mix-adjusted lengths of stay, private nonprofit or investor-owned hospitals, and hospitals located outside of the north central United States were more likely to abandon IPPB by 1980. Teaching status, location, ownership, volume, and source of payment all appeared to affect rates of IPPB use in 1980. The longitudinal analysis examines both the probability a hospital abandoned IPPB and declines in rates of IPPB use over the study period, conditioned on the availability of IPPB in 1980. The results show that changes in the characteristics of hospitals, patients, and physicians all help to explain variations in the abandonment of IPPB. These findings contrast with previous studies of technological change, which find hospital size to be the most important variable. Size is important in explaining the rate of use in 1980, but it has no effect on the rate of decline in use or abandonment after 1980. In general, the analysis demonstrates that a combination of factors, economic incentives as well as information, contribute to the abandonment of outmoded medical technologies. Given the surprisingly long time periods required for this process to occur, the analysis underscores the need to strengthen financial incentives that encourage appropriate medical decisions and to disseminate information about the efficacy of specific procedures more widely and effectively.

  16. Retention factors in relation to organisational commitment in medical and information technology services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette van Dyk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Retaining staff with scarce and critical skills in the medical and information technology (IT industry has become a top priority because of skills shortages.Research purpose: The objectives of the study were to investigate empirically: (1 the relationship between employees’ satisfaction with organisational retention factors (measured by the Retention Factors Scale and their organisational commitment (measured by the Organisational Commitment Questionnaire and (2 whether gender, age, race and tenure groups differ significantly in terms of these variables.Motivation for the study: Medical and information technology professionals have specialised and hard to replace skills. They also have strong tendencies to leave their organisations and countries. Understanding the retention factors that will increase their organisational commitment may benefit the organisations who want to retain their valuable talent.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design to collect data from a purposive sample of 206 staff members who had scarce skills in a South African medical and information technology services company. Correlational and inferential statistics were computed to achieve the objectives.Main findings: The results showed that the participants’ satisfaction with retention factors has a significant relationship with their organisational commitment and that the biographical groups differ significantly in terms of the variables.Practical/managerial implications: The measured retention factors were all associated with human resource management practices that influence employees’ intentions to leave.Contribution/value-add: The results are important to managers who are interested in retaining staff who have scarce skills and provide valuable pointers for designing effective retention strategies.

  17. Enabling Access to Medical and Health Education in Rwanda Using Mobile Technology: Needs Assessment for the Development of Mobile Medical Educator Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusatira, Jean Christophe; Tomaszewski, Brian; Dusabejambo, Vincent; Ndayiragije, Vincent; Gonsalves, Snedden; Sawant, Aishwarya; Mumararungu, Angeline; Gasana, George; Amendezo, Etienne; Haake, Anne; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-06-01

    Lack of access to health and medical education resources for doctors in the developing world is a serious global health problem. In Rwanda, with a population of 11 million, there is only one medical school, hence a shortage in well-trained medical staff. The growth of interactive health technologies has played a role in the improvement of health care in developed countries and has offered alternative ways to offer continuous medical education while improving patient's care. However, low and middle-income countries (LMIC) like Rwanda have struggled to implement medical education technologies adapted to local settings in medical practice and continuing education. Developing a user-centered mobile computing approach for medical and health education programs has potential to bring continuous medical education to doctors in rural and urban areas of Rwanda and influence patient care outcomes. The aim of this study is to determine user requirements, currently available resources, and perspectives for potential medical education technologies in Rwanda. Information baseline and needs assessments data collection were conducted in all 44 district hospitals (DHs) throughout Rwanda. The research team collected qualitative data through interviews with 16 general practitioners working across Rwanda and 97 self-administered online questionnaires for rural areas. Data were collected and analyzed to address two key questions: (1) what are the currently available tools for the use of mobile-based technology for medical education in Rwanda, and (2) what are user's requirements for the creation of a mobile medical education technology in Rwanda? General practitioners from different hospitals highlighted that none of the available technologies avail local resources such as the Ministry of Health (MOH) clinical treatment guidelines. Considering the number of patients that doctors see in Rwanda, an average of 32 patients per day, there is need for a locally adapted mobile education app

  18. The patient experience of high technology medical imaging: A systematic review of the qualitative evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, Zachary; Jordan, Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Background: When presenting to an imaging department, the person who is to be imaged is often in a vulnerable state, and can experience the scan in a number of ways. It is the role of the radiographer to produce a high quality image and facilitate patient care throughout the imaging process. A qualitative systematic review was performed to synthesise the existent evidence on the patient experience of high technology medical imaging. Only papers relating to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) were identified. Inclusion criteria: Studies that were of a qualitative design that explored the phenomenon of interest, the patient experience of high technology medical imaging. Participants included anyone who had undergone one of these procedures. Methods: A systematic search of medical and allied health databases was conducted. Articles identified during the search process that met the inclusion criteria were then critically appraised for methodological quality independently by two reviewers. Results: During the search and inclusion process, 15 studies were found that were deemed of suitable quality to be included in the review. From the 15 studies, 127 findings were extracted from the included studies. These were analysed in more detail to observe common themes, and then grouped into 33 categories. From these 33 categories, 11 synthesised findings were produced. The 11 synthesised findings highlight the diverse, unique and challenging ways in which people experience imaging with MRI and CT scanners. Conclusion: The results of the review demonstrate the diverse ways in which people experience medical imaging. All health professionals involved in imaging need to be aware of the different ways each patient may experience imaging.

  19. Medical student case presentation performance and perception when using mobile learning technology in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tews, Matthew; Brennan, Kimberly; Begaz, Tomer; Treat, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Hand-held mobile learning technology provides opportunities for clinically relevant self-instructional modules to augment traditional bedside teaching. Using this technology as a teaching tool has not been well studied. We sought to evaluate medical students' case presentation performance and perception when viewing short, just-in-time mobile learning videos using the iPod touch prior to patient encounters. Twenty-two fourth-year medical students were randomized to receive or not to receive instruction by video, using the iPod Touch, prior to patient encounters. After seeing a patient, they presented the case to their faculty, who completed a standard data collection sheet. Students were surveyed on their perceived confidence and effectiveness after using these videos. Twenty-two students completed a total of 67 patient encounters. There was a statistically significant improvement in presentations when the videos were viewed for the first time (p=0.032). There was no difference when the presentations were summed for the entire rotation (p=0.671). The reliable (alpha=0.97) survey indicated that the videos were a useful teaching tool and gave students more confidence in their presentations. Medical student patient presentations were improved with the use of mobile instructional videos following first time use, suggesting mobile learning videos may be useful in medical student education. Clinical educators should consider whether, in an instance where live bedside or direct interactive teaching is unavailable, using just-in-time educational videos on a handheld device might be useful as a supplemental instructional strategy.

  20. Using digital technologies to engage with medical research: views of myotonic dystrophy patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coathup, Victoria; Teare, Harriet J A; Minari, Jusaku; Yoshizawa, Go; Kaye, Jane; Takahashi, Masanori P; Kato, Kazuto

    2016-08-24

    As in other countries, the traditional doctor-patient relationship in the Japanese healthcare system has often been characterised as being of a paternalistic nature. However, in recent years there has been a gradual shift towards a more participatory-patient model in Japan. With advances in technology, the possibility to use digital technologies to improve patient interactions is growing and is in line with changing attitudes in the medical profession and society within Japan and elsewhere. The implementation of an online patient engagement platform is being considered by the Myotonic Dystrophy Registry of Japan. The aim of this exploratory study was to understand patients' views and attitudes to using digital tools in patient registries and engagement with medical research in Japan, prior to implementation of the digital platform. We conducted an exploratory, cross-sectional, self-completed questionnaire with a sample of myotonic dystrophy (MD) patients attending an Open Day at Osaka University, Japan. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were 18 years or older, and were diagnosed with MD. A total of 68 patients and family members attended the Open Day and were invited to participate in the survey. Of those, 59 % submitted a completed questionnaire (n = 40). The survey showed that the majority of patients felt that they were not receiving the information they wanted from their clinicians, which included recent medical research findings and opportunities to participate in clinical trials, and 88 % of patients indicated they would be willing to engage with digital technologies to receive relevant medical information. Patients also expressed an interest in having control over when and how they received this information, as well as being informed of how their data is used and shared with other researchers. Overall, the findings from this study suggest that there is scope to develop a digital platform to engage with patients so that they can receive

  1. Current Trends on Medical and Pharmaceutical Applications of Inkjet Printing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoutaris, Nicolaos; Ross, Steven; Douroumis, Dennis

    2016-08-01

    Inkjet printing is an attractive material deposition and patterning technology that has received significant attention in the recent years. It has been exploited for novel applications including high throughput screening, pharmaceutical formulations, medical devices and implants. Moreover, inkjet printing has been implemented in cutting-edge 3D-printing healthcare areas such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Recent inkjet advances enabled 3D printing of artificial cartilage and skin, or cell constructs for transplantation therapies. In the coming years inkjet printing is anticipated to revolutionize personalized medicine and push the innovation portfolio by offering new paths in patient - specific treatments.

  2. Rituals in Death and Dying: Modern Medical Technologies Enter the Fray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of immortality, the human species has over the millennia developed rites and rituals to help in the passing of life to honor the person who is dying or has died or in some way demonstrate their “courage” and perseverance as well as duty even in the face of almost certain death. The centuries-old traditions of the gathering of loved ones, the chanting of prayers, the ritual religious blessings are in the process of being replaced by the “miracles” of modern medical technology.

  3. Disruptive technology: new medical advances are troublesome for even the most successful health systems and innovator health companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Lawrence; Vaul, Joanne; Chumer, Kathleen; Faul, Maureen; Sheehan, Lisa; DeCerce, Jack

    2004-01-01

    An independent expert panel conducted a multi-year research/education/advocacy initiative on the impact of the new drug-eluting stent technology. They conclude that this technology represents a "tipping point" in a series of transformative drugs and medical devices, often used in combination, and recommend that healthcare decision makers develop careful, data-based strategies to avoid the disruptiveness of these medical advances.

  4. Nano-enabled medical devices based on biosensing principles: technology basis and new concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina G. Siontorou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research and development in the biosensors for medical applications remain a focused area benefiting industry, society and knowledge production alike. The framework established is conducive to innovation and rapid assimilation of technological change. At the advent of nanotechnology, the various biosensor classes have been benefited in different ways, scales and rates. This paper studies the nanotechnology-driven shifting of the biosensor innovation system towards new concepts and the broadening, in depth and extent, of its science base. The scientific domain of (nanobiosensors has been studied using a roadmapping framework, especially developed to handle the dynamics and scopes of academic research. The results indicate that the sector seized the opportunities that nanotools offered to solve technology problems and revisit old concepts for optimizing the traditional platforms. Yet, the ability to control nanoeffects fuels a new transition towards bioelectronic integration that sets entirely new horizons for future trajectories.

  5. Health technology assessment process of a cardiovascular medical device in four different settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olry de Labry Lima, Antonio; Espín Balbino, Jaime; Lemgruber, Alexandre; Caro Martínez, Araceli; García-Mochón, Leticia; Martín Ruiz, Eva; Lessa, Fernanda

    2017-10-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a tool to help the decision-making process. The aim is to describe methods and processes used in the reimbursement decision making for drug-eluting stents (DES) in four different settings. DES as a technology under study was selected according to different criteria, all of them agreed by a working group. A survey of key informants was designed. DES was evaluated following well-structured HTA processes. Nonetheless, scope for improvement was observed in relation to the data considered for the final decision, the transparency and inclusiveness of the process as well as in the methods employed. An attempt to describe the HTA processes of a well-known medical device.

  6. Evaluating the Impact of Information Technology Tools to Support the Asthma Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiz, L Adriana; Robbins-Milne, Laura; Krause, M Christine; Peretz, Patricia J; Rausch, John C

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of information technology tools on the outcomes of children with asthma in the medical home. A registry was established for children aged 4 to 18 years with an ICD-9 code for asthma. Changes to the electronic health record included modifications to notes, care plans, and orders. A retrospective analysis of emergency department and in-patient utilization for a cohort of patients was conducted from July 2009 through June 2013. Of the study population (n = 1217), 65% had a classification of asthma severity and 63% were risk-stratified. Seventy percent had a control assessment at least once. Care plan use increased from 5% to 22% and enrollment in care coordination increased from 0.1% to 4%. After 3 years, there was a reduction of emergency department and inpatient admissions for asthma (P information technology tools was associated with improved asthma outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison BJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brittany J Harrison,1 Tara N Hilton,1 Raphaël N Rivière,1 Zachary M Ferraro,1–3 Raywat Deonandan,4 Mark C Walker1–3,51Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 4University of Ottawa Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 5Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, CanadaObjectives: This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved.Methods: A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical were included in the review.Conclusion: There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old. This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a

  8. Ethical reflection on multi-disciplinarity and confidentiality of information in medical imaging through new information and communication technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, J.; Le Coz, P.

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in medical imaging has resulted in the exponential increase of the number of images per examination, caused the irreversible decline of the silver film and imposed digital imaging. This digitization is a concept whose levels of development are multiple, reflecting the complexity of this process of technological change. Under these conditions, the use of medical information via new information and communication technologies is at the crossroads of several scientific approaches and several disciplines (medicine, ethics, law, economics, psychology, etc.) surrounding the information systems in health, doctor-patient relationship and concepts that are associated. Each day, these new information and communication technologies open up new horizons and the space of possibilities, spectacularly developing access to information and knowledge. In this perspective of digital technology emergence impacting the multidisciplinary use of health information systems, the ethical questions are numerous, especially on the preservation of privacy, confidentiality and security of medical data, and their accessibility and integrity. (authors)

  9. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  10. Competencies of Career-Entry Medical Technology Graduates of Lyceum of Batangas: Basis for Enhancement of the Internship Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Anacleta P.

    2010-01-01

    The role of medical technologists in the years due to changes in the laboratory environment. curriculum is needed to prepare graduates for changes in laboratory medicine. It is the ultimate goal of the College to prepare students for career entry positions as medical technology professionals. The curriculum should be designed to prepare the…

  11. Mobile technologies: expectancy, usage, and acceptance of clinical staff and patients at a university medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiger, Kristin; Hupka, Markus; von Jan, Ute; Wichelhaus, Daniel; Albrecht, Urs-Vito

    2014-10-21

    Despite their increasing popularity, little is known about how users perceive mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs in medical contexts. Available studies are often restricted to evaluating the success of specific interventions and do not adequately cover the users' basic attitudes, for example, their expectations or concerns toward using mobile devices in medical settings. The objective of the study was to obtain a comprehensive picture, both from the perspective of the patients, as well as the doctors, regarding the use and acceptance of mobile devices within medical contexts in general well as the perceived challenges when introducing the technology. Doctors working at Hannover Medical School (206/1151, response 17.90%), as well as patients being admitted to this facility (213/279, utilization 76.3%) were surveyed about their acceptance and use of mobile devices in medical settings. Regarding demographics, both samples were representative of the respective study population. GNU R (version 3.1.1) was used for statistical testing. Fisher's exact test, two-sided, alpha=.05 with Monte Carlo approximation, 2000 replicates, was applied to determine dependencies between two variables. The majority of participants already own mobile devices (doctors, 168/206, 81.6%; patients, 110/213, 51.6%). For doctors, use in a professional context does not depend on age (P=.66), professional experience (P=.80), or function (P=.34); gender was a factor (P=.009), and use was more common among male (61/135, 45.2%) than female doctors (17/67, 25%). A correlation between use of mobile devices and age (P=.001) as well as education (P=.002) was seen for patients. Minor differences regarding how mobile devices are perceived in sensitive medical contexts mostly relate to data security, patients are more critical of the devices being used for storing and processing patient data; every fifth patient opposed this, but nevertheless, 4.8% of doctors (10/206) use their devices for this

  12. An Examination of Safety Management Systems and Aviation Technologies in the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Steven A.

    The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) industry has a significant role in the transportation of injured patients, but has experienced more accidents than all other segments of the aviation industry combined. With the objective of addressing this discrepancy, this study assesses the effect of safety management systems implementation and aviation technologies utilization on the reduction of HEMS accident rates. Participating were 147 pilots from Federal Aviation Regulations Part 135 HEMS operators, who completed a survey questionnaire based on the Safety Culture and Safety Management System Survey (SCSMSS). The study assessed the predictor value of SMS implementation and aviation technologies to the frequency of HEMS accident rates with correlation and multiple linear regression. The correlation analysis identified three significant positive relationships. HEMS years of experience had a high significant positive relationship with accident rate (r=.90; paviation technologies from a systems engineering application. Recommendations for practice included the adoption of existing regulatory guidance for a SMS program. A qualitative analysis was also recommended for future study SMS implementation and HEMS accident rate from the pilot's perspective. A quantitative longitudinal study would further explore inferential relationships between the study variables. Current strategies should include the increased utilization of available aviation technology resources as this proactive stance may be beneficial for the establishment of an effective safety culture within the HEMS industry.

  13. [Medical doctors driving technological innovation: questions about and innovation management approaches to incentive structures for lead users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Kientzler, Fionn

    2010-01-01

    Management science defines user-generated innovations as open innovation and lead user innovation. The medical technology industry finds user-generated innovations profitable and even indispensable. Innovative medical doctors as lead users need medical technology innovations in order to improve patient care. Their motivation to innovate is mostly intrinsic. But innovations may also involve extrinsic motivators such as gain in reputation or monetary incentives. Medical doctors' innovative activities often take place in hospitals and are thus embedded into the hospital's organisational setting. Hospitals find it difficult to gain short-term profits from in-house generated innovations and sometimes hesitate to support them. Strategic investment in medical doctors' innovative activities may be profitable for hospitals in the long run if innovations provide first-mover competitive advantages. Industry co-operations with innovative medical doctors offer chances but also bear potential risks. Innovative ideas generated by expert users may result in even higher complexity of medical devices; this could cause mistakes when applied by less specialised users and thus affect patient safety. Innovations that yield benefits for patients, medical doctors, hospitals and the medical technology industry can be advanced by offering adequate support for knowledge transfer and co-operation models.

  14. Evaluating interactive computer-based scenarios designed for learning medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Johanna; Dalholm, Elisabeth Hornyánszky; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    The use of medical equipment is growing in healthcare, resulting in an increased need for resources to educate users in how to manage the various devices. Learning the practical operation of a device is one thing, but learning how to work with the device in the actual clinical context is more challenging. This paper presents a computer-based simulation prototype for learning medical technology in the context of critical care. Properties from simulation and computer games have been adopted to create a visualization-based, interactive and contextually bound tool for learning. A participatory design process, including three researchers and three practitioners from a clinic for infectious diseases, was adopted to adjust the form and content of the prototype to the needs of the clinical practice and to create a situated learning experience. An evaluation with 18 practitioners showed that practitioners were positive to this type of tool for learning and that it served as a good platform for eliciting and sharing knowledge. Our conclusion is that this type of tools can be a complement to traditional learning resources to situate the learning in a context without requiring advanced technology or being resource-demanding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Information technology leadership in academic medical centers: a tale of four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C P

    1999-07-01

    Persons and groups within academic medical centers bring consistent and predictable viewpoints to planning and decision making. The varied professional and academic cultures of these individuals appear to account primarily for the diversity of their viewpoints. Understanding these professional cultures can help leaders achieve some predictability in the complex environments for which they are responsible. Leaders in information technology in particular, in order to be successful, must become part-time anthropologists, immersing themselves in the varied workplaces of their constituents to understand the work they do and the cultures that have grown up around this work. Only in this way will they be able to manage the challenges that arise continuously as the technology and the needs it can address change over time. In this article, the author briefly describes the concept of culture, portrays four specific professional cultures that typically coexist in academic medical centers, and argues that understanding these cultures is absolutely critical to effective management and use of information resources.

