WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology literacy gains

  1. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... between the 3 areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  2. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  3. Adult Literacy using Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Adnan Al-Alaoui

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on our project, “ALIT”, Adult Literacy using Information Technology, consists of an adult computer literacy software package that aims at helping adult illiterates to learn how to basically read and write in Arabic. Our proposed software seeks to empower its users with substantial and effective educational gains. This is achieved by providing adequate tools such as voice communication with the user and interactive Arabic handwriting recognition using geometrical features and neural networks to automatically recognize (read on-line handwritten Arabic words. Moreover, the proposed ALIT seeks to offer a variety of economic, social, and human-development benefit. The success of this program depends to a large extent on illiterates’ willingness to choose, adapt, and use the IT based software effectively.

  4. GAIN Technology Workshops Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braase, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    National and global demand for nuclear energy is increasing and United States (U.S.) global leadership is eroding. There is a sense of urgency with respect to the deployment of the innovative nuclear energy technologies. The Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative is based on the simultaneous achievement of three strategic goals. The first is maintaining global technology leadership within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The second is enabling global industrial leadership for nuclear vendors and suppliers. The third is focused on utility optimization of nuclear energy within the clean energy portfolio. An effective public-private partnership is required to achieve these goals. DOEs recognizes the recent sense of urgency new developers and investors have in getting their concepts to market. They know that time to market for nuclear technology takes too long and the facilities needed to conduct the necessary research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities are very expensive to develop and maintain. Early technologies, in the lower technology readiness levels (TRL) need materials testing, analysis, modeling, code development, etc., most of which currently exists in the DOE national laboratory system. However, mature technologies typically need large component testing and demonstration facilities, which are expensive and long-lead efforts. By understanding the needs of advanced nuclear technology developers, GAIN will connect DOE national laboratory capabilities (e.g., facilities, expertise, materials, and data) with industry RD&D needs. In addition, GAIN is working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to streamline processes and increase understanding of the licensing requirements for advanced reactors.

  5. GAIN Technology Workshops Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    National and global demand for nuclear energy is increasing and United States (U.S.) global leadership is eroding. There is a sense of urgency with respect to the deployment of the innovative nuclear energy technologies. The Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative is based on the simultaneous achievement of three strategic goals. The first is maintaining global technology leadership within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The second is enabling global industrial leadership for nuclear vendors and suppliers. The third is focused on utility optimization of nuclear energy within the clean energy portfolio. An effective public-private partnership is required to achieve these goals. DOEs recognizes the recent sense of urgency new developers and investors have in getting their concepts to market. They know that time to market for nuclear technology takes too long and the facilities needed to conduct the necessary research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities are very expensive to develop and maintain. Early technologies, in the lower technology readiness levels (TRL) need materials testing, analysis, modeling, code development, etc., most of which currently exists in the DOE national laboratory system. However, mature technologies typically need large component testing and demonstration facilities, which are expensive and long-lead efforts. By understanding the needs of advanced nuclear technology developers, GAIN will connect DOE national laboratory capabilities (e.g., facilities, expertise, materials, and data) with industry RD&D needs. In addition, GAIN is working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to streamline processes and increase understanding of the licensing requirements for advanced reactors.

  6. Technological literacy and innovation education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    , and a heavy digitization of the health care sector. These developments have actualized the fundamental question of how new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships? As one way to deal with this question, health education programmes have begun to focus...... on innovation education and educational activities fostering technological literacy. While focus on technological literacy has often (historically) taken a functionalist direction, and mainly been related to ICT and development of non- vocational curricula, more recent developments of approaches...... education approaches. This paper inscribes itself in these latter movements, and contributes to opening up the question of how health education programmes can deal with the ways new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships. The paper presents and discusses three...

  7. Information and Communications Technology Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifuddin Syarifuddin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of information and communication technology (ICT has brought changes for the people of Indonesia. With ICT, community can easily access a variety of information and support jobs. But the problem that arises is the uneven penetration of ICT in all parts of Indonesia, including in South Sulawesi. Giving rise to the digital divide as well as the weakness of ICT literacy. Therefore, this study aims to determine the ICT literacy community in South Sulawesi. The method used in this study is a survey with a quantitative approach. The results show that ICT (computer, mobile phone, and internet has been used by communities in South Sulawesi. Among the three media, mobile phone has the highest number of penetration followed by computer and the internet. The majority of respondents have also entered into 5 levels of ICT literacy mobile phones and computers as an integral part of daily activities. While the internet was still in level 3 where they have been used but not significantly.

  8. The New Literacy: Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Theoni Soublis

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements are forcing the definition of literacy to expand in this new century. Students are coming to the classroom digitally fluent. Yet, our educational system has not risen to the challenges of modifying curriculum and instruction to suit the needs of this generation of learners. Literacy needs to be redefined. In order to…

  9. Teaching Embedded System Concepts for Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzker, M.; Schwandt, A.

    2011-01-01

    A basic understanding of technology is recognized as important knowledge even for students not connected with engineering and computer science. This paper shows that embedded system concepts can be taught in a technological literacy course. An embedded system teaching block that has been used in an electronics module for non-engineers is…

  10. Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Using Digital Technologies in Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierczynski, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    In order to best prepare our preservice teachers to incorporate digital technologies into future literacy instruction, we must first explore how they perceive implementation of digital technologies in literacy instruction. Limited research exists which examines the employment of digital technologies in literacy instruction, and even less considers…

  11. Information And Communication Technology Literacy Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to assess the Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Academics in A.B.U., Zaria. Two research questions were raised and answered and 2 hypothesis were also formulated and tested at α 0.05. The research questions sought to find the available ICT gadget and fluency of the ...

  12. Information And Communication Technology Literacy And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explored eAssessment challenges and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Literacy needed for effective automation of assessment in Open and Distance Learning. The population consisted of students of National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) already exposed to eAssessment. Sample was ...

  13. Information Technology literacy and information utilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information technology (IT) is widely used in variety of ways to improve the quality of learning in Nigerian universities. One significant area of application of IT is the provision of basic access to and utilization of global electronic information resources. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of IT literacy among ...

  14. Using Technology To Enhance Early Literacy through Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Poh-Hwa; Johnson, James

    1999-01-01

    Discusses technology with reference to children's play, including how technology mixes with the established connection between children's play and emergent literacy and advantages and disadvantages of the three-way intersection of technology, literacy, and play in early childhood education. Addresses play and computers, software, the Internet, and…

  15. Implementation literacy strategies on health technology theme Learning to enhance Indonesian Junior High School Student's Physics Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feranie, Selly; Efendi, Ridwan; Karim, Saeful; Sasmita, Dedi

    2016-08-01

    The PISA results for Indonesian Students are lowest among Asian countries in the past two successive results. Therefore various Innovations in science learning process and its effectiveness enhancing student's science literacy is needed to enrich middle school science teachers. Literacy strategies have been implemented on health technologies theme learning to enhance Indonesian Junior high school Student's Physics literacy in three different health technologies e.g. Lasik surgery that associated with application of Light and Optics concepts, Ultra Sonographer (USG) associated with application of Sound wave concepts and Work out with stationary bike and walking associated with application of motion concepts. Science learning process involves at least teacher instruction, student learning and a science curriculum. We design two main part of literacy strategies in each theme based learning. First part is Integrated Reading Writing Task (IRWT) is given to the students before learning process, the second part is scientific investigation learning process design packed in Problem Based Learning. The first part is to enhance student's science knowledge and reading comprehension and the second part is to enhance student's science competencies. We design a transformation from complexity of physics language to Middle school physics language and from an expensive and complex science investigation to a local material and simply hands on activities. In this paper, we provide briefly how literacy strategies proposed by previous works is redesigned and applied in classroom science learning. Data were analysed using t- test. The increasing value of mean scores in each learning design (with a significance level of p = 0.01) shows that the implementation of this literacy strategy revealed a significant increase in students’ physics literacy achievement. Addition analysis of Avarage normalized gain show that each learning design is in medium-g courses effectiveness category

  16. Information Literacy Education on College of Technology at Kyushu Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Ikeda, Naomitsu; Irie, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Yoichi; Oshima, Shunsuke; Murayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Hirotsugu

    Recently, the importance of an engineering education increases by the development of the information technology (IT) . Development of the information literacy education is important to deal with new IT in the education on college of technology. Our group investigated the current state of information literacy education on college of technology at Kyushu area and the secondary education. In addition, we investigated about the talent whom the industrial world requested. From these investigation results, this paper proposed cooperation with the elementary and secondary education, enhancement of intellectual property education, introduction of information ethics education, introduction of career education and enhancement of PBL to information literacy education on college of technology.

  17. Assessing gains in teacher knowledge and confidence in a long-duration climate literacy initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, D. B.; Kendall, L.; Yelton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Climate Literacy: Integrating Modeling & Technology Experiences (CLIMATE) in NC Classrooms, an interdisciplinary, global climate change program for NC high school science teachers is administered by UNC Chapel Hill's Institute for the Environment (IE) with funding from NASA's Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Program. Currently in its third year, this year-long program serves 24 teaching fellows annually and combines hands-on climate science investigations with experiential learning in fragile ecosystem environments to achieve the following program goals: increased teacher knowledge of climate change science and predicted impacts; increased teacher knowledge of modeling and technology resources, with an emphasis on those provided by NASA; and increased teacher confidence in using technology to address climate change education. A mixed-methods evaluation approach that includes external evaluation is providing quantitative and qualitative data about the extent to which program goals are being achieved. With regard to increases in teacher knowledge, teachers often self-report an increase in knowledge as a result of a program activity; this session will describe our strategies for assessing actual gains in teacher knowledge which include pre- and post-collaborative concept mapping and pre- and post-open response questionnaires. For each evaluation approach utilized, the process of analyzing these qualitative data will be discussed and results shared. For example, a collaborative concept mapping activity for assessment of learning as a result of the summer institute was utilized to assess gains in content knowledge. Working in small groups, teachers were asked to identify key vocabulary terms and show their relationship to one another via a concept map to answer these questions: What is global climate change? What is/are the: evidence? mechanisms? causes? consequences? Concept maps were constructed at the beginning (pre) and again at the end (post) of the Summer

  18. Literacy Instruction in the Brave New World of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Technology integration into language arts instruction has been slow and tentative, even as information technologies have evolved with frightening speed. Today's teachers need to be aware of several extant and unchanging realities: Technology is now indispensable to literacy development; reading with technology requires new skills and…

  19. Standards for Technological Literacy: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, William E., Jr; Moye, Johnny J.

    2018-01-01

    "Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (STL)" provides the content for what every technologically literate student should know and be able to do. It "defines what the study of technology in Grades K-12 should be, but it does not lay out a curriculum" (ITEA/ITEEA, 2000/2002/2007, p. 200).…

  20. Deconstructing Technological Literacy: Opening a Window to Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Brandt

    2015-01-01

    In an environment of rapid and unpredictable change determined and directed by technologies that are constantly changing, the assumption that being technologically literate is the key to being a sustained, contributing life-long learner is well founded. However, technological literacy is seldom referred to or considered in academic arguments as a…

  1. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  2. A Path Model of Factors Affecting Secondary School Students' Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Stanislav; Jamšek, Janez

    2018-01-01

    Technological literacy defines a competitive vision for technology education. Working together with competitive supremacy, technological literacy shapes the actions of technology educators. Rationalised by the dictates of industry, technological literacy was constructed as a product of the marketplace. There are many models that visualise…

  3. Language and technology literacy barriers to accessing government services

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barnard, E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available , literacy and level of technology experience. These issues are investigated and solutions researched in a developing world context. The project on which the paper is based aims to develop a service delivery framework and technology where service delivery...

  4. Developing a Comprehensive View of General Technological Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Eric

    A literature review was conducted to define technological literacy and its implications for the role of education in preparing citizens in a participatory democracy, as consumers and family members, for employment, and in the spiritual/philosophical dimensions of life as they relate to our conceptions of technology. A definition of technological…

  5. Incorporating Disciplinary Literacy in Technology and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of how to relate reading to a content area, specifically technology education. The author notes that, with the new focus on Common Core English Language Arts State Standards and state-developed standards, technology and engineering teachers should include disciplinary literacy in their curriculum. Academic…

  6. Information And Communication Technology (ICT) Literacy Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various means such as formal education, informal education, colleagues, training at workplace, attending workshops/seminars are accepted as ideal for the acquisition of ICT literacy skills. However, financial problems, poor infrastructure, lack of library management interest and lack of training opportunity hinders the ...

  7. Measuring the Influences That Affect Technological Literacy in Rhode Island High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study sampled the current state of technological literacy in Rhode Island high schools using a new instrument, the Technological Literacy Assessment, which was developed for this study. Gender inequalities in technological literacy were discovered, and possible causes and solutions are presented. This study suggests possible next steps for…

  8. Online technology for teaching and learning-gains and losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2015-07-01

    This commentary describes recent developments in the use of online technologies, in particular social media and mobile devices, for teaching and learning and considers what has been gained and lost. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Smeets, E. (2011, 13-16 September). Information Literacy and technology to improve learning and education. Presentation and discussion in a cross-network symposium of networks 16 and 12 at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the “European Educational Research

  10. Using Mobile Technology to Support Literacy Coaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. C.; Martin, Aqueasha

    2013-01-01

    This article examines literacy coaches' (n = 7) digital note-taking practices using mobile technology and their influence on reflective practice. The study, which employed a design-based approach, investigated the coaches' transition from note-taking by paper and pencil to the note-taking application Evernote. Data included interviews with the…

  11. Bridging Divides through Technology Use: Transnationalism and Digital Literacy Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueron, Silvia Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigate the digital literacy practices of adult immigrants, and their relationship with transnational processes and practices. Specifically, I focus on their conditions of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their life trajectories, their conditions of learning in a community center, and their…

  12. Integration of Old and New Technology: Computers, Photography, and Video Technology in an Even Start Family Literacy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerholm, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    McCosh Even Start, a federally funded family-literacy project located in a Chicago school, used older donated Apple computers, video technology, and photography to develop literacy and also to evaluate parents' and children's literacy progress. Older and newer technologies were successfully combined. (MLH)

  13. A multimedia adult literacy program: Combining NASA technology, instructional design theory, and authentic literacy concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    For a number of years, the Software Technology Branch of the Information Systems Directorate has been involved in the application of cutting edge hardware and software technologies to instructional tasks related to NASA projects. The branch has developed intelligent computer aided training shells, instructional applications of virtual reality and multimedia, and computer-based instructional packages that use fuzzy logic for both instructional and diagnostic decision making. One outcome of the work on space-related technology-supported instruction has been the creation of a significant pool of human talent in the branch with current expertise on the cutting edges of instructional technologies. When the human talent is combined with advanced technologies for graphics, sound, video, CD-ROM, and high speed computing, the result is a powerful research and development group that both contributes to the applied foundations of instructional technology and creates effective instructional packages that take advantage of a range of advanced technologies. Several branch projects are currently underway that combine NASA-developed expertise to significant instructional problems in public education. The branch, for example, has developed intelligent computer aided software to help high school students learn physics and staff are currently working on a project to produce educational software for young children with language deficits. This report deals with another project, the adult literacy tutor. Unfortunately, while there are a number of computer-based instructional packages available for adult literacy instruction, most of them are based on the same instructional models that failed these students when they were in school. The teacher-centered, discrete skill and drill-oriented, instructional strategies, even when they are supported by color computer graphics and animation, that form the foundation for most of the computer-based literacy packages currently on the market may not

  14. LA ALFABETIZACIÓN TECNOLÓGICA THE TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Ortega Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La incorporación a la sociedad del conocimiento es posible mediante la alfabetización tecnológica. Para poder conseguir una educación de calidad a través del uso de las tecnologías es necesario una alfabetización tecnológica entendida como la capacitación no solo instrumental, sino la adquisición de las competencias necesarias para la utilización didáctica de las tecnologías y poder acceder al conocimiento. A través de la alfabetización tecnológica se democratizan los procesos de formación y se consigue la inclusión social, laboral y una mejora en la calidad de vida.The incorporation to the society of the knowledge is possible through the technological literacy. In order to achieve a quality education through the use of the technologies is necessary a technological literacy understood as the training not only instrument, but the acquisition of the necessary powers for the didactic use of technologies and to be able to access to the knowledge. Through the technological literacy are democratized formation processes and is achieved the social, work inclusion and an improvement in the quality of life.

  15. Is Computer Science Compatible with Technological Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Chris; Koperski, Kevin; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2018-01-01

    Although technology education evolved over time, and pressure increased to infuse more engineering principles and increase links to STEM (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) initiatives, there has never been an official alignment between technology and engineering education and computer science. There is movement at the federal level…

  16. Examining the Relationship between Technology & Engineering Instruction and Technology & Engineering Literacy in K-8 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tamarra L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between technology and engineering instruction and technology and engineering literacy in grades K-8. The factors identified and used for the purpose of this study were gender, socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and important modes of technology and engineering instruction. These factors…

  17. Technological Literacy: A Multiliteracies Approach for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. John

    2009-01-01

    Throughout history various grand narratives have impacted on technology education. In the current post modern era of globalization, technology education continues to struggle for relevance and definition, and takes various forms in different countries, but none seem resoundingly successful. The current development of what some have termed a…

  18. Moral Literacy in Technological Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøjer, Jo; Dupret, Katia

    2014-01-01

    to design work processes and technology work in ways that include a sense of ‘the Other’ and make moral judgement an indispensable part of professional competence in technology. This article provides new understandings of the way ethics are involved in care institutions. Nurses’ moral judgements...... are sophisticated with regard to ethical perspectives. In hospitals, nurses combine Latour's notion of symmetry in human/technology relations with an ethics implying ethical priority to human beings over other beings. This combination of ethics is not only sophisticated; it is also paradoxical, as it puts together...... mutually contradictory ethics. Instead of causing moral confusion, this ethical paradox is employed to produce a particularly refined notion of care situations, allowing nurses’ care to include patients and technology alike...

  19. The Literacy Practices of Vocational Training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Mackay, James

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that vocational students' literacy practices are more demanding than is generally recognised. Employing a view of literacy acquisition as socialisation, we investigated the literacy practices of trades training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology, by interviewing tutors and examined course books and student writing. A…

  20. Middle school special education teachers' perceptions and use of assistive technology in literacy instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Emily C; Richardson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In this research the authors examined middle school special education teachers' perceptions of assistive technology during literacy instruction with students with high incidence disabilities. A survey explored the use, effectiveness, and factors impacting use or effectiveness of assistive technology for literacy teaching and learning. Results suggested teachers' perceived assistive technology to be an effective tool for literacy, but use it minimally. When assistive technology was used, teachers indicated it was an effective literacy support. Teachers also reported barriers to using assistive technology in literacy including cost, usability, and lack of training/experience. However, factors such as previous successful experiences with assistive technology and assistive technology supporting students' learning encouraged assistive technology use. The consistency of teachers' reports of needing more experience and knowledge in assistive technology to fully use it suggests implications for preservice preparation such as providing additional experiences and information on assistive technology.

  1. The New Zealand Curriculum's approach to technological literacy through the lens of the philosophy of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaemi Nia, M.M.; de Vries, M.J.

    2016-01-01


    New Zealand’s curriculum, in terms of its approach to technological literacy, attempts to deliver a sound, philosophy-­based understanding of the nature of technology. The curriculum’s main authors claim that it conforms well to Mitcham’s (2014) categorization of different aspects of

  2. Enhancing students' science literacy using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyawati, Sunarya, Yayan; Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    This research attempts to enhance students' science literacy in the aspects of students' science content, application context, process, and students' attitude using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology. The quasi-experimental method with pre-post test design was used to achieve these objectives. Seventy-two students of class XII at a high school were employed as research's subject. Thirty-six students were in control class and another thirty-six were in experiment class. Variance test (t-test) was performed on the average level of 95% to identify the differences of students' science literacy in both classes. As the result, there were significant different of learning outcomes between experiment class and control class. Almost half of students (41.67%) in experiment class are categorized as high. Therefore, the learning using solar cell learning multimedia can improve students' science literacy, especially in the students' science content, application context, and process aspects with n-gain(%) 59.19 (medium), 63.04 (medium), and 52.98 (medium). This study can be used to develop learning multimedia in other science context.

  3. The Implementation of Web 2.0 Technology for Information Literacy Instruction in Thai University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawetrattanasatian, Oranuch

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology has drawn much attention recently as a fascinating tool for Information Literacy Instruction (ILI), especially in academic libraries. This research was aimed to investigate the implementation of Web 2.0 technology for ILI in Thai university libraries, in terms of information literacy skills being taught, types of Web 2.0…

  4. Influence of Health Literacy on Outcomes Using Telehomecare Technology: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtekaer Haesum, Lisa Korsbakke; Ehlers, Lars; Hejlesen, Ole K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature describing the interaction between the use of telehomecare technology and level of health literacy among chronic patients. The aim of the review was both to explore whether and how level of health literacy affects the ability to use telehomecare technology and, additionally, whether and…

  5. Effect of Physical Education Teachers' Computer Literacy on Technology Use in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' computer literacy has been identified as a factor that determines their technology use in class. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical education (PE) teachers' computer literacy and their technology use in PE. The study group consisted of 57 high school level in-service PE teachers. A survey was used…

  6. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  7. Using Communication Technology to Facilitate Scientific Literacy: A Framework for Engaged Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuskirk, Shireen Adele

    The purpose of this research project is to describe how existing communication technologies are used to foster scientific literacy for secondary students. This study develops a new framework as an analytic tool to categorize the activities of teachers and students involved in scientific literacy to describe what elements of scientific literacy are facilitated by such technologies. Four case studies are analyzed using the framework to describe the scientific literacy initiatives. Data collection at each site included interviews with the teacher, student focus groups, student surveys, and classroom observations. Qualitative analysis of the data provided insight into the learning activities and student experiences in the four cases. This study intentionally provides a platform for student voice. Very few previous empirical studies in the area of scientific literacy include the student experience. This represents a significant gap in the current literature on scientific literacy. An interpretation of scientific literacy that promotes student engagement, interaction, and initiative corresponds to a need to listen to students' perspectives on these experiences. Findings of the study indicated that the classroom activities depended on the teacher's philosophy regarding scientific literacy. Communication technology was ubiquitous; where the teacher did not initiate the use of social media in the classroom, the students did. The goal of supporting scientific literacy in students is an objective that extends beyond the boundaries of classroom walls, and it can be facilitated by technologies that seem both abundant and underutilized. Technology-enhanced pedagogy altered the classroom practices and resulted in more student participation and engagement.

  8. Australian studies: A vehicle for scientific and technological literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Beverley L.

    1990-01-01

    In Victoria, schools are adopting one common certificate, the VCE (Victorian Certificate of Education) which encompasses two years of study (Years 11 and 12) and comprises 44 subject areas or Studies, each of one semester duration. Amongst the compulsory subjects is Australian Studies (Units 1 and 2) with its focus on Work in Australian society. This paper discusses concerns about the teaching of the compulsory subject Australian Studies in the new VCE. The purpose is to consider whether the science and technology component in the Australian Studies course can raise the students’ level of scientific and technological literacy. The discussion is based on one semester’s teaching experience of Year 11 Australian Studies and consequent reflections on practice.

  9. Tracing Academic Literacies across Contemporary Literacy Sponsorscapes: Mobilities, Ideologies, Identities, and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Jon M.; De Costa, Peter I.

    2017-01-01

    Locating itself broadly within the "sociolinguistics of mobility" (Blommaert, 2014) and taking heed of Stornaiuolo and Hall's (2014) call to "trace resonance" in writing and literacies research, this article works to trace academic literacies across the emerging "literacy sponsorscapes" (Wargo, 2016a) of contemporary…

  10. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  11. Teachers' Engagement with New Literacies: Support for Implementing Technology in the English/Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoch, Melody; Myers, Joy; Belcher, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examined in-service teachers who were enrolled in a graduate level course that focused on new literacies and the integration of technology with literacy. They also taught children enrolled in a summer writing camp as part of the course. The authors followed the teachers into their classrooms once the graduate course ended to…

  12. Literacies, new technologies and young people : negotiating the interface in secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Bulfin, Scott Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how young people aged 15-16 use new media technologies in school. The study’s main aim was to provide a fine-grained account of the participants’ engagement with new technologies and to consider the implications for language and literacy learning. In particular, the study examined the participants’ sanctioned and unsanctioned use of literacy and new technologies and explored how these are negotiated. Negotiation, a key concept in the study, is defined as a process o...

  13. The Effectiveness of a Geospatial Technologies-Integrated Curriculum to Promote Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Bodzin, A. M.; Peffer, T.; Sahagian, D. L.; Cirucci, L.

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a geospatial technologies - integrated climate change curriculum (http://www.ei.lehigh.edu/eli/cc/) to promote climate literacy in an urban school district. Five 8th grade Earth and Space Science classes in an urban middle school (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) consisting of three different ability level tracks participated in the study. Data gathering methods included pre/posttest assessments, daily classroom observations, daily teacher meetings, and examination of student produced artifacts. Data was gathered using a climate change literacy assessment instrument designed to measure students' climate change content knowledge. The items included distractors that address misunderstandings and knowledge deficits about climate change from the existing literature. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to compare the pre- and post-test assessment results. The results of these analyses were used to compare overall gains as well as ability level track groups. Overall results regarding the use of the climate change curriculum showed significant improvement in urban middle school students' understanding of climate change concepts. Effect sizes were large (ES>0.8) and significant (pmiddle school students to improve their knowledge of climate change and improve their spatial thinking and reasoning skills.

  14. Towards an integrated analytical framework of information and communications technology literacy: from intended to implemented and achieved dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Markauskaite

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Theoretical approaches and frameworks that help us to understand the contemporary notion of information and communication technology (ICT literacy in the formal education sector are reviewed and examined. Method. The analysis is conducted from a technology (i.e., computer science conceptual perspective. The focus is on those aspects of new literacies that are directly related to the use of ICT. Structured literature review and documentary research techniques are applied. Analysis. Relationships between ICT literacy, information literacy, media literacy and other new literacies are clarified. Important terms - 'ICT', 'literacy' and 'ICT literacy' - are discussed. An analytical framework for the investigation of contemporary understandings of ICT literacy is presented. Three analytical dimensions of ICT literacy - (1 intended, (2 implemented and (3 achieved - are employed in this framework. The main perspectives and structural approaches that can be applied for the examination of ICT literacy in each of these three dimensions are discussed. Results. The proposed analytical framework reveals links between (1 the conceptual approaches and initial aims of ICT literacy policies, proposed at the top-level of policymaking; (2 teaching and learning practices, implemented at the middle-level of educational system and (3 ICT literacy learning experiences and students' outcomes, expected at the base-level of educational system. Conclusion. . It is argued that this analytical framework can be applied for an integrated analysis of ICT literacy. The framework provides a conceptual structure for discovering inconsistencies in the understanding of ICT literacy at various levels of educational systems.

  15. Pedagogical Praxis Surrounding the Integration of Photography, Visual Literacy, Digital Literacy, and Educational Technology into Business Education Classrooms: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Peter Allen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into how Marketing and Business Education Teachers utilize and integrate educational technology into curriculum through the use of photography. The ontology of this visual, technological, and language interface is explored with an eye toward visual literacy, digital literacy, and pedagogical praxis, focusing…

  16. First graders' literacy and self-regulation gains: The effect of individualizing student instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Ponitz, Claire Cameron; Phillips, Beth M.; Travis, Q. Monét; Glasney, Stephanie; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effect of individualizing student instruction (ISI; N=445 students, 46 classrooms) on first graders' self-regulation gains compared to a business-as-usual control group. Self-regulation, conceptualized as a constellation of executive skills, was positively associated with academic development. We hypothesized that the ISI intervention's emphasis on teacher planning and organization, classroom management, and the opportunity for students to work independently and in small groups would promote students' self-regulation. We found no main effect of ISI on self-regulation gains. However, for students with weaker initial self-regulation, ISI was associated with greater self-regulation gains compared to peers in control classrooms. The ISI effect on self-regulation was greater when the intervention was more fully implemented. PMID:20728691

  17. Space station high gain antenna concept definition and technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    The layout of a technology base is reported from which a mechanically gimballed, directional antenna can be developed to support a manned space station proposed for the late 1970's. The effort includes the concept definition for the antenna assembly, an evaluation of available technology, the design of critical subassemblies and the design of critical subassembly tests.

