WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology literacy gains

  1. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per;

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  2. Technological literacy and innovation education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2014-01-01

    , and a heavy digitization of the health care sector. These developments have actualized the fundamental question of how new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships? As one way to deal with this question, health education programmes have begun to focus...... on innovation education and educational activities fostering technological literacy. While focus on technological literacy has often (historically) taken a functionalist direction, and mainly been related to ICT and development of non- vocational curricula, more recent developments of approaches...

  3. Fulfilling a Promise: Standards for Technological Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the place of standards in U.S. education, the development of the Standards for Technological Literacy, and the recent publication of "Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy: Student Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards." (Contains 21 references.) (SK)

  4. GAIN Technology Workshops Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    National and global demand for nuclear energy is increasing and United States (U.S.) global leadership is eroding. There is a sense of urgency with respect to the deployment of the innovative nuclear energy technologies. The Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative is based on the simultaneous achievement of three strategic goals. The first is maintaining global technology leadership within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The second is enabling global industrial leadership for nuclear vendors and suppliers. The third is focused on utility optimization of nuclear energy within the clean energy portfolio. An effective public-private partnership is required to achieve these goals. DOEs recognizes the recent sense of urgency new developers and investors have in getting their concepts to market. They know that time to market for nuclear technology takes too long and the facilities needed to conduct the necessary research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities are very expensive to develop and maintain. Early technologies, in the lower technology readiness levels (TRL) need materials testing, analysis, modeling, code development, etc., most of which currently exists in the DOE national laboratory system. However, mature technologies typically need large component testing and demonstration facilities, which are expensive and long-lead efforts. By understanding the needs of advanced nuclear technology developers, GAIN will connect DOE national laboratory capabilities (e.g., facilities, expertise, materials, and data) with industry RD&D needs. In addition, GAIN is working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to streamline processes and increase understanding of the licensing requirements for advanced reactors.

  5. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...

  6. Achieving Technological Literacy: A National Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance of technological literacy for the 21st century. Points out that, of the top 100 headlines of the 20th century, over 40 percent were related to technology, yet many people have an outdated notion of what technology really is. Discusses the need for standards of technological literacy. (JOW)

  7. Literacy and Communication Technologies: Distance Education Strategies for Literacy Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderinoye, Rashid

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the promotion of literacy through information and communication technologies (ICTs) and through various modes of distance learning. After a general discussion of these approaches, the article focuses on efforts towards reducing illiteracy in Nigeria through integrated strategies for literacy delivery and especially through…

  8. Information and Communications Technology Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifuddin Syarifuddin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of information and communication technology (ICT has brought changes for the people of Indonesia. With ICT, community can easily access a variety of information and support jobs. But the problem that arises is the uneven penetration of ICT in all parts of Indonesia, including in South Sulawesi. Giving rise to the digital divide as well as the weakness of ICT literacy. Therefore, this study aims to determine the ICT literacy community in South Sulawesi. The method used in this study is a survey with a quantitative approach. The results show that ICT (computer, mobile phone, and internet has been used by communities in South Sulawesi. Among the three media, mobile phone has the highest number of penetration followed by computer and the internet. The majority of respondents have also entered into 5 levels of ICT literacy mobile phones and computers as an integral part of daily activities. While the internet was still in level 3 where they have been used but not significantly.

  9. Improving Technology Literacy: Does It Open Doors to Traditional Content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether an identifiable link existed between gains in technology literacy and achievement in the areas of reading, mathematics, and language arts. Normal curve equivalent (NCE) content score changes from TerraNova assessments were calculated for approximately 5,000 students from fourth- to fifth-grade and 5,000 students…

  10. Technological Literacy and the Liberal Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Edward A., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Programs that illustrate the ways in which colleges and universities are helping students understand technological methods and issues are described. Some of the programs approach technological literacy from a humanities vantage point that integrates technology into the coursework, while others employ a strict technological approach that touches…

  11. Information And Communication Technology Literacy Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information And Communication Technology Literacy Among Academics In Ahmadu Bello ... horizon in education in USA was adopted as data collection instruments. ... The research discovered that computer system, CD-Rom, flash drives, ...

  12. "Lunch Is Gross": Gaining Access to Powerful Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This ethnographic study documents how a space for critical literacy practices emerged as one teacher attempted to make literacy learning authentic. The school lunch program in an urban elementary district provided the theme for an authentic and focused literacy unit. Throughout this focus unit, the students not only met state standards but also…

  13. Literacy and Communication Technologies: Distance Education Strategies for Literacy Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderinoye, Rashid

    2008-11-01

    This article examines the promotion of literacy through information and communication technologies (ICTs) and through various modes of distance learning. After a general discussion of these approaches, the article focuses on efforts towards reducing illiteracy in Nigeria through integrated strategies for literacy delivery and especially through distance learning. After highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of these measures, the author makes some suggestions on how to maximize their effectiveness in helping Nigeria to achieve the targets of the Education for All agenda and the Millennium Development Goals.

  14. Teaching Embedded System Concepts for Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzker, M.; Schwandt, A.

    2011-01-01

    A basic understanding of technology is recognized as important knowledge even for students not connected with engineering and computer science. This paper shows that embedded system concepts can be taught in a technological literacy course. An embedded system teaching block that has been used in an electronics module for non-engineers is…

  15. Validation of the Information/Communications Technology Literacy Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Technical Report 1360 Validation of the Information / Communications Technology Literacy Test D. Matthew Trippe Human Resources Research...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Validation of the Information / Communications Technology Literacy Test 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER W91WAS-09-D-0013 5b...validate a measure of cyber aptitude, the Information / Communications Technology Literacy Test (ICTL), in predicting trainee performance in Information

  16. Technology Links to Literacy: A Case Book of Special Educators' Use of Technology To Promote Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, James M., Ed.; Burton-Radzely, Lisa, Ed.

    This monograph describes how special educators in seven schools are using technology to promote literacy. Profiles of the different schools provide concrete examples of technology use in different instructional settings and demonstrate how various educational philosophies and implementation efforts help schools build successful technology-based…

  17. "Handy Manny" and the Emergent Literacy Technology Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourcade, Jack J.; Parette, Howard P., Jr.; Boeckmann, Nichole; Blum, Craig

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the use of a technology toolkit to support emergent literacy curriculum and instruction in early childhood education settings. Components of the toolkit include hardware and software that can facilitate key emergent literacy skills. Implementation of the comprehensive technology toolkit enhances the development of these…

  18. Implementation literacy strategies on health technology theme Learning to enhance Indonesian Junior High School Student's Physics Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feranie, Selly; Efendi, Ridwan; Karim, Saeful; Sasmita, Dedi

    2016-08-01

    The PISA results for Indonesian Students are lowest among Asian countries in the past two successive results. Therefore various Innovations in science learning process and its effectiveness enhancing student's science literacy is needed to enrich middle school science teachers. Literacy strategies have been implemented on health technologies theme learning to enhance Indonesian Junior high school Student's Physics literacy in three different health technologies e.g. Lasik surgery that associated with application of Light and Optics concepts, Ultra Sonographer (USG) associated with application of Sound wave concepts and Work out with stationary bike and walking associated with application of motion concepts. Science learning process involves at least teacher instruction, student learning and a science curriculum. We design two main part of literacy strategies in each theme based learning. First part is Integrated Reading Writing Task (IRWT) is given to the students before learning process, the second part is scientific investigation learning process design packed in Problem Based Learning. The first part is to enhance student's science knowledge and reading comprehension and the second part is to enhance student's science competencies. We design a transformation from complexity of physics language to Middle school physics language and from an expensive and complex science investigation to a local material and simply hands on activities. In this paper, we provide briefly how literacy strategies proposed by previous works is redesigned and applied in classroom science learning. Data were analysed using t- test. The increasing value of mean scores in each learning design (with a significance level of p = 0.01) shows that the implementation of this literacy strategy revealed a significant increase in students’ physics literacy achievement. Addition analysis of Avarage normalized gain show that each learning design is in medium-g courses effectiveness category

  19. A review of health literacy and diabetes: opportunities for technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, Suzanne Austin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the published literature on health literacy and diabetes, as well as identify opportunities for technology to strengthen information skills and modify behavior to improve diabetes health outcomes. Medline (1990-2008), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1990-2008), and the Education Resources Information Center (1990-2008) were searched, and reference lists from included articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Articles were included that presented measures of literacy or numeracy specific to diabetes, examined associations between health literacy and diabetes outcomes, or tested a health literacy intervention among persons with diabetes. Twenty-four articles were included in this review. Five articles reported on measures of literacy or numeracy specific to diabetes. Thirteen of the fifteen cross-sectional studies (87%) associated limited health literacy with poorer diabetes outcomes. Two of the four (50%) health literacy intervention studies lead to improved health outcomes. The cross-sectional studies provide evidence of an association between health literacy and diabetes outcomes; however, there is a need to design and test strategies to improve diabetes health outcomes that consider health literacy. Information and communication technology opportunities could help to mediate the effect that limited health literacy has on diabetes-related health outcomes. © Diabetes Technology Society

  20. Scientific and Technological Literacy as a Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourez, Gerard

    1997-01-01

    Speculates on the strength of the relationships between science, technology, and society. Provides information on a social movement called Scientific and Technological Literacy (STL) and discusses how familiar individuals need to be with these concepts. (DDR)

  1. Teachers enacting a technology-rich curriculum for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Cviko, A., McKenney, S., & Voogt, J. (2012). Teachers enacting a technology-rich curriculum for emergent literacy. Educational Technology Research and Development, 60(1), 31-54. doi:10.1007/s11423-011-9208-3

  2. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students’ language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of technology on teens, and scant literature is available that incorporates the perspective of urban and linguistically diverse students on the feasibility of applying new technologies in teaching and learning literacy in intact classrooms. This paper reports urban adolescents’ perspectives on the use of technology within teen culture, for learning in general and for literacy instruction in particular. Focus group interviews were conducted among linguistically diverse urban students in grades 6, 7 and 8 in a lower income neighborhood in the Northeastern region of the United States. The major findings of the study were that 1 urban teens primarily and almost exclusively used social media and technology devices for peer socializing, 2 they were interested in using technology to improve their literacy skills, but did not appear to voluntarily or independently integrate technology into learning, and 3 8th graders were considerably more sophisticated in their use of technology and their suggestions for application of technology to literacy learning than 6th and 7th graders. These findings lead to suggestions for developing effective literacy instruction using new technologies.

  3. Information Literacy Education on College of Technology at Kyushu Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Ikeda, Naomitsu; Irie, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Yoichi; Oshima, Shunsuke; Murayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Hirotsugu

    Recently, the importance of an engineering education increases by the development of the information technology (IT) . Development of the information literacy education is important to deal with new IT in the education on college of technology. Our group investigated the current state of information literacy education on college of technology at Kyushu area and the secondary education. In addition, we investigated about the talent whom the industrial world requested. From these investigation results, this paper proposed cooperation with the elementary and secondary education, enhancement of intellectual property education, introduction of information ethics education, introduction of career education and enhancement of PBL to information literacy education on college of technology.

  4. Assessing gains in teacher knowledge and confidence in a long-duration climate literacy initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, D. B.; Kendall, L.; Yelton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Climate Literacy: Integrating Modeling & Technology Experiences (CLIMATE) in NC Classrooms, an interdisciplinary, global climate change program for NC high school science teachers is administered by UNC Chapel Hill's Institute for the Environment (IE) with funding from NASA's Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Program. Currently in its third year, this year-long program serves 24 teaching fellows annually and combines hands-on climate science investigations with experiential learning in fragile ecosystem environments to achieve the following program goals: increased teacher knowledge of climate change science and predicted impacts; increased teacher knowledge of modeling and technology resources, with an emphasis on those provided by NASA; and increased teacher confidence in using technology to address climate change education. A mixed-methods evaluation approach that includes external evaluation is providing quantitative and qualitative data about the extent to which program goals are being achieved. With regard to increases in teacher knowledge, teachers often self-report an increase in knowledge as a result of a program activity; this session will describe our strategies for assessing actual gains in teacher knowledge which include pre- and post-collaborative concept mapping and pre- and post-open response questionnaires. For each evaluation approach utilized, the process of analyzing these qualitative data will be discussed and results shared. For example, a collaborative concept mapping activity for assessment of learning as a result of the summer institute was utilized to assess gains in content knowledge. Working in small groups, teachers were asked to identify key vocabulary terms and show their relationship to one another via a concept map to answer these questions: What is global climate change? What is/are the: evidence? mechanisms? causes? consequences? Concept maps were constructed at the beginning (pre) and again at the end (post) of the Summer

  5. The Nursing Informatician's Role in Mediating Technology Related Health Literacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ramona; Carter-Templeton, Heather D

    2016-01-01

    The advent of computer based technology and the internet have not changed nurses' responsibility for patient education; but they are rapidly changing what we teach and how we teach. The challenge for nursing informaticians is to create innovative patient education models and applications with the goal of achieving literate, engaged, empowered and informed patients as well as preparing health professionals to maximize the advantages offered by digital media and other new technology based tools. This paper explores the interrelationship of basic literacy, health literacy and technology related literacies that provide the foundation for achieving these goals.

  6. ‘New’ literacies: technologies and values ‘New’ literacies: technologies and values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Knobel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is too easy to make light of ‘new literacies’ by saying things like: “Well, there are always newer ones coming along”. Such remarks suggest new literacies have a similar kind of life trajectory to an automobile: new in 2009, semi-new in 2010, and old hat by 2011. Against this kind of “that’s so yesterday” perspective, we suggest in this article that ‘new literacies’ are best understood in terms of an historical period of social, cultural, institutional, economic, and intellectual change that is likely to span many decades – some of which are already behind us. We associate new literacies with an historical conjuncture and an ascending social paradigm. From this perspective we suggest that the kinds of practices we currently identify as new literacies will cease to be ‘new’ once the social ways characterizing the ascending paradigm have become sufficiently establised and grounded to be regarded as conventional. Furthermore we suggest that at the heart of the idea of new ethos stuff is the idea of technological change aligning with a range of increasingly popular values.It is too easy to make light of ‘new literacies’ by saying things like: “Well, there are always newer ones coming along”. Such remarks suggest new literacies have a similar kind of life trajectory to an automobile: new in 2009, semi-new in 2010, and old hat by 2011. Against this kind of “that’s so yesterday” perspective, we suggest in this article that ‘new literacies’ are best understood in terms of an historical period of social, cultural, institutional, economic, and intellectual change that is likely to span many decades – some of which are already behind us. We associate new literacies with an historical conjuncture and an ascending social paradigm. From this perspective we suggest that the kinds of practices we currently identify as new literacies will cease to be ‘new’ once the social ways characterizing the ascending

  7. Relationship between Pre-School Preservice Teachers' Environmental Literacy and Science and Technology Literacy Self Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmeli, Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between preschool teachers' environmental literacy and their science and technology self efficacy beliefs. 120 preschool teachers from teacher education programme at one university participated in this study. Data were collected by using Environmental Literacy Scale and Science and Technology Literacy Self…

  8. Relationship between Pre-School Preservice Teachers' Environmental Literacy and Science and Technology Literacy Self Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmeli, Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between preschool teachers' environmental literacy and their science and technology self efficacy beliefs. 120 preschool teachers from teacher education programme at one university participated in this study. Data were collected by using Environmental Literacy Scale and Science and Technology Literacy Self…

  9. Relationship between Pre-School Preservice Teachers' Environmental Literacy and Science and Technology Literacy Self Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmeli, Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between preschool teachers' environmental literacy and their science and technology self efficacy beliefs. 120 preschool teachers from teacher education programme at one university participated in this study. Data were collected by using Environmental Literacy Scale and Science and Technology Literacy Self…

  10. Literacy Instruction in the Brave New World of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Technology integration into language arts instruction has been slow and tentative, even as information technologies have evolved with frightening speed. Today's teachers need to be aware of several extant and unchanging realities: Technology is now indispensable to literacy development; reading with technology requires new skills and…

  11. Media Literacy Education: Harnessing the Technological Imaginary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Katherine G.

    2011-01-01

    An important challenge for media literacy education in the next decade will be to cultivate a commanding voice in the cultural conversation about new and emerging communication media. To really have a stake in the social, economic and educational developments that emerge around new digital media in the U.S. and globally, media literacy educators…

  12. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  13. Hidden Disruptions: Technology and Technological Literacy as Influences on Professional Writing Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to explore whether and in what ways individual students' technological literacies might impact collaborative teams. For the collaborative team discussed in this article, technological literacy--specifically, limited repertoires for solving technical problems, clashes between document management strategies,…

  14. Incorporating Disciplinary Literacy in Technology and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of how to relate reading to a content area, specifically technology education. The author notes that, with the new focus on Common Core English Language Arts State Standards and state-developed standards, technology and engineering teachers should include disciplinary literacy in their curriculum. Academic…

  15. Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling to Examine How Individual SLPs Differentially Contribute to Children's Language and Literacy Gains in Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Kelly; Tambyraja, Sherine R; Logan, Jessica; Justice, Laura M; Schmitt, Mary Beth

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine the unique contributions in children's language and literacy gains, over 1 academic year, that are attributable to the individual speech-language pathologist (SLP) and (b) to explore possible child- and SLP-level factors that may further explain SLPs' contributions to children's language and literacy gains. Participants were 288 kindergarten and 1st-grade children with language impairment who were currently receiving school-based language intervention from SLPs. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we partitioned the variance in children's gains in language (i.e., grammar, vocabulary) and literacy (i.e., word decoding) that could be attributed to their individual SLP. Results revealed a significant contribution of individual SLPs to children's gains in grammar, vocabulary, and word decoding. Children's fall language scores and grade were significant predictors of SLPs' contributions, although no SLP-level predictors were significant. The present study makes a first step toward incorporating implementation science and suggests that, for children receiving school-based language intervention, variance in child language and literacy gains in an academic year is at least partially attributable to SLPs. Continued work in this area should examine the possible SLP-level characteristics that may further explicate the relative contributions of SLPs.

  16. Measuring the Influences That Affect Technological Literacy in Rhode Island High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study sampled the current state of technological literacy in Rhode Island high schools using a new instrument, the Technological Literacy Assessment, which was developed for this study. Gender inequalities in technological literacy were discovered, and possible causes and solutions are presented. This study suggests possible next steps for…

  17. Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Smeets, E. (2011, 13-16 September). Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education. Presentation and discussion in a cross-network symposium of networks 16 and 12 at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the “European Educational Research

  18. Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Smeets, E. (2011, 13-16 September). Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education. Presentation and discussion in a cross-network symposium of networks 16 and 12 at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the “European Educational Research Associatio

  19. Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Smeets, E. (2011, 13-16 September). Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education. Presentation and discussion in a cross-network symposium of networks 16 and 12 at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the “European Educational Research Associatio

  20. Using Mobile Technology to Support Literacy Coaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. C.; Martin, Aqueasha

    2013-01-01

    This article examines literacy coaches' (n = 7) digital note-taking practices using mobile technology and their influence on reflective practice. The study, which employed a design-based approach, investigated the coaches' transition from note-taking by paper and pencil to the note-taking application Evernote. Data included interviews with the…

  1. Teaching with Technology: An Examination of Literacy Instruction and the Use of Technology with Teacher Candidates and Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas-York, Keli; Wiedemann, Chantal; Bennett, Joelle

    2008-01-01

    The article describes teacher candidates' perceptions of the instructional effectiveness of integrating literacy and technology during the field experience component of a literacy methods course. An examination of the impact of the inclusion of technology with literacy instruction on student engagement was also conducted but no significant…

  2. Natives and Newcomers: Gaining Access to Literacy in a Classroom for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Claire; Padden, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Describes a residential school classroom for deaf third graders. A critical school skill, the ability to engage in literacy activities, grows from the ability to exploit American Sign Language-based (ASL) literacy practices, which are indigenous to the culture of signing deaf people and critical for literacy learning when ASL is the medium of…

  3. The Need for Increased Integration of Technology and Digital Skills in the Literacy Field in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the increasing need for literacy professionals and practitioners in Canada to integrate technology into literacy instruction. An overview of the current state of technology in education and workforce training is presented. This is contrasted with the literacy field, which remains heavily reliant on paper-based resources. The…

  4. A multimedia adult literacy program: Combining NASA technology, instructional design theory, and authentic literacy concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    For a number of years, the Software Technology Branch of the Information Systems Directorate has been involved in the application of cutting edge hardware and software technologies to instructional tasks related to NASA projects. The branch has developed intelligent computer aided training shells, instructional applications of virtual reality and multimedia, and computer-based instructional packages that use fuzzy logic for both instructional and diagnostic decision making. One outcome of the work on space-related technology-supported instruction has been the creation of a significant pool of human talent in the branch with current expertise on the cutting edges of instructional technologies. When the human talent is combined with advanced technologies for graphics, sound, video, CD-ROM, and high speed computing, the result is a powerful research and development group that both contributes to the applied foundations of instructional technology and creates effective instructional packages that take advantage of a range of advanced technologies. Several branch projects are currently underway that combine NASA-developed expertise to significant instructional problems in public education. The branch, for example, has developed intelligent computer aided software to help high school students learn physics and staff are currently working on a project to produce educational software for young children with language deficits. This report deals with another project, the adult literacy tutor. Unfortunately, while there are a number of computer-based instructional packages available for adult literacy instruction, most of them are based on the same instructional models that failed these students when they were in school. The teacher-centered, discrete skill and drill-oriented, instructional strategies, even when they are supported by color computer graphics and animation, that form the foundation for most of the computer-based literacy packages currently on the market may not

  5. LA ALFABETIZACIÓN TECNOLÓGICA THE TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Ortega Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La incorporación a la sociedad del conocimiento es posible mediante la alfabetización tecnológica. Para poder conseguir una educación de calidad a través del uso de las tecnologías es necesario una alfabetización tecnológica entendida como la capacitación no solo instrumental, sino la adquisición de las competencias necesarias para la utilización didáctica de las tecnologías y poder acceder al conocimiento. A través de la alfabetización tecnológica se democratizan los procesos de formación y se consigue la inclusión social, laboral y una mejora en la calidad de vida.The incorporation to the society of the knowledge is possible through the technological literacy. In order to achieve a quality education through the use of the technologies is necessary a technological literacy understood as the training not only instrument, but the acquisition of the necessary powers for the didactic use of technologies and to be able to access to the knowledge. Through the technological literacy are democratized formation processes and is achieved the social, work inclusion and an improvement in the quality of life.

  6. Boosting Technology Literacy in Deaf Students

    OpenAIRE

    Herbold, Blake

    2014-01-01

    Technology in education is a global phenomenon (Knezek, 2007). In an increasingly digital world, technology is rapidly changing the way we live. The advances of technology in society has created a demand for foundational technology skills in educational systems. Schools across the nation fall in line to revamp traditional curriculums with technology. A plethora of digital learning resources for educational use have surfaced, albeit none of the resources address the needs of a bilingual Deaf s...

  7. The Literacy Practices of Vocational Training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Mackay, James

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that vocational students' literacy practices are more demanding than is generally recognised. Employing a view of literacy acquisition as socialisation, we investigated the literacy practices of trades training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology, by interviewing tutors and examined course books and student writing. A…

  8. "Tech-Savviness" Meets Multiliteracies: Exploring Adolescent Girls' Technology-Mediated Literacy Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler-Olcott, Kelly; Mahar, Donna

    2003-01-01

    Explores early adolescent girls' use of digital technologies in their literacy practices. Highlights the technology-mediated literacy practices of two seventh-grade girls. Discusses two major themes which emerged from data analysis: the centrality of multimedia popular culture texts in the girls' technology-mediated designing; and the importance…

  9. Moral Literacy in Technological Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøjer, Jo; Dupret, Katia

    2014-01-01

    . Also, professionals try to assess the possible consequences of the involvement of specific technologies and adjust their actions in order to ensure ethical responsibility. Thus, ethics is necessary in order to obtain and sustain one's professionalism. This presents care institutions with the challenge...

  10. Digital Literacy and New Technological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feola, Elvia Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to reflect on the implications and challenges that experts in the field have to deal with when you want to evaluate the performance in the use of digital technologies in teaching. The argument stems from a contextual and social assessment, and then proceeds to an application and methodological connotation of digital literacy…

  11. Enhancing students' science literacy using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyawati, Sunarya, Yayan; Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    This research attempts to enhance students' science literacy in the aspects of students' science content, application context, process, and students' attitude using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology. The quasi-experimental method with pre-post test design was used to achieve these objectives. Seventy-two students of class XII at a high school were employed as research's subject. Thirty-six students were in control class and another thirty-six were in experiment class. Variance test (t-test) was performed on the average level of 95% to identify the differences of students' science literacy in both classes. As the result, there were significant different of learning outcomes between experiment class and control class. Almost half of students (41.67%) in experiment class are categorized as high. Therefore, the learning using solar cell learning multimedia can improve students' science literacy, especially in the students' science content, application context, and process aspects with n-gain(%) 59.19 (medium), 63.04 (medium), and 52.98 (medium). This study can be used to develop learning multimedia in other science context.

  12. Understanding Technology Literacy: A Framework for Evaluating Educational Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation in the United States currently mandates that technology be integrated into school curricula because of the popular belief that learning is enhanced through the use of technology. The challenge for educators is to understand how best to teach with technology while developing the technological expertise of their students. This…

  13. Information and Communication Technology (ICT Literacy: Integration and Assessment in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvin R. Katz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite coming of age with the Internet and other technology, many college students lack the information and communication technology (ICT literacy skills—--locating, evaluating, and communicating information—--necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available today. This paper presents a study of the validity of a simulations-based assessment of ICT literacy skills. Our overall goals for the assessment are to support ICT literacy instructional initiatives at colleges and universities.

  14. The Implementation of Web 2.0 Technology for Information Literacy Instruction in Thai University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawetrattanasatian, Oranuch

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology has drawn much attention recently as a fascinating tool for Information Literacy Instruction (ILI), especially in academic libraries. This research was aimed to investigate the implementation of Web 2.0 technology for ILI in Thai university libraries, in terms of information literacy skills being taught, types of Web 2.0…

  15. Influence of Health Literacy on Outcomes Using Telehomecare Technology: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtekaer Haesum, Lisa Korsbakke; Ehlers, Lars; Hejlesen, Ole K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature describing the interaction between the use of telehomecare technology and level of health literacy among chronic patients. The aim of the review was both to explore whether and how level of health literacy affects the ability to use telehomecare technology and, additionally, whether and…

  16. Effect of Physical Education Teachers' Computer Literacy on Technology Use in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' computer literacy has been identified as a factor that determines their technology use in class. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical education (PE) teachers' computer literacy and their technology use in PE. The study group consisted of 57 high school level in-service PE teachers. A survey was used…

  17. Middle School Special Education Teachers' Perceptions and Use of Assistive Technology in Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Emily C.; Richardson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In this research the authors examined middle school special education teachers' perceptions of assistive technology during literacy instruction with students with high incidence disabilities. A survey explored the use, effectiveness, and factors impacting use or effectiveness of assistive technology for literacy teaching and learning. Results…

  18. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  19. Using Communication Technology to Facilitate Scientific Literacy: A Framework for Engaged Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuskirk, Shireen Adele

    The purpose of this research project is to describe how existing communication technologies are used to foster scientific literacy for secondary students. This study develops a new framework as an analytic tool to categorize the activities of teachers and students involved in scientific literacy to describe what elements of scientific literacy are facilitated by such technologies. Four case studies are analyzed using the framework to describe the scientific literacy initiatives. Data collection at each site included interviews with the teacher, student focus groups, student surveys, and classroom observations. Qualitative analysis of the data provided insight into the learning activities and student experiences in the four cases. This study intentionally provides a platform for student voice. Very few previous empirical studies in the area of scientific literacy include the student experience. This represents a significant gap in the current literature on scientific literacy. An interpretation of scientific literacy that promotes student engagement, interaction, and initiative corresponds to a need to listen to students' perspectives on these experiences. Findings of the study indicated that the classroom activities depended on the teacher's philosophy regarding scientific literacy. Communication technology was ubiquitous; where the teacher did not initiate the use of social media in the classroom, the students did. The goal of supporting scientific literacy in students is an objective that extends beyond the boundaries of classroom walls, and it can be facilitated by technologies that seem both abundant and underutilized. Technology-enhanced pedagogy altered the classroom practices and resulted in more student participation and engagement.

  20. Community Colleges in the Information Age: Gains Associated with Students' Use of Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bodi; Horn, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Computer literacy is increasingly important in higher education, and many educational technology experts propose a more prominent integration of technology into pedagogy. Empirical evidence is needed to support these theories. This study examined community college students planning to transfer to 4-year universities and estimated the relationship…

  1. Mistaking Computers for Technology: Technology Literacy and the Digital Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Tel

    2006-01-01

    No other information and communication technology has swept the globe with greater speed than the Internet, having the potential to promote vast social, economic, and political transformations. As new technologies become available the pattern of adoption and diffusion creates disparities in access and ownership. At the most basic this gap is…

  2. The Effectiveness of a Geospatial Technologies-Integrated Curriculum to Promote Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Bodzin, A. M.; Peffer, T.; Sahagian, D. L.; Cirucci, L.

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a geospatial technologies - integrated climate change curriculum (http://www.ei.lehigh.edu/eli/cc/) to promote climate literacy in an urban school district. Five 8th grade Earth and Space Science classes in an urban middle school (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) consisting of three different ability level tracks participated in the study. Data gathering methods included pre/posttest assessments, daily classroom observations, daily teacher meetings, and examination of student produced artifacts. Data was gathered using a climate change literacy assessment instrument designed to measure students' climate change content knowledge. The items included distractors that address misunderstandings and knowledge deficits about climate change from the existing literature. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to compare the pre- and post-test assessment results. The results of these analyses were used to compare overall gains as well as ability level track groups. Overall results regarding the use of the climate change curriculum showed significant improvement in urban middle school students' understanding of climate change concepts. Effect sizes were large (ES>0.8) and significant (p<0.001) for the entire assessment and for each ability level subgroup. Findings from classroom observations, assessments embedded in the curriculum, and the examination of all student artifacts revealed that the use of geospatial technologies enable middle school students to improve their knowledge of climate change and improve their spatial thinking and reasoning skills.

  3. Pedagogical Praxis Surrounding the Integration of Photography, Visual Literacy, Digital Literacy, and Educational Technology into Business Education Classrooms: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Peter Allen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into how Marketing and Business Education Teachers utilize and integrate educational technology into curriculum through the use of photography. The ontology of this visual, technological, and language interface is explored with an eye toward visual literacy, digital literacy, and pedagogical praxis, focusing…

  4. Pedagogical Praxis Surrounding the Integration of Photography, Visual Literacy, Digital Literacy, and Educational Technology into Business Education Classrooms: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Peter Allen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into how Marketing and Business Education Teachers utilize and integrate educational technology into curriculum through the use of photography. The ontology of this visual, technological, and language interface is explored with an eye toward visual literacy, digital literacy, and pedagogical praxis, focusing…

  5. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  6. Impacts of a teacher geospatial technologies professional development project on student spatial literacy skills and interests in science and technology in grade 5--12 classrooms across Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Jeffrey Willard

    interest scores for the low quantity group either remained the same or increased. Changes between the two groups indicate a gain in spatial literacy skills for the high quantity group likely due to the greater amount of exposure and a decrease in interests in science and technology, possibly attributed to a point-of-saturation for students, resulting from to-much-all-at-once implementation.

  7. Relations among Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Classroom Quality, and Children's Language and Literacy Gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relations among preschool teachers' self-efficacy (n = 67), classroom quality (instructional and emotional support), and children's (n = 328) gains in print awareness and vocabulary knowledge over an academic year in the US. Results indicated that teachers' self-efficacy and classroom quality served as significant and…

  8. First Graders' Literacy and Self-Regulation Gains: The Effect of Individualizing Student Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Ponitz, Claire Cameron; Phillips, Beth M.; Travis, Q. Monet; Glasney, Stephanie; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effect of individualizing student instruction (ISI; N = 445 students, 46 classrooms) on first graders' self-regulation gains compared to a business-as-usual control group. Self-regulation, conceptualized as a constellation of executive skills, was positively associated with academic development. We hypothesized that the ISI…

  9. Small groups, big gains: efficacy of a tier 2 phonological awareness intervention with preschoolers with early literacy deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Lydia G; Spencer, Trina D; Olszewski, Arnold; Goldstein, Howard

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a phonological awareness (PA) intervention, designed for Tier 2 instruction in a Response to Intervention (RTI) model, delivered to small groups of preschoolers. A multiple-baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention on low-income preschool children's PA skills. A trained interventionist delivered small group sessions 3 to 4 days a week and ensured children received frequent opportunities to respond and contingent feedback. Participants received 28 to 36 lessons that lasted about 10 min each and focused on PA and alphabet knowledge. Initiation of intervention was staggered across 3 triads, and 7 children completed the study. The intervention produced consistent gains on weekly progress monitoring assessments of the primary outcome measure for first sound identification (First Sound Fluency). Most children also demonstrated gains on other measures of PA and alphabet knowledge. Results provide support for the application of a small group intervention consistent with an RTI framework and document the potential benefits of the intervention to learners who need early literacy instruction beyond the core curriculum.