  16. Retention factors in relation to organisational commitment in medical and information technology services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette van Dyk

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The objectives of the study were to investigate empirically: (1 the relationship between employees’ satisfaction with organisational retention factors (measured by the Retention Factors Scale and their organisational commitment (measured by the Organisational Commitment Questionnaire and (2 whether gender, age, race and tenure groups differ significantly in terms of these variables. Motivation for the study: Medical and information technology professionals have specialised and hard to replace skills. They also have strong tendencies to leave their organisations and countries. Understanding the retention factors that will increase their organisational commitment may benefit the organisations who want to retain their valuable talent. Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design to collect data from a purposive sample of 206 staff members who had scarce skills in a South African medical and information technology services company. Correlational and inferential statistics were computed to achieve the objectives. Main findings: The results showed that the participants’ satisfaction with retention factors has a significant relationship with their organisational commitment and that the biographical groups differ significantly in terms of the variables. Practical/managerial implications: The measured retention factors were all associated with human resource management practices that influence employees’ intentions to leave. Contribution/value-add: The results are important to managers who are interested in retaining staff who have scarce skills and provide valuable pointers for designing effective retention strategies.

  17. A dual use case study of space technologies for terrestrial medical applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozmuta, Ioana

    2017-05-01

    Many challenges exist in understanding the human body as a whole, its adaptability, its resilience, its immunological response, its healing and regeneration power. New knowledge is usually obtained by exploring unique conditions and environments and space is one such variable. Primarily, these attributes have been studied in space for the purpose of understanding the effect of the space environment on long duration space travel. However a myriad of lessons learned have emerged that are important for terrestrial medicine problems such as cardiovascular changes, intracranial pressure changes, vision changes, reduced immunity, etc. For medical study purposes, the changes induced by the space environment on the human body are in general fast and predictable; they persist while in the space environment but also revert to the initial pre-flight healthy state upon return to Earth. This provides a unique cycle to study wellness and disease prediction as well as to develop more effective countermeasures for the benefit of people on earth. At a scientific level, the environment of space can be used to develop new lines of investigations and new knowledge to push the terrestrial state of the art (i.e. study of phase diagrams, identification of new system's states, etc). Moreover, the specialized requirements for space medicine have driven advances in terrestrial medical technologies in areas such as monitoring, diagnostic, prevention and treatment. This talk will provide an overview of compelling examples in key areas of interest for terrestrial medical applications.

  18. Left to their own devices: medical learners' use of mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Fink, Patricia; Graves, Lisa; Campbell, Alanna

    2014-02-01

    Although many medical learners and teachers are using mobile technologies within medical education, there has been little evidence presented describing how they use mobile devices across a whole curriculum. The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) introduced a new mobile device program in 2010. Incoming undergraduate medical learners received a laptop and an iPad and learners entering year three of the four-year program received a laptop and an iPhone. A survey was sent to all learners to gather information on their use of and attitudes toward these devices. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to analyze the data and to generate a series of themes that synthesized student behaviors, perceptions and attitudes. Context and learner autonomy were found to be important factors with learners using multiple devices for different purposes and adopting strategic approaches to learning using these devices. The expectation that school-issued devices would be regularly and enthusiastically used to replace more traditional study media was not reflected in practice. Learners' approaches to using mobile devices are heterogeneous as is the extent to which they use them. Learners adapt their use of mobile devices to the learning cultures and contexts they find themselves in.

  19. Progress in computer aided diagnosis for medical images by information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekada, Yoshito

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the history, present state and future view of computer aided diagnosis (CAD) based on processing, recognition and visualization of chest and abdominal images. A primitive feature of CAD is seen as early as in 1960's for lung cancer detection. Contemporarily, advances in medical imaging by CT, MRI, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) in multi-dimensions require doctors to read those vast information, where necessity of CAD is evident. At present, simultaneous CAD for multi-organs and multi-diseases is in progress, the interaction between images and medical doctors is leading to developing a newer system like virtual endoscopy, objective evaluation of CAD systems is necessary for its approval to authorities like fluorescein diacetate (FDA) with use of receiver operating characteristics analysis, and thus cooperation of medical and technological fields is more and more important. In future, CAD should be responsible for individual difference and for change in disease state, usable simultaneously for time and space, more recognized of its importance by doctors, and more useful in participation to therapeutic practice. (R.T.)

  20. Academic medical product development: an emerging alliance of technology transfer organizations and the CTSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-12-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS clinical and translational science award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related inventions. The technology transfer Offices (TTO) of CTSA-funded universities can be important partners in the development process; facilitating the transfer of medical research to the commercial sector for further development and ultimately, distribution to patients. The Aggregating Intellectual Property (IP) Working Group (AWG) of the CTSA public private partnerships key function committee (PPP-KFC) developed a survey to explore how CTSA-funded institutions currently interface with their respective TTOs to support medical product development. The results suggest a range of relationships across institutions; approximately half have formal collaborative programs, but only a few have well-connected programs. Models of collaborations are described and provided as examples of successful CTSA/TTO partnerships that have increased the value of health-related inventions as measured by follow-on funding and industry involvement; either as a consulting partner or licensee. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Video chat technology to remotely quantify dietary, supplement and medication adherence in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Courtney M; Apolzan, John W; Wright, Courtney; Martin, Corby K

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two studies to test the validity, reliability, feasibility and acceptability of using video chat technology to quantify dietary and pill-taking (i.e. supplement and medication) adherence. In study 1, we investigated whether video chat technology can accurately quantify adherence to dietary and pill-taking interventions. Mock study participants ate food items and swallowed pills, while performing randomised scripted 'cheating' behaviours to mimic non-adherence. Monitoring was conducted in a cross-over design, with two monitors watching in-person and two watching remotely by Skype on a smartphone. For study 2, a twenty-two-item online survey was sent to a listserv with more than 20 000 unique email addresses of past and present study participants to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. For the dietary adherence tests, monitors detected 86 % of non-adherent events (sensitivity) in-person v. 78 % of events via video chat monitoring (P=0·12), with comparable inter-rater agreement (0·88 v. 0·85; P=0·62). However, for pill-taking, non-adherence trended towards being more easily detected in-person than by video chat (77 v. 60 %; P=0·08), with non-significantly higher inter-rater agreement (0·85 v. 0·69; P=0·21). Survey results from study 2 (n 1076 respondents; ≥5 % response rate) indicated that 86·4 % of study participants had video chatting hardware, 73·3 % were comfortable using the technology and 79·8 % were willing to use it for clinical research. Given the capability of video chat technology to reduce participant burden and outperform other adherence monitoring methods such as dietary self-report and pill counts, video chatting is a novel and promising platform to quantify dietary and pill-taking adherence.

  2. Development of coverage with evidence development for medical technologies in Switzerland from 1996 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brügger, Urs; Ruckstuhl, Andreas; Horisberger, Bruno; Gratwohl, Alois

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess incidence, time frame, and outcome of "Coverage with Evidence Development" (CED) decisions in the Swiss Basic Health Insurance scheme. Analysis of all controversial medical technologies submitted to review by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH) from 1996 to 2012 with focus on decisions with constraints. Description of types of technology, type of initial decision, duration of evaluation period, final decision, and search for potential factors associated with changes over time. Forty-five (37.5 percent) of 120 controversial health technologies were classified as "yes, in evaluation, reimbursed" for a certain period of time and thirty-five (29.2 percent) as "no, in evaluation, not reimbursed" by the Federal Department of Home Affairs from 1996 to 2012. The rate of CED decisions ranged between zero and nine per year and was influenced by type of technology and calendar year. Forty-four of forty-five decisions were subject to further restrictions, to a "center or a specialist" (76 percent), "indications" (49 percent), "registry" (31 percent), or "other" (49 percent). The time to a final decision ranged from 1.5 to 11 years (median, 6 years). No factors associated with initial decision and final outcome could be identified. CED as a reality in Switzerland might have enabled patients to obtain access to promising technologies early in their life cycle. CED might have acted as a trigger to a successful implementation of a comprehensive national registry. The lack of qualitative data stresses the urgent need for evaluation of the HTA decisions and their impact on patient outcome and costs.

  3. Information technologies, mechatronics and robotics as a basis of an interdisciplinary approach to engineering and medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Ovsyanitskaya, L. Y.; Yurasova, E. V.; Овсяницкая, Л. Ю.; Юрасова, Е. В.

    2015-01-01

    Information technologies, robotics and mechatronics play an important role in modern medicine. The article shows that the use of information technology is an essential part of any activity of a specialist healthcare. The main goal of the medical technique development is the high accuracy and quality of service, efficiency of treatment, reducing the risk of harm to human health. However, despite advances in engineering and technology, health care professionals are not always aware of them, ...

  4. Information technologies, mechatronics and robotics as a basis of an interdisciplinary approach to engineering and medical education

    OpenAIRE

    OVSYANITSKAYA L.Y.; YURASOVA E.V.

    2015-01-01

    Information technologies, robotics and mechatronics play an important role in modern medicine. The article shows that the use of information technology is an essential part of any activity of a specialist healthcare. The main goal of the medical technique development is the high accuracy and quality of service, efficiency of treatment, reducing the risk of harm to human health. However, despite advances in engineering and technology, health care professionals are not always aware of them, and...

  5. Emerging Use of Early Health Technology Assessment in Medical Product Development: A Scoping Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJzerman, Maarten J; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Fenwick, Elisabeth; Krahn, Murray

    2017-07-01

    Early health technology assessment is increasingly being used to support health economic evidence development during early stages of clinical research. Such early models can be used to inform research and development about the design and management of new medical technologies to mitigate the risks, perceived by industry and the public sector, associated with market access and reimbursement. Over the past 25 years it has been suggested that health economic evaluation in the early stages may benefit the development and diffusion of medical products. Early health technology assessment has been suggested in the context of iterative economic evaluation alongside phase I and II clinical research to inform clinical trial design, market access, and pricing. In addition, performing early health technology assessment was also proposed at an even earlier stage for managing technology portfolios. This scoping review suggests a generally accepted definition of early health technology assessment to be "all methods used to inform industry and other stakeholders about the potential value of new medical products in development, including methods to quantify and manage uncertainty". The present review also aimed to identify recent published empirical studies employing an early-stage assessment of a medical product. With most included studies carried out to support a market launch, the dominant methodology was early health economic modeling. Further methodological development is required, in particular, by combining systems engineering and health economics to manage uncertainty in medical product portfolios.

  6. [The implementation of innovative medical technologies: biological pharmaceuticals for the treatment of psoriasis--a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Orna; Lomnicky, Yosef

    2012-06-01

    Advanced health systems worldwide strive to adopt new technologies that will ensure improved health and better clinical outcomes. The implementation of new medical technologies is affected by medical factors as well as economic and social forces, influencing both the individual and the health care providers. Chronic disease management is a major challenge to governments, as a result of the cumulative effects of chronic morbidity, life expectancy, quality of life and the national burden of disease due to accelerating medical expenditure. Psoriasis, a common chronic disease, for which advanced technologies were recently implemented, was chosen as a case study. The distribution of utility of various technologies for the treatment of psoriasis over the past nine years was analyzed to categorize "patterns of behavior" in accordance with the lifecycle of medical technology described in the Literature. It is expected that these changing trends will produce overall economic consequences, on direct expenditure combined with a reduction in some health services. Analyzing these clinical and economic trends, may add important considerations for the adoption of emerging medical technologies, presenting an important tool for policymakers at at all levels.

  7. Evolution and acceptability of medical applications of RFID implants among early users of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    RFID as a wireless identification technology that may be combined with microchip implants have tremendous potential in today's market. Although these implants have their advantages and disadvantages, recent improvements how allowed for implants designed for humans. Focus was given to the use of RFID tags and its effects on technology and CRM through a case study on VeriChip, the only corporation to hold the rights and the patent to the implantable chip for humans, and an empirically based study on working professionals to measure perceptions by early adopters of such technology. Through hypotheses-testing procedures, it was found that although some resistance to accept microchip implants was found in several applications, especially among gender, it was totally expected that healthcare and medical record keeping activities would be universally treated in a positive light and the use of authorities (namely governmental agencies) would be equally treated in a negative light by both sexes. Future trends and recommendations are presented along with statistical results collected through personal interviews.

  8. Cobalt-60 Machines and Medical Linear Accelerators: Competing Technologies for External Beam Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, B J; van der Merwe, D; Christaki, K E; Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) and cobalt-60 machines are both mature technologies for external beam radiotherapy. A comparison is made between these two technologies in terms of infrastructure and maintenance, dosimetry, shielding requirements, staffing, costs, security, patient throughput and clinical use. Infrastructure and maintenance are more demanding for linacs due to the complex electric componentry. In dosimetry, a higher beam energy, modulated dose rate and smaller focal spot size mean that it is easier to create an optimised treatment with a linac for conformal dose coverage of the tumour while sparing healthy organs at risk. In shielding, the requirements for a concrete bunker are similar for cobalt-60 machines and linacs but extra shielding and protection from neutrons are required for linacs. Staffing levels can be higher for linacs and more staff training is required for linacs. Life cycle costs are higher for linacs, especially multi-energy linacs. Security is more complex for cobalt-60 machines because of the high activity radioactive source. Patient throughput can be affected by source decay for cobalt-60 machines but poor maintenance and breakdowns can severely affect patient throughput for linacs. In clinical use, more complex treatment techniques are easier to achieve with linacs, and the availability of electron beams on high-energy linacs can be useful for certain treatments. In summary, there is no simple answer to the question of the choice of either cobalt-60 machines or linacs for radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries. In fact a radiotherapy department with a combination of technologies, including orthovoltage X-ray units, may be an option. Local needs, conditions and resources will have to be factored into any decision on technology taking into account the characteristics of both forms of teletherapy, with the primary goal being the sustainability of the radiotherapy service over the useful lifetime of the equipment

  9. Effective Crew Operations: An Analysis of Technologies for Improving Crew Activities and Medical Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Craig

    2005-01-01

    NASA's vision for space exploration (February 2004) calls for development of a new crew exploration vehicle, sustained lunar operations, and human exploration of Mars. To meet the challenges of planned sustained operations as well as the limited communications between Earth and the crew (e.g., Mars exploration), many systems will require crews to operate in an autonomous environment. It has been estimated that once every 2.4 years a major medical issue will occur while in space. NASA's future travels, especially to Mars, will begin to push this timeframe. Therefore, now is the time for investigating technologies and systems that will support crews in these environments. Therefore, this summer two studies were conducted to evaluate the technology and systems that may be used by crews in future missions. The first study evaluated three commercial Indoor Positioning Systems (IPS) (Versus, Ekahau, and Radianse) that can track equipment and people within a facility. While similar to Global Positioning Systems (GPS), the specific technology used is different. Several conclusions can be drawn from the evaluation conducted, but in summary it is clear that none of the systems provides a complete solution in meeting the tracking and technology integration requirements of NASA. From a functional performance (e.g., system meets user needs) evaluation perspective, Versus performed fairly well on all performance measures as compared to Ekahau and Radianse. However, the system only provides tracking at the room level. Thus, Versus does not provide the level of fidelity required for tracking assets or people for NASA requirements. From an engineering implementation perspective, Ekahau is far simpler to implement that the other two systems because of its wi-fi design (e.g., no required runs of cable). By looking at these two perspectives, one finds there was no clear system that met NASA requirements. Thus it would be premature to suggest that any of these systems are ready for

  10. Medical technology integration: CT, angiography, imaging-capable OR-table, navigation and robotics in a multifunctional sterile suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A L; Regazzoni, P; Bilecen, D; Rasmus, M; Huegli, R W; Messmer, P

    2007-01-01

    Technology integration is an enabling technological prerequisite to achieve a major breakthrough in sophisticated intra-operative imaging, navigation and robotics in minimally invasive and/or emergency diagnosis and therapy. Without a high degree of integration and reliability comparable to that achieved in the aircraft industry image guidance in its different facets will not ultimately succeed. As of today technology integration in the field of image-guidance is close to nonexistent. Technology integration requires inter-departmental integration of human and financial resources and of medical processes in a dialectic way. This expanded techno-socio-economic integration has profound consequences for the administration and working conditions in hospitals. At the university hospital of Basel, Switzerland, a multimodality multifunction sterile suite was put into operation after a substantial pre-run. We report the lessons learned during our venture into the world of medical technology integration and describe new possibilities for similar integration projects in the future.

  11. Tobacco Use, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Cessation Training among Third-Year Medical Technology Students in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjuntra, Pisit; Suriyaprom, Kanjana

    2015-10-01

    Compare tobacco use, exposure to second-hand smoke, and smoking cessation training among third-year medical technology students in Thailand between 2006 and 2011. The medical technology student survey was carried out with Global Health Professions Student Survey (GHPSS) between October and November 2011. The population of the present study was all students in nine medical technology schools. There were 773 students enrolled in this study yielding a response rate of 95.1%. The prevalence of current cigarette smokers had decreased from 2006 to 2011 (4.8% to 1.4%, respectively). Rates of exposure to second-hand smoke at home were 36.3% in 2006 and 39.7% in 2011, while rates of exposure to second-hand smoke in other places did not change. Most students recognized that they should give patients counseling to quit smoking, but only 20.6% in 2006 and 28.4% in 2011 of them had received formal training in tobacco cessation counseling. There were low percentages of current cigarette smoking but high percentages of exposure to second-hand smoke among medical technology students. The percentage of cessation training was still low among students. Therefore, medical technology schools should provide formal training in tobacco cessation for all students to help improve their ability in providing advice to patients.