  18. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  19. Clickers to the Rescue: Technology Integration Helps Boost Literacy Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratelli, Katelyn; DeJarnette, Nancy K.

    2014-01-01

    Literacy assessment scores in an urban 5th grade classroom left much to be desired. In this diverse classroom population, typical urban distractions such as poverty, crime, English as a second language, and lack of parental support contribute to extremely low literacy scores. This classroom study examined the effects of implementing clickers, a…

  20. Health Literacy and Health Information Technology Adoption: The Potential for a New Digital Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Mabry-Flynn, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Donovan, Erin E; Pounders, Kathrynn

    2016-10-04

    Approximately one-half of American adults exhibit low health literacy and thus struggle to find and use health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative outcomes including overall poorer health. Health information technology (HIT) makes health information available directly to patients through electronic tools including patient portals, wearable technology, and mobile apps. The direct availability of this information to patients, however, may be complicated by misunderstanding of HIT privacy and information sharing. The purpose of this study was to determine whether health literacy is associated with patients' use of four types of HIT tools: fitness and nutrition apps, activity trackers, and patient portals. Additionally, we sought to explore whether health literacy is associated with patients' perceived ease of use and usefulness of these HIT tools, as well as patients' perceptions of privacy offered by HIT tools and trust in government, media, technology companies, and health care. This study is the first wide-scale investigation of these interrelated concepts. Participants were 4974 American adults (n=2102, 42.26% male, n=3146, 63.25% white, average age 43.5, SD 16.7 years). Participants completed the Newest Vital Sign measure of health literacy and indicated their actual use of HIT tools, as well as the perceived ease of use and usefulness of these applications. Participants also answered questions regarding information privacy and institutional trust, as well as demographic items. Cross-tabulation analysis indicated that adequate versus less than adequate health literacy was significantly associated with use of fitness apps (P=.02), nutrition apps (P<.001), activity trackers (P<.001), and patient portals (P<.001). Additionally, greater health literacy was significantly associated with greater perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness across all HIT tools after controlling for demographics. Regarding privacy perceptions of HIT and

  1. Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper

    I løbet at de seneste 10 år har literacy-begrebet for alvor vundet indpas som et etableret begreb i den nordiske forsknings- og uddannelsesverden, ikke mindst inden for læse-/skriveområdet. Der er dog langt fra konsensus om den præcise betydning af begrebet, og af samme grund hersker der en udbredt...... forvirring om hvorledes det skal forstås. Man kan på den baggrund stille spørgsmålet om hvorvidt literacy overhovedet er et brugbart og produktivt begreb i en nordisk kontekst. Når man i PISA-undersøgelserne giver læseområdet den pleonastiske betegnelse reading literacy, kunne det give anledning til...... at tvivle på at det er tilfældet. Med afsæt i forskellige begrebs- og forskningsmæssige perspektiver diskuteres i oplægget literacy-begrebets berettigelse, og i forlængelse heraf præsenteres et bud på en trifokal optik som teoretisk blik på literacy i undervisningskontekster. Eksempler fra forskellige...

  2. Investigation on the Relationship between Information Communication Technology and Reading Literacy for Northeast Asian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yi-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of internet communication technologies (ICT usage and reading literacy of Northeast Asian Students in PISA 2009. ICT was crucial for all governments in the world towards promoting equity. ICT had been considered a low cost opportunity towards equalizing educational systems. A multilevel modelling (MLM was applied to identify at which school-level the largest variations in the three indicators exist in this study. With MLM, it could be examine simultaneously the effects of different hierarchical school-level variables; to take account of possible correlations of students’ reading literacy in this study within higher levels (Urbanization, Total number of students Computers for education which may otherwise lead to incorrect standard errors and inefficient estimates; to treat higher levels as related; and to examine inter-area variations at each level. The empirical results include the different between group components was significant. Self-confidence in ICT high level tasks was positive with students’ reading literacy, and self-confidence in ICT high level tasks was negative with students’ reading literacy. The urbanization of schools’ area and total number of students of schools were positive with students’ reading literacy. The urbanization of schools’ area was negative with the relationship of ICT for school related tasks and students’ reading literacy. Total number of students was negative with the relationship of ICT for school related tasks and students’ reading literacy, and ICT availability in school and students’ reading literacy.

  3. "New Literacies or New Challenges?": The Development of the Concept of Literacy in the Context of Information and Communication Technologies and Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the development of the concept of literacy in the context of IC technologies and English language teaching stressing the idea that literacy is no longer a stable concept which was always connected with the basic skills of reading and writing. The rapid developments of today have been changing, affecting and modifying this…

  4. Reconstructing the Pupils Attitude towards Technology-Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardies, Jan; De Maeyer, Sven; Gijbels, David

    2013-01-01

    In knowledge based economies technological literacy is gaining interest. Technological literacy correlates with attitude towards technology. When measuring technological literacy as an outcome of education, the attitudinal dimension has to be taken into account. This requires a valid, reliable instrument that should be as concise as possible, in…

  5. The Atrial Fibrillation Health Literacy Information Technology System: Pilot Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Jared W; Schlusser, Courtney L; Kimani, Everlyne; Rollman, Bruce L; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Bickmore, Timothy W

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a highly prevalent heart rhythm condition that has significant associated morbidity and requires chronic treatment. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have the potential to enhance multiple aspects of AF care, including education, monitoring of symptoms, and encouraging and tracking medication adherence. We have previously implemented and tested relational agents to improve outcomes in chronic disease and sought to develop a smartphone-based relational agent for improving patient-centered outcomes in AF. The objective of this study was to pilot a smartphone-based relational agent as preparation for a randomized clinical trial, the Atrial Fibrillation Health Literacy Information Technology Trial (AF-LITT). We developed the relational agent for use by a smartphone consistent with our prior approaches. We programmed the relational agent as a computer-animated agent to simulate a face-to-face conversation and to serve as a health counselor or coach specific to AF. Relational agent's dialogue content, informed by a review of literature, focused on patient-centered domains and qualitative interviews with patients with AF, encompassed AF education, common symptoms, adherence challenges, and patient activation. We established that the content was accessible to individuals with limited health or computer literacy. Relational agent content coordinated with use of the smartphone AliveCor Kardia heart rate and rhythm monitor. Participants (N=31) were recruited as a convenience cohort from ambulatory clinical sites and instructed to use the relational agent and Kardia for 30 days. We collected demographic, social, and clinical characteristics and conducted baseline and 30-day assessments of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with the Atrial Fibrillation Effect on Quality of life (AFEQT) measure; self-reported medication adherence with the Morisky 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8); and patient activation with the Patient Activation

  6. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daramola, Florence Olutunu; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Oyelekan, Oloyede Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the information and communication technology literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers out of which 360…

  7. Beyond Repair: Literacy, Technology, and a Curriculum of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Lauren Marshall

    2012-01-01

    The magazine of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) often relies on problematic rhetorics that privilege youth-centered ideals and create limited representations of older adults' literacy in digital times. These rhetorics rest on a metaphor of repair, which labels aging adults as primarily bodies in need of fixing or protection. In…

  8. A Pilot Project – From Illiteracy to Computer Literacy: Teaching and Learning Using Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Adnan Al-Alaoui

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the use of information and communication technologies, ICT or IT for brevity, to combat illiteracy and move participants directly from illiteracy to computer literacy. The resulting assistive technology and instructional software and hardware can be employed to speed up literacy programs and make them more attractive and effective. The approach provides an interactive, self-paced, autonomous and entertaining learning experience, eases entry and exit in and out of the program, and permits monitoring and updating progress status. The hallmark of the proposed approach is the integration of speech and handwriting recognition, as well as audio and visual aids into the flow.

  9. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Schmidt Hanbidge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative mlearning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five different classes majoring in psychology, social work, education or social development studies in an attempt to determine the effectiveness of using mobile technology to enhance students’ information literacy skills and learning experiences. Pre and post-test measures, and survey questionnaires generated quantitative and qualitative data that was analyzed to determine the degree of changes in frequency of mobile device information literacy access and fluency in digital literacy skills. The article highlights the Mobile Information Literacy innovation and includes the development and design of the mobile lessons, interactive exercises, and its applications. The study’s main results and conclusions are also discussed. Additionally, the successes and challenges of the pilot to support anytime, anywhere student mobile information literacy eLearning training that engages mobile learners and enhances their learning experience are identified and critically reflected upon to improve the innovation for stage two of the project.

  10. Information Technology How Leading Firms Use It to Gain an Advantage

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, William V

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the strategic principles fundamental to using information technology to gain market control. This book provides case examples of how to use IT. It is designed to help managers struggling with how to harness the information revolution. It describes how non-information technology companies are employing strategic principles and using it.

  11. Technological Learning after School: A Study of the Communication Dimensions of Technological Literacy in Three Informal Education Programs for Female and Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Carolyn Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation asks how the communication dimensions of technological literacy are understood in three informal education programs in Texas that aim to bridge the digital divide for female and low-income minority youth. Technological literacy is a prerequisite for economic, political, and cultural equality, yet different rationales for…

  12. Electronic Reading Workshop: Beyond Books with New Literacies and Instructional Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Lotta C.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the challenge of meeting the needs of today's learners, teachers must know how to teach and facilitate new literacies and instructional technologies. This article introduces the concept of an electronic reading workshop (ERW), in which participants read eBooks, respond to literature in digital response journals, participate in…

  13. The Effect of Technology Integration on High School Students' Literacy Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kara

    2016-01-01

    This literature review presents a critical appraisal of current research on the role technology integration plays in high school students' literacy achievement. It identifies the gaps within the research through comprehensive analysis. The review develops an argument that the use of laptops in secondary English classrooms has a significant impact…

  14. Teacher design of technology for emergent literacy: An explorative feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data was collected to explore the

  15. The Impact of Content-Based Network Technologies on Perceptions of Nutrition Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Hannah; Church, E. Mitchell; Brewer, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumers are exposed to obesogenic environments on a regular basis. Building nutrition literacy is critical for sustaining healthy dietary habits for a lifetime and reducing the prevalence of chronic disease. Purpose: There is a need to investigate the impact of content-based network (CBN) technologies on perceptions of nutrition…

  16. Literacy, Information and Communication Technology as Tools for Empowerment of Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Tenibiaje Dele

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the present position of literacy, information and communication technology (ICT) in prisons by examining the perception of inmates. The study adopted a descriptive survey using structured questionnaire and observation guides on a randomly and purposively drawn sample of 664 inmates out of a population of 47,628 inmates…

  17. Technical Writing for Women of the English Renaissance: Technology, Literacy, and the Emergence of a Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebeaux, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Examines technical books for women of the English renaissance as a microcosm for studying connections among the emergence of technical writing as a genre, the rise of literacy, expansion of knowledge and technology, and replacement of orality by textuality as a result of increasing knowledge. (SR)

  18. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only

  19. Are Gender Differences in Perceived and Demonstrated Technology Literacy Significant? It Depends on the Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlfeld, Tina N.; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Barron, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines gender differences related to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy using two valid and internally consistent measures with eighth grade students (N = 1,513) from Florida public schools. The results of t test statistical analyses, which examined only gender differences in demonstrated and perceived ICT skills,…

  20. Integrating Geospatial Technologies, Action Research, and Curriculum Theory to Promote Ecological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Mary Frances; Carpenter, Penny

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine and report on the impact of integrating geospatial technology and ecological literacy into an educational leadership Master's class block comprised of action research and curriculum theory. Design/methodology/approach: Action and teacher research informed by environmental issues framed an action…

  1. Ella-V and technology usage technology usage in an english language and literacy acquisition validation randomized controlled trial study

    OpenAIRE

    Roisin P. Corcoran; Steven M. Ross; Beverly J. Irby; Fuhui Tong; Rafael Lara-Alecio; Cindy Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of technology to provide virtual professional development (VPD) for teachers and to conduct classroom observations in a study of English Language Learner (ELL) instruction in grades K–3. The technology applications were part of a cluster randomized control trial (RCT) design for a federally funded longitudinal validation study of a particular program, English Language and Literacy Acquisition-Validation, ELLA- V, to determine its degree of impact on English oral l...

  2. Utilization of internet technology by low-income adults: the role of health literacy, health numeracy, and computer assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Davis, LaShara A; Guntzviller, Lisa M

    2010-09-01

    To examine whether low-income adults' utilization of Internet technology is predicted or mediated by health literacy, health numeracy, and computer assistance. Low-income adults (N = 131) from the midwestern United States were surveyed about their technology access and use. Individuals with low health literacy skills were less likely to use Internet technology (e.g., email, search engines, and online health information seeking), and those with low health numeracy skills were less likely to have access to Internet technology (e.g., computers and cell phones). Consistent with past research, males, older participants, and those with less education were less likely to search for health information online. The relationship between age and online health information seeking was mediated by participant literacy. The present study suggests that significant advances in technology access and use could be sparked by developing technology interfaces that are accessible to individuals with limited literacy skills.

  3. Enhancing RN-to-BSN students' information literacy skills through the use of instructional technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Michelle A; Hightower, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing advocates that professional nurses have the information literacy skills essential for evidence-based practice. As nursing schools embrace evidence-based models to prepare students for nursing careers, faculty can collaborate with librarians to create engaging learning activities focused on the development of information literacy skills. Instructional technology tools such as course management systems, virtual classrooms, and online tutorials provide opportunities to reach students outside the traditional campus classroom. This article discusses the collaborative process between faculty and a library instruction coordinator and strategies used to create literacy learning activities focused on the development of basic database search skills for a Computers in Nursing course. The activities and an online tutorial were included in a library database module incorporated into WebCT. In addition, synchronous classroom meeting software was used by the librarian to reach students in the distance learning environment. Recommendations for module modifications and faculty, librarian, and student evaluations are offered.

  4. An Exploratory Study of the Factors Associated with Literacy Teachers' Integration of Technology: A Study of Lebanese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaban, Youmen; Moloney, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Lebanese teachers' perceptions of the factors determining their integration of technology into literacy classrooms. A quantitative survey examining literacy teachers' individual characteristics and their perceptions of contextual factors was conducted at Lebanese schools. The survey collected data on the…

  5. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Olutunu Daramola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the ICT literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers consisting of 360 males and 248 females. The instrument used for the study was a researcher-designed questionnaire with a reliability index of .74. The results indicated that student-teachers in North-central Nigeria have an average ICT literacy level. No significant difference was established in the level of ICT literacy between male and female student-teachers {t(636=1.672 >.05} and there was no significant difference in the level of ICT literacy by student-teachers in the Arts, Sciences, and Social Sciences {F(2,635 = 0.935 > 0.05}. It was recommended that universities make available more ICT equipment and facilitate the student-teachers in adopting the culture of integrating ICT into pedagogy and educational administration since they have an average ICT literacy level.

  6. Reading and Writing Gains for Maori Students in Mainstream Schools: Effective Partnerships in the Rotorua Home and School Literacy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Ted; Berryman, Mere; Glynn, Vin

    The Rotorua Energy Charitable Trust with support from the Ministry of Education funded a home and school literacy project in nine Rotorua primary schools. The project funded each school to train a home-school liaison worker (either a school staff member or a community person) to assist schools in developing a working partnership with the students'…

  7. Communication and Technology—the Literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Abstract. This paper explores some of the many gains achieved by the new technologies and points out some practices that these new technologies encourage which are already undermining our literacy and redefining our cultural values. It then points to measures that can be taken to ensure that our boom in technology ...

  8. Ella-V and technology usage technology usage in an english language and literacy acquisition validation randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin P. Corcoran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of technology to provide virtual professional development (VPD for teachers and to conduct classroom observations in a study of English Language Learner (ELL instruction in grades K–3. The technology applications were part of a cluster randomized control trial (RCT design for a federally funded longitudinal validation study of a particular program, English Language and Literacy Acquisition-Validation, ELLA- V, to determine its degree of impact on English oral language/literacy, reading, and science across 63 randomly assigned urban, suburban, and rural schools (first year of implementation. ELLA-V also examines the impact of bimonthly VPD for treatment teachers compared to comparison group teachers on pedagogical skills, measured by sound observation instruments, and on student achievement, measured by state/national English language/literacy/reading tests and a national science test. This study features extensive technology use via virtual observations, bimonthly VPD, and randomly assigned treatment and control schools with students served in English as second language (ESL instructional time. The study design and methodology are discussed relativeto the specialized uses of technology and issues involving the evaluation of technology’s contribution to the intervention of interest and of the efficient, cost-effective execution of the study.

  9. Fresh Perspectives on New Literacies and Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbo, Linda D.; Place, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This article provides practical ideas for integrating technologies into the classroom in ways that honor students' out-of-school technology funds of knowledge. The challenges and unintended consequences of integrating technology into the classroom and the role that video gaming can play in helping students find agency and the ability to think…

  10. A New Role for Music Technology: Enhancing Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardo, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    General music teachers have a technology tool that not only helps students sing better, it helps them read better! Carry-a-Tune or Singing Coach--the technology that received a rave review from former "General Music Today" technology columnist Kirk Kassner in 2005--is now being offered in an enhanced version called TUNEin[TM] to READING.…

  11. The long-term effects of using telehomecare technology on functional health literacy: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hæsum, L K E; Ehlers, L H; Hejlesen, O K

    2017-09-01

    The association between the use of telehomecare technology and functional health literacy is rather unexplored in the current literature. This relationship could prove important in the future management of chronic diseases, as technology has become a more integrated part of modern healthcare systems. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore how the use of telehomecare technology affects the level of functional health literacy over a period of 10 months. Randomized controlled trial. Our sample comprised 116 patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A face-to-face interview and an objective test of functional health literacy were conducted with each patient at baseline and again at follow-up after 10 months. Twenty-six patients were lost to follow-up and thus, providing a total of 47 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in the intervention group and 43 in the control group for this follow-up study. The level of functional health literacy was assessed with the Danish Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. The difference from baseline to follow-up, in both the functional health literacy score and the mean response time to the entire Danish Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA), was tested for statistical significance between the intervention group and the control group. A significant increase in functional health literacy is observed in both the groups from baseline to follow-up, but there is no statistical difference between groups (P-value = 0.62). A significant increase in the functional health literacy score was observed in both groups, but the findings of this present study provide no information on what causes the increase, so further research is needed to explore the increase in functional health literacy score more thoroughly and establish if the use of telehomecare technology is a part of the explanation. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Towards an integrated analytical framework of information and communications technology literacy: from intended to implemented and achieved dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Markauskaite

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Theoretical approaches and frameworks that help us to understand the contemporary notion of information and communication technology (ICT) literacy in the formal education sector are reviewed and examined. Method. The analysis is conducted from a technology (i.e., computer science) conceptual perspective. The focus is on those aspects of new literacies that are directly related to the use of ICT. Structured literature review and documentary research techniques are applied. Ana...

  13. An Intelligent Computer-aided Training System (CAT) for Diagnosing Adult Illiterates: Integrating NASA Technology into Workplace Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaden, David B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An important part of NASA's mission involves the secondary application of its technologies in the public and private sectors. One current application being developed is The Adult Literacy Evaluator, a simulation-based diagnostic tool designed to assess the operant literacy abilities of adults having difficulties in learning to read and write. Using Intelligent Computer-Aided Training (ICAT) system technology in addition to speech recognition, closed-captioned television (CCTV), live video and other state-of-the-art graphics and storage capabilities, this project attempts to overcome the negative effects of adult literacy assessment by allowing the client to interact with an intelligent computer system which simulates real-life literacy activities and materials and which measures literacy performance in the actual context of its use. The specific objectives of the project are as follows: (1) to develop a simulation-based diagnostic tool to assess adults' prior knowledge about reading and writing processes in actual contexts of application; (2) to provide a profile of readers' strengths and weaknesses; and (3) to suggest instructional strategies and materials which can be used as a beginning point for remediation. In the first and development phase of the project, descriptions of literacy events and environments are being written and functional literacy documents analyzed for their components. From these descriptions, scripts are being generated which define the interaction between the student, an on-screen guide and the simulated literacy environment.

  14. Literacy and Technological Development in Nigeria: A Philosophical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many challenges have occurred in society as a result of advances in sciences and technology. Some of these changes have been good while others have involved risks that were either not known or are faintly perceived. Science and technology touch the lives of all people in several basic ways on a daily basis, affecting ...

  15. Addressing Mathematics Literacy through Technology, Innovation, Design, and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litowitz, Len S.

    2009-01-01

    In an era when so much emphasis is being placed on the high-stakes standardized testing of fundamental subjects such as reading, writing, and math, it makes sense to demonstrate the role technology educators play in developing such fundamental knowledge and skills in youth. While the author believes that technology education contributes to the…

  16. Literacy, Instruction, and Technology: Meeting Millennials on Their Own Turf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Novice teachers today struggle to integrate engaging pedagogy into their standards based curriculum. 21st century students have been immersed in technology from birth and are accustomed to multi-tasking with several types of technology each day. Students no longer rely on the traditional ways of communication and absorb their information via…

  17. Deconstructing Digital Natives: Young People, Technology, and the New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There have been many attempts to define the generation of students who emerged with the Web and new digital technologies in the early 1990s. The term "digital native" refers to the generation born after 1980, which has grown up in a world where digital technologies and the internet are a normal part of everyday life. Young people…

  18. Bandwidth and Gain Enhancement of Patch Antenna with Stacked Parasitic Strips Based on LTCC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact patch antenna with stacked parasitic strips (SPSs based on low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC technology is presented. By adding three pairs of SPSs above the traditional patch antenna, multiple resonant modes are excited to broaden the bandwidth. At the same time, the SPSs act as directors to guide the antenna radiation toward broadside direction to enhance the gain. The measured results show that the prototype antenna achieves an impedance bandwidth of 16% for S11<-10 dB (32.1–37.9 GHz and a maximum gain of about 8 dBi at 35 GHz. Furthermore, the radiation patterns and gain are relatively stable within the operating bandwidth. The total volume of the antenna is only 8 × 8 × 1.1 mm3.

  19. Validation of the Information/Communications Technology Literacy Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Assembling Objects (AO), Auto & Shop Information (AS), Electronics Information (EI), General Science (GS), Math Knowledge (MK...Table A2 (continued) 25N Training Performance Rating Scales Learns to gain access to devices through multiple sources • Accesses a terminal server...e.g., MRV). • Uses applications to access devices (e.g., Pumpkin, PUTTY). • Configures a hyper terminal . • Accesses the KVM. • Uses a URL to

  20. Achieving prescribed gain/frequency responses with advances in hearing aid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammeth, C A; Preves, D A; Bratt, G W; Peek, B F; Bess, F H

    1993-01-01

    Technological limitations have restricted the capability of older generation in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids to closely match prescribed real ear gain/frequency responses. Newer technology, widely available in currently marketed ITE hearing aids, has considerably improved this capability. Data for 60 ears are presented comparing the real ear insertion gain (REIG) actually achieved to the target REIG, using ITE hearing aids having: 1) older generation narrow-band receivers, and amplifiers with single-pole-filter low frequency tone control and a class A amplifier output stage (n = 30), and 2) newer generation amplifiers with a two- or four-pole-filter low frequency tone control, and wide band receivers, containing a class D amplifier output stage (n = 30). With the newer technology ITE hearing aids, the means and ranges of deviation from target gain were reduced. Capability for achieving prescription REIG with ITE hearing aids can be further improved with multichannel amplifiers. Examples of the latter are shown for several difficult-to-fit audiograms.

  1. Digital literacy and problem solving in technology-rich environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Dolničar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development and progress, as well as the growing presence of information and communications technologies dictate the need for more highly developed digital skills in individuals. The paper focuses on the concepts of digital skills and problem solving in technology-rich environments. It examines these on the basis of empirical data obtained in the international study PIAAC. The introductory part presents an overview of the literature and the results of previous research in the field of measurement of digital skills, and data on the use of information society services among the EU Member States. The second part of the article refers to the results obtained in the study PIAAC. The results, confirmed by the results of other studies, showed the impact of age and education level on the problem solving in technology-rich environments. Article concludes with suggestions for improving the current state of integration of all population groups in training programs in the field of digital skills.

  2. Designing technology for emergent literacy: the PictoPal initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2009-01-01

    PictoPal is the name of a technology-supported intervention designed to foster the development of emergent reading and writing skills in four and five year old children. Following the theoretical underpinnings and a brief description of PictoPal, this article describes how children worked with the

  3. Weaving Words with the Dreamweaver: Literacy, Indigeneity, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitzke, Cushla; Bogitini, Samuela; Chen, Min; MacNeill, Greg; Mayer, Diane; Muirhead, Bruce; Renshaw, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a pilot project that is encouraging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to view themselves as innovators and leaders in new information and communications technologies. Describes the aims, activities, and outcomes of the program, and closes with some comments on the new forms of social identity that emerged through literate…

  4. Game Development as a Pathway to Information Technology Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Teaching game development has become an accepted methodology for introducing programming concepts and capturing the interest of beginning computer science and information technology (IT) students. This study, conducted over three consecutive semesters, explores game development using a gaming engine, rather than a traditional programming language,…

  5. [A survey of information literacy for undergraduate students in the department of radiological technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the information literacy of undergraduate students and problems in information education. An annual questionnaire survey was carried out by an anonymous method from 2003 to 2006. The survey was intended for third-year students in the Department of Radiological Technology. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) ownership of a personal computer (PC), (2) usage purpose and frequency of PC operation, (3) operation frequency and mechanism of the Internet, and (4) IT terminology. The response rate was 100% in each year. The ratio of PC possession exceeded 80%. The ratio of students who replied "nearly every day" for the use of a PC and the Internet increased twofold and threefold in four years, respectively. More than 70% of students did not understand the mechanism of the Internet, and more than 60% of students did not know about TCP/IP. In the future, we need to consider information literacy education in undergraduate education.

  6. Student’s STEM Literacy in Biotechnology Learning at Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurlaely, N.; Permanasari, A.; Riandi, R.

    2017-09-01

    A considerable study to student’s STEM literacy achievement profile, especially in biotechnology learning, has been conducted to make the innovation of the STEM-based learning. The study aims to find out the STEM literacy. The sample is taken through purposive sampling technique to 45 students of 9th grade of a junior high school in Tasikmalaya district. The instruments are multiple choice questions. Data are analysed by calculating mean score of students’ STEM literacy achievement. The results show that student’s STEM literacy achievement was low. Science literacy aspect was the lowest, while mathematical literacy gained better than another aspect. The low achievement of students’ STEM literacy was because of learning activities that have not been able to integrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in science learning. The literacy profile indicates the importance of applying STEM approach to science learning, and it is recommended to improve students’ STEM literacy achievement.