  10. Health Literacy and Health Information Technology Adoption: The Potential for a New Digital Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry-Flynn, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Donovan, Erin E; Pounders, Kathrynn

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately one-half of American adults exhibit low health literacy and thus struggle to find and use health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative outcomes including overall poorer health. Health information technology (HIT) makes health information available directly to patients through electronic tools including patient portals, wearable technology, and mobile apps. The direct availability of this information to patients, however, may be complicated by misunderstanding of HIT privacy and information sharing. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether health literacy is associated with patients’ use of four types of HIT tools: fitness and nutrition apps, activity trackers, and patient portals. Additionally, we sought to explore whether health literacy is associated with patients’ perceived ease of use and usefulness of these HIT tools, as well as patients’ perceptions of privacy offered by HIT tools and trust in government, media, technology companies, and health care. This study is the first wide-scale investigation of these interrelated concepts. Methods Participants were 4974 American adults (n=2102, 42.26% male, n=3146, 63.25% white, average age 43.5, SD 16.7 years). Participants completed the Newest Vital Sign measure of health literacy and indicated their actual use of HIT tools, as well as the perceived ease of use and usefulness of these applications. Participants also answered questions regarding information privacy and institutional trust, as well as demographic items. Results Cross-tabulation analysis indicated that adequate versus less than adequate health literacy was significantly associated with use of fitness apps (P=.02), nutrition apps (P<.001), activity trackers (P<.001), and patient portals (P<.001). Additionally, greater health literacy was significantly associated with greater perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness across all HIT tools after controlling for demographics

  11. ICT literacy, information l

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact | Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    This paper discussed information communication technology (ICT) literacy as ... Questionnaire was used for data collection which yielded a 79.7% response ... Keywords: ICT literacy, information literacy, university libraries, computer literacy,.

  12. Integrating Technology in Early Literacy: A Snapshot of Community Innovation in Family Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Shayna

    2016-01-01

    As a growing number of young children across the country are using media and interactive technology on a daily basis, the conversation has shifted from whether technology is appropriate to use at all to how it should be used to best support children's early language and literacy development. A new brief released today, Integrating Technology in…

  13. Technology and Literacy: 21st Century Library Programming for Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jennifer; Braafladt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Technology may not be a magic wand, but innovative technology programming can genuinely help children become adept at navigating our increasingly wired world while also helping them develop deductive reasoning, math, and other vital literacy skills. One of the simplest and most powerful tools for technology-based public library programming is…

  14. Investigation on the Relationship between Information Communication Technology and Reading Literacy for Northeast Asian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yi-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of internet communication technologies (ICT usage and reading literacy of Northeast Asian Students in PISA 2009. ICT was crucial for all governments in the world towards promoting equity. ICT had been considered a low cost opportunity towards equalizing educational systems. A multilevel modelling (MLM was applied to identify at which school-level the largest variations in the three indicators exist in this study. With MLM, it could be examine simultaneously the effects of different hierarchical school-level variables; to take account of possible correlations of students’ reading literacy in this study within higher levels (Urbanization, Total number of students Computers for education which may otherwise lead to incorrect standard errors and inefficient estimates; to treat higher levels as related; and to examine inter-area variations at each level. The empirical results include the different between group components was significant. Self-confidence in ICT high level tasks was positive with students’ reading literacy, and self-confidence in ICT high level tasks was negative with students’ reading literacy. The urbanization of schools’ area and total number of students of schools were positive with students’ reading literacy. The urbanization of schools’ area was negative with the relationship of ICT for school related tasks and students’ reading literacy. Total number of students was negative with the relationship of ICT for school related tasks and students’ reading literacy, and ICT availability in school and students’ reading literacy.

  15. Secondary content area teachers speak about literacy and technology: Tensions, complexities, conceptualizations, and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Elizabeth Joy Petroelje

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to share the details, complexities, contradictions, parallels, conceptualizations, and practices of secondary content area teachers' use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to enhance literacy practices and learning. Specifically, the research questions were: How do English, Science, and Social Studies teachers conceptualize the impacts ICTs have on literacy practices and learning? What is the relationship between English, Science, and Social Studies teachers' conceptualizations and their use of ICTs in their everyday pedagogical practices to enhance literacy practices and learning? I used the notions of literacy as a social practice to frame the study and writing as a method of inquiry to analyze the teachers' conceptualizations and practices. Through observations and interviews, I learned the teachers' stories. Within these stories, four tensions emerged in regard to how the teachers negotiate between their conceptualizations and classroom practices: (1) access to ICTs adequate for the task; (2) sufficient levels of ICT knowledge for the task; (3) fear of the unknown; and (4) identification of who benefits form the ICTs and how these benefits can be determined. The conclusions, or major themes highlighted in the teachers' stories, are that: (a) technology seems to be an add-on to support well-established practices, (b) teachers cling to traditional literacy practices, (c) teachers take up and use ICTs and literacy for unique purposes based on their individual classroom contexts, and (d) teachers' tensions limit their ability to envision beyond what they currently see and do in regards to ICTs and literacy.

  16. New Literacies for New Learners: The Need for Digital Technologies in Primary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzani, Elena; Leu, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    All students must start learning new literacies skills early if they are to gain the skills they will need as adults. Integrating these skills into classroom instruction at a young age is especially important for economically disadvantaged students. Moreover, the interactive nature of the Internet and other digital tools may hold special learning…

  17. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daramola, Florence Olutunu; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Oyelekan, Oloyede Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the information and communication technology literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers out of which 360…

  18. Teacher knowledge for using technology to foster early literacy: A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, Nelleke; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Bradley, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to describe the knowledge and skills teachers need for using technology to foster early literacy development in kindergarten classrooms. The study was guided by three research questions, concerning 1) effects of specific technologies, 2) effective design characteris

  19. Bridging between Information Literacy and Information Technology in Singapore Schools: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Intan Azura; Foo, Schubert; Majid, Shaheen

    2007-01-01

    With rapid developments in information technology (IT) and the increasingly sophisticated abilities of IT users, schools have the inevitable task of integrating IT in their school curriculum. Owing to the prevalent use of educational technology in schools, it is often questioned whether information literacy (IL) is necessary in the school…

  20. A Constructivist Stretch: Preservice Teachers Meet Preteens in a Technology-Based Literacy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, John F.; Anderson, Rebecca S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study conducted within a constructivist framework to examine pre-service teachers' development and implementation of a collaborative, technology-based literacy project with 11- and 12-year-old learners. Concludes that the pre-service teachers learned the value of Internet technology, e-mail, and hypermedia applications, but problems…

  1. Leveraging New Technologies for Professional Learning in Education: Digital Literacies as Culture Shift in Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Janet; Lebans, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Providing just-in-time job-embedded professional learning using a technologically mediated model achieves professional growth goals and encourages teachers to build digital literacy competencies and incorporate new technologies in instructional approaches in the classroom. This article highlights the lessons learned from an award-winning…

  2. Teacher knowledge for using technology to foster early literacy: A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, Nelleke; Belo, Nelleke; McKenney-Jensh, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke; Bradley, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to describe the knowledge and skills teachers need for using technology to foster early literacy development in kindergarten classrooms. The study was guided by three research questions, concerning 1) effects of specific technologies, 2) effective design

  3. Teacher knowledge for using technology to foster early literacy : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, N.; McKenney, S.; Voogt, J.; Bradley, B.

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to describe the knowledge and skills teachers need for using technology to foster early literacy development in kindergarten classrooms. The study was guided by three research questions, concerning 1) effects of specific technologies, 2) effective design

  4. Literacy disparities in patient access and health-related use of Internet and mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stacy C; O'Conor, Rachel; Bojarski, Elizabeth A; Mullen, Rebecca; Patzer, Rachel E; Vicencio, Daniel; Jacobson, Kara L; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Age and race-related disparities in technology use have been well documented, but less is known about how health literacy influences technology access and use. To assess the association between patients' literacy skills and mobile phone ownership, use of text messaging, Internet access, and use of the Internet for health-related purposes. A secondary analysis utilizing data from 1077 primary care patients enrolled in two, multisite studies from 2011-2013. Patients were administered an in-person, structured interview. Patients with adequate health literacy were more likely to own a mobile phone or smartphone in comparison with patients having marginal or low literacy (mobile phone ownership: 96.8 vs. 95.2 vs. 90.1%, respectively, P text messaging (78.6 vs. 75.2 vs. 53.1%, P literacy-related disparities in technology access and use are widespread, with lower literate patients being less likely to own smartphones or to access and use the Internet, particularly for health reasons. Future interventions should consider these disparities and ensure that health promotion activities do not further exacerbate disparities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Health Literacy and Health Information Technology Adoption: The Potential for a New Digital Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Mabry-Flynn, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Donovan, Erin E; Pounders, Kathrynn

    2016-10-04

    Approximately one-half of American adults exhibit low health literacy and thus struggle to find and use health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative outcomes including overall poorer health. Health information technology (HIT) makes health information available directly to patients through electronic tools including patient portals, wearable technology, and mobile apps. The direct availability of this information to patients, however, may be complicated by misunderstanding of HIT privacy and information sharing. The purpose of this study was to determine whether health literacy is associated with patients' use of four types of HIT tools: fitness and nutrition apps, activity trackers, and patient portals. Additionally, we sought to explore whether health literacy is associated with patients' perceived ease of use and usefulness of these HIT tools, as well as patients' perceptions of privacy offered by HIT tools and trust in government, media, technology companies, and health care. This study is the first wide-scale investigation of these interrelated concepts. Participants were 4974 American adults (n=2102, 42.26% male, n=3146, 63.25% white, average age 43.5, SD 16.7 years). Participants completed the Newest Vital Sign measure of health literacy and indicated their actual use of HIT tools, as well as the perceived ease of use and usefulness of these applications. Participants also answered questions regarding information privacy and institutional trust, as well as demographic items. Cross-tabulation analysis indicated that adequate versus less than adequate health literacy was significantly associated with use of fitness apps (P=.02), nutrition apps (Pliteracy was significantly associated with greater perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness across all HIT tools after controlling for demographics. Regarding privacy perceptions of HIT and institutional trust, patients with greater health literacy often demonstrated decreased privacy

  6. Engaging the Homeless through Technology and Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Fannie M.

    2013-01-01

    The University of Louisville (U of L) Libraries' outreach mission is to encourage the development of information literacy (IL) and critical thinking in individuals. In March 2010, a community engagement partnership began between Ekstrom Library and the Wayside Christian Mission for the libraries to provide a basic computer skills class to its…

  7. Popularising Chemistry in Secondary Schools--through the development of Scientific and Technological Literacy for All

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jack Holbrook

    2002-01-01

    While chemistry is popular for children of primary school age, its popularity drops dramatically in secondary schools. A potential solution to address this is to recognise the need for greater relevance - relevance to the curriculum, to the needs of society and, in the eyes of the students.The paper tries to puts forward a rethink of the philosophy for school chemistry education, based on the und erlying belief that chemistry education is an integral part of education. The target is labelled scientific and technological literacy for all (STL). STL rejects the notion that chemistry is taught solely to acquire the abilities to be a scientist and supports the vision of a single curriculum goal, applicable to all students.Besides being a philosophy, STL is also a teaching approach. This approach is to initiate the teaching of chemistry topics, starting from a carefully chosen society perspective and to introduce the conceptual learning on a need - to - know basis.A limitation is the professional development of teachers. Suggestion for overcoming this involve workshop on materials development. A concern is expressed in cases where teachers make use of ready - made teaching materials ( a common practice),without first gaining an understanding and an appreciation of the intended philosophy related to these materials.

  8. Information Technology How Leading Firms Use It to Gain an Advantage

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, William V

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the strategic principles fundamental to using information technology to gain market control. This book provides case examples of how to use IT. It is designed to help managers struggling with how to harness the information revolution. It describes how non-information technology companies are employing strategic principles and using it.

  9. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Schmidt Hanbidge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative mlearning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five different classes majoring in psychology, social work, education or social development studies in an attempt to determine the effectiveness of using mobile technology to enhance students’ information literacy skills and learning experiences. Pre and post-test measures, and survey questionnaires generated quantitative and qualitative data that was analyzed to determine the degree of changes in frequency of mobile device information literacy access and fluency in digital literacy skills. The article highlights the Mobile Information Literacy innovation and includes the development and design of the mobile lessons, interactive exercises, and its applications. The study’s main results and conclusions are also discussed. Additionally, the successes and challenges of the pilot to support anytime, anywhere student mobile information literacy eLearning training that engages mobile learners and enhances their learning experience are identified and critically reflected upon to improve the innovation for stage two of the project.

  10. Literacy, Information and Communication Technology as Tools for Empowerment of Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Tenibiaje Dele

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the present position of literacy, information and communication technology (ICT) in prisons by examining the perception of inmates. The study adopted a descriptive survey using structured questionnaire and observation guides on a randomly and purposively drawn sample of 664 inmates out of a population of 47,628 inmates…

  11. Teacher design of technology for emergent literacy: An explorative feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney-Jensh, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data was collected to explore the

  12. The Impact of Content-Based Network Technologies on Perceptions of Nutrition Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Hannah; Church, E. Mitchell; Brewer, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumers are exposed to obesogenic environments on a regular basis. Building nutrition literacy is critical for sustaining healthy dietary habits for a lifetime and reducing the prevalence of chronic disease. Purpose: There is a need to investigate the impact of content-based network (CBN) technologies on perceptions of nutrition…

  13. The Digital Literacy Debate: An Investigation of Digital Propensity and Information and Communication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasah, Angelique; DaCosta, Boaventura; Kinsell, Carolyn; Seok, Soonhwa

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests students' use of information and communication technology (ICT) may be more a matter of digital literacy and access rather than a generational trait. We sought to identify ICT preferences of post-secondary students (N = 580) through a Digital Propensity Index (DPI), investigating communication methods, Internet practices and the…

  14. The Digital Literacy Debate: An Investigation of Digital Propensity and Information and Communication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasah, Angelique; DaCosta, Boaventura; Kinsell, Carolyn; Seok, Soonhwa

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests students' use of information and communication technology (ICT) may be more a matter of digital literacy and access rather than a generational trait. We sought to identify ICT preferences of post-secondary students (N = 580) through a Digital Propensity Index (DPI), investigating communication methods, Internet practices and the…

  15. Teacher Design of Technology for Emergent Literacy: An Explorative Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data was collected to explore the design and implementation of the learning…

  16. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only

  17. Technological Literacy Learning with Cumulative and Stepwise Integration of Equations into Electrical Circuit Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozogul, G.; Johnson, A. M.; Moreno, R.; Reisslein, M.

    2012-01-01

    Technological literacy education involves the teaching of basic engineering principles and problem solving, including elementary electrical circuit analysis, to non-engineering students. Learning materials on circuit analysis typically rely on equations and schematic diagrams, which are often unfamiliar to non-engineering students. The goal of…

  18. Teachers conversations during design of technology rich curriculum activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Ferry; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2014-01-01

    Boschman, F., McKenney, S. & Voogt (2013). Teachers conversations during design of technology rich curriculum activities for early literacy. Paper presentation at the European Association for Practitioner Research on Improving Learning (EAPRIL) Annual Conference. November 27-29, Biel/Bienne, Switzer

  19. Librarians as Leaders in Professional Learning Communities through Technology, Literacy, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Dianne; Mayer, Alisande; Morin, Heather; Willis, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Librarians promote student learning through technology, literacy, and collaboration with teachers. Each element provides ample opportunities to offer leadership and to learn as a member of the learning community. The librarian demonstrates leadership within the professional learning community (PLC) by providing professional development for…

  20. Teacher design of technology for emergent literacy: An explorative feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data was collected to explore the

  1. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only role

  2. New Literacies and Emerging Technologies: Perspectives from U.S. and Chinese Middle Level Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Hiller A.; Morris, Gwynn; Zhang, Junzheng

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on middle grades teachers from the United States and China, the two countries with the highest Internet use, in an attempt to understand both groups' perspectives on integrating new literacies and technologies into their teaching. Survey and focus group results indicate that, although U.S. and Chinese teachers are operating…

  3. Feminist Articulations, Social Literacies, and Ubiquitous Mobile Technology Use in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanya, Brenda N.; Odero, Phantus W.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the changes occurring in learning and literacy in the age of ubiquitous mobile phone use. Focusing on rural Kenyan women's use of mobile phone technologies in civic education programs, mobile banking, and to contact family members, the article explores how these women's use of mobile phones, based on their everyday needs, has…

  4. An Analysis of the Educational Significance of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Scientific and Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laherto, Antti

    2010-01-01

    Due to the rapid development and growing societal role of nanoscience and nanotechnology (NST), these emerging fields are also growing in educational importance. The demands for incorporating NST-related issues into curricula are often expressed with reference to the goals of scientific and technological literacy. This paper reports on a…

  5. Early Adopters: Playing New Literacies and Pretending New Technologies in Print-Centric Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, semiotic analysis of children's practices and designs with video game conventions considers how children use play and drawing as spatializing literacies that make room to import imagined technologies and user identities. Microanalysis of video data of classroom interactions collected during a three year ethnographic study of…

  6. Predicting Academic Success and Technological Literacy in Secondary Education: A Learning Styles Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Stanislav; Szewczyk-Zakrzewska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the predictive validity of learning styles on academic achievement and technological literacy (TL). For this purpose, secondary school students were recruited (n = 150). An empirical research design was followed where the TL test was used with a learning style inventory measuring learning orientation, processing…

  7. The Digital Literacy Practices of Latina/o Immigrant Parents in an After-School Technology Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Casas, Margarita; Sánchez, Patricia; Ek, Lucila D.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from a larger qualitative four-year study of an after-school technology partnership called "La Clase Mágica" at the University of Texas at San Antonio (LCM@UTSA), the authors focus on how digital literacies mediate the literacy learning of Latina/o bilingual immigrant parents. They also discuss how the elementary school and…

  8. Materialist Perspectives on Digital Technologies: Informing Debates on Digital Literacy and Competence

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Publisher's version, source: http://doi.org/10.1515/nor-2016-0006. The present article brings critical media research and science and technology studies (STS) into dialogue with approaches to digital literacy and digital competencies in educational contexts. In particular, it focuses on material aspects of new information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as technical infrastructure, economic conditions, ecological consequences, and code-based as well as embodied forms of impact, ...

  9. Enhancing RN-to-BSN students' information literacy skills through the use of instructional technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Michelle A; Hightower, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing advocates that professional nurses have the information literacy skills essential for evidence-based practice. As nursing schools embrace evidence-based models to prepare students for nursing careers, faculty can collaborate with librarians to create engaging learning activities focused on the development of information literacy skills. Instructional technology tools such as course management systems, virtual classrooms, and online tutorials provide opportunities to reach students outside the traditional campus classroom. This article discusses the collaborative process between faculty and a library instruction coordinator and strategies used to create literacy learning activities focused on the development of basic database search skills for a Computers in Nursing course. The activities and an online tutorial were included in a library database module incorporated into WebCT. In addition, synchronous classroom meeting software was used by the librarian to reach students in the distance learning environment. Recommendations for module modifications and faculty, librarian, and student evaluations are offered.

  10. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Olutunu Daramola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the ICT literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers consisting of 360 males and 248 females. The instrument used for the study was a researcher-designed questionnaire with a reliability index of .74. The results indicated that student-teachers in North-central Nigeria have an average ICT literacy level. No significant difference was established in the level of ICT literacy between male and female student-teachers {t(636=1.672 >.05} and there was no significant difference in the level of ICT literacy by student-teachers in the Arts, Sciences, and Social Sciences {F(2,635 = 0.935 > 0.05}. It was recommended that universities make available more ICT equipment and facilitate the student-teachers in adopting the culture of integrating ICT into pedagogy and educational administration since they have an average ICT literacy level.

  11. Technological Literacy for Students Aged 6-18: A New Method for Holistic Measuring of Knowledge, Capabilities, Critical Thinking and Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Stanislav; Jamšek, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Technological literacy is identified as a vital achievement of technology- and engineering-intensive education. It guides the design of technology and technical components of educational systems and defines competitive employment in technological society. Existing methods for measuring technological literacy are incomplete or complicated,…

  12. Use of change management theories in gaining acceptance of telemedicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufo, Rebecca Zapatochny

    2012-01-01

    The success of telemedicine applications within health care begins with the process of implementing planned change. The attitudes of staff and their willingness to embrace new technology can be positively influenced in order to gain acceptance of new ways to perform tasks. Telemedicine applications have been designed to improve operational efficiency and obtain improved outcomes, but system designers and procurers are dependent upon the organization's leadership to effect attitudinal and behavioral changes that are essential for acceptance and usage of new technology.

  13. A Comparison of Gains in Keypad Response Technology Classroom with Other Pedagogies in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from the socio-cultural theory of Vygotsky, this study compared the academic performance gains scores of pupils in a Keypad Response Technology (KRT) class with those in two other pedagogies to determine the learners' language proficiency level in ESL classroom. A sample of 99 Nigerian primary six pupils participated in the study.…

  14. The use and application of assistive technology to promote literacy in early childhood: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burne, Brian; Knafelc, Valerie; Melonis, Maureen; Heyn, Patricia C

    2011-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Act was implemented in 1975 to assure that all children aged 0-21 years old have access and the right to an equal education. However, young children with disabilities continue to need additional support to meet the reading readiness standards as outlined in The No Child Left Behind legislation (2004). Although all children benefit from readiness skills, it is essential for children with special needs. With the technology boom of the past decade, assistive technology (AT) has been used increasingly to enhance emerging literacy skills. In order to identify current trends in the use of AT as a means to enhance emergent literacy skills in young children with disabilities, a systematic review of the literature was undertaken. The findings from this review support the scarcity of empirical research demonstrating the benefit of AT to promote emergent literacy with young children with disabilities. We also found a need for evidence supporting education approaches for the proper use of AT in early childhood literacy as well as little family knowledge regarding the implementation and instructional use of AT.

  15. Ella-V and technology usage technology usage in an english language and literacy acquisition validation randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin P. Corcoran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of technology to provide virtual professional development (VPD for teachers and to conduct classroom observations in a study of English Language Learner (ELL instruction in grades K–3. The technology applications were part of a cluster randomized control trial (RCT design for a federally funded longitudinal validation study of a particular program, English Language and Literacy Acquisition-Validation, ELLA- V, to determine its degree of impact on English oral language/literacy, reading, and science across 63 randomly assigned urban, suburban, and rural schools (first year of implementation. ELLA-V also examines the impact of bimonthly VPD for treatment teachers compared to comparison group teachers on pedagogical skills, measured by sound observation instruments, and on student achievement, measured by state/national English language/literacy/reading tests and a national science test. This study features extensive technology use via virtual observations, bimonthly VPD, and randomly assigned treatment and control schools with students served in English as second language (ESL instructional time. The study design and methodology are discussed relativeto the specialized uses of technology and issues involving the evaluation of technology’s contribution to the intervention of interest and of the efficient, cost-effective execution of the study.

  16. "One hundred percent efficiency": Technology and the pursuit of scientific literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kenneth Paul

    This dissertation examined the role of technology in science education during the twentieth century. A historical approach was taken to examine teacher practices in the use of technology. The three technologies considered in this study were the motion picture, the television, and the computer. As an organizing principle, historical definitions of "scientific literacy" were used to examine the goals of using technology within science education. The evolution of the concept of science literacy is traced from the early part of the twentieth century to the late 1990s. Documentation examined revealed the "best practices" associated with the use of technology. The use of the motion picture was traced from the silent film through film loops, videotape, videodisc and the advent of the digital video disc, and the means by which teachers used this technology were considered. The instructional use of television was examined from several different approaches: commercial broadcasts, educational and instructional programming, closed circuit approaches and the use of cable and satellite programming. The manner in which these approaches were used to achieve goals of scientific literacy was considered. The use of the computer was examined in terms of the purpose of the software involved. Teaching practice to achieve scientific literacy, using computers as a means of accessing information, as an analytical tool, as a creativity tool, and as a means of communication were addressed. In each of these technologies, similar implementation trends were present within each one. The literature supporting the use of the technology described first the focus on the hardware, followed by the development of appropriate pedagogy, and then by the proliferation of software supporting the use of the technology. Suggestions for additional study were offered as well as speculation as to future practices with technology in science teaching. Investigations using expectation-value theory suggest

  17. An Intelligent Computer-aided Training System (CAT) for Diagnosing Adult Illiterates: Integrating NASA Technology into Workplace Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaden, David B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An important part of NASA's mission involves the secondary application of its technologies in the public and private sectors. One current application being developed is The Adult Literacy Evaluator, a simulation-based diagnostic tool designed to assess the operant literacy abilities of adults having difficulties in learning to read and write. Using Intelligent Computer-Aided Training (ICAT) system technology in addition to speech recognition, closed-captioned television (CCTV), live video and other state-of-the-art graphics and storage capabilities, this project attempts to overcome the negative effects of adult literacy assessment by allowing the client to interact with an intelligent computer system which simulates real-life literacy activities and materials and which measures literacy performance in the actual context of its use. The specific objectives of the project are as follows: (1) to develop a simulation-based diagnostic tool to assess adults' prior knowledge about reading and writing processes in actual contexts of application; (2) to provide a profile of readers' strengths and weaknesses; and (3) to suggest instructional strategies and materials which can be used as a beginning point for remediation. In the first and development phase of the project, descriptions of literacy events and environments are being written and functional literacy documents analyzed for their components. From these descriptions, scripts are being generated which define the interaction between the student, an on-screen guide and the simulated literacy environment.

  18. Bandwidth and Gain Enhancement of Patch Antenna with Stacked Parasitic Strips Based on LTCC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact patch antenna with stacked parasitic strips (SPSs based on low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC technology is presented. By adding three pairs of SPSs above the traditional patch antenna, multiple resonant modes are excited to broaden the bandwidth. At the same time, the SPSs act as directors to guide the antenna radiation toward broadside direction to enhance the gain. The measured results show that the prototype antenna achieves an impedance bandwidth of 16% for S11<-10 dB (32.1–37.9 GHz and a maximum gain of about 8 dBi at 35 GHz. Furthermore, the radiation patterns and gain are relatively stable within the operating bandwidth. The total volume of the antenna is only 8 × 8 × 1.1 mm3.

  19. Literacy, Instruction, and Technology: Meeting Millennials on Their Own Turf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Novice teachers today struggle to integrate engaging pedagogy into their standards based curriculum. 21st century students have been immersed in technology from birth and are accustomed to multi-tasking with several types of technology each day. Students no longer rely on the traditional ways of communication and absorb their information via…

  20. Deconstructing Digital Natives: Young People, Technology, and the New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There have been many attempts to define the generation of students who emerged with the Web and new digital technologies in the early 1990s. The term "digital native" refers to the generation born after 1980, which has grown up in a world where digital technologies and the internet are a normal part of everyday life. Young people belonging to this…

  1. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  2. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  3. Emergent Technological Literacy: What Do Children Bring to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    There has been very little research into children's technological practice in early childhood settings. This article describes four typical examples of the technological activity that occurs on a daily basis in New Zealand early childhood settings. It is suggested that children come to compulsory schooling with well-developed technological…

  4. Addressing Mathematics Literacy through Technology, Innovation, Design, and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litowitz, Len S.

    2009-01-01

    In an era when so much emphasis is being placed on the high-stakes standardized testing of fundamental subjects such as reading, writing, and math, it makes sense to demonstrate the role technology educators play in developing such fundamental knowledge and skills in youth. While the author believes that technology education contributes to the…

  5. Tech Tonic: Towards a New Literacy of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Colleen; Miller, Edward

    2004-01-01

    This report addresses the effect of technology on today's children, advancing three central arguments: (1) Our children face a technological frontier of irreversible changes in human biology and the world's ecology; (2) Children's lives are increasingly filled with screen time rather than real time with nature, caring adults, the arts, and…

  6. Middle School English Second Language (ESL) Teachers' Usage of Technology for Literacy Instruction and Their English Language Learners' (ELL) Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoki, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Digital technologies surround our lives today and many adolescent students are actively engaged in reading and writing through multimodal digital technologies. The omnipresence of digital technologies in today's society inevitably influences students' literacy practices. Thus, there is an imminent need on the teacher's part to infuse technologies…

  7. Digital literacy and problem solving in technology-rich environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Dolničar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development and progress, as well as the growing presence of information and communications technologies dictate the need for more highly developed digital skills in individuals. The paper focuses on the concepts of digital skills and problem solving in technology-rich environments. It examines these on the basis of empirical data obtained in the international study PIAAC. The introductory part presents an overview of the literature and the results of previous research in the field of measurement of digital skills, and data on the use of information society services among the EU Member States. The second part of the article refers to the results obtained in the study PIAAC. The results, confirmed by the results of other studies, showed the impact of age and education level on the problem solving in technology-rich environments. Article concludes with suggestions for improving the current state of integration of all population groups in training programs in the field of digital skills.

  8. A novel design of ultra-broadband, high-gain and high-linearity variable gain distributed amplifier in 0.13 μm CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharvand, Zainab; Hakimi, Ahmad; Rashedi, Esmat

    2016-12-01

    A high-gain, high-linearity and ultra-broadband variable gain distributed amplifier (VGDA) based on employing multiple techniques is presented to substantially increase the gain. The complete design is composed of two major parts including a VGDA part followed by a single stage distributed amplifier (SSDA) part. The VGDA part makes it possible to achieve different gain settings. For high gain considerations, the SSDA part cascades with the VGDA part that takes the benefits of the multiplicative gain mechanism. A theory is presented to enhance the linearity without imposing further DC power consumption. This idea has been validated by simulation results as expected. The design is analysed and simulated in the standard 0.13 μm CMOS technology. It presents the large gain tuning range of 35 dB, from -5 dB attenuation gain up to +30 dB maximum amplification gain, in relation to the control voltage (Vctr) that varies between 0.42 and 1.1 V. At the maximum amplification gain setting, it presents a DC up to 16 GHz 3 dB bandwidth, an average noise figure of 3.2 dB and an IIP3 of -2 dB m. Furthermore, it dissipates 46.42 mW from 0.7 and 0.9 V power supplies of the drain lines of VGDA and SSDA parts, respectively. Additionally, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been performed to predict an estimate of the accuracy of performance of the proposed design under various conditions.

  9. [A survey of information literacy for undergraduate students in the department of radiological technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the information literacy of undergraduate students and problems in information education. An annual questionnaire survey was carried out by an anonymous method from 2003 to 2006. The survey was intended for third-year students in the Department of Radiological Technology. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) ownership of a personal computer (PC), (2) usage purpose and frequency of PC operation, (3) operation frequency and mechanism of the Internet, and (4) IT terminology. The response rate was 100% in each year. The ratio of PC possession exceeded 80%. The ratio of students who replied "nearly every day" for the use of a PC and the Internet increased twofold and threefold in four years, respectively. More than 70% of students did not understand the mechanism of the Internet, and more than 60% of students did not know about TCP/IP. In the future, we need to consider information literacy education in undergraduate education.

  10. Technological Literacy: The Proper Focus to Educate All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Thomas; Love, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    As technology and engineering (T&E) education seeks to survive a shortage of teachers and funding, among other factors, it must proceed with caution. The field should remain true to its hands-on, design-based roots but must also provide rigorous instruction that applies STEM skills and situates it as a valuable stakeholder among the core…

  11. Designing technology for emergent literacy: the PictoPal initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2009-01-01

    PictoPal is the name of a technology-supported intervention designed to foster the development of emergent reading and writing skills in four and five year old children. Following the theoretical underpinnings and a brief description of PictoPal, this article describes how children worked with the t

  12. Learning with Mobiles in Developing Countries: Technology, Language, and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, John M.

    2017-01-01

    In the countries of the global South, the challenges of fixed infrastructure and environment, the apparent universality of mobile hardware, software and network technologies and the rhetoric of the global knowledge economy have slowed or impoverished the development of appropriate theoretical discourses to underpin learning with mobiles. This…

  13. Designing technology for emergent literacy: the PictoPal initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney-Jensh, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke

    2009-01-01

    PictoPal is the name of a technology-supported intervention designed to foster the development of emergent reading and writing skills in four and five year old children. Following the theoretical underpinnings and a brief description of PictoPal, this article describes how children worked with the

  14. Writing, Literacy and Technology: Toward a Cyborg Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gary A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with feminist social critic Donna Haraway about her call for "cyborg writing," writing that replaces the idea of an authoritative or dominant story with an acknowledgment of the wide range of narratives to be told in science, technology, and other areas. Also questions Haraway about activism for academics, particularly as it…

  15. ICT Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The entanglement of ethics and technology makes it necessary for us to understand and reflect upon our own practices and to question technological hypes. The information and communication technology (ICT) literacy required to navigate the twenty-first century has to do with recognizing our own...... human limitations, developing critical measures and acknowledging feelings of estrangement, puzzlement as well as sheer wonder of technology. ICT literacy is indeed all about visions of the good life and the art of living in the twenty-first century. The main focus of this paper is to explore...... sensitivity with regard to ICT in the ‘classic’ literacy context of the educational system....