  12. Antimicrobial Treatment of Polymeric Medical Devices by Silver Nanomaterials and Related Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polívková, Markéta; Hubáček, Tomáš; Staszek, Marek; Švorčík, Václav; Siegel, Jakub

    2017-02-15

    Antimicrobial biocompatible polymers form a group of highly desirable materials in medicinal technology that exhibit interesting thermal and mechanical properties, and high chemical resistance. There are numerous types of polymers with antimicrobial activity or antimicrobial properties conferred through their proper modification. In this review, we focus on the second type of polymers, especially those whose antimicrobial activity is conferred by nanotechnology. Nanotechnology processing is a developing area that exploits the antibacterial effects of broad-scale compounds, both organic and inorganic, to form value-added medical devices. This work gives an overview of nanostructured antimicrobial agents, especially silver ones, used together with biocompatible polymers as effective antimicrobial composites in healthcare. The bactericidal properties of non-conventional antimicrobial agents are compared with those of conventional ones and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  13. Antimicrobial Treatment of Polymeric Medical Devices by Silver Nanomaterials and Related Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markéta Polívková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial biocompatible polymers form a group of highly desirable materials in medicinal technology that exhibit interesting thermal and mechanical properties, and high chemical resistance. There are numerous types of polymers with antimicrobial activity or antimicrobial properties conferred through their proper modification. In this review, we focus on the second type of polymers, especially those whose antimicrobial activity is conferred by nanotechnology. Nanotechnology processing is a developing area that exploits the antibacterial effects of broad-scale compounds, both organic and inorganic, to form value-added medical devices. This work gives an overview of nanostructured antimicrobial agents, especially silver ones, used together with biocompatible polymers as effective antimicrobial composites in healthcare. The bactericidal properties of non-conventional antimicrobial agents are compared with those of conventional ones and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  14. Final report of the group research. Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging Research. 1996-2000 FY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    This report involves the organization of the research groups (4 units of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, radiotracer and radiopharmacology, clinical imaging, and molecular informative research), 5 research reports and 38 published research papers. The research reports concern Fundamental researches on the availability and production of PET radiopharmaceuticals using the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) cyclotron, Design and evaluation of in vivo radiopharmaceuticals for PET measurement (kinetics and metabolism in small animals and primates), Fundamental studies on development of technique radiation measurement, Clinical application of medical imaging technology in the fields of neuroscience, cardiovascular, cancer diagnosis and others, and A study to establish and evaluate a lung cancer screening system using spiral CT units which is in pilot-progress in Kanto and Kansai regions. (N.I.)

  15. Diagnostic imaging over the last 50 years: research and development in medical imaging science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, diagnostic imaging has grown from a state of infancy to a high level of maturity. Many new imaging modalities have been developed. However, modern medical imaging includes not only image production but also image processing, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), image recording and storage, and image transmission, most of which are included in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The content of this paper includes a short review of research and development in medical imaging science and technology, which covers (a) diagnostic imaging in the 1950s, (b) the importance of image quality and diagnostic performance, (c) MTF, Wiener spectrum, NEQ and DQE, (d) ROC analysis, (e) analogue imaging systems, (f) digital imaging systems, (g) image processing, (h) computer-aided diagnosis, (i) PACS, (j) 3D imaging and (k) future directions. Although some of the modalities are already very sophisticated, further improvements will be made in image quality for MRI, ultrasound and molecular imaging. The infrastructure of PACS is likely to be improved further in terms of its reliability, speed and capacity. However, CAD is currently still in its infancy, and is likely to be a subject of research for a long time. (review)

  16. Adaptive Learning in Medical Education: The Final Piece of Technology Enhanced Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neel; Doherty, Iain; Dong, Chaoyan

    2017-09-01

    Technology enhanced learning (TEL) is now common practice in the field of medical education. One of the primary examples of its use is that of high fidelity simulation and computerised mannequins. Further examples include online learning modules, electronic portfolios, virtual patient interactions, massive open online courses and the flipped classroom movement. The rise of TEL has occurred primarily due to the ease of internet access enabling the retrieval and sharing of information in an instant. Furthermore, the compact nature of internet ready devices such as smartphones and laptops has meant that access to information can occur anytime and anywhere. From an educational perspective however, the current utilisation of TEL has been hindered by its lack of understanding of learners' needs. This is concerning, particularly as evidence highlights that during medical training, each individual learner has their own learning requirements and often achieves competency at different rates. In view of this, there has been interest in ensuring TEL is more learner aware and that the learning process should be more personalised. Adaptive learning can aim to achieve this by ensuring content is delivered according to the needs of the learner. This commentary highlights the move towards adaptive learning and the benefits of such an intervention.

  17. A Technology Acceptance Model for Inter-Organisational Electronic Medical Records Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Handy

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of the first stage of an ongoing, longitudinal study into the implementation of an interorganisational electronic medical records (EMR system. The study adapted and expanded Davis' (1993 technology acceptance model (TAM to investigate the attitudes of primary care practitioners towards a proposed system for maternity patients. All doctors and midwives holding maternity care contracts with a large urban hospital in New Zealand were sent a questionnaire soliciting their views on a planned EMR system linking the hospital and the primary care sectors. The results showed that whilst Davis' two key factors of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were important to medical professionals, another key factor, perceived system acceptability, which concerns control and management of information is vitally important to the acceptance of the system. The study also showed that the two groups of professionals had differing requirements due to different levels of experience and practice computerisation. Finally, the research highlights a number of wider organisational issues particularly relevant to the use of inter organisational systems in general and healthcare systems in particular.

  18. A new model for graduate education and innovation in medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Youseph; Acharya, Soumyadipta

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new model of graduate education in bioengineering innovation and design- a year long Master's degree program that educates engineers in the process of healthcare technology innovation for both advanced and low-resource global markets. Students are trained in an iterative "Spiral Innovation" approach that ensures early, staged, and repeated examination of all key elements of a successful medical device. This includes clinical immersion based problem identification and assessment (at Johns Hopkins Medicine and abroad), team based concept and business model development, and project planning based on iterative technical and business plan de-risking. The experiential, project based learning process is closely supported by several core courses in business, design, and engineering. Students in the program work on two team based projects, one focused on addressing healthcare needs in advanced markets and a second focused on low-resource settings. The program recently completed its fourth year of existence, and has graduated 61 students, who have continued on to industry or startups (one half), additional graduate education, or medical school (one third), or our own Global Health Innovation Fellowships. Over the 4 years, the program has sponsored 10 global health teams and 14 domestic/advanced market medtech teams, and launched 5 startups, of which 4 are still active. Projects have attracted over US$2.5M in follow-on awards and grants, that are supporting the continued development of over a dozen projects.

  19. Obesity bias, medical technology, and the hormonal hypothesis: should we stop demonizing fat people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    deShazo, Richard D; Hall, John E; Skipworth, Leigh Baldwin

    2015-05-01

    There is adequate evidence to demonstrate that bias toward obese individuals by health professionals is common. Bias predisposes to errors in medical judgment and care. There is also evidence to show that the pathophysiology of obesity is more complex than eating too much and moving too little. Widespread obesity is a new phenomenon in the United States and reflects changes in culture, including food, at many levels. The modern abundance of low-cost, available, palatable, energy-dense processed foods and the ability of these foods to activate central nervous system centers that drive food preference and overeating appear to play an important role in the obesity epidemic. The usual hormonal systems that promote body weight homeostasis appear to have been counterbalanced by pleasurable (hedonic) influences these foods generate in higher neurologic networks, including the limbic system. The use of medical technology, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, to quantitate hedonic responses to food, enhance taste, and effectively develop and market commercial food products has produced new areas of ethical concern and opportunities to better understand eating and satiety. These developments further demonstrate the urgency to address the bias that exists toward obese patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Building Irish families through surrogacy: medical and judicial issues for the advanced reproductive technologies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sills, Eric Scott

    2008-01-01

    Surrogacy involves one woman (surrogate mother) carrying a child for another person\\/s (commissioning person\\/couple), based on a mutual agreement requiring the child to be handed over to the commissioning person\\/couple following birth. Reasons for seeking surrogacy include situations where a woman has non-functional or absent reproductive organs, or as a remedy for recurrent pregnancy loss. Additionally, surrogacy may find application in any medical context where pregnancy is contraindicated, or where a couple consisting of two males seek to become parents through oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy is one of the main issues at the forefront of bioethics and the advanced reproductive technologies, representing an important challenge to medical law. This analysis reviews the history of surrogacy and clinical and legal issues pertaining to this branch of reproductive medicine. Interestingly, the Medical Council of Ireland does not acknowledge surrogacy in its current practice guidelines, nor is there specific legislation addressing surrogacy in Ireland at present. We therefore have developed a contract-based model for surrogacy in which, courts in Ireland may consider when confronted with a surrogacy dispute, and formulated a system to resolve any potential dispute arising from a surrogacy arrangement. While the 2005 report by the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction (CAHR) is an expert opinion guiding the Oireachtas\\' development of specific legislation governing assisted human reproduction and surrogacy, our report represents independent scholarship on the contractual elements of surrogacy with particular focus on how Irish courts might decide on surrogacy matters in a modern day Ireland. This joint medico-legal collaborative also reviews the contract for services arrangement between the commissioning person\\/s and the surrogate, and the extent to which the contract may be enforced.

  1. Building Irish families through surrogacy: medical and judicial issues for the advanced reproductive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Eric Scott; Healy, Clifford M

    2008-01-01

    Surrogacy involves one woman (surrogate mother) carrying a child for another person/s (commissioning person/couple), based on a mutual agreement requiring the child to be handed over to the commissioning person/couple following birth. Reasons for seeking surrogacy include situations where a woman has non-functional or absent reproductive organs, or as a remedy for recurrent pregnancy loss. Additionally, surrogacy may find application in any medical context where pregnancy is contraindicated, or where a couple consisting of two males seek to become parents through oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy is one of the main issues at the forefront of bioethics and the advanced reproductive technologies, representing an important challenge to medical law. This analysis reviews the history of surrogacy and clinical and legal issues pertaining to this branch of reproductive medicine. Interestingly, the Medical Council of Ireland does not acknowledge surrogacy in its current practice guidelines, nor is there specific legislation addressing surrogacy in Ireland at present. We therefore have developed a contract-based model for surrogacy in which, courts in Ireland may consider when confronted with a surrogacy dispute, and formulated a system to resolve any potential dispute arising from a surrogacy arrangement. While the 2005 report by the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction (CAHR) is an expert opinion guiding the Oireachtas' development of specific legislation governing assisted human reproduction and surrogacy, our report represents independent scholarship on the contractual elements of surrogacy with particular focus on how Irish courts might decide on surrogacy matters in a modern day Ireland. This joint medico-legal collaborative also reviews the contract for services arrangement between the commissioning person/s and the surrogate, and the extent to which the contract may be enforced. PMID:18983640

  2. Building Irish families through surrogacy: medical and judicial issues for the advanced reproductive technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Healy Clifford M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surrogacy involves one woman (surrogate mother carrying a child for another person/s (commissioning person/couple, based on a mutual agreement requiring the child to be handed over to the commissioning person/couple following birth. Reasons for seeking surrogacy include situations where a woman has non-functional or absent reproductive organs, or as a remedy for recurrent pregnancy loss. Additionally, surrogacy may find application in any medical context where pregnancy is contraindicated, or where a couple consisting of two males seek to become parents through oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy is one of the main issues at the forefront of bioethics and the advanced reproductive technologies, representing an important challenge to medical law. This analysis reviews the history of surrogacy and clinical and legal issues pertaining to this branch of reproductive medicine. Interestingly, the Medical Council of Ireland does not acknowledge surrogacy in its current practice guidelines, nor is there specific legislation addressing surrogacy in Ireland at present. We therefore have developed a contract-based model for surrogacy in which, courts in Ireland may consider when confronted with a surrogacy dispute, and formulated a system to resolve any potential dispute arising from a surrogacy arrangement. While the 2005 report by the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction (CAHR is an expert opinion guiding the Oireachtas' development of specific legislation governing assisted human reproduction and surrogacy, our report represents independent scholarship on the contractual elements of surrogacy with particular focus on how Irish courts might decide on surrogacy matters in a modern day Ireland. This joint medico-legal collaborative also reviews the contract for services arrangement between the commissioning person/s and the surrogate, and the extent to which the contract may be enforced.

  3. Educational technology improves ECG interpretation of acute myocardial infarction among medical students and emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Tanski, Mary; Davis, Steven; Shokoohi, Hamid; Lucas, Raymond; Zaver, Fareen

    2015-01-01

    Asynchronous online training has become an increasingly popular educational format in the new era of technology-based professional development. We sought to evaluate the impact of an online asynchronous training module on the ability of medical students and emergency medicine (EM) residents to detect electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We developed an online ECG training and testing module on AMI, with emphasis on recognizing ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) and early activation of cardiac catheterization resources. Study participants included senior medical students and EM residents at all post-graduate levels rotating in our emergency department (ED). Participants were given a baseline set of ECGs for interpretation. This was followed by a brief interactive online training module on normal ECGs as well as abnormal ECGs representing an acute MI. Participants then underwent a post-test with a set of ECGs in which they had to interpret and decide appropriate intervention including catheterization lab activation. 148 students and 35 EM residents participated in this training in the 2012-2013 academic year. Students and EM residents showed significant improvements in recognizing ECG abnormalities after taking the asynchronous online training module. The mean score on the testing module for students improved from 5.9 (95% CI [5.7-6.1]) to 7.3 (95% CI [7.1-7.5]), with a mean difference of 1.4 (95% CI [1.12-1.68]) (p<0.0001). The mean score for residents improved significantly from 6.5 (95% CI [6.2-6.9]) to 7.8 (95% CI [7.4-8.2]) (p<0.0001). An online interactive module of training improved the ability of medical students and EM residents to correctly recognize the ECG evidence of an acute MI.

  4. USE AND KNOWLEDGE ON THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN MEDICAL EDUCATION -BOSNIAN AND HERZEGOVINIAN EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Begic, Nedim

    2016-04-01

    Information technologies (IT) are becoming a tool without which further education of both medical students and doctors would not be possible. The aim of this paper was to analyze the use of IT in the prism of two systems, the old system and the Bologna system. Answers from questionnaires from total of 459 students (2012/13-2015/16 generation) were analyzed. The presence of large number of female students, in both systems is significant (p education, information (via Internet) and for communication (e-mail, chat, social networks) (68.5% of the old system and 84% of students of the Bologna system have chosen all 4 offered answers). MS Word and MS Power Point are significantly more used compared to the use of MS Excel in both systems (p Education in software solutions that are connected to databases processing, must be imperative in reform of the teaching process. IT can only improve the teaching process, the organization of the education system in most eminent universities is undeniably linked to information technologies.

  5. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease.

  6. Advantages of genome sequencing by long-read sequencer using SMRT technology in medical area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Minami, Maiko; Nakanishi, Tetsuhiro; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    PacBio RS II is the first commercialized third-generation DNA sequencer able to sequence a single molecule DNA in real-time without amplification. PacBio RS II's sequencing technology is novel and unique, enabling the direct observation of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase. PacBio RS II confers four major advantages compared to other sequencing technologies: long read lengths, high consensus accuracy, a low degree of bias, and simultaneous capability of epigenetic characterization. These advantages surmount the obstacle of sequencing genomic regions such as high/low G+C, tandem repeat, and interspersed repeat regions. Moreover, PacBio RS II is ideal for whole genome sequencing, targeted sequencing, complex population analysis, RNA sequencing, and epigenetics characterization. With PacBio RS II, we have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of many species, from viruses to humans. Herein, we summarize and review some of our key genome sequencing projects, including full-length viral sequencing, complete bacterial genome and almost-complete plant genome assemblies, and long amplicon sequencing of a disease-associated gene region. We believe that PacBio RS II is not only an effective tool for use in the basic biological sciences but also in the medical/clinical setting.

  7. Quality management of medical education at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Peter Erich

    2008-12-01

    The Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany, was founded in 1993 after the reunification of Germany. In 1999, a reform process of medical education was started together with Harvard Medical International. The traditional teacher and discipline-centred curriculum was replaced by a student-centred, interdisciplinary and integrative curriculum which has been named DIPOL (Dresden Integrative Patient/Problem- Oriented Learning). The reform process was accompanied and supported by a parallel-ongoing Faculty Development Program. In 2004, a Quality Management Program in medical education was implemented, and in 2005 medical education received DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification. Quality Management Program and DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification were/are unique for the 34 medical schools in Germany. The students played a very important strategic role in all processes. They were/are members in all committees like the Faculty Board, the Board of Study Affairs (with equal representation) and the ongoing audits in the Quality Management Program. Students are the only ones who experience all years of the curriculum and are capable of detecting, for example gaps, overlaps, inconsistencies of the curriculum and assessments. Therefore, the in-depth knowledge of students about the medical school's curriculum is a very helpful and essential tool in curriculum reform processes and Quality Management Programs of medical education. The reform in medical education, the establishment of the Quality Management program and the certification resulted in an improvement of quality and output of medical education and medical research.

  8. Evaluation of medication errors with implementation of electronic health record technology in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao TV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available T Vivian Liao,1 Marina Rabinovich,2 Prasad Abraham,2 Sebastian Perez,3 Christiana DiPlotti,4 Jenny E Han,5 Greg S Martin,5 Eric Honig5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Mercer Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Pharmacy and Clinical Nutrition, Grady Health System, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University, 4Pharmacy, Ingles Markets, 5Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU are at an increased risk for medication errors (MEs and adverse drug events from multifactorial causes. ME rate ranges from 1.2 to 947 per 1,000 patient days in the medical ICU (MICU. Studies with the implementation of electronic health records (EHR have concluded that it significantly reduced overall prescribing errors and the number of errors that caused patient harm decreased. However, other types of errors, such as wrong dose and omission of required medications increased after EHR implementation. We sought to compare the number of MEs before and after EHR implementation in the MICU, with additional evaluation of error severity.Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, quality improvement study of all patients admitted to a single MICU service at an academic medical center. Patients were evaluated during four periods over 2 years: August–September 2010 (preimplementation; period I, January–February 2011 (2 months postimplementation; period II, August–September 2012 (21 months postimplementation; period III, and January–February 2013 (25 months postimplementation; period IV. All medication orders and administration records were reviewed by an ICU clinical pharmacist and ME was defined as a deviation from established standards for prescribing, dispensing, administering, or documenting medication. The frequency and classification of MEs were compared between groups by chi square; p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There was a statistically significant increase

  9. Aequilibrium prudentis: on the necessity for ethics and policy studies in the scientific and technological education of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Misti Ault; Giordano, James

    2013-04-23

    The importance of strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education continues to grow as society, medicine, and the economy become increasingly focused and dependent upon bioscientific and technological innovation. New advances in frontier sciences (e.g., genetics, neuroscience, bio-engineering, nanoscience, cyberscience) generate ethical issues and questions regarding the use of novel technologies in medicine and public life. In light of current emphasis upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education (at the pre-collegiate, undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels), the pace and extent of advancements in science and biotechnology, the increasingly technological orientation and capabilities of medicine, and the ways that medicine - as profession and practice - can engage such scientific and technological power upon the multi-cultural world-stage to affect the human predicament, human condition, and perhaps nature of the human being, we argue that it is critical that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education go beyond technical understanding and directly address ethical, legal, social, and public policy implications of new innovations. Toward this end, we propose a paradigm of integrative science, technology, ethics, and policy studies that meets these needs through early and continued educational exposure that expands extant curricula of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs from the high school through collegiate, graduate, medical, and post-graduate medical education. We posit a synthetic approach that elucidates the historical, current, and potential interaction of scientific and biotechnological development in addition to the ethico-legal and social issues that are important to educate and sustain the next generation of medical and biomedical professionals who can appreciate, articulate, and address the realities of scientific and biotechnological progress given the shifting

  10. Early bedside care during preclinical medical education: can technology-enhanced patient simulation advance the Flexnerian ideal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James A; Hayden, Emily M; Ahmed, Rami A; Pawlowski, John B; Khoury, Kimberly N; Oriol, Nancy E

    2010-02-01

    Flexner wanted medical students to study at the patient bedside-a remarkable innovation in his time-so that they could apply science to clinical care under the watchful eye of senior physicians. Ever since his report, medical schools have reserved the latter years of their curricula for such an "advanced" apprenticeship, providing clinical clerkship experiences only after an initial period of instruction in basic medical sciences. Although Flexner codified the segregation of preclinical and clinical instruction, he was committed to ensuring that both domains were integrated into a modern medical education. The aspiration to fully integrate preclinical and clinical instruction continues to drive medical education reform even to this day. In this article, the authors revisit the original justification for sequential preclinical-clinical instruction and argue that modern, technology-enhanced patient simulation platforms are uniquely powerful for fostering simultaneous integration of preclinical-clinical content in a way that Flexner would have applauded. To date, medical educators tend to focus on using technology-enhanced medical simulation in clinical and postgraduate medical education; few have devoted significant attention to using immersive clinical simulation among preclinical students. The authors present an argument for the use of dynamic robot-mannequins in teaching basic medical science, and describe their experience with simulator-based preclinical instruction at Harvard Medical School. They discuss common misconceptions and barriers to the approach, describe their curricular responses to the technique, and articulate a unifying theory of cognitive and emotional learning that broadens the view of what is possible, feasible, and desirable with simulator-based medical education.