  7. The Relationship of Health Literacy With Use of Digital Technology for Health Information: Implications for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Falisi, Angela; Strogatz, David

    An understanding of the association of health literacy with patterns related to access and usage of digital technologies and preferences for sources of health information is necessary for public health agencies and organizations to appropriately target channels for health information dissemination. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in New York State. Health literacy was assessed using the Morris Single-Item Screener, a self-report question. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE. The final sample size of New York State residents used for analysis was 1350. In general, self-report health literacy did not predict digital technology use (ie, Internet and smartphone use, text messaging) but was associated with certain digital activities. People with low self-report health literacy were less likely to use search engines (P = .026) but more likely to get health information from social networking sites (P = .002) and use health-related phone apps (P = .046). With respect to health information seeking, those with lower self-report health literacy reported greater difficulty with their most recent search for health information. Furthermore, they were more likely to prefer text messages (P = .013) and radio (P = .022), 2 text-limited communication channels, to receive health information than those with higher self-report health literacy. While self-report health literacy does not appear to influence access to and use of digital technologies, there is a strong association with experiences searching for health information and preferences for health information sources. Public health agencies and organizations should consider the needs and preferences of people with low health literacy when determining channels for health information dissemination. They should also consider implementing interventions to develop health information-seeking skills in populations they serve and prepare information and materials that are easily accessible and

  8. Impact of Recent Trends in Information and Communication Technology on the Validity of the Construct Information Literacy in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.J. (Jos) van Helvoort

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is a reflective discussion on the validity of the construct Information Literacy in the perspective of changing information and communication technologies. The research question that will be answered is: what is the impact of technological developments on the relevance of

  9. To What Extent Do Biology Textbooks Contribute to Scientific Literacy? Criteria for Analysing Science-Technology-Society-Environment Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Florbela M.; Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    Our article proposes a set of six criteria for analysing science-technology-society-environment (STSE) issues in regular textbooks as to how they are expected to contribute to students' scientific literacy. We chose genetics and gene technology as fields prolific in STSE issues. We derived our criteria (including 26 sub-criteria) from a literature…

  10. Development and Validation of the Computer Technology Literacy Self-Assessment Scale for Taiwanese Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Sui

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development and validation of an instrument to identify various dimensions of the computer technology literacy self-assessment scale (CTLS) for elementary school students. The instrument included five CTLS dimensions (subscales): the technology operation skills, the computer usages concepts, the…

  11. Changing Conceptions and Uses of Computer Technologies in the Everyday: Literacy Practices of Sixth and Seventh Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Jane; Altarriba, Jeanette

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on 189 sixth and seventh graders in two large suburban schools and their use of computer technologies as part of their everyday literacy practices. The authors were especially interested in the students' conceptions of computer technologies and how computer use varied across grade and reading levels. The study included a survey…

  12. Information Literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ian

    conceptions and learning experiences of students, information literacy initiatives and IL learning challenges in higher .... is familiar with and able to effectively engage in new technology environments, including social media, and. • is able to ... The study demonstrated that a lack of information literacy skills in university.

  13. Toward fostering the scientific and technological literacy establishment of the 'Central Scientific and Technological Museum-Institute' and nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    The public in general does not necessarily have enough knowledge for the reasonable decision making in the application of scientific and technological development even in the ear of the Information Society. However strongly the necessity of the consensus in the scientific policy like nuclear R and D is required, it is impossible to attain the goal, unless the scientific literacy of the general public is. In order to improve it the role of the scientific museum as a social educational facility is very important. In this respect, there still remains vast room to improve in the Japanese museum system and its activities. The concept of the 'Central Scientific and Technological Museum-Institute', which also operates very small-sized reactor for the educational use, is developed in this paper. (author)

  14. A randomized controlled trial study of a technology-enhanced approach to early literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin P. Corcoran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a plan to formatively evaluate, via a cluster randomized control trial (RCT design, a U.S. Department of Education Investing in Innovation (i3 study of Around the Corner, a technology-enhanced approach to early literacy that combines the Success for All Foundation’s Curiosity Corner preschool and kindergarten programs with technology enhancements from the award-winning PBS show Between the Lions and other multimedia content. After development and piloting in collaboration with partner schools, a formative evaluation of Around the Corner will be carried out, with qualitative measures and a quantitative evaluation with random assignment of 12 schools and students within schools to conditions. The expected outcome is a fully-developed program ready to be more broadly evaluated and disseminated nationally.

  15. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy: a cross-case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, A.; McKenney, S.; Voogt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only

  16. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy: A cross-case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only

  17. A Science-Technology-Society Paradigm and Cross River State Secondary School Students' Scientific Literacy: Problem Solving and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Grace

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Science-Technology-Society (STS) curriculum on students' scientific literacy, problem solving and decision making. Four hundred and eighty (480) Senior Secondary two science and non-science students were randomly selected from intact classes in six secondary schools in Calabar Municipality of…

  18. A Study on the Effects of Teachers' Information Literacy on Information Technology Integrated Instruction and Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anxin; Chen, Guisong

    2016-01-01

    The approach of information digitalization era has largely changed the teaching environment on campus. The application of information technology to education has become a concern in modern education.Traditional basic literacy of reading, writing, and algorithm could no longer cope with the demands in information societies that the information…

  19. Writing the Talking Stick: Alphabetic Literacy as Colonial Technology and Postcolonial Appropriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Laura E.

    1998-01-01

    Draws on Isabelle Knockwood's memoir about Mi'kmaw children's experiences in a Nova Scotia boarding school to examine the contradictory impacts of English literacy on American-Indian peoples and cultures. Discusses literacy as a weapon of colonial assimilation and, conversely, the appropriation of literacy within a Mi'kmaw system of knowledge…

  20. Information and Communication Technology Literacy Skills and Class Instruction: a Comprehensive Perception Survey of University of Benin First Year Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke O. Obasuyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of class instruction (GST 111 – use of library on University of Benin (UNIBEN first year students’ information and communication technology (ICT literacy skills. The study adopted the survey research method using the questionnaire as research instrument. First year students in the 2013/2014 academic session constituted the population of study. Simple random and total enumeration sampling methods were used to collect data from students in five out of twelve faculties in the university. The questionnaire used is a 4-point likert scale instrument: SA (Strongly agreed = 4; A (Agreed = 3; D (Disagreed = 2; and SD (Strongly disagreed = 1. Data was collected at the end of the first semester when the GST 111 – use of library was concluded. Results revealed that Computer, Software, Internet, WWW and ICT literacy skills of the students are high. There is a significant difference in Computer, Software, Internet and WWW and ICT literacy skills of the students per faculty. Majority (65% of the students are skillful in ICT use. Class instruction is very well perceived by the students and it positively influenced students’ ICT literacy skills. Gender and secondary school attended did not influence students’ ICT literacy skills. There is no significant difference between male and female students’ ICT literacy skills as well as students that attended private or public secondary schools. It is therefore concluded that the students are highly ICT literate and class instruction (GST 111 – use of library course mainly influenced the students’ ICT literacy skills thus the class instruction programme in the university is adequate and effective.

  1. Technology Literacy According to Students: What is It, where are We and What Should We Do for Parents and Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a swift transformation in Information and Communications Technology (ICT and all technological devices and tools affect our lives both on an individual and societal level with their innovations. Especially such technological devices as computers, mobile phones and tablet PCs require us to know how to use these technologies efficiently, therefore aiming to make their use and the lives of individuals and societies much easier. In this view, the concept of technology literacy comes to the prominence. In this study designed qualitatively, the opinions of 25 students from the Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies about the term ‘technological literacy’ are collected. A definition is made using these concepts while students define technological literacy as becoming aware and following, ability to use, problem solving and benefiting from its use in social life. In addition to that, students stated negative opinions about the society in which they live. They stated that there is an unconscious and purposeless or limited technology use even though the use of technology differs to a great extent in terms of age. Students also made a recommendation for parents and children to get education on technology, to acquire further information and to keep a close track on technology

  2. What's technology cooking up? A systematic review of the use of technology in adolescent food literacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Catherine A; Carbone, Elena T

    2018-06-01

    Over one-third of adolescents are overweight or obese. Food literacy (FL), the ability to plan and manage, select, prepare, and eat healthy foods, is a contemporary concept that provides a mechanism to understand the relationship between food-related knowledge and skills and dietary intake. Innovative interventions which focus on the core concepts of FL and include generationally appropriate technology have the potential to provide positive impact on the dietary habits of adolescents. This systematic review followed PRISMA guidelines and employed the Downs and Black criteria for rating studies. Titles and abstracts of 545 articles were collected and reviewed from 13 electronic databases. Studies were selected if they were peer-reviewed, included adolescents 12-19 years-old, incorporated concepts related to FL, and employed technology as part of the intervention. Eight studies, six randomized controlled trials (RCT) and two interventions without controls were included. Seven of the interventions used Internet or web-based platforms to access program components and all RCTs incorporated game elements. Studies included between two and four constructs of FL. All reported positive changes in food intake with five reporting significant positive pre- and post-intervention changes. Few technology-driven FL-related studies exist within the literature. Although all studies reported improvements in dietary intake, due to variation in program design, delivery, and evaluation it is difficult to tease out the effect of the technology component. Continued research is needed to: 1) determine the degree to which FL should be included in interventions to effect a positive change on dietary intake; 2) develop adolescent-specific FL measures to more appropriately evaluate changes in knowledge, food-related skills, and dietary intake; and 3) design technology-driven interventions so that technology components can be analyzed separately from other program elements. Copyright © 2018

  3. The Tools, Approaches and Applications of Visual Literacy in the Visual Arts Department of Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecoma, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the tools, approaches and applications of visual literacy in the Visual Arts Department of Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria. The objective of the discourse is to examine how the visual arts training and practice equip students with skills in visual literacy through methods of production, materials and…

  4. WikiHyperGlossary (WHG): an information literacy technology for chemistry documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael A; Berleant, Daniel; Cornell, Andrew P; Belford, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    The WikiHyperGlossary is an information literacy technology that was created to enhance reading comprehension of documents by connecting them to socially generated multimedia definitions as well as semantically relevant data. The WikiHyperGlossary enhances reading comprehension by using the lexicon of a discipline to generate dynamic links in a document to external resources that can provide implicit information the document did not explicitly provide. Currently, the most common method to acquire additional information when reading a document is to access a search engine and browse the web. This may lead to skimming of multiple documents with the novice actually never returning to the original document of interest. The WikiHyperGlossary automatically brings information to the user within the current document they are reading, enhancing the potential for deeper document understanding. The WikiHyperGlossary allows users to submit a web URL or text to be processed against a chosen lexicon, returning the document with tagged terms. The selection of a tagged term results in the appearance of the WikiHyperGlossary Portlet containing a definition, and depending on the type of word, tabs to additional information and resources. Current types of content include multimedia enhanced definitions, ChemSpider query results, 3D molecular structures, and 2D editable structures connected to ChemSpider queries. Existing glossaries can be bulk uploaded, locked for editing and associated with multiple social generated definitions. The WikiHyperGlossary leverages both social and semantic web technologies to bring relevant information to a document. This can not only aid reading comprehension, but increases the users' ability to obtain additional information within the document. We have demonstrated a molecular editor enabled knowledge framework that can result in a semantic web inductive reasoning process, and integration of the WikiHyperGlossary into other software technologies, like

  5. Integrating technology with literacy: using teacher-guided collaborative online learning to encourage critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson Simpson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on classroom-based research that was designed to monitor the integration of information and communication technology (ICT in a teacherguided collaborative online learning context to encourage students' critical response to literary texts. The study investigates the premise that an ICT project where children read books and then use email communication to exchange responses with other learners will support critical thinking. Videos of classroom observations, journals and rap sheets were analysed for individual students' levels of critical awareness. Improvements in critical thinking were measured using linguistic analysis. Teachers and students were also interviewed for attitudes to technology use related to learning. Although there were gains in critical thinking, there was little student engagement with technology. The discussion problematises the integration of technology in the classroom through a repositioning of collaboration in a blended learning context known as book raps.

  6. Psychological aspects of literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livija Knaflič

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Literacy is a complex cultural and social phenomenon with multiple effects on both, the individual and social levels. This article presents multidimensional model of literacy with linguistic, cognitive, socio-cultural, developmental and educational dimensions. A use of literacy is a literacy event and it means the use and/or presence of all dimensions of literacy. The use of new technologies and the emergence of digital literacy brought about a new meaning of literacy. There are two main processes to stress: (a the writing (text is more and more dominated by images and (b the book is going to be replaced by the screen. These facts raise at least two questions: what is the future of literacy and what are psychological, social and cultural effects of these changes? The aim of this article is to present a psychological view of literacy skills with a very modest aspiration to offer a better understanding of library users and non users.

  7. Perspectives on scientific and technological literacy in Tonga: Moving forward in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palefau, Tevita Hala

    Tonga has undergone complex changes in the last three decades. Disturbing numbers of young Tongans have inadequate knowledge in traditional science and technology, ill equipped to work in, contribute to and profit from our society. In short, they lack sufficient background knowledge to acquire the training, skills and understanding that are needed in the 21st Century. The purpose of this research is to assist the formulation of national science and technology curriculum. Hence, views of life in Tonga and opinions about Tonga's needs held by three stakeholder groups (traditional, workplaces, public) were paramount in this study. How these stakeholders see Tonga in terms of science and technology needs will contribute substantially to the Ministry of Education's decisions for this century. Based on critical evaluation of international literature and how scientific and technological literacy (STL) is crucial to Tongan society, a model 'TAP-STL' is established as study framework: 'TAP' for ṯraditional, a&barbelow;cademic and p&barbelow;ublic STL, to promote national development. This qualitative case study employs an interview method to collect data from twelve knowledgeable participants selected by reputational sampling from across the kingdom. By exploring their understanding of STL requirements, the study sought to identify any shortfall between the science and technology provided in school and that needed for maintenance of traditional culture, effective participation in Tonga's workplaces and public understanding. The study produced findings under these categories: understanding of traditional knowledge and skills needed to preserve Tongan cultural identity; understanding needed for fishing, handicrafts and everyday maintenance, together with essential health knowledge and skills; and required understanding of public information campaigns related to health, domestic goods, drugs and environment that contribute to responsible citizenship. The study identified

  8. The Primary Results of the Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology (TARGIT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen C; Thomas, Fridtjof; Richey, Phyllis; Tran, Quynh T; Tylavsky, Fran; Miro, Danielle; Coday, Mace

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate whether a behavioral weight management program combined with a smoking cessation program delivered via interactive technology could prevent postcessation weight gain. Three hundred and thirty young adult smokers, age 18 to 35 years, were randomized to a smoking cessation program alone (comparison group), which included behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement, or to a behavioral weight management program adapted from the Look AHEAD trial plus the same smoking cessation program (intervention group). The Treating Adult Smokers at Risk for Weight Gain with Interactive Technology study randomized 164 participants to the comparison group and 166 participants to the intervention group. On average, the participants gained 0.91 kg after 24 months in the trial (comparison group + 1.45 kg and intervention group + 0.32; P = 0.157). The only variable systematically affecting weight change over time was smoking abstinence, in which those who were abstinent, on average, gained 0.14 kg more per month compared with those who continued to smoke (P technology was not associated with greater long-term weight gain prevention. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  9. The Early Literacy at Preschool Education: The Book or The E-Book?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçintas Sezgin, Elif; Ulus, Leyla

    2017-01-01

    Educational technology is commonly used. The use of technology at preschool education has an important role with a lot of effective methods so that children can learn. Preschool teachers use the technology to support children's development. Early literacy skills have gained more importance especially in the recent years. As a result, the use of…

  10. The Potential of Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Relevant to the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Amy C.; Colwell, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Digital tools have the potential to transform instruction and promote literacies outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Empirical research is examined to illustrate this potential in grades 6-12 instruction.

  11. The Electronic Health Literacy and Utilization of Technology for Health in a Remote Hawaiian Community: Lana'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Nash Ak; Humphry, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    The Lana'i Community Health Center (LCHC) like other health care organizations, is striving to implement technology-enabled care (TEC) in the clinical setting. TEC includes such technological innovations as patient portals, mobile phone applications, wearable health sensors, and telehealth. This study examines the utilization of communication technology by members of the Lana'i community and LCHC staff and board members in the home and in their daily lives and evaluates the community's electronic health literacy. Quantitative surveys and qualitative focus groups were utilized. These revealed that members of the Lana'i community and LCHC staff and board members regularly utilize technology, in the form of smart cell phones, WiFi, and internet texting. This community has integrated technology into their daily lives, even though they live on an isolated island with 3,102 people; however, despite this integration, the electronic health literacy of this population appears insufficient for proper understanding and utilization of TEC, limiting the potential of patient portals or remote monitoring of patient generated data for chronic disease prevention and management without additional education and mentoring. It is therefore in the best interest of the LCHC and other health organizations wishing to implement TEC in a rural community such as Lana'i to include a strong educational component with use of TEC, and perhaps establish a mentor/partnership program for the highly-challenged patient.

  12. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xudong; Xi Fengming; Geng Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. → Mechanical technology leads to more CO 2 emission reduction. → Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. → Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. → Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO 2 e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

  13. Gains from resistance: contesting a new digital technology in a service sector workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shulzhenko, Elena; Holmgren, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Increasing expectations of efficiency enabled by new digital technology have led to renewed interest in spaces remaining for employee resistance to management power. The study contributes to this debate by analysing resistance to a new technology introduced in the home-nursing sector in Denmark....... Nurses succeeded in halting a technological change that allowed them to report data related to their visits online from inside patients’ homes and reduced their co-located working time. Work location became a central area of contestation between nurses and management. The study offers a nuanced analysis...... of power relations during the technological change. It shows that the capacity of IT management – a management actor uninhibited by a care ethos - to influence nursing workplaces rose along with the increasing significance of expertise in digital technologies in performing care work. Nurses’ alliances...

  14. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Delia Smith; Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-06-13

    Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Students remained weight stable (HW: -0.48+1.9 kg; control: -0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs -1.1+3.4, respectively; P =.003) and there was no increase in

  15. The Effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design Course to Teacher Candidates' Gaining of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozkoparam, Süleyman Burak; Kiliç, Muhammet Emre; Usta, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of teacher candidates in Turkish Teaching department of Mevlana (Rumi) University and the effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design (ITMD) Course on TPACK. The study is a study of quantitative type and single-group pretest-posttest…

  16. Rationale and design of the Atrial Fibrillation health Literacy Information Technology Trial: (AF-LITT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhl, Emily N; Schlusser, Courtney L; Henault, Lori E; Bickmore, Timothy W; Kimani, Everlyne; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Magnani, Jared W

    2017-11-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is challenging for patients and adversely impacts health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Long-term management of AF requires that patients adhere to complex therapies, understand difficult terminology, navigate subspecialty care, and have continued symptom monitoring with the goal of preventing adverse outcomes. Continued interventions to ameliorate the patient experience of AF are essential. The Atrial Fibrillation health Literacy Information Technology Trial (AF-LITT; NCT03093558) is an investigator-initiated, 2-arm randomized clinical trial (RCT). This RCT is a pilot in order to implement a novel, smartphone-based intervention to address the patient experience of AF. This pilot RCT will compare a combination of the Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) and the Alive Cor Kardia Mobile heart rhythm monitor to the current standard of care. The study will enroll 180 adults with non-valvular AF who are receiving anticoagulation for stroke prevention and randomize them to receive a 30-day intervention (smartphone-based ECA/Kardia) or standard of care, which will include a symptom and adherence journal. The primary end-points are improvement in HRQoL and self-reported adherence to anticoagulation. The secondary end-points are the acceptability of the intervention to participants, its use by participants, and acceptability to referring physicians. The AF-LITT pilot aims to evaluate the efficacy of the ECA/Kardia to improve HRQoL and anticoagulant adherence, and to guide its implementation in a larger, multicenter clinical trial. The intervention has potential to improve HRQoL, adherence, and health care utilization in individuals with chronic AF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  18. ICT literacy, information l

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact | Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Abstract. This paper discussed information communication technology (ICT) literacy as the relative measure of library staff's capacity to make appropriate use of ICTs for information acquisition, organization, retrieval and dissemination. It also examined the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy ...

  19. Virtual Field Sites: Losses and Gains in Authenticity with Semantic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, Kate; Stott, Tim A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigate the potential of semantic web technologies to enhance "Virtual Fieldwork" resources and learning activities in the Geosciences. They consider the difficulties inherent in the concept of Virtual Fieldwork and how these might be reconciled with the desire to provide students with "authentic" tools for…

  20. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that information literacy is acquired only by experience, there is a false assumption that technological ability is the same as information literacy, faculty culture makes information literacy less significant than other educational pursuits, faculty have a limited perception of the ability of librarians. and accrediting bodies have not yet advanced information literacy to a viable position in higher education. The new information age demands that these barriers be overcome and information literacy take a prominent place within the academic experience.

  1. Digital technologies for population health and health equity gains: the perspective of public health associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, James; Perera, Yoshith; Clarke, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Digital technology (DT) plays an increasingly important role in the health sector. This study explores how national public health associations (PHAs) use DT to achieve their mandate. The World Federation of Public Health Associations canvassed and conducted a semi-structured interview with its national public health association members about their use of DT, the challenges they encounter in using it, and their experiences and thoughts as to how to assess its impact, both organizationally as well as on population health and health equity. The study found that digital technology plays an important role in some PHAs, principally those in higher income countries. PHAs want to broaden their use within PHAs and to assess how DT enables PHAs to achieve their organizational mandates and goals, including improved public health and health equity.

  2. Deploying innovations in wearable technology to gain insight into clinical disorders and their treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsons, Christine; Jensen, Kasper Løvborg; Linehan, Conor

    , but infrequent assessment. Wearable technology can provide new ways to understand physiology beyond the laboratory. In order to harness this potential, we need to develop methods to monitor patients unobtrusively, with minimal patient burden, and due concern for privacy issues. Furthermore, we need to ensure......Peripheral psychophysiological measures have been used to inform our understanding of symptoms in mental health disorders, to predict treatment response, and to investigate mechanisms of treatment change. Typically, psychophysiological measures are laboratory-based, yielding precise, reliable...... that methods developed are acceptable to patients, as well as being engaging to use. In this interdisciplinary project, we adopt approaches from human-computer interaction, where target users are involved in the design and refinement of our technological solutions. The engineering challenge involves building...

  3. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xudong; Xi, Fengming; Geng, Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO(2)e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kg ce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Internet and Information Literacy: Taking the First Step toward Technology Education in the Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Thomas J.; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Describes an action research study designed to examine high school students' use of the Internet, their evaluation of it as a learning tool, and their personal satisfaction at using the Internet for educational research. Presents the findings in detail and concludes by discussing the need for information literacy in the social studies curriculum.…

  5. Speakeasy Studio and Cafe: Information Literacy, Web-based Library Instruction, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of academic library instruction and information literacy focuses on a Web-based program developed at Washington State University called Speakeasy Studio and Cafe that is used for bibliographic instruction. Highlights include the research process; asking the right question; and adapting to students' differing learning styles. (LRW)

  6. Technology as an Electronic Mentor: Scaffolding Preservice Teachers in Writing Effective Literacy Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cory Cooper

    2006-01-01

    A marked difference in the quality of reading lesson plans after early childhood education students were required to use the Unit Builder feature in a web-based productivity tool (TaskStream) prompted the design of a study to measure significant changes. A rubric was created that meshed the qualities of effective teachers of literacy and the…

  7. Exploring Teacher Roles and Pupil Outcomes in Technology-Rich Early Literacy Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, A.; McKenney, S.; Voogt, J.; Orey, M.; Branch, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the involvement of Dutch kindergarten teachers in curriculum (design and) implementation of PictoPal activities in three different roles: executor-only, re-designer, and co-designer. PictoPal refers to ICT-rich on- and off-computer activities for early literacy. In the

  8. Exploring teacher roles and pupil outcomes in technology-rich early literacy learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Orey, Michael; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the involvement of Dutch kindergarten teachers in curriculum (design and) implementation of PictoPal activities in three different roles: executor-only, re-designer, and co-designer. PictoPal refers to ICT-rich on- and off-computer activities for early literacy. In the

  9. Exploring teacher roles and pupil outcomes in technology-rich early literacy learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the involvement of Dutch kindergarten teachers in curriculum (design and) implementation of PictoPal activities in three different roles: executor-only, re-designer, and co-designer. PictoPal refers to ICT-rich on- and off- computer activities for early literacy. In the

  10. Teacher roles and pupil outcomes in technology-rich early literacy learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focused on involvement of kindergarten teachers in curriculum (design and) implementation of PictoPal activities. PictoPal refers to ICT-rich on- and off-computer activities for early literacy. Teachers in this study were involved in three different roles: executor-only,

  11. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbidge, Alice Schmidt; Sanderson, Nicole; Tin, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative m-learning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five…

  12. Supporting Teachers in Integrating Digital Technology into Language Arts Instruction to Promote Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Jamie; Hutchison, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review of relevant literature was conducted to provide a source of information and practical guidelines for teachers and teacher educators to consider instructional methods for using digital tools in elementary language arts classrooms to promote literacy. Focal studies are highlighted to provide rich descriptions of practical uses…

  13. One Screen, Many Fingers: Young Children's Collaborative Literacy Play with Digital Puppetry Apps and Touchscreen Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the digital literacy practices that emerge when young children play together with digital apps on touchscreen devices. Children's collaborative composing with a digital puppetry app on a touchscreen--with many hands all busy dragging, resizing, and animating puppet characters, and many voices making sound effects, narrating,…

  14. The Literacy Environment of Preschool Classrooms: Contributions to Children's Emergent Literacy Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.; McGinty, Anita

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among features of the classroom physical literacy environment (book materials, literacy area and writing materials) and psychological literacy environment (instructional support), and preschool children's gains in two areas of emergent literacy over an academic year. Results showed that features of the physical…

  15. Results of innovative communication processes on productivity gains in a high technology environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    The technology which resulted in performance breakthroughs at engineering and management services is discussed. As a result of the innovative approaches of communicating productivity concepts to the employees, specific outcomes can now be pinpointed at all levels of the organization such as: (1) employee-headed program; (2) performance feedback processes; and (3) an investigative approach to creating leadership. The Lockheed Corporation began the innovative trend in 1974 when they became the first company to introduce quality circles in America. Although some of Lockheed-EMSCO's processes may sound different from traditional improvement processes, the context out of which those to be presented evolved has sustained more than 10 years of positive results through employee involvement activities.

  16. Qualification Testing Versus Quantitative Reliability Testing of PV - Gaining Confidence in a Rapidly Changing Technology: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Repins, Ingrid L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hacke, Peter L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jordan, Dirk [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kempe, Michael D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Whitfield, Kent [Underwriters Laboratories; Phillips, Nancy [DuPont; Sample, Tony [European Commission; Monokroussos, Christos [TUV Rheinland; Hsi, Edward [Swiss RE; Wohlgemuth, John [PowerMark Corporation; Seidel, Peter [First Solar; Jahn, Ulrike [TUV Rheinland; Tanahashi, Tadanori [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology; Chen, Yingnan [China General Certification Center; Jaeckel, Bengt [Underwriters Laboratories; Yamamichi, Masaaki [RTS Corporation

    2017-10-05

    Continued growth of PV system deployment would be enhanced by quantitative, low-uncertainty predictions of the degradation and failure rates of PV modules and systems. The intended product lifetime (decades) far exceeds the product development cycle (months), limiting our ability to reduce the uncertainty of the predictions for this rapidly changing technology. Yet, business decisions (setting insurance rates, analyzing return on investment, etc.) require quantitative risk assessment. Moving toward more quantitative assessments requires consideration of many factors, including the intended application, consequence of a possible failure, variability in the manufacturing, installation, and operation, as well as uncertainty in the measured acceleration factors, which provide the basis for predictions based on accelerated tests. As the industry matures, it is useful to periodically assess the overall strategy for standards development and prioritization of research to provide a technical basis both for the standards and the analysis related to the application of those. To this end, this paper suggests a tiered approach to creating risk assessments. Recent and planned potential improvements in international standards are also summarized.

  17. Analysis and Design of a Linear Digital Programmable Gain Amplifier in a 0.13 µm SiGe BiCMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xuan-Quang; Knobloch, Anselm; Grözing, Markus; Buck, Matthias; Berroth, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the analysis and the design of a fully-differential digital programmable gain amplifier (PGA) in a 0.13 µm BiCMOS technology. The PGA has a gain control range of 31 dB with 1 dB gain step size and consumes 284 mW from a 3.6 V power supply. At a maximum gain of 25 dB, the PGA exhibits a 3-dB bandwidth of 10.1 GHz. The measured gain error for all 32 possible gain settings is between -0.19/+0.46 dB at 1 GHz. Up to 13 GHz the third harmonic distortion H{D3} stays below -34 dB for all 32 gain settings at a differential output peak-to-peak voltage of 1 V after the last amplifier stage.