  16. Literacy and Technology: Integrating Technology with Small Group, Peer-Led Discussions of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Genya

    2012-01-01

    This review examines research of computer-mediated small group discussion of literature. The goal of this review is to explore several instructional formats for integrating print-based and new literacies skills. First, the theoretical foundations for the shift from teacher-led to student led discussion are outlined. Research exploring ways in…

  17. Technology and Thematic Units: An Elementary Example on Japan (Technology Links to Literacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepner, Shelley B.

    1993-01-01

    Uses a thematic unit on Japan to show how software can become an additional resource for elementary students' literacy learning in social studies, science, language arts, and art. Notes that the five-week unit addresses Japan's culture and customs. (RS)

  18. GLOBE Observer and the Association of Science & Technology Centers: Leveraging Citizen Science and Partnerships for an International Science Experiment to Build Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek Kohl, H.; Chambers, L. H.; Murphy, T.

    2016-12-01

    For more that 20 years, the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program has sought to increase environment literacy in students by involving them in the process of data collection and scientific research. In 2016, the program expanded to accept observations from citizen scientists of all ages through a relatively simple app. Called GLOBE Observer, the new program aims to help participants feel connected to a global community focused on advancing the scientific understanding of Earth system science while building climate literacy among participants and increasing valuable environmental data points to expand both student and scientific research. In October 2016, GLOBE Observer partnered with the Association of Science & Technology Centers (ASTC) in an international science experiment in which museums and patrons around the world collected cloud observations through GLOBE Observer to create a global cloud map in support of NASA satellite science. The experiment was an element of the International Science Center and Science Museum Day, an event planned in partnership with UNESCO and ASTC. Museums and science centers provided the climate context for the observations, while GLOBE Observer offered a uniform experience and a digital platform to build a connected global community. This talk will introduce GLOBE Observer and will present the results of the experiment, including evaluation feedback on gains in climate literacy through the event.

  19. The Relationship of Health Literacy With Use of Digital Technology for Health Information: Implications for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Falisi, Angela; Strogatz, David

    An understanding of the association of health literacy with patterns related to access and usage of digital technologies and preferences for sources of health information is necessary for public health agencies and organizations to appropriately target channels for health information dissemination. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in New York State. Health literacy was assessed using the Morris Single-Item Screener, a self-report question. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE. The final sample size of New York State residents used for analysis was 1350. In general, self-report health literacy did not predict digital technology use (ie, Internet and smartphone use, text messaging) but was associated with certain digital activities. People with low self-report health literacy were less likely to use search engines (P = .026) but more likely to get health information from social networking sites (P = .002) and use health-related phone apps (P = .046). With respect to health information seeking, those with lower self-report health literacy reported greater difficulty with their most recent search for health information. Furthermore, they were more likely to prefer text messages (P = .013) and radio (P = .022), 2 text-limited communication channels, to receive health information than those with higher self-report health literacy. While self-report health literacy does not appear to influence access to and use of digital technologies, there is a strong association with experiences searching for health information and preferences for health information sources. Public health agencies and organizations should consider the needs and preferences of people with low health literacy when determining channels for health information dissemination. They should also consider implementing interventions to develop health information-seeking skills in populations they serve and prepare information and materials that are easily accessible and

  20. Development and Validation of the Computer Technology Literacy Self-Assessment Scale for Taiwanese Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Sui

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development and validation of an instrument to identify various dimensions of the computer technology literacy self-assessment scale (CTLS) for elementary school students. The instrument included five CTLS dimensions (subscales): the technology operation skills, the computer usages concepts, the…

  1. Changing Conceptions and Uses of Computer Technologies in the Everyday: Literacy Practices of Sixth and Seventh Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Jane; Altarriba, Jeanette

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on 189 sixth and seventh graders in two large suburban schools and their use of computer technologies as part of their everyday literacy practices. The authors were especially interested in the students' conceptions of computer technologies and how computer use varied across grade and reading levels. The study included a survey…

  2. Overcoming Language and Literacy Barriers: Using Student Response System Technology to Collect Quality Program Evaluation Data from Immigrant Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan K.; Mao, Dung

    2016-01-01

    Student response system technology was employed for parenting education program evaluation data collection with Karen adults. The technology, with translation and use of an interpreter, provided an efficient and secure method that respected oral language and collective learning preferences and accommodated literacy needs. The method was popular…

  3. Technologies, literacies in English oral communication and teacher education: an empirical study at the university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinildes Dias

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to report data findings and results obtained in a 60-hour course designed for 20 pre-service English teachers in the first semester of 2014. The course integrated technologies and pedagogical practices to improve advanced oral communication skills. The theoretical framework comprised Kalantzis and Cope (2012, 2013 and their work on literacy, the use of technology by Prensky (2010 and Warschauer (2011, blended learning (THORNE, 2003 and genre (KRESS, 2003. The methodology involved critical reflection of teaching practices, blended-learning classes using Moodle forums and class discussions as well as recording of personal introductions, interviews and documentaries. The results showed that our student teachers improved their oral communication skills by means of critical reflection, use of web tools and recording, thus comprehending oral genres in a significant way. Based on our study, we can say that they will be able to implement these instructional strategies in their future teaching practices.

  4. Using Disruptive Technologies to Make Digital Connections: Stories of Media Use and Digital Literacy in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Shanedra D.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on ways teachers and students in an urban high school used technologies often labeled as disruptive (i.e. social media and mobile phones) as learning and relationship building tools, inside and outside the classroom. In this teacher research study, secondary teachers discussed digital literacies, the digital divide, and digital…

  5. A Study on the Effects of Teachers' Information Literacy on Information Technology Integrated Instruction and Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anxin; Chen, Guisong

    2016-01-01

    The approach of information digitalization era has largely changed the teaching environment on campus. The application of information technology to education has become a concern in modern education.Traditional basic literacy of reading, writing, and algorithm could no longer cope with the demands in information societies that the information…

  6. The Effect of Use of Information and Communication Technologies on Elementary Student Teachers' Perceived Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiralay, Raziye; Karadeniz, Sirin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate and evaluate elementary student teachers' perceived information literacy self-efficacy in terms of the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). The relational survey method which determines the relationships between two or more variables was used in the research. The data gathered from…

  7. The Effect of an Educational Program on Technological Literacy--The Example of a Design College in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yuan-Hsiang

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of an educational intervention on the variables of awareness, perception, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions towards technological literacy among students at a College of Design in Southern Taiwan. Using non-probability sampling, 42 freshmen students from the Department of Product Design participated in the…

  8. A Study on the Effects of Teachers' Information Literacy on Information Technology Integrated Instruction and Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anxin; Chen, Guisong

    2016-01-01

    The approach of information digitalization era has largely changed the teaching environment on campus. The application of information technology to education has become a concern in modern education.Traditional basic literacy of reading, writing, and algorithm could no longer cope with the demands in information societies that the information…

  9. Using Disruptive Technologies to Make Digital Connections: Stories of Media Use and Digital Literacy in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Shanedra D.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on ways teachers and students in an urban high school used technologies often labeled as disruptive (i.e. social media and mobile phones) as learning and relationship building tools, inside and outside the classroom. In this teacher research study, secondary teachers discussed digital literacies, the digital divide, and digital…

  10. Embracing Emergent Technologies and Envisioning New Ways of Using Them for Literacy Learning in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this narrative, Sue Halsey, a New Zealand primary school teacher, taking her cue from Leu and Kinzer (2000), describes her own "envisionment" as she realizes a number of new possibilities for literacy and learning in her classroom utilizing a range of new (including Web2) technologies. In doing so, she mediates between her two…

  11. Courseware Design by College Students: The Educational Gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or-Bach, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Describes the experience gained during several years of teaching courses on CBT (computer-based training) design to undergraduate students with varying backgrounds and interests. Discusses the theoretical background for the potential benefits; preparation for lifelong learning; information technology literacy and teaching multimedia development; a…

  12. WikiHyperGlossary (WHG): an information literacy technology for chemistry documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael A; Berleant, Daniel; Cornell, Andrew P; Belford, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    The WikiHyperGlossary is an information literacy technology that was created to enhance reading comprehension of documents by connecting them to socially generated multimedia definitions as well as semantically relevant data. The WikiHyperGlossary enhances reading comprehension by using the lexicon of a discipline to generate dynamic links in a document to external resources that can provide implicit information the document did not explicitly provide. Currently, the most common method to acquire additional information when reading a document is to access a search engine and browse the web. This may lead to skimming of multiple documents with the novice actually never returning to the original document of interest. The WikiHyperGlossary automatically brings information to the user within the current document they are reading, enhancing the potential for deeper document understanding. The WikiHyperGlossary allows users to submit a web URL or text to be processed against a chosen lexicon, returning the document with tagged terms. The selection of a tagged term results in the appearance of the WikiHyperGlossary Portlet containing a definition, and depending on the type of word, tabs to additional information and resources. Current types of content include multimedia enhanced definitions, ChemSpider query results, 3D molecular structures, and 2D editable structures connected to ChemSpider queries. Existing glossaries can be bulk uploaded, locked for editing and associated with multiple social generated definitions. The WikiHyperGlossary leverages both social and semantic web technologies to bring relevant information to a document. This can not only aid reading comprehension, but increases the users' ability to obtain additional information within the document. We have demonstrated a molecular editor enabled knowledge framework that can result in a semantic web inductive reasoning process, and integration of the WikiHyperGlossary into other software technologies, like

  13. Educational techno mobile laboratory: robotics courses for low cost scientific and technological literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Germain Ortiz Meza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The robotics in education is a multidisciplinary branch of the engineering that has been an invaluable asset to promote the science and the technology as something fun. However, the high costs for the implementation as also the difficulty to train instructors have made the robotics more common only in first world countries, because generally they have more educational budget for this practices. For this reason the Educational Techno Mobile Lab was created; this Lab incorporates robotics courses based on BEAM robots and also sciences and cognitive practices. The objective of the Project is to create a new concept of learning based on a techno educative platform with the finality to promote the scientific and technological literacy to the development of knowledge and critical scientific thinking. The results of the evaluation present a 36% of improvement related science and technology knowledge on fourth grade students; these results show the necessity to incorporate a given robotic course to all the public education level.

  14. Developing Technological Literacy: A Case Study of Technology Integration in a Latina Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razfar, Aria

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, information technology has been the fastest growing sector in the global economy. Nevertheless, technology and computer-based instruction have not been sufficiently integrated into the curriculum especially at institutions that serve primarily language minority, low income, and first generation, female college populations.…

  15. Technological policies for education and digital literacy: the governmental program ‘e.escolinha’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the Portuguese government announced the initiative ’e.escolinha’ which included the distribution of computers ‘Magalhães’ to students of the 1st cycle of basic education for three consecutive school years. Currently suspended, the programme was a flagship of the XVII Constitutional Government, led by José Sócrates, but it was also subject of controversy from the opposition parties and from the school community, especially due to the apparent emphasis on access to technology rather than a greater concern with the training and pedagogical practices. Under the Technological Plan for Education, the ’e.escolinha’ initiative was part of a broader policy for the development of a competitive and dynamic economy, responding to the goals set by the EU in the Lisbon Strategy 2000. The initiative was presented to the country with ambitious goals regarding the expected changes to teachers’ pedagogical practices, the process of children’s learning and school success in general. However, the most visible face of the policy, although it may comprise other nuances, may have been reduced to the question of access, investing little in other dimensions of digital literacy. Based on interviews with key actors involved in the conception and implementation of the ’e.escolinha’ initiative, and on official programme documents, this paper intends to discuss how policy makers and companies set out and evaluate the objectives of this initiative. It is intended, in particular, to understand if they share the idea that this governmental measure follows a technological drift or if they discern any digital literacy objectives in it. This piece of work is part of a research project titled "Navigating with Magellan: Study on the Impact of Digital Media on Schoolchildren," that is being carried out at the Communication and Society Research Centre at the University of Minho, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology ((PTDC

  16. 'New’ literacies: technologies and values Nuevas alfabetizaciones: tecnologías y valores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Lankshear

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is too easy to make light of ‘new literacies’ by saying things like: “Well, there are always newer ones coming along”. Such remarks suggest new literacies have a similar kind of life trajectory to an automobile: new in 2009, semi-new in 2010, and old hat by 2011. Against this kind of “that’s so yesterday” perspective, we suggest in this article that ‘new literacies’ are best understood in terms of an historical period of social, cultural, institutional, economic, and intellectual change that is likely to span many decades – some of which are already behind us. We associate new literacies with an historical conjuncture and an ascending social paradigm. From this perspective we suggest that the kinds of practices we currently identify as new literacies will cease to be ‘new’ once the social ways characterizing the ascending paradigm have become sufficiently establised and grounded to be regarded as conventional. Furthermore we suggest that at the heart of the idea of new ethos stuff is the idea of technological change aligning with a range of increasingly popular values.Pensar en las “nuevas alfabetizaciones” con afirmaciones del tipo “seguro que algo más nuevo está al caer” es un recurso fácil, que asimila la trayectoria de las nuevas alfabetizaciones a la de un coche: nuevo en 2009, seminuevo en 2010 y un usado en 2011. Frente a esta perspectiva de “eso ya pasó de moda”, en este artículo proponemos abordar las “nuevas alfabetizaciones” como parte de un periodo de cambios sociales, culturales, económicos e intelectuales cuyo inicio se remonta varias décadas en el tiempo. Desde esta perspectiva sugerimos que “las nuevas alfabetizaciones", entendidas como paradigma social emergente, forman parte de una coyuntura histórica. A su vez sostenemos que este conjunto de nuevas prácticas dejarán de ser “novedosas” cuando los estilos sociales que caracterizan este paradigma emergente se hayan

  17. Integrating technology with literacy: using teacher-guided collaborative online learning to encourage critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson Simpson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on classroom-based research that was designed to monitor the integration of information and communication technology (ICT in a teacherguided collaborative online learning context to encourage students' critical response to literary texts. The study investigates the premise that an ICT project where children read books and then use email communication to exchange responses with other learners will support critical thinking. Videos of classroom observations, journals and rap sheets were analysed for individual students' levels of critical awareness. Improvements in critical thinking were measured using linguistic analysis. Teachers and students were also interviewed for attitudes to technology use related to learning. Although there were gains in critical thinking, there was little student engagement with technology. The discussion problematises the integration of technology in the classroom through a repositioning of collaboration in a blended learning context known as book raps.

  18. Low power analog front-end electronics in deep submicrometer CMOS technology based on gain enhancement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Galán, J.A., E-mail: jgalan@uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Sánchez-Rodríguez, T.; Sánchez-Raya, M.; Martel, I. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); López-Martín, A. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Electrónica, Universidad Pública de Navarra (Spain); Carvajal, R.G. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Ramírez-Angulo, J. [Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering, New Mexico State University (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates the design of front-end electronics in modern technologies to be used in a new generation of heavy ion detectors—HYDE (FAIR, Germany)—proposing novel architectures to achieve high gain in a low voltage environment. As conventional topologies of operational amplifiers in modern CMOS processes show limitations in terms of gain, novel approaches must be raised. The work addresses the design using transistors with channel length of no more than double the feature size and a supply voltage as low as 1.2 V. A front-end system has been fabricated in a 90 nm process including gain boosting techniques based on regulated cascode circuits. The analog channel has been optimized to match a detector capacitance of 5 pF and exhibits a good performance in terms of gain, speed, linearity and power consumption.

  19. To What Extent do Biology Textbooks Contribute to Scientific Literacy? Criteria for Analysing Science-Technology-Society-Environment Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela M. Calado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our article proposes a set of six criteria for analysing science-technology-society-environment (STSE issues in regular textbooks as to how they are expected to contribute to students’ scientific literacy. We chose genetics and gene technology as fields prolific in STSE issues. We derived our criteria (including 26 sub-criteria from a literature review of the debate in science education on how to increase scientific literacy. We inspected the textbooks regarding the relationships between science, technology, society, and environment, and considered the presence of the decontextualized and socially neutral view of science as distorted view. We, qualitatively and quantitatively, applied our set of criteria to two German Biology textbooks and identified, in total, 718 STSE statements. Based on the frequencies of different criteria and sub-criteria in the textbooks, we drew conclusions concerning STSE issues and the underlying conceptions of science and technology, which might hinder the furtherance of scientific literacy. The applicability of our approach in other science education contexts is discussed.

  20. New literacies, multiple literacies, unlimited literacies: what now, what next, where to? A response to blue listerine, parochialism and ASL literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to Blue Listerine, Parochialism, and ASL Literacy (Czubek, 2006). The author presents his views on the concepts of literacy and the new and multiple literacies. In addition, the merits of print literacy and other types of literacies are discussed. Although the author agrees that there is an American Sign Language (ASL) literacy, he maintains that there should be a distinction between conversational "literacy" forms (speech and sign) and secondary literacy forms (reading and writing). It might be that cognitive skills associated with print literacy and, possibly, other captured literacy forms, are necessary for a technological, scientific-driven society such as that which exists in the United States.

  1. Perspectives on scientific and technological literacy in Tonga: Moving forward in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palefau, Tevita Hala

    Tonga has undergone complex changes in the last three decades. Disturbing numbers of young Tongans have inadequate knowledge in traditional science and technology, ill equipped to work in, contribute to and profit from our society. In short, they lack sufficient background knowledge to acquire the training, skills and understanding that are needed in the 21st Century. The purpose of this research is to assist the formulation of national science and technology curriculum. Hence, views of life in Tonga and opinions about Tonga's needs held by three stakeholder groups (traditional, workplaces, public) were paramount in this study. How these stakeholders see Tonga in terms of science and technology needs will contribute substantially to the Ministry of Education's decisions for this century. Based on critical evaluation of international literature and how scientific and technological literacy (STL) is crucial to Tongan society, a model 'TAP-STL' is established as study framework: 'TAP' for ṯraditional, a&barbelow;cademic and p&barbelow;ublic STL, to promote national development. This qualitative case study employs an interview method to collect data from twelve knowledgeable participants selected by reputational sampling from across the kingdom. By exploring their understanding of STL requirements, the study sought to identify any shortfall between the science and technology provided in school and that needed for maintenance of traditional culture, effective participation in Tonga's workplaces and public understanding. The study produced findings under these categories: understanding of traditional knowledge and skills needed to preserve Tongan cultural identity; understanding needed for fishing, handicrafts and everyday maintenance, together with essential health knowledge and skills; and required understanding of public information campaigns related to health, domestic goods, drugs and environment that contribute to responsible citizenship. The study identified

  2. Development of a Responsive Literacy Pedagogy Incorporating Technology for the Indigenous Learners in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalan, T. Vanitha; Siraj, Saedah; Alias, Norlidah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a literacy pedagogy to facilitate literacy learning among the Indigenous community in Malaysia. The Developmental Research Approach method was used and thus various groups of people participated in the study. They included subject matter experts, English language teachers from schools with indigenous students,…

  3. The Accidental Technology Steward: Or, How You Can Gamble Very Little and Gain a Lot

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Technology stewardship is important in learning communities, where technology is not a primary focus and there is a lot of second-wave adoption. In schools, the students are usually first-wave adopters. Teachers, parents, and administrators are often the second wave; less comfortable with, interested in, or adept at technology adoption. Stewarding…

  4. PROMOTING SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY AMONG POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS AT THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION UTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Sulaiman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One important issue in the Science Education debate over the last century was how to prepare a more relevant science education of the 21st Century that emphasizes on promoting scientific literacy through a more meaningful science education program. In response to this call, a general science education elective course code named MPS1163 Epistemological, Social and Ethical Issues in Science and Technology was designed and implemented starting in Semester 2 Session 2009/2010. By the end of Semester 2 Session 2012/2013 the course has been running for 7 semesters and had invited 128 postgraduate students from 7 different programs, including a PhD program. A questionnaire was distributed to 26 course participants at the end of semester 2 Session 2012/2013. The objective of the questionnaire was to seek their personal assessment on their knowledge and understanding on the eleven course contents taken during the whole semester. The results indicated that there was a mean increment of between 40- 50% on their knowledge and understanding on the topics covered compared to their knowledge and understanding before taking the course. The second part of the questionnaire consisted of six items, using five point Likert Scale, seeking their suggestions for improving a more relevant science education through the elective course. The response was commendable. Implications of the study related to course contents and students opinions on the course contents and suggestions for the improvement of the course are discussed in this paper.

  5. 0.35% Absolute Efficiency Gain of Bifacial N-type Si Solar cells by Industrial Metal Wrap Through Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerligs, L.J.; Guillevin, N.; Weeber, A.W.; Bultman, J.H.; Heurtault, B. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Zhao, Wenchao; Wang, Jianming; Shen, Yanlong; Wang, Ziqian; Chen, Yingle; Hu, Zhiyan; Li, Gaofei; Chen, Jianhui; Xiong, Jingfeng [Yingli Green Energy Holding Co., Ltd, 3399 North Chaoyang Avenue, Baoding (China)

    2012-06-15

    N-type Metal Wrap Through (n-MWT) is presented as an industrially promising back-contact technology to reach high performance of silicon solar cells and modules. It can combine benefits from both n-type base and MWT metallization. In this paper, the integration of the MWT technique with a commercial industrial bifacial n-type Si Solar cell (239 cm{sup 2}) process is described. After the integration, 0.35% absolute efficiency gain was achieved, and V{sub oc} gain and I{sub sc} gain up to 0.42% and 2.45%, respectively, were obtained, mainly attributed to reduced shadow loss and surface recombination. Based on calculations, the anticipation of further improvements for n-MWT solar cells, by taking better advantage of this integration, is also presented.

  6. Experience gained from mastering practical use of the fluidized bed technology in boilers for industrial and municipal power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemyakin, V. N.; Karapetov, A. E.

    2012-06-01

    Experience gained from mastering practical use of the technology of low-temperature fluidized bed as applied to the firing of combustible shales, milled peat, and various wood wastes is generalized. The design characteristics of boilers and results from their tests are presented. Special attention is paid to formation of agglomerates from particles of bed material and slag deposits on the nonshielded surfaces of a furnace chamber, problems inherent in the given technology. Methods to control the formation of agglomerates and deposits are considered.

  7. When Education, Media, and Technology Converge, What Do Latino/a Students Gain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Dolores Valencia

    2003-01-01

    Research suggests that Latino students' success in college is closely linked to the interpersonal relationships they experience with faculty and staff. However, the convergence of technology, media, and education promises less rather than more of these types of interactions. Relevant research is reviewed on the growth of technology-based…

  8. Gains from resistance: contesting a new digital technology in a service sector workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shulzhenko, Elena; Holmgren, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Increasing expectations of efficiency enabled by new digital technology have led to renewed interest in spaces remaining for employee resistance to management power. The study contributes to this debate by analysing resistance to a new technology introduced in the home-nursing sector in Denmark....... Nurses succeeded in halting a technological change that allowed them to report data related to their visits online from inside patients’ homes and reduced their co-located working time. Work location became a central area of contestation between nurses and management. The study offers a nuanced analysis...... of power relations during the technological change. It shows that the capacity of IT management – a management actor uninhibited by a care ethos - to influence nursing workplaces rose along with the increasing significance of expertise in digital technologies in performing care work. Nurses’ alliances...

  9. Proceedings of the ASPE/MSFC Symposium on Engineering and Productivity Gains from Space Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Aerospace technology findings were examined in regard to nonaerospace applications. Studies of energy generation, materials and processes, earth observation as well as advances and benefits of electronics are included.

  10. English-Spanish equivalence of the Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Kallen, Michael A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Ganschow, Pamela S; Garcia, Sofia F; Burns, James L

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased measurement instruments are needed to reliably estimate health literacy in diverse populations. The study aimed (a) to evaluate measurement equivalence of Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT) and (b) to compare Health LiTT scores between English- and Spanish-speaking individuals. Health LiTT and several patient-reported outcome instruments were completed by adult patients receiving care for type 2 diabetes at a safety net clinic. English-Spanish measurement equivalence was evaluated with an item response theory approach to differential item functioning (DIF) detection and impact. Health LiTT scores were compared by language using multivariable linear regression. Approximately equal numbers of English-speaking patients (n=146) and Spanish-speaking patients (n=149) with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. English participants were primarily non-Hispanic Black (65%); all Spanish participants were Hispanic. Six Health LiTT items were flagged for DIF. The Pearson correlation between unadjusted and DIF adjusted scores was 0.995; the mean difference of individual difference scores was 0.0005 (SD=0.0888). After adjusting for predisposing characteristics, enabling resources and need for care, Health LiTT scores were comparable for Spanish-speaking individuals versus English-speaking individuals. The effect of DIF items on Health LiTT scores appeared to be trivial. English-Spanish equivalence of Health LiTT will permit researchers to determine the independent effects of limited English proficiency and limited literacy.

  11. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that information literacy is acquired only by experience, there is a false assumption that technological ability is the same as information literacy, faculty culture makes information literacy less significant than other educational pursuits, faculty have a limited perception of the ability of librarians. and accrediting bodies have not yet advanced information literacy to a viable position in higher education. The new information age demands that these barriers be overcome and information literacy take a prominent place within the academic experience.

  12. Virtual Field Sites: Losses and Gains in Authenticity with Semantic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, Kate; Stott, Tim A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigate the potential of semantic web technologies to enhance "Virtual Fieldwork" resources and learning activities in the Geosciences. They consider the difficulties inherent in the concept of Virtual Fieldwork and how these might be reconciled with the desire to provide students with "authentic" tools for knowledge construction…

  13. The Literacy Environment of Preschool Classrooms: Contributions to Children's Emergent Literacy Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.; McGinty, Anita

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among features of the classroom physical literacy environment (book materials, literacy area and writing materials) and psychological literacy environment (instructional support), and preschool children's gains in two areas of emergent literacy over an academic year. Results showed that features of the physical…

  14. Digital technologies for population health and health equity gains: the perspective of public health associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, James; Perera, Yoshith; Clarke, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Digital technology (DT) plays an increasingly important role in the health sector. This study explores how national public health associations (PHAs) use DT to achieve their mandate. The World Federation of Public Health Associations canvassed and conducted a semi-structured interview with its national public health association members about their use of DT, the challenges they encounter in using it, and their experiences and thoughts as to how to assess its impact, both organizationally as well as on population health and health equity. The study found that digital technology plays an important role in some PHAs, principally those in higher income countries. PHAs want to broaden their use within PHAs and to assess how DT enables PHAs to achieve their organizational mandates and goals, including improved public health and health equity.

  15. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xudong; Xi, Fengming; Geng, Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO(2)e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kg ce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

  16. Speakeasy Studio and Cafe: Information Literacy, Web-based Library Instruction, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of academic library instruction and information literacy focuses on a Web-based program developed at Washington State University called Speakeasy Studio and Cafe that is used for bibliographic instruction. Highlights include the research process; asking the right question; and adapting to students' differing learning styles. (LRW)

  17. Exploring Teacher Roles and Pupil Outcomes in Technology-Rich Early Literacy Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, A.; McKenney, S.; Voogt, J.; Orey, M.; Branch, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the involvement of Dutch kindergarten teachers in curriculum (design and) implementation of PictoPal activities in three different roles: executor-only, re-designer, and co-designer. PictoPal refers to ICT-rich on- and off-computer activities for early literacy. In the

  18. Exploring teacher roles and pupil outcomes in technology-rich early literacy learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Orey, Michael; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the involvement of Dutch kindergarten teachers in curriculum (design and) implementation of PictoPal activities in three different roles: executor-only, re-designer, and co-designer. PictoPal refers to ICT-rich on- and off-computer activities for early literacy. In the

  19. One Screen, Many Fingers: Young Children's Collaborative Literacy Play with Digital Puppetry Apps and Touchscreen Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the digital literacy practices that emerge when young children play together with digital apps on touchscreen devices. Children's collaborative composing with a digital puppetry app on a touchscreen--with many hands all busy dragging, resizing, and animating puppet characters, and many voices making sound effects, narrating,…

  20. Speakeasy Studio and Cafe: Information Literacy, Web-based Library Instruction, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of academic library instruction and information literacy focuses on a Web-based program developed at Washington State University called Speakeasy Studio and Cafe that is used for bibliographic instruction. Highlights include the research process; asking the right question; and adapting to students' differing learning styles. (LRW)

  1. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbidge, Alice Schmidt; Sanderson, Nicole; Tin, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative m-learning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five…

  2. Energy Efficiency Gain of Cellular Base Stations with Large-Scale Antenna Systems for Green Information and Communication Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Moo Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ever-increasing data demand of end users, the number of information and communication technology (ICT-related devices and equipment continues to increase. This induces large amounts of heat emissions, which can cause serious environmental pollution. In recent times, signal transmission systems such as cellular base stations (BSs have been constructed everywhere and these emit a large carbon footprint. Large-scale antenna systems (LSASs that use a large amount of transmission antennas to serve a limited number of users can increase energy efficiency (EE of BSs based on the beamforming effect, and thus can be a promising candidate to reduce the carbon footprint of the ICT field. In this paper, we discuss the necessary schemes to realize LSASs and show the expected EE gain of the LSAS with enough practicality. There are many obstacles to realize the high EE LSAS, and even though several studies have shown separate schemes to increase the EE and/or throughput (TP of LSASs, few have shown combinations of schemes, and presented how much EE gain can be achieved by the schemes in the overall system. Based on the analysis in this paper, we believe more detailed work for the realization of high energy efficient BSs with LSASs is possible because this paper shows the necessary schemes and the maximum achievable energy efficiency gain as a reference. Extensive analysis and simulation results show that with proper implementation of the power amplifier/RF module and a robust channel estimation scheme, LSASs with 600 transmitter (TX antennas can achieve 99.4 times more EE gain compared to the current systems, thereby resulting in significant reduction of carbon footprints.

  3. Results of innovative communication processes on productivity gains in a high technology environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    The technology which resulted in performance breakthroughs at engineering and management services is discussed. As a result of the innovative approaches of communicating productivity concepts to the employees, specific outcomes can now be pinpointed at all levels of the organization such as: (1) employee-headed program; (2) performance feedback processes; and (3) an investigative approach to creating leadership. The Lockheed Corporation began the innovative trend in 1974 when they became the first company to introduce quality circles in America. Although some of Lockheed-EMSCO's processes may sound different from traditional improvement processes, the context out of which those to be presented evolved has sustained more than 10 years of positive results through employee involvement activities.