  11. Use of medical technologies in rehabilitation medicine settings in Israel: results of the TECHNO-R 2005 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Haim; Keren, Ofer; Zwecker, Manuel; Dynia, Aida

    2007-10-01

    With the development of computer technology and the high-tech electronic industry over the past 30 years, the technological age is flourishing. New technologies are continually being introduced, and questions regarding the economic viability of these technologies need to be addressed. To identify the medical technologies currently in use in different rehabilitation medicine settings in Israel. The TECHNO-R 2005 survey was conducted in two phases. Beginning in 2004, the first survey used a questionnaire with open questions relating to the different technologies in clinical use, including questions on their purpose, who operates the device (technician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, physician, etc.), and a description of the treated patients. This questionnaire was sent to 31 rehabilitation medicine facilities in Israel. Due to difficulties in comprehension of the term "technology," a second revised standardized questionnaire with closed-ended questions specifying diverse technologies was introduced in 2005. The responder had to mark from a list of 15 different medical technologies which were in use in his or her facility, as well as their purpose, who operates the device, and a description of the treated patients. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, the TILT bed, continuous passive movement, and therapeutic ultrasound were the most widely used technologies in rehabilitation medicine facilities. Monitoring of the sitting position in the wheelchair, at the bottom of the list, was found to be the least used technology (with 15.4% occurrence). Most of the technologies are used primarily for treatment purposes and to a lesser degree for diagnosis and research. Our study poses a fundamental semantic and conceptual question regarding what kind of technologies are or should be part of the standard equipment of any accredited rehabilitation medicine facility for assessment, treatment and/or research. For this purpose, additional data are needed.

  12. Fiscal 1999 research report on long-term energy technology strategy. Basic research on industrial technology strategy (Individual technology strategy). Human life, medical care and welfare field (Medical health care technology field); 1999 nendo choki energy gijujtsu senryaku ni kansuru chosa hokokusho. Sangyo gijutsu senryaku sakutei kiban chosa (bun'yabetsu gijutsu senryaku) ningen seikatsu iryo fukushi bun'ya (medidal health care gijutsu bun'ya)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1999 research result on Japanese technology competitiveness, future trend, technology innovation and policy needs in a medical health care field. Future international growth of a medical health care equipment industry is promising because of an expected progress of medical care technology, change in medical care needs and creation of the new global market. The current highlighted technical trend is fusion of medical technology with network, system, biotechnology and micro-machine technologies, and such fusion is expected to contribute to daily use, less/no invasion and improvement of medical treatment. Industry-government cooperative measures for upgrading an international competitiveness are as follows: an approach as national policy by preparing Japanese BECOM, preparation of a system supporting venture businesses for developing medical health care equipment, and systematic establishment of a medical-engineering cooperative system. Preparation of a complementary relation with overseas countries is also desirable. (NEDO)

  13. Advancements in Undergraduate Medical Education: Meeting the Challenges of an Evolving World of Education, Healthcare, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, P G; Corral, Irma; Kyle, Brandon

    2017-06-01

    Restructuring of undergraduate medical education (UGME) has occurred from time to time over the past century. Many influences, including the persuasive report of Abraham Flexner in 1910, acted to reorganize medical education in the early twentieth century [1, 2]. In his report, Flexner called on American medical schools to enact higher graduation standards and to stringently adhere to the protocols of mainstream science in their teaching. Prior to this report, UGME had changed little over the previous century but over the last several decades, reform within medical education has become routine. This increasing rate of change has been challenging for those within the realm of undergraduate medical education and can be frustrating to those outside this sphere. Today, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) are typically the driving forces behind such changes, along with acceleration of advances in medical care and technology. The number of changes in the last decade is significant and warrants review by those interested or involved in education of medical students. This article aims to provide a summary of recent changes within UGME. Within the article, changes in both the pre-clerkship (1st and 2nd years) and clinical years (3rd and 4th) will be discussed. Finally, this review will attempt to clarify new terminology and concepts such as the recently released Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs). The goal of these UGME changes, as with Flexner's reform, is to ensure future physicians are better prepared for patient care.

  14. Does Wearable Medical Technology With Video Recording Capability Add Value to On-Call Surgical Evaluations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sameer; Boehme, Jacqueline; Manser, Kelly; Dewar, Jannine; Miller, Amie; Siddiqui, Gina; Schwaitzberg, Steven D

    2016-10-01

    Background Google Glass has been used in a variety of medical settings with promising results. We explored the use and potential value of an asynchronous, near-real time protocol-which avoids transmission issues associated with real-time applications-for recording, uploading, and viewing of high-definition (HD) visual media in the emergency department (ED) to facilitate remote surgical consults. Study Design First-responder physician assistants captured pertinent aspects of the physical examination and diagnostic imaging using Google Glass' HD video or high-resolution photographs. This visual media were then securely uploaded to the study website. The surgical consultation then proceeded over the phone in the usual fashion and a clinical decision was made. The surgeon then accessed the study website to review the uploaded video. This was followed by a questionnaire regarding how the additional data impacted the consultation. Results The management plan changed in 24% (11) of cases after surgeons viewed the video. Five of these plans involved decision making regarding operative intervention. Although surgeons were generally confident in their initial management plan, confidence scores increased further in 44% (20) of cases. In addition, we surveyed 276 ED patients on their opinions regarding concerning the practice of health care providers wearing and using recording devices in the ED. The survey results revealed that the majority of patients are amenable to the addition of wearable technology with video functionality to their care. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential value of a medically dedicated, hands-free, HD recording device with internet connectivity in facilitating remote surgical consultation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Technology Access and Smartphone App Preferences for Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for sickle cell disease (SCD) with short- and long-term benefits for both morbidity and mortality. However, hydroxyurea underutilization and adherence remain challenges for patients with SCD. The objectives of this study were to determine access to technology among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with SCD and to identify their preferred technology-based strategies for improving medication adherence. A cross-sectional survey was administered in a variety of clinical settings from October 2014 through May 2015 to AYA (12-22 years) with SCD (all genotypes) followed in a Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. Eighty of 107 eligible participants completed the survey for a 75% response rate. Participants (51% female, 94% Black) had a mean age of 15.3 ± 2.8 years. Most participants (75%) were on a daily medication with about half on hydroxyurea. Forgetfulness (67%) was the most common barrier to medication adherence. The majority of participants (85%) owned smartphones and either owned or had access to electronic tablets (83%), laptops (72%), or desktops (70%). Of the proposed smartphone app features, daily medication reminders were ranked first most frequently, followed by education about SCD, adherence text prompts, education about SCD medications, and medication log. The majority of our AYA with SCD owned smartphones and had access to other electronic devices. Our survey results provided valuable insight into the preferred app features and optimal strategies for developing technology-based interventions, such as a multicomponent app, to increase medication adherence for AYA with SCD or other chronic conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cloud Engineering Principles and Technology Enablers for Medical Image Processing-as-a-Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shunxing; Plassard, Andrew J.; Landman, Bennett A.; Gokhale, Aniruddha

    2017-01-01

    Traditional in-house, laboratory-based medical imaging studies use hierarchical data structures (e.g., NFS file stores) or databases (e.g., COINS, XNAT) for storage and retrieval. The resulting performance from these approaches is, however, impeded by standard network switches since they can saturate network bandwidth during transfer from storage to processing nodes for even moderate-sized studies. To that end, a cloud-based “medical image processing-as-a-service” offers promise in utilizing the ecosystem of Apache Hadoop, which is a flexible framework providing distributed, scalable, fault tolerant storage and parallel computational modules, and HBase, which is a NoSQL database built atop Hadoop’s distributed file system. Despite this promise, HBase’s load distribution strategy of region split and merge is detrimental to the hierarchical organization of imaging data (e.g., project, subject, session, scan, slice). This paper makes two contributions to address these concerns by describing key cloud engineering principles and technology enhancements we made to the Apache Hadoop ecosystem for medical imaging applications. First, we propose a row-key design for HBase, which is a necessary step that is driven by the hierarchical organization of imaging data. Second, we propose a novel data allocation policy within HBase to strongly enforce collocation of hierarchically related imaging data. The proposed enhancements accelerate data processing by minimizing network usage and localizing processing to machines where the data already exist. Moreover, our approach is amenable to the traditional scan, subject, and project-level analysis procedures, and is compatible with standard command line/scriptable image processing software. Experimental results for an illustrative sample of imaging data reveals that our new HBase policy results in a three-fold time improvement in conversion of classic DICOM to NiFTI file formats when compared with the default HBase region split

  17. Cloud Engineering Principles and Technology Enablers for Medical Image Processing-as-a-Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shunxing; Plassard, Andrew J; Landman, Bennett A; Gokhale, Aniruddha

    2017-04-01

    Traditional in-house, laboratory-based medical imaging studies use hierarchical data structures (e.g., NFS file stores) or databases (e.g., COINS, XNAT) for storage and retrieval. The resulting performance from these approaches is, however, impeded by standard network switches since they can saturate network bandwidth during transfer from storage to processing nodes for even moderate-sized studies. To that end, a cloud-based "medical image processing-as-a-service" offers promise in utilizing the ecosystem of Apache Hadoop, which is a flexible framework providing distributed, scalable, fault tolerant storage and parallel computational modules, and HBase, which is a NoSQL database built atop Hadoop's distributed file system. Despite this promise, HBase's load distribution strategy of region split and merge is detrimental to the hierarchical organization of imaging data (e.g., project, subject, session, scan, slice). This paper makes two contributions to address these concerns by describing key cloud engineering principles and technology enhancements we made to the Apache Hadoop ecosystem for medical imaging applications. First, we propose a row-key design for HBase, which is a necessary step that is driven by the hierarchical organization of imaging data. Second, we propose a novel data allocation policy within HBase to strongly enforce collocation of hierarchically related imaging data. The proposed enhancements accelerate data processing by minimizing network usage and localizing processing to machines where the data already exist. Moreover, our approach is amenable to the traditional scan, subject, and project-level analysis procedures, and is compatible with standard command line/scriptable image processing software. Experimental results for an illustrative sample of imaging data reveals that our new HBase policy results in a three-fold time improvement in conversion of classic DICOM to NiFTI file formats when compared with the default HBase region split policy

  18. [Application of new technologies in the design, manufacture and use of technology deployment of field medical units and establishments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, S V; Sidorov, V A; Korniushko, I G; Medvedev, V R; Matveev, A G

    2011-11-01

    Presented data is about attendance means of deployment of field medical units and pieces of army-level medical services and disaster medicine Defense Ministry did not ensure compliance with requirements to create optimal conditions for highly effective work of the medical staff, placing the wounded, the use of modern aids and appliances. The prospects of creation of mobile unit for high-availability modular pre-fabricated on the basis of tent structures, pneumoconstructions and removable habitable bodies, containers, tents, pneumocovers till 2020 are analyzed. Livelihood systems provide armor protection against fragments, bullets, flames, damaging factors of chemical and biological weapons.

  19. Probability Elicitation to Inform Early Health Economic Evaluations of New Medical Technologies : A Case Study in Heart Failure Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Qi; Postmus, Douwe; Hillege, Hans L.; Buskens, Erik

    Objectives: Early estimates of the commercial headroom available to a new medical device can assist producers of health technology in making appropriate product investment decisions. The purpose of this study was to illustrate how this quantity can be captured probabilistically by combining

  20. Digital radiography - usability of experience in medical technology with fluorescent storage material for technical X-ray testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattis, A.; Winterberg, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    In nearly 100 years' development of X-ray technique, synergy effects between medical technology and non-destructive material testing (NDT) have repeatedly led to new applications. Thus digital radiography in medicine is a 'low dose' process introduced years ago which, by using a specially developed storage foil technique, offers extensive possibilities of application for NDT. (orig.) [de

  1. Endangered Literacies? Affordances of Paper-Based Literacy in Medical Practice and Its Persistence in the Transition to Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterponi, Laura; Zucchermaglio, Cristina; Alby, Francesca; Fatigante, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Under the rapid advances of digital technology, traditional paper-based forms of reading and writing are steadily giving way to digital-based literacies, in theory as well as in application. Drawing on a study of literacy in a medical workplace context, this article examines critically the shift toward computer-mediated textual practices. While a…

  2. [Research on medical instrument information integration technology based on IHE PCD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianli; Liao, Yun; Yang, Yongyong

    2014-06-01

    Integrating medical instruments with medical information systems becomes more and more important in healthcare industry. To make medical instruments without standard communication interface possess the capability of interoperating and sharing information with medical information systems, we developed a medical instrument integration gateway based on Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise Patient Care Device (IHE PCD) integration profiles in this research. The core component is an integration engine which is implemented according to integration profiles and Health Level Seven (HL7) messages defined in IHE PCD. Working with instrument specific Javascripts, the engine transforms medical instrument data into HL7 ORU message. This research enables medical instruments to interoperate and exchange medical data with information systems in a standardized way, and is valuable for medical instrument integration, especially for traditional instruments.

  3. Research on cultivating medical students' self-learning ability using teaching system integrated with learning analysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Shi-Yong; Ma, Xiu-Qiang; Wang, Ri; Li, Bing; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advancement of information technology and the era of big data education, using learning process data to provide strategic decision-making in cultivating and improving medical students' self-learning ability has become a trend in educational research. Educator Abuwen Toffler said once, the illiterates in the future may not be the people not able to read and write, but not capable to know how to learn. Serving as educational institutions cultivating medical students' learning ability, colleges and universities should not only instruct specific professional knowledge and skills, but also develop medical students' self-learning ability. In this research, we built a teaching system which can help to restore medical students' self-learning processes and analyze their learning outcomes and behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system in supporting medical students' self-learning, an experiment was conducted in 116 medical students from two grades. The results indicated that problems in self-learning process through this system was consistent with problems raised from traditional classroom teaching. Moreover, the experimental group (using this system) acted better than control group (using traditional classroom teaching) to some extent. Thus, this system can not only help medical students to develop their self-learning ability, but also enhances the ability of teachers to target medical students' questions quickly, improving the efficiency of answering questions in class.

  4. A triple helix model of medical innovation: Supply, demand, and technological capabilities in terms of Medical Subject Headings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, A.M.; Rotolo, D.; Leydesdorff, L.

    We develop a model of innovation that enables us to trace the interplay among three key dimensions of the innovation process: (i) demand of and (ii) supply for innovation, and (iii) technological capabilities available to generate innovation in the forms of products, processes, and services.

  5. 2010 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Emergency Medical Technician. (Program CIP: 51.0904 - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Lisa; Bryant, Katrina; Galtelli, Mark; Glasson, Kristi; Hall, David; Hood, Brenda; Mahaffey, Libby; McBryde, John; Read, John; Shirley, Gary; Wright, Al

    2010-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  6. Starting a Medical Technology Venture as a Young Academic Innovator or Student Entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manbachi, Amir; Kreamer-Tonin, Katlin; Walch, Philipp; Gamo, Nao J; Khoshakhlagh, Parastoo; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Montague, Charles; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Logsdon, Elizabeth A; Allen, Robert H; Durr, Nicholas J; Luciano, Mark G; Theodore, Nicholas; Brem, Henry; Yazdi, Youseph

    2018-01-01

    Following the footprints of Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg, there has been a misconception that students are better off quitting their studies to bring to life their ideas, create jobs and monetize their inventions. Having historically transitioned from manpower to mind power, we live in one of the most rapidly changing times in human history. As a result, academic institutions that are supposed to be pioneers and educators of the next generations have started to realize that they need to adapt to a new system, and change their policies to be more flexible towards patent ownership and commercialization. There is an infrastructure being developed towards students starting their own businesses while continuing with their studies. This paper aims to provide an overview of the existing landscape, the exciting rewards as well as risks awaiting a student entrepreneur, the challenges of the present ecosystem, and questions to consider prior to embarking on such a journey. Various entities influencing the start-up environment are considered, specifically for the medical technology sector. These parties include but are not limited to: scientists, clinicians, investors, academic institutions and governments. A special focus will be set on the seemingly unbridgeable gap between founding a company and a scientific career.

  7. HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL DEVICES IN EUROPE: PROCESSES, PRACTICES, AND METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Sabine; Olberg, Britta; Panteli, Dimitra; Busse, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    To review and compare current Health Technology Assessment (HTA) activities for medical devices (MDs) across European HTA institutions. A comprehensive approach was adopted to identify institutions involved in HTA in European countries. We systematically searched institutional Web sites and other online sources by using a structured tool to extract information on the role and link to decision making, structure, scope, process, methodological approach, and available HTA reports for each included institution. Information was obtained from eighty-four institutions, forty-seven of which were analyzed. Fifty-four methodological documents from twenty-three agencies in eighteen countries were identified. Only five agencies had separate documents for the assessment of MDs. A few agencies made separate provisions for the assessment of MDs in their general methods. The amount of publicly available HTA reports on MDs varied by device category and agency remit. Despite growing consensus on their importance and international initiatives, such as the EUnetHTA Core Model®, specific tools for the assessment of MDs are rarely developed and implemented at the national level. Separate additional signposts incorporated in existing general methods guides may be sufficient for the evaluation of MDs.