  18. Toward fostering the scientific and technological literacy establishment of the 'Central Scientific and Technological Museum-Institute' and nuclear development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Takashi [Graduate School of Energy Sci., Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    The public in general does not necessarily have enough knowledge for the reasonable decision making in the application of scientific and technological development even in the ear of the Information Society. However strongly the necessity of the consensus in the scientific policy like nuclear R and D is required, it is impossible to attain the goal, unless the scientific literacy of the general public is. In order to improve it the role of the scientific museum as a social educational facility is very important. In this respect, there still remains vast room to improve in the Japanese museum system and its activities. The concept of the 'Central Scientific and Technological Museum-Institute', which also operates very small-sized reactor for the educational use, is developed in this paper. (author)

  19. An analysis of the relationship between information and communication technology (ICT) and scientific literacy in Canada and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, King

    Despite the lack of substantial evidence for improvement in the quality of teaching and learning with information and communication technology (ICT), governmental organizations, including those of Canada and Australia, have made large investments into ICT. This investment has been largely predicated on the hypothesized relationship between ICT and science achievement, and the need for ICT as a means of providing broad-scale training to meet the demand for a skilled workforce. To better understand this possible relationship, this study used data from the 2006 administration of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA 2006) to determine the extent to which scientific literacy is predicted by student- and school-level variables related to ICT, after adjusting for student demographic characteristics and school characteristics. The findings suggest that, once student demographic characteristics and school characteristics have been accounted for, students with prior experience with ICT, who browse the Internet more frequently, and who are confident with basic ICT tasks earned higher scientific literacy scores. Gender differences existed with respect to types of productivity and entertainment software used; this difference may be attributed to personal choice and initiative to learn ICT. Finally, differences in ICT use between Canada and Australia, particularly with school use, may be due to initiatives in Australia (e.g., National Goals of Schooling for the Twenty-first Century) that promote the increased use of ICT in classrooms.

  20. From the Abacus to the World Wide Web: An Analysis of the Educational Technology Movement and Its Impact upon Adult Literacy in the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlubowski, Michael G.

    This paper discusses the various educational technology movements and initiatives currently underway in China and the impact they may have on the literacy rate of the Chinese people. Topics addressed include: (1) China's political history and its impact on the educational system, including China under the rule of Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, and…

  1. Differences in Student Information and Communication Technology Literacy Based on Socio-Economic Status, Ethnicity, and Gender: Evidence of a Digital Divide in Florida Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Liu, Feng; Dawson, Kara; Barron, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    This research examines student information and communication technology (ICT) literacy and its relationships to a student's socio-economic status (SES), gender, and ethnicity of middle school students. We recruited 5,990 students from 13 school districts across the state of Florida. Student participants completed the Student Tool for Technology…

  2. Bruce's Magnificent Quartet: Inquiry, Community, Technology and Literacy--Implications for Renewing Qualitative Research in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Bruce and Bishop's community informatics work brings forward four critical concepts: inquiry, community, technology, and literacy. These four terms serve as the basis for a discussion of qualitative research in the twenty-first century--what is lacking and what is needed. The author suggests that to resolve the tensions or challenges…

  3. Developing Energy Literacy in US Middle-Level Students Using the Geospatial Curriculum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Fu, Qiong; Peffer, Tamara E.; Kulo, Violet

    2013-06-01

    This quantitative study examined the effectiveness of a geospatial curriculum approach to promote energy literacy in an urban school district and examined factors that may account for energy content knowledge achievement. An energy literacy measure was administered to 1,044 eighth-grade students (ages 13-15) in an urban school district in Pennsylvania, USA. One group of students received instruction with a geospatial curriculum approach (geospatial technologies (GT)) and another group of students received 'business as usual' (BAU) curriculum instruction. For the GT students, findings revealed statistically significant gains from pretest to posttest (p improve the energy literacy of urban middle-level education students.

  4. Foundations of Science Literacy: Using Instruction-Embedded Formative Assessment to Strengthen the Relation between Gains in Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Children's Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark-Chiarelli, Nancy; Gropen, Jess; Fuccillo, Janna; Hoisington, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    The need for a scientifically-literate American population has gained great prominence on the educational landscape of priorities over the past decade; young children will be increasingly exposed to the STEM fields and encouraged to excel in these areas. Professional development is key to assuring that early childhood teachers provide children…

  5. International Computer-Based Literacy Instruction: The Time Has Come (Editorial Comment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Jay; Tullis, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Discusses (1) literacy and the related concepts of functional literacy and illiteracy; (2) what is meant by computer technology for literacy instruction; (3) advantages and disadvantages of computer-based literacy instruction; and (4) today's efforts and tomorrow's expectations. (RS)

  6. Specific technological communication skills and functional health literacy have no influence on self-reported benefits from enrollment in the TeleCare North trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilholt, Pernille Heyckendorff; Hæsum, Lisa Korsbakke Emtekær; Ehlers, Lars Holger; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2016-07-01

    The Danish TeleCare North trial has developed a telehealth system, Telekit, which is used for self-management by patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Self-management is the engagement in one's own illness and health by monitoring and managing one's symptoms and signs of illness. The study examines the association between COPD patients' use of Telekit and their functional health literacy and the association between their use of Telekit and their specific technological communication skills. A consecutive sample of participants (n=60) from the TeleCare North trial were recruited. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with each participant to collect demographic data. Functional health literacy was measured with the Danish TOFHLA test. Participants completed a non-standardised questionnaire about their health status, their use of the Telekit system, and their specific technological communication skills. Binary logistic regressions were performed to examine how functional health literacy and specific technological communication skills influenced the use of Telekit by giving users an enhanced sense of freedom, security, control, and a greater awareness of COPD symptoms. Participants (27 women, 33 men) had a mean age of 70 (SD: 8.37) years. Functional health literacy levels were classified as inadequate in 14 (23%) participants, as marginal in 12 (20%), and as adequate in 34 (57%). Participants self-reported a feeling of increased security (72%), greater freedom (27%), more control (62%), and greater awareness of symptoms (50%) when using Telekit. The use of Telekit was not significantly associated with levels of functional health literacy or with the number of specific technological communication skills (p>0.05) based on the binary logistic regressions. The enhanced sense of security, freedom, control, and the greater awareness of COPD symptoms achieved by using Telekit were unassociated both with the patients' score of functional health

  7. The role of digital literacy in the academic performance of first year students in the National Diploma: Information Technology at the University of Johannesburg

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M.Ed. The aim of this study is to determine the role of pre-existing levels of digital literacy on the academic performance of students who are enrolled for the National Diploma Information Technology at the University of Johannesburg. The majority of students entering the University of Johannesburg are black and come from schools and communities which do not enjoy the same technologically rich environments as that of their counterparts, yet on entering their first year of studies, they ar...

  8. A Different Approach to Have Science and Technology Student-Teachers Gain Varied Methods in Laboratory Applications: A Sample of Computer Assisted POE Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Arzu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach and assess the application for the science and technology student-teachers to gain varied laboratory methods in science and technology teaching. It is also aimed to describe the computer-assisted POE application in the subject of "Photosynthesis-Light" developed in the context of…

  9. ICT Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2017-01-01

    human limitations, developing critical measures and acknowledging feelings of estrangement, puzzlement as well as sheer wonder of technology. ICT literacy is indeed all about visions of the good life and the art of living in the twenty-first century. The main focus of this paper is to explore...... and discuss ICT in relation to pupils and teachers and try to understand why and how these technologies are implemented in the school system. This focus not only allows us to better understand how concepts and habits with respect to ICT are shaped in numerous children, but teaches us to acquire an enhanced...

  10. ALFABETIZAÇÃO DE CRIANÇAS UTILIZANDO RECURSOS TECNOLÓGICOS. CHILDREN LITERACY USING TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Alvarenga Pimenta Vilas Boas

    2013-11-01

    literacy processes and some considerations about the use of technologies and computers in scholar and literacy environments. It shows that the emergence of technological resources as an educational tool and the growing familiarization of students with them has caused teachers to try to use these alternatives as teaching instrumental. In this perspective, we carried a case study out with the main goal of identifying if the use of computers, with activities directed to the initial teaching of reading and writing, specifically of the relationship between phonemes and graphemes, could contribute, someway, with a specific group of students who had no yet obtained the alphabetic level of writing. The research was conducted, at the second semester of 2010, with a group of students enrolled at the third year of the literacy basic program. Those students had already attended the two first years of the program and, therefore, they should be consolidating the process of reading and writing, but they were still at levels lower than the expectations. The software activities have phonic, visual and articulation strategies, thus highlighting the work with some of the necessary facets to initial domain of reading and writing processes. We conclude that, when applied in a systematic way, those technological resources collaborate with the progress of students with delays in reading and writing, bringing a new way to work with those children; they are also considered a different, interesting, attractive and motivating activity and promote a more playful and meaningful way of learning, providing a literacy more consistent with the reality of twenty-first century.

  11. Marking Physical Literacy or Missing the Mark on Physical Literacy? A Conceptual Critique of Canada's Physical Literacy Assessment Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel B.; Randall, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Margaret Whitehead first introduced the concept of physical literacy over 20 years ago. Since that introduction, physical literacy has been gaining in popularity within many Western physical education and sport contexts. This is particularly true within Canada, where physical literacy has been embraced by two of the nation's most notable national…

  12. Information Literacy: Partnerships for Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Patricia Senn; Senn, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the partnerships between teacher-librarians and principals, teachers, community members, public librarians, and businesses that school children need to gain information literacy skills. Descriptions, which are adapted from the forthcoming book "Information Literacy: Resources for Elementary School Leaders," include the…

  13. Gaze-controlled communication technology for children with severe multiple disabilities: Parents and professionals' perception of gains, obstacles, and prerequisites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Eva; Thunberg, Gunilla; Peny Dahlstrand, Marie

    2017-05-04

    The aim of this study was to explore parents' and professionals' thoughts of how a gaze-controlled computer can be beneficial to children with severe multiple disabilities. All systems were provided primarily for symbol-based communication, but were also used for other purposes such as play, leisure and school activities. A further aim was to investigate factors affecting usability, specifically for communication. The study used a qualitative approach, involving content analysis of semistructured interviews with the children's key persons (N = 11). The analysis yielded three categories and twelve subcategories. There were gains for the children in terms of empowerment, social interaction, learning opportunities and efficient computer use. Inaccessibility, liability issues and technical failure were seen as obstacles, while the prerequisites included time, collaboration, stimulating content, know-how and opportunities. To sum up, this study suggests that gaze-controlled technology can provide children who have multiple disabilities involving severe motor dysfunction and communicative and cognitive problems with new opportunities to communicate, interact and perform activities independently, as long as conditions are right.

  14. Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

  15. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  16. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  17. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  18. Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Thomas P.; Jacobson, Trudi E.

    2011-01-01

    Social media environments and online communities are innovative collaborative technologies that challenge traditional definitions of information literacy. Metaliteracy is an overarching and self-referential framework that integrates emerging technologies and unifies multiple literacy types. This redefinition of information literacy expands the…

  19. Rethinking the Role of Information Technology-Based Research Tools in Students' Development of Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-06-01

    Given the central place IT-based research tools take in scientific research, the marginal role such tools currently play in science curricula is dissatisfying from the perspective of making students scientifically literate. To appropriately frame the role of IT-based research tools in science curricula, we propose a framework that is developed to understand the use of tools in human activity, namely cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT). Accordingly, IT-based research tools constitute central moments of scientific research activity and neither can be seen apart from its objectives, nor can it be considered apart from the cultural-historical determined forms of activity (praxis) in which human subjects participate. Based on empirical data involving students participating in research activity, we point out how an appropriate account of IT-based research tools involves subjects' use of tools with respect to the objectives of research activity and the contribution to the praxis of research. We propose to reconceptualize the role of IT-based research tools as contributing to scientific literacy if students apply these tools with respect to the objectives of the research activity and contribute to praxis of research by evaluating and modifying the application of these tools. We conclude this paper by sketching the educational implications of this reconceptualized role of IT-based research tools.

  20. Data Literacy for Educators: Making It Count in Teacher Preparation and Practice. Technology, Education--Connections (The TEC Series)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandinach, Ellen B.; Gummer, Edith S.

    2016-01-01

    Data literacy has become an essential skill set for teachers as education becomes more of an evidence-based profession. Teachers in all stages of professional growth need to learn how to use data effectively and responsibly to inform their teaching practices. This groundbreaking resource describes data literacy for teaching, emphasizing the…

  1. Teacher design knowledge and beliefs for technology enhanced learning materials in early literacy: Four portraits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, F.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; Voogt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher engagement in the design of technology-rich learning material is beneficial to teacher learning and may create a sense of ownership, both of which are conducive to bringing about innovation with technology. During collaborative design, teachers draw on various types of knowledge and beliefs:

  2. Engineering Student Outcomes for Infusion into Technological Literacy Programs: Grades 9-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Craig; Childress, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Center for Engineering and Technology Education (NCETE) secured funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to infuse engineering design into the schools through technology education. In order to reach this goal the researchers, in cooperation with NCETE, conducted a two phase study to identify outcomes for high-school…

  3. Urban Adolescent Students and Technology: Access, Use and Interest in Learning Language and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents today have vastly different opportunities to learn and process information via pervasive digital technologies and social media. However, there is scant literature on the impact of these technologies on urban adolescents with lower socioeconomic status. This study of 531 urban students in grades 6-8 used a self-reported survey to…

  4. Making a Literacy Plan: Developing an Integrated Curriculum That Meets Your School's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Literacy does not happen in a single lesson or course. There are no shortcuts to gaining mastery over a skill set, whether it is reading literacy, information literacy and research skills, online literacy and digital citizenship, or visual literacy. School librarians dream about a perfect integrated curriculum: there is ample time for…

  5. DIMENSIÓN FORMATIVA DE LA ALFABETIZACIÓN TECNOLÓGICA THE EDUCATIONAL DIMENSION OF TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Ortega Navas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La alfabetización tecnológica en el marco actual de la Sociedad del Conocimiento tiene un papel esencial en la educación. El impacto de la tecnología en la vida de las personas es tan patente, que los profesionales de la educación han considerado que el conocimiento y uso adecuado de ésta, es un contenido educativo necesario que reconfigura el propio sistema educativo en relación al modelo de alumno, del formador y de todo el proceso de conocimiento. La importancia y la incidencia de la tecnología en la educación se ha convertido en una señal de progreso, calidad y mejora que abre nuevas perspectivas formativas y formas de aprendizaje que condicionan tanto nuestras vidas personales y profesionales como nuestros estilos de vida. En este contexto el papel del formador está sufriendo una transformación para dar respuesta a los nuevos retos y exigencias educativas y sociales que se plantean en el siglo XXI.Technological literacy in the context of today’s Knowledge Society plays an essential role in education. The impact of technology on people’s lives is so obvious that teaching professionals consider the knowledge and adequate use thereof to be a necessary ingredient of education, and one which reshapes the educational system itself with respect to the model of the educator, the student and the entire knowledge process. The importance and the impact of technology on education has become a sign of progress, quality and improvement that creates new educational perspectives and new ways of learning, shaping both our professional and personal lives as well as our lifestyles. In this context, the role of the educator is being transformed to respond to the new educational and social challenges and demands of the twenty-first century.

  6. Negotiating Voice in Translingual Literacies: From Literacy Regimes to Contact Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canagarajah, Suresh; Matsumoto, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    Voice in mobile texts has received attention lately among scholars in literacy, sociolinguistics, and rhetoric. Some sociolinguists of globalisation have argued that uptake is shaped by the norms of each literacy regime. Though texts of non-western communities will gain positive uptake in local literacy regimes according to their own norms and…

  7. Information literacy: implications for perioperative nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michelle M

    2011-02-01

    The concept of information literacy may be new to some perioperative nurses; however, embracing this concept will help nurses identify situations that necessitate gaining more information, locate and access information sources, evaluate and analyze data, and cite information in compliance with copyright and fair use laws. The culture of health care is continually changing as a result of new technology and new methods to improve patient care, and this creates an information explosion. Perioperative educators should add information literacy as a strategic goal for obtaining Magnet status because it is foundational to evidence-based practice. Administrators also should advocate to obtain resources that will enable nurses to access information that addresses current patient care issues.

  8. Boat-Based Education for Boston Area Public Schools: Encouraging Marine Science and Technology Literacy and Awareness of the Coastal "Backyard"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E. M.; Reynolds, R. M.; Wright, A. K.; Deschenes, H. A.

    2016-02-01

    Half the global population lives within 60 km of the ocean, profoundly influencing environmental quality and services to local communities. Adoption of marine science curricula creates opportunities for educators and scientists to engage and entrain K-12 students as ocean stewards. In particular, boat-based science activities facilitate hands-on inquiry. These activities reinforce key science concepts while creating a tangible connection to our shared coastal "backyard." A collaboration between Zephyr Education Foundation, the New England Aquarium, the University of Massachusetts Boston and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has taken >500 Boston, MA area students from 26 public schools on boat-based education trips in Boston Harbor. Marine science and technology professionals and educators facilitate participatory activities using modern marine technology aboard a research vessel. Trips are funded at no cost to participants by a grant from the Richard Lounsbery Foundation; cost-free outings are essential for participation from underserved public school districts. Participants perceived three important outcomes of their outings: the trips 1) enhanced in-class curricular learning and improved marine science literacy 2) increased personal connections to local marine environments, and 3) increased interest in careers in marine science, including engineering and technical positions. Despite living in close proximity to water, this was the first boat outing for many students; boat-based education trips enhanced student awareness of local environments in a way that curricular study had not. Boston trip results are being evaluated, but 3000 evaluations from similar trips in Woods Hole, MA indicate that 98% of participants gained a better understanding and appreciation of the work conducted by marine scientists, engineers, and other professionals, and 82% said their experience made them more interested in becoming involved in science at school and/or as a job. In summary

  9. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  10. Students’ Information Literacy: A Perspective from Mathematical Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ariyadi Wijaya

    2016-01-01

    Information literacy is mostly seen from the perspective of library science or information and communication technology. Taking another point of view, this study was aimed to explore students’ information literacy from the perspective of mathematical literacy. For this purpose, a test addressing Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) mathematics tasks were administered to 381 eighth and ninth graders from nine junior high schools in the Province of Yogyakarta. PISA mathematics ...

  11. [Undergraduate education of medical technologists to promote scientific and technological literacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Akizawa, Hirotsugu

    2010-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's medical technologists to receive proper training on the safety of medical treatment and healthcare in order to accommodate the rapid changes and advancement in medical technology. In particular, because of the increase of hospital-acquired infections, the role of medical technologists involved in infection control has become much more important. In addition, particularly in Japan, the career options available to students graduating with a degree in medical technology have become much more diverse, ranging from research laboratories to clinical services; however, undergraduate education for medical technologists is limited. It is therefore deemed necessary for undergraduate students to be provided with adequate training from their universities by offering a wider selection of classes in this subject area. In this paper, we summarize our preliminary findings on the trial lessons that are offered to medical technology students in their microbiology class. These lessons are designed to enhance students' academic potential and to engage their interest.

  12. A high current gain gate-controlled lateral bipolar junction transistor with 90 nm CMOS technology for future RF SoC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo-Mao; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Lee, I. C.; Chiang, Yen-Ting

    2008-08-01

    A CMOS-compatible gate-controlled lateral BJT (GC-LBJT) was prepared with a conventional 90 nm CMOS technology for radio frequency system-on-chip (RF SoC) applications. The emitter injection efficiency and the doping profile in P-well were optimized by properly controlling source, drain, and well implants. Consequently, the GC-LBJT with a gate length of 0.15 μm can achieve a current gain over 2000 and 17/19 GHz for the fT/fmax, respectively, which are 1000%, 200%, and 60% improvements in current gain, fT and fmax, respectively as compared to the LBJT reported previously.

  13. Technology and Engineering Literacy Framework for the 2014 National Assessment of Educational Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assessment Governing Board, 2013

    2013-01-01

    To what extent can young people analyze the pros and cons of a proposal to develop a new source of energy? Construct and test a model or prototype? Use the Internet to find and summarize data and information in order to solve a problem or achieve a goal? The exploding growth in the world of technology and the need to answer questions similar to…

  14. Contemporary Literacies and Technologies in English Language Arts Teacher Education: Shift Happens!

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Marshall; Pope, Carol; Reid, Louann

    2015-01-01

    Three leaders of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Conference on English Education (CEE) reflect on the changes that have occurred in English language arts teacher education in the past 15 years since the first edition of "Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education" ("CITE Journal") was published.…

  15. Programmatic Knowledge Management: Technology, Literacy, and Access in 21st-Century Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Eric James

    2015-01-01

    Growing out of research in Technical Communication, Composition Studies, and Writing Program Administration, the articles in this dissertation explicitly seek to address changes in the practices and products of writing and writing studies wrought by the so-called "digital revolution" in communication technology, which has been ongoing in…

  16. The Importance of Design Thinking for Technological Literacy: A Phenomenological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    "We know that progress depends on discovery, inventions, creativity and design, but we have simply supposed that it happens anyway," de Bono (1999 p. 43). Technology education is ostensibly a foundation for future designers and creative thinking. However evidence of good design or creative thinking in outcomes displayed in school…

  17. Digi-teens: Media Literacies and Digital Technologies in the Secondary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Andrew; Reed, Kate

    1999-01-01

    Describes a course set up for Year 11 students using digital editing equipment to examine the audiovisual fabric of films of their choice. Investigates how the advent of digital technologies enables new kinds of reading of visual texts as well as new kinds of textual production. (NH)

  18. New Technologies and Literacy Learning in a Mayan School in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Midge; Sullivan, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Faculty, staff and alumni from Rowan University recently traveled to Antigua, Guatemala to conduct a technology assessment, so that a three to four times yearly teacher training program can be expanded to a year round online professional development program. Since 2002, Rowan Reading Professor Midge Madden and Professor Emeritus Jane Sullivan have…

  19. Teaching with a Technological Twist: Exit Tickets via Twitter in Literacy Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Jiménez, Carla; Hungerford-Kresser, Holly; Pole, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe, reflect, and analyze the implementation of a commonly used teaching strategy with a technological twist: exit tickets via Twitter. Longitudinal data collected over the course of three years demonstrated that using Twitter to reinvent a nondigital teaching practice ultimately demonstrated a better…

  20. Parents' Perceptions of Their Preschoolers' Experiences with Information Communication Technologies and Emergent Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parents' perception of preschool children's early Information Communication Technologies (ICT) experiences in the home on the dimensions of parent attitude toward the benefits of ICT use, frequency of ICT use, parent attitude toward ICT use, quality of interaction with ICT, and…

  1. A systematic review and meta-analysis of teachers’ development of digital literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Slættalíð, Tóri; Parveen, Mahmuda

    2015-01-01

    Teachers’ development of digital literacy (DL) is gaining importance with the increase in the integration and adoption of information and communication technologies in educational contexts. The focus has been predominantly on students and not much on teachers, who require greater attention due...... of teachers’ as an agenda for the transformation at both individual level and organizational level. Applying the methodology elaborated by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement, 16 peer-reviewed articles were selected. Constant-comparative method was used...... for the qualitative analysis. This paper reports on three main categories: (a) definition of digital literacy, (b) development of digital literacy of pre-service and in-service teachers and (c) models for the development and evaluation of digital literacy. The general definitions of DL include the elements...

  2. Science-Technology-Society literacy in college non-majors biology: Comparing problem/case studies based learning and traditional expository methods of instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John S.

    This study used a multiple response model (MRM) on selected items from the Views on Science-Technology-Society (VOSTS) survey to examine science-technology-society (STS) literacy among college non-science majors' taught using Problem/Case Studies Based Learning (PBL/CSBL) and traditional expository methods of instruction. An initial pilot investigation of 15 VOSTS items produced a valid and reliable scoring model which can be used to quantitatively assess student literacy on a variety of STS topics deemed important for informed civic engagement in science related social and environmental issues. The new scoring model allows for the use of parametric inferential statistics to test hypotheses about factors influencing STS literacy. The follow-up cross-institutional study comparing teaching methods employed Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) to model the efficiency and equitability of instructional methods on STS literacy. A cluster analysis was also used to compare pre and post course patterns of student views on the set of positions expressed within VOSTS items. HLM analysis revealed significantly higher instructional efficiency in the PBL/CSBL study group for 4 of the 35 STS attitude indices (characterization of media vs. school science; tentativeness of scientific models; cultural influences on scientific research), and more equitable effects of traditional instruction on one attitude index (interdependence of science and technology). Cluster analysis revealed generally stable patterns of pre to post course views across study groups, but also revealed possible teaching method effects on the relationship between the views expressed within VOSTS items with respect to (1) interdependency of science and technology; (2) anti-technology; (3) socioscientific decision-making; (4) scientific/technological solutions to environmental problems; (5) usefulness of school vs. media characterizations of science; (6) social constructivist vs. objectivist views of theories; (7

  3. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Consumer-Focused Health Information Technology Systems Through eHealth Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayser, Lars; Kushniruk, Andre; Osborne, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    attributes has not been adequately considered by health IT designers. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to propose how users' needs and competences can be taken into account when designing new information and communications technology solutions in health care by expanding the user-task-context matrix...... the end users engaged for these participatory design processes are not actual representatives of the general population, and developers may have limited understanding about how well they might represent the full range of intended users of the eHealth products. As a consequence, resulting information...... technology (IT) designs may not accommodate the needs, skills, cognitive capacities, and/or contexts of use of the intended broader population of health consumers. This may result in challenges for consumers who use the health IT systems, and could lead to limitations in adoption if the diversity of user...

  4. Enhancing Earth Science And IT Literacy Through Environmental Science Information Technology Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, K. E.; Molinaro, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Information Technology Activities (ESITA) program provides grades 9 and 10 students with under-represented minority backgrounds in the East San Francisco Bay Area with real-world opportunities to learn about and apply information technologies through a series of project-based activities related to environmental science. Supported by the NSF Information Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, ESITA activities engage students in the use of newly acquired information technology (IT) skills and understandings while performing air and water quality research investigations. One project that ESITA students have become involved in relates to the currently relevant issue of elevated levels of lead found in drinking waters in Washington, D.C. Students based in the Bay Area have initiated and maintained E-mail correspondence with children who attend elementary schools in the D.C. area. After receiving a thorough explanation of required sampling procedures devised by the Bay Area students, the elementary school children have sent 500 ml water samples from their homes and schools to Berkeley along with information about the locations from which the water samples were collected. These samples were then prepared for lead analysis at Lawrence Hall of Science by ESITA students, who used resulting data to perform a preliminary assessment of the geospatial distribution of lead trouble spots throughout Washington, DC. Later, ESITA student scientists will work with students from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health to develop surveys and questionnaires that generate high quality information useful with regard to assessing the impact of the current lead crisis on younger children in the Washington, D.C. area. Through the application of new understandings to current, real-world environmental problems and issues such as that related to lead, positive changes in students' attitudes towards IT and science have occurred, which accompany

  5. Family Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livija Knaflič

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in child and adult literacy demonstrates that the achievement and the level of literacy that children attain at school is connected with the social and cultural characteristics and the level of literacy of the child's family. This intergenerational transfer of the level of literacy has motivated the search for different ways of improving the level of literacy.The concept of family literacy is based on the assumption that a higher level of parent literacy means that the children may achieve the same, and it also offers better schooling prospects. Family literacy programmes help fami­lies to develop different activities, in­cluding reading and writing skills, both in their community and in everyday life.