  4. How to measure gain-sharing in an outsourcing relationship: a case study in information technology environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Agrawal

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to approach the issue of gain-sharing measurement in an information technology outsourcing relationship as a component of remuneration policies for contracted services among companies. The methodology encompass three steps: (i bibliographical revision on outsourcing relationship in information technology environment and pricing in outsourcing decisions; (ii a case study in which the problem of gain-sharing measurement emerges in the relationship (providing information technology services between two large-scale international companies that operate in Brazilian credit card market; (iii discussion of the findings of the case study on basis of the revised literature. The contributions of the paper are: (i to identify the main issues related to outsourcing decisions and pricing in outsourcing relationship; (ii to present a description of the characteristics and behavior of costs in information technology environment; and (iii to provide an analysis and discussion about the method adopted by the companies for gain-sharing measurement. The bibliographical research showed a lack of literature regarding to the specific subject of gain-sharing measurement. The findings of the empirical study indicated that information technology companies are highly structured with fixed costs and that gain-sharing method adopted by studied companies corresponds to costs savings measured by cost-accounting concepts of price and efficiency cost variances according to budget parameters. In addiction, it was observed that the method adopted contributes to get more transparency and capability to analyze the business relationship by both receiver and provider companies.Este estudo tem o objetivo de analisar o problema da mensuração do gain-sharing na terceirização de serviços de tecnologia da informação como um componente da política de remuneração dos serviços contratados entre duas organizações. A metodologia adotada compõe-se de três passos

  5. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been developed…

  6. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been…

  7. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been…

  8. Enhancing Physical Education and Sport Science Students' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes regarding Information and Communication Technologies through a Computer Literacy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have become an integral component of Physical Education (PE) and Sport Science (SS) curricula and professions. It is thus imperative that PE and SS students develop ICT skills, self-efficacy in ICT and positive attitudes towards ICT. This study was aimed at designing a computer literacy course…

  9. Bruce's Magnificent Quartet: Inquiry, Community, Technology and Literacy--Implications for Renewing Qualitative Research in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Bruce and Bishop's community informatics work brings forward four critical concepts: inquiry, community, technology, and literacy. These four terms serve as the basis for a discussion of qualitative research in the twenty-first century--what is lacking and what is needed. The author suggests that to resolve the tensions or challenges…

  10. A Reflection on Distorted Views of Science and Technology in Science Textbooks as Obstacles to the Improvement of Students' Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Florbela M.; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific literacy has been increasingly considered a major goal of science education. While textbooks remain the most widespread tools for pursuing this goal within classrooms, they have been slow to adapt to the most recent epistemological paradigms, often still conveying distorted views of science and technology. Accordingly, we present herein…

  11. Bruce's Magnificent Quartet: Inquiry, Community, Technology and Literacy--Implications for Renewing Qualitative Research in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Bruce and Bishop's community informatics work brings forward four critical concepts: inquiry, community, technology, and literacy. These four terms serve as the basis for a discussion of qualitative research in the twenty-first century--what is lacking and what is needed. The author suggests that to resolve the tensions or challenges…

  12. Creative and Computational Thinking in the Context of New Literacies: Working with Teachers to Scaffold Complex Technology-Mediated Approaches to Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSchryver, Michael D.; Yadav, Aman

    2015-01-01

    For too long, creativity in schools has been almost solely associated with art, music, and writing classes. Now, creative thinking skills are increasingly emphasized across the disciplines. At the same time, technological progress has brought about calls for the integration of new literacies and computational thinking to prepare students as…

  13. Differences in Student Information and Communication Technology Literacy Based on Socio-Economic Status, Ethnicity, and Gender: Evidence of a Digital Divide in Florida Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Liu, Feng; Dawson, Kara; Barron, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    This research examines student information and communication technology (ICT) literacy and its relationships to a student's socio-economic status (SES), gender, and ethnicity of middle school students. We recruited 5,990 students from 13 school districts across the state of Florida. Student participants completed the Student Tool for Technology…

  14. Teaching for Success: Literacy, Diversity, and Technology. Proceedings of the PEPNet English Think Tank (5th, Washington, DC, June 14-15, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEPNet 2, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 meeting of the English Think Tank published here represents a sample of the English Think Tank V presentations. In reading these papers one is struck by the imagination and expertise possessed by so many members in the field. The paper topics fall roughly into four categories--assessment, diversity, literacy, and technology. This…

  15. A Different Approach to Have Science and Technology Student-Teachers Gain Varied Methods in Laboratory Applications: A Sample of Computer Assisted POE Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Arzu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach and assess the application for the science and technology student-teachers to gain varied laboratory methods in science and technology teaching. It is also aimed to describe the computer-assisted POE application in the subject of "Photosynthesis-Light" developed in the context of…

  16. Marking Physical Literacy or Missing the Mark on Physical Literacy? A Conceptual Critique of Canada's Physical Literacy Assessment Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel B.; Randall, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Margaret Whitehead first introduced the concept of physical literacy over 20 years ago. Since that introduction, physical literacy has been gaining in popularity within many Western physical education and sport contexts. This is particularly true within Canada, where physical literacy has been embraced by two of the nation's most notable national…

  17. Information Literacy, "New" Literacies, and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschman, John

    2009-01-01

    Literacy was once thought to be well understood and well defined. However, it has been argued that the digital world has disrupted previous notions of literacy, supplanting them with "new" forms of literacies--first in various new literacy studies and now in the library and information science (LIS) scholarship as it applies to information…

  18. ALFABETIZAÇÃO DE CRIANÇAS UTILIZANDO RECURSOS TECNOLÓGICOS. CHILDREN LITERACY USING TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Alvarenga Pimenta Vilas Boas

    2013-11-01

    literacy processes and some considerations about the use of technologies and computers in scholar and literacy environments. It shows that the emergence of technological resources as an educational tool and the growing familiarization of students with them has caused teachers to try to use these alternatives as teaching instrumental. In this perspective, we carried a case study out with the main goal of identifying if the use of computers, with activities directed to the initial teaching of reading and writing, specifically of the relationship between phonemes and graphemes, could contribute, someway, with a specific group of students who had no yet obtained the alphabetic level of writing. The research was conducted, at the second semester of 2010, with a group of students enrolled at the third year of the literacy basic program. Those students had already attended the two first years of the program and, therefore, they should be consolidating the process of reading and writing, but they were still at levels lower than the expectations. The software activities have phonic, visual and articulation strategies, thus highlighting the work with some of the necessary facets to initial domain of reading and writing processes. We conclude that, when applied in a systematic way, those technological resources collaborate with the progress of students with delays in reading and writing, bringing a new way to work with those children; they are also considered a different, interesting, attractive and motivating activity and promote a more playful and meaningful way of learning, providing a literacy more consistent with the reality of twenty-first century.

  19. Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

  20. Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

  1. Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Thomas P.; Jacobson, Trudi E.

    2011-01-01

    Social media environments and online communities are innovative collaborative technologies that challenge traditional definitions of information literacy. Metaliteracy is an overarching and self-referential framework that integrates emerging technologies and unifies multiple literacy types. This redefinition of information literacy expands the…

  2. Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Thomas P.; Jacobson, Trudi E.

    2011-01-01

    Social media environments and online communities are innovative collaborative technologies that challenge traditional definitions of information literacy. Metaliteracy is an overarching and self-referential framework that integrates emerging technologies and unifies multiple literacy types. This redefinition of information literacy expands the…

  3. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outc

  4. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outco

  5. Teachers as Co-Designers of Technology-Rich Learning Activities for Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outcomes. A case-study method was used to investigate:…

  6. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outco

  7. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outc

  8. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  9. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  10. New Literacy Studies: An Alternative Frame for Preparing Teachers to Use Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraian, Srikala; Surabian, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Even as research continues to suggest the potential of assistive technology for improving student outcomes, it remains under-utilized in schools. Among numerous challenges to the effective utilization of assistive technology, research has suggested that educators are inadequately prepared to consider and implement the use of such technologies. In…

  11. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  12. Negotiating Voice in Translingual Literacies: From Literacy Regimes to Contact Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canagarajah, Suresh; Matsumoto, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    Voice in mobile texts has received attention lately among scholars in literacy, sociolinguistics, and rhetoric. Some sociolinguists of globalisation have argued that uptake is shaped by the norms of each literacy regime. Though texts of non-western communities will gain positive uptake in local literacy regimes according to their own norms and…

  13. Motherboards, Microphones and Metaphors: Re-Examining New Literacies and Black Feminist Thought through Technologies of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Tisha Lewis; Kirkland, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how two African American females composed counter-selves using a computer motherboard and a stand-alone microphone as critical identity texts. Situated within sociocultural and critical traditions in new literacy studies and black feminist thought, the authors extend conceptions of language, literacy and black femininity via…

  14. Motherboards, Microphones and Metaphors: Re-Examining New Literacies and Black Feminist Thought through Technologies of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Tisha Lewis; Kirkland, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how two African American females composed counter-selves using a computer motherboard and a stand-alone microphone as critical identity texts. Situated within sociocultural and critical traditions in new literacy studies and black feminist thought, the authors extend conceptions of language, literacy and black femininity via…

  15. Rethinking the Role of Information Technology-Based Research Tools in Students' Development of Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-06-01

    Given the central place IT-based research tools take in scientific research, the marginal role such tools currently play in science curricula is dissatisfying from the perspective of making students scientifically literate. To appropriately frame the role of IT-based research tools in science curricula, we propose a framework that is developed to understand the use of tools in human activity, namely cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT). Accordingly, IT-based research tools constitute central moments of scientific research activity and neither can be seen apart from its objectives, nor can it be considered apart from the cultural-historical determined forms of activity (praxis) in which human subjects participate. Based on empirical data involving students participating in research activity, we point out how an appropriate account of IT-based research tools involves subjects' use of tools with respect to the objectives of research activity and the contribution to the praxis of research. We propose to reconceptualize the role of IT-based research tools as contributing to scientific literacy if students apply these tools with respect to the objectives of the research activity and contribute to praxis of research by evaluating and modifying the application of these tools. We conclude this paper by sketching the educational implications of this reconceptualized role of IT-based research tools.

  16. Information literacy: implications for perioperative nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michelle M

    2011-02-01

    The concept of information literacy may be new to some perioperative nurses; however, embracing this concept will help nurses identify situations that necessitate gaining more information, locate and access information sources, evaluate and analyze data, and cite information in compliance with copyright and fair use laws. The culture of health care is continually changing as a result of new technology and new methods to improve patient care, and this creates an information explosion. Perioperative educators should add information literacy as a strategic goal for obtaining Magnet status because it is foundational to evidence-based practice. Administrators also should advocate to obtain resources that will enable nurses to access information that addresses current patient care issues.

  17. Writing Assessment and the Revolution in Digital Texts and Technologies. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Writing and the teaching of writing is changing at a rapid pace. How can educators understand writing assessment "as" and "with" technology in the 21st-century classroom? Michael Neal contends that new technologies are neither the problem nor the solution. Instead, educators need to tap into digital resources only inasmuch as they promote writing…

  18. The Teacher as Re-Designer of Technology Integrated Activities for an Early Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2013-01-01

    Though popular among children outside of school, Dutch teachers often struggle to offer technology integrated activities in the kindergarten classroom. Because involving teachers in development of technology integrated activities can support their implementation, this study examines teachers in the role of re-designing such activities. Two case…

  19. Urban Adolescent Students and Technology: Access, Use and Interest in Learning Language and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents today have vastly different opportunities to learn and process information via pervasive digital technologies and social media. However, there is scant literature on the impact of these technologies on urban adolescents with lower socioeconomic status. This study of 531 urban students in grades 6-8 used a self-reported survey to…

  20. Technological Literacy and Political Participation in McLean County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 266 residents of McLean County, Illinois, found that 91 percent believe technology makes life easier; 70 percent believe people are too technologically dependent; those with a history of political participation felt confident engaging in political activities regarding nuclear power, automation, and genetic engineering; and the public…

  1. Teacher design knowledge and beliefs for technology enhanced learning materials in early literacy: Four portraits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, F.B.; McKenney-Jensh, Susan E.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Teacher engagement in the design of technology-rich learning material is beneficial to teacher learning and may create a sense of ownership, both of which are conducive to bringing about innovation with technology. During collaborative design, teachers draw on various types of knowledge and beliefs:

  2. Teacher design knowledge and beliefs for technology enhanced learning materials in early literacy: Four portraits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Ferry; McKenney, Susan; Pieters, Jules; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Teacher engagement in the design of technology-rich learning material is beneficial to teacher learning and may create a sense of ownership, both of which are conducive to bringing about innovation with technology. During collaborative design, teachers draw on various types of knowledge and beliefs:

  3. Teacher design knowledge and beliefs for technology enhanced learning materials in early literacy: Four portraits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, F.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; Voogt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher engagement in the design of technology-rich learning material is beneficial to teacher learning and may create a sense of ownership, both of which are conducive to bringing about innovation with technology. During collaborative design, teachers draw on various types of knowledge and beliefs:

  4. Promoting Children's Learning through Technology Literacy: Challenges to School Librarians in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejikeme, Anthonia N.; Okpala, Helen N.

    2017-01-01

    In today's world of technological revolution, children need to be encouraged to be ready to acquire lifelong knowledge and skills in the 21st century. This paper presents an overview of the application of technologies in children's learning environment which apparently will give them the opportunity of making use of their thinking skills in order…

  5. Technological Literacy and Political Participation in McLean County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 266 residents of McLean County, Illinois, found that 91 percent believe technology makes life easier; 70 percent believe people are too technologically dependent; those with a history of political participation felt confident engaging in political activities regarding nuclear power, automation, and genetic engineering; and the public…

  6. DIMENSIÓN FORMATIVA DE LA ALFABETIZACIÓN TECNOLÓGICA THE EDUCATIONAL DIMENSION OF TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Ortega Navas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La alfabetización tecnológica en el marco actual de la Sociedad del Conocimiento tiene un papel esencial en la educación. El impacto de la tecnología en la vida de las personas es tan patente, que los profesionales de la educación han considerado que el conocimiento y uso adecuado de ésta, es un contenido educativo necesario que reconfigura el propio sistema educativo en relación al modelo de alumno, del formador y de todo el proceso de conocimiento. La importancia y la incidencia de la tecnología en la educación se ha convertido en una señal de progreso, calidad y mejora que abre nuevas perspectivas formativas y formas de aprendizaje que condicionan tanto nuestras vidas personales y profesionales como nuestros estilos de vida. En este contexto el papel del formador está sufriendo una transformación para dar respuesta a los nuevos retos y exigencias educativas y sociales que se plantean en el siglo XXI.Technological literacy in the context of today’s Knowledge Society plays an essential role in education. The impact of technology on people’s lives is so obvious that teaching professionals consider the knowledge and adequate use thereof to be a necessary ingredient of education, and one which reshapes the educational system itself with respect to the model of the educator, the student and the entire knowledge process. The importance and the impact of technology on education has become a sign of progress, quality and improvement that creates new educational perspectives and new ways of learning, shaping both our professional and personal lives as well as our lifestyles. In this context, the role of the educator is being transformed to respond to the new educational and social challenges and demands of the twenty-first century.

  7. Literacy, Electronic Networking, and the Internet. ILI Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel A.; Hopey, Christopher

    Three Internet-based adult literacy and adult education programs in Philadelphia were examined to identify ways Internet technology can be used to improve adult basic and literacy education. The Adult Literacy Technology Innovation Network (ALTIN) technology program, which began in the mid-1990s, provides basic instructional technology staff…

  8. Seeing Technology through Five Phases: A Theoretical Framing to Articulate Holism, Ethics and Critique in, and for, Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keirl, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a tentative framing that has emerged out of one person's theorised and reflective professional practice with pre-service primary and secondary Design and Technology teachers as well as with practising teachers, school leadership teams and curriculum policy designers and writers. Over many years, several curricular and…

  9. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  10. Assessing computerized eye tracking technology for gaining insight into expert interpretation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram: an objective quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R R; Zhu, T; Finlay, D D; Drew, B; Kligfield, P D; Guldenring, D; Breen, C; Gallagher, A G; Daly, M J; Clifford, G D

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that accurate interpretation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) requires a high degree of skill. There is also a moderate degree of variability among those who interpret the ECG. While this is the case, there are no best practice guidelines for the actual ECG interpretation process. Hence, this study adopts computerized eye tracking technology to investigate whether eye-gaze can be used to gain a deeper insight into how expert annotators interpret the ECG. Annotators were recruited in San Jose, California at the 2013 International Society of Computerised Electrocardiology (ISCE). Each annotator was recruited to interpret a number of 12-lead ECGs (N=12) while their eye gaze was recorded using a Tobii X60 eye tracker. The device is based on corneal reflection and is non-intrusive. With a sampling rate of 60Hz, eye gaze coordinates were acquired every 16.7ms. Fixations were determined using a predefined computerized classification algorithm, which was then used to generate heat maps of where the annotators looked. The ECGs used in this study form four groups (3=ST elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI], 3=hypertrophy, 3=arrhythmias and 3=exhibiting unique artefacts). There was also an equal distribution of difficulty levels (3=easy to interpret, 3=average and 3=difficult). ECGs were displayed using the 4x3+1 display format and computerized annotations were concealed. Precisely 252 expert ECG interpretations (21 annotators×12 ECGs) were recorded. Average duration for ECG interpretation was 58s (SD=23). Fleiss' generalized kappa coefficient (Pa=0.56) indicated a moderate inter-rater reliability among the annotators. There was a 79% inter-rater agreement for STEMI cases, 71% agreement for arrhythmia cases, 65% for the lead misplacement and dextrocardia cases and only 37% agreement for the hypertrophy cases. In analyzing the total fixation duration, it was found that on average annotators study lead V1 the most (4.29s), followed by leads V2 (3.83s

  11. [Undergraduate education of medical technologists to promote scientific and technological literacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Akizawa, Hirotsugu

    2010-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's medical technologists to receive proper training on the safety of medical treatment and healthcare in order to accommodate the rapid changes and advancement in medical technology. In particular, because of the increase of hospital-acquired infections, the role of medical technologists involved in infection control has become much more important. In addition, particularly in Japan, the career options available to students graduating with a degree in medical technology have become much more diverse, ranging from research laboratories to clinical services; however, undergraduate education for medical technologists is limited. It is therefore deemed necessary for undergraduate students to be provided with adequate training from their universities by offering a wider selection of classes in this subject area. In this paper, we summarize our preliminary findings on the trial lessons that are offered to medical technology students in their microbiology class. These lessons are designed to enhance students' academic potential and to engage their interest.

  12. Science-Technology-Society literacy in college non-majors biology: Comparing problem/case studies based learning and traditional expository methods of instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John S.

    This study used a multiple response model (MRM) on selected items from the Views on Science-Technology-Society (VOSTS) survey to examine science-technology-society (STS) literacy among college non-science majors' taught using Problem/Case Studies Based Learning (PBL/CSBL) and traditional expository methods of instruction. An initial pilot investigation of 15 VOSTS items produced a valid and reliable scoring model which can be used to quantitatively assess student literacy on a variety of STS topics deemed important for informed civic engagement in science related social and environmental issues. The new scoring model allows for the use of parametric inferential statistics to test hypotheses about factors influencing STS literacy. The follow-up cross-institutional study comparing teaching methods employed Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) to model the efficiency and equitability of instructional methods on STS literacy. A cluster analysis was also used to compare pre and post course patterns of student views on the set of positions expressed within VOSTS items. HLM analysis revealed significantly higher instructional efficiency in the PBL/CSBL study group for 4 of the 35 STS attitude indices (characterization of media vs. school science; tentativeness of scientific models; cultural influences on scientific research), and more equitable effects of traditional instruction on one attitude index (interdependence of science and technology). Cluster analysis revealed generally stable patterns of pre to post course views across study groups, but also revealed possible teaching method effects on the relationship between the views expressed within VOSTS items with respect to (1) interdependency of science and technology; (2) anti-technology; (3) socioscientific decision-making; (4) scientific/technological solutions to environmental problems; (5) usefulness of school vs. media characterizations of science; (6) social constructivist vs. objectivist views of theories; (7

  13. Changing Literacies, Changing Formations: The Role of Elicitation in Teacher Action Research with New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Wilson, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    As new technologies promise to be an enduring feature of the landscape of teachers' work, we consider how teachers implicitly bring stories forward into their classroom explorations with new media as a part of their "informal learning". By "stories" is meant specific classroom texts as well as preferred teacher practices with those texts. The…

  14. The Importance of Design Thinking for Technological Literacy: A Phenomenological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    "We know that progress depends on discovery, inventions, creativity and design, but we have simply supposed that it happens anyway," de Bono (1999 p. 43). Technology education is ostensibly a foundation for future designers and creative thinking. However evidence of good design or creative thinking in outcomes displayed in school…

  15. Technology Literacy and the MySpace Generation: They're Not Asking Permission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLester, Susan

    2007-01-01

    As open source and other participatory Web venues become the norm in the new century, educators will be facing an even more overwhelming technology learning curve. A new digital divide is in the future--one that is largely generational. At its heart will be the fundamental questions of what "school" really means and whether digital immigrants can…

  16. Integrating Technology with Literacy: Using Teacher-Guided Collaborative Online Learning to Encourage Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alyson

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on classroom-based research that was designed to monitor the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in a teacher-guided collaborative online learning context to encourage students' critical response to literary texts. The study investigates the premise that an ICT project where children read books and then…

  17. Digi-teens: Media Literacies and Digital Technologies in the Secondary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Andrew; Reed, Kate

    1999-01-01

    Describes a course set up for Year 11 students using digital editing equipment to examine the audiovisual fabric of films of their choice. Investigates how the advent of digital technologies enables new kinds of reading of visual texts as well as new kinds of textual production. (NH)

  18. Intercultural Teaching through Translation: An Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Literacy Course Case in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlakkilic, Alaattin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to teach and evaluate the effectiveness of an Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) course through translation to students in Afghanistan. First, an interview was conducted to determine students' computer skills. It was concluded that the students had almost no computer skills. The course was delivered to…

  19. Parents' Perceptions of Their Preschoolers' Experiences with Information Communication Technologies and Emergent Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parents' perception of preschool children's early Information Communication Technologies (ICT) experiences in the home on the dimensions of parent attitude toward the benefits of ICT use, frequency of ICT use, parent attitude toward ICT use, quality of interaction with ICT, and…

  20. Technology and Engineering Literacy Framework for the 2014 National Assessment of Educational Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assessment Governing Board, 2013

    2013-01-01

    To what extent can young people analyze the pros and cons of a proposal to develop a new source of energy? Construct and test a model or prototype? Use the Internet to find and summarize data and information in order to solve a problem or achieve a goal? The exploding growth in the world of technology and the need to answer questions similar to…

  1. Contemporary Literacies and Technologies in English Language Arts Teacher Education: Shift Happens!

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Marshall; Pope, Carol; Reid, Louann

    2015-01-01

    Three leaders of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Conference on English Education (CEE) reflect on the changes that have occurred in English language arts teacher education in the past 15 years since the first edition of "Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education" ("CITE Journal") was published.…

  2. The Importance of Design Thinking for Technological Literacy: A Phenomenological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    "We know that progress depends on discovery, inventions, creativity and design, but we have simply supposed that it happens anyway," de Bono (1999 p. 43). Technology education is ostensibly a foundation for future designers and creative thinking. However evidence of good design or creative thinking in outcomes displayed in school…

  3. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Consumer-Focused Health Information Technology Systems Through eHealth Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayser, Lars; Kushniruk, Andre; Osborne, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    technology (IT) designs may not accommodate the needs, skills, cognitive capacities, and/or contexts of use of the intended broader population of health consumers. This may result in challenges for consumers who use the health IT systems, and could lead to limitations in adoption if the diversity of user...

  4. Why Free Software Matters for Literacy Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, Michael D.; Bruce, Bertram C.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that understanding what "free software" means and its implications for access and use of new technologies is an important component of the new literacies. Concludes that if free speech and free press are essential to the development of a general literacy, then free software can promote the development of computer literacy. (SG)

  5. The Comprehensive Emergent Literacy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Rohde

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The early skills of Emergent Literacy include the knowledge and abilities related to the alphabet, phonological awareness, symbolic representation, and communication. However, existing models of emergent literacy focus on discrete skills and miss the perspective of the surrounding environment. Early literacy skills, including their relationship to one another, and the substantial impact of the setting and context, are critical in ensuring that children gain all of the preliminary skills and awareness they will need to become successful readers and writers. Research findings over the last few decades have led to a fuller understanding of all that emergent literacy includes, resulting in a need for a new, more comprehensive model. A new model, described in this article, strives to explain how emergent literacy can be viewed as an interactive process of skills and context rather than a linear series of individual components. Early literacy learning opportunities are more likely to happen when teachers have a solid knowledge base of emergent literacy and child development. Research has shown that preschool teachers with limited knowledge about literacy development are significantly less able to provide such experiences for children. Teachers will be better able to facilitate all of the components of emergent literacy if they have access to, and understanding of, a model that describes the components, their interactions, and the importance of environmental factors in supporting children.

  6. Integrating technology with literacy: using teacher-guided collaborative online learning to encourage critical thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Alyson

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on classroom-based research that was designed to monitor the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in a teacherguided collaborative online learning context to encourage students’ critical response to literary texts. The study investigates the premise that an ICT project where children read books and then use email communication to exchange responses with other learners will support critical thinking. Videos of classroom observations, journals and rap...

  7. Envisioning New Literacies through a Lens of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Diane; Moss, Barbara; Rowsell, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    What are new literacies and how do they mesh with core curriculum? Classroom teachers who find their students' interests and bases of knowledge about new technologies expanding exponentially often ask this question. While broadening the definition of new literacies beyond internet literacy this article explores the history of new literacies and…

  8. Portraits of New Literacies in Two Singapore Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lynde; Bopry, Jeanette; Guo, Libo

    2010-01-01

    The need to broaden the notion of literacy has been continually emphasized within the field of New Literacy Studies in recent years. This is necessary because of the advent of information and communication technology (ICT) in our everyday, school and workplace literacy practices. A broader notion of literacy is needed to pay attention to the…

  9. Envisioning New Literacies through a Lens of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Diane; Moss, Barbara; Rowsell, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    What are new literacies and how do they mesh with core curriculum? Classroom teachers who find their students' interests and bases of knowledge about new technologies expanding exponentially often ask this question. While broadening the definition of new literacies beyond internet literacy this article explores the history of new literacies and…

  10. Individuality and Literacy: Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Rosemary A.

    The technology of literacy for any given culture helps to Determine the character of its members. In less than 3,000 years, Western culture has been transformed from an oral/aural culture through many increasingly literate phases to a present stage which is approaching "computer literacy." Erich Fromm suggests that in the course of…

  11. Individuality and Literacy: Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Rosemary A.

    The technology of literacy for any given culture helps to Determine the character of its members. In less than 3,000 years, Western culture has been transformed from an oral/aural culture through many increasingly literate phases to a present stage which is approaching "computer literacy." Erich Fromm suggests that in the course of…

  12. Family Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livija Knaflič

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in child and adult literacy demonstrates that the achievement and the level of literacy that children attain at school is connected with the social and cultural characteristics and the level of literacy of the child's family. This intergenerational transfer of the level of literacy has motivated the search for different ways of improving the level of literacy.The concept of family literacy is based on the assumption that a higher level of parent literacy means that the children may achieve the same, and it also offers better schooling prospects. Family literacy programmes help fami­lies to develop different activities, in­cluding reading and writing skills, both in their community and in everyday life.

  13. 信息技术教师评价素养研究%Research on the Evaluation Literacy of Information Technology Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王飞; 江玲

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate evaluation literacy of teacher hinder the development of assessment reform for primary and secondary school in our country .The evaluation literacy of teacher mainly include the knowledge and skills ,awareness ,communica-tion ,application ,human spirit constitution of evaluation .For the characteristics and needs of today's information technolo-gy teacher professional development ,combined with the current development of evaluation literacy ,made some guiding recommendations for the current problems .%教师专业评价素养日益引起社会关注。教师评价素养主要由知识与技能、评价意识、评价交流、评价应用、评价人文精神构成。根据信息技术教师专业发展的特点和需求,结合我国评价素养发展现状,针对当前评价素养缺乏等问题提出了一些建议。

  14. DIGITAL LITERACY CONCEPT AND ITS PEDAGOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariana Vidotti de Rezende

    2016-01-01

    .... We understand, however, that the technology uses perception in school practices pervades, especially, the teaching and learning of Portuguese language context and the concept of digital literacy...

  15. Facebook levels the playing field: Dyslexic students learning through digital literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Barden

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia has an ambivalent relationship with learning technology. Any potential gains may be nullified if the technology is perceived to exacerbate stigma. This paper examines the use of an ‘everyday’ technology, Facebook, by a small group of sixth form students labelled as dyslexic. ‘Levelling the playing field’ is a phrase the participants used often when discussing what they wanted from learning technology. Because dyslexia usually is defined in terms of significant difficulties with literacy, we might reasonably anticipate that the participants would see Facebook as stigmatising rather than levelling the playing field, because of the very public literacy events that it demands. However, the data indicate that far from shying away from Facebook because of fear of their difficulties with literacy being exposed, the participants enthusiastically embraced it. The students saw Facebook as a desirable presence in their education, one that supported inclusion. For them, levelling the playing field with Facebook had five dimensions: keeping up to date and meeting deadlines; increased control over learning; developing metacognitive awareness; greater control over literacy process and demands; and being experts and helpers. The findings perhaps challenge some assumptions about dyslexia, literacy and learning, and may be of interest to teachers working with dyslexic students, or researchers studying learning in digitally mediated social networks.

  16. Computer literacy in nursing: developing the information technology syllabus in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranto, K; Leino-Kilpi, H

    1997-02-01

    This study has two main purposes: first, to identify and describe the computer skills required in nursing; and second, to find out what should be taught about information technology in nursing education. A three-round Delphi survey was carried out with a panel of experts representing nursing practice, nursing education, nurse students and consumers. The panel showed a consensus of opinion on 71% of the items included in the questionnaire designed for the study. The experts agreed that nurses must know how to use the computer for word-processing purposes, for accessing and using the hospital information system, and for e-mailing. Nurses must also be aware of system security and show a positive attitude towards computers. It is concluded that hospital information systems and nursing informatics should be integrated into laboratory and hospital training.

  17. Political Literacy as Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ross Cory Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This paper contends that political literacy and information literacy are compatible concepts that are inextricably linked and should therefore be taught and stressed simultaneously to students in the classroom. Improving the information literacy and political literacy skills of students will allow them to not only perform better academically, but also empower them to become better citizens who form opinions and make decisions based on appropriate and quality information.

  18. Merging Health Literacy with Computer Technology: Self-Managing Diet and Fluid Intake among Adult Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Janet L.; Siek, Katie A.; Connelly, Kay H.; Astroth, Kim S.; McManus, M. Sue; Scott, Linda; Heo, Seongkum; Kraus, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Dietary Intake Monitoring Application (DIMA) is an electronic dietary self-monitor developed for use on a personal digital assistant (PDA). This paper describes how computer, information, numerical, and visual literacy were considered in development of DIMA. Methods An iterative, participatory design approach was used. Forty individuals receiving hemodialysis at an urban inner-city facility, primarily middle-aged and African American, were recruited. Results Computer literacy was considered by assessing abilities to complete traditional/nontraditional PDA tasks. Information literacy was enhanced by including a Universal-Product-Code (UPC) scanner, picture icons for food with no UPC code, voice recorder, and culturally sensitive food icons. Numerical literacy was enhanced by designing DIMA to compute real-time totals that allowed individuals to see their consumption relative to their dietary prescription. Visual literacy was considered by designing the graphical interface to convey intake data over a 24-hour period that could be accurately interpreted by patients. Pictorial icons for feedback graphs used objects understood by patients. Practice Implications Preliminary data indicate the application is extremely helpful for individuals as they self-monitor their intake. If desired, DIMA could also be used for dietary counseling. PMID:19796911

  19. High Gain, Very Low Areal Density, Scalable RF Apertures Enabled by Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose that the Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) approach be expanded with a specific focus on space exploration orbiting comm network RF aperture...

  20. Manual de Alfabetizacion del Cuerpo de Paz (Peace Corps Literacy Handbook). Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Manual Series No. M-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comings, John; Kahler, David

    This Spanish-language version of a literacy handbook provides an introduction to literacy work for Peace Corps volunteers and other development workers in situations where the literacy work is a primary project or secondary activity. It presents information on planning and preparing for literacy work, offers guidance on program and material…

  1. Home literacy environment: characteristics of children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.H.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Balkom, L.J.M. van; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have diff

  2. Home literacy environment: characteristics of children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.H.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Balkom, L.J.M. van; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have diff

  3. Copyright, digital media literacies and preservice teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Dezuanni; Cushla Kapitzke; Radha Iyer

    2010-01-01

    This article considers copyright knowledge and skills as a new literacy that can be developed through the application of digital media literacy pedagogies. Digital media literacy is emerging from more established forms of media literacy that have existed in schools for several decades and have continued to change as the social and cultural practices around media technologies have changed. Changing requirements of copyright law present specific new challenges for media literacy education bec...

  4. Technology developments and first measurements on inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) for high energy physics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulla, M.; Fernández-García, M.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Flores, D.; González, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Jaramillo, R.; Merlos, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Vila, I.

    2016-12-01

    The first Inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) have been fabricated at IMB-CNM (CSIC). The iLGAD structure includes the multiplication diffusions at the ohmic contact side while the segmentation is implemented at the front side with multiple p+ diffusions. Therefore, iLGAD is p on p position-sensitive detector with a uniform electric field all along the device area that guarantees the same signal amplification wherever a particle passes through the sensitive bulk solving the main draw of the LGAD microstrip detector. However, the detection current is dominated by holes flowing back from the multiplication junction with the subsequent increase of the transient current pulse duration in comparison with conventional LGAD counterparts. Applications of iLGAD range from tracking and timing applications, like determination of primary interaction vertex, to medical imaging. The paper addresses the optimization of the iLGAD structure with the aid of TCAD simulations, focusing on the electric field profiles of iLGAD and LGAD microstrip structures and the corresponding gain. The electrical performance of the first fabricated samples is also provided. For the first time, we have the experimental demonstration of the signal amplification of these novel iLGAD detectors.

  5. Summer Program Helps Adolescents Merge Technology, Popular Culture, Reading, and Writing for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Salika A.; McNeal, Kelly; Yildiz, Melda N.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how faculty provided opportunities for urban high school students to develop literacy proficiencies in reading, writing, and technology. The 12 students participating in an on-campus summer program completed four projects using technology. The faculty collected and reviewed a variety of sources to gain insights into the…

  6. Exploration of Sub-VT and Near-VT 2T Gain-Cell Memories for Ultra-Low Power Applications under Technology Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fish

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low power applications often require several kb of embedded memory and are typically operated at the lowest possible operating voltage (VDD to minimize both dynamic and static power consumption. Embedded memories can easily dominate the overall silicon area of these systems, and their leakage currents often dominate the total power consumption. Gain-cell based embedded DRAM arrays provide a high-density, low-leakage alternative to SRAM for such systems; however, they are typically designed for operation at nominal or only slightly scaled supply voltages. This paper presents a gain-cell array which, for the first time, targets aggressively scaled supply voltages, down into the subthreshold (sub-VT domain. Minimum VDD design of gain-cell arrays is evaluated in light of technology scaling, considering both a mature 0.18 μm CMOS node, as well as a scaled 40 nm node. We first analyze the trade-offs that characterize the bitcell design in both nodes, arriving at a best-practice design methodology for both mature and scaled technologies. Following this analysis, we propose full gain-cell arrays for each of the nodes, operated at a minimum VDD. We find that an 0.18 μm gain-cell array can be robustly operated at a sub-VT supply voltage of 400mV, providing read/write availability over 99% of the time, despite refresh cycles. This is demonstrated on a 2 kb array, operated at 1 MHz, exhibiting full functionality under parametric variations. As opposed to sub-VT operation at the mature node, we find that the scaled 40 nm node requires a near-threshold 600mV supply to achieve at least 97% read/write availability due to higher leakage currents that limit the bitcell’s retention time. Monte Carlo simulations show that a 600mV 2 kb 40 nm gain-cell array is fully functional at frequencies higher than 50 MHz.