  8. [Medical equipment companies and their ties with technology development centers in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, B; Arredondo, A; Cruz, C; Sánchez, E; Damián, T

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of the companies that produce, distribute, and service medical equipment in Mexico and the factors related to whether or not they had established ties with research and technology development centers. The data analyzed came from a survey of such companies carried out in Mexico City and environs in 1989. The information was updated in 1991. Multivariate analyses were carried out in order to identify the characteristics of companies that had established ties or wished to do so and the areas of interest of those companies. Of 208 companies surveyed, only 23% had ties with research centers. The companies that had such ties or were interested in establishing them tended to invest in research and to have made plans for expansion. The establishment of ties appeared to be a two-way process, with positive consequences for the companies involved, the research centers, and the health sector. It was concluded that it would be advantageous to design programs to promote ties with companies having the characteristics mentioned.

  9. The reported preparedness and disposition by students in a Nigerian university towards the use of information technology for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, A; Desalu, O O; Ameen, A; Adeboye, A N Muhammed

    2010-01-01

    The computer and information technology (IT) revolution have transformed modern health care systems in the areas of communication, storage, retrieval of medical information and teaching, but little is known about IT skill and use in most developing nations. The aim of this study has been to evaluate the reported preparedness and disposition by medical students in a Nigerian university toward the use of IT for medical education. A self-administered structured questionnaire containing 24 items was used to obtain information from medical students in the University of Ilorin, Nigeria on their level of computer usage, knowledge of computer software and hardware, availability and access to computer, possession of personal computer and e-mail address, preferred method of medical education and the use of computer as a supplement to medical education. Out of 479 medical students, 179 (37.4%) had basic computer skills, 209 (43.6%) had intermediate skills and 58(12.1%) had advanced computer skills. Three hundred and thirty (68.9%) have access to computer and 451(94.2%) have e-mail addresses. For medical teaching, majority (83.09%), preferred live lecture, 56.78% lecture videos, 35.1% lecture handout on web site and 410 (85.6%) wants computer as a supplement to live lectures. Less than half (39.5%) wants laptop acquisition to be mandatory. Students with advanced computer skills were well prepared and disposed to IT than those with basic computer skill. The findings revealed that the medical students with advanced computer skills were well prepared and disposed to IT based medical education. Therefore, high level of computer skill is required for them to be prepared and favorably disposed to IT based medical education.

  10. [Ethical reflection on multidisciplinarity and confidentiality of information in medical imaging through new information and communication technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béranger, J; Le Coz, P

    2012-05-01

    Technological advances in medical imaging has resulted in the exponential increase of the number of images per examination, caused the irreversible decline of the silver film and imposed digital imaging. This digitization is a concept whose levels of development are multiple, reflecting the complexity of this process of technological change. Under these conditions, the use of medical information via new information and communication technologies is at the crossroads of several scientific approaches and several disciplines (medicine, ethics, law, economics, psychology, etc.) surrounding the information systems in health, doctor-patient relationship and concepts that are associated. Each day, these new information and communication technologies open up new horizons and the space of possibilities, spectacularly developing access to information and knowledge. In this perspective of digital technology emergence impacting the multidisciplinary use of health information systems, the ethical questions are numerous, especially on the preservation of privacy, confidentiality and security of medical data, and their accessibility and integrity. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiation chemical technology for production of polymeric hydrogels for medical purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, G.A.; Nurkeeva, Z.S.; Akhmetkalieva, G.; Sergaziev, A.D.; Petukhov, V.K.; Lyssukhin, S.N.; Chakrov, P.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Polymeric hydrogels are water-swelling cross-linked hydrophilic polymers with ability to store reversibly great amount of water (more than 1000 g of water per 1 g of dry polymer). At present they found a lot of different applications in highly developed countries in science and industry. The set of unique physicochemical and biomedical properties (regulated sorption ability in respect to water and biological liquids, biocompatibility, soft tissue state, permeability in respect to small and big molecules, non-toxicity, etc.) allows their application in medicine. According to the clinical data there are no materials that can compete with hydrogels in development of endo-prostheses of soft-tissues in surgery, contact lenses for eyesight correction, hemo-compatible materials, novel for treatment of wounds and burns, targeted drug delivery systems. Polymeric hydrogels today practically substitute the traditional hydrophobic bases (Vaseline, lanolin) in technology of drug forms for development of ointments and dressings, containing natural and synthetic physiologically active substances. The advantages of hydrogels in comparison with hydrophobic analogues are obvious due to the drainage effect, homogenous distribution of drugs, better contact with wound, painless removing by water washing. The polymeric hydrogels are not produced in Kazakhstan in spite of the big source of raw materials. The aim of the present work is the development of radiation-chemical technology and development of polymeric biomedical hydrogels production based on raw materials of Kazakhstan. The novel types of polymeric hydrogel materials are developed by the authors of the report based on vinyl ethers of glycols, which produced in 'Alash Ltd.' (Temirtau). The great fundamental information content has been obtained about these monomers and polymers including direct quantitative data of their structure formation mechanism and physicochemical properties. These data served as a basis for

  12. Use of raiting assessment of students at studying of technology of medications under the credit – module system of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Litvinenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of credit-module system into educational process is a main requirement of Bolognese process. First and foremost rating estimation of student’s knowledge is a modern technology in educational field which helps teacher to estimate of student’s knowledge objectively. Aim of article. To analyze tactic of carrying out training for foreign students in technology of medications. Materials and methods. Investigation was carrying out on the basis of new working program of technology of medications with introduction of credit-module system into educational process. As material was used experience in working with foreign students, textbooks and methodical decisions of department, faculty and university. Results and their discussion. Usage of this system in educational process for foreign students will help teacher to take into account special features of each student and give a chance to teach how to enrich their knowledge of technology of medications on one's own. Conclusion. Teacher’s collaboration with each student is a guarantee of quality usage of credit-module system in higher institutes of education.

  13. Use of societal criteria in evaluation of medical technology assessment research proposals in the Netherlands: Development and testing of a checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortwijn, W.J.; Ament, A.J.H.A.; Vondeling, H.

    1996-01-01

    Rising health care costs, and the recognition that medical technology is a significant contributor to these costs, have provided the stimulus to develop medical technology assessment programmes in the Netherlands. The most important programme in this field is the Investigational Medicine Programme

  14. Lifelong Learning for Clinical Practice: How to Leverage Technology for Telebehavioral Health Care and Digital Continuing Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M; Turvey, Carolyn; Hwang, Tiffany

    2018-03-12

    Psychiatric practice continues to evolve and play an important role in patients' lives, the field of medicine, and health care delivery. Clinicians must learn a variety of clinical care systems and lifelong learning (LLL) is crucial to apply knowledge, develop skills, and adjust attitudes. Technology is rapidly becoming a key player-in delivery, lifelong learning, and education/training. The evidence base for telepsychiatry/telemental health via videoconferencing has been growing for three decades, but a greater array of technologies have emerged in the last decade (e.g., social media/networking, text, apps). Clinicians are combining telepsychiatry and these technologies frequently and they need to reflect on, learn more about, and develop skills for these technologies. The digital age has solidified the role of technology in continuing medical education and day-to-day practice. Other fields of medicine are also adapting to the digital age, as are graduate and undergraduate medical education and many allied mental health organizations. In the future, there will be more online training, simulation, and/or interactive electronic examinations, perhaps on a monthly cycle rather than a quasi-annual or 10-year cycle of recertification.

  15. APPEALING OF ADULT POPULATION TO TERRITORIAL DENTAL POLYCLINIC AND DEMAND FOR MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолий Иванович Бабенко

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion. The presented information and analytical technology of the use of the personalized database of territorial dental polyclinic has allowed revealing not only the nature of appealing of adult population for the dental care, but also defining the demand for dental technologies of the general, therapeutic and surgical profiles, establishing the significance of separate types of technologies in quantitative expression.

  16. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Health Information Technology. (Program CIP-51.0707-Medical Records Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Casey; Jones, Robin; McGuffee, Michelle; Scott, Nena

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  17. Adoption of information technology in primary care physician offices in New Zealand and Denmark, part 3: medical record environment comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Protti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the third in a series of five papers about the use of computing technology in general practitioner (GP practices in Denmark and New Zealand. This paper looks at the environments within which electronic medical records (EMRs operate, including their functionality and the extent to which electronic communications are used to send and receive clinical information. It also introduces the notion of a longitudinal electronic health record (versus an EMR.

  18. ‘Livings Labs’ for New Health Concepts and Medical Technology in Cluster Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guldemond, N.A.; Van Geenhuizen, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    The development of medical clusters is high on the agenda of many policymakers in the European Union. Constructing medical clusters may draw on the presence of living labs of different kinds in the regions involved. Living labs are practical environments for innovation aiming at a better mix and

  19. Supporting medication intake of the elderly with robot technology : Poster and demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Fokeltje; Sweers, Nikie; Shantia, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Medication intake can prove a complicated task for the elderly. Since roughly 50% of all prescribed medication is taken incorrectly (MacLaughlin, et al., 2005), simplification of this task might have beneficial effects on this group’s general health and society’s healthcare costs. In response,

  20. Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: A focus on medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Puc, Cyril; Szwarcensztein, Karine; Beuscart, Régis; Coulonjou, Hélène; Degrassat-Théas, Albane; Dutot, Camille; Epis de Fleurian, Anne-Aurélie; Favrel-Feuillade, Florence; Hounliasso, Iliona; Lechat, Philippe; Luigi, Emmanuel; Mairot, Laurent; Nguyen, Thao; Piazza, Laurent; Roussel, Christophe; Vienney, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) guides decisions as to whether new healthcare products should be made available within hospital structures. Its extension to medical devices (MDs) makes it possible to analyse several relevant aspects of these healthcare products in addition to their clinical value, and such evaluations are of interest to national health authorities, other healthcare establishments and industry. The aim of this work was to formulate several recommendations for a blueprint for hospital-based HTA for MDs in France. Five themes based on the work of the European Adopting hospital-based HTA in the EU (AdHopHTA) project were defined. Each member of the roundtable was then allocated a documentation task based on their experience of the theme concerned, and a literature review was carried out. An inventory of hospital-based HTA was performed and six recommendations aiming to strengthen and improve this approach were put forward: (1) encouragement of the spread of the hospital-based HTA culture and participation in communications and the promotion of this approach to hospital decision-makers; (2) adaptation of hospital-based HTA to the needs of decision-makers, taking into account the financial timetable and strategic objectives of the healthcare establishment; (3) harmonisation of the dossiers requested from industry between healthcare establishments, based on a common core; (4) promotion of the sharing of hospital-based HTA data under certain conditions, with data dissociable from the HTA report and the use of a validated methodology for the literature review; (5) creation of a composite indicator reflecting data production effort and the sharing of HTA activities, to be taken into account in the distribution of funds allocated for teaching, research and innovation missions considered of general interest; (6) the transmission of information directly from local to national level by pioneering centres. This work highlights the major issues

  1. Knowledge Attitude and Behavior of Medical Technology Vocational Training School Students About Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Taner Gursoy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine The Medical Technology Vocational Training School (MTVTS students’ the knowledge about the effects of GMO on human health and environment and to evaluate their attitude and behavior has been aimed. METHODS: All of the second class students of the year 2006-2007 of MTVTS were included (N=161 in the study, response rate was 92%. The survey questionare included questions on knowledge, the risk perception and attitute about GMOs. The legal framework in Turkey about GMOs, the rationale for GMO production, the labeling for GMO and the students’ perception of their knowledge was evaluated through 14 items with Likert scale. After the questionaire, the students received an informative brochure on GMOs. RESULTS: The open-ended question asking to define GMOs was answered by 59,2% of the students among which 35,6% defined as “additive”, 34,5% as “food with hormones”. The risk perceived for GMOs was the forth following cigarette smoking, stres, and environmental pollution in the ranking according to the risk score means. Sex has been the only determinant effecting this scoring for GMOs where girls perceived the risk greater. If family was one of the information sources about GMOs, the perceived risk was increased (p=0,000. Among the students 81,6% thought that GMO should not be grown in Turkey, 77,7% think that GMO was sold however. The leading topic of ambivalence is the state of self knowledge on GMO. The low income group are less concerned about consuming GMO for themselves or for their children (respectively p==0.003 ve p=0,012. CONCLUSION: Health workers are assigned with an important role to inform the public for healthy eating. However although the the risk perception of the study group for GMOs is high, their knowledge is low. Training activities to supply this deficiency should be implemented. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(6.000: 503-508

  2. radiochemical study on the medically and technology radionuclides of some lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglan, H.A.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, trials for the production of the medically and technologically interesting 139 Ce and 142 Pr radionuclides through cyclotron irradiations using protons and alpha particles were studied. The radiochemical separation of no-carrier-added cerium from proton irradiated lanthanum was studied by solvent extraction using DEE, TBP and TPPO, the latter reagent being employed for the first time for separation of radio cerium from bulk of lanthanum. Distribution coefficients of cerium and lanthanum were investigated as a function of equilibrium time and HNO 3 concentration. A mixture of 0.05 M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 and 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 was used as an oxidizing agent to improve the separation efficiency of cerium. A comparative study of the three extractants released that DEE is the best for separation of cerium from bulk of lanthanum oxide. The target was prepared by pressing. The production of 139 Ce of high radionuclidic and chemical purity via irradiation of lanthanum oxide target at MGC-20 cyclotron with protons of energy 14.5 is described. The experimental yield was found to be 153 kBq/μAh .The adsorption behaviour of La/Ce system on Dowex 50W-X8 in different media, namely, nitric acid, acetate buffer and citrate buffer was studied as a function of the concentration of nitric acid and buffer ph. In addition, in cation-exchange column chromatography experiments, three different eluants, namely, citrate buffer of ph 5.5, 0.1 M EDTA and 0.2 M α-HIBA, were employed for separation of Ce (III) from La (III). The optimum conditions for improvement of radiochemical separation of no-carrier-added 139 Ce from proton irradiated lanthanum were applied using the most suitable chelating agent 0.2 M α-HIBA. The purification of 139 Ce from macro amount of La (III) was done using two columns in a sequence. The experimental yield was found to be 200 kBq/μAh.

  3. Contexts and Opportunities of e-Health Technology in Medical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Sojib Bin; Hossain, Naznin; Ahammed, Shad; Ahmed, Zubair

    2017-01-01

    Keeping up with a sound health is a fundamental right for the human beings. It also acts as an indicator of the socio-economic development of a country. However, nowadays keeping sound health is challenging because of rapidly increasing non-communicable diseases. Concurrently, we are on the edge of very fast technological advancement which includes usage of cellular technology, high-speed internet and wireless communications. These technologies and their unique applications are creating lots ...

  4. The agency of patients and carers in medical care and self-care technologies for interacting with doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Francisco; Andersen, Tariq; Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

    2017-06-01

    People living with Parkinson's disease engage in self-care for most of the time but, two or three times a year, they meet with doctors to re-evaluate the condition and adjust treatment. Patients and (informal) carers participate actively in these encounters, but their engagement might change as new patient-centred technologies are integrated into healthcare infrastructures. Drawing on a qualitative study that used observations and interviews to investigate consultations, and digital ethnography to understand interactions in an online community, we describe how patients and carers living with Parkinson's participate in the diagnosis and treatment decisions, engage in discussions to learn about certain topics, and address inappropriate medication. We contrast their engagement with a review of self-care technologies that support interactions with doctors, to investigate how these artefacts may influence the agency of patients and carers. Finally, we discuss design ideas for improving the participation of patients and carers in technology-mediated scenarios.

  5. Implementing a Swedish regionalized medical program supported by digital technologies: possibilities and challenges from a management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Fanny L M

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, Umeå University in Sweden was facing its first attempt to transform the existing medical program into a regionalized medical program (RMP), supported by the use of digital technologies. The Swedish RMP means that students are distributed in geographically separated groups while doing their five clinical clerkship semesters. To provide medical students with ways of undertaking their theoretical studies when geographically distributed, digital technologies are used for educational and administrative purposes. In this article, the Swedish RMP will be described and related to previous international research on educating medical students in rural settings. The aim of this article was, from a management perspective, to understand if and how contradictions arise during the implementation process of the Swedish RMP, supported by digital technologies. Based on this analysis, a further aim was to discuss, from a management perspective, the possibilities and challenges for improvement of this medical educational practice, as well as to provide implications for other similar changes in medical programs internationally. To identify possible contradictions during the implementation process, ethnographically inspired observations were made during management work meetings, before and during the first regionalized semester. In addition, in-depth follow-up interviews were held in May and June 2011 with six management executives of the Swedish RMP, concerning their expectations and experiences of the implementation process. The qualitative and activity theory (AT)-inspired analysis resulted in the emergence of two main themes and seven sub-themes. The analysis suggests that a number of contradictions arose during the implementation process of the Swedish RMP. For instance, a contradiction constituted as a conflict between the university management and some teachers concerning how digital technologies and technology enhanced learning (TEL) could and should be used when

  6. Implementation of smart technology to improve medication adherence in patients with cardiovascular disease: is it effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskes, Roderick W; Van der Velde, Enno T; Schoones, Jan W; Schalij, Martin J

    2018-02-01

    Medication adherence is of key importance in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Studies consistently show that a substantial proportion of patients is non-adherent. Areas covered: For this review, telemedicine solutions that can potentially improve medication adherence in patients with cardiovascular disease were reviewed. A total of 475 PubMed papers were reviewed, of which 74 were assessed. Expert commentary: Papers showed that evidence regarding telemedicine solutions is mostly conflictive. Simple SMS reminders might work for patients who do not take their medication because of forgetfulness. Educational interventions and coaching interventions, primarily delivered by telephone or via a web-based platform can be effective tools to enhance medication adherence. Finally, it should be noted that current developments in software engineering may dramatically change the way non-adherence is addressed in the nearby future.

  7. [Diagnosis and the technology for optimizing the medical support of a troop unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshever, N G; Polkovov, S V; Lavrinenko, O V; Krupnov, P A; Anastasov, K N

    2000-05-01

    The work is devoted to investigation of the system of military unit medical support with the use of principles and states of organizational diagnosis; development of the method allowing to assess its functional activity; and determination of optimization trends. Basing on the conducted organizational diagnosis and expert inquiry the informative criteria were determined which characterize the stages of functioning of the military unit medical support system. To evaluate the success of military unit medical support the complex multi-criteria pattern was developed and algorithm of this process optimization was substantiated. Using the results obtained, particularly realization of principles and states of decision taking theory in machine program it is possible to solve more complex problem of comparison between any number of military units: to dispose them according to priority decrease; to select the programmed number of the best and worst; to determine the trends of activity optimization in corresponding medical service personnel.

  8. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    American Telemedicine Association), we demonstrated how continuous monitoring of the patient’s SpO2 and respiratory rate could detect the onset of...designed to monitor sepsis infection sounded its alarm continually, day and night. The device was built with an innovative algorithm to detect sepsis, but...transport Figure 3. This medical device has misread its sensors and inserted false data into patient’s permanent medical record. SPECIal FEaTuRE October

  9. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    death,” The Boston Globe, April 3 2010. 27. Arney D, Pajic M, Goldman JM, Lee I, Mangharam R, Sokolsky O, “Toward Patient Safety in Closed - Loop Medical ...becoming increasingly clear. We have been providing medical device interoperability domain expertise to assist the Veterans Administration in a...15. Wallroth C, Goldman J, Manigel J, Osborn D, Roellike T, Weininger S, Westenskow D, “Development of a Standard for Physiologic Closed Loop

  10. Tablet technology in medical education in South Africa: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarus, L; Sookrajh, R; Satyapal, K S

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to establish the use of mobile devices by learners at a selected medical school. Distribution of mobile devices was an inaugural initiative implemented by our college. Design A mixed methodology design using a questionnaire comprising both open-ended and close-ended questions was analysed from 179 (60 male; 119 female) second year medical students registered for the Anatomy course. Open-ended questions were analysed using a thematic approach by identify...