  6. Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, and ... adults in the United States have low health literacy. It affects their ability to make health decisions. ...

  7. Is Media Literacy Passive or Active?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Zachary S.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to "read" and "write", i.e. literacy, was once considered a trade secret by the professional scribes who depended on it for job security. The ability to read and write is still the most commonly understood notion of literacy, but technological developments require that the definition of literacy be expanded and…

  8. Physical literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Roučka, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Topic: Physical literacy Goals: The aproximation of physical literacy, collection and evaluation questionnaires of physical literacy knowledge and students anamnesis. Description of applicants progress in the specific movement skills. Method: Unified questionnaires was used for obtaining informations. We make video for movement analysis. Results: The results didn't obtain our expectation that students are able to express precisely the content of physical literacy by specific skills. However, ...

  9. The Comprehensive Emergent Literacy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Rohde

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The early skills of Emergent Literacy include the knowledge and abilities related to the alphabet, phonological awareness, symbolic representation, and communication. However, existing models of emergent literacy focus on discrete skills and miss the perspective of the surrounding environment. Early literacy skills, including their relationship to one another, and the substantial impact of the setting and context, are critical in ensuring that children gain all of the preliminary skills and awareness they will need to become successful readers and writers. Research findings over the last few decades have led to a fuller understanding of all that emergent literacy includes, resulting in a need for a new, more comprehensive model. A new model, described in this article, strives to explain how emergent literacy can be viewed as an interactive process of skills and context rather than a linear series of individual components. Early literacy learning opportunities are more likely to happen when teachers have a solid knowledge base of emergent literacy and child development. Research has shown that preschool teachers with limited knowledge about literacy development are significantly less able to provide such experiences for children. Teachers will be better able to facilitate all of the components of emergent literacy if they have access to, and understanding of, a model that describes the components, their interactions, and the importance of environmental factors in supporting children.

  10. Individuality and Literacy: Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Rosemary A.

    The technology of literacy for any given culture helps to Determine the character of its members. In less than 3,000 years, Western culture has been transformed from an oral/aural culture through many increasingly literate phases to a present stage which is approaching "computer literacy." Erich Fromm suggests that in the course of…

  11. SOME INSIGHTS THAT ORALITY-LITERACY STUDIES CAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    consequences of literacy that are of relevance to language teachers that will be discussed in this paper. 3.3 Literacy as a neutral, technical skill. The assumption that literacy has the above-mentioned social and cognitive consequences, is based on the assumption that literacy is a neutral technology which is the same for all.

  12. Political Literacy as Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ross Cory Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This paper contends that political literacy and information literacy are compatible concepts that are inextricably linked and should therefore be taught and stressed simultaneously to students in the classroom. Improving the information literacy and political literacy skills of students will allow them to not only perform better academically, but also empower them to become better citizens who form opinions and make decisions based on appropriate and quality information.

  13. Visual Culture and Visual Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Onursoy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently visual literacy gains importance in the context of understanding the rising visual culture products, thinking about them and producing these products. The purpose of this article examines the concept of visual literacy that is the relationship with visual culture depending on the literature. Visual literacy is one of the multiple literatures that emerge from the development of information and information dissemination forms. Visual literacy is an interdisciplinary concept and associated with some areas, such as graphic design, visual arts, architectural engineering, industrial product design, visual communication and media literacy. Visual culture covers every human product, so visual products that we face in everyday life and visual realities with abundant alternatives constitute our daily life itself. Sometimes, this confusing visual understanding creates a gap between contemporary cultural richness and what can be observed.

  14. Data Literacy is Statistical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Past definitions of statistical literacy should be updated in order to account for the greatly amplified role that data now play in our lives. Experience working with high-school students in an innovative data science curriculum has shown that teaching statistical literacy, augmented by data literacy, can begin early.

  15. High Gain, Very Low Areal Density, Scalable RF Apertures Enabled by Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose that the Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) approach be expanded with a specific focus on space exploration orbiting comm network RF aperture...

  16. "Just Say It Like It Is!" Use of a Community-Based Participatory Approach to Develop a Technology-Driven Food Literacy Program for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Catherine A; Carbone, Elena T

    2018-01-01

    FuelUp&Go! is a technology-driven food literacy program consisting of six in-person skill building sessions as well as fitness trackers, text messages, and a companion website. A community-based participatory research approach was used with adolescents who were recruited to participate in a Kid Council. Qualitative data were collected about the use of surveys, program activities, recipes, technology and text messages, and music and incentives. Changes suggested by Kid Councilmembers informed the design and development of a pilot program. Participants were recruited for the pilot program and completed pre- and postintervention surveys. The results indicated food-related knowledge remained low but increased from baseline to follow-up. Attitudes toward vegetables and physical activity increased slightly. Self-reported participation in physical activity and consumption of sugar-added beverages moved in positive directions. These findings suggest that community-based participatory research approach is an effective approach to engage adolescents in the development of a technology-driven food literacy program.

  17. Facebook levels the playing field: Dyslexic students learning through digital literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Barden

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia has an ambivalent relationship with learning technology. Any potential gains may be nullified if the technology is perceived to exacerbate stigma. This paper examines the use of an ‘everyday’ technology, Facebook, by a small group of sixth form students labelled as dyslexic. ‘Levelling the playing field’ is a phrase the participants used often when discussing what they wanted from learning technology. Because dyslexia usually is defined in terms of significant difficulties with literacy, we might reasonably anticipate that the participants would see Facebook as stigmatising rather than levelling the playing field, because of the very public literacy events that it demands. However, the data indicate that far from shying away from Facebook because of fear of their difficulties with literacy being exposed, the participants enthusiastically embraced it. The students saw Facebook as a desirable presence in their education, one that supported inclusion. For them, levelling the playing field with Facebook had five dimensions: keeping up to date and meeting deadlines; increased control over learning; developing metacognitive awareness; greater control over literacy process and demands; and being experts and helpers. The findings perhaps challenge some assumptions about dyslexia, literacy and learning, and may be of interest to teachers working with dyslexic students, or researchers studying learning in digitally mediated social networks.

  18. A Quantitative and Qualitative Inquiry into Future Teachers' Use of Information and Communications Technology to Develop Students' Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Stéphanie; Karsenti, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand how preservice programs prepare future teachers to use ICT to develop students' information literacy skills. A survey was conducted from January 2014 through May 2014 with 413 future teachers in four French Canadian universities. In the spring of 2015, qualitative data were also collected from 48 students in their…

  19. Technology versus Teachers in the Early Literacy Classroom: An Investigation of the Effectiveness of the Istation Integrated Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Rebecca S.

    2017-01-01

    Guided by Vygotsky's social learning theory, this study reports a 24-week investigation on whether regular use of Istation®, an integrated learning system used by approximately 4 million students in the United States, had an effect on the early literacy achievement of children in twelve kindergarten classrooms. A mixed-method, quasi-experimental…

  20. Pocket School: Exploring Mobile Technology as a Sustainable Literacy Education Option for Underserved Indigenous Children in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Miranda, Talia; Olaciregui, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is a human right unequally distributed among the world's population. Despite global efforts to fight illiteracy, high illiteracy rates continue to jeopardize access for many to basic schooling, life-long learning, health, and environment safety. Illiteracy also hinders the economic prosperity of the poorest societies in this digital age.…

  1. Rethinking Instructional Technology to Improve Pedagogy for Digital Literacy: A Design Case in a Graduate Early Childhood Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langub, Lee Woodham; Lokey-Vega, Anissa

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacy is an important aspect to consider within teacher education as a way to address twenty-first century learner needs, particularly in early childhood contexts where developmental concerns should be paramount in making instructional design decisions. This article is a design case of a graduate level early childhood education…

  2. Technology developments and first measurements on inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) for high energy physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carulla, M.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; IMB-CNM (CSIC); Flores, D.; IMB-CNM (CSIC); González, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Jaramillo, R.; Merlos, A.; Palomo, F.R.; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D.; Vila, I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The first Inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) have been fabricated at IMB-CNM (CSIC). The iLGAD structure includes the multiplication diffusions at the ohmic contact side while the segmentation is implemented at the front side with multiple P + diffusions. Therefore, iLGAD is P on P position-sensitive detector with a uniform electric field all along the device area that guarantees the same signal amplification wherever a particle passes through the sensitive bulk solving the main draw of the LGAD microstrip detector. However, the detection current is dominated by holes flowing back from the multiplication junction with the subsequent transient current pulse duration increase in comparison with conventional LGAD counterparts. Applications of iLGAD range from tracking and timing applications like determination of primary interaction vertex to medical imaging. The paper addresses the optimization of the iLGAD structure with the aid of TCAD simul...

  3. Exploration of Sub-VT and Near-VT 2T Gain-Cell Memories for Ultra-Low Power Applications under Technology Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fish

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low power applications often require several kb of embedded memory and are typically operated at the lowest possible operating voltage (VDD to minimize both dynamic and static power consumption. Embedded memories can easily dominate the overall silicon area of these systems, and their leakage currents often dominate the total power consumption. Gain-cell based embedded DRAM arrays provide a high-density, low-leakage alternative to SRAM for such systems; however, they are typically designed for operation at nominal or only slightly scaled supply voltages. This paper presents a gain-cell array which, for the first time, targets aggressively scaled supply voltages, down into the subthreshold (sub-VT domain. Minimum VDD design of gain-cell arrays is evaluated in light of technology scaling, considering both a mature 0.18 μm CMOS node, as well as a scaled 40 nm node. We first analyze the trade-offs that characterize the bitcell design in both nodes, arriving at a best-practice design methodology for both mature and scaled technologies. Following this analysis, we propose full gain-cell arrays for each of the nodes, operated at a minimum VDD. We find that an 0.18 μm gain-cell array can be robustly operated at a sub-VT supply voltage of 400mV, providing read/write availability over 99% of the time, despite refresh cycles. This is demonstrated on a 2 kb array, operated at 1 MHz, exhibiting full functionality under parametric variations. As opposed to sub-VT operation at the mature node, we find that the scaled 40 nm node requires a near-threshold 600mV supply to achieve at least 97% read/write availability due to higher leakage currents that limit the bitcell’s retention time. Monte Carlo simulations show that a 600mV 2 kb 40 nm gain-cell array is fully functional at frequencies higher than 50 MHz.

  4. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Consumer-Focused Health Information Technology Systems Through eHealth Literacy: A Framework for Understanding Users' Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Lars; Kushniruk, Andre; Osborne, Richard H; Norgaard, Ole; Turner, Paul

    2015-05-20

    eHealth systems and applications are increasingly focused on supporting consumers to directly engage with and use health care services. Involving end users in the design of these systems is critical to ensure a generation of usable and effective eHealth products and systems. Often the end users engaged for these participatory design processes are not actual representatives of the general population, and developers may have limited understanding about how well they might represent the full range of intended users of the eHealth products. As a consequence, resulting information technology (IT) designs may not accommodate the needs, skills, cognitive capacities, and/or contexts of use of the intended broader population of health consumers. This may result in challenges for consumers who use the health IT systems, and could lead to limitations in adoption if the diversity of user attributes has not been adequately considered by health IT designers. The objective of this paper is to propose how users' needs and competences can be taken into account when designing new information and communications technology solutions in health care by expanding the user-task-context matrix model with the domains of a new concept of eHealth literacy. This approach expands an existing method for supporting health IT system development, which advocates use of a three-dimensional user-task-context matrix to comprehensively identify the users of health IT systems, and what their needs and requirements are under differing contexts of use. The extension of this model involved including knowledge about users' competences within the seven domains of eHealth literacy, which had been identified based on systematic engagement with computer scientists, academics, health professionals, and patients recruited from various patient organizations and primary care. A concept map was constructed based on a structured brainstorm procedure, card sorting, and computational analysis. The new eHealth literacy

  5. A Conceptual Model of Observed Physical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Dean A.

    2015-01-01

    Physical literacy is a concept that is gaining greater acceptance around the world with the United Nations Educational, Cultural, and Scientific Organization (2013) recognizing it as one of several central tenets in a quality physical education framework. However, previous attempts to understand progression in physical literacy learning have been…

  6. Teaching Two Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    It's obvious that technology is reshaping students' reading and writing practices, with or without educators' intervention. The challenge is to teach students to be truly literate in two languages--those of the pre- and post-digital worlds. So how can teachers teach to two literacies at once? They must approach this task with three mind-sets.…

  7. Online Literacies at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Uses examples drawn from research across several sites in tourism and hospitality in which employees are required to interact with technology, in order to highlight issues relating to new online literacies that are now required for efficient work practices and to discuss implications for practice. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy…

  8. Rethinking Literacy Education in New Times: Multimodality, Multiliteracies, & New Literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Rowsell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical overview of new fields of research, pedagogy, and practice in literacy education. In a digital, media-driven, globalized world, educators are faced with the challenge of mediating traditional notions of what it means to be literate (e.g., read and writing print-based texts with new and ever-emerging skills and interests in technology and digital media. Focusing on a pilot study in Oakville, ON and a longitudinal research study in Sydney, Australia, we compel readers to think about literacy in a new light. Without a push to redefine literacy, educators run the risk of teaching and learning language and literacy skills in anachronistic paradigms and frameworks. While research has not been able to fully establish the impact of multimodal communication, it is essential that educators learn to use these different modes of communication to teach literacy.

  9. The relationship of document and quantitative literacy with learning styles and selected personal variables for aerospace technology students at Indiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Royce Ann

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent that student scores on a researcher-constructed quantitative and document literacy test, the Aviation Documents Delineator (ADD), were associated with (a) learning styles (imaginative, analytic, common sense, dynamic, and undetermined), as identified by the Learning Type Measure, (b) program curriculum (aerospace administration, professional pilot, both aerospace administration and professional pilot, other, or undeclared), (c) overall cumulative grade point average at Indiana State University, and (d) year in school (freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior). The Aviation Documents Delineator (ADD) was a three-part, 35 question survey that required students to interpret graphs, tables, and maps. Tasks assessed in the ADD included (a) locating, interpreting, and describing specific data displayed in the document, (b) determining data for a specified point on the table through interpolation, (c) comparing data for a string of variables representing one aspect of aircraft performance to another string of variables representing a different aspect of aircraft performance, (d) interpreting the documents to make decisions regarding emergency situations, and (e) performing single and/or sequential mathematical operations on a specified set of data. The Learning Type Measure (LTM) was a 15 item self-report survey developed by Bernice McCarthy (1995) to profile an individual's processing and perception tendencies in order to reveal different individual approaches to learning. The sample used in this study included 143 students enrolled in Aerospace Technology Department courses at Indiana State University in the fall of 1996. The ADD and the LTM were administered to each subject. Data collected in this investigation were analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression analysis technique. Results of the study revealed that the variables, year in school and GPA, were significant predictors of the criterion variables, document

  10. Operational gain : measuring the capture of genetic gain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Operational gain : measuring the capture of genetic gain : operational deployment of technology. ... The concept of operational gain is more than the weighted average of the genetic quality of planted hectares, and encompasses tree breeding efficiencies, propagation efficiencies, matching of species and genotype to site, ...

  11. Literacy testing practices in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Literacy testing has been researched as a social practice from different perspectives (McNamara & Roewer, 2006; Shohamy, 2001). Drawing on a Faucault inspired concept og governmentality in which literacy testing practices are seen as social technologies (Dean, 1999) and as a phenomenon closely...... related to supra- and transnational agencies this paper investigates the relation between state, pedagogy and conceptualizations of literacy. Drawing on data and findings from three ethnographic oriented studies of institutional testing practices of literacy in preschool, primary school and adult second...... language teaching in Denmark (Holm, 2004; 2007; 2009) this paper reveals the construction of values, ideologies and practices around institutional testing of litaracy in education. The analyses of testing instruments and assessment practices indicate among other things that testing of literacy have become...

  12. Adherence to self-monitoring via interactive voice response technology in an eHealth intervention targeting weight gain prevention among Black women: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Dori M; Levine, Erica L; Lane, Ilana; Askew, Sandy; Foley, Perry B; Puleo, Elaine; Bennett, Gary G

    2014-04-29

    eHealth interventions are effective for weight control and have the potential for broad reach. Little is known about the use of interactive voice response (IVR) technology for self-monitoring in weight control interventions, particularly among populations disproportionately affected by obesity. This analysis sought to examine patterns and predictors of IVR self-monitoring adherence and the association between adherence and weight change among low-income black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. The Shape Program was a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-month eHealth behavioral weight gain prevention intervention to usual care among overweight and obese black women in the primary care setting. Intervention participants (n=91) used IVR technology to self-monitor behavior change goals (eg, no sugary drinks, 10,000 steps per day) via weekly IVR calls. Weight data were collected in clinic at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Self-monitoring data was stored in a study database and adherence was operationalized as the percent of weeks with a successful IVR call. Over 12 months, the average IVR completion rate was 71.6% (SD 28.1) and 52% (47/91) had an IVR completion rate ≥80%. At 12 months, IVR call completion was significantly correlated with weight loss (r =-.22; P=.04) and participants with an IVR completion rate ≥80% had significantly greater weight loss compared to those with an IVR completion rate self-monitoring. Adherence to IVR self-monitoring was high among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Higher adherence to IVR self-monitoring was also associated with greater weight change. IVR is an effective and useful tool to promote self-monitoring and has the potential for widespread use and long-term sustainability. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938535; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00938535.

  13. APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael W. Rose

    2005-09-22

    The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

  14. Early literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from the Danish contribution to the EASE project, a European research project running from 2008 to 2010 on early literacy in relation to the transition from childcare to school. It explores a holistic, inclusive approach to early literacy that resists a narrow...... and schools. The paper also draws on Gee’s (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008) sociocultural approach to literacy, and Honneth’s (2003, 2006) concept of recognition. Emphasizing participation and recognition as key elements, it claims that stakeholders in early liter- acy must pay attention to how diverse early literacy...... opportunities empower children, especially when these opportunities are employed in a project-based learning environ- ment in which each child is able to contribute to the shared literacy events....

  15. Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. Appendix D: Standard Error Tables. First Look. NCES 2014-008

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides Appendix D, Standard Error tables, for the full report, entitled. "Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. First Look. NCES 2014-008." The full report presents results of the Program…

  16. Climate Literacy Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Mooney, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Climate Literacy Ambassadors program is a collaborative effort to advance climate literacy led by the Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. With support from NASA, CIMSS is coordinating a three-tiered program to train G6-12 teachers to be Ambassadors of Climate Literacy in their schools and communities. The complete training involves participation at a teacher workshop combined with web-based professional development content around Global and Regional Climate Change. The on-line course utilizes e-learning technology to clarify graphs and concepts from the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Summary for Policy Makers with content intricately linked to the Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. Educators who take the course for credit can develop lesson plans or opt for a project of their choosing. This session will showcase select lesson plans and projects, ranging from a district-wide action plan that engaged dozens of teachers to Ambassadors volunteering at the Aldo Leopold Climate Change Nature Center to a teacher who tested a GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) learning project with plans to participate in the SCRC program. Along with sharing successes from the CIMSS Climate Literacy Ambassadors project, we will share lessons learned related to the challenges of sustaining on-line virtual educator communities.

  17. The use of audience response system technology with limited-english-proficiency, low-literacy, and vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Matthew C; Reyes, Iris; Liebman, Amy K; Juarez-Carrillo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) have long been used to improve the interactivity of educational activities. Most studies of ARS have addressed education of literate trainees. How well these devices work with low-literacy subjects is not well studied. Information gathering on the training audience is an important use of ARS and helpful in improving the targeting of training information. However, obtaining demographic information from vulnerable populations with reasons to be concerned about divulging information about themselves has not been tested. In addition, a culturally competent method to effectively collect demographic and evaluation data of this growing population is essential. This project investigated the use of ARS to gather information from Hispanic immigrant workers, many of whom are socially vulnerable and have limited English proficiency (LEP) and low-literacy. Workers attended focus groups and were asked to use ARS devices or clickers to respond to questions. Questions were both categorical (multiple choice) and open-ended numerical (text entry), and varied from simple queries to more sensitive points regarding immigration. Most workers answered the one-key response categorical questions with little difficulty. In contrast, some participants struggled when responding to numerical questions, especially when the response required pressing multiple clicker keys. An overwhelming majority of participants reported that the clickers were comfortable and easy to use despite the challenges presented by the more complex responses. The error rate increased as question complexity increased and the trend across three ordered categories of response complexity reached statistical significance. Results suggest that ARS is a viable method for gathering dichotomous or higher-order categorical information from LEP and low-literacy populations in a group setting while assuring anonymity. However, it is recommended that clickers be developed and tested with fewer, bigger

  18. Functional Adult Literacy and Empowerment of Women: Impact of a Functional Literacy Program in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagitcibasi, Cigdem; Goksen, Fatos; Gulgoz, Sami

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses the impact of functional adult literacy on the empowerment of women in the absence of formal schooling. It examines whether the effects of functional literacy are exclusively content specific or whether there are gains going beyond the obvious benefits and extending to other spheres of everyday functioning, such as…

  19. Greening the Media Literacy Ecosystem: Situating Media Literacy for Green Cultural Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Antonio R.

    2013-01-01

    Media literacy is touted as a necessary life skill for cultural citizenship, yet as it is generally practiced there is little engagement with sustainability issues. In order to gain insights into why this is the case, this research investigated how media literacy practitioners use metaphors to frame both the role of media education in the world…

  20. Health Literacy Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Health Outcomes Strategies Resources What is health literacy? Health literacy is the degree to which individuals ... to be retained. Back to Top What is literacy? Literacy can be defined as a person's ability ...

  1. Literacy and Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther; Mooney, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the relationship between literacy and health disparities, focusing on the concept of health literacy. Recommendations are provided for ways to bridge the health literacy gap for learners in adult basic education and family literacy programs.

  2. Digital literacies

    CERN Document Server

    Hockly, Nicky; Pegrum, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic shifts in our communication landscape have made it crucial for language teaching to go beyond print literacy and encompass the digital literacies which are increasingly central to learners' personal, social, educational and professional lives. By situating these digital literacies within a clear theoretical framework, this book provides educators and students alike with not just the background for a deeper understanding of these key 21st-century skills, but also the rationale for integrating these skills into classroom practice. This is the first methodology book to address not jus

  3. Gaining Competency: Learning to Teach Data Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin A. Briney

    2018-01-01

    Data services librarians are often faced with local needs in all 12 data information literacy competencies (Carlson et al. 2011) but may not have the requisite skills in each area to offer services. Gaining expertise in an unfamiliar competency, particularly one which has not historically been associated with the library like “data visualization and representation”, can be challenging. This paper identifies a scaffolding for librarians to gain foundational experience in data visualization and...

  4. Computational Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio; Robering, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in and recognition of the importance of Computational Literacy, a skill generally considered to be necessary for success in the 21st century. While much research has concentrated on requirements, tools, and teaching methodologies for the acquisit......In recent years, there has been a growing interest in and recognition of the importance of Computational Literacy, a skill generally considered to be necessary for success in the 21st century. While much research has concentrated on requirements, tools, and teaching methodologies...... for the acquisition of Computational Literacy at basic educational levels, focus on higher levels of education has been much less prominent. The present paper considers the case of courses for higher education programs within the Humanities. A model is proposed which conceives of Computational Literacy as a layered...

  5. Students’ Information Literacy: A Perspective from Mathematical Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyadi Wijaya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy is mostly seen from the perspective of library science or information and communication technology. Taking another point of view, this study was aimed to explore students’ information literacy from the perspective of mathematical literacy. For this purpose, a test addressing Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA mathematics tasks were administered to 381 eighth and ninth graders from nine junior high schools in the Province of Yogyakarta. PISA mathematics tasks which were used in this test had specific characteristics regarding information processing, i.e. containing superfluous information, having missing information, and requiring connection across information sources. An error analysis was performed to analyze students’ incorrect responses. The result of this study shows that students did not acquire three characteristics of information literacy; i.e. recognizing information needs, locating and evaluating the quality of information, and making effective and ethical use of information. This result indicates students’ low ability in information literacy.Keywords: information literacy, mathematical literacy, Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.7.2.3532.73-82

  6. Playful Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel

    these practices, which compose the taxonomy of tablet play. My contribution lies in identifying and proposing a series of theoretical concepts that complement recent theories related to play and digital literacy studies. The data collected through observations informed some noteworthy aspects, including how...... vocabulary in children’s digital play experiences. These early digital experiences set the rules for the playgrounds and assert digital tablets as twenty-first-century toys, shaping young children’s playful literacy....

  7. Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Nesset, Sigmund

    2003-01-01

    Information literacy is a concept which is well established in theory while in practice it is only slowly breaking ground in accordance with the understanding of its significance and the possibilities of its realisation. Based on fundamental works, the characteristics of information literacy, its cognitive foundations and significance for individuals as well as for society, are argumented in the article. The analyzed content of this concept is connected with the content of a librarian’s knowl...

  8. Information literacy: Educate through literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Atjo, Nur Amanah Ilham; Pratama, Muhammad Fadhil

    2017-01-01

    The concepts and terms about “Information Literacy” has become general study in education studies. Information literacy is pivotal in this global world where the information literacy equip a person’s ability to access, understand and use the information intelligently. In higher education, in the learning process, students should be able to get used to a new way in education. Students must independently by finding, training themselves and absorbing the education material from lecturers. The de...

  9. Technologcal Literacy in welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch-Jensen, Peter; Kondrup, Sissel

    to be ‘welfare technological literate’ – both generally as well as within specific welfare professions. Secondly to support the development of a helpful educational framework that enables students to develop welfare technological literacy. This paper discusses some difficulties and preliminary findings...

  10. Reconceptualising Science Education Practices from New Literacies Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    In light of profound socio-economic and technological changes, the research from New Literacies has raised fundamental questions on the nature of literacy in the way we read, write, and communicate. Yet, in science education, research in literacy has been largely restricted to the domain of print-oriented academic language. This paper aims to set…

  11. Understanding New Media Literacy: An Explorative Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Bin; Li, Jen-Yi; Deng, Feng; Lee, Ling

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of new media technologies, the role of media in a society has been changed that leads researchers to re-construct the meaning of literacy from classic literacy to new media literacy. There have been continuing efforts to understand new media and promote the importance of becoming new media literate among researchers, educators,…

  12. Developing Media Literacy: Managing Fear and Moving Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    One way to view the development of the media literacy movement is through the various different ways in which strains of media literacy education have been called on to allay fears that accompanying new media technologies. This article focuses on how one media literacy organization,The LAMP, deals with two very different arenas--the internet…

  13. Revisiting Jack Goody to Rethink Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits Goody's arguments about literacy's influence on social arrangements, culture, cognition, economics, and other domains of existence. Whereas some of his arguments tend toward technological determinism (i.e., literacy causes change in the world), other of his arguments construe literacy as a force that shapes and is shaped by…

  14. Journey to Medieval China: Using Technology-Enhanced Instruction to Develop Content Knowledge and Digital Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Kristen; Winstead, Lisa; Kottler, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Recent innovations in Web-based technology tools have made planning instruction with technology in mind far more doable than in years past. To aid teachers in planning with technology, tools are organized into five broad categories: communication, collaboration, presentation, organization and critical-thinking. The purpose and potential of each…

  15. Examining Media Literacy Levels of Prospective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taskın INAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As in many other countries, following the 2007-2008 education year when media literacy courses began to be included in the curricula, media literacy has become one of the discussion topics among educators and decision makers in Turkey. Discussion topics related to media literacy have included who is going to give the media literacy courses, what qualifications will be sought out in media literacy education teachers, what will be included in the media literacy curriculum in terms of its content, and at what level the media literacy course will be given. The current study which aims to examine media literacy levels of prospective teachers utilized thesurvey method. The sample of the study included prospective teachers (480 attending Elementary School Education, Social Studies Education and Turkish Language Education departments in the Education Faculty at the Dumlupinar University in the 2008-2009 education year. The results of the study showed that prospective teachers have a low level of reaction to media messages, do not educate people around enough about the effects of media, but make use of different sources of media to gain information, and are cognizant of media literacy.