  7. Pocket School: Exploring Mobile Technology as a Sustainable Literacy Education Option for Underserved Indigenous Children in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Miranda, Talia; Olaciregui, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is a human right unequally distributed among the world's population. Despite global efforts to fight illiteracy, high illiteracy rates continue to jeopardize access for many to basic schooling, life-long learning, health, and environment safety. Illiteracy also hinders the economic prosperity of the poorest societies in this digital age.…

  8. Pocket School: Exploring Mobile Technology as a Sustainable Literacy Education Option for Underserved Indigenous Children in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Miranda, Talia; Olaciregui, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is a human right unequally distributed among the world's population. Despite global efforts to fight illiteracy, high illiteracy rates continue to jeopardize access for many to basic schooling, life-long learning, health, and environment safety. Illiteracy also hinders the economic prosperity of the poorest societies in this digital age.…

  9. A Quantitative and Qualitative Inquiry into Future Teachers' Use of Information and Communications Technology to Develop Students' Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Stéphanie; Karsenti, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand how preservice programs prepare future teachers to use ICT to develop students' information literacy skills. A survey was conducted from January 2014 through May 2014 with 413 future teachers in four French Canadian universities. In the spring of 2015, qualitative data were also collected from 48 students in their…

  10. Rethinking Instructional Technology to Improve Pedagogy for Digital Literacy: A Design Case in a Graduate Early Childhood Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langub, Lee Woodham; Lokey-Vega, Anissa

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacy is an important aspect to consider within teacher education as a way to address twenty-first century learner needs, particularly in early childhood contexts where developmental concerns should be paramount in making instructional design decisions. This article is a design case of a graduate level early childhood education…

  11. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Consumer-Focused Health Information Technology Systems Through eHealth Literacy: A Framework for Understanding Users' Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background eHealth systems and applications are increasingly focused on supporting consumers to directly engage with and use health care services. Involving end users in the design of these systems is critical to ensure a generation of usable and effective eHealth products and systems. Often the end users engaged for these participatory design processes are not actual representatives of the general population, and developers may have limited understanding about how well they might represent the full range of intended users of the eHealth products. As a consequence, resulting information technology (IT) designs may not accommodate the needs, skills, cognitive capacities, and/or contexts of use of the intended broader population of health consumers. This may result in challenges for consumers who use the health IT systems, and could lead to limitations in adoption if the diversity of user attributes has not been adequately considered by health IT designers. Objective The objective of this paper is to propose how users’ needs and competences can be taken into account when designing new information and communications technology solutions in health care by expanding the user-task-context matrix model with the domains of a new concept of eHealth literacy. Methods This approach expands an existing method for supporting health IT system development, which advocates use of a three-dimensional user-task-context matrix to comprehensively identify the users of health IT systems, and what their needs and requirements are under differing contexts of use. The extension of this model involved including knowledge about users’ competences within the seven domains of eHealth literacy, which had been identified based on systematic engagement with computer scientists, academics, health professionals, and patients recruited from various patient organizations and primary care. A concept map was constructed based on a structured brainstorm procedure, card sorting, and computational

  12. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Consumer-Focused Health Information Technology Systems Through eHealth Literacy: A Framework for Understanding Users' Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Lars; Kushniruk, Andre; Osborne, Richard H; Norgaard, Ole; Turner, Paul

    2015-05-20

    eHealth systems and applications are increasingly focused on supporting consumers to directly engage with and use health care services. Involving end users in the design of these systems is critical to ensure a generation of usable and effective eHealth products and systems. Often the end users engaged for these participatory design processes are not actual representatives of the general population, and developers may have limited understanding about how well they might represent the full range of intended users of the eHealth products. As a consequence, resulting information technology (IT) designs may not accommodate the needs, skills, cognitive capacities, and/or contexts of use of the intended broader population of health consumers. This may result in challenges for consumers who use the health IT systems, and could lead to limitations in adoption if the diversity of user attributes has not been adequately considered by health IT designers. The objective of this paper is to propose how users' needs and competences can be taken into account when designing new information and communications technology solutions in health care by expanding the user-task-context matrix model with the domains of a new concept of eHealth literacy. This approach expands an existing method for supporting health IT system development, which advocates use of a three-dimensional user-task-context matrix to comprehensively identify the users of health IT systems, and what their needs and requirements are under differing contexts of use. The extension of this model involved including knowledge about users' competences within the seven domains of eHealth literacy, which had been identified based on systematic engagement with computer scientists, academics, health professionals, and patients recruited from various patient organizations and primary care. A concept map was constructed based on a structured brainstorm procedure, card sorting, and computational analysis. The new eHealth literacy

  13. Technology developments and first measurements on inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) for high energy physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carulla, M.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; IMB-CNM (CSIC); Flores, D.; IMB-CNM (CSIC); González, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Jaramillo, R.; Merlos, A.; Palomo, F.R.; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D.; Vila, I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The first Inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) have been fabricated at IMB-CNM (CSIC). The iLGAD structure includes the multiplication diffusions at the ohmic contact side while the segmentation is implemented at the front side with multiple P + diffusions. Therefore, iLGAD is P on P position-sensitive detector with a uniform electric field all along the device area that guarantees the same signal amplification wherever a particle passes through the sensitive bulk solving the main draw of the LGAD microstrip detector. However, the detection current is dominated by holes flowing back from the multiplication junction with the subsequent transient current pulse duration increase in comparison with conventional LGAD counterparts. Applications of iLGAD range from tracking and timing applications like determination of primary interaction vertex to medical imaging. The paper addresses the optimization of the iLGAD structure with the aid of TCAD simul...

  14. The Effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design Course to Teacher Candidates' Gaining of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozkoparam, Süleyman Burak; Kiliç, Muhammet Emre; Usta, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of teacher candidates in Turkish Teaching department of Mevlana (Rumi) University and the effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design (ITMD) Course on TPACK. The study is a study of quantitative type and single-group pretest-posttest…

  15. Teaching Two Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    It's obvious that technology is reshaping students' reading and writing practices, with or without educators' intervention. The challenge is to teach students to be truly literate in two languages--those of the pre- and post-digital worlds. So how can teachers teach to two literacies at once? They must approach this task with three mind-sets.…

  16. Online Literacies at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Uses examples drawn from research across several sites in tourism and hospitality in which employees are required to interact with technology, in order to highlight issues relating to new online literacies that are now required for efficient work practices and to discuss implications for practice. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy…

  17. Information Literacy and Employability

    OpenAIRE

    O'Keeffe, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Information Literacy (IL) and its relationship to third level graduates’ employability has gained more attention in recent years. This article examines how IL has evolved from skills initially associated with academic libraries into a key workplace skill set of the knowledge economy. It outlines the challenges interviewees encounter when selling IL to employers, how IL can be utilised when preparing for upcoming interviews and suggests a distinction between workplace IL and employability IL. ...

  18. Evolution of Digital Literacy: New Concepts and New Literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raidell Avello Martínez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of digital literacy has been basically limited to the technical aspects and the use of information and communication technologies. Consequently, a holistic view regarding the role played by digital literacy in both teaching-learning processes and society has not been achieved. The present paper aims at conducting a bibliographical and theoretical review for understanding the evolution and modifications of the concept of digital literacy, as well as the elements and criteria for its definition. Development of Internet towards the social web or the web 2.0 was found to be the major change leading to the reformulation of the concept of digital literacy. The literature review allowed analyzing the theoretical foundations of digital literacy in Cuba and abroad in depth.

  19. Rethinking Literacy Education in New Times: Multimodality, Multiliteracies, & New Literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Rowsell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical overview of new fields of research, pedagogy, and practice in literacy education. In a digital, media-driven, globalized world, educators are faced with the challenge of mediating traditional notions of what it means to be literate (e.g., read and writing print-based texts with new and ever-emerging skills and interests in technology and digital media. Focusing on a pilot study in Oakville, ON and a longitudinal research study in Sydney, Australia, we compel readers to think about literacy in a new light. Without a push to redefine literacy, educators run the risk of teaching and learning language and literacy skills in anachronistic paradigms and frameworks. While research has not been able to fully establish the impact of multimodal communication, it is essential that educators learn to use these different modes of communication to teach literacy.

  20. The Effect of Student Learning Styles on the Learning Gains Achieved When Interactive Simulations Are Coupled with Real-Time Formative Assessment via Pen-Enabled Mobile Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, F V

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes results from a project in an undergraduate engineering physics course that coupled classroom use of interactive computer simulations with the collection of real-time formative assessment using pen-enabled mobile technology. Interactive simulations (free or textbook-based) are widely used across the undergraduate science and engineering curriculia to help actively engaged students increase their understanding of abstract concepts or phenomena which are not directly or easily observable. However, there are indications in the literature that we do not yet know the pedagogical best practices associated with their use to maximize learning. This project couples student use of interactive simulations with the gathering of real-time formative assessment via pen-enabled mobile technology (in this case, Tablet PCs). The research question addressed in this paper is: are learning gains achieved with this coupled model greater for certain types of learners in undergraduate STEM classrooms? To answer t...

  1. Challenges for information literacy education at a university of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges for information literacy education at a university of technology. ... project to investigate the effectiveness of an information literacy intervention for ... of two workshops which aimed at teaching the students to find information relevant ...

  2. The relationship of document and quantitative literacy with learning styles and selected personal variables for aerospace technology students at Indiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Royce Ann

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent that student scores on a researcher-constructed quantitative and document literacy test, the Aviation Documents Delineator (ADD), were associated with (a) learning styles (imaginative, analytic, common sense, dynamic, and undetermined), as identified by the Learning Type Measure, (b) program curriculum (aerospace administration, professional pilot, both aerospace administration and professional pilot, other, or undeclared), (c) overall cumulative grade point average at Indiana State University, and (d) year in school (freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior). The Aviation Documents Delineator (ADD) was a three-part, 35 question survey that required students to interpret graphs, tables, and maps. Tasks assessed in the ADD included (a) locating, interpreting, and describing specific data displayed in the document, (b) determining data for a specified point on the table through interpolation, (c) comparing data for a string of variables representing one aspect of aircraft performance to another string of variables representing a different aspect of aircraft performance, (d) interpreting the documents to make decisions regarding emergency situations, and (e) performing single and/or sequential mathematical operations on a specified set of data. The Learning Type Measure (LTM) was a 15 item self-report survey developed by Bernice McCarthy (1995) to profile an individual's processing and perception tendencies in order to reveal different individual approaches to learning. The sample used in this study included 143 students enrolled in Aerospace Technology Department courses at Indiana State University in the fall of 1996. The ADD and the LTM were administered to each subject. Data collected in this investigation were analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression analysis technique. Results of the study revealed that the variables, year in school and GPA, were significant predictors of the criterion variables, document

  3. The library of the Institute of Alajuela address the information and communication technologies: User training and information literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Garmendia Bonilla, Lovania

    2011-01-01

    The Library of the Institute of Alajuela made an induction experience and training of users and ventured into the information literacy and engaged in the work of the teaching-learning as an integral part of the curriculum. The actions of the library in developing search strategies, location, selection and use of information brought inthe health service, changes to the role of the library, the librarian, the book and the information in the educational environment.By sharing this experience is ...

  4. The effect of time gaining on chemical composition and technological characteristics of mechanically separated turkey meat (MSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Cegiełka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanically separated meat (MSM of poultry is a raw material widely used in the meat industry in Poland and most European Union countries. The manner and conditions for the production of this raw material cause, however, that it has limited technological usefulness. In this study the effect of time of obtaining turkey MSM produced by pressure separation on selected quality characteristics of this raw material: basic chemical composition, pH, thermal loss, water binding capacity and colour was determined. The experimental material consisted of MSM, which was collected directly from the machine after 1, 2 and 3 h of operation. The content of water, protein and fat in MSM was determined using a near infrared spectrometer. The instrumental measurement of colour parameters was performed in the CIE L*a*b* (1976 system. Determination of ash content in MSM and pH measurement were performed according to the requirements of Polish standards, and to determine other technological quality characteristics the methods described in the literature were used. It was found that the extension of working time of the pressure separator from 1 to 3 h resulted in a significant increase in the water content in turkey MSM. Furthermore, the MSM sample obtained after 3 h of operation of the device was characterized by a significantly lower thermal loss and higher water binding capacity than a similar material, but obtained after 1 and 2 h of operation of the device. Time of obtaining of turkey MOM had no significant effect on the content of protein, fat and ash, pH value and colour parameters (L*, a*, b* of the raw material.

  5. 论教育技术学专业学生视觉素养培养%On Educational Technology Students'Visual Literacy Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳

    2013-01-01

    读图时代是视觉信息猛增的时代,越来越多的视觉元素充斥在我们的生活中,对图像信息的解读、运用成为新世纪年轻一代必要的素养。教育技术学专业与视觉素养更有着息息相关的联系,通过视觉素养的培养提高教育技术学专业学生视觉感知、视觉理解和视觉表达能力,使其成为媒体资源的开发者。%The image era is an era of visual information explosion,and more and more visual ele-ments are full of our life.Interpreting and using image information has become a necessary skill for young generation in the new century.The discipline of education technology has a close connection with visual literacy.We should improve the students'visual perception,visual expression and visual understanding through the training of their visual literacy and make them the media resource develop-ers.

  6. Climate Literacy Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Mooney, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Climate Literacy Ambassadors program is a collaborative effort to advance climate literacy led by the Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. With support from NASA, CIMSS is coordinating a three-tiered program to train G6-12 teachers to be Ambassadors of Climate Literacy in their schools and communities. The complete training involves participation at a teacher workshop combined with web-based professional development content around Global and Regional Climate Change. The on-line course utilizes e-learning technology to clarify graphs and concepts from the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Summary for Policy Makers with content intricately linked to the Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. Educators who take the course for credit can develop lesson plans or opt for a project of their choosing. This session will showcase select lesson plans and projects, ranging from a district-wide action plan that engaged dozens of teachers to Ambassadors volunteering at the Aldo Leopold Climate Change Nature Center to a teacher who tested a GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) learning project with plans to participate in the SCRC program. Along with sharing successes from the CIMSS Climate Literacy Ambassadors project, we will share lessons learned related to the challenges of sustaining on-line virtual educator communities.

  7. Health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lizzy

    2010-05-01

    According to the most recent data from the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, there are an estimated 759 million adults lacking minimum literacy skills in the world. Health literacy, however is not just about people's ability to read and understand health information but also includes the capacity to obtain, process and engage in basic health information and services and subsequently making suitable health decisions.

  8. Improving Preschoolers' Language and Literacy Skills through Web-Mediated Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q; Downer, Jason T

    2011-10-01

    MyTeachingPartner (MTP) is a web-mediated approach that provides ongoing support for teachers to improve the quality of their interactions with children. This study examined the effects of MTP on the preschool language and literacy development of children who are at risk for later academic difficulties. Results of this randomized controlled trial indicated that for English-only classrooms, teachers receiving a high level of support had students who made greater gains in language and literacy skills than teachers who only received access to a curricular supplement. Three implications are drawn from these findings: (1) on-going, video-based consultation holds promise not only for altering teacher-child interactions, but also improving children's learning, (2) technology allows teachers to receive intensive, effective support from a distance, and (3) there is still much to be learned about how professional development can support effective teaching of language and literacy skills to children whose home language is not English.

  9. eHealth literacy 2.0: problems and opportunities with an evolving concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Cameron

    2011-12-23

    As the use of eHealth grows and diversifies globally, the concept of eHealth literacy - a foundational skill set that underpins the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) for health - becomes more important than ever to understand and advance. EHealth literacy draws our collective attention to the knowledge and complex skill set that is often taken for granted when people interact with technology to address information, focusing our attention on learning and usability issues from the clinical through to population health level. Just as the field of eHealth is dynamic and evolving, so too is the context where eHealth literacy is applied and understood. The original Lily Model of eHealth literacy and scale used to assess it were developed at a time when the first generation of web tools gained prominence before the rise of social media. The rapid shifts in the informational landscape created by Web 2.0 tools and environments suggests it might be time to revisit the concept of eHealth Literacy and consider what a second release might look like.

  10. Nanocomposite coatings based on Ti-N-Cr/Ni-Cr-B-Si-Fe, gained by two technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Erdybayeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The first results of manufacturing and investigations of a new type of nanocomposite protective coatings are presented. They were manufactured using a combination of two technologies: plasma-detonation coating deposition with the help of plasma jets and thin coating vacuum-arc deposition. We investigated structure, morphology, physical and mechanical properties of the coatings of 80-90 μm thickness, as well as defined the hardness, elastic Young modulus and their corrosion resistance in different media. Grain dimensions of the nanocomposite coatings on Ti-N-Cr base varied from 2.8 to 4 nm. The following phases and compounds formed as a result of plasma interaction with the thick coating surface were found in the coatings: Ti-N-Cr (200, (220, y-Ni3-Fe, a hexagonal Cr2-Ti, Fe3-Ni, (Fe, NiN and the following Ti-Ni compounds: Ti2Ni, Ni3Ti, Ni4Ti, etc. We also found that the nanocomposite coating microhardness increased to H = 31.6 ± 1.1 GPa. The Young elastic modulus was determined to be E = 319 ± 27 GPa – it was derived from the loading-unloading curves. The protective coating demonstrated the increased corrosion resistance in acidic and alkaline media in comparison with that of the stainless steel substrate.

  11. Canadian entrepreneur looks to Utah oil sands : possible hurdles include gaining acceptance for a new technology, funding and regulatory approval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmeyer, P.

    2010-09-15

    Alberta-based Earth Energy Resources has chosen Utah for its first major oilsand development project. Utah has excellent oil sands resources, but most cannot be economically extracted using conventional methods. The president of Earth Energy Resources has proposed to use new technologies, processes and workflow methods to make resource extraction economically viable. The company currently holds a 100 percent interest in 3,170 hectares under lease from the State of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) in the PR Spring deposit. The recoverable high-quality bitumen is estimated at 250 million barrels. The oil sands in Utah are disaggregated and spread out over a relatively wide area. The bitumen quality is very similar to that found in the Athabasca deposit, but it has a much lower sulphur content. Earth Energy Resources plans on using the Ophus Process which involves a series of small 2,000 barrel per day production facilities that can be easily set up, and moved as the resources in one particular area are recovered. Production could be expanded as needed by the addition of more facilities. An environmentally sound citrus-based extraction chemical will replace much of the mechanical energy and caustic soda mixture used in the Clark Process. The new energy and water efficient process will significantly reduce the quantity of middlings produced in the process, thereby eliminating the need for tailings ponds and reducing environmental impacts. 1 fig.

  12. Health literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batterham, R. W.; Hawkins, M.; Collins, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of 'health literacy' refers to the personal and relational factors that affect a person's ability to acquire, understand and use information about health and health services. For many years, efforts in the development of the concept of health literacy exceeded the development...... of measurement tools and interventions. Furthermore, the discourse about and development of health literacy in public health and in clinical settings were often substantially different. This paper provides an update about recently developed approaches to measurement that assess health literacy strengths...... and limitations of individuals and of groups across multiple aspects of health literacy. This advancement in measurement now allows diagnostic and problem-solving approaches to developing responses to identified strengths and limitations. In this paper, we consider how such an approach can be applied across...

  13. Early literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from the Danish contribution to the EASE project, a European research project running from 2008 to 2010 on early literacy in relation to the transition from childcare to school. It explores a holistic, inclusive approach to early literacy that resists a narrow...... and schools. The paper also draws on Gee’s (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008) sociocultural approach to literacy, and Honneth’s (2003, 2006) concept of recognition. Emphasizing participation and recognition as key elements, it claims that stakeholders in early liter- acy must pay attention to how diverse early literacy...... opportunities empower children, especially when these opportunities are employed in a project-based learning environ- ment in which each child is able to contribute to the shared literacy events....

  14. Gaining Relational Competitive Advantages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Zhang, Si; Li, Jizhen

    2015-01-01

    Establishing strategic technological partnerships (STPs) with foreign partners is an increasingly studied topic within the innovation management literature. Partnering firms can jointly create sources of relational competitive advantage. Chinese firms often lack research and development (R......&D) capabilities but are increasingly becoming preferred technological partners for transnational corporations. We investigate an STP between a Scandinavian and a Chinese firm and try to explore how to gain relational competitive advantage by focusing on its two essential stages: relational rent generation...

  15. Greening the Media Literacy Ecosystem: Situating Media Literacy for Green Cultural Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Antonio R.

    2013-01-01

    Media literacy is touted as a necessary life skill for cultural citizenship, yet as it is generally practiced there is little engagement with sustainability issues. In order to gain insights into why this is the case, this research investigated how media literacy practitioners use metaphors to frame both the role of media education in the world…

  16. Integration of technology in the school curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treagust, David F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes, chronologically, the deliberations of a school staff in their decision-making to place technology education in their school. The outcome of these deliberations is a curriculum model whereby objectives of technology awareness, technological literacy, technological capability and transferable skills are integrated with all subjects in the school. The desired outcome is that students at this school will gain a technological education by, for example, attending classes in English, Home Economics, Mathematics, Social Studies, Science and Art. The implementation process is ongoing, is being evaluated and has already experienced senior staff changes and industrial disruption without loss of vigour or intent.

  17. Verbo-Visual Literacy: Understanding and Applying New Educational Communication Media Technologies. Selected Readings from the Symposium of the International Visual Literacy Association (Delphi, Greece, June 25-29, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinos, Nikos, Ed.

    This document contains the welcoming and keynote addresses and selected papers from a 1993 symposium of the International Visual Literacy Association. Topics addressed in the papers include: visual literacy; research methodology and design for content analysis of visual images; multimedia as courseware; design issues in authoring multimedia…

  18. Health literacy lost in translations? Introducing the European Health Literacy Glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Kristine; Brand, Helmut

    2014-12-01

    Health literacy has gained momentum in the Western world, yet in Europe the concept of health literacy is only marginally integrated in research, policy and practice. The present paper presents how translation may act as an influential factor with regard to integration of the health literacy notion in Europe. This study has compared five data sources that provide translations of health literacy: The European Union's Health Strategy; the translations applied in the European Health Literacy Project; national health expert opinions and Google Translate. The comparison integrated Peter Fawcett's translation techniques as a framework for analysis. The results showed a total of 28 translations: 22 from the European Union Health Strategy; 6 from the HLS-EU project; 17 from experts; 25 from Google Translate. Some countries are consistent in translations of health literacy, other countries diverge, the reasons being that health literacy is not yet mainstreamed and the translations are primarily driven by a latent polarized discourse of the concept of literacy. The study showed that translations in general reveals enriched insights in the cohesion of health literacy as one notion and provides the European Health Literacy Glossary that can inform health professionals, academia and decision-makers to further advance health literacy across Europe.

  19. The use of audience response system technology with limited-english-proficiency, low-literacy, and vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Matthew C; Reyes, Iris; Liebman, Amy K; Juarez-Carrillo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) have long been used to improve the interactivity of educational activities. Most studies of ARS have addressed education of literate trainees. How well these devices work with low-literacy subjects is not well studied. Information gathering on the training audience is an important use of ARS and helpful in improving the targeting of training information. However, obtaining demographic information from vulnerable populations with reasons to be concerned about divulging information about themselves has not been tested. In addition, a culturally competent method to effectively collect demographic and evaluation data of this growing population is essential. This project investigated the use of ARS to gather information from Hispanic immigrant workers, many of whom are socially vulnerable and have limited English proficiency (LEP) and low-literacy. Workers attended focus groups and were asked to use ARS devices or clickers to respond to questions. Questions were both categorical (multiple choice) and open-ended numerical (text entry), and varied from simple queries to more sensitive points regarding immigration. Most workers answered the one-key response categorical questions with little difficulty. In contrast, some participants struggled when responding to numerical questions, especially when the response required pressing multiple clicker keys. An overwhelming majority of participants reported that the clickers were comfortable and easy to use despite the challenges presented by the more complex responses. The error rate increased as question complexity increased and the trend across three ordered categories of response complexity reached statistical significance. Results suggest that ARS is a viable method for gathering dichotomous or higher-order categorical information from LEP and low-literacy populations in a group setting while assuring anonymity. However, it is recommended that clickers be developed and tested with fewer, bigger

  20. Functional Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Nolimal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author first defines literacy as the ability of co-operation in all fields of life and points at the features of illiterate or semi-literate individuals. The main stress is laid upon the assessment of literacy and illiteracy. In her opinion the main weak­ ness of this kind of evaluation are its vague psycho-metric characteristics, which leads to results valid in a single geographical or cultural environment only. She also determines the factors causing illiteracy, and she states that the level of functional literacy is more and more becoming a national indicator of successfulness.

  1. Digital literacies

    CERN Document Server

    Hockly, Nicky; Pegrum, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic shifts in our communication landscape have made it crucial for language teaching to go beyond print literacy and encompass the digital literacies which are increasingly central to learners' personal, social, educational and professional lives. By situating these digital literacies within a clear theoretical framework, this book provides educators and students alike with not just the background for a deeper understanding of these key 21st-century skills, but also the rationale for integrating these skills into classroom practice. This is the first methodology book to address not jus

  2. Adherence to self-monitoring via interactive voice response technology in an eHealth intervention targeting weight gain prevention among Black women: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Dori M; Levine, Erica L; Lane, Ilana; Askew, Sandy; Foley, Perry B; Puleo, Elaine; Bennett, Gary G

    2014-04-29

    eHealth interventions are effective for weight control and have the potential for broad reach. Little is known about the use of interactive voice response (IVR) technology for self-monitoring in weight control interventions, particularly among populations disproportionately affected by obesity. This analysis sought to examine patterns and predictors of IVR self-monitoring adherence and the association between adherence and weight change among low-income black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. The Shape Program was a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-month eHealth behavioral weight gain prevention intervention to usual care among overweight and obese black women in the primary care setting. Intervention participants (n=91) used IVR technology to self-monitor behavior change goals (eg, no sugary drinks, 10,000 steps per day) via weekly IVR calls. Weight data were collected in clinic at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Self-monitoring data was stored in a study database and adherence was operationalized as the percent of weeks with a successful IVR call. Over 12 months, the average IVR completion rate was 71.6% (SD 28.1) and 52% (47/91) had an IVR completion rate ≥80%. At 12 months, IVR call completion was significantly correlated with weight loss (r =-.22; P=.04) and participants with an IVR completion rate ≥80% had significantly greater weight loss compared to those with an IVR completion rate educated participants were more likely to achieve high IVR call completion. Participants reported positive attitudes toward IVR self-monitoring. Adherence to IVR self-monitoring was high among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Higher adherence to IVR self-monitoring was also associated with greater weight change. IVR is an effective and useful tool to promote self-monitoring and has the potential for widespread use and long-term sustainability. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938535; http

  3. Redefining Literacy: The Realities of Digital Literacy for Students with Disabilities in K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalem, Majed A.

    2016-01-01

    Technology has shaped the definition of literacy from the traditional meaning of having the ability to read and write to being a social practice that enables individuals to learn and interact with the world. With this notion of literacy, technology has become a tool to motivate and engage all learners through broad practices and platforms that…

  4. A qualitative case study of ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2017-07-03

    eHealth's many forms are benchmarked by the World Health Organization. Scotland is considered an advanced adopter of ehealth. The third global survey on ehealth includes pharmacy-related ehealth indicators. Advances in ehealth place an obligation on pharmacy staff to demonstrate proficiency, or digital literacy, in using ehealth technologies. The aim of this study was to provide an indepth exploration of the ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff in the North East of Scotland. A qualitative local case study approach was adopted for observational and interview activities in community and hospital pharmacies. Interview and observational data were collated and analysed using a framework approach. This study gained management approval from the local health board following ethical review by the sponsor university. Nineteen pharmacies and staff (n = 94) participated including two hospitals. Most participants were female (n = 82), aged 29 years and younger (n = 34) with less than 5 years pharmacy experience (n = 49). Participants identified their own digital literacy as basic. Most of the pharmacies had minimum levels of technology implemented (n = 15). Four themes (technology, training, usability, processes) were inducted from the data, coded and modelled with illustrative quotes. Scotland is aspirational in seeking to support the developing role of pharmacy practice with ehealth, however, evidence to date shows most pharmacy staff work with minimum levels of technology. The self-reported lack of digital literacy and often mentioned lack of confidence in using IT suggest pharmacy staff need support and training. Informal work based digital literacy development of the pharmacy team is self-limiting. Usability of ehealth technology could be a key element of its' acceptability. There is potential to better engage with ehealth process efficiencies in both hospital and community pharmacy. As Scotland increasingly invests in ehealth pharmacy

  5. Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, and how ... is also about using them to make good health decisions. It involves differences that people have in ...

  6. Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Research Underway Plain Language Health Literacy “Saves Lives. Saves Time. Saves Money.” - NIH Communication between and among human ...

  7. Information Literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ian

    Whereas learning to be information literate implies an end to a process, information .... According to Christenbury (1989), cultural literacy refers to a familiarity with the ..... number of doctoral level IL studies that have been done in Brazil, Mexico ...

  8. Ideology and Interaction: Debating Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross; Street, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    In this exchange, Street and Collin debate the merits of the interaction model of literacy that Collin outlined in a recent issue of Reading Research Quarterly. Built as a complement and a counter to Street's ideological model of literacy, Collin's interaction model defines literacies as technologies that coevolve with sociocultural…

  9. Developing Media Literacy: Managing Fear and Moving Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    One way to view the development of the media literacy movement is through the various different ways in which strains of media literacy education have been called on to allay fears that accompanying new media technologies. This article focuses on how one media literacy organization,The LAMP, deals with two very different arenas--the internet…

  10. influence of early literacy parental involvement on science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Influence of early literacy on science achievement of Junior Secondary School students was examined in this ... were highly involved in their children's early literacy acquisition; parental involvement in literacy ... Curriculum Studies and Instructional Technology Department, Faculty of education. ..... Albany,. NY: Suny Press.

  11. Ideology and Interaction: Debating Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross; Street, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    In this exchange, Street and Collin debate the merits of the interaction model of literacy that Collin outlined in a recent issue of Reading Research Quarterly. Built as a complement and a counter to Street's ideological model of literacy, Collin's interaction model defines literacies as technologies that coevolve with sociocultural…

  12. Reconceptualising Science Education Practices from New Literacies Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    In light of profound socio-economic and technological changes, the research from New Literacies has raised fundamental questions on the nature of literacy in the way we read, write, and communicate. Yet, in science education, research in literacy has been largely restricted to the domain of print-oriented academic language. This paper aims to set…

  13. Understanding New Media Literacy: An Explorative Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Bin; Li, Jen-Yi; Deng, Feng; Lee, Ling

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of new media technologies, the role of media in a society has been changed that leads researchers to re-construct the meaning of literacy from classic literacy to new media literacy. There have been continuing efforts to understand new media and promote the importance of becoming new media literate among researchers, educators,…

  14. The New Literacies: Multiple Perspectives on Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    With contributions from leading scholars, this compelling volume offers fresh insights into literacy teaching and learning--and the changing nature of literacy itself--in today's K-12 classrooms. The focus is on varied technologies and literacies such as social networking sites, text messaging, and online communities. Cutting-edge approaches to…

  15. Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Novljan

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy is a concept which is well established in theory while in practice it is only slowly breaking ground in accordance with the understanding of its significance and the possibilities of its realisation. Based on fundamental works, the characteristics of information literacy, its cognitive foundations and significance for individuals as well as for society, are argumented in the article. The analyzed content of this concept is connected with the content of a librarian’s knowl...