  11. RESEARCH OF RUSSIAN HIGH TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MARKET: THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Станислав Сергеевич Отставнов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data obtained from comprehensive study of russian hi-tech medical equipment market. The size and the structure of Russian medical equipment market in 2005-2011 were investigated and market size forecast for 2012-2015 was given. Priority segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market were identified (products with a high degree of visualization, anesthetic and ventilation equipment, patient monitors  based on the analysis of literature sources and morbidity structure. Key players in key segments of the market were identified and their financial performance such as number of employees, revenue, net profit, researches and development expenses were compared (according to actual annual reports.Research allowed to draw the following conclusion: today in the key segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market the leadership of foreign companies  (Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba, General Electric, Dräger is indisputable, objective preconditions for the fundamental change of the situation are absent. Import substitution requires the consolidation of domestic producers, adequate funding and human resource.The results can be used in practice by medical industry companies and State authorities on purpose to upgrade the medical industry.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-31

  12. The state of the art of medical imaging technology: from creation to archive and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations.

  13. Influencing Factors for Adopting Technology Enhanced Learning in the Medical Schools of Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shazia; Ahmad, Shahzad; Willis, Ian

    2017-01-01

    As the successful establishment of technology supported educational systems requires wide investment in terms of finances and faculty time, this study explores the influencing factors in the adoption of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) and the main barriers encountered during the use of TEL in Punjab, Pakistan. Semi-structured interviews were…

  14. Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  15. Monograph on safety in high power and high energy advanced technologies and medical applications of lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is intended for creating awareness amongst the safety and health professionals of nuclear and radiation facilities on hazards involved in high power and high energy advanced technologies as well as on how development of advanced technologies can benefit the common people

  16. Complexities in building innovation systems : the case of radical medical technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukk, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to facilitate a further understanding of how firms behind innovative technologies deal with different complexities in system-building strategies and the co-dependencies among different technologies, actors and system-building activities, while contributing to the

  17. Readiness of hospitals affiliated with Shiraz university of medical sciences for implementation of radio frequency identification technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ebrahimi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Applying information technology in healthcare system is one of the most important criteria of the World Health Organization for evaluating the quality of healthcare systems of different countries. Moreover, applying this technology in different parts of health care system can create great potentials for improving the quality of healthcare services. In this regard, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology is one of the most practical technologies in identifying and collecting data. The present study aimed to compare the readiness of Shiraz University of medical sciences hospitals for implementation of RFID system in 2014. Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2014. The research population consisted of 110 senior and middle managers. Due to the limited research population, census method was used. The research tool was a questionnaire prepared by the researcher to investigate the hospitals’ readiness for implementation of RFID technology. Face and content validity of the questionnaire were approved by the experts. Cronbach’s alpha test was run to determine the reliability of the questionnaire (data were considered significant at p <0.05. Also, the data were analyzed in SPSS software using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, and percentage and inferential statistics (one-way ANOVA. Results: The study showed that the readiness level of the hospitals was moderate. Comparing the mean of the total readiness level in the hospitals under the study revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between hospital M and other hospitals (P=0.003. However, the total readiness of hospital I was higher than others. Conclusion: Among 13 hospitals under the study, the hospitals I and A were moderately ready and others were not ready for implementation of RFID technology. Thus, considering various applications and advantages of RFID technology, it is suggested that the hospitals should prepare

  18. Medical technology companies broaden role to support the financial success of clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Soren

    2003-01-01

    Market challenges continue to mount for hospitals and clinics, causing an unparalleled focus on profitability and return on investment for services. To support these challenges, technology suppliers that were once content to deliver and install equipment have become partners with the institutions they serve. Savvy technology companies are offering an extensive array of services that assist facilities in the planning, cost justification, implementation and ongoing support of their technology. The result is a marriage of progress and profit, resulting in solutions that enhance both the quality of care and the bottom line.

  19. The appropriate use of technology (particularly in medical problems of the elderly).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, F I

    1990-09-01

    Technology, particularly "high" technology, with little solid data, is often blamed for much of our increasing cost of health care. Politics and emotions are poor substitutes for accurate information needed for rational solutions. By targeting the desired outcome and studying the process needed to reach the outcome, we can make better decisions. The methods of designing, conducting and funding the studies needed to answer the difficult questions posed by the use of high technology in the elderly are available. Do we have the wisdom to use them?

  20. The role of hospital payments in the adoption of new medical technologies: an international survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Corinna; Drummond, Michael; Torbica, Aleksandra; Callea, Giuditta; Mateus, Ceu

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the role of prospective payment systems in the adoption of new medical technologies across different countries. A literature review was conducted to provide background for the study and guide development of a survey instrument. The survey was disseminated to hospital payment systems experts in 15 jurisdictions. Fifty-one surveys were disseminated, with 34 returned. The surveys returned covered 14 of the 15 jurisdictions invited to participate. The majority (71%) of countries update the patient classification system and/or payment tariffs on an annual basis to try to account for new technologies. Use of short-term separate or supplementary payments for new technologies occurs in 79% of countries to ensure adequate funding and facilitate adoption. A minority (43%) of countries use evidence of therapeutic benefit and/or costs to determine or update payment tariffs, although it is somewhat more common in establishing short-term payments. The main barrier to using evidence is uncertain or unavailable clinical evidence. Almost three-fourths of respondents believed diagnosis-related group systems incentivize or deter technology adoption, depending on the particular circumstances. Improvements are needed, such as enhanced strategies for evidence generation and linking evidence of value to payments, national and international collaboration and training to improve existing practice, and flexible timelines for short-term payments. Importantly, additional research is needed to understand how different payment policies impact technology uptake as well as quality of care and costs.

  1. Methods for studying medical device technology and practitioner cognition: the case of user-interface issues with infusion pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraagen, Jan Maarten; Verhoeven, Fenne

    2013-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate how a variety of research methods is commonly employed to study technology and practitioner cognition. User-interface issues with infusion pumps were selected as a case because of its relevance to patient safety. Starting from a Cognitive Systems Engineering perspective, we developed an Impact Flow Diagram showing the relationship of computer technology, cognition, practitioner behavior, and system failure in the area of medical infusion devices. We subsequently conducted a systematic literature review on user-interface issues with infusion pumps, categorized the studies in terms of methods employed, and noted the usability problems found with particular methods. Next, we assigned usability problems and related methods to the levels in the Impact Flow Diagram. Most study methods used to find user interface issues with infusion pumps focused on observable behavior rather than on how artifacts shape cognition and collaboration. A concerted and theory-driven application of these methods when testing infusion pumps is lacking in the literature. Detailed analysis of one case study provided an illustration of how to apply the Impact Flow Diagram, as well as how the scope of analysis may be broadened to include organizational and regulatory factors. Research methods to uncover use problems with technology may be used in many ways, with many different foci. We advocate the adoption of an Impact Flow Diagram perspective rather than merely focusing on usability issues in isolation. Truly advancing patient safety requires the systematic adoption of a systems perspective viewing people and technology as an ensemble, also in the design of medical device technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Translating silicon nanowire BioFET sensor-technology to embedded point-of-care medical diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Zulfiqar, Azeem; Patou, François

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowire and nanoribbon biosensors have shown great promise in the detection of biomarkers at very low concentrations. Their high sensitivity makes them ideal candidates for use in early-stage medical diagnostics and further disease monitoring where low amounts of biomarkers need to be de......Silicon nanowire and nanoribbon biosensors have shown great promise in the detection of biomarkers at very low concentrations. Their high sensitivity makes them ideal candidates for use in early-stage medical diagnostics and further disease monitoring where low amounts of biomarkers need...... to be detected. However, in order to translate this technology from the bench to the bedside, a number of key issues need to be taken into consideration: Integrating nanobiosensors-based technology requires to overcome the difficult tradeoff between imperatives for high device reproducibilty and associated...... rising fabrication costs. Also the translation of nano-scale sensor technology into daily-use point-of-care devices requires acknowledgement of the end-user requirements, making device portability and human-interfacing a focus point in device development. Sample handling or purification for instance...

  3. SU-F-E-14: Global Radiation Oncology Education and Training in Medical Physics Powered by Information and Communication Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngwa, W; Sajo, E; Ngoma, T; Dachi, J; Julius Mwaiselage, J; Kenton, O; Avery, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have highlighted the potential of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to catalyze collaborations in cancer care, research and education in global radiation oncology. This work reports on the use of ICTs for global Medical Physics education and training across three countries: USA, Tanzania and Kuwait Methods: An online education platform was established by Radiation Oncology Faculty from Harvard Medical School, and the University of Pennsylvania with integrated Medical Physics Course modules accessible to trainees in Tanzania via partnership with the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, and the Ocean Road Cancer Institute. The course modules incorporated lectures covering Radiation Therapy Physics with videos, discussion board, assessments and grade center. Faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of Massachusetts Lowell also employed weekly Skype meetings to train/mentor three graduate students, living out-of-state and in Kuwait for up to 9 research credits per semester for over two semesters towards obtaining their graduate degrees Results: Students were able to successfully access the Medical Physics course modules and participate in learning activities, online discussion boards, and assessments. Other instructors could also access/co-teach the course modules from USA and Tanzania. Meanwhile all three graduate students with remote training via Skype and email made major progress in their graduate training with each one of them submitting their research results as abstracts to be presented at the 2016 AAPM conference. One student has also published her work already and all three are developing these abstracts for publication in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusion: Altogether, this work highlights concrete examples/model on how ICTs can be used for capacity building in Medical Physics across continents, for both education and research training needed for Masters/PhD degrees. The developed modules

  4. SU-F-E-14: Global Radiation Oncology Education and Training in Medical Physics Powered by Information and Communication Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngwa, W [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Sajo, E [University Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Ngoma, T [Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, TA (Tanzania, United Republic of); Dachi, J; Julius Mwaiselage, J [Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Kenton, O [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Avery, S [University of Pennsylvania, Sicklerville, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent publications have highlighted the potential of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to catalyze collaborations in cancer care, research and education in global radiation oncology. This work reports on the use of ICTs for global Medical Physics education and training across three countries: USA, Tanzania and Kuwait Methods: An online education platform was established by Radiation Oncology Faculty from Harvard Medical School, and the University of Pennsylvania with integrated Medical Physics Course modules accessible to trainees in Tanzania via partnership with the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, and the Ocean Road Cancer Institute. The course modules incorporated lectures covering Radiation Therapy Physics with videos, discussion board, assessments and grade center. Faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of Massachusetts Lowell also employed weekly Skype meetings to train/mentor three graduate students, living out-of-state and in Kuwait for up to 9 research credits per semester for over two semesters towards obtaining their graduate degrees Results: Students were able to successfully access the Medical Physics course modules and participate in learning activities, online discussion boards, and assessments. Other instructors could also access/co-teach the course modules from USA and Tanzania. Meanwhile all three graduate students with remote training via Skype and email made major progress in their graduate training with each one of them submitting their research results as abstracts to be presented at the 2016 AAPM conference. One student has also published her work already and all three are developing these abstracts for publication in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusion: Altogether, this work highlights concrete examples/model on how ICTs can be used for capacity building in Medical Physics across continents, for both education and research training needed for Masters/PhD degrees. The developed modules

  5. Governing Nanomedicine: Lessons from within, and for the EU medical technology regulatory framework.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorbeck-Jung, Barbel R.; Bowman, Diana M.; van Calster, Geert

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly emerging technologies, such as nanotechnologies, are posing significant challenges to regulatory governance due to the uncertainties of development trajectories, product properties, and potential risk problems (Davies 2009). While nanotechnology-based products and processes fall within the

  6. Optical coherence tomography: technology and applications (biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is emerging as a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue. This book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from biomedical and clinical perspectives. The chapters are written by leading research groups, in a style comprehensible to a broad audience.

  7. Absorption and metabolization of sex hormones and their transformation into contraceptive technologies: the paths taken by medical thought in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Claudia; Teixeira, Luiz Antonio; Nakano, Andreza Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    The article analyses knowledge assimilation and the development of clinical and research practices relating to sex hormones among Brazilian gynaecologists. It discusses the paths taken by medical thought from the reception of the hormones to their transformation into contraceptives. Our objective is to comprehend styles of introducing and disseminating medical technologies in the area of reproductive health in Brazil. It uses methods of historical analysis and takes as its source the Anais Brasileiros de Ginecologia, a journal published between 1936 and 1970. From the outset, the accompaniment of scientific breakthroughs in relation to sex hormones and their use to treat diverse female illnesses played a key role in the rapid medical acceptance of hormonal contraception. Scientific and technical questions (side effects, dosages) and the demographic issue formed part of the majority of the debates. Objections from the Catholic Church were considered but did not set the agenda of medical thought on contraceptives. The quest to consolidate gynaecology as a scientific, modern and cosmopolitan area of expertise, along with sanitary and demographic motives that allowed contraceptives to be classed as ethical drugs, are identified as processes underlying the assimilation and metabolization of sex hormones as hormonal contraceptives.

  8. Predicting medical staff intention to use an online reporting system with modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Chiu; Hsu, Hui-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to report incident events using an online information system (IS) may be different from those of a paper-based reporting system. The nationwide online Patient-Safety Reporting System (PSRS) contains a value judgment behind use of the system, similar to the Value of Perceived Consequence (VPC), which is seldom discussed in ISs applications of other disciplines. This study developed a more adequate research framework by integrating the VPC construct into the well-known Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model as a theoretical base to explore the predictors of medical staff's intention to use online PSRS. The results showed that management support was an important factor to influence medical staff's intention of using PSRS. The effects of factors such as performance expectancy, perceived positive, and perceived negative consequence on medical staff's intention of using PSRS were moderated by gender, age, experience, and occupation. The results proved that the modified UTAUT model is significant and useful in predicting medical staff's intention of using the nationwide online PSRS.

  9. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. As technology and generations in medical education change, what remains is the intersection between educator, learners, assessment and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Amin

    2013-06-01

    The information era has begun to create major shifts in educational systems, including those in undergraduate medical and graduate psychiatric training programmes. Despite these changes, teaching and learning in formal educational settings remains predominately the product of the intersection between educator, learners, assessment and context. This article reviews intrinsic and external forces influencing each of these elements, such as intergenerational differences in teaching and learning styles, education technologies as they relate to delivery and maintenance of curricula, competency frameworks of assessment, and individual learning and teaching development plans. Maintaining a focus on the relationship between these factors and re-conceptualizing psychiatric education and formal medical education systems in general as a mutual two-way learning exchange between participants will promote careers of lifelong learning.

  11. The Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance conference on research endpoints appropriate for Medicare coverage of new PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Bruce J; Frank, Richard A; Abraham, Brian C

    2013-09-01

    The outcomes of a 2011 Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance (MITA) conference helped shape considerations about what might be the most appropriate pathways for the regulatory and payment considerations of new PET radiopharmaceuticals. As follow-up to that conference, MITA convened a second conference of stakeholders to advise payers on what might be acceptable endpoints for clinical trials to support the coverage of novel PET agents. The conference involved experts on imaging and clinical research, providers of PET services, as well as representatives of interested medical societies, the PET industry, and the regulatory and payer communities. The principal outcome of their deliberations was that it was unrealistic to expect trials of new PET radiopharmaceuticals to directly demonstrate a health benefit. Rather, intermediate outcomes, such as a positive change in patient management, would be more efficient and appropriate.

  12. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    conferencing techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. The experimental design and results concerning information behavior are presented in the article "Exploring the Potential of Video...

  13. Electrical aspects of argon micro-cell plasma with applications in bio-medical technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horiuchi, Y.; Dijk, van J.; Makabe, T.

    2003-01-01

    Argon micro-cell plasma (MCP) is believed to be a viable tool for performing micro-surgery. The non-thermal nature of the discharge allows an effective treatment of pathological tissue without causing thermal damage to its surroundings. This bio-medical application imposes a number of design

  14. Automating payroll, billing, and medical records. Using technology to do more with less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, E

    1995-08-01

    As home care agencies grow, so does the need to streamline the paperwork involved in running an agency. One agency found a way to reduce its payroll, billing, and medical records paperwork by implementing an automated, image-based data collection system that saves time, money, and paper.

  15. The Promise of E-Platform Technology in Medical Education | Dawd ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing the number as well as improving the capacity and quality of medical professionals to achieve an equitable health care for all is a global priority and a global challenge. In developing countries, which are facing the largest burden of disease, to achieve the above stated objective, there is a big need for more ...