  16. [Peculiarities of the health literacy education system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveikauskas, Vaclovas

    2005-01-01

    Health education encompasses opportunities for learning designed to improve health literacy, including increased knowledge and the development of life skills that lead to the improvement of individual and community health. Health literacy represents the cognitive and social skills, which determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access, to understand and use information in ways, which promote and maintain good health. There are three types of health literacy: basic, functional and critical. Basic health literacy implies a fundamental understanding of health problem and the ability to comply with prescribed actions to remedy the problem. Functional health literacy involves more advanced knowledge and skills to function in everyday society and the ability to seek out information in order to respond to changing needs. The most advanced level of health literacy is critical health literacy. It implies a significant level of knowledge, personal skills and confidence to manage one's health, and the ability to take action to change the determinants of health in the environment. Although these levels of health literacy are widely examined but systematic point of view is missing. The goal of this article is to report the peculiarities of the health literacy education system.

  17. Measuring Practicing Clinicians’ Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E.; Bennett, Katelyn J.; Sherman, Scott E.; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. Objectives This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans’ Affairs (VA) medical center. Methods Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach’s a=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson’s correlations. Results Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. Conclusions While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians’ information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs. PMID:28197620

  18. Media Literacy Education: Global Tendencies and Search of Lithuanian Path

    OpenAIRE

    Lilija Duoblienė

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the influence of information technologies on education. Different viewpoints on information literacy education, which is often assimilated to media literacy education, are presented in the paper. The article investigates both advantages of media literacy, which involve its positive influence on education, and disadvantages, which encompass dishonest ideological purposes of media literacy that are hidden behind the notion of efficient teaching. This work defends the idea ...

  19. Identifying Predictors of Achievement in the Newly Defined Information Literacy: A Neural Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Randall; Hignite, Michael; Margavio, Thomas M.; Margavio, Geanie W.

    2009-01-01

    Information Literacy is a concept that evolved as a result of efforts to move technology-based instructional and research efforts beyond the concepts previously associated with "computer literacy." While computer literacy was largely a topic devoted to knowledge of hardware and software, information literacy is concerned with students' abilities…

  20. Urgency Competence of Media Literacy for Archivist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Santoso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of media literacy has been conducted by the earlier scientists. That research uses population that have different characteristics to each other. So this studies of media literacy have various models or patterns. This models or patterns of media literacies will be used as basic data to the next study that generated will usually be the basis for the further research. Basically, the model of media literacy generated by some researchers only can be applied in the population which become objects of research. To day, the archives faced many challenges due to the presence of information technology, so that the competence of media literacy as one of the important competencies to have. Through this competency, archivist are expected to manage archives organization effectively and efficiently. This paper uses a descriptive method to describe how media literacy becomes important for archives.

  1. Digital literacies at school. Students' digital profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pennazio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo presenta una ricerca volta a focalizzare le modalità in cui la Digital Literacy si traduce a scuola. Lo studio ha inteso sottolineare le molteplici dimensioni della Digital Literacy: Information Technology Literacy; Information Literacy; Visual Literacy e Media Literacy ed è stato effettuato nelle scuole primarie e secondarie di primo grado in Liguria. Sono state organizzate settimane di attività di ricerca, analisi e rielaborazione di informazioni, in classe e in rete, individualmente e in gruppo. Dalle autovalutazione degli studenti, svolte al termine di ogni attività, sono emersi i profili digitali che gli studenti tendono ad assumere quando utilizzano le tecnologie digitali. Tali profili possono essere utilizzati dagli insegnanti per progettare in maniera più mirata e significativa le attività con le tecnologie a scuola.

  2. Urgency Competence of Media Literacy for Archivist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Santoso

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of media literacy has been conducted by the earlier scientists. That research uses population that have different characteristics to each other. So this studies of media literacy have various models or patterns. This models or patterns of media literacies will be used as basic data to the next study that generated will usually be the basis for the further research. Basically, the model of media literacy generated by some researchers only can be applied in the population which become objects of research. To day, the archives faced many challenges due to the presence of information technology, so that the competence of media literacy as one of the important competencies to have. through this competency, archivist are expected to manage archives organization effectively and efficiently. This paper uses a descriptive method to describe how media literacy becomes important for archives.

  3. Instructional Preferences of First-Year College Students with Below-Proficient Information Literacy Skills: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Don; Gross, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    The Attaining Information Literacy Project has focused on identifying first-year college students with below-proficient information literacy skills, gaining an understanding of those students' self-views and perceptions of information literacy, gaining an understanding of their instructional experiences and preferences, and developing an…

  4. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie MacLure

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  5. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2015-10-15

    In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration) pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth) applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  6. Gaining Relational Competitive Advantages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Zhang, Si; Li, Jizhen

    2015-01-01

    Establishing strategic technological partnerships (STPs) with foreign partners is an increasingly studied topic within the innovation management literature. Partnering firms can jointly create sources of relational competitive advantage. Chinese firms often lack research and development (R......&D) capabilities but are increasingly becoming preferred technological partners for transnational corporations. We investigate an STP between a Scandinavian and a Chinese firm and try to explore how to gain relational competitive advantage by focusing on its two essential stages: relational rent generation...... and appropriation. Based on an explorative case study, we develop a conceptual framework that consists of process, organizational alliance factors, and coordination modes that we propose lead to relational competitive advantage....

  7. Evaluation of optical data gained by ARAMIS-measurement of abdominal wall movements for an anisotropic pattern design of stress-adapted hernia meshes produced by embroidery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, A.; Bittrich, L.; Hahn, J.; Spickenheuer, A.

    2017-10-01

    For the sustainable repair of abdominal wall hernia the application of hernia meshes is required. One reason for the relapse of hernia after surgery is seen in an inadequate adaption of the mechanical properties of the mesh to the movements of the abdominal wall. Differences in the stiffness of the mesh and the abdominal tissue cause tension, friction and stress resulting in a deficient tissue response and subsequently in a recurrence of a hernia, preferentially in the marginal area of the mesh. Embroidery technology enables a targeted influence on the mechanical properties of the generated textile structure by a directed thread deposition. Textile parameters like stitch density, alignment and angle can be changed easily and locally in the embroidery pattern to generate a space-resolved mesh with mechanical properties adapted to the requirement of the surrounding tissue. To determine those requirements the movements of the abdominal wall and the resulting distortions need to be known. This study was conducted to gain optical data of the abdominal wall movements by non-invasive ARAMIS-measurement on 39 test persons to estimate direction and value of the major strains.

  8. New Literacy Implementation: The Impact of Professional Development on Middle School Student Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Yin; Wang, Shaing-Kwei; Coster, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    With advancing technology, "literacy" evolves to include new forms of literacy made possible by digital technologies. "New literacy" refers to using technology to research, locate, evaluate, synthesize and communication information. The purpose of the study is to develop a framework to guide science teachers' new literacy…

  9. Examining e-Health literacy and the digital divide in an underserved population in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm; Crosby, Martha E

    2014-02-01

    Seeking health information is one of the leading uses for the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW). Research has found the amount one benefits from e-Health information (health information from electronic sources) is directly related to the level of e-Health literacy. e-Health literacy is defined as "the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem." In order to gain a further understanding of the effects and use of technology, the digital divide, and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes, focus group interviews were conducted with participants diagnosed with diabetes and currently residing in a Medically Underserved Area. Overall, 25 volunteers participated in the four focus group meetings. Based on the focus group discussions, a general low e-Health literacy rate was identified. This was demonstrated by the lack of access to the Internet and the skills needed to retrieve health information. Of the 25 participants, 64% reported having Internet access at some level, but, only one reported going on the Internet every day. When the barriers to using the Internet were discussed, many participants expressed a lack of knowledge in how to retrieve information. Results of this study further show that having access to technology is not necessarily associated with usage. This dynamic is evolving into a new form of digital divide, gap in information retrieval and usage, versus gap in access. This is the first known study to examine e-Health literacy in an underserved population in Hawai'i. With the proliferation of information and communication technology and the transformation of information retrieval to be mobile and "on demand", a multi-pronged communication and education strategy is needed to explore how technology can improve e-Health literacy and health outcomes among underserved populations.

  10. Examining e-Health Literacy and the Digital Divide in an Underserved Population in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    Seeking health information is one of the leading uses for the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW). Research has found the amount one benefits from e-Health information (health information from electronic sources) is directly related to the level of e-Health literacy. e-Health literacy is defined as “the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem.” In order to gain a further understanding of the effects and use of technology, the digital divide, and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes, focus group interviews were conducted with participants diagnosed with diabetes and currently residing in a Medically Underserved Area. Overall, 25 volunteers participated in the four focus group meetings. Based on the focus group discussions, a general low e-Health literacy rate was identified. This was demonstrated by the lack of access to the Internet and the skills needed to retrieve health information. Of the 25 participants, 64% reported having Internet access at some level, but, only one reported going on the Internet every day. When the barriers to using the Internet were discussed, many participants expressed a lack of knowledge in how to retrieve information. Results of this study further show that having access to technology is not necessarily associated with usage. This dynamic is evolving into a new form of digital divide, gap in information retrieval and usage, versus gap in access. This is the first known study to examine e-Health literacy in an underserved population in Hawai‘i. With the proliferation of information and communication technology and the transformation of information retrieval to be mobile and “on demand”, a multi-pronged communication and education strategy is needed to explore how technology can improve e-Health literacy and health outcomes among underserved populations. PMID:24567867

  11. A methodological proposal to contribute to the development of research skills in science education to start the design of a didactic unit built on foundations of scientific and technological literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Velásquez Mosquera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to promote a discussion of the need to promote the training of investigative skills in students of natural sciences from a methodology structured from the design of the plan of course, including a didactic unit, based on scientific and technological literacy to. It is the result of several years of experience in teaching and research of the author in the field of the didactics of the sciences. 

  12. A Social Practice Approach to Understanding Teachers' Learning to Use Technology and Digital Literacies in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Judy; Guerrero, Elsa

    2013-01-01

    Current educational policy in Mexico, as in many other parts of the world, leans heavily on teachers to use computers in their classrooms. This article explores under what conditions teachers are willing to learn about and use digital technology in their work. The authors' central premise is that incorporating technology into teaching is a complex…

  13. Literacy competence based on fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    tool towards children's general Bildung and more specific development of literacy competence in the first years of school, in 2007 we carried out an investigation about fiction as a part of mother-tongue teaching and the process of children's learning to read. Via the investigation and general studies...... we want to get more knowledge ablout following questions:   How to define fiction which holds a personal and language "Bildung"? How to define the importance of fiction related to children's literacy competence? What kind of fiction do teachers use? How do teachers mediate fiction, how and in what...... extend do teachers make use of drawing and play activities? How to find a balance between to maintain the aesthetical and narrative methods and expressions AND gaining a literacy competence?   This paper has focus on the fourth question....

  14. Adult Literacy in Zanzibar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Ahmed H.

    The philosophy behind adult literacy in Zanzibar is that adult literacy is a process whereby the illiterate is empowered to become aware of his or her potential. Literacy activities emphasize a relation to work, sometimes known as functional literacy. Specific objectives of literacy programs are to improve living conditions, impart self-reliant…

  15. Measuring Science Literacy in College Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Chris David; Buxner, S. R.; Antonellis, J.; King, C.; Johnson, E.; CATS

    2010-01-01

    Initial results from a major study of scientific literacy are presented, involving nearly 10,000 undergraduates in science classes at a large Southwestern Land Grant public university over a 20-year period. The science content questions overlap with those in the NSF's Science Indicators series. About 10% of all undergraduates in the US take a General Education astronomy course, and NSF data and the work of Jon Miller show that the number of college science courses taken is the strongest predictor of civic scientific literacy. Our data show that gains in knowledge on any particular item through the time students graduate are only 10-15%. Among students who have taken most or all of their science requirements, one-in-three think that antibiotics kill viruses as well as bacteria, one-in-four think lasers work by focusing sound waves, one-in-five think atoms are smaller than electrons, and the same fraction is unaware that humans evolved from earlier species of animals and that the Earth takes a year to go around the Sun. The fraction of undergraduates saying that astrology is "not at all” scientific increases from 17% to a still-low 34% as they move through the university. Equally worrying, half of all science majors say that astrology is "sort of” or "very” scientific. Education majors - the cohort of future teachers - perform worse than average on most individual questions and in terms of their overall scientific literacy. Assuming the study institution is representative of the nation's higher education institutions, our instruction is not raising students to the level we would expect for educated citizens who must vote on many issues that relate to science and technology. We acknowledge the NSF for funding under Award No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program.

  16. Information Literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ian

    2) would agree, saying that information literate students access, evaluate and use information from a variety of sources, communicate effectively, and reflect on the process as well as the product. Information Literacy is especially relevant in primary and secondary schools, institutions of higher learning, and in business and ...

  17. Information Literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ian

    accepted, leading to a renewed emphasis on information literacy in all education sectors (Bundy 2002). ALA's definition sees IL as ... and/or networks to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, and create information in order to function in a knowledge society. This definition .... organizing and accessing information. The study ...

  18. eHealth literacy: extending the digital divide to the realm of health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neter, Efrat; Brainin, Esther

    2012-01-27

    eHealth literacy is defined as the ability of people to use emerging information and communications technologies to improve or enable health and health care. The goal of this study was to explore whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet. The study focused on (1) traditional digital divide variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics, digital access, and digital literacy, (2) information search processes, and (3) the outcomes of Internet use for health information purposes. We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286). We measured eHealth literacy; Internet access; digital literacy; sociodemographic factors; perceived health; presence of chronic diseases; as well as health information sources, content, search strategies, and evaluation criteria used by consumers. Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance), and interpersonal (interacting with their physician) gains. The present study documented differences between respondents high and low in eHealth literacy in terms of background attributes, information consumption, and outcomes of the information search. The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated use of the Internet and the subsequent increased

  19. Quantitative Literacy: Geosciences and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; McCallum, W. G.

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative literacy seems like such a natural for the geosciences, right? The field has gone from its origin as a largely descriptive discipline to one where it is hard to imagine failing to bring a full range of mathematical tools to the solution of geological problems. Although there are many definitions of quantitative literacy, we have proposed one that is analogous to the UNESCO definition of conventional literacy: "A quantitatively literate person is one who, with understanding, can both read and represent quantitative information arising in his or her everyday life." Central to this definition is the concept that a curriculum for quantitative literacy must go beyond the basic ability to "read and write" mathematics and develop conceptual understanding. It is also critical that a curriculum for quantitative literacy be engaged with a context, be it everyday life, humanities, geoscience or other sciences, business, engineering, or technology. Thus, our definition works both within and outside the sciences. What role do geoscience faculty have in helping students become quantitatively literate? Is it our role, or that of the mathematicians? How does quantitative literacy vary between different scientific and engineering fields? Or between science and nonscience fields? We will argue that successful quantitative literacy curricula must be an across-the-curriculum responsibility. We will share examples of how quantitative literacy can be developed within a geoscience curriculum, beginning with introductory classes for nonmajors (using the Mauna Loa CO2 data set) through graduate courses in inverse theory (using singular value decomposition). We will highlight six approaches to across-the curriculum efforts from national models: collaboration between mathematics and other faculty; gateway testing; intensive instructional support; workshops for nonmathematics faculty; quantitative reasoning requirement; and individual initiative by nonmathematics faculty.

  20. Information Literacy and Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Baysen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Teachers play a key role in raising individuals equipped with literacy skills that societies need in the 21st century. Therefore, teacher candidates should be equipped with such skills first. Thus those programs that aim to help teacher candidates gain these skills should be included in the curriculums of education faculties. Based on this framework, the aim of the study is to both reveal if the information literacy program is considered in both national policies, in laws and in teacher qualification and also determine the existence of information literacy program in departments of educations’ teacher training curriculum. For this purpose, qualitative research approaches have been utilized in the study for determining the existing situation. The data is collected from documents of laws, national policies and action plans, national education council decisions, teacher competencies which were produced by Ministry of Education of both Turkey and Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC and other related institutions and ministries and missions and programs of primary sources of governmental and foundation universities including education faculties in Ankara-Turkey and TRNC. Content analysis method was used to analyze the data. The analysis showed that information literacy education is not addressed sufficiently both in Turkey and TRNC in teacher education programs, there is a lack of awareness on information literacy education program in the education faculties. At the end of this study, evaluation of the obtained data was made and suggestions were made for future researches.

  1. Studying New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, Michele; Lankshear, Colin

    2014-01-01

    New literacies research offers valuable insights into young people's everyday literacy practices. Teachers can use the kinds of research outcomes reported here to build on new literacies in appropriate ways for academic purposes.

  2. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  3. Refreshing Information Literacy: Learning from Recent British Information Literacy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justine

    2013-01-01

    Models play an important role in helping practitioners implement and promote information literacy. Over time models can lose relevance with the advances in technology, society, and learning theory. Practitioners and scholars often call for adaptations or transformations of these frameworks to articulate the learning needs in information literacy…

  4. Experiments and Pilot Study Evaluating the Performance of Reading Miscue Detector and Automated Reading Tutor for Filipino: A Children's Speech Technology for Improving Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M. Pascual

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The latest advances in speech processing technology have allowed the development of automated reading tutors (ART for improving children's literacy. An ART is a computer-assisted learning system based on oral reading fluency (ORF instruction and automated speech recognition (ASR technology. However, the design of an ART system is language-specif ic, and thus, requires developing a system specif ically for the Filipino language. In a previous work, the authors have presented the development of the children's Filipino speech corpus (CFSC for the purpose of designing an ART in Filipino. In this paper, the authors present the evaluation of the ART in Filipino which integrates a reference verification (RV- and word duration analysis-based reading miscue detector (RMD, a user interface, and a feedback and instruction set. The authors also present the performance evaluation of the RMD in offline tests, and the effectiveness of the ART as shown by the results of the intervention program, a month-long pilot study that involved the use of the ART by a small group of students. Offline test results show that the RMD's performance (i.e., FA rate ≈ 3% and MDerr rate ≈ 5% is at par with those from state-of-the-art RMDs reported in the literature. The results of the ART intervention experiment showed that the students, on the average, have improved in their words correct per minute (WCPM rate by 4.66 times, in their ORF-16 scores by 6.0 times, and in their reading comprehension exam scores by 4.4 times, after using the ART.

  5. (Re)Imagining Content-Area Literacy Instruction. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Roni Jo, Ed.; Broomhead, Paul, Ed.; Jensen, Amy Petersen, Ed.; Nokes, Jeffery D., Ed.; Siebert, Daniel, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Today's teachers need to prepare students for a world that places increasingly higher literacy demands on its citizens. In this timely book, the authors explore content-area literacy and instruction in English, music, science, mathematics, social studies, visual arts, technology, and theatre. Each of the chapters has been written by teacher…

  6. Health literacy of Dutch adults: a cross sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Rademakers, J.; Schipper, M.; Droomers, M.; Sorensen, K.; Uiters, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relatively little knowledge is available to date about health literacy among the general population in Europe. It is important to gain insights into health literacy competences among the general population, as this might contribute to more effective health promotion and help clarify

  7. Changing Our Aim: Infiltrating Faculty with Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Sandra; Eva, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Librarians are stretched thin these days--budget cuts and decreasing numbers are forcing us to look at new ways of doing things. While the embedded information literacy model has gained popularity in the past number of years, it may be time for a new model of information literacy. We must arm teaching faculty with the tools they need to teach…

  8. Implications of Physical Literacy for Research and Practice: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Physical literacy is a term that has increasingly gained popularity in recent years. A variety of individuals and organizations have promoted the use of the term internationally, and a variety of claims have been made for the benefits of using the term. A historical overview allows the reader to consider physical literacy as one of many terms that…

  9. Health literacy of Dutch adults: a cross sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Iris; Rademakers, Jany; Schipper, Maarten; Droomers, Mariël; Sørensen, Kristine; Uiters, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little knowledge is available to date about health literacy among the general population in Europe. It is important to gain insights into health literacy competences among the general population, as this might contribute to more effective health promotion and help clarify socio-economic

  10. Empowering Physicians with Financial Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Or, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Most doctors complete their medical training without sufficient knowledge of business and finance. This leads to inefficient financial decisions, avoidable losses, and unnecessary anxiety. A big part of the problem is that the existing options for gaining financial knowledge are flawed. The ideal solution is to provide a simple framework of financial literacy to all students: one that can be adapted to their specific circumstances. That framework must be delivered by an objective expert to young physicians before they complete medical training.

  11. Playful Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel

    these practices, which compose the taxonomy of tablet play. My contribution lies in identifying and proposing a series of theoretical concepts that complement recent theories related to play and digital literacy studies. The data collected through observations informed some noteworthy aspects, including how...... with tablets’ physical and digital affordances shape children’s digital play. This thesis presents how young children’s current practices when playing with tablets inform digital experiences in Denmark and Japan. Through an interdisciplinary lens and a grounded theory approach, I have identified and mapped...... vocabulary in children’s digital play experiences. These early digital experiences set the rules for the playgrounds and assert digital tablets as twenty-first-century toys, shaping young children’s playful literacy....

  12. The Nuances of Health Literacy, Nutrition Literacy, and Food Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velardo, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy, defined as the ability to access, understand, and use health information, has been identified as an international public health goal. The term nutrition literacy has emerged as a distinct form of health literacy, yet scholars continue to reflect on constituent skills and capabilities in light of discussions regarding what it means to be food literate and health literate. This viewpoint argues that a comprehensive conceptualization of nutrition literacy should reflect key elements of health literacy and food literacy constructs. Nutbeam's tripartite model of health literacy is employed to explore competencies that are likely to facilitate healthy food relationships. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adapting to Teach Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, B.; Schwartz, K. L.

    2017-12-01

    Adaptation is a key strategy to deal with the effects of climate change, and it can also be a key strategy in teaching climate literacy. Adapting curriculum to include utilizing new instructional practices, modifying existing lessons, evaluating evidence and engaging students in real-world projects are strategies employed in Recharge the Rain. Arizona Project WET and Watershed Management Group developed the Recharge the Rain project, through a NOAA Environmental Literacy Grant, to build community resiliency to hazards associated with increased temperatures, drought and flooding in Arizona. Sixth through twelfth grade teachers, students and the public will move through a continuum from awareness, to knowledge gain, to conceptual understanding, to action. During the first year of the project, through professional development and ongoing guidance, teachers developed a climate literacy curriculum to use in their classrooms. Using systems thinking language and structure from the Cabrera Research Labs, teachers and students gain the thinking tools necessary to increase understanding of Earth's climate system. Lessons and resources for teaching about climate change are abundant and many, such as those on the Climate Literacy Education Awareness Network (CLEAN), have gone through an extensive review process. By cataloguing online resources and sharing these with teachers through a social bookmarking tool, wakelet.com, teachers are easily able to find appropriate teaching material. Engaging students in evaluating evidence requires the data to be relevant to their everyday lives. Online data resources are readily available from NOAA and other sources at both the global and local levels. When teachers, students and the public contribute to the data collection process in citizen science projects such as CoCoRaHS, iSeeChange, and USA National Phenology Network, the data empowers them to act in ways to mitigate the climate threats in their community. Adapting to teach climate

  14. Religious Literacies in a Secular Literacy Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Allison

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how a literacy teacher and her students engaged students' Christian religious literacies in a secular classroom and the outcomes of those transactions. Case study methods; scholarship offering historical, cultural, and social perspectives on Christian religious literacies; and the New London Group's theory of a pedagogy of…

  15. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Technology-Based Approach for Preventing Excess Weight Gain during Pregnancy among Women with Overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ariana M; Srinivas, Sindhu K; Studt, Stacia K; Diewald, Lisa K; Sarwer, David B; Allison, Kelly C

    2017-01-01

    Overweight/obesity and excess weight gain during pregnancy are associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Few interventions have been effective in limiting gestational weight gain among women with overweight or obesity. This pilot, randomized clinical trial compared treatment as usual (TAU) to a lifestyle modification program delivered via phone for the prevention of excess gestational weight gain in women who had overweight or obesity. Participants included 41 pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m 2 (mean age = 28.7 ± 5.8 years; mean pre-gravid BMI = 31.2 ± 6.2 kg/m 2 ; 54% black, 39% white). The intervention group ( n  = 20) received weekly telephone counseling sessions and used WiFi scales to monitor their weight from weeks 16 to 36 of pregnancy. We compared differences in weight and birth outcomes for the intervention vs. the TAU group ( n  = 21). The intervention and TAU groups did not differ with respect to: gestational weight gain (15.5 ± 5.3 vs. 13.3 ± 6.8 kg, respectively); proportion gaining above the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommended weight range (83 vs. 70%); and weight gain from pre-pregnancy weight to 6 weeks postpartum (4.8 ± 4.6 vs. 3.0 ± 5.5 kg). Other birth and health outcomes also did not differ. A telemedicine intervention designed to decrease logistical burden on participants was not more successful in reducing excessive weight gain during pregnancy as compared to TAU. Future studies should examine more intensive forms of remote treatment beginning earlier in pregnancy as well as interventions promoting a healthy weight prior to pregnancy.

  16. Online Tutorials and Effective Information Literacy Instruction for Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Brighid M.

    2014-01-01

    As Internet and computer technologies have evolved, libraries have incorporated these technologies into the delivery of information literacy instruction. Of particular benefit is the ability of online tutorials to deliver information literacy instruction to students not physically present on campus. A survey of library and information science…

  17. Assessment of staff ICT literacy competence in Nigerian federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed information communication technology (ICT) literacy as the relative measure of library staff's capacity to make appropriate use of ICTs for information acquisition, organization, retrieval and dissemination. It also examined the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy on the ...

  18. Media Literacy Education: Global Tendencies and Search of Lithuanian Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilija Duoblienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the influence of information technologies on education. Different viewpoints on information literacy education, which is often assimilated to media literacy education, are presented in the paper. The article investigates both advantages of media literacy, which involve its positive influence on education, and disadvantages, which encompass dishonest ideological purposes of media literacy that are hidden behind the notion of efficient teaching. This work defends the idea that media literacy education is inevitable in modern schooling and that it is step by step replacing traditional ways of learning. Several media education paradigms are discussed: protectionist, media arts education, media literacy education and critical media literacy education. Some of them teach how to utilize modern technologies and develop creativity, whereas others educate how to recognize ideologies and be publicly engaged. The paper evaluates media literacy in Lithuania by exploring the context of media education, i.e. by analyzing Wiki culture, didactic approach of media literacy, relationships among participants of learning process, and influence of information technologies on the development of educational techniques. Prominent questions about Lithuanian readiness for changes in schooling methods are asked. It is argued if the country has a clear and coherent media literacy education philosophy. Answers are found by investigating information literacy programs and media literacy projects in Lithuanian secondary schools. The article arrives to a conclusion that in Lithuania media literacy education is only at the early stage of development, but its progress is quite rapid and omits several stages which were underwent in Western countries. Nevertheless, the work determines that Lithuania lacks new and brave mindset which should be spread together with critical pedagogy and critical media literacy (i.e. transforming education.

  19. Gaining Competency: Learning to Teach Data Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A. Briney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Data services librarians are often faced with local needs in all 12 data information literacy competencies (Carlson et al. 2011 but may not have the requisite skills in each area to offer services. Gaining expertise in an unfamiliar competency, particularly one which has not historically been associated with the library like “data visualization and representation”, can be challenging. This paper identifies a scaffolding for librarians to gain foundational experience in data visualization and provides a case study on one library’s initial service offering in this area – a “Data Visualization 101” workshop.

  20. Development and Validation of Scientific Literacy Scale for College Preparedness in STEM with Freshmen from Diverse Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Thomas E.; Marks, Bryant; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.; Rose, Jordan; Pollard, Ethen; Thomas, Alicia; Muldrow, Lycurgus L.