  16. Health Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Yalcin Balcik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Today is knowledge age and in this era, individuals are expected to interpret their disease, determine symptoms and make decisions on their health that is good for themselves. The efficiancy, effectiveness and quality of health care depends on health care services users decisions. These decisions are determined by health literacy level which is defined as the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand the basic health information to make appropriate health decisions. There are three types of health literacy: functional health literacy (reading and writing skills to understand and use health information, interactive health literacy (cognitive skills to interact with health-care providers and critical health literacy (advanced cognitive, social skills and ability to critically thinking. If all of these skills are low, people are poorer overall health, they are use less preventive health care services and more medical services for their diseases, they have a poorer understand of treatment and a lower level of adherence to medical regimes. Limited health literacy is not only an individual problem, it is also important for health care manager and policy makers to organise and structure of health care services because of the increasing health services utilization and huge cost. Although the term and #8216;health literacy and #8217; has discussed since 1970 and #8217;s, and has grown tremendously in the past decade, there are not enough researchs on this subject in Turkiye. The aim of the study is to make an overall assessment about health literacy and is to contribute to the national literature on subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(4.000: 321-326

  17. Technologcal Literacy in welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch-Jensen, Peter; Kondrup, Sissel

    to be ‘welfare technological literate’ – both generally as well as within specific welfare professions. Secondly to support the development of a helpful educational framework that enables students to develop welfare technological literacy. This paper discusses some difficulties and preliminary findings...

  18. Examining Media Literacy Levels of Prospective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taskın INAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As in many other countries, following the 2007-2008 education year when media literacy courses began to be included in the curricula, media literacy has become one of the discussion topics among educators and decision makers in Turkey. Discussion topics related to media literacy have included who is going to give the media literacy courses, what qualifications will be sought out in media literacy education teachers, what will be included in the media literacy curriculum in terms of its content, and at what level the media literacy course will be given. The current study which aims to examine media literacy levels of prospective teachers utilized thesurvey method. The sample of the study included prospective teachers (480 attending Elementary School Education, Social Studies Education and Turkish Language Education departments in the Education Faculty at the Dumlupinar University in the 2008-2009 education year. The results of the study showed that prospective teachers have a low level of reaction to media messages, do not educate people around enough about the effects of media, but make use of different sources of media to gain information, and are cognizant of media literacy.

  19. The Nuances of Health Literacy, Nutrition Literacy, and Food Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velardo, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy, defined as the ability to access, understand, and use health information, has been identified as an international public health goal. The term nutrition literacy has emerged as a distinct form of health literacy, yet scholars continue to reflect on constituent skills and capabilities in light of discussions regarding what it means to be food literate and health literate. This viewpoint argues that a comprehensive conceptualization of nutrition literacy should reflect key elements of health literacy and food literacy constructs. Nutbeam's tripartite model of health literacy is employed to explore competencies that are likely to facilitate healthy food relationships.

  20. Identifying Predictors of Achievement in the Newly Defined Information Literacy: A Neural Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Randall; Hignite, Michael; Margavio, Thomas M.; Margavio, Geanie W.

    2009-01-01

    Information Literacy is a concept that evolved as a result of efforts to move technology-based instructional and research efforts beyond the concepts previously associated with "computer literacy." While computer literacy was largely a topic devoted to knowledge of hardware and software, information literacy is concerned with students' abilities…

  1. Identifying Predictors of Achievement in the Newly Defined Information Literacy: A Neural Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Randall; Hignite, Michael; Margavio, Thomas M.; Margavio, Geanie W.

    2009-01-01

    Information Literacy is a concept that evolved as a result of efforts to move technology-based instructional and research efforts beyond the concepts previously associated with "computer literacy." While computer literacy was largely a topic devoted to knowledge of hardware and software, information literacy is concerned with students' abilities…

  2. Development of the eHealth Literacy Assessment Toolkit, eHLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Dorthe Furstrand; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Assessment toolkit, eHLA, evaluating the user by seven scales: computer familiarity, confidence, incentive and performance as well as functional health literacy, health literacy self-assessment and health literacy performance, as a first step toward development of technology that accommodates the literacy...

  3. Emotionally Crafted Experiences: Layering Literacies in Minecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Sandra Schamroth; Rowsell, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacies play a foundational role in the rhythm and pattern of our lives, yet debates continue about how to harness them for educational purposes. In an effort to humanize digital literacies, this column provides a venue for research and practical applications that depict technology use as part of the fabric of being human. This…

  4. Emotionally Crafted Experiences: Layering Literacies in Minecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Sandra Schamroth; Rowsell, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacies play a foundational role in the rhythm and pattern of our lives, yet debates continue about how to harness them for educational purposes. In an effort to humanize digital literacies, this column provides a venue for research and practical applications that depict technology use as part of the fabric of being human. This…

  5. New Literacies Instruction in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sarah; Wang, Shiang-Kwei; Hsu, Hui-Yin; Tsuei, Mengping

    2007-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are transforming the priorities of the International Reading Association (IRA) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) to focus on preparing for the "new literacies." According to the Partnership of 21st Century Skills, "new literacy" is the ability to use ICTs to develop 21st…

  6. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie MacLure

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  7. Measuring Practicing Clinicians’ Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E.; Bennett, Katelyn J.; Sherman, Scott E.; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. Objectives This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans’ Affairs (VA) medical center. Methods Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach’s a=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson’s correlations. Results Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. Conclusions While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians’ information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs. PMID:28197620

  8. Journey to Medieval China: Using Technology-Enhanced Instruction to Develop Content Knowledge and Digital Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Kristen; Winstead, Lisa; Kottler, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Recent innovations in Web-based technology tools have made planning instruction with technology in mind far more doable than in years past. To aid teachers in planning with technology, tools are organized into five broad categories: communication, collaboration, presentation, organization and critical-thinking. The purpose and potential of each…

  9. Journey to Medieval China: Using Technology-Enhanced Instruction to Develop Content Knowledge and Digital Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Kristen; Winstead, Lisa; Kottler, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Recent innovations in Web-based technology tools have made planning instruction with technology in mind far more doable than in years past. To aid teachers in planning with technology, tools are organized into five broad categories: communication, collaboration, presentation, organization and critical-thinking. The purpose and potential of each…

  10. Digital literacies at school. Students' digital profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pennazio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo presenta una ricerca volta a focalizzare le modalità in cui la Digital Literacy si traduce a scuola. Lo studio ha inteso sottolineare le molteplici dimensioni della Digital Literacy: Information Technology Literacy; Information Literacy; Visual Literacy e Media Literacy ed è stato effettuato nelle scuole primarie e secondarie di primo grado in Liguria. Sono state organizzate settimane di attività di ricerca, analisi e rielaborazione di informazioni, in classe e in rete, individualmente e in gruppo. Dalle autovalutazione degli studenti, svolte al termine di ogni attività, sono emersi i profili digitali che gli studenti tendono ad assumere quando utilizzano le tecnologie digitali. Tali profili possono essere utilizzati dagli insegnanti per progettare in maniera più mirata e significativa le attività con le tecnologie a scuola.

  11. Examining e-Health literacy and the digital divide in an underserved population in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm; Crosby, Martha E

    2014-02-01

    Seeking health information is one of the leading uses for the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW). Research has found the amount one benefits from e-Health information (health information from electronic sources) is directly related to the level of e-Health literacy. e-Health literacy is defined as "the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem." In order to gain a further understanding of the effects and use of technology, the digital divide, and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes, focus group interviews were conducted with participants diagnosed with diabetes and currently residing in a Medically Underserved Area. Overall, 25 volunteers participated in the four focus group meetings. Based on the focus group discussions, a general low e-Health literacy rate was identified. This was demonstrated by the lack of access to the Internet and the skills needed to retrieve health information. Of the 25 participants, 64% reported having Internet access at some level, but, only one reported going on the Internet every day. When the barriers to using the Internet were discussed, many participants expressed a lack of knowledge in how to retrieve information. Results of this study further show that having access to technology is not necessarily associated with usage. This dynamic is evolving into a new form of digital divide, gap in information retrieval and usage, versus gap in access. This is the first known study to examine e-Health literacy in an underserved population in Hawai'i. With the proliferation of information and communication technology and the transformation of information retrieval to be mobile and "on demand", a multi-pronged communication and education strategy is needed to explore how technology can improve e-Health literacy and health outcomes among underserved populations.

  12. Promoting Youths’ Science and Technology Literacy Depending on Three Platforms%三大阵地提升青少年科学素质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍元媛

    2015-01-01

    Teenagers are future builders of our country. Today,high-quality scientific and technological personnel are needed by the society. How to cultivate talents by way of targeted education is a question brought up to educators. This paper advocates to rely on classroom instructions,build on-campus popular science bases through absorption of social resources and hold campus science festivals to gradually promote the science and technology literacy of youths.%青少年是祖国未来的建设者,当今社会需要的是高素质科技人才,培养人才的重任在教师,如何有针对性地培养青少年成才是教育工作者需要思考的问题。提出依据课堂教学、利用社会资源建设校内科普基地、举办校园科技节三大阵地互相牵引,循序渐进,为提升青少年科学素质奠定坚实基础。

  13. Measuring Science Literacy in College Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Chris David; Buxner, S. R.; Antonellis, J.; King, C.; Johnson, E.; CATS

    2010-01-01

    Initial results from a major study of scientific literacy are presented, involving nearly 10,000 undergraduates in science classes at a large Southwestern Land Grant public university over a 20-year period. The science content questions overlap with those in the NSF's Science Indicators series. About 10% of all undergraduates in the US take a General Education astronomy course, and NSF data and the work of Jon Miller show that the number of college science courses taken is the strongest predictor of civic scientific literacy. Our data show that gains in knowledge on any particular item through the time students graduate are only 10-15%. Among students who have taken most or all of their science requirements, one-in-three think that antibiotics kill viruses as well as bacteria, one-in-four think lasers work by focusing sound waves, one-in-five think atoms are smaller than electrons, and the same fraction is unaware that humans evolved from earlier species of animals and that the Earth takes a year to go around the Sun. The fraction of undergraduates saying that astrology is "not at all” scientific increases from 17% to a still-low 34% as they move through the university. Equally worrying, half of all science majors say that astrology is "sort of” or "very” scientific. Education majors - the cohort of future teachers - perform worse than average on most individual questions and in terms of their overall scientific literacy. Assuming the study institution is representative of the nation's higher education institutions, our instruction is not raising students to the level we would expect for educated citizens who must vote on many issues that relate to science and technology. We acknowledge the NSF for funding under Award No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program.

  14. A methodological proposal to contribute to the development of research skills in science education to start the design of a didactic unit built on foundations of scientific and technological literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Velásquez Mosquera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to promote a discussion of the need to promote the training of investigative skills in students of natural sciences from a methodology structured from the design of the plan of course, including a didactic unit, based on scientific and technological literacy to. It is the result of several years of experience in teaching and research of the author in the field of the didactics of the sciences. 

  15. A methodological proposal to contribute to the development of research skills in science education to start the design of a didactic unit built on foundations of scientific and technological literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Felipe Velásquez Mosquera; Eduardo Augusto López

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to promote a discussion of the need to promote the training of investigative skills in students of natural sciences from a methodology structured from the design of the plan of course, including a didactic unit, based on scientific and technological literacy to. It is the result of several years of experience in teaching and research of the author in the field of the didactics of the sciences. 

  16. eHealth Literacy: Extending the Digital Divide to the Realm of Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainin, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Background eHealth literacy is defined as the ability of people to use emerging information and communications technologies to improve or enable health and health care. Objective The goal of this study was to explore whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet. The study focused on (1) traditional digital divide variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics, digital access, and digital literacy, (2) information search processes, and (3) the outcomes of Internet use for health information purposes. Methods We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286). We measured eHealth literacy; Internet access; digital literacy; sociodemographic factors; perceived health; presence of chronic diseases; as well as health information sources, content, search strategies, and evaluation criteria used by consumers. Results Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance), and interpersonal (interacting with their physician) gains. Conclusions The present study documented differences between respondents high and low in eHealth literacy in terms of background attributes, information consumption, and outcomes of the information search. The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated

  17. eHealth literacy: extending the digital divide to the realm of health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neter, Efrat; Brainin, Esther

    2012-01-27

    eHealth literacy is defined as the ability of people to use emerging information and communications technologies to improve or enable health and health care. The goal of this study was to explore whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet. The study focused on (1) traditional digital divide variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics, digital access, and digital literacy, (2) information search processes, and (3) the outcomes of Internet use for health information purposes. We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286). We measured eHealth literacy; Internet access; digital literacy; sociodemographic factors; perceived health; presence of chronic diseases; as well as health information sources, content, search strategies, and evaluation criteria used by consumers. Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance), and interpersonal (interacting with their physician) gains. The present study documented differences between respondents high and low in eHealth literacy in terms of background attributes, information consumption, and outcomes of the information search. The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated use of the Internet and the subsequent increased

  18. Literacy in Francophone Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokora, Pascal D.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in francophone Africa, where literacy is still a privilege, is reviewed in terms of the complex linguistic situation, effects of population change, concepts and definitions of literacy, promotion of literacy in adult nonformal settings (e.g., African language literacy materials, multilingual settings). (23 references) (LB)

  19. Computational Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio; Robering, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    for the acquisition of Computational Literacy at basic educational levels, focus on higher levels of education has been much less prominent. The present paper considers the case of courses for higher education programs within the Humanities. A model is proposed which conceives of Computational Literacy as a layered...... set of skills rather than one single skill. Skills acquisition at these layers can be tailored to the specific needs of students. The work presented here builds upon experience from courses for such students from the Humanities in which programming is taught as a tool for other purposes. Results...

  20. An Investigation about Dimensionality and level of Students ’ Technological Literacy in Senior Middle Schools%高中生技术素养的维度与水平--基于北京的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶莹; 马龙敏

    2014-01-01

    技术素养已经成为公民必备的基本素养,与科学素养并列,关系到国家的综合实力和科技竞争力。本研究整合国外成果将技术素养分成知识、能力、批判性思维和决策、态度四个维度,横向领域结构包括技术和社会、设计与系统、信息与通信技术,具体分为4个一级指标,12个二级指标和36个三级指标。对北京1520名高中生进行了实证调查,从技术素养的知识、能力、批判性思维和决策、态度这4个一级指标进行了基本水平的统计,具体涉及三级指标的描述性分析、典型指标的频率分析等。调查研究结果表明:在知识维度,学生对于核心产品、形式产品、附加产品、核心概念、故障诊断、工具、材料的知识掌握很好,这7项的得分都达到高分的类别,但是学生在设计系统和其他资源的知识掌握欠佳。整体来看,高中生技术素养整体水平薄弱,尤其在技术素养的核心维度表现不佳,对于学生技术素养的培养不仅需要在政策层面得以重视,也应该在实际教学中显化。%In company with scientific literacy, technological literacy has become the basic qualification for citizens, which is related to the comprehensive strength of a country and the competitiveness of science and technology. This study integrated the foreign results and divided technological literacy into four dimensions which are knowledge, ability, critical thinking and decision making, attitude .The transverse field structure which is specifically divided into 4 first-level indicators, 12 secondary indicators and 36 tertiary indicators includes technology and society , design and system, information and communication technology. It is an empirical investigation of 1520 senior high school students in Beijing by using SPSS statistical software, and the four first-level indicators of technological literacy which are knowledge, ability, critical

  1. Exploring Literacy Coaches' Relationships with Teachers: Balancing Responsive and Directive Coaching Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Jacy C.

    2009-01-01

    Literacy coaching has become an increasingly popular form of literacy professional development in the United States based on the common assumption that strong relationships between coaches and teachers will drive instructional improvement and gains in student achievement. However, there is little empirical research describing how literacy coaches…

  2. Toppling Hierarchies? Media and Information Literacies, Ethnicity, and Performative Media Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotner, Kirsten; Kobbernagel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article suggests how we should study media and information literacies (MIL) and do so at a time, when young people nurture these literacies through multiple media practices and across spaces of learning. Our basic argument is this: in order to gain a robust knowledge base for the development of MIL we need to study literacy practices beyond…

  3. Exploring Literacy Coaches' Relationships with Teachers: Balancing Responsive and Directive Coaching Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Jacy C.

    2009-01-01

    Literacy coaching has become an increasingly popular form of literacy professional development in the United States based on the common assumption that strong relationships between coaches and teachers will drive instructional improvement and gains in student achievement. However, there is little empirical research describing how literacy coaches…

  4. Quantitative Literacy: Geosciences and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; McCallum, W. G.

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative literacy seems like such a natural for the geosciences, right? The field has gone from its origin as a largely descriptive discipline to one where it is hard to imagine failing to bring a full range of mathematical tools to the solution of geological problems. Although there are many definitions of quantitative literacy, we have proposed one that is analogous to the UNESCO definition of conventional literacy: "A quantitatively literate person is one who, with understanding, can both read and represent quantitative information arising in his or her everyday life." Central to this definition is the concept that a curriculum for quantitative literacy must go beyond the basic ability to "read and write" mathematics and develop conceptual understanding. It is also critical that a curriculum for quantitative literacy be engaged with a context, be it everyday life, humanities, geoscience or other sciences, business, engineering, or technology. Thus, our definition works both within and outside the sciences. What role do geoscience faculty have in helping students become quantitatively literate? Is it our role, or that of the mathematicians? How does quantitative literacy vary between different scientific and engineering fields? Or between science and nonscience fields? We will argue that successful quantitative literacy curricula must be an across-the-curriculum responsibility. We will share examples of how quantitative literacy can be developed within a geoscience curriculum, beginning with introductory classes for nonmajors (using the Mauna Loa CO2 data set) through graduate courses in inverse theory (using singular value decomposition). We will highlight six approaches to across-the curriculum efforts from national models: collaboration between mathematics and other faculty; gateway testing; intensive instructional support; workshops for nonmathematics faculty; quantitative reasoning requirement; and individual initiative by nonmathematics faculty.

  5. New Literacies in Schome Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Julia

    In this chapter I deploy a synthesis of methods I term virtual literacy ethnography to investigate the diverse literacy practices of the Schome Park project (SPP). This project worked with teenagers on the first European "closed" (i.e. protected) island in the 3D virtual world Teen Second LifeTM (TSL) as described in the previous chapter. Firstly I introduce an ethnographic perspective on this lengthy, rich project and reflect on my own interpretive approach. Introducing my own focus of interest, the new literacy practices fostered by the environment and in particular activities I judge to be especially creative, I begin to develop the methodology of a "virtual literacy ethnography". I show how the diverse multimodal affordances of the communicative domains are imaginatively exploited by the students, supported by peers and staff in an environment characterised by "fluid leadership". I include some analysis of literacy work around a genre traditionally valued by educators, a dictionary, which I was not involved in at the time. I suggest this is an exemplar literacy practice, creative in itself and illustrative of the methodological possibilities and of course limitations linked with the technologies utilised. Traditional distinctions between "reading" and "writing" become permeable in interesting ways as new creative practices, fostered by the environment of the Schome Park programme, emerged. I offer support for Kress's (2005) claim that changes in writing and reading practices amount to a "revolution in the world of communication." In conclusion, I claim that virtual literacy ethnography, as I have proposed it here, can be fruitful in exploring the complexity and creativity of the students' literacy practices, although more developmental work is needed.

  6. On the Importance of Art Literacy of Science and Technology Talents in our Country%论我国科技人才艺术素养的重要性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李剑平; 杨咏东; 李静媛

    2013-01-01

    科学与艺术是相辅相成、不可分割的.我国科技人才大都缺乏艺术素养,创造才能发挥受到限制,阻碍了科学技术研究发展.良好的艺术素养对科技人才的创造力和思维技能、良好人格的形成、工作激情、减轻工作压力、交际与沟通能力等方面具有重要的影响作用,科技人才应该努力提高艺术素养,为科学技术发展做出更大的贡献.%Science and arts and humanities are complementary and inseparable. In our country, most of scientific and technical workers lack the literacy of humanities and arts, which limits the creative ability to be brought into full play and also hinders the development of scientific and technological research. Good humane and artistic literacy has an important influence on not only the creativity and thinking skills of scientific and technical workers, but also the formation of a good personality and the passion for work. In addition, it plays an important role in reducing stress and improving communication skills. Scientific and technological workers should strive to improve the literacy of humane and artistic literacy, so that they can make a greater contribution to the development of science and technology.

  7. eHealth literacy: a marker for "digital divide" in health information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Neter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available eHealth literacy is defined as the use of emerging information and communications technology to improve or enable health and health care. The study examined whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet.We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286.Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance, and interpersonal (interacting with their physician gains.The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated use of the Internet and the subsequent increased gains among the high eHealth literate create new inequalities in the domain of digital health information.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v3i3.281

  8. Studying New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, Michele; Lankshear, Colin

    2014-01-01

    New literacies research offers valuable insights into young people's everyday literacy practices. Teachers can use the kinds of research outcomes reported here to build on new literacies in appropriate ways for academic purposes.

  9. Changing Our Aim: Infiltrating Faculty with Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Sandra; Eva, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Librarians are stretched thin these days--budget cuts and decreasing numbers are forcing us to look at new ways of doing things. While the embedded information literacy model has gained popularity in the past number of years, it may be time for a new model of information literacy. We must arm teaching faculty with the tools they need to teach…

  10. Health literacy of Dutch adults: a cross sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Rademakers, J.; Schipper, M.; Droomers, M.; Sorensen, K.; Uiters, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relatively little knowledge is available to date about health literacy among the general population in Europe. It is important to gain insights into health literacy competences among the general population, as this might contribute to more effective health promotion and help clarify soci

  11. Health literacy of Dutch adults: a cross sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Rademakers, J.; Schipper, M.; Droomers, M.; Sorensen, K.; Uiters, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relatively little knowledge is available to date about health literacy among the general population in Europe. It is important to gain insights into health literacy competences among the general population, as this might contribute to more effective health promotion and help clarify soci

  12. Integrating Information Literacy into Teacher Education: A Successful Grant Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Information literacy has gained importance over the last few decades, not only among librarians, but also with higher education faculty. Information literacy instruction is important for all college-level students. However, it is essential for teacher education students who must not only be information literate themselves, but also be able to…

  13. Refreshing Information Literacy: Learning from Recent British Information Literacy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justine

    2013-01-01

    Models play an important role in helping practitioners implement and promote information literacy. Over time models can lose relevance with the advances in technology, society, and learning theory. Practitioners and scholars often call for adaptations or transformations of these frameworks to articulate the learning needs in information literacy…

  14. Profile of middle school students on scientific literacy achievements by using scientific literacy assessments (SLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmatullah, Arif; Diana, Sariwulan; Rustaman, Nuryani Y.

    2016-02-01

    Along with the development of science and technology, the basic ability to read, write and count is not enough just to be able to survive in the modern era that surrounded by the products of science and technology. Scientific literacy is an ability that might be added as basic ability for human in the modern era. Recently, Fives et al. developed a new scientific literacy assessment for students, named as SLA (Scientific Literacy Assessment). A pilot study on the achievements of scientific literacy of middle school students in Sumedang using SLA was conducted to investigate the profile scientific literacy achievement of 223 middle school students in Sumedang, and compare the outcomes between genders (159 girls and 64 boys) and school accreditation (A and B) using a quantitative method with descriptive research-school survey. Based on the results, the average achievement of scientific literacy Sumedang middle school students is 45.21 and classified as the low category. The five components of scientific literacy, which is only one component in the medium category, namely science motivation and beliefs, and the four other components are in the low and very low category. Boys have higher scientific literacy, but the differences not statistically significant. Student's scientific literacy in an accredited school is higher than B, and the differences are statistically significant. Recommendation for further are: involve more research subjects, add more number of questions for each indicator, and conduct an independent research for each component.

  15. Fostering Digital Literacy through Web-Based Collaborative Inquiry Learning--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Fu; Pow, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Digital literacy (DL), a term that emerged with the explosion of digital information and multimedia technology, refers to basic competence in using digital technology. The present study first analyzed the evolvement from media literacy to digital literacy and developed a four-branch theoretical framework of DL by investigating related definitions…

  16. Video Games and Digital Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkuehler, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Today's youth are situated in a complex information ecology that includes video games and print texts. At the basic level, video game play itself is a form of digital literacy practice. If we widen our focus from the "individual player + technology" to the online communities that play them, we find that video games also lie at the nexus of a…

  17. Alcune riflessioni sulla digital literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Gapski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of some of the major structural condition to discuss the conceptualization of digital literacy and reflect on the implications and the specific challenges facing operators when necessary to document or evaluate the use of digital technology in our society '.

  18. Video Games and Digital Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkuehler, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Today's youth are situated in a complex information ecology that includes video games and print texts. At the basic level, video game play itself is a form of digital literacy practice. If we widen our focus from the "individual player + technology" to the online communities that play them, we find that video games also lie at the nexus of a…

  19. Thinking Is Literacy, Literacy Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Terry; Billings, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the profound relationship between thinking and language, the authors have developed the traditional Paideia seminar into a literacy cycle of instruction that involves students in reading, speaking, listening, writing, and thinking. As staff members of the National Paideia Center, they have observed that learning to think requires…

  20. The Relevance of Feenberg's Critical Theory of Technology to Critical Visual Literacy: The Case of Scientific and Technical Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcut, Kathryn M.

    2007-01-01

    Andrew Feenberg's critical theory of technology is an underutilized, relatively unknown resource in technical communication which could be exploited not only for its potential clarification of large social issues that involve our discipline, but also specifically toward the development of a critical theory of illustrations. Applications of…

  1. The Relevance of Feenberg's Critical Theory of Technology to Critical Visual Literacy: The Case of Scientific and Technical Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcut, Kathryn M.

    2007-01-01

    Andrew Feenberg's critical theory of technology is an underutilized, relatively unknown resource in technical communication which could be exploited not only for its potential clarification of large social issues that involve our discipline, but also specifically toward the development of a critical theory of illustrations. Applications of…

  2. From the Islands of Knowledge to a Shared Understanding: Interdisciplinarity and Technology Literacy for Innovation in Smart Electronic Product Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Teresa; Casas, Roberto; Manchado-Pérez, Eduardo; Asensio, Ángel; López-Pérez, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the evolving Internet, a balance between technological advances and meaning change is crucial to develop innovative and breakthrough "connected electronics" that enable the Internet of Things. Designers and technologists are key enablers of this process respectively, ensuring adequate users' needs and technology…

  3. Development and Validation of Scientific Literacy Scale for College Preparedness in STEM with Freshmen from Diverse Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Thomas E.; Marks, Bryant; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.; Rose, Jordan; Pollard, Ethen; Thomas, Alicia; Muldrow, Lycurgus L.

    2017-01-01

    Although a major goal of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education is to develop scientific literacy, prior efforts at measuring scientific literacy have not attempted to link scientific literacy with success in STEM fields. The current Scientific Literacy Survey for College Preparedness in STEM (SLSCP-STEM) scale was…

  4. Unpacking New Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Thanq “victor” Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century has marked an unprecedented advancement of new media. New media has become so pervasive that it has penetrated into every aspect of our society. New media literacy plays an essential role for any citizen to participate fully in the 21st century society. Researchers have documented that literacy has evolved historically from classic literacy (reading-writing-understanding to audiovisual literacy to digital literacy or information literacy and recently to new media literacy. A review of literature on media literacy reveals that there is a lack of thorough analysis of unique characteristics of new media and its impacts upon the notion of new media literacy. The purpose of the study is to unpack new media literacy and propose a framework for a systematic investigation of new media literacy.

  5. Students’ information literacy in Slovenian higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Brečko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s information society, academic libraries play an important role in developing students’ information literacy. The key characteristics of the information society are the dominance of information technology and a fast-growing amount of accessible information. The skill of dealing with information has thus become an indispensable tool for surviving in the 21st century. Information literacy is an ability to acquire, evaluate and use information from various sources. It is a long-lasting process to span all the years of education. At the higher level of education, information literacy is based on the knowledge and skills acquired in elementary and secondary school. To efficiently teach students information literacy, uniform guidelines are desperately needed to serve librarians and teachers for their pedagogical work. Students can acquire information literacy skills throughout their study years only through planned and systematic teaching incorporated in the study programs.

  6. Online Tutorials and Effective Information Literacy Instruction for Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Brighid M.

    2014-01-01

    As Internet and computer technologies have evolved, libraries have incorporated these technologies into the delivery of information literacy instruction. Of particular benefit is the ability of online tutorials to deliver information literacy instruction to students not physically present on campus. A survey of library and information science…

  7. Guiding Principles for Supporting New Literacies in Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchmer-Klein, Rachel; Shinas, Valerie Harlow

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose four principles to guide teachers' thinking as they use technology to support teaching and literacy learning in 21st century classrooms. Specifically, teachers must be aware of emerging technologies, recognize the complexities of new literacies, realize tech-savvy students may not be skilled readers and writers…

  8. Media Literacy Education: Global Tendencies and Search of Lithuanian Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilija Duoblienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the influence of information technologies on education. Different viewpoints on information literacy education, which is often assimilated to media literacy education, are presented in the paper. The article investigates both advantages of media literacy, which involve its positive influence on education, and disadvantages, which encompass dishonest ideological purposes of media literacy that are hidden behind the notion of efficient teaching. This work defends the idea that media literacy education is inevitable in modern schooling and that it is step by step replacing traditional ways of learning. Several media education paradigms are discussed: protectionist, media arts education, media literacy education and critical media literacy education. Some of them teach how to utilize modern technologies and develop creativity, whereas others educate how to recognize ideologies and be publicly engaged. The paper evaluates media literacy in Lithuania by exploring the context of media education, i.e. by analyzing Wiki culture, didactic approach of media literacy, relationships among participants of learning process, and influence of information technologies on the development of educational techniques. Prominent questions about Lithuanian readiness for changes in schooling methods are asked. It is argued if the country has a clear and coherent media literacy education philosophy. Answers are found by investigating information literacy programs and media literacy projects in Lithuanian secondary schools. The article arrives to a conclusion that in Lithuania media literacy education is only at the early stage of development, but its progress is quite rapid and omits several stages which were underwent in Western countries. Nevertheless, the work determines that Lithuania lacks new and brave mindset which should be spread together with critical pedagogy and critical media literacy (i.e. transforming education.

  9. Playful Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    these practices, which compose the taxonomy of tablet play. My contribution lies in identifying and proposing a series of theoretical concepts that complement recent theories related to play and digital literacy studies. The data collected through observations informed some noteworthy aspects, including how...... with tablets’ physical and digital affordances shape children’s digital play. This thesis presents how young children’s current practices when playing with tablets inform digital experiences in Denmark and Japan. Through an interdisciplinary lens and a grounded theory approach, I have identified and mapped...... vocabulary in children’s digital play experiences. These early digital experiences set the rules for the playgrounds and assert digital tablets as twenty-first-century toys, shaping young children’s playful literacy....

  10. Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted learning (CAL) has enhanced undergraduate medical education. CAL improves performance at examinations, develops problem solving skills and increases student satisfaction. The study evaluates computer literacy among first year medical students in Sri Lanka. Methods The study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka between August-September 2008. First year medical students (n = 190) were invited for the study. Data on computer literacy and associated factors were collected by an expert-validated pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Computer literacy was evaluated by testing knowledge on 6 domains; common software packages, operating systems, database management and the usage of internet and E-mail. A linear regression was conducted using total score for computer literacy as the continuous dependant variable and other independent covariates. Results Sample size-181 (Response rate-95.3%), 49.7% were Males. Majority of the students (77.3%) owned a computer (Males-74.4%, Females-80.2%). Students have gained their present computer knowledge by; a formal training programme (64.1%), self learning (63.0%) or by peer learning (49.2%). The students used computers for predominately; word processing (95.6%), entertainment (95.0%), web browsing (80.1%) and preparing presentations (76.8%). Majority of the students (75.7%) expressed their willingness for a formal computer training programme at the faculty. Mean score for the computer literacy questionnaire was 48.4 ± 20.3, with no significant gender difference (Males-47.8 ± 21.1, Females-48.9 ± 19.6). There were 47.9% students that had a score less than 50% for the computer literacy questionnaire. Students from Colombo district, Western Province and Student owning a computer had a significantly higher mean score in comparison to other students (p computer training was the strongest predictor of computer literacy (β = 13.034), followed by using

  11. Development and Validation of Scientific Literacy Achievement Test to Assess Senior Secondary School Students' Literacy Acquisition in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, A. A.; Joshua, E. O.