  16. Antimicrobial treatment of polymeric medical devices by silver nanomaterials and related technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívková, A.; Hubáček, Tomáš; Staszek, M.; Švorčík, V.; Siegel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 419. E-ISSN 1422-0067 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : antimicrobials * medical devices * nanostructures * polymers * modification Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  17. Enhancing Third-Year Medical Clerkships: Using Mobile Technology for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janette R.; Nuss, Michelle A.; Cervero, Ronald M.; Gaines, Julie K.; Middendorf, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The third year clerkship is one of the most exciting and challenging times for medical students (Cooke, Irby, & O'Brien, 2010) when students spend significant time in clinical settings (e.g., hospitals) assisting in the care of patients on a daily basis. Getting information and resources just-in-time and at point-of-care (Author, 2009) is one…

  18. WE-E-213AB-01: Medical Physics Challenges for Implementation of New Technologies in External Beam Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiras, C; Bourland, J; Gonzalez, L Brualla; Bulychkin, P; Ford, E; Kazantsev, P; Krylova, T; Medina, A Lopez; Prusova, M; Romanov, D; Ferrando, J Rosello; Willoughby, T; Yan, D; Yu, C; Zvereva, A

    2012-06-01

    The AAPM has signed two formal Educational Exchange Agreements with the Spanish (SEFM) and the Russian (AMPR) medical physics societies. While the primary purpose of the Agreements is to provide educational opportunities for young medical physicists, the Agreements also contemplate holding joint sessions at scientific congresses. The purpose of this professional AAPM/SEFM/AMPR Joint Symposium is to explore the challenges that medical physicists in the three countries face when new external beam radiotherapy technologies are introduced in their facilities and to suggest potential solutions to limitations in testing equipment and lack of familiarity with protocols. Speakers from the three societies will present reviews of the technical aspects of IMRT, Arc EVIRT (IMAT/VMAT/Rapid Arc), SRS/SRBT, and IGRT/Adaptive radiotherapy, and will describe the status of these technologies in their countries, including the challenges found in tasks such as developing anatomical and biological dose optimization techniques and implementing QA management, risk assessment and patient safety programs. The SEFM will offer AAPM and AMPR members the possibility to participate in collaborative proposals for future research bids in UE and USA based on an ongoing Spanish project for adaptive radiotherapy using functional imaging. A targeted discussion will debate three propositions: the cost/benefit ratio of IGRT, whether IMRT requires IGRT, and the use of non-ionizing radiation technologies for realtime monitoring of prostate IGRT. For these debates, each society has designated one speaker to present and defend either "For" or "Against" the proposition, followed by discussion by all participants. The Symposium presentations and the country-tailored recommendations drawn will be made available to each society for inclusion in their websites. The WGNIMP, the AAPM Work Group charged with executing the AAPM/SEFM and AAPM/AMPR Agreements, will follow up on the commitments made by the AAPM.Di Yan

  19. Impact of Risk-Benefit Perception and Trust on Medical Technology Acceptance in Relation to Drug and Device Lag: A Tripartite Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaka, Koji; Kishimoto, Junji; Ikeda, Masayuki; Ikeda, Koji; Yamamoto, Haruko

    2017-01-01

    New drug and medical device introduction in Japan usually lags behind that in the West. Many reports indicate that in Japan, the associated risks are considered greater than the benefits recognized in other countries. This study aimed to compare the relationship between risk-benefit perception and acceptance of medical technologies in 3 leading markets. A tripartite cross-sectional survey of the general public was used. In total, 3345 adults in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Japan participated, and sexes and age groups were equally represented. Questions about the perception of risk, benefit, and acceptance of medical and other scientific technologies, and trust of medical product providers or regulatory authorities were included. Five-step Likert coding for risk/benefit/acceptance of 4 medical items (x-rays, antibiotics, vaccines, and cardiac pacemakers) and 6 general items (such as automobiles and airplanes) were collected. Relationships between benefit perception and acceptance were linear for 4 medical technologies. The relationship had a similar slope but was shifted downward in Japan compared with the UK and US ( P medical technologies, benefits of medical technologies, trust in doctors, and trust in the Department of Health. The UK and US attributes were clustered with positive responses such as "useful," "acceptable," and "trustworthy," whereas Japan was clustered with intermediate to negative responses such as "neither" and "untrustworthy." Acceptance of medical technologies was low in Japan because of significant differences in trust for doctors and authorities compared with that in the UK and US. This is a possible basis for delays of 24 to 60 months for medical product approval in Japan.

  20. A cognitive perspective on technology enhanced learning in medical training: great opportunities, pitfalls and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Itiel; Schmidt, Pascal; O'connor, Lanty

    2011-01-01

    As new technology becomes available and is used for educational purposes, educators often take existing training and simply transcribe it into the new technological medium. However, when technology drives e-learning rather than the learner and the learning, and when it uses designs and approaches that were not originally built for e-learning, then often technology does not enhance the learning (it may even be detrimental to it). The success of e-learning depends on it being 'brain friendly', on engaging the learners from an understanding of how the cognitive system works. This enables educators to optimize learning by achieving correct mental representations that will be remembered and applied in practice. Such technology enhanced learning (TEL) involves developing and using novel approaches grounded in cognitive neuroscience; for example, gaming and simulations that distort realism rather than emphasizing visual fidelity and realism, making videos interactive, training for 'error recovery' rather than for 'error reduction', and a whole range of practical ways that result in effective TEL. These are a result of e-learning that is built to fit and support the cognitive system, and therefore optimize the learning.

  1. Restructuring an EHR system and the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard to improve interoperability by archetype technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Kume, Naoto; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In 2001, we developed an EHR system for regional healthcare information inter-exchange and to provide individual patient data to patients. This system was adopted in three regions in Japan. We also developed a Medical Markup Language (MML) standard for inter- and intra-hospital communications. The system was built on a legacy platform, however, and had not been appropriately maintained or updated to meet clinical requirements. To improve future maintenance costs, we reconstructed the EHR system using archetype technology on the Ruby on Rails platform, and generated MML equivalent forms from archetypes. The system was deployed as a cloud-based system for preliminary use as a regional EHR. The system now has the capability to catch up with new requirements, maintaining semantic interoperability with archetype technology. It is also more flexible than the legacy EHR system.

  2. Implementation of electronic medical records requires more than new software: Lessons on integrating and managing health technologies from Mbarara, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Amy; Rosenberg, Julie; Muyindike, Winnie R; Bangsberg, David R; Bwana, Mwebesa B; Martin, Jeffrey N; Kanyesigye, Michael; Weintraub, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    Implementation lessons: • Technology alone does not necessarily lead to improvement in health service delivery, in contrast to the common assumption that advanced technology goes hand in hand with progress. • Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems is a complex, resource-intensive process that, in addition to software, hardware, and human resource investments, requires careful planning, change management skills, adaptability, and continuous engagement of stakeholders. • Research requirements and goals must be balanced with service delivery needs when determining how much information is essential to collect and who should be interfacing with the EMR system. • EMR systems require ongoing monitoring and regular updates to ensure they are responsive to evolving clinical use cases and research questions. • High-quality data and analyses are essential for EMRs to deliver value to providers, researchers, and patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. eLearning or technology enhanced learning in medical education-Hope, not hype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Poh Sun

    2016-09-01

    This Personal View elaborates on my strong conviction that the excitement and positive feelings that many of us have for eLearning or Technology enhanced learning (TeL) is well founded, and will argue why our hopes are justified, and not misplaced. In a nutshell, I believe that eLearning or TeL is a significant advance from previous generations of educational innovation, and offers benefits for students, educators and administrators; by synergistically combining the capabilities of digital content, the Internet, and mobile technology, supported by software and applications or "Apps".

  4. Automation and adaptation: Nurses’ problem-solving behavior following the implementation of bar coded medication administration technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Faye, Héléne; Scanlon, Matthew C.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2012-01-01

    The most common change facing nurses today is new technology, particularly bar coded medication administration technology (BCMA). However, there is a dearth of knowledge on how BCMA alters nursing work. This study investigated how BCMA technology affected nursing work, particularly nurses’ operational problem-solving behavior. Cognitive systems engineering observations and interviews were conducted after the implementation of BCMA in three nursing units of a freestanding pediatric hospital. Problem-solving behavior, associated problems, and goals, were specifically defined and extracted from observed episodes of care. Three broad themes regarding BCMA’s impact on problem solving were identified. First, BCMA allowed nurses to invent new problem-solving behavior to deal with pre-existing problems. Second, BCMA made it difficult or impossible to apply some problem-solving behaviors that were commonly used pre-BCMA, often requiring nurses to use potentially risky workarounds to achieve their goals. Third, BCMA created new problems that nurses were either able to solve using familiar or novel problem-solving behaviors, or unable to solve effectively. Results from this study shed light on hidden hazards and suggest three critical design needs: (1) ecologically valid design; (2) anticipatory control; and (3) basic usability. Principled studies of the actual nature of clinicians’ work, including problem solving, are necessary to uncover hidden hazards and to inform health information technology design and redesign. PMID:24443642

  5. Software-Related Recalls of Health Information Technology and Other Medical Devices: Implications for FDA Regulation of Digital Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, Jay G; Zuckerman, Diana M

    2017-09-01

    Policy Points: Medical software has become an increasingly critical component of health care, yet the regulation of these devices is inconsistent and controversial. No studies of medical devices and software assess the impact on patient safety of the FDA's current regulatory safeguards and new legislative changes to those standards. Our analysis quantifies the impact of software problems in regulated medical devices and indicates that current regulations are necessary but not sufficient for ensuring patient safety by identifying and eliminating dangerous defects in software currently on the market. New legislative changes will further deregulate health IT, reducing safeguards that facilitate the reporting and timely recall of flawed medical software that could harm patients. Medical software has become an increasingly critical component of health care, yet the regulatory landscape for digital health is inconsistent and controversial. To understand which policies might best protect patients, we examined the impact of the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) regulatory safeguards on software-related technologies in recent years and the implications for newly passed legislative changes in regulatory policy. Using FDA databases, we identified all medical devices that were recalled from 2011 through 2015 primarily because of software defects. We counted all software-related recalls for each FDA risk category and evaluated each high-risk and moderate-risk recall of electronic medical records to determine the manufacturer, device classification, submission type, number of units, and product details. A total of 627 software devices (1.4 million units) were subject to recalls, with 12 of these devices (190,596 units) subject to the highest-risk recalls. Eleven of the devices recalled as high risk had entered the market through the FDA review process that does not require evidence of safety or effectiveness, and one device was completely exempt from regulatory review

  6. Feasibility of mHealth and Near Field Communication technology based medication adherence monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Juergen; Schwarz, Mark; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Poor patients' adherence to intake of prescribed medication has been identified as a serious problem in the treatment of chronically ill patients. Technical solutions are needed to measure and - if necessary - to increase the patients' adherence. A telemonitoring solution was developed to record a patient's medication intake based on smart blisters and mobile phones with NFC functionality. The components allowed recording of drug type, timestamp, and dosage of pills taken. The system's usability and technical feasibility was evaluated in the course of an application study. Over a period of 13 months 59 patients suffering from diabetes were monitored. 1,760 blisters were handed out to these patients and 14,843 takeout events were recorded and transmitted via mobile phone. Results indicate the feasibility of this concept to monitor adherence. Although the system still needs to be optimized for routine use it shows the potential for targeting the problem of poor patient adherence by NFC enabled devices.

  7. Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Group SLW STAR Link ® Web SNP Single Nucleotide Polymorphism SNS Strategic National Stockpile SOA Service Oriented Architecture SOP Standard...The group prepared a white paper detailing recommendations/guidelines for the assessment of new assays (potency or other assays) relevant to cord...adverse medical affects. The BRT course contains four sections and a 29 question exam that is submitted via the Internet. At the conclusion of this

  8. The impact of social media and technology on professionalism in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C

    2011-01-01

    The use of social media is the norm among the digital native generation, with 75% of the Millennial Generation connected through Facebook. For students in medical education who struggle to distinguish between personal and professional boundaries, social media provides yet another challenge. Incidents of unprofessional conduct and academic dismissal have been reported. Administration, faculty, and students would benefit from clear policies and procedures, case scenarios of social media violations, and suggestions for using social media wisely.

  9. [Multi-course web-learning system for supporting students of medical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Satoru; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi; Kurihara, Yuriko; Yoshida, Shoko; Sakai, Nobue

    2013-05-01

    Web-Learning system was developed to support the self-learning for national qualification examination and medical engineering practice by students. The results from small tests in various situations suggest that the unit-learning systems are more effective, especially for the early stage of their self learning. In addition, the answers of some questionnaire suggest that the students' motivation has a certain relation with the number of the questions in the system. That is, the less number of the questions, the easier they are worked out with a higher learning motivation by students. Thus, the system was extended to enable students to study various subjects and/or units by themselves. The system enables them to have learning effects more easily by the exercise during lectures. The effectiveness of the system was investigated on medical associated subjects installed in the system. The concerning questions of Medical engineering and Pathological histology are adequately divided into several groups, of which sixteen Web-Learning subsystems were well composed for their practical application. Our concerning various unit-learning systems were confirmed much useful for most students comparing with the case of the overall Web-Learning system.

  10. Development of regulatory technologies of key issues of radiation sources in the medical and industrial fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Kim, Byung Soo; Ku, Bon Chul

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this research is to provide with rational bases to address the key issues raising up during the expansion of RI/RG usage in the medical and industrial fields, thus eventually contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of national regulatory systems. Related key issues that are introduced in the medical and industrial fields are analyzed and some outcomes are produced. The following results are attained. - Estimation Methodology Development of Regulatory Effects for the Use of Radioactive Substances, - Survey on Domestic Status of Nuclear Materials and Review on Domestic/Foreign Regulatory System for Nuclear Materials Regulation, - Comparative Analysis of KSTAR and Fusion Facilities of Advanced Countries, - Radiological Characteristics of Proton Therapy and Analysis of Foreign Cases and Systems, - Detection and Safety Analysis of Leak Radiation of High Energy Medical Generators, - Survey and Analysis on Usage and Requirements of Sealed Sources, - Incidents/Accidents Reporting System for RI-related Facilities, - Development of Audio-Visual Education Materials for Radiation Workers, - Development of Major Safety Procedures for Portable RIs, - Expansion of Existing DB for Radiation Devices including New Domestic Ones, - Survey of Foreign Status of Quality Maintenance System for Radiation equipment

  11. Conceptual Study of LSTAT Integration to Robotics and Other Advanced Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-31

    Ballistic Impact Detection CDDS Clinical Decision-Support System CPAP Continuous Positive Airway Pressure CRT Cathode Ray Tube CSH Combat Support...by soldier non-volatile flash memory various commercial technologies available referred to as electronic information carrier (EIC) or

  12. Assessing Factors Affecting Physician's Intention to Adopt Biometric Authentication Technology in Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazao, Cesar E.

    2014-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) regulated the privacy and security of patient information. Since HIPPA became a law, hospital operators have struggled to comply fully with its security and privacy provisions. The proximity-based biometric authentication (PBBA) technology evolved in last decade to help…

  13. Project in Haiti to make medical care more efficient through technology

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-06

    Oct 6, 2010 ... A major weakness in Haitian healthcare is the lack of health systems supported by electronic and information technologies (e-health) and ... (due to the poor quality internet connectivity) and also building tools to track ... For people living in sub-Saharan Africa, psychiatric services are not always accessible.

  14. 75 FR 1446 - Rate of Payment for Medical Records Received Through Health Information Technology (IT) Necessary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... Received Through Health Information Technology (IT) Necessary To Make Disability Determinations AGENCY... Federal Register. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cheryl Elksnis, Office of Disability Programs, Social Security Administration, 6401 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21235-6401, 410-966-0497, for information...

  15. High social impact of medical applications in nuclear technology: gynecological brachitherapy remote control in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubizarreta, E.

    1996-01-01

    In the present article is studied many systems for uterine carcinoma therapy. Among modern therapy systems it was found Fletcher applicator compound with Cesium and Iridium sources. This new technology by remote control has improved radioprotection levels in the exposition workers and disappear radioactive sources mislead, increasing sources activities and decreasing the exposition time

  16. Visualizing the Future: Technology Competency Development in Clinical Medicine, and Implications for Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Keenan, Craig R.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In this article, the authors ask three questions. First, what will physicians need to know in order to be effective in the future? Second, what role will technology play in achieving that high level of effectiveness? Third, what specific skill sets will physicians need to master in order to become effective? Method: Through three case…

  17. Correlationally Assessing the Relationship of Information Technology Investments in Electronic Medical Records to Business Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    The lag in information exchange and assimilation adoption experienced by modern primary care physicians in the conduct of evidence based medicine may be affecting health care system productivity and patient quality of care. Further, interest in whether or not information technology (IT) investments show an increase in business value has increased…

  18. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Paramedic. (Program CIP: 51.0904 - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Lisa; Bryant, Katrina; Deschamp, Clyde; Galtelli, Mark; Glasson, Kristi; Hall, David; Hood, Brenda; Mahaffey, Libby; McBryde, John; Read, John; Shirley, Gary

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  19. Evolution of technology in teaching: Blackboard and beyond in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; Mendis, Susirith; John, Lisha Jenny; Shanthakumari, Nisha; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Shaikh, Rizwana B

    2016-10-01

    the passing of knowledge from one generation to another - has been in existence from the earliest times of human civilization. It began in 1801, with a large piece of slate hung on the wall in a school in Scotland to provide information to a large audience at one time. In the US by mid-19th century, every class room had a blackboard to teach students. The modern version of the blackboard is either green or brown board. This was introduced in late 1960s. The whiteboards came into use during the late 1980s. Projected aids have been used since 1420. The various devices used are the epidiascope, slide projector, overhead projector for transparencies and the micro projector. An instrument to project images from a horizontal surface onto a vertical screen was invented in the 1870s. By the 1960s, transparencies were in use in classrooms. The 'Hyalotype', a transparent image of a photograph using actual black and white photographs on a glass slide that could be projected was invented in 1851. By 1916, the German company Agfa started producing colored lantern slides. The first version of PowerPoint was released by Microsoft in the year 1990. Cell phones, palmtops, and handheld computers; tablets, laptops, and media players are included under mobile learning devices. With the evolution of technology, students achieved competence and interested in interactive learning. The education industry has moved from distance learning to e-learning and finally to m-learning as knowledge expanded exponentially and the demand escalated. While using teaching aids with advanced technology, we must not forget the lessons from the past, striking a balance between embracing new methods of teaching and learning while upholding the timeless principles of education. The newer educational technology can be part of a comprehensive system for lifelong education. Use of technology in education has come a long way since the earliest times of human civilization. While embarking on aids with advanced

  20. Ethical issues in the application of medical technology to paediatric intensive care: two views of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J S

    1996-04-01

    Recent advances in medical technology have led to a marked improvement in the chances of survival of sick or preterm infants, thereby stimulating renewed ethical debate on the status of the newborn. Two contradictory attitudes to the medical care of preterm or congenitally malformed newborn infants can be discerned in our pluralistic society. The two attitudes have their historical roots in the classical Graeco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian ethical traditions respectively. The former views newborn infants as of potential value only whereas the latter emphasises the intrinsic worth and dignity of the individual made in God's image. Recent secular philosophical reflection has provided a rationale for infanticide of the sick or abnormal newborn. A Christian approach to the care of the newborn prohibits intentional killing yet may encompass the withdrawal of treatment that is inappropriate or unduly burdensome. Medical care should be based upon respect for the value of the individual, protection of the defenceless from abuse or exploitation, and wise stewardship of limited health-care resources.

  1. Managing data quality in an existing medical data warehouse using business intelligence technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Scott; Ostrander, Michael; Santangelo, Jennifer; Kamal, Jyoti

    2008-11-06

    The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) Information Warehouse (IW) is a comprehensive data warehousing facility that provides providing data integration, management, mining, training, and development services to a diversity of customers across the clinical, education, and research sectors of the OSUMC. Providing accurate and complete data is a must for these purposes. In order to monitor the data quality of targeted data sets, an online scorecard has been developed to allow visualization of the critical measures of data quality in the Information Warehouse.