    2017-01-01

    Although a major goal of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education is to develop scientific literacy, prior efforts at measuring scientific literacy have not attempted to link scientific literacy with success in STEM fields. The current Scientific Literacy Survey for College Preparedness in STEM (SLSCP-STEM) scale was…

  1. Literacy in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graubard, Stephen R., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This collection of essays addresses issues related to basic literacy and mathematical competence in the United States. Articles include the following: "The Roots of Literacy" (David Hawkins); "Historical Perspectives on Literacy and Schooling" (Daniel P. Resnick); "Reconciling the Literacies of Generations" (William…

  2. Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted learning (CAL) has enhanced undergraduate medical education. CAL improves performance at examinations, develops problem solving skills and increases student satisfaction. The study evaluates computer literacy among first year medical students in Sri Lanka. Methods The study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka between August-September 2008. First year medical students (n = 190) were invited for the study. Data on computer literacy and associated factors were collected by an expert-validated pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Computer literacy was evaluated by testing knowledge on 6 domains; common software packages, operating systems, database management and the usage of internet and E-mail. A linear regression was conducted using total score for computer literacy as the continuous dependant variable and other independent covariates. Results Sample size-181 (Response rate-95.3%), 49.7% were Males. Majority of the students (77.3%) owned a computer (Males-74.4%, Females-80.2%). Students have gained their present computer knowledge by; a formal training programme (64.1%), self learning (63.0%) or by peer learning (49.2%). The students used computers for predominately; word processing (95.6%), entertainment (95.0%), web browsing (80.1%) and preparing presentations (76.8%). Majority of the students (75.7%) expressed their willingness for a formal computer training programme at the faculty. Mean score for the computer literacy questionnaire was 48.4 ± 20.3, with no significant gender difference (Males-47.8 ± 21.1, Females-48.9 ± 19.6). There were 47.9% students that had a score less than 50% for the computer literacy questionnaire. Students from Colombo district, Western Province and Student owning a computer had a significantly higher mean score in comparison to other students (p computer training was the strongest predictor of computer literacy (β = 13.034), followed by using

  3. Development and Validation of Scientific Literacy Achievement Test to Assess Senior Secondary School Students' Literacy Acquisition in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, A. A.; Joshua, E. O.

    2015-01-01

    Physics literacy plays a crucial part in global technological development as several aspects of science and technology apply concepts and principles of physics in their operations. However, the acquisition of scientific literacy in physics in our society today is not encouraging enough to the desirable standard. Therefore, this study focuses on…

  4. Reconceptualizing Media Literacy in the Social Studies: A Pragmatist Critique of the NCSS Position Statement on Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance; Metzger, Scott Alan

    2012-01-01

    The National Council for the Social Studies Position Statement on Media Literacy argues that media literacy can facilitate participatory democracy if students' interest in media is harnessed. The statement conceives of media technology as neutral and under-conceptualizes socializing aspects of media technologies that foster atomized individualism.…

  5. Computer Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    curricula, systems must reorder their priorities.ඇ One question for computer-literacy advocates is this: What is computer literacy more important...Context." AEDS Journal, 17, 3 (Spring 1984) 1-13. "Reader’s Survey Results: What Is Computer Literacy?" Classroom Computer Learning (March 1986) p. 53...Acquisition of Computer Literacy." Journal of Computer-Based Information, 12, 1 (Winter 1985) 12-16. "\\ What is Computer Literacy?" Article 10c in Cannings

  6. Promoting Information Literacy by Promoting Health Literacy in the Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Dastani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the information society, the production, distribution and use of information are freely and widely available for all issues of life. Proper and appropriate use of reliable information is especially important in health care. The present study introduces the concepts and benefits of health literacy and information literacy and its role in improving health literacy. This study was a review based on the concepts of information society, information literacy and information education to present importance of promoting information literacy on health literacy in the information society. The information society is presented by providing a platform of information technology and computer systems to attempt to exchange and develop information among people in the community. Currently, electronic and web-based health information in the mass form is available. Information as a fundamental base of the information society is a phenomenon that our decisions are affected in relation to various issues such as safety and health issues. It is important to avoid the mass of invalid, incorrect and inappropriate information which is available on the internet. This requires information literacy skills such as identifying, accessing and evaluating information. In general, it can be said that the promotion of health literacy in communities requires learning different skills in the form of information literacy.Data obtained from this study can be used in developing the long term health programs to prevention of non-communicable diseases in our country

  7. 102: PROMOTING INFORMATION LITERACY BY PROMOTING HEALTH LITERACY IN THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastani, Meisam; Sattari, Masoume

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims In the information society the production, distribution and use of information is freely and widely available for all issues of life. Correct and appropriate use of appropriate and reliable information is especially important in health care. The present study introduces the concepts and benefits of health literacy and information literacy and its role in improving health literacy. Methods This study is a review based on a review of the concepts of the information society, information literacy and information educated to present importance of promoting information literacy on health literacy in the information society. Results and Conclusion The information society by providing a platform of information technology and computer systems to attempts exchange and development information between people in the community. Currently, electronic and web-based health information in the form of mass is available for people. Information as a fundamental base of the information society is a phenomenon that our decisions are affect in relation to various issues such as safety and health issues. It is important point to avoid the mass of information invalid, incorrect and inappropriate available on the internet. This requires information literacy skills such as identifying, accessing and evaluating information. In general, it can be said that the promotion of health literacy in communities are required to learn different skills in the form of information literacy.

  8. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikk...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  9. Science Information Literacy Tutorials and Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study examined information literacy tutorials in science. The goals of the research were to identify which of the information literacy standards for science, engineering and technology were addressed in the tutorials, and the extent that the tutorials incorporated good pedagogical elements.Methods – The researcher chose for review 31 of the tutorials selected by members of the ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS Information Literacy Committee. She carefully analyzed the tutorials and developed a database with codes for the topic of each tutorial, the STS information literacy standard(s addressed by the tutorial, and whether good pedagogical elements were incorporated. The entire analysis and coding procedure was repeated three times to ensure consistency.Results – The tutorials analyzed in this study covered various subjects and addressed all the (STS information literacy standards. The tutorials presented information clearly and allowed users to select their own learning paths. The incorporation of good pedagogical elements was limited, especially in relation to active learning elements.Conclusions – Web tutorials have been accepted as effective information literacy instruction tools and have been used to teach all elements of the STS information literacy standards. Yet, ensuring they provide a real learning experience for students remains a challenge. More serious thought needs to be given to integrating good pedagogy into these instructional tools in order to attain deep learning.

  10. ROBOT LITERACY AN APPROACH FOR SHARING SOCIETY WITH INTELLIGENT ROBOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetsugu Suto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept of media education called “robot literacy” is proposed. Here, robot literacy refers to the means of forming an appropriate relationship with intelligent robots. It can be considered a kind of media literacy. People who were born after the Internet age can be considered “digital natives” who have new morals and values and behave differently than previous generations in Internet societies. This can cause various problems among different generations. Thus, the necessity of media literacy education is increasing. Internet technologies, as well as robotics technologies are growing rapidly, and people who are born after the “home robot age,” whom the author calls “robot natives,” will be expected to have a certain degree of “robot literacy.” In this paper, the concept of robot literacy is defined and an approach to robot literacy education is discussed.

  11. Improving academic literacy by teaching collocations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    education students' use of collocations in writing are discussed. Keywords: teaching ... academic literacy in a South African context goes beyond language proficiency, the latter seems to be the only matter of ..... The results indicate that the explicit teaching of collocations results in significant gains in collocation growth, both ...

  12. “Turn Your Cell Phones on”: Mobile Phone Polling as a Tool for Teaching Information Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Burkhardt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While mobile technologies are ubiquitous among students and increasingly used in many aspects of libraries, they have yet to gain traction in information literacy instruction. Librarians at Champlain College piloted mobile phone polling in a first-year classroom as a less expensive and more versatile alternative to clickers. By utilizing a technology that virtually all students have in their pockets librarians found that it increased engagement from previous iterations of the session. In addition, by asking poll questions about students’ experiences, librarians were able to facilitate in-depth inquiry into information literacy topics. Ultimately, from direct experience in over 30 different classes, we found that mobile phone polling is a useful tool for any librarian to have in their pedagogical toolbox.

  13. What matters in the classroom: A structural model of standards-based scientific literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Louise E.

    For over two decades educators and policy makers have been particularly concerned with student achievement in the wake of A Nation at Risk. A majority of studies indicates that students' family background has the strongest influence on achievement, although characteristics of their teachers and schools have significant impact as well. This study considered achievement in science in particular, investigating the influence of alterable factors within the classroom on students' gains in scientific literacy. Scientific literacy included three elements: content knowledge, scientific process skills, and attitude towards science. Based on a review of the literature on student achievement, a structural equation model was constructed with five latent variables: teacher's education, instructional practices, teacher's attitudes, school's context, and students' scientific literacy. The model was tested using data from the five-month implementation of a standards-based integrated text/technology/laboratory program, Biology: Exploring Life. The sixteen biology teachers completed two pre-implementation surveys, and 664 of their students completed the three pretests and the corresponding posttests. The initial model did not fit well (chi2(80) = 2784.16; chi 2/df = 34.80; GFI = .70; IFI = .49; CFI = .49) and was inadmissible due to the presence of negative variances. After revision of the model, fit improved somewhat (chi2(53) = 1623.97; chi 2/df = 30.64; GFI = .77; IFI = .65; CFI = .65), although a negative variance migrated and persisted. The total effects were greatest for the teacher's attitudes (largely indirect, mediated through instructional practices), followed by school's context, and instructional practices. Teacher's education had the lowest total effects due to almost equal but opposite direct effects (positive) and indirect effects (mediated through instructional practices and teacher's attitudes). The investigator concluded that alterable factors such as teachers

  14. Exploring the role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information: Insights from a mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diviani, N.; van den Putte, B.; Meppelink, C.S.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    Objective To gain new insights into the relationship between health literacy and evaluation of online health information. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach, forty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted followed by a short questionnaire on health literacy and eHealth literacy.

  15. 75 FR 51831 - Request for Measures of Health Plan Efforts To Address Health Plan Members' Health Literacy Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Measures of Health Plan Efforts To Address Health Plan Members' Health Literacy Needs AGENCY: Agency for... well health plans and health providers address health plan enrollees' health literacy needs and how... literacy for the CAHPS[supreg] Health Plan Survey. The intent of the planned survey is to gain patients...

  16. Assessing and developing academic literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weideman, Albert

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that there is much to learn from an external, peer or expert evaluation by a department that concerns itself with the assessment and development of academic literacy. Such an evaluation provides an opportunity to step back and reflect on the foundations of one’s work, and redefine its operational focuses. Taking the response to one such evaluation as an example, the paper shows how the external input led to the alignment of the two main aims of our work: (1 testing academic literacy levels, and (2 course design and teaching. The paper concludes by highlighting the numerous opportunities that are now opening up for inter-institutional co-operation on a national scale. Sharing the results and insights gained from an evaluation is not normally done outside of the institution that was evaluated. We hope that by making our information about this more freely available, it will further stimulate such co-operation.

  17. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which...... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....

  18. Adhesive market develops new technologies. The thin-film solar cells gain ground; El mercado de adhesivos desarrolla nuevas tecnologias. Las celulas solares de capa fina ganan terreno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluke, M.

    2010-07-01

    The solar industry is booming. thin-film technology is experiencing a high demand as promised cost advantages and currently is providing excellent results, while a range of efficiency reaches acceptable. (Author)

  19. Development of the eHealth Literacy Assessment Toolkit, eHLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Dorthe Furstrand; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In a world with rising focus on the use of eHealth, the match between the competences of the individual and the demands of eHealth systems becomes increasingly important, thus making assessment of eHealth literacy as a measure of user competences a vital element. We propose the eHealth Literacy...... Assessment toolkit, eHLA, evaluating the user by seven scales: computer familiarity, confidence, incentive and performance as well as functional health literacy, health literacy self-assessment and health literacy performance, as a first step toward development of technology that accommodates the literacy...

  20. Information Literacy in Croatia: An Ideological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poler Kovacic, Melita; Zgrabljic Rotar, Nada; Erjavec, Karmen

    2012-01-01

    New information and communication technologies were widely perceived as something that would lead post-socialist European countries towards the technologically developed information society. In this article, a critical perspective is taken in examining information literacy as an ideological form. The deconstruction of ideological practice was…

  1. Health Literacy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Health Literacy URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Health Literacy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  2. Literacy in the World and Turkey "A General Assessment of the Situation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asici, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Literacy concept has changed and become different as a result of researches carried out in the field of educational sciences, and social and technological developments in the world. Particularly after the 1990s, literacy concept included not a single fact, but multiple facts. The word literacy has started being used along with different…

  3. Using the Digital Transmedia Magazine Project to Support Students with 21st-Century Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner-Zachocki, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies have had a significant impact on how educators have come to understand and define literacy, and on the types of literacies and literacy practices that are required in the 21st century. In response, organizations such as the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) have designed frameworks that attempt to articulate…

  4. How is eHealth literacy measured and what do the measurements tell us?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Astrid Karnøe; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of digital services and technologies in health care calls for effective tools to evaluate the users’ eHealth literacy in order to better understand the users’ interaction with health technologies. We here present a systematic review of existing tools to measure eHealth literacy...... and for what these tools have been used to investigate. We identified eight tools, of which three of them are bases upon a conceptual model of eHealth literacy and the remaining five are dual tools, i.a. comprised of individual measures for health literacy and digital literacy. Of these eight tools, only one...... dual tools were primarily used to screen for adequate and inadequate health literacy and digital literacy. In conclusion, there is very little knowledge about individuals’ eHealth literacy and how it relates to health outcomes or the clinical course of specific diseases. New tools developed for the new...

  5. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Katherine; Culbertson, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Scientific discovery, technological revolutions, and complex global challenges are commonplace in the modern era. People are bombarded with news about climate change, pandemics, and genetically modified organisms, and scientific literacy has never been more important than in the present day. Yet only 29% of American adults have sufficient understanding to be able to read science stories reported in the popular press [Miller, 2010], and American students consistently rank below other nations in math and science [National Center for Education Statistics, 2012].

  6. Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlow, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued.

  7. Why life sciences companies need to tap technology to gain a competitive edge?and what that means for the chief information officers (CIO) role

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental changes in the marketplace for medicines, as well as the rapid and continuing evolution of technology are bringing new challenges and opportunities for life sciences companies and their contribution to healthcare systems. These changes bring pressure on chief information officers (CIOs) within the healthcare industry to play an increasingly strategic role in advancing business success and delivering digital transformation.

  8. Why life sciences companies need to tap technology to gain a competitive edge-and what that means for the chief information officers (CIO) role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental changes in the marketplace for medicines, as well as the rapid and continuing evolution of technology are bringing new challenges and opportunities for life sciences companies and their contribution to healthcare systems. These changes bring pressure on chief information officers (CIOs) within the healthcare industry to play an increasingly strategic role in advancing business success and delivering digital transformation.

  9. Literacies in the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, the author invites readers to consider the body and its central place in literacy pedagogy, practice and research. She emphasizes two interrelated paths for teachers and researchers interested in literacies to tend to the body: (1) the ways literacies are engaged and cultivated for making sense of bodies, and (2) the literacies…

  10. Health literacy in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemer, Frederieke S.; Haan, Yentl C.; Nannan Panday, Rani V.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Oehlers, Glenn P.; Brewster, Lizzy M.

    2017-01-01

    Low health literacy is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, data on health literacy in low- and middle-income countries are scarce. Therefore, we assessed the level of health literacy in Suriname, a middle-income country with a high cardiovascular mortality. We estimated

  11. Health literacy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Sørensen, Kristine; Röthlin, Florian; Pelikan, Jürgen; Rademakers, Jany; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is an important determinant of health, but national health literacy levels are known for only some European countries. This study aims to examine to what extent national health literacy levels can be estimated based on publicly available census data. Method:

  12. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  13. Empowering Indonesian women through building digital media literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Suwana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is still a gender digital divide in Indonesia. Indonesian women need digital media literacy skills to effectively use the Internet and to raise their quality of life. Empowering literacy abilities includes the skills of using digital media to access, search, analyze, reflect, share, and create. In this qualitative research study, founders, leaders, and participants from IWITA (Indonesian Women Information Technology Awareness and FemaleDev (Female Developer were interviewed because these organizations focus on developing digital literacy for women. The findings indicated that digital media literacy remains low because of inadequate education, lack of opportunities and the patriarchal system in Indonesia.

  14. Health workers' ICT literacy in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the ICT literacy among the health workers of Igbinedion University Teaching Hospital. The emergence of Internet for Telemedicine and health information revolution necessitates that issue of computer and other communication technology literacy among the health workers of Igbinedion University ...

  15. Bridging the Gap: Information Literacy Workshops for High School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, Janet; Curtis, Sylvia; DeDecker, Sherry; Edgerton, Sylvelin; Gibbens, Carol; Lueck, Lorna

    2002-01-01

    A team of University of California, Santa Barbara instruction librarians developed information literacy workshops for local high school teachers and librarians. They introduced teachers to information literacy standards, provided technology training, presented strategies and activities for incorporating critical thinking into the research process,…

  16. Discursive Constructions of Literacies: Shifting Sands in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandretto, Susan; Tilson, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Literacy policy and pedagogy in Aotearoa New Zealand have a strong discursive heritage of traditional literacies, which emphasise code breaking and meaning making with linguistic codes and conventions over other possible modes of communication. In a rapidly evolving landscape where changes in communication technologies give birth to new literacies…

  17. Digital diversity: a study of teachers’ everyday digital literacy practices

    OpenAIRE

    Tour, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    As digital media have become increasingly integrated in everyday life, there have been calls for new literacies to become an integral part of language and literacy education. Yet traditional approaches to digital technologies, which position technology as an occasional add-on to existing pedagogies, continue to persist in Australian school settings. The role of teachers and their approaches to digital technologies have been acknowledged in efforts to explain the challenges associated with tea...

  18. Using Gaming Literacies to Cultivate New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Yin; Wang, Shiang-Kwei

    2010-01-01

    The use of games in educational contexts has recently received growing attention; however, many teachers struggle with finding a right context to adopt games in the classroom. To strengthen teachers' beliefs about the educational value of games, this article explains the similarities and differences between new literacies and gaming literacy and…

  19. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antidepressants and weight gain: What causes it? Can antidepressants cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall- ... is a possible side effect of nearly all antidepressants. However, each person responds to antidepressants differently. Some ...

  20. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosanne Marie Cordell

    2013-01-01

    Digital Literacy is a more recent term than Information Literacy and is used for multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between Information Literacy and Digital Literacy is essential before revision of the Information Literacy Standards can proceed.

  1. Information Literacy Policy Development in Canada: Is It Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines policy issues related to information literacy in Canada. It provides some background on the information literacy concept, reflecting on popular definitions offered by American, British, and Australian library associations, before advocating for a broader definition that views information literacy as a human right. Information literacy is also considered in relationship to the proliferation of other “literacies,” such as digital, web, media, and information technology, that are the subject of increased advocacy and attention from interest groups and educators. The ongoing need for improved information literacy levels is analyzed not only in the context of inputs (the increasing complexity of the information environment but also in terms of potential personal, social, and economic outcomes that can be realized through widespread information literacy education efforts. The paper argues that information literacy must become a priority not only among academic librarians but also school, public, and special librarians, as well as others outside of the library sector, if significant improvements in information literacy levels are to be realized. Such a coordinated approach can only be achieved in the context of policies that require, and adequately support, widespread efforts at improving information literacy levels. After a review of the ad-hoc state of information literacy education in Canada today, this paper analyzes information literacy-related policy development efforts in Canada to date in the four arenas where one would expect to see such activity: the Government of Canada, provincial governments, library associations, and other stakeholder groups. This article aims to start a wide-reaching discussion about information literacy and associated policy issues in Canada.

  2. Using a tailored health information technology- driven intervention to improve health literacy and medication adherence in a Pakistani population with vascular disease (Talking Rx) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ayeesha Kamran; Muqeet, Abdul; Farhat, Kashfa; Khalid, Wardah; Jamil, Anum; Gowani, Ambreen; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Zaidi, Fabiha; Khan, Danyal; Elahi, Touseef; Sharif, Shahrukh; Raz, Sibtain; Zafar, Taha; Bokhari, Syedah Saira; Rahman, Nasir; Sultan, Fateh Ali Tipoo; Sayani, Saleem; Virani, Salim S

    2016-03-05

    Vascular disease, manifesting as myocardial infarction and stroke, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Current estimates are that only one in six patients have good adherence to medications and very few have sufficient health literacy. Our aim is to explore the effectiveness and acceptability of Prescription Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Talking Prescriptions (Talking Rx) and SMS reminders in increasing medication adherence and health literacy in Pakistani patients with vascular disease. This is a randomized, controlled, single center trial. Adult participants, with access to a cell phone and a history of vascular disease, taking multiple risk-modifying medications (inclusive of anti-platelets and statins) will be selected from cerebrovascular and cardiovascular clinics. They will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio via a block design to the intervention or the control arm with both groups having access to a helpline number to address their queries in addition to standard of care as per institutional guidelines. Participants in the intervention group will also have access to Interactive Voice Response (IVR) technology tailored to their respective prescriptions in the native language (Urdu) and will have the ability to hear information about their medication dosage, correct use, side effects, mechanism of action and how and why they should use their medication, as many times as they like. Participants in the intervention arm will also receive scheduled SMS messages reminding them to take their medications. The primary outcome measure will be the comparison of the difference in adherence to anti-platelet and statin medication between baseline and at 3-month follow-up in each group measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. To ascertain the impact of our intervention on health literacy, we will also compare a local content-validated and modified version of Test of Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) between

  3. Lessons Learned from the Holocaust: Blogging to Teach Critical Multicultural Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Elizabeth Years; Brown, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative dual-case study addresses two 21st century teacher education imperatives, technology infusion and critical multicultural literacy instruction. We researched the integration of a blog as a tool to promote technology use in a graduate course on literacy and technology with a thematic focus on the Holocaust. Using a grounded theory…

  4. Social Support and “Playing Around”: An Examination of How Older Adults Acquire Digital Literacy With Tablet Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-yi Sandy; Shillair, Ruth; Cotten, Shelia R.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how older adults learn to use tablet computers. Learning to use new technologies can help older adults to be included in today’s digital society. However, learning to use new technologies is not always easy, especially for older adults. This study focuses on how older adults learn to use a specific technology, tablet computers, and the role that social support plays in this process. Data for this project are from 21 in-depth interviews with individuals who own tablet computers. We examine how older adults engage with tablet devices and increase their digital literacy. The findings suggest that, for older adults to start to use tablets, social support plays an important role. In addition, a key way that many participants report gaining expertise with the technology is through “playing around” with the tablets. Suggestions for how to help older adults learn to use new technologies are detailed. PMID:26491029

  5. Social Support and "Playing Around": An Examination of How Older Adults Acquire Digital Literacy With Tablet Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi Sandy; Shillair, Ruth; Cotten, Shelia R

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how older adults learn to use tablet computers. Learning to use new technologies can help older adults to be included in today's digital society. However, learning to use new technologies is not always easy, especially for older adults. This study focuses on how older adults learn to use a specific technology, tablet computers, and the role that social support plays in this process. Data for this project are from 21 in-depth interviews with individuals who own tablet computers. We examine how older adults engage with tablet devices and increase their digital literacy. The findings suggest that, for older adults to start to use tablets, social support plays an important role. In addition, a key way that many participants report gaining expertise with the technology is through "playing around" with the tablets. Suggestions for how to help older adults learn to use new technologies are detailed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. A cluster randomized control field trial of the ABRACADABRA web-based literacy intervention: Replication and extension of basic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noella Angele Piquette

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports a cluster randomized control trial evaluation of teaching using ABRACADABRA (ABRA, an evidence-based and web-based literacy intervention (http://abralite.concordia.ca with 107 kindergarten and 96 grade 1 children in 24 classes (12 intervention 12 control classes from all 12 elementary schools in one school district in Canada. Children in the intervention condition received 10-12 hours of whole class instruction using ABRA between pre- and post-test. Hierarchical linear modeling of post-test results showed significant gains in letter-sound knowledge for intervention classrooms over control classrooms. In addition, medium effect sizes were evident for three of five outcome measures favoring the intervention: letter-sound knowledge (d = +.66, phonological blending (d = +.52, and word reading (d = +.52, over effect sizes for regular teaching. It is concluded that regular teaching with ABRA technology adds significantly to literacy in the early elementary years.

  7. Using literacy narratives to scaffold academic literacy in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal for Language Teaching ... Subsequently, the proposed framework, which infuses narrative pedagogy and a particular version of transformative pedagogies into a new literacies model, ... the paper. Keywords: academic literacy, language pedagogy, literacy narratives, multiliteracies, multimodality, teacher education ...

  8. Media Literacy and Information Behavior in Cyberspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Akbar Famil Rouhany

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate media literacy and information behavior in cyberspace. This was a review and library research based study. With the advent of the digital age and the increasing spread of the World Wide Web, popularity and general acceptance of virtual social networks in the world today, the need to examine media literacy and information behavior in human life is important. Approach to media literacy which is the subset of information literacy in cyberspace has become necessary and obvious. As an individual, higher level of literacy can lead to choosing better content and search for information to find useful content. By assessing the theoretical basis and different approaches in a virtual environment, it can be concluded that having literacy skills and information behavior, the period of time spent in cyberspace and the number of readers have increased, leading to the ability to criticize and interpret the social, political and economic information and identify useful information. Consequently, by acquiring new technologies and increasing the adaptability in viewpoints and improving skills within researchers, the context for developing new ideas will be provided.

  9. Personal Biometric Information from Wearable Technology Tracked and Followed Using an ePortfolio: A Case Study of eHealth Literacy Development with Emerging Technology in Hong Kong Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Michele; Sobko, Tanja; Churchill, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will show our research approach and discuss potential outcomes. The research project started in January 2016. To understand eHealth literacy development in higher education in Hong Kong, the researchers will conduct a multiple case study including 20 students from an undergraduate course. Each of them will use a wearable device…

  10. The first year pre-service teachers' chemical literacy in individual learning case using the fuel cell technology based-chemical enrichment book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernani, Saefulloh, Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    This research aims to analyze chemical literacy ability of pre-service teachers based on PISA 2015 scientific competency. This research used descriptive method. Instrument that used in this research is multiple choice question that built based on scientific competency of PISA 2015. The result is grouping by PISA 2015 competency and mapped by high, medium and low GPA classified. This research involves 19 the first year pre-service teachers of 90 population that randomly chosen. According to the result, chemical literacy ability of pre-service described as follows: 1) 35.5% of sample are able to explain phenomena scientifically. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 25.0%, 40.3% and 29.2%; 2) 31.6% of sample are able to evaluate and design scientific enquiry. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 16.7%, 35.4% and 31.3%; 3) 31.6% of sample are able to Interpret data and evidence scientifically. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 50.0%, 25.0% and 37.5%; For the attitude competency, 68.4% of sample able to showing PISA attitude competency that consist of interest in science, environment awareness and Valuing scientific approaches to enquiry attitude. Based on GPA, for high, medium and low GPA group respectively 77.8%, 63.9% and 75.0%. According to the data, chemical literacy ability of pre-service teachers in average are bellow to 50.0% thereby need to be given special attention while scientific attitude are above to 50.0%.