    2015-01-01

    Physics literacy plays a crucial part in global technological development as several aspects of science and technology apply concepts and principles of physics in their operations. However, the acquisition of scientific literacy in physics in our society today is not encouraging enough to the desirable standard. Therefore, this study focuses on…

  12. Reconceptualizing Media Literacy in the Social Studies: A Pragmatist Critique of the NCSS Position Statement on Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance; Metzger, Scott Alan

    2012-01-01

    The National Council for the Social Studies Position Statement on Media Literacy argues that media literacy can facilitate participatory democracy if students' interest in media is harnessed. The statement conceives of media technology as neutral and under-conceptualizes socializing aspects of media technologies that foster atomized individualism.…

  13. Reconceptualizing Media Literacy in the Social Studies: A Pragmatist Critique of the NCSS Position Statement on Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance; Metzger, Scott Alan

    2012-01-01

    The National Council for the Social Studies Position Statement on Media Literacy argues that media literacy can facilitate participatory democracy if students' interest in media is harnessed. The statement conceives of media technology as neutral and under-conceptualizes socializing aspects of media technologies that foster atomized individualism.…

  14. Literacy in Three Metaphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Sylvia

    1984-01-01

    Discusses differing meanings of literacy implicit in three metaphors, each rooted in assumptions about the social motivations for literacy, the nature of existing literacy practices, and judgments about which practices are critical for individual and social enhancement. Provides a study of the social meaning of literacy in a traditional society.…

  15. 技术技能型人才绿色素养评价指标体系设计%On the Design of Evaluation Index System for Green Literacy of Technology Skilled Talents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晶晶; 于晓东

    2016-01-01

    在绿色经济发展模式的背景下,职业教育必须关注如何培养技术技能型人才的绿色素养。技术技能型人才的绿色素养主要包括:对环境知识的掌握程度,对环境保护的价值取向,对环境问题的社会态度,对环境保护的参与度,解决环境问题的技能等。技术技能型人才的绿色素养可从绿色知识、绿色价值、绿色态度、绿色行为和绿色技能五个方面进行评价。%Under the background of green economic development, it is obligatory for vocational education to focus on how to cultivate green literacy of technology skilled talents. Green literacy mainly includes the mastery of environmental knowledge, values of environmental protection, social attitude towards environmental issues, participation in environmental protection, and skills for solving environmental problems,etc. Green literacy can be evaluated from green knowledge, green values, green attitude, green behavior and green skills.

  16. Promoting Information Literacy by Promoting Health Literacy in the Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Dastani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the information society, the production, distribution and use of information are freely and widely available for all issues of life. Proper and appropriate use of reliable information is especially important in health care. The present study introduces the concepts and benefits of health literacy and information literacy and its role in improving health literacy. This study was a review based on the concepts of information society, information literacy and information education to present importance of promoting information literacy on health literacy in the information society. The information society is presented by providing a platform of information technology and computer systems to attempt to exchange and develop information among people in the community. Currently, electronic and web-based health information in the mass form is available. Information as a fundamental base of the information society is a phenomenon that our decisions are affected in relation to various issues such as safety and health issues. It is important to avoid the mass of invalid, incorrect and inappropriate information which is available on the internet. This requires information literacy skills such as identifying, accessing and evaluating information. In general, it can be said that the promotion of health literacy in communities requires learning different skills in the form of information literacy.Data obtained from this study can be used in developing the long term health programs to prevention of non-communicable diseases in our country

  17. Science Information Literacy Tutorials and Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study examined information literacy tutorials in science. The goals of the research were to identify which of the information literacy standards for science, engineering and technology were addressed in the tutorials, and the extent that the tutorials incorporated good pedagogical elements.Methods – The researcher chose for review 31 of the tutorials selected by members of the ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS Information Literacy Committee. She carefully analyzed the tutorials and developed a database with codes for the topic of each tutorial, the STS information literacy standard(s addressed by the tutorial, and whether good pedagogical elements were incorporated. The entire analysis and coding procedure was repeated three times to ensure consistency.Results – The tutorials analyzed in this study covered various subjects and addressed all the (STS information literacy standards. The tutorials presented information clearly and allowed users to select their own learning paths. The incorporation of good pedagogical elements was limited, especially in relation to active learning elements.Conclusions – Web tutorials have been accepted as effective information literacy instruction tools and have been used to teach all elements of the STS information literacy standards. Yet, ensuring they provide a real learning experience for students remains a challenge. More serious thought needs to be given to integrating good pedagogy into these instructional tools in order to attain deep learning.

  18. ROBOT LITERACY AN APPROACH FOR SHARING SOCIETY WITH INTELLIGENT ROBOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetsugu Suto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept of media education called “robot literacy” is proposed. Here, robot literacy refers to the means of forming an appropriate relationship with intelligent robots. It can be considered a kind of media literacy. People who were born after the Internet age can be considered “digital natives” who have new morals and values and behave differently than previous generations in Internet societies. This can cause various problems among different generations. Thus, the necessity of media literacy education is increasing. Internet technologies, as well as robotics technologies are growing rapidly, and people who are born after the “home robot age,” whom the author calls “robot natives,” will be expected to have a certain degree of “robot literacy.” In this paper, the concept of robot literacy is defined and an approach to robot literacy education is discussed.

  19. Digital literacy: A vital competence for 2010?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; People are living in a fast changing world today in both their business and personal lives. With the rate of change in technology continuing at Gordon Moore's 1965 predictions [1], what competencies are needed to take full advantage of today's Knowledge Society? The EU has recognised the need for digital literacy and has included this in the definition of eInclusion [2]. This paper defines digital literacy as a competence which is vital for all citizens, examines the c...

  20. Exploring the role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information: Insights from a mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diviani, N.; van den Putte, B.; Meppelink, C.S.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    Objective To gain new insights into the relationship between health literacy and evaluation of online health information. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach, forty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted followed by a short questionnaire on health literacy and eHealth literacy.

  1. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikke...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  2. To Enhance Information Literacy:an Important Goal of Information Technology Education in Primary and Secondary Schools%提升信息素养:中小学信息技术教育的重要目标

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武怀生; 李秀明

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, through the analysis of the current information technology education in primary and secondary schools is behind the prosperity from the series of problems in the interpretation of meaning, and the extension of information technology cur?riculum guidelines and standards in primary and secondary schools, to explore information technology education to promote the stu?dents' information literacy theory support and the practice path.%该文通过分析当前中小学信息技术教育的繁荣背后从在的系列问题,解读中小学信息技术课程纲要和标准的内涵与外延,探索通过信息技术教育来提升学生信息素养的理论支持和实践途径.

  3. Cultivate of Scientific-technology Information Literacy%高校师生科技信息素质的培育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The concept of information literacy,the meaning of library non-material products and the spiritual pro-duce force were studied in this paper.An applicable and operationalinformation literacy assessment standards were pro-posed.These standards are available for assessing teachers and students,information literacy.Some measures were put forward to innovate scientific information service.%论述了信息素质、图书中精神产品—精神生产力的物理涵义。介绍一种有较强适用性和可操作性的对高校师生信息素质的评价指标体系,分析了图书中精神产品的价值和作用,提出了大学及图书馆科技创新信息服务的几点措施。

  4. The Evolution of Education and Literacy in Western Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Perreault, M.S., J.D., Ph.D. (ABD

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Education and literacy have contributed to how people in Western Civilization communicate and learn about everything in life from the humanities to science and technology.  As a result, literacy and education have been the indicators of whether or not a person is “well off” or “disadvantaged” (Kraus, 2000, p. 323.  Other civilizations and cultures also value education and literacy because it gives them the new knowledge of people, places, and inventions.

  5. Development of the eHealth Literacy Assessment Toolkit, eHLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Dorthe Furstrand; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In a world with rising focus on the use of eHealth, the match between the competences of the individual and the demands of eHealth systems becomes increasingly important, thus making assessment of eHealth literacy as a measure of user competences a vital element. We propose the eHealth Literacy...... Assessment toolkit, eHLA, evaluating the user by seven scales: computer familiarity, confidence, incentive and performance as well as functional health literacy, health literacy self-assessment and health literacy performance, as a first step toward development of technology that accommodates the literacy...

  6. Rethinking literacy education in new times: Multimodality, multiliteracies, and new literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenniffer Rowsell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical overview of new fields of research, pedagogy, and practice in literacy education. In a digital, media-driven, globalized world, educators are faced with the challenge of mediating traditional notions of what it means to be literate (e.g., read and writing print-based texts with new and ever-emerging skills and interests in technology and digital media. Focusing on a pilot study in Oakville, ON and a longitudinal research study in Sydney, Australia, we compel readers to think about literacy in a new light. Without a push to redefine literacy, educators run the risk of teaching and learning language and literacy skills in anachronistic paradigms and frameworks. While research has not been able to fully establish the impact of multimodal communication, it is essential that educators learn to use these different modes of communication to teach literacy.

  7. The Cultivation of the Secondary School Students' Visual Literacy in the Context of Information Technology%信息技术背景下中学生化学视觉素养的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雨强; 张志红

    2011-01-01

    As technology advances, more and more people apply visual images to communicate and express information, especially with the emergence of today's digital media which brings a strong visual impact. So it is particularly urgent and important to develop students' visual literacy in chemistry education. This article will be based on the significance and demands of visual literacy, preliminarily imploring the strategies of cultivating secondary school students' visual literacy in the context of information technology.%视觉素养是通过看所获得的一系列视觉能力,并同时将看与其他感觉经验相整合,具备视觉素养的人能区分和解释视觉行动、视觉物体以及自然的或人造的视觉符号。化学视觉素养有宏观、微观、符号三种表征形式,体现为视觉学习、视觉交流、视觉思考三种水平,它有助于学生转变学习方式、培训视觉思维、开发视觉一空间智能、对化学信息作出正确判断和解释。多媒体课件的视觉传达设计、开设化学视觉课程、建立化学虚拟社区、提升教师视觉素养、建立评价标准等措施,均能有效提升中学生的化学视觉素养。

  8. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore...

  9. Techno-Literacy Practices of Emergent Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razeale G. Fernandez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available – This research explored the techno-literacy practices of emergent readers. The study found that young children experienced a multi-literate practices in their homes that comprised not only print and paper-based literacies but also techno-literacies. That television, games on tablets and phones are the sources of textual pleasure of young children.Families reported that children watched television and play games on tablets/phones regularly. This is due to the limited options of leisure activities available to younger children. Emergent readers are highly focused to televisual text as they demonstrate meaningmaking practices when they constantly ask questions and talk about what they are watching,hence they are active meaning-makers. The learning opportunities which include hand eye coordination, parallel processing, and problem solving skills young children acquired through playing computer games and games on tablet/iPad . Aside from these, they also developed a number of literacy skills as well as how to behave as players.It can be concluded thatexposure to imagery in electronic technologies contributed to the children’s literacy development. The literate identities of emergent readers can be further enhanced as they begin formal schooling. Data indicated that young children are developing techno-literacy practices and this concurs to the findings of Marsh (2010. Therefore, technology serves as a tool for the literacy development of young children. That techno-literacy practices of young children should be valued in school. Future research should also consider attitude, behavior and practices of parents towards the use of technology by children.

  10. A Framework for Using iPads to Build Early Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, Laura; Killeen, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The quick adoption of iPads into the classroom, coupled with the many apps targeting early literacy skills, offers a new way to build early literacy skills with emergent and beginning readers. However, young children may be more proficient with the technology than with the literacy concepts, and may not be maximizing learning, or even learning at…

  11. The New Literacy Studies: A Point of Contact between Literacy Research and Literacy Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Guy

    2003-01-01

    The New Literacy Studies' assumptions of socially embedded literacy practices and multiple literacies support the following literacy education models: (1) involving communities in programs; (2) encouraging learner invention of literacy practices; and (3) helping learners adapt and expand literacy practices. (SK)

  12. Middle School Science Teachers' Confidence and Pedagogical Practice of New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Yin; Wang, Shiang-Kwei; Runco, Lisa

    2013-06-01

    Due to the rapid advancements of information and communication technologies (ICTs), educational researchers argue that multimodal and new literacies should become common practices in schools. As new ICTs emerge and evolve, students need the new literacies skills and practices to successfully participate fully in the civic life of a global community. Are teachers prepared to integrate ICTs in the classroom to develop students' new literacies skills? The purpose of this study is to suggest a new literacies framework that guides ICTs integration and supports scientific inquiry, as well as investigate middle school teachers' confidence to practice new literacies in science classrooms. The study adopted mixed-methodology design, surveyed 32 middle school science teachers' ICTs and new literacies skills, and randomly observed 15 teachers' new literacies practices in the classrooms. The results revealed that even though teachers have high confidence in using ICTs, the meaningful technology integration and new literacies practices were scarcely observed in their classroom practices.

  13. Adhesive market develops new technologies. The thin-film solar cells gain ground; El mercado de adhesivos desarrolla nuevas tecnologias. Las celulas solares de capa fina ganan terreno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluke, M.

    2010-07-01

    The solar industry is booming. thin-film technology is experiencing a high demand as promised cost advantages and currently is providing excellent results, while a range of efficiency reaches acceptable. (Author)

  14. Information Literacy in Croatia: An Ideological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poler Kovacic, Melita; Zgrabljic Rotar, Nada; Erjavec, Karmen

    2012-01-01

    New information and communication technologies were widely perceived as something that would lead post-socialist European countries towards the technologically developed information society. In this article, a critical perspective is taken in examining information literacy as an ideological form. The deconstruction of ideological practice was…

  15. Information Literacy in Croatia: An Ideological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poler Kovacic, Melita; Zgrabljic Rotar, Nada; Erjavec, Karmen

    2012-01-01

    New information and communication technologies were widely perceived as something that would lead post-socialist European countries towards the technologically developed information society. In this article, a critical perspective is taken in examining information literacy as an ideological form. The deconstruction of ideological practice was…

  16. Social Contexts of New Media Literacy: Mapping Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thorne Wallington

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and diffusion of new media and digital technologies has profoundly affected the literacy experiences of today’s youth.  Young people today develop literacy through a variety of new media and digital technologies (Ito et al, 2009.  The dissemination of these resources has also allowed for youth to have literacy-rich experiences in an array of different settings.  This paper will explore how mapping and geographic information systems (GIS can help illuminate the cultural and social factors related to how, and where, students access and use new media literacies and digital technology.  Libraries play an important role in encouraging new media literacy development; yet access to libraries must be understood through social and cultural contexts.

  17. Viewing youth and mobile privacy through a digital policy literacy framework

    OpenAIRE

    Shade, Leslie Regan; Shepherd, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Digital policy literacy is a critical element of digital literacy that emphasizes an understanding of communication policy processes, the political economy of media, and technological infrastructures. This paper introduces an analytical framework of digital policy literacy and illustrates it with examples of young people’s everyday negotiations of mobile privacy, in order to argue for increased policy literacy around privacy and mobile phone communication. The framework is applied to the Cana...

  18. Literacy and Children's Needs in the Television Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Valerie

    Modern information technology holds both threats and promises for the young generation in every aspect of life--social, political, economic, cultural, and personal. Already research is showing some consequences previously unsuspected. The case for mass literacy must be reappraised to assess what sort of literacy is now required, how it must link…

  19. "Rap Universal": Using Multimodal Media Production to Develop ICT Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2011-01-01

    Through a multimodal media production literacy intervention in an extended-day program, culturally and linguistically diverse youth developed valuable information and communication technology literacies, including: (1) Specific how-to skills useful in future academic, professional, social, and civic contexts; (2) Abilities to critically interpret…

  20. Computer Literacy: Intermediate and Secondary Grades, Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide outlines a course on computer literacy for junior or senior high school students reflecting the technology of the early 1980s. A chart shows computer literacy scope and sequence for students in kindergarten, grades 1-2, grades 3-6, and grades 7-9. Forty lessons for the intermediate grades and high school are then presented,…

  1. "Rap Universal": Using Multimodal Media Production to Develop ICT Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2011-01-01

    Through a multimodal media production literacy intervention in an extended-day program, culturally and linguistically diverse youth developed valuable information and communication technology literacies, including: (1) Specific how-to skills useful in future academic, professional, social, and civic contexts; (2) Abilities to critically interpret…

  2. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Katherine; Culbertson, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Scientific discovery, technological revolutions, and complex global challenges are commonplace in the modern era. People are bombarded with news about climate change, pandemics, and genetically modified organisms, and scientific literacy has never been more important than in the present day. Yet only 29% of American adults have sufficient understanding to be able to read science stories reported in the popular press [Miller, 2010], and American students consistently rank below other nations in math and science [National Center for Education Statistics, 2012].

  3. Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlow, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued.

  4. Health Literacy Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Develop one's knowledge and potential 2 The term “illiteracy” means being unable to read or write. A ... is health literacy important? Only 12 percent of adults have Proficient health literacy, according to the National ...

  5. How is eHealth literacy measured and what do the measurements tell us?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Astrid Karnøe; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of digital services and technologies in health care calls for effective tools to evaluate the users’ eHealth literacy in order to better understand the users’ interaction with health technologies. We here present a systematic review of existing tools to measure eHealth literacy...... and for what these tools have been used to investigate. We identified eight tools, of which three of them are bases upon a conceptual model of eHealth literacy and the remaining five are dual tools, i.a. comprised of individual measures for health literacy and digital literacy. Of these eight tools, only one...

  6. Reconceptualizing (new media literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Aczel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce a theoretical-critical approach which shall revisit elements and cast light upon subsets of (new media literacy. It endeavours to draw community, spatial, procedural and aural literacy (auralacy into consideration, relating them to the complex of media literacy, striving to provide invigorating insights into its conceptual foundations and integrated perspectives for its pedagogy.

  7. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  8. Literacy in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in South America must be understood in terms of the linguistic diversity there, where only 2 of 14 nations and territories are monolingual. Oral traditions, standardization of indigenous languages, nonstandard varieties of colonial languages, bilingual education and mother tongue literacy, literacy teaching, and politics are discussed.…

  9. Theme: Agricultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeds, Jacquelyn P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six theme articles attempt to define and advocate agricultural literacy, review the status of K-8 agricultural literacy programs in states, discuss an Oklahoma study of agricultural literacy, clarify the meaning of sustainable agriculture, and describe the Future Farmers of America's Food for America program for elementary students. (SK)

  10. Adolescent Literacy. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineaux, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that there is a crisis in adolescent literacy. Part of the problem is that students often receive little literacy instruction after elementary school. This "Focus On" examines the literacy instruction that adolescents need to be successful as they move on to more challenging texts in middle and high school. In addition, this…

  11. Literacies in the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, the author invites readers to consider the body and its central place in literacy pedagogy, practice and research. She emphasizes two interrelated paths for teachers and researchers interested in literacies to tend to the body: (1) the ways literacies are engaged and cultivated for making sense of bodies, and (2) the literacies…

  12. Why life sciences companies need to tap technology to gain a competitive edge—and what that means for the chief information officers (CIO) role

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental changes in the marketplace for medicines, as well as the rapid and continuing evolution of technology are bringing new challenges and opportunities for life sciences companies and their contribution to healthcare systems. These changes bring pressure on chief information officers (CIOs) within the healthcare industry to play an increasingly strategic role in advancing business success and delivering digital transformation. PMID:28293588

  13. Why life sciences companies need to tap technology to gain a competitive edge-and what that means for the chief information officers (CIO) role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental changes in the marketplace for medicines, as well as the rapid and continuing evolution of technology are bringing new challenges and opportunities for life sciences companies and their contribution to healthcare systems. These changes bring pressure on chief information officers (CIOs) within the healthcare industry to play an increasingly strategic role in advancing business success and delivering digital transformation.

  14. Digital literacy – towards a re description of literacy for the digital learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of ‘digital literacy' and ‘digital competence' are the focus in this paper. The paper will argue that the traditional concepts regarding literacy need to be re described and augmented when faced with the challenges and affordances of the digital learning environments. The paper will suggest a theoretical framework for how to understand the ways in which young people include digital technologies into their social and cultural practices. Some examples from the empirical material wi...

  15. Social Support and "Playing Around": An Examination of How Older Adults Acquire Digital Literacy With Tablet Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi Sandy; Shillair, Ruth; Cotten, Shelia R

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how older adults learn to use tablet computers. Learning to use new technologies can help older adults to be included in today's digital society. However, learning to use new technologies is not always easy, especially for older adults. This study focuses on how older adults learn to use a specific technology, tablet computers, and the role that social support plays in this process. Data for this project are from 21 in-depth interviews with individuals who own tablet computers. We examine how older adults engage with tablet devices and increase their digital literacy. The findings suggest that, for older adults to start to use tablets, social support plays an important role. In addition, a key way that many participants report gaining expertise with the technology is through "playing around" with the tablets. Suggestions for how to help older adults learn to use new technologies are detailed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Social Support and “Playing Around”: An Examination of How Older Adults Acquire Digital Literacy With Tablet Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-yi Sandy; Shillair, Ruth; Cotten, Shelia R.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how older adults learn to use tablet computers. Learning to use new technologies can help older adults to be included in today’s digital society. However, learning to use new technologies is not always easy, especially for older adults. This study focuses on how older adults learn to use a specific technology, tablet computers, and the role that social support plays in this process. Data for this project are from 21 in-depth interviews with individuals who own tablet computers. We examine how older adults engage with tablet devices and increase their digital literacy. The findings suggest that, for older adults to start to use tablets, social support plays an important role. In addition, a key way that many participants report gaining expertise with the technology is through “playing around” with the tablets. Suggestions for how to help older adults learn to use new technologies are detailed. PMID:26491029

  17. Information Literacy Policy Development in Canada: Is It Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines policy issues related to information literacy in Canada. It provides some background on the information literacy concept, reflecting on popular definitions offered by American, British, and Australian library associations, before advocating for a broader definition that views information literacy as a human right. Information literacy is also considered in relationship to the proliferation of other “literacies,” such as digital, web, media, and information technology, that are the subject of increased advocacy and attention from interest groups and educators. The ongoing need for improved information literacy levels is analyzed not only in the context of inputs (the increasing complexity of the information environment but also in terms of potential personal, social, and economic outcomes that can be realized through widespread information literacy education efforts. The paper argues that information literacy must become a priority not only among academic librarians but also school, public, and special librarians, as well as others outside of the library sector, if significant improvements in information literacy levels are to be realized. Such a coordinated approach can only be achieved in the context of policies that require, and adequately support, widespread efforts at improving information literacy levels. After a review of the ad-hoc state of information literacy education in Canada today, this paper analyzes information literacy-related policy development efforts in Canada to date in the four arenas where one would expect to see such activity: the Government of Canada, provincial governments, library associations, and other stakeholder groups. This article aims to start a wide-reaching discussion about information literacy and associated policy issues in Canada.

  18. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Asthma Contact Us Share Asthma Triggers: Gain Control Breathing Freely: Controlling Asthma Triggers This video features ... Air Quality: Biological Pollutants Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma Top of Page Molds About Molds ...

  19. Using Gaming Literacies to Cultivate New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Yin; Wang, Shiang-Kwei

    2010-01-01

    The use of games in educational contexts has recently received growing attention; however, many teachers struggle with finding a right context to adopt games in the classroom. To strengthen teachers' beliefs about the educational value of games, this article explains the similarities and differences between new literacies and gaming literacy and…

  20. Becoming a Literacy Teacher: Approximations in Critical Literacy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The new literacy studies (NLS) is a tradition of research that includes ethnographic work on literacy that has many applications for classroom teachers. The NLS include explorations of local literacies and critical literacy as well as the notion of literacy itself. When teachers draw on the NLS, students are able to draw on their practices in…

  1. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosanne Marie Cordell

    2013-01-01

    Digital Literacy is a more recent term than Information Literacy and is used for multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between Information Literacy and Digital Literacy is essential before revision of the Information Literacy Standards can proceed.

  2. Coaching Literacy Teachers as They Design Critical Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Literacy specialists and coaches are called upon for literacy leadership in schools and often wrestle with the tensions of implementing top-down reforms and making room for teacher- and student-led practices, such as critical literacy. Critical literacy education holds the promise of engaging learners to use literacy practices in ways that matter…

  3. Becoming a Literacy Teacher: Approximations in Critical Literacy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The new literacy studies (NLS) is a tradition of research that includes ethnographic work on literacy that has many applications for classroom teachers. The NLS include explorations of local literacies and critical literacy as well as the notion of literacy itself. When teachers draw on the NLS, students are able to draw on their practices in…

  4. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosanne Marie Cordell

    2013-01-01

    Digital Literacy is a more recent term than Information Literacy and is used for multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between Information Literacy and Digital Literacy is essential before revision of the Information Literacy Standards can proceed.

  5. A cluster randomized control field trial of the ABRACADABRA web-based literacy intervention: Replication and extension of basic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noella Angele Piquette

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports a cluster randomized control trial evaluation of teaching using ABRACADABRA (ABRA, an evidence-based and web-based literacy intervention (http://abralite.concordia.ca with 107 kindergarten and 96 grade 1 children in 24 classes (12 intervention 12 control classes from all 12 elementary schools in one school district in Canada. Children in the intervention condition received 10-12 hours of whole class instruction using ABRA between pre- and post-test. Hierarchical linear modeling of post-test results showed significant gains in letter-sound knowledge for intervention classrooms over control classrooms. In addition, medium effect sizes were evident for three of five outcome measures favoring the intervention: letter-sound knowledge (d = +.66, phonological blending (d = +.52, and word reading (d = +.52, over effect sizes for regular teaching. It is concluded that regular teaching with ABRA technology adds significantly to literacy in the early elementary years.

  6. Using a tailored health information technology- driven intervention to improve health literacy and medication adherence in a Pakistani population with vascular disease (Talking Rx) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ayeesha Kamran; Muqeet, Abdul; Farhat, Kashfa; Khalid, Wardah; Jamil, Anum; Gowani, Ambreen; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Zaidi, Fabiha; Khan, Danyal; Elahi, Touseef; Sharif, Shahrukh; Raz, Sibtain; Zafar, Taha; Bokhari, Syedah Saira; Rahman, Nasir; Sultan, Fateh Ali Tipoo; Sayani, Saleem; Virani, Salim S

    2016-03-05

    Vascular disease, manifesting as myocardial infarction and stroke, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Current estimates are that only one in six patients have good adherence to medications and very few have sufficient health literacy. Our aim is to explore the effectiveness and acceptability of Prescription Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Talking Prescriptions (Talking Rx) and SMS reminders in increasing medication adherence and health literacy in Pakistani patients with vascular disease. This is a randomized, controlled, single center trial. Adult participants, with access to a cell phone and a history of vascular disease, taking multiple risk-modifying medications (inclusive of anti-platelets and statins) will be selected from cerebrovascular and cardiovascular clinics. They will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio via a block design to the intervention or the control arm with both groups having access to a helpline number to address their queries in addition to standard of care as per institutional guidelines. Participants in the intervention group will also have access to Interactive Voice Response (IVR) technology tailored to their respective prescriptions in the native language (Urdu) and will have the ability to hear information about their medication dosage, correct use, side effects, mechanism of action and how and why they should use their medication, as many times as they like. Participants in the intervention arm will also receive scheduled SMS messages reminding them to take their medications. The primary outcome measure will be the comparison of the difference in adherence to anti-platelet and statin medication between baseline and at 3-month follow-up in each group measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. To ascertain the impact of our intervention on health literacy, we will also compare a local content-validated and modified version of Test of Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) between

  7. Results of the commercialisation of scientific research in the light of experience gained at the Nicolaus Copernicus University Centre for Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matlakiewicz Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The statutory mission of a university, in addition to the creation of scientific knowledge and education, lies in the cooperation with the economic sector through the transfer of knowledge and technology. The effectiveness of this process directly affects the affluence of any given State’s economy. Owing to the new amendments to the Act on Higher Education, many barriers that hinder commercialisation of knowledge in Poland have been brought down. Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń sets an excellent example in this respect having established a special purpose entity, which has already managed to set up thirteen spin-off companies in just 18 months.

  8. Narrative Competence and the Enhancement of Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This essay argues for narrative competence as an underlying skill neglected in educational policy makers’ calls for enhanced literacy through improved reading, writing, numeracy and working with digital technology. This argument is presented in three parts. First, a genealogy of the narrative is presented by looking at understandings of narratives with respect to changes in technology and socio-cultural relations. Three technological forms of the narrative are examined: the oral, written and ...

  9. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information.

  10. DIGITAL LITERACY OF STUDENTS AND ITS IMPROVEMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shopova, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    ...) in education and training, this paper focuses on the key role of digital literacy and the skills of students to use new technology that will have an increasing role in the integration in the European...

  11. A taxonomy characterizing complexity of consumer eHealth Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Connie V; Matthews, Lisa A; Kaufman, David R

    2009-11-14

    There are a range of barriers precluding patients from fully engaging in and benefiting from the spectrum of eHealth interventions developed to support patient access to health information, disease self-management efforts, and patient-provider communication. Consumers with low eHealth literacy skills often stand to gain the greatest benefit from the use of eHealth tools. eHealth skills are comprised of reading/writing/numeracy skills, health literacy, computer literacy, information literacy, media literacy, and scientific literacy [1]. We aim to develop an approach to characterize dimensions of complexity and to reveal knowledge and skill-related barriers to eHealth engagement. We use Bloom's Taxonomy to guide development of an eHealth literacy taxonomy that categorizes and describes each type of literacy by complexity level. Illustrative examples demonstrate the utility of the taxonomy in characterizing dimensions of complexity of eHealth skills used and associated with each step in completing an eHealth task.

  12. Personal Biometric Information from Wearable Technology Tracked and Followed Using an ePortfolio: A Case Study of eHealth Literacy Development with Emerging Technology in Hong Kong Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Michele; Sobko, Tanja; Churchill, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will show our research approach and discuss potential outcomes. The research project started in January 2016. To understand eHealth literacy development in higher education in Hong Kong, the researchers will conduct a multiple case study including 20 students from an undergraduate course. Each of them will use a wearable device…

  13. Developing Energy Literacy in US Middle-Level Students Using the Geospatial Curriculum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Fu, Qiong; Peffer, Tamara E.; Kulo, Violet

    2013-06-01

    This quantitative study examined the effectiveness of a geospatial curriculum approach to promote energy literacy in an urban school district and examined factors that may account for energy content knowledge achievement. An energy literacy measure was administered to 1,044 eighth-grade students (ages 13-15) in an urban school district in Pennsylvania, USA. One group of students received instruction with a geospatial curriculum approach (geospatial technologies (GT)) and another group of students received 'business as usual' (BAU) curriculum instruction. For the GT students, findings revealed statistically significant gains from pretest to posttest (p < 0.001) on knowledge of energy resource acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. The GT students had year-end energy content knowledge scores significantly higher than those who learned with the BAU curriculum (p < 0.001; effect size being large). A multiple regression found that prior energy content knowledge was the only significant predictor to the year-end energy content knowledge achievement for the GT students (p < 0.001). The findings support that the implementation of a geospatial curriculum approach that employs learning activities that focus on the spatial nature of energy resources can improve the energy literacy of urban middle-level education students.

  14. Improving Preschoolers’ Language and Literacy Skills through Web-Mediated Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Downer, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    MyTeachingPartner (MTP) is a web-mediated approach that provides ongoing support for teachers to improve the quality of their interactions with children. This study examined the effects of MTP on the preschool language and literacy development of children who are at risk for later academic difficulties. Results of this randomized controlled trial indicated that for English-only classrooms, teachers receiving a high level of support had students who made greater gains in language and literacy skills than teachers who only received access to a curricular supplement. Three implications are drawn from these findings: (1) on-going, video-based consultation holds promise not only for altering teacher-child interactions, but also improving children's learning, (2) technology allows teachers to receive intensive, effective support from a distance, and (3) there is still much to be learned about how professional development can support effective teaching of language and literacy skills to children whose home language is not English. PMID:23105917

  15. 實徵研究/Service-learning as Effective Pedagogy for Information Literacy and Technology Competency Instruction in a Cross-Disciplinary, Cross-Cultural Context / Cynthia Hsieh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Hsieh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a detailed description of an interdisciplinary project for teaching information literacy and technology competency that overcomes institutional barriers and socioeconomic gaps – two obstacles that often hinder collaboration between higher education institutions and their local communities. Most importantly, it proposes a model of powerful pedagogical partnership between librarians and teaching faculty.The article first describes the background and philosophy of the project and provides a detailed account of the project implementation and pedagogies. A key element of the project design is the service-learning component that provides a “real world” environment to accelerate students’ learning experience. Finally, it offers valuable suggestions to those who wish to collaborate in a similar project.頁次:4-18

  16. Social Contexts of New Media Literacy: Mapping Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The development and diffusion of new media and digital technologies has profoundly affected the literacy experiences of today’s youth.  Young people today develop literacy through a variety of new media and digital technologies (Ito et al, 2009).  The dissemination of these resources has also allowed for youth to have literacy-rich experiences in an array of different settings.  This paper will explore how mapping and geographic information systems (GIS) can help illuminate the cultural and s...

  17. The first year pre-service teachers' chemical literacy in individual learning case using the fuel cell technology based-chemical enrichment book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernani, Saefulloh, Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    This research aims to analyze chemical literacy ability of pre-service teachers based on PISA 2015 scientific competency. This research used descriptive method. Instrument that used in this research is multiple choice question that built based on scientific competency of PISA 2015. The result is grouping by PISA 2015 competency and mapped by high, medium and low GPA classified. This research involves 19 the first year pre-service teachers of 90 population that randomly chosen. According to the result, chemical literacy ability of pre-service described as follows: 1) 35.5% of sample are able to explain phenomena scientifically. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 25.0%, 40.3% and 29.2%; 2) 31.6% of sample are able to evaluate and design scientific enquiry. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 16.7%, 35.4% and 31.3%; 3) 31.6% of sample are able to Interpret data and evidence scientifically. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 50.0%, 25.0% and 37.5%; For the attitude competency, 68.4% of sample able to showing PISA attitude competency that consist of interest in science, environment awareness and Valuing scientific approaches to enquiry attitude. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 77.8%, 63.9% and 75.0%. According to the data, chemical literacy ability of pre-service teachers in average are bellow to 50.0% thereby need to be given special attention while scientific attitude are above to 50.0%.