  2. Development of casting technology and localization for a medical radioisotope transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. S.; Kim, H. S.; Jang, S. J.; Seo, K. S.; Kim, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to localize the shielding casks for shipping medical isotopes, this research was carried out. The various casting factors such as the diameter of shielding casting, the temperature of melt and the temperature gradient of a mold were determined with the calculation results of solidification analysis computer code. Through the experiment, the manufacturing method of Ti core was developed to have no defects causing casting failure. As a results of casting experiment, depleted uranium shielding castings were successfully cast without any defect. Also as the results of the radiation shielding capability test, it was good enough to satisfied the standards of transport regulations

  3. The Use of Autonomous Systems in Emergency Medical Services: Bridging Human Intelligence and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Google’s Autonomous Car Applies Lessons Learned from Driverless Races by Alan Brown, the literature provides the reader with a basic understanding of...Brown, “Google’s Autonomous Car Applies Lessons Learned from Driverless Races,” Mechanical Engineering 133, no. 2 (February 2011): 31. 11 Robert...sensormonitoring.files.wordpress. com/2014/03/iot.png. B. AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY The “Google Car,” “automatic car,” “ driverless vehicle

  4. Just another reproductive technology? The ethics of human reproductive cloning as an experimental medical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, D

    2006-10-01

    Human reproductive cloning (HRC) has not yet resulted in any live births. There has been widespread condemnation of the practice in both the scientific world and the public sphere, and many countries explicitly outlaw the practice. Concerns about the procedure range from uncertainties about its physical safety to questions about the psychological well-being of clones. Yet, key aspects such as the philosophical implications of harm to future entities and a comparison with established reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) are often overlooked in discussions about HRC. Furthermore, there are people who are willing to use the technology. Several scientists have been outspoken in their intent to pursue HRC. The importance of concerns about the physical safety of children created by HRC and comparisons with concerns about the safety of IVF are discussed. A model to be used to determine when it is acceptable to use HRC and other new assisted reproductive technologies, balancing reproductive freedom and safety concerns, is proposed. Justifications underpinning potential applications of HRC are discussed, and it is determined that these are highly analogous to rationalisations used to justify IVF treatment. It is concluded that people wishing to conceive using HRC should have a prima facie negative right to do so.

  5. The application of imaging technologies in the detection of trace evidence in forensic medical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Jeannie; du Toit-Prinsloo, Lorraine; Steffens, Francois; Saayman, Gert

    2015-04-01

    In a country notorious for violent crime, it seems that South African medico-legal laboratories make minimal application of technology in the death investigation process and little attention is given to trace evidence. Non-destructive, non-invasive, portable and cost-effective tools are required. This study was conducted at the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory. The surface area of the bodies and clothing of victims of fatal interpersonal violence were examined using a torch, magnifying lamp, portable digital microscope and alternate light source to gauge their potential for trace evidence detection. Most studies apply these and similar tools to inert surfaces, with few focusing on their application to human skin. There was a statistically significant difference in the detection of many of the evidence types between the naked-eye observation of the pathologists and the technologies. The different imaging technologies were compared as to their cost, evidence detection ability and ease of use. The most common evidence types discovered on the bodies and clothing of victims of fatal interpersonal violence, as well as the propensity of each tool to detect these, was evaluated in order to devise the best option for incorporation into the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory routine. The digital microscope performed best overall followed by the magnifying lamp, torch and the Polilight(®). This study aimed to justify the investment of more time, effort and funding into trace evidence recovery in the South African mortuary environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probability elicitation to inform early health economic evaluations of new medical technologies: a case study in heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Postmus, Douwe; Hillege, Hans L; Buskens, Erik

    2013-06-01

    Early estimates of the commercial headroom available to a new medical device can assist producers of health technology in making appropriate product investment decisions. The purpose of this study was to illustrate how this quantity can be captured probabilistically by combining probability elicitation with early health economic modeling. The technology considered was a novel point-of-care testing device in heart failure disease management. First, we developed a continuous-time Markov model to represent the patients' disease progression under the current care setting. Next, we identified the model parameters that are likely to change after the introduction of the new device and interviewed three cardiologists to capture the probability distributions of these parameters. Finally, we obtained the probability distribution of the commercial headroom available per measurement by propagating the uncertainty in the model inputs to uncertainty in modeled outcomes. For a willingness-to-pay value of €10,000 per life-year, the median headroom available per measurement was €1.64 (interquartile range €0.05-€3.16) when the measurement frequency was assumed to be daily. In the subsequently conducted sensitivity analysis, this median value increased to a maximum of €57.70 for different combinations of the willingness-to-pay threshold and the measurement frequency. Probability elicitation can successfully be combined with early health economic modeling to obtain the probability distribution of the headroom available to a new medical technology. Subsequently feeding this distribution into a product investment evaluation method enables stakeholders to make more informed decisions regarding to which markets a currently available product prototype should be targeted. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Health Technology Assessment for Molecular Diagnostics: Practices, Challenges, and Recommendations from the Medical Devices and Diagnostics Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Susan; Polisena, Julie; S Spinner, Daryl; Postulka, Anne; Y Lu, Christine; Tiwana, Simrandeep K; Faulkner, Eric; Poulios, Nick; Zah, Vladimir; Longacre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Health technology assessments (HTAs) are increasingly used to inform coverage, access, and utilization of medical technologies including molecular diagnostics (MDx). Although MDx are used to screen patients and inform disease management and treatment decisions, there is no uniform approach to their evaluation by HTA organizations. The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Devices and Diagnostics Special Interest Group reviewed diagnostic-specific HTA programs and identified elements representing common and best practices. MDx-specific HTA programs in Europe, Australia, and North America were characterized by methodology, evaluation framework, and impact. Published MDx HTAs were reviewed, and five representative case studies of test evaluations were developed: United Kingdom (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's Diagnostics Assessment Programme, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase mutation), United States (Palmetto's Molecular Diagnostic Services Program, OncotypeDx prostate cancer test), Germany (Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare, human papillomavirus testing), Australia (Medical Services Advisory Committee, anaplastic lymphoma kinase testing for non-small cell lung cancer), and Canada (Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, Rapid Response: Non-invasive Prenatal Testing). Overall, the few HTA programs that have MDx-specific methods do not provide clear parameters of acceptability related to clinical and analytic performance, clinical utility, and economic impact. The case studies highlight similarities and differences in evaluation approaches across HTAs in the performance metrics used (analytic and clinical validity, clinical utility), evidence requirements, and how value is measured. Not all HTAs are directly linked to reimbursement outcomes. To improve MDx HTAs, organizations should provide greater transparency, better communication and collaboration between industry and HTA

  8. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: 3D bioprinting, surface modification, nano/micro-technology and clinical aspects in tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cen; Bang, Sumi; Cho, Younghak; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Inseop; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses about biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, after previous scientific commentary of the invitation-based, Korea-China joint symposium on biomimetic medical materials, which was held in Seoul, Korea, from October 22 to 26, 2015. The contents of this review were evolved from the presentations of that symposium. Four topics of biomimetic medical materials were discussed from different research groups here: 1) 3D bioprinting medical materials, 2) nano/micro-technology, 3) surface modification of biomaterials for their interactions with cells and 4) clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage focusing on cells, scaffolds and cytokines.

  9. Decision to adopt medical technology: case study of breast cancer radiotherapy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Heather Taffet; Pitrelli, Kimberly; Hayes, Mary Katherine; Murphy, Madhuvanti Mahadeo

    2014-11-01

    To understand decision making concerning adoption and nonadoption of accelerated partial breast radiotherapy (RT) prior to long-term randomized trial evidence. A total of 36 radiation oncologists and surgeons were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling strategies from September 2010 through January 2013. Semistructured phone interviews were conducted and audio-recorded and lasted 20-45 minutes. Qualitative analysis was conducted using a framework approach, iteratively exploring key concepts and emerging issues raised by subjects. Interviews were transcribed and imported into Atlas.ti v6. Transcripts were independently coded by 3 researchers shortly after each interview, followed by consensus development on each coded transcript. Barriers and facilitators of adoption, practice patterns, and informational/educational sources concerning accelerated partial breast RT were all assessed to determine major themes. Nearly half of physicians were surgeons (47%), and half were radiation oncologists (53%), with 61% overall in urban settings. Twenty-nine of the 36 physicians interviewed used brachytherapy-based partial breast RT. Five major factors were involved in physicians' decisions to adopt accelerated partial breast RT: facilitators encouraging adoption (e.g., enthusiastic colleagues and patient convenience), financial and prestige incentives, pressures to adopt (e.g., potential declines in referrals), judgment concerning acceptable level of scientific evidence, and barriers (e.g., not having appropriate machinery or referral mechanism in place). If technology was adopted, clinical guideline adherence varied. Technology adoption is based on financial and social pressures, along with often-limited scientific evidence and what seems "best" for patients. For technology adoption and diffusion to be rational and evidence-based, we must encourage appropriate financial payment models to curb use outside of research studies and promote development of additional

  10. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching of Patient-Centered Interviewing for Early Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltman, Stacey; Talisman, Nicholas; Pennestri, Susan; Syverson, Eleri; Arthur, Paige; Vovides, Yianna

    2018-06-01

    Effective strategies for teaching communication skills to health professions students are needed. This article describes the design and evaluation of immersive and interactive video simulations for medical students to practice basic communication skills. Three simulations were developed, focusing on patient-centered interviewing techniques such as using open-ended questions, reflections, and empathic responses while assessing a patient's history of present illness. First-year medical students were randomized to simulation or education-as-usual arms. Students in the simulation arm were given access to three interactive video simulations developed using Articulate Storyline, an e-learning authoring tool, to practice and receive feedback on patient-centered interviewing techniques to prepare for their Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Trained raters evaluated videos of two OSCE cases for each participant to assess specific communication skills used during the history of present illness component of the interview. Eighty-seven percent of the students in the simulation arm interacted with at least one simulation during the history of present illness. For both OSCE cases, students in the simulation arm asked significantly more open-ended questions. Students in the simulation arm asked significantly fewer closed-ended questions and offered significantly more empathic responses in one OSCE case. No differences were found for reflections. Students reported that the simulations helped improve their communication skills. The use of interactive video simulations was found to be feasible to incorporate into the curriculum and was appealing to students. In addition, students in the simulation arm displayed more behaviors consistent with the patient-centered interviewing model practiced in the simulations. Continued development and research are warranted.

  11. Breaking up is hard to do: why disinvestment in medical technology is harder than investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Marion; Hall, Jane; Viney, Rosalie; Gallego, Gisselle

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare technology is a two-edged sword - it offers new and better treatment to a wider range of people and, at the same time, is a major driver of increasing costs in health systems. Many countries have developed sophisticated systems of health technology assessment (HTA) to inform decisions about new investments in new healthcare interventions. In this paper, we question whether HTA is also the appropriate framework for guiding or informing disinvestment decisions. In exploring the issues related to disinvestment, we first discuss the various HTA frameworks which have been suggested as a means of encouraging or facilitating disinvestment. We then describe available means of identifying candidates for disinvestment (comparative effectiveness research, clinical practice variations, clinical practice guidelines) and for implementing the disinvestment process (program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) and related techniques). In considering the possible reasons for the lack of progress in active disinvestment, we suggest that HTA is not the right framework as disinvestment involves a different decision making context. The key to disinvestment is not just what to stop doing but how to make it happen - that is, decision makers need to be aware of funding disincentives.

  12. Virtual and augmented medical imaging environments: enabling technology for minimally invasive cardiac interventional guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A; White, James; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gérard M; Peters, Terry M

    2010-01-01

    Virtual and augmented reality environments have been adopted in medicine as a means to enhance the clinician's view of the anatomy and facilitate the performance of minimally invasive procedures. Their value is truly appreciated during interventions where the surgeon cannot directly visualize the targets to be treated, such as during cardiac procedures performed on the beating heart. These environments must accurately represent the real surgical field and require seamless integration of pre- and intra-operative imaging, surgical tracking, and visualization technology in a common framework centered around the patient. This review begins with an overview of minimally invasive cardiac interventions, describes the architecture of a typical surgical guidance platform including imaging, tracking, registration and visualization, highlights both clinical and engineering accuracy limitations in cardiac image guidance, and discusses the translation of the work from the laboratory into the operating room together with typically encountered challenges.

  13. Identifying and Synchronizing Health Information Technology (HIT) Events from FDA Medical Device Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong; Wang, Frank; Zhou, Sicheng; Miao, Qi; Gong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Health information technology (HIT) events, a subtype of patient safety events, pose a major threat and barrier toward a safer healthcare system. It is crucial to gain a better understanding of the nature of the errors and adverse events caused by current HIT systems. The scarcity of HIT event-exclusive databases and event reporting systems indicates the challenge of identifying the HIT events from existing resources. FDA Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is a potential resource for HIT events. However, the low proportion and the rapid evolvement of HIT-related events present challenges for distinguishing them from other equipment failures and hazards. We proposed a strategy to identify and synchronize HIT events from MAUDE by using a filter based on structured features and classifiers based on unstructured features. The strategy will help us develop and grow an HIT event-exclusive database, keeping pace with updates to MAUDE toward shared learning.

  14. Green Materials Science and Engineering Reduces Biofouling: Approaches for Medical and Membrane-based Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerianne M Dobosz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous engineered and natural environments suffer deleterious effects from biofouling and/or biofilm formation. For instance, bacterial contamination on biomedical devices pose serious health concerns. In membrane-based technologies, such as desalination and wastewater reuse, biofouling decreases membrane lifetime and increases the energy required to produce clean water. Traditionally, approaches have combatted bacteria using bactericidal agents. However, due to globalization, a decline in antibiotic discovery, and the widespread resistance of microbes to many commercial antibiotics and metallic nanoparticles, new materials and approaches to reduce biofilm formation are needed. In this mini-review, we cover the recent strategies that have been explored to combat microbial contamination without exerting evolutionary pressure on microorganisms. Renewable feedstocks, relying on structure-property relationships, bioinspired/nature-derived compounds, and green processing methods are discussed. Greener strategies that mitigate biofouling hold great potential to positively impact human health and safety.

  15. Analysis of Documentation Speed Using Web-Based Medical Speech Recognition Technology: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Markus; Kaisers, Wolfgang; Wassmuth, Ralf; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2015-11-03

    Clinical documentation has undergone a change due to the usage of electronic health records. The core element is to capture clinical findings and document therapy electronically. Health care personnel spend a significant portion of their time on the computer. Alternatives to self-typing, such as speech recognition, are currently believed to increase documentation efficiency and quality, as well as satisfaction of health professionals while accomplishing clinical documentation, but few studies in this area have been published to date. This study describes the effects of using a Web-based medical speech recognition system for clinical documentation in a university hospital on (1) documentation speed, (2) document length, and (3) physician satisfaction. Reports of 28 physicians were randomized to be created with (intervention) or without (control) the assistance of a Web-based system of medical automatic speech recognition (ASR) in the German language. The documentation was entered into a browser's text area and the time to complete the documentation including all necessary corrections, correction effort, number of characters, and mood of participant were stored in a database. The underlying time comprised text entering, text correction, and finalization of the documentation event. Participants self-assessed their moods on a scale of 1-3 (1=good, 2=moderate, 3=bad). Statistical analysis was done using permutation tests. The number of clinical reports eligible for further analysis stood at 1455. Out of 1455 reports, 718 (49.35%) were assisted by ASR and 737 (50.65%) were not assisted by ASR. Average documentation speed without ASR was 173 (SD 101) characters per minute, while it was 217 (SD 120) characters per minute using ASR. The overall increase in documentation speed through Web-based ASR assistance was 26% (P=.04). Participants documented an average of 356 (SD 388) characters per report when not assisted by ASR and 649 (SD 561) characters per report when assisted

  16. Developing information technology at the Medical Research Unit of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibacka, Paterne Lessihuin; Bounda, Yann; Nguema, Davy Ondo; Lell, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    Information technology has become a key resource for research institutions, providing services such as hardware, software and network maintenance, as well as data management services. The IT department of the Medical Research Unit (MRU) of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon is a good example of how IT has developed at African Research Centres in recent years and demonstrates the scope of work that a modern research centre needs to offer. It illustrates the development in the past 15 years--from single computers maintained by investigators to the present situation of a group of well-trained local IT personal who are in charge of a variety of hardware and software and who also develop applications for use in a research environment. Open source applications are particularly suited for these needs and various applications are used in data management, data analysis, accounting, administration and quality management.

  17. Challenges to effective crisis management: using information and communication technologies to coordinate emergency medical services and emergency department teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhu C; Paul, Sharoda A; Abraham, Joanna; McNeese, Michael; DeFlitch, Christopher; Yen, John

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the major challenges to coordination between emergency department (ED) teams and emergency medical services (EMS) teams. We conducted a series of focus groups involving both ED and EMS team members using a crisis scenario as the basis of the focus group discussion. We also collected organizational workflow data. We identified three major challenges to coordination between ED and EMS teams including ineffectiveness of current information and communication technologies, lack of common ground, and breakdowns in information flow. The three challenges highlight the importance of designing systems from socio-technical perspective. In particular, these inter-team coordination systems must support socio-technical issues such as awareness, context, and workflow between the two teams.

  18. Education of radiochemistry and radiation chemistry at a college of medical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Takeyoshi

    2005-01-01

    The present report aims at introducing my creative textbook on the subject. The contents start from the history of the 20th century on discovery and use of radiation and radioisotope''. In the study of the history the students can aware of their position in a future profession as a medical radiation worker. In addition, own originality for the textbook was shown in the descriptions of (1) Auger effect of EC decay nuclide used remarkably in nuclear medicine, (2) the relation between isotope, isotone and isobar and the kind of nuclear reaction, (3) the distinction of the use of isotope dilution method in substoichiometry and radioimmunoassay, (4) nuclear reactor chemistry (nuclear fuel cycle and disposal of high level radioactive waste), (5) fundamental constants used in radioisotope techniques and (6) the exposure dose in taking a side view of the radiation chemistry. A questionnaire survey after the closing the lesson showed that the students took an interest in 60% of the contents in the textbook of radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. (author)

  19. [Modern information and communication technology in medical rehabilitation. Enhanced sustainability through Internet-delivered aftercare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, H; Theis, F; Wolf, M

    2011-04-01

    Internet and mobile phones open new avenues for the optimization of health services in medical rehabilitation. Various models of Internet-delivered aftercare after psychosomatic inpatient treatment have shown promising results. The focus of this report is on the experience in translating one of the promising models, the Internet-Bridge ("Internet-Brücke"), to every day health care. Effectiveness was estimated through comparison of 254 patients who were treated in a hospital specialized in psychosomatic medicine and who participated in the Internet-Bridge as well as in the 1-year follow-up in the frame of standard quality assurance between 2003-2010 with 364 patients of the same hospital who also participated in the 1-year follow-up, but did not utilize the aftercare. Sustainable, reliable, and clinically significant improvements were more frequent in participants of the Internet-Bridge, especially with regard to psychological well-being, social problems, and psychosocial competence-at small additional costs. Results are understood as encouragement to start translation to routine care accompanied by research.

  20. Evaluation of a Tracking System for Patients and Mixed Intravenous Medication Based on RFID Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, María; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Dafonte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    At present, one of the primary concerns of healthcare professionals is how to increase the safety and quality of the care that patients receive during their stay in hospital. This is particularly important in the administration of expensive and high-risk medicines with which it is fundamental to minimize the possibility of adverse events in the process of prescription-validation-preparation/dosage-dispensation-administration of intravenous mixes. This work is a detailed analysis of the evaluation, carried out by the health personnel involved in the Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) system developed in the Day Hospital and Pharmacy services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña (CHUAC). The RFID system is evaluated by analyzing surveys completed by said health personnel, since their questions represent the key indicators of the patient care process (safety, cost, adequacy with the clinical practice). This work allows us to conclude, among other things, that the system tracks the patients satisfactorily and that its cost, though high, is justified in the context of the project context (use of dangerous and costly medication). PMID:27916915