  18. Toward a Theory-Predicated Definition of Digital Literacy for Early Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Kazakoff

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Though young children are frequent users of digital technology, there is no comprehensive definition of early childhood digital literacy. Currently, digital literacy and related terms are defined with much older children and adults in mind. This paper aims to lay groundwork for redefining digital literacy in an early childhood context. Taking into account the unique developmental needs of early childhood when discussing digital literacy can provide a gateway to developing technological tools and curricula to prepare children in kindergarten through second grade to be more effective users of digital technologies throughout their lives.

  19. Developing Information Literacy and Research Skills in Introductory Psychology: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Judith E.; Pines, Harvey A.

    2005-01-01

    How do you engage faculty in the task of developing student information literacy? This case study offers a model for incorporating information retrieval into a social science research project so that literacy becomes an intrinsic part of the course assignment. Students showed significant gains in database search and assessment skills with minimal…

  20. The Relationship between Prospective Teachers' Media and Television Literacy and Their Critical Thinking Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aybek, Birsel

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Teachers play a significant role in shaping students on media literacy and critical thinking. Hence, prospective teachers are required to gain knowledge about media literacy and critical thinking during pre-service training. Provided that prospective teachers who will shape the next generation possess such skills as accessing to…

  1. Information Literacy in Mathematics Undergraduate Education: Where Does It Stand Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Jeffra Diane; Bond, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The published literature on information literacy in mathematics is relatively sparse. This article explores the current state of information literacy initiatives in undergraduate mathematics. The authors survey academic librarians (n = 118) who liaise with mathematics departments in order to gain an understanding of their practices and attitudes…

  2. Sociocognitive Growth and the Young Child: Comparisons with Spatial and Literacy Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella, Gaile S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated effects of spatial and literacy content on learning through social interaction. Pairs of kindergarten children in three interaction episodes solved spatial and literacy problems. Gains were made in spatial understanding independent of the type of social interaction used. Spatial understanding appeared to be affected more by how…

  3. Information Literacy in Mathematics Undergraduate Education: Where Does It Stand Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Jeffra Diane; Bond, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The published literature on information literacy in mathematics is relatively sparse. This article explores the current state of information literacy initiatives in undergraduate mathematics. The authors survey academic librarians (n = 118) who liaise with mathematics departments in order to gain an understanding of their practices and attitudes…

  4. Content Area Literacy: Individualizing Student Instruction in Second-Grade Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Kaya, Sibel; Luck, Melissa; Toste, Jessica R.; Canto, Angela; Rice, Diana; Tani, Novell; Underwood, Phyllis S.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes a second-grade science curriculum designed to individualize student instruction (ISI-Science) so that students, regardless of initial science and literacy skills, gain science knowledge and reading skills. ISI-Science relies on the 5-E Learning Cycle as a framework and incorporates flexible, homogeneous, literacy skills-based…

  5. The Association between Expressive Grammar Intervention and Social and Emergent Literacy Outcomes for Preschoolers with SLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether (a) expressive grammar intervention facilitated social and emergent literacy outcomes better than no intervention and (b) expressive grammar gains and/or initial expressive grammar level predicted social and emergent literacy outcomes. Method: This investigation was a follow-up to a recently published study exploring…

  6. "A Great Program...for Me as a Gramma": Caregivers Evaluate a Family Literacy Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jim; Morrison, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we report a study in which we asked 137 parents and caregivers to evaluate a year-long family literacy program in which they participated. Parents valued the insights they gained about children's learning in general and literacy development in particular. They reported that they learned from each other as well as from the program…

  7. Investigate the relation between the media literacy and information literacy of students of communication science and information science and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Esmaeil Pounaki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new millennium is called Information Age, in which information and communication technologies have been developed. The transfer from industrial society to information society has changed the form and level of education and information from those of the past times. In the past, literacy meant the ability of reading and writing, but today the meaning of literacy has been changed through the time and such a type of literacy is not enough to meet people’s needs in the industrial society of the 21st century. Today’s life requires media and information literacy especially for the students, whose duty is to research and who have a significant role in the development of their country from any perspective. This research aims to study the relation between the media literacy and information literacy of the students of the fields of communication science and information science and knowledge. This is an applied research in terms of its objective and uses a survey-correlation method. The statistical population of this research consists of the postgraduate students studying in the fields of study of information science and knowledge and communication science at Tehran University and Allameh Tabatabai University. The data required for this research were collected by a researcher-made questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaire has been evaluated by Cronbach’s Alpha, which was equal to 0.936. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistic methods. The results showed that the level of media literacy and information literacy of students is desirable. There is a significant relationship between the economic status of students and their media literacy. However, the social status of students was directly related to their "ability to communicate" variable of media literacy. Also the Pearson correlation test showed a significant relationship between the variables of media literacy and information literacy.

  8. Smart Currency: Defining Literacy in the Modern Age is Crucial to Building Professional Learning that Prepares Students for the Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers and education professionals have emphasized the importance of literacy in a global economy many times this century. The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) updated its own definition of 21st-century literacies, noting that "[a]s society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the…

  9. Embedding Multiple Literacies into STEM Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, Aline; Nielsen, Sarah; LeDuc, Danika; Inouye, Caron; Singley, Jason; Wildy, Erica; Seitz, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2012, an interdisciplinary team of science, English, and library faculty embedded reading, writing, and information literacy strategies in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) curricula as a first step in improving student learning and retention in science courses and aligning them with the Next Generation Science and…

  10. Multimodal Literacies in the Secondary English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, William C.; Denton, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    To provide insight into the issue of multimodal literacy instruction, the authors explore presentation techniques and instructional activities employed in their secondary language arts classes. They collaborate on assignments that focus students on "anchored media instruction" and engage them in producing multimodal, technology-infused projects,…

  11. Word Perfect: Literacy in the Computer Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuman, Myron C.

    Elaborating on Emile Durkheim's claim that major debates about pedagogy are always an indicator of underlying social change, this book charts the enormous impact computers are having on how people read and write, how reading and writing are taught, and how literacy is defined. The larger concern of the book is how technology generally affects not…

  12. Digital automatic gain control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Performance analysis, used to evaluated fitness of several circuits to digital automatic gain control (AGC), indicates that digital integrator employing coherent amplitude detector (CAD) is best device suited for application. Circuit reduces gain error to half that of conventional analog AGC while making it possible to automatically modify response of receiver to match incoming signal conditions.

  13. Different Perspectives on Literacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢果

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to further understanding Literacy in foreign language teaching, I explored Kern’s notion of Literacy and think about how it has shaped the work of teachers. There are different definitions of Literacy among theorist, and many conceptions can help language learners to contextualize and interpret what they read. Kern proposes as a working definition for the notion of Literacy that weaves together linguistic,cognitive, and sociocultural strands. In this aspect, teacher needs own the ability to combine a focus on language use in social contexts, and this is crucial in foreign language teaching.

  14. Comparing gains and losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, A Peter; Larsen, Jeff T; Kahneman, Daniel; Schkade, David

    2010-10-01

    Loss aversion in choice is commonly assumed to arise from the anticipation that losses have a greater effect on feelings than gains, but evidence for this assumption in research on judged feelings is mixed. We argue that loss aversion is present in judged feelings when people compare gains and losses and assess them on a common scale. But many situations in which people judge and express their feelings lack these features. When judging their feelings about an outcome, people naturally consider a context of similar outcomes for comparison (e.g., they consider losses against other losses). This process permits gains and losses to be normed separately and produces psychological scale units that may not be the same in size or meaning for gains and losses. Our experiments show loss aversion in judged feelings for tasks that encourage gain-loss comparisons, but not tasks that discourage them, particularly those using bipolar scales.

  15. Information Literacy and its Application in Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delwar Hossain

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy has been embedded by the university into the first year nursing curriculum. Embedding this literacy will not necessarily ensure the nursing graduates will apply this skill to the provision of high quality evidence-based health care. For this to happen information literacy skills gained in the classroom must contribute to sound decision making based on best practice evidence. This paper discusses the findings of a three phases research project designed to (i determine the information literacy skills, confidence and problem solving abilities of students entering the university’s Bachelor of Nursing Program; (ii determine if information literacy skills, confidence and problem solving abilities improve as a result of embedding information literacy instruction into a nursing course; and iii ascertain whether there are any differences in information literacy skills, confidence and problem solving abilities based on the students demographic information.Data were collected in two sequential semesters using a questionnaire administered to the students. The response rates in semester one and two were 45 and 56 per cent respectively. Student confidence and awareness regarding information literacy is positively affected by learning experiences from semester one to semester two. Students indicated that they need both specific and regular instruction to adequately retain learning. Overall the study suggests that embedding information literacy instruction into the first year, first semester nursing program is beneficial. By the second semester the information literacy confidence and awareness of students increased as a result of intra-curricular instruction, however, problem solving skills need to be improved.

  16. How is eHealth literacy measured and what do the measurements tell us?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Astrid Karnøe; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of digital services and technologies in health care calls for effective tools to evaluate the users’ eHealth literacy in order to better understand the users’ interaction with health technologies. We here present a systematic review of existing tools to measure eHealth literacy...

  17. Laptops Meet Schools, One-One Draw: M-Learning for Secondary Students with Literacy Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Paul F.; Amberson, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technology-enhanced literacy initiatives have become a focus of efforts to support learning for students with literacy difficulties. The "Laptops Initiative for Post-Primary Students with Dyslexia or other Reading/Writing Difficulties" offers insights into and addresses questions about ICT policy making regarding m-learning technologies for…

  18. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Rosanne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Digital literacy is a more recent concept than information literacy and can relate to multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between information literacy and digital literacy is essential before revision of the ACRL "Standards" can proceed.

  19. Collaborative Learning is an Effective Method for Improving the E-health Literacy of Older Adults in the Community. A Review of: Xie, B. (2011. Older adults, e-health literacy, and collaborative learning: An experimental study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(5, 933-946. doi: 10.1002/asi.21507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa S. Arndt

    2011-01-01

    importance of the Internet for obtaining health information. Subjects were also asked to report on changes to their health behaviour/decision- making post intervention, and learning effort expended during the study. Additional questions measured psychological adjustment to later life, attitudes toward computers, attitude toward the aging experience, and attitude toward the collaborative learning method and the class.Main Results – A dependent t-test analysis indicated strong significant gains post-test in computing/Internet knowledge and skills, and in e-health literacy efficacy (perceived skills/comfort with using the Internet for health information and decision-making. Pre-test results showed participants to be low on these measures, leaving much room for improvement. Perception of the usefulness and importance of the Internet for health decision-making also showed strong gains.Significant positive changes were also found in these areas of attitude: reduction of computer anxiety, attitude toward physical changes associated with aging, and improvement in attitude toward the collaborative learning method.A majority of participants indicated altering health-related behaviours as a result of the class, including changing the way they think about diet or exercise, changing the way they cope with a condition, and changing their approach to maintaining health.The results showed no significant change in self-esteem, self-efficacy, and psychological attitudes toward aging. Computer interest and efficacy also showed no significant change, perhaps because participants already measured high in these prior to the intervention.The amount of time participants spent preparing for class correlated significantly to e-health literacy efficacy and perceived importance of Internet health information, but not to other outcome measures.Group composition (gender, peer familiarity, prior computer experience did not affect outcomes; however composition was uneven, as groups were small and

  20. Indoor acoustic gain design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  1. Self-generated Literacy Practices in Disadvantaged Environments in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Calderón López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the role of literacy in disadvantaged environments and the interplay between self-generated literacy practices and their conceptualization of literacy in 7 to 10-year-old Chilean pupils from two different schools located in Santiago, Chile. The study was framed within a participatory approach focused on promoting the children’s agency and voice in the research. A range of second-level data materials were collected through interviews with parents, photographs and existing documents. Although at a resources-associated level the sociocultural context did not inhibit the emergence of literacy practices, the context did contribute to the children’s understanding of literacy. This study raises the need for considering how children’s understanding of literacy influence their involvement and learning about reading and writing as their experiences and perceptions have an important role in their learning process, particularly on how they develop their reading and writing practices. The findings implied that by raising the participants’ awareness of the relevance of everyday practices in relation with reading and writing, they are likelier to feel more comfortable and empowered towards their own literacy practices. Particularly, the empowerment of children coming from a disadvantaged background would give them more opportunities to support their learning. By making the children aware of the relevance of their own perceptions and practices, the pupils could gain in confidence, be agents of their learning processes, and have more resources to succeed on the demanding school environment.

  2. Information literacy of the academic library users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Hasenay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy should be a foundation of any educational system, which would enable students and library users a more efficient way to perform academically and in everyday life. The research goal was to determine the level of information literacy among the students, users of the Library of Faculty of Food and Technology Osijek (PTFOS. A special survey – quiz was used to determine students’ knowledge of library collection and services. The sample of 115 students was surveyed between 16th and 27th of February 2015. The library users are aware of the conditions of using the library collections as well as library services, but they don't read messages on the library's bulletin board, desks and web site. The research results will be used as guidelines for improving information literacy and future research.

  3. The communication media in postliteracy education: New dimensions of literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semali, Ladislaus M.

    1993-05-01

    Postliteracy programs have been used to produce written materials for newly literate adults, but this narrow view falls short of preventing relapse into illiteracy. Furthermore, the gradual move away from mass educational programs and government financing of education has put postliteracy at greater risk. This study tests levels of retention of literacy among neo-literates in Tanzania who gained a literacy certificate five years ago. Some modest success is noted. The pattern of radio broadcasting, newspaper coverage and library provision in the country is summarized, and the influence of these media on literacy retention assessed. Investment in them is seen as crucial to the maintenance of literacy. However, it is also suggested that the cultural context cannot be overlooked, that the importance of oral communication does not swiftly diminish and that excessive emphasis on functional postliteracy texts does not coincide with the leisure-time interests of neo-literates.

  4. Weight gain - unintentional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be due to menstruation, heart or kidney failure, preeclampsia, or medicines you take. A rapid weight gain ... al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: weight management. J Am Diet Assoc . 2009;109:330-46. ...

  5. Adult Literacy: Contexts and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Anabel Powell; Beverstock, Caroline

    Reporting recent and significant studies across the spectrum of the literacy movement to help plan the United States' literacy future, this book discusses the history of the adult literacy movement, especially in the United States, and the emergent definitions of adult literacy. The book also reports on the scholarship about, practice of, and…

  6. China's Successful Adult Literacy Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Dorothy

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Chinese effort to eliminate adult illiteracy. The author discusses purposes of adult education, history of adult literacy education, adult illiteracy statistics, the design of literacy education, curriculum construction, teaching methods, evaluation of the literacy education process, impact of literacy education, and implications of…

  7. Digital Literacy. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    21st Century students need a complex set of skills to be successful in a digital environment. Digital literacy, similar to traditional definitions of literacy, is a set of skills students use to locate, organize, understand, evaluate and create information. The difference is that it occurs in an environment where a growing set of digital tools…

  8. Marketing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, more than a decade after the original Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter the Standards) were institutionalized as the goal of academic library instruction, the Information Literacy Competency Standards Review Task Force convened by ACRL recommended…

  9. Institutionalizing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that information literacy is essential for individual and community empowerment, workforce readiness, and global competitiveness. However, there is a history of difficulty in integrating information literacy with the postsecondary educational process. This paper posits that a greater understanding of the…

  10. Literacy in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the various facets and dimensions of literacy programs in South Asia indicates that literacy is viewed as a means of human resource development geared toward meaningful participation of all sectors in society, with individual programs varying according to the magnitude of illiteracy, national goals, linguistic setting, and regional…

  11. Invest in Financial Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Sarah B.; McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of the economy elevates the need to build awareness of financial markets and personal finance among the nation's young people through implementing a financial literacy curriculum in schools. A limited amount of time spent on financial literacy can have a positive effect on students' budgeting skills. This knowledge will only add…

  12. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  13. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  14. Institutionalizing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that information literacy is essential for individual and community empowerment, workforce readiness, and global competitiveness. However, there is a history of difficulty in integrating information literacy with the postsecondary educational process. This paper posits that a greater understanding of the…

  15. Metamaterials with Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ortwin

    2012-02-01

    Nanoplasmonic metamaterials are the key to an extreme control of light and allow us to conceive materials with negative or vanishing refractive index. Indeed, metamaterials enable a multitude of exciting and useful applications, such as subwavelength focusing, invisibility cloaking, and ``trapped rainbow'' stopping of light. The realization of these materials has recently advanced from the microwave to the optical regime. However, at optical wavelengths, metamaterials may suffer from high dissipative losses owing to the metallic nature of their constituent nanoplasmonic meta-molecules. It is therefore not surprising that overcoming loss restrictions by gain is currently one of the most important topics in metamaterials' research. At the same time, providing gain on the nanoplasmonic (metamolecular) level opens up exciting new possibilities such as a whole new type of metamaterial nano-laser with a cavity length of about a tenth of the wavelength. The talk gives an overview of the state of the art of gain-enhanced metamaterials. Particular focus will be placed on nano-plasmonic metamaterials (such as double-fishnet metamaterials) with integrated laser dyes as gain medium. The successful compensation of loss by gain is demonstrated on the meta-molecular level. On the basis of a comprehensive, microscopic Maxwell-Bloch Langevin approach of spatio-temporal light amplification and lasing in gain-enhanced nanoplasmonic (negative-index) metamaterials a methodology based on the discrete Poynting's theorem is introduced that allows dynamic tracing of the flow of electromagnetic energy into and out of ``microscopic'' channels (light field, plasmons, gain medium). It is shown that steady-state amplification can be achieved in nanoplasmonic metamaterials. Finally, a complex spatio-temporal interplay of light-field and coherent absorption dynamics is revealed in the lasing dynamics of a nanoplasmonic gain-enhanced double-fishnet metamaterial.

  16. Embedding Literacy Strategies in Social Studies for Eighth-Grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alishia Gaston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This action research study evaluated the effects of literacy strategies on academic achievement, motivation, and engagement of eighth-grade social studies students. Incorporating literacy strategies included teaching students to construct meaning, think critically, and build content knowledge, while stimulating their interests, using multiple texts and technology, and providing collaborative opportunities and high engagement during instructional activities. Students were divided into a literacy group and a direct instruction group with each class being taught the same content. Literacy strategies were incorporated in one class, and direct instruction activities were used in the other class. Results were determined using pre and posttest scores, a student motivation questionnaire, and a student engagement checklist. Results indicated significantly higher student achievement and engagement when literacy strategies were a part of the social studies instruction. Motivation also increased when literacy strategies were used. Literacy instruction was a beneficial strategy to improve student achievement, motivation, and engagement.

  17. Health literacy and community empowerment: it is more than just reading, writing and counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacio, Emee Vida

    2013-08-01

    The concept of health literacy is evolving. The re-emergence of Freireian-inspired health literacy projects moves the conceptualisation of health literacy from merely the ability to apply functional literacy skills in a health-care context to a wider ability to exert control over the determinants of health. This article presents an example of a community-based project that adopts an empowerment education model in health literacy. Based within a small indigenous community in the Philippines, participants were engaged in critical reflection to gain a better understanding of how health is conceptualised within their socio-economic and political environment and its implications for practice, power relations and subjective experiences. The article concludes with the assertion that although developing health literacy skills is important, we must never lose sight of unbalanced power relations and unfair structures that hinder positive social change.

  18. Studying bilingual students’ literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia

    2012-01-01

    ), and linguistic diversity seems to be associated with societal problems and educational failure. ”The bilingual student” is placed in the core of this debate, as he or she is portrayed as a main cause of the low national placement in the international rankings (Holm & Laursen, 2011) and thus increasingly...... conceived of as a threat to a school’s profile (Rampton, Harris & Leung, 2001). In this paper, I focus on different conceptualizations of literacy and discuss the implications for research on bilingual children's literacy acquisition and the need to expand the understanding of literacy in ways, which might...... contribute to lift the basic understanding of bilinguals’ literacy out of a disqualifying political discourse. Drawing on the ongoing study Sign of Language (Laursen, 2011), I reflect on how a social semiotic framework might help open new research perspectives on bilingual children’s literacy acquisition...

  19. Computer technology teacher candidates’ views on the concepts of literacy related to information technologyBilgisayar öğretmen adaylarının bilişim alanıyla ilgili okuryazarlık kavramlarına yönelik görüşleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelkin Diker Coşkun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the views of teacher candidates in the department of Computer Education and Educational Technology at Yeditepe University on the concepts of information literacy, digital literacy and media literacy. A descriptive research method was employed in the data analysis procedure. Data was collected through a questionnaire involving 5 questions. The questionnaire was divided into two main parts: a subject profile and open-ended questions. The profile contained demographic and educational characteristics of teacher candidates such as gender, grade level, type of school attended and grade point average. The open-ended questions explored teacher candidates’ views on the concepts of literacy. Qualitative data derived from the open-ended questions was analyzed using content analysis techniques. Two main themes emerged from the analysis of data, including: teacher candidates’ definitions of the concepts and teacher candidates’ views on the use of these concepts in different fields. The findings of the study indicated that teacher candidates’ definitions of information literacy were more complete than their definitions of digital literacy and media literacy. However, they could not identify the main components of information literacy such as using diverse information resources and synthesizing them.  It was also determined that teacher candidates’ knowledge of digital literacy was inadequate, and they defined the concept in different ways. As for media literacy, which was one of the major themes of the study, teacher candidates were unable to sufficiently define media literacy in terms of media sources. ÖzetBu araştırmanın amacı, Yeditepe Üniversitesi Eğitim Fakültesi Bilgisayar ve Öğretim teknolojisi bölümünde öğrenim gören  öğretmen adaylarının Bilgi-okuryazarlığı, Dijital Okur-yazarlık, Medya-okuryazarlığı kavramlarıyla ilgili görüşlerini ortaya koymaktır. Verilerin toplanması,

  20. Let's Go to the Zoo: Guiding Elementary Students through Research; Ladders of Collaboration; Information Literacy and Assessment: Web Resources Too Good To Miss; Top Secret: Collaborative Efforts Really Do Make a Difference; What Is Collaboration to You?; Volunteering for Information Literacy; Getting an Early Start on Using Technology for Research; Collaborations: Working with Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Lynn; Asper, Vicki; Repman, Judi; Tschamler, Addie; Thomas, Melody; Kearns, Jodi; Farmer, Lesley S. J.; Buzzeo, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Includes eight articles that address the role of the elementary school librarian in developing information literacy, focusing on collaboration between media specialists and classroom teachers. Highlights include student research, including a research planning sheet; Web resources on information literacy and assessment; and helping students use…

  1. Characterizing Financial and Statistical Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Girolamo, Amalia; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten

    We characterize the literacy of an individual in a domain by their elicited subjective belief distribution over the possible responses to a question posed in that domain. We consider literacy across several financial, economic and statistical domains. We find considerable demographic heterogeneity...... approach to characterize financial capability, the consequences of non-literacy, social literacy, and the information content of hypothetical survey measures of literacy....

  2. Using primary literature to teach science literacy to introductory biology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krontiris-Litowitz, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate students struggle to read the scientific literature and educators have suggested that this may reflect deficiencies in their science literacy skills. In this two-year study we develop and test a strategy for using the scientific literature to teach science literacy skills to novice life science majors. The first year of the project served as a preliminary investigation in which we evaluated student science literacy skills, created a set of science literacy learning objectives aligned with Bloom's taxonomy, and developed a set of homework assignments that used peer-reviewed articles to teach science literacy. In the second year of the project the effectiveness of the assignments and the learning objectives were evaluated. Summative student learning was evaluated in the second year on a final exam. The mean score was 83.5% (±20.3%) and there were significant learning gains (p < 0.05) in seven of nine of science literacy skills. Project data indicated that even though students achieved course-targeted lower-order science literacy objectives, many were deficient in higher-order literacy skills. Results of this project suggest that building scientific literacy is a continuing process which begins in first-year science courses with a set of fundamental skills that can serve the progressive development of literacy skills throughout the undergraduate curriculum.

  3. DEVELOPING INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS FOR LIFELONG LEARNING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Demiralay

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes in information and communication technologieshave high impact on societies to transform into the information societies. Nowadays,owning a dynamic economy which based on information is the main objective of thesocieties. It is the fact that the individuals need to have lifelong learning and informationliteracy skills in order to come into being in the information society. The educationalinstitutions are responsible to cause individuals to gain these skills. Especially it isimportant to be acquired these skills in elementary education. In this study; lifelonglearning and information literacy concepts are examined, the models which will be usedto provide students to gain information literacy skills in a systematic way are presented,and an example course plan in elementary education based on Big6 Model which haswidely used and project based learning are presented. Finally, information society,lifelong learning and information literacy are discussed in the perspectives of teacher,student and teacher candidates and various suggestions are offered

  4. Narrative Competence and the Enhancement of Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Dobson

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues for narrative competence as an underlying skill neglected in educational policy makers’ calls for enhanced literacy through improved reading, writing, numeracy and working with digital technology. This argument is presented in three parts. First, a genealogy of the narrative is presented by looking at understandings of narratives with respect to changes in technology and socio-cultural relations. Three technological forms of the narrative are examined: the oral, written and image based narrative. Second, revisiting Bernstein, narrative competency is connected to pedagogic practice. The focus is upon code recognition and the rhythm of narrative in a classroom context. Third, a proposal is made to develop narrative competence as a research programme capable of exploring literacy in an age of open learning.

  5. Opportunities and challenges of mobile learning for promoting mathematical literacy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical literacy plays an important role in supporting individuals to fulfil their professional roles in modern society. The affordances of mobile technologies as well as the emergence of new theories in mobile learning have the potential to promote mathematical literacy. However, implementation of mobile learning in Indonesian society faces challenges related to perceived ethical and learning issues in curriculum-based educational settings. This study aims to investigate the preparednes...

  6. Information literacy training in AgroParisTech food studies

    OpenAIRE

    Agnès Grimal; Florence Dubois-Brissonnet; Elisabeth Dumoulin

    2015-01-01

    AgroParisTech professors and librarians in Food Science and Technology have developed information literacy instruction to help students find and use relevant information. The course trains students to develop information literacy competencies: to identify the information needed and define its nature and extent; to access the information with efficiency because they select and use methods, resources and retrieval systems most appropriate to the topic; to evaluate the used methods, information,...

  7. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  8. Media Literacy Pedagogy: Critical and New/Twenty-First-Century Literacies Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Nalova

    2011-01-01

    This article offers a conceptualization of media literacy pedagogy in light of National Education Technology Plan efforts, which name teaching as one of five essential areas to build an education system that can increase as well as sustain the United States' economic growth and prosperity in the global economy. In particular, two distinct…

  9. Automatization and Retention of Literacy Skills in Adult Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Bebko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Findings from recent efficacy studies comparing literacy program types suggest that struggling adult readers often make limited to moderate gains across varied types of literacy interventions, with no specific approach consistently surpassing others to date. An alternative to comparing program types is to investigate whether there are specific characteristics or skills that vary by individual that can predict higher gains and skill retention across program type. Using an experimental, prospective, longitudinal design, the present study examined the role of automatization (over-learning of component skills involved in reading during participation in general literacy programs. On average, participants in the study gained the equivalent of one full reading grade-level after participation in programs for six months. The degree of automatization of reading skills was found to be the strongest predictor of gains made during programs; a measure of automatization was also the strongest predictor of subsequent retention of skills, months later at follow-up testing. Implications for adult literacy practitioners and directions for future research related to skill retention are discussed.

  10. Literacy Teaching Aids from High/Scope Educational Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2005

    2005-01-01

    High/Scope's approach to education is a blend of Jean Piaget's constructivist theory of child development and the best of traditional teacher experience. The High/Scope approach is about helping students gain knowledge and skills in important content areas, such as language and literacy, initiative and social relations, movement, music, and…

  11. The Embedded and Embodied Literacies of a Young Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that if we paid attention to the local situation of a reader the way we attend to the life story of an author, we might gain a very different understanding of children's literacy. It explores the literate approaches of a single child exploring a single theme--the settler culture as represented in a variety of materials…

  12. The Embedded and Embodied Literacies of a Young Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that if we paid attention to the local situation of a reader the way we attend to the life story of an author, we might gain a very different understanding of children's literacy. It explores the literate approaches of a single child exploring a single theme--the settler culture as represented in a variety of materials…

  13. Literacy Teaching Aids from High/Scope Educational Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2005

    2005-01-01

    High/Scope's approach to education is a blend of Jean Piaget's constructivist theory of child development and the best of traditional teacher experience. The High/Scope approach is about helping students gain knowledge and skills in important content areas, such as language and literacy, initiative and social relations, movement, music, and…

  14. Relational Information Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, Marco; Jaeger, Manfred; Frasconi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We introduce relational information gain, a refinement scoring function measuring the informativeness of newly introduced variables. The gain can be interpreted as a conditional entropy in a well-defined sense and can be efficiently approximately computed. In conjunction with simple greedy general......-to-specific search algorithms such as FOIL, it yields an efficient and competitive algorithm in terms of predictive accuracy and compactness of the learned theory. In conjunction with the decision tree learner TILDE, it offers a beneficial alternative to lookahead, achieving similar performance while significantly...

  15. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  16. What role does health literacy play in patients' involvement in medical decision-making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabers, Anne E. M.; Rademakers, Jany J. D. J. M.; Groenewegen, Peter P.; van Dijk, Liset; de Jong, Judith D.

    2017-01-01

    Patients vary in their preferences towards involvement in medical decision-making. Previous research, however, gives no clear explanation for this observed variation in their involvement. One possible explanation might be health literacy. Health literacy refers to personal characteristics and social resources needed for people to access, understand and use information to make decisions about their health. This study aimed to examine the relationship between health literacy and self-reported patient involvement. With respect to health literacy, we focused on those competences relevant for medical decision-making. We hypothesized that people with higher health literacy report that they are more involved in medical decision-making. A structured questionnaire was sent to members of the Dutch Health Care Consumer Panel in May 2015 (response 46%, N = 974). Health literacy was measured using five scales of the Health Literacy Questionnaire. A regression model was used to estimate the relationship between health literacy and self-reported involvement. In general, our results did not show a relationship between health literacy and self-reported involvement. We did find a positive significant association between the health literacy scale appraisal of health information and self-reported involvement. Our hypothesis was partly confirmed. The results from this study suggest that higher order competences, that is to say critical health literacy, in particular, are important in reporting involvement in medical decision-making. Future research is recommended to unravel further the relationship between health literacy and patient involvement in order to gain insight into whether health literacy might be an asset to enhance patient participation in medical decision-making. PMID:28257472

  17. What role does health literacy play in patients' involvement in medical decision-making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabers, Anne E M; Rademakers, Jany J D J M; Groenewegen, Peter P; van Dijk, Liset; de Jong, Judith D

    2017-01-01

    Patients vary in their preferences towards involvement in medical decision-making. Previous research, however, gives no clear explanation for this observed variation in their involvement. One possible explanation might be health literacy. Health literacy refers to personal characteristics and social resources needed for people to access, understand and use information to make decisions about their health. This study aimed to examine the relationship between health literacy and self-reported patient involvement. With respect to health literacy, we focused on those competences relevant for medical decision-making. We hypothesized that people with higher health literacy report that they are more involved in medical decision-making. A structured questionnaire was sent to members of the Dutch Health Care Consumer Panel in May 2015 (response 46%, N = 974). Health literacy was measured using five scales of the Health Literacy Questionnaire. A regression model was used to estimate the relationship between health literacy and self-reported involvement. In general, our results did not show a relationship between health literacy and self-reported involvement. We did find a positive significant association between the health literacy scale appraisal of health information and self-reported involvement. Our hypothesis was partly confirmed. The results from this study suggest that higher order competences, that is to say critical health literacy, in particular, are important in reporting involvement in medical decision-making. Future research is recommended to unravel further the relationship between health literacy and patient involvement in order to gain insight into whether health literacy might be an asset to enhance patient participation in medical decision-making.

  18. Should I Gain Weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you're having trouble with your body image, talk about how you feel with someone you like and trust who's been through it — maybe a parent, doctor, counselor, coach, or teacher. continue It's the Growth, Not the Gain No ...

  19. Teaching Media Literacy with Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, Katie

    2010-01-01

    Background: A current problem in media literacy studies is whether or not to categorize graphic novels as media literacy texts. Thus, this article begins with a review of current media literacy research and its emphasis on defining media literacy texts as texts that rely on both print literacies and image literacies. Because graphic novels rely on…

  20. The Effectiveness of CPS-ALM Model in Enhancing Statistical Literacy Ability and Self Concept of Elementary School Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaria, J.; Rumahlatu, D.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this study is to examine comprehensively statistical literacy and self-concept enhancement of elementary school student teacher through CPS-BML model in which this enhancement is measured through N-gain. The result of study indicate that the use of Collaborative Problem Solving Model assisted by literacy media (CPS-ALM) model…