  11. Health Literacy among Iranian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajouei, Reza; Salehi, Fatemeh

    2017-03-01

    We examined the health lit- eracy status of high school students in Kerman, Iran. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at high schools in Kerman. Data concerning 3 dimensions of health literacy (health knowledge, health skills and health be- haviors) were collected from 312 students using an adapted version of a valid and reliable questionnaire developed by the Ministry of Health of China. Data analysis was performed by descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis using SPSS version 22. The average age of the students was 16 ± 3 years and 50% (N = 156) of them were girls. Twenty-nine percent of students gained a health literacy score between 37 and 47 (adequate). A statistically significant relationship was found between health literacy and type of school (p health literacy requiring serious interventions by authorities and policy-makers. Incorporating subjects such as mental health, prevention of addiction, and puberty and sexual health into educational curricula can improve Iranian students' health literacy.

  12. Health literacy: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speros, Carolyn

    2005-06-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the concept of health literacy in order to clarify its meaning, reduce ambiguities associated with references to it, and promote consistency in using the concept in nursing dialogue and research. Health literacy is a relatively new concept in health promotion research. Only within the last decade have researchers identified the problems associated with health literacy, the role it plays in an individual's ability to comprehend health and self-care information, and its relationship to health outcomes. Clarifying the concept is essential so that nurses develop an awareness of the phenomenon and its relationship to the outcomes of their communication and health education efforts. The method used for this concept analysis was that of Walker and Avant (1995). Health literacy empowers people to act appropriately in new and changing health-related circumstances through the use of advanced cognitive and social skills. The defining attributes of health literacy are reading and numeracy skills, comprehension, the capacity to use information in health care decision-making, and successful functioning as a healthcare consumer. Antecedents of health literacy are literacy and a health-related experience. Consequences of health literacy include improved self-reported health status, lower health care costs, increased health knowledge, shorter hospitalizations, and less frequent use of health care services. Empirical referents of the concept are the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults and the health literacy component of the National Assessment of Adult Literacy. An analysis of the concept of health literacy enhances nurses' ability to assess more accurately their clients' levels of health literacy, thus identifying those at risk for misunderstanding health care instructions, shame associated with inadequate reading skills, and inability to adhere to health care recommendations.

  13. Improving Preschoolers’ Language and Literacy Skills through Web-Mediated Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Downer, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    MyTeachingPartner (MTP) is a web-mediated approach that provides ongoing support for teachers to improve the quality of their interactions with children. This study examined the effects of MTP on the preschool language and literacy development of children who are at risk for later academic difficulties. Results of this randomized controlled trial indicated that for English-only classrooms, teachers receiving a high level of support had students who made greater gains in language and literacy skills than teachers who only received access to a curricular supplement. Three implications are drawn from these findings: (1) on-going, video-based consultation holds promise not only for altering teacher-child interactions, but also improving children's learning, (2) technology allows teachers to receive intensive, effective support from a distance, and (3) there is still much to be learned about how professional development can support effective teaching of language and literacy skills to children whose home language is not English. PMID:23105917

  14. Information Literacy in Mathematics Undergraduate Education: Where Does It Stand Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Jeffra Diane; Bond, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The published literature on information literacy in mathematics is relatively sparse. This article explores the current state of information literacy initiatives in undergraduate mathematics. The authors survey academic librarians (n = 118) who liaise with mathematics departments in order to gain an understanding of their practices and attitudes…

  15. The Association between Expressive Grammar Intervention and Social and Emergent Literacy Outcomes for Preschoolers with SLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether (a) expressive grammar intervention facilitated social and emergent literacy outcomes better than no intervention and (b) expressive grammar gains and/or initial expressive grammar level predicted social and emergent literacy outcomes. Method: This investigation was a follow-up to a recently published study exploring…

  16. The Relationship between Prospective Teachers' Media and Television Literacy and Their Critical Thinking Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aybek, Birsel

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Teachers play a significant role in shaping students on media literacy and critical thinking. Hence, prospective teachers are required to gain knowledge about media literacy and critical thinking during pre-service training. Provided that prospective teachers who will shape the next generation possess such skills as accessing to…

  17. Framing Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Anneke Dirkx

    2016-01-01

    In 2000 the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) published the Standards for Information Literacy. After 15 years these standards were in desperate need of revision. Instead of releasing a revised edition of the Standards, in 2015 ACRL presented a completely new vision on information literacy in higher education. In this keynote we will explore the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in all its glory. We will compare it to the old standards. Is this new American Fram...

  18. Investigate the relation between the media literacy and information literacy of students of communication science and information science and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Esmaeil Pounaki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new millennium is called Information Age, in which information and communication technologies have been developed. The transfer from industrial society to information society has changed the form and level of education and information from those of the past times. In the past, literacy meant the ability of reading and writing, but today the meaning of literacy has been changed through the time and such a type of literacy is not enough to meet people’s needs in the industrial society of the 21st century. Today’s life requires media and information literacy especially for the students, whose duty is to research and who have a significant role in the development of their country from any perspective. This research aims to study the relation between the media literacy and information literacy of the students of the fields of communication science and information science and knowledge. This is an applied research in terms of its objective and uses a survey-correlation method. The statistical population of this research consists of the postgraduate students studying in the fields of study of information science and knowledge and communication science at Tehran University and Allameh Tabatabai University. The data required for this research were collected by a researcher-made questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaire has been evaluated by Cronbach’s Alpha, which was equal to 0.936. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistic methods. The results showed that the level of media literacy and information literacy of students is desirable. There is a significant relationship between the economic status of students and their media literacy. However, the social status of students was directly related to their "ability to communicate" variable of media literacy. Also the Pearson correlation test showed a significant relationship between the variables of media literacy and information literacy.

  19. Teaching Information Literacy to Generation Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Kate

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to change library information literacy classes for Generation Y students (born after 1981) to accommodate their learning styles and preferences, based on experiences at California State University, Hayward. Topics include positive outlooks toward technology; orientation toward images, not linear text; low thresholds for boredom and…

  20. Visual Literacy in Instructional Design Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervine, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    In this technologically advanced environment, users have become highly visual, with television, videos, web sites and images dominating the learning environment. These new forms of searching and learning are changing the perspective of what it means to be literate. Literacy can no longer solely rely on text-based materials, but should also…

  1. From Literature to Cultural Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Segal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the academic field of literary studies has changed radically. Literary scholars are now working on objects other than poems, dramas or fiction. This essay presents an ongoing strategic project, Cultural Literacy in Contemporary Europe, which was founded in 2007 and run in 2009-11 as an European Science Foundation & Cooperation in Science and Technology (ESF-COST synergy. Its aim is to investigate and celebrate the range of research currently being conducted in the field we have renamed “literary-and-cultural studies”, or LCS. This research aims to enhance cultural literacy. Cultural literacy is an attitude to the social and cultural phenomena that shape our existence—bodies of knowledge, fields of social action, individuals or groups, and of course cultural artefacts, including texts—which views them as being essentially readable: it is a way of looking at social and cultural issues, especially issues of change and mobility, through the lens of literary thinking. The project focuses on four academic fields—cultural memory, migration and translation, electronic textuality, and biopolitics and the body—and four concepts: textuality, fictionality, rhetoricity and historicity. It stresses multilingualism and is part of the movement of interdisciplinarity within the humanities and between the humanities and other disciplines, but remains a distinctive activity within that larger movement.

  2. Academic literacy practices on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Aparecida Soares Reis Franco

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p13 In this paper, we analyze academic and digital literacies practices developed by participants of a Language and Technology developmental program. We adopt a social and academic literacies approach (LEA; STREET, 1998; LILLIS; SCOTT, 2007 to examine what texts participants write in disciplines that use Facebook as a learning platform. The reported study is of a qualitative and interpretive nature. The events herein analyzed integrate the data bank of a research project that involved participant observation developed throughout the years of 2012 and 2013 in a Brazilian professional graduate program. The analysis makes visible that literacy practices developed by participants are oriented by the “skills model” (Lea & Street, 1998, that leads to the “institutional practice of mystery” (LILLIS; SCOTT, 2007. In this context, it is interesting to note that teacher’s writings can be characterized as a hybrid of scholastic genres and Facebook genres.

  3. The association between expressive grammar intervention and social and emergent literacy outcomes for preschoolers with SLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla N

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether (a) expressive grammar intervention facilitated social and emergent literacy outcomes better than no intervention and (b) expressive grammar gains and/or initial expressive grammar level predicted social and emergent literacy outcomes. This investigation was a follow-up to a recently published study exploring the impact of grammatical language intervention on expressive grammar outcomes for preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). Twenty-two 3- to 5-year-old preschoolers received ten 20-minute intervention sessions addressing primary deficits in grammatical morphology. Participants' social and emergent literacy skills were not targeted. Twelve children awaiting intervention, chosen from the same selection pool as intervention participants, served as controls. Blind assessments of social and emergent literacy outcomes were completed at preintervention, immediately postintervention, and 3 months postintervention. Only intervention participants experienced significant gains in social and emergent literacy outcomes and maintained these gains for 3 months postintervention. Expressive grammar gains was the only single significant predictor of these outcomes. Expressive grammar intervention was associated with broad impacts on social and emergent literacy outcomes that were maintained beyond the intervention period. Gains in expressive grammar predicted these outcomes. Social and emergent literacy skills were positively affected for preschoolers with SLI during a grammatical language intervention program.

  4. Collaborative Learning is an Effective Method for Improving the E-health Literacy of Older Adults in the Community. A Review of: Xie, B. (2011. Older adults, e-health literacy, and collaborative learning: An experimental study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(5, 933-946. doi: 10.1002/asi.21507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa S. Arndt

    2011-01-01

    importance of the Internet for obtaining health information. Subjects were also asked to report on changes to their health behaviour/decision- making post intervention, and learning effort expended during the study. Additional questions measured psychological adjustment to later life, attitudes toward computers, attitude toward the aging experience, and attitude toward the collaborative learning method and the class.Main Results – A dependent t-test analysis indicated strong significant gains post-test in computing/Internet knowledge and skills, and in e-health literacy efficacy (perceived skills/comfort with using the Internet for health information and decision-making. Pre-test results showed participants to be low on these measures, leaving much room for improvement. Perception of the usefulness and importance of the Internet for health decision-making also showed strong gains.Significant positive changes were also found in these areas of attitude: reduction of computer anxiety, attitude toward physical changes associated with aging, and improvement in attitude toward the collaborative learning method.A majority of participants indicated altering health-related behaviours as a result of the class, including changing the way they think about diet or exercise, changing the way they cope with a condition, and changing their approach to maintaining health.The results showed no significant change in self-esteem, self-efficacy, and psychological attitudes toward aging. Computer interest and efficacy also showed no significant change, perhaps because participants already measured high in these prior to the intervention.The amount of time participants spent preparing for class correlated significantly to e-health literacy efficacy and perceived importance of Internet health information, but not to other outcome measures.Group composition (gender, peer familiarity, prior computer experience did not affect outcomes; however composition was uneven, as groups were small and

  5. Situated Literacies: Reading and Writing in Context. Literacies Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, David, Ed.; Hamilton, Mary, Ed.; Ivanic, Roz, Ed.

    This book contains 13 papers on situated literacies and reading and writing in context. The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Denny Taylor); "Introduction: Exploring Situated Literacies"; "Literacy Practices" (David Barton, Mary Hamilton); "Expanding the New Literacy Studies: Using Photographs To Explore…

  6. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Rosanne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Digital literacy is a more recent concept than information literacy and can relate to multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between information literacy and digital literacy is essential before revision of the ACRL "Standards" can proceed.

  7. The Development of Adolescent Online Reading Literacy Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Lin Chang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By adopting the constructs of reading literacy and with the use of information and communication technology, the purpose of this study is to develop two adolescent online reading literacy assessments (ORLA and examine the preliminary validity of ORLA. In addition, samples of online reading literacy performance are described. The design of ORLA is based on PISA electronic reading assessment framework and Leu et al. (2004’s online reading comprehension definition. A total of 601 eighth graders from junior high schools and 618 tenth graders from senior high schools in Taiwan City participated in this study. This study uses Rasch IRT model to calibrate the item parameter and scale scores. The results indicated: the online reading literacy assessments had adequate difficulty level, reasonable validity evidences, and students’ online reading literacy performance contains ICT element which is different from offline reading; the gender effect exists in the online reading environment by grades.

  8. Marketing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, more than a decade after the original Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter the Standards) were institutionalized as the goal of academic library instruction, the Information Literacy Competency Standards Review Task Force convened by ACRL recommended…

  9. Institutionalizing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that information literacy is essential for individual and community empowerment, workforce readiness, and global competitiveness. However, there is a history of difficulty in integrating information literacy with the postsecondary educational process. This paper posits that a greater understanding of the…

  10. Computer Literacy: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Robert

    Varied views are presented in this report which addresses five primary issues: (1) What is computer literacy? (2) What does it cover? (3) Who is it for? (4) How should it be presented? and (5) Where can one get help in organizing a computer literacy program? The first section summarizes results of a survey of 14 educators who were asked their…

  11. Who Researches Functional Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Donita; Perry, Kristen H.; Ivanyuk, Lyudmyla; Tham, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to discover who researches functional literacy. This study was situated within a larger systematic literature review. We searched seven electronic databases and identified 90 sources to answer our larger question regarding how functional literacy is defined and conceptualized as well as the specific question pertinent…

  12. Physical Literacy en bewegingsonderwijs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jan de Leeuw

    2017-01-01

    Physical Literacy gaat er in de kern om dat mensen beschikken over eigenschappen die het mogelijk maken een leven lang bewegen. Het begrip heeft een aantal implicaties voor het bewegingsonderwijs. Door Physical Literacy wordt het bewegingsonderwijs geïnspireerd een bijdrage te leveren aan de

  13. Literacy as Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Critical scholarship frequently depicts literacy education as an "initiation into passivity." Disconnected from the lives of students and reduced to strategies for scoring points on tests, literacy becomes an exercise in the reproduction of a moral economy of discipline, compliance, and productivity. Yet people also recognize that the modern world…

  14. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  15. Literacy Tutoring Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljander, Raymond P.; Reina, Jacqueline A.; Siljander, Roger A.

    2005-01-01

    This book investigates the depth of the illiteracy problem in the United States and the rationale and administration of a literacy-learning program. Based on some of the latest reading research, the authors provide a comprehensive up-to-date look at literacy tutoring. Following an introduction to the illiteracy problem, the book focuses on…

  16. Invest in Financial Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Sarah B.; McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of the economy elevates the need to build awareness of financial markets and personal finance among the nation's young people through implementing a financial literacy curriculum in schools. A limited amount of time spent on financial literacy can have a positive effect on students' budgeting skills. This knowledge will only add…

  17. Using Digital Comics to Develop Digital Literacy: Fostering Functionally, Critically, and Rhetorically Literate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchoff, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Literacy scholarship has established the importance of teaching, supporting, and facilitating digital literacy education for 21st century students. Stuart Selber goes a step further, arguing that students must be functionally (using digital technology), critically (questioning digital technology), and rhetorically (producing effective digital…

  18. Internet at school: possibility for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conceição da Silva Linhares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the contribution of teaching practices using social networking tools and computer literacy of high school students the Internet is analyzed. According to authors like Gasque (2012, Cervero (2007 Area (2006, Smith (2002 and Freire (1987, knowing how to use the information and the means to express it, a creative approach, understanding of what we read in conjunction keywords, concepts and ideas on how to intertextuality. This knowledge is evaluative in today's society, adjective by the exponential increase of information available in various formats and languages device through information and communication, including Internet technologies. The qualitative approach in the perspective of participant observation is the option that the object of this study suits to consider in its analysis, the relationships between subjects and cultural mediations, objectified by Internet spaces and tools to illuminate computer literacy. Develop pedagogical practices using social media and Internet tools for computer literacy work contributes to a significant experience with information.

  19. Information literacy of the academic library users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Hasenay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy should be a foundation of any educational system, which would enable students and library users a more efficient way to perform academically and in everyday life. The research goal was to determine the level of information literacy among the students, users of the Library of Faculty of Food and Technology Osijek (PTFOS. A special survey – quiz was used to determine students’ knowledge of library collection and services. The sample of 115 students was surveyed between 16th and 27th of February 2015. The library users are aware of the conditions of using the library collections as well as library services, but they don't read messages on the library's bulletin board, desks and web site. The research results will be used as guidelines for improving information literacy and future research.

  20. Relocalising academic literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negot......This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine...... the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among students of the international master’s programme, Anthropology of Education and Globalisation (AEG), University of Aarhus, Denmark. The article draws on an understanding of academic literacy as a local practice situated in the social and institutional...... contexts in which it appears. Based on qualitative interviews with eleven AEG-students, we analyse students’ individual experiences of, and perspectives on, the academic literacy practices of this study programme. Our findings reveal contradictory understandings of internationalism and indicate a learning...

  1. Studying bilingual students’ literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia

    2012-01-01

    ), and linguistic diversity seems to be associated with societal problems and educational failure. ”The bilingual student” is placed in the core of this debate, as he or she is portrayed as a main cause of the low national placement in the international rankings (Holm & Laursen, 2011) and thus increasingly...... conceived of as a threat to a school’s profile (Rampton, Harris & Leung, 2001). In this paper, I focus on different conceptualizations of literacy and discuss the implications for research on bilingual children's literacy acquisition and the need to expand the understanding of literacy in ways, which might...... contribute to lift the basic understanding of bilinguals’ literacy out of a disqualifying political discourse. Drawing on the ongoing study Sign of Language (Laursen, 2011), I reflect on how a social semiotic framework might help open new research perspectives on bilingual children’s literacy acquisition...

  2. Self-generated Literacy Practices in Disadvantaged Environments in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Calderón López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the role of literacy in disadvantaged environments and the interplay between self-generated literacy practices and their conceptualization of literacy in 7 to 10-year-old Chilean pupils from two different schools located in Santiago, Chile. The study was framed within a participatory approach focused on promoting the children’s agency and voice in the research. A range of second-level data materials were collected through interviews with parents, photographs and existing documents. Although at a resources-associated level the sociocultural context did not inhibit the emergence of literacy practices, the context did contribute to the children’s understanding of literacy. This study raises the need for considering how children’s understanding of literacy influence their involvement and learning about reading and writing as their experiences and perceptions have an important role in their learning process, particularly on how they develop their reading and writing practices. The findings implied that by raising the participants’ awareness of the relevance of everyday practices in relation with reading and writing, they are likelier to feel more comfortable and empowered towards their own literacy practices. Particularly, the empowerment of children coming from a disadvantaged background would give them more opportunities to support their learning. By making the children aware of the relevance of their own perceptions and practices, the pupils could gain in confidence, be agents of their learning processes, and have more resources to succeed on the demanding school environment.

  3. Information Literacy: Requirements of the 21st Century Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Walter R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses business and technology trends that affect the need for employees to have more information skills. Highlights include the globalization of commerce; competition; lower-cost digital technology; employment trends; the role of digital systems; the impact of technology; advanced information-related literacy skills; and future education…

  4. Characterizing Financial and Statistical Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Girolamo, Amalia; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten

    We characterize the literacy of an individual in a domain by their elicited subjective belief distribution over the possible responses to a question posed in that domain. We consider literacy across several financial, economic and statistical domains. We find considerable demographic heterogeneity...... in the degree of literacy. We also characterize the degree of consistency within a sample about their knowledge, even when that knowledge is imperfect. We show how uncertainty aversion might be a normatively attractive behavior for individuals who have imperfect literacy. Finally, we discuss extensions of our...... approach to characterize financial capability, the consequences of non-literacy, social literacy, and the information content of hypothetical survey measures of literacy....

  5. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    OpenAIRE

    William Badke

    2011-01-01

    Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that infor...

  6. Bridging the digital divide in diabetes: family support and implications for health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay S; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell L; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2011-10-01

    Abstract Background: Patient web portals (PWPs) offer patients remote access to their medical record and communication with providers. Adults with health literacy limitations are less likely to access and use health information technology (HIT), including PWPs. In diabetes, PWP use has been associated with patient satisfaction, patient-provider communication, and glycemic control. Using mixed methods, we explored the relationships between health literacy, numeracy, and computer literacy and the usage of a PWP and HIT. Participants (N=61 adults with type 2 diabetes) attended focus groups and completed surveys, including measures of health literacy, numeracy, and computer anxiety (an indicator of computer literacy) and frequency of PWP and HIT use. Computer literacy was positively associated with health literacy (r=0.41, Pdigital divide" in diabetes by helping adults access a PWP or HIT for diabetes management.

  7. Embedding Literacy Strategies in Social Studies for Eighth-Grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alishia Gaston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This action research study evaluated the effects of literacy strategies on academic achievement, motivation, and engagement of eighth-grade social studies students. Incorporating literacy strategies included teaching students to construct meaning, think critically, and build content knowledge, while stimulating their interests, using multiple texts and technology, and providing collaborative opportunities and high engagement during instructional activities. Students were divided into a literacy group and a direct instruction group with each class being taught the same content. Literacy strategies were incorporated in one class, and direct instruction activities were used in the other class. Results were determined using pre and posttest scores, a student motivation questionnaire, and a student engagement checklist. Results indicated significantly higher student achievement and engagement when literacy strategies were a part of the social studies instruction. Motivation also increased when literacy strategies were used. Literacy instruction was a beneficial strategy to improve student achievement, motivation, and engagement.

  8. Artistic Technology Integration: Stories From Primary and Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Barbara; Shinas, Valerie Harlow; Van Vaerenewyck, Leah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform teachers about the ways technology can be integrated to add value to literacy instruction. Artistic technology-integrated literacy and disciplinary instruction in preK through grade 4 classrooms is described through the stories of five teachers who were identified as both strong teachers of literacy and…

  9. Relational Information Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, Marco; Jaeger, Manfred; Frasconi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We introduce relational information gain, a refinement scoring function measuring the informativeness of newly introduced variables. The gain can be interpreted as a conditional entropy in a well-defined sense and can be efficiently approximately computed. In conjunction with simple greedy general......-to-specific search algorithms such as FOIL, it yields an efficient and competitive algorithm in terms of predictive accuracy and compactness of the learned theory. In conjunction with the decision tree learner TILDE, it offers a beneficial alternative to lookahead, achieving similar performance while significantly...

  10. A Design-Based Research Capturing Science Teachers' Practices of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) Integration Using the New Literacy Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiang-Kwei; Hsu, Hui-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Technology integration in K-12 classrooms is usually teacher-centered and has insufficient impact on students' learning. The purpose of this project is to facilitate science teachers' use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as cognitive tools to shift their practices from teacher-centered methods to constructivist,…

  11. Libraries and Literacy. A Literacy Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan Library, Lansing.

    This handbook is designed to provide a comprehensive reference source about adult illiteracy for Michigan public librarians, whether or not they currently work with local literacy councils. Introductory material provides listings of members of the Michigan State Legislative Council and Library of Michigan Board of Trustees, and a listing of the…

  12. Unpacking the physical literacy concept for K-12 physical education: What should we expect the learner to master?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Paul Roetert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The term “physical literacy” is gaining traction in many countries and institutions as a goal for physical education. This paper explores the concept of physical literacy and highlights the foundational work in this area, particularly that of Margaret Whitehead. The relationship of physical literacy to physical education is also discussed with potential ramifications for teachers and learners who adopt physical literacy as the goal of the subject area.

  13. The Associations Among Individual Factors, eHealth Literacy, and Health-Promoting Lifestyles Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shu-Ching; Luo, Yi-Fang; Chiang, Chia-Hsun

    2017-01-01

    Background eHealth literacy is gaining importance for maintaining and promoting health. Studies have found that individuals with high eHealth literacy are more likely to adopt healthy eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. In addition, previous studies have shown that various individual factors (eg, frequency of seeking information on health issues, degree of health concern, frequency of eating organic food, and students? college major) are associated with eHealth literacy and health-promotin...

  14. Academic Literacy Curriculum Renewal at a South African University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of students admitted by universities in South Africa has grown tremendously in the past two to three decades. Most of these students, however, graduate from high school without having gained the academic literacy ability required for success at university. A result of this has been that the students struggle to ...

  15. Influence of Maternal Health Literacy on Healthy Pregnancy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... defined as the cognitive and social skills which determine the motivation and ability of women to gain ... health literacy and some cognitive skills are required for healthy maternity and pregnancy outcomes. .... between the time of pregnancy recognition and the time of initiation of prenatal care and the ...

  16. Literacy Teaching Aids from High/Scope Educational Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2005

    2005-01-01

    High/Scope's approach to education is a blend of Jean Piaget's constructivist theory of child development and the best of traditional teacher experience. The High/Scope approach is about helping students gain knowledge and skills in important content areas, such as language and literacy, initiative and social relations, movement, music, and…

  17. Literacy Courses and the Prevention of Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-McKenna, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Preventing reading difficulties in the early grades has been a topic of interest for more than a decade. Research has clearly delineated the components needed for early literacy programs to be effective in teaching nearly all children to learn to read. Teacher educators have a responsibility to ensure that candidates gain extensive knowledge about…

  18. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutosh.bhardwaj@cern.ch; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-11-11

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  19. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  20. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  1. Teaching Media Literacy with Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, Katie

    2010-01-01

    Background: A current problem in media literacy studies is whether or not to categorize graphic novels as media literacy texts. Thus, this article begins with a review of current media literacy research and its emphasis on defining media literacy texts as texts that rely on both print literacies and image literacies. Because graphic novels rely on…

  2. Does literacy improve finance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Martha; Olen, Helaine

    2015-04-01

    When economists ask questions about basic financial principles, most ordinary people answer incorrectly. Economic experts call this condition "financial illiteracy," which suggests that poor financial outcomes are due to a personal deficit of reading-related skills. The analogy to reading is compelling because it suggests that we can teach our way out of population-wide financial failure. In this comment, we explain why the idea of literacy appeals to policy makers in the advanced industrial nations. But we also show that the narrow skill set laid out by economists does not satisfy the politically inclusive definition of literacy that literacy studies fought for. We identify several channels through which people engage with ideas about finance and demonstrate that not all forms of literacy will lead people to the educational content prescribed by academic economists. We argue that truly financial literate people can defy the demands of financial theory and financial institutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Beethoven, Literacy, and Me.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Susan

    1988-01-01

    Relates the author's experiences with literacy in another medium during 18 months of concentrated music study. Describes how this experience produced insights about the student/teacher relationship, about learning, and about the writing process. (SR)

  4. Learn about Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidelines & Tools Plain Language Materials & Resources Testing Visual Communication Resources Understand Your Audience Measuring Skills & Experiences Culture & Language Older Adults Getting Started Importance of Health Literacy How Older Adults Make Health ...

  5. The Balanced Literacy Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willows, Dale

    2002-01-01

    Describes professional development program in Ontario school district to improve student reading and writing skills. Program used food-pyramid concepts to help teacher learn to provide a balanced and flexible approach to literacy instruction based on student needs. (PKP)

  6. What role does health literacy play in patients' involvement in medical decision-making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabers, Anne E M; Rademakers, Jany J D J M; Groenewegen, Peter P; van Dijk, Liset; de Jong, Judith D

    2017-01-01

    Patients vary in their preferences towards involvement in medical decision-making. Previous research, however, gives no clear explanation for this observed variation in their involvement. One possible explanation might be health literacy. Health literacy refers to personal characteristics and social resources needed for people to access, understand and use information to make decisions about their health. This study aimed to examine the relationship between health literacy and self-reported patient involvement. With respect to health literacy, we focused on those competences relevant for medical decision-making. We hypothesized that people with higher health literacy report that they are more involved in medical decision-making. A structured questionnaire was sent to members of the Dutch Health Care Consumer Panel in May 2015 (response 46%, N = 974). Health literacy was measured using five scales of the Health Literacy Questionnaire. A regression model was used to estimate the relationship between health literacy and self-reported involvement. In general, our results did not show a relationship between health literacy and self-reported involvement. We did find a positive significant association between the health literacy scale appraisal of health information and self-reported involvement. Our hypothesis was partly confirmed. The results from this study suggest that higher order competences, that is to say critical health literacy, in particular, are important in reporting involvement in medical decision-making. Future research is recommended to unravel further the relationship between health literacy and patient involvement in order to gain insight into whether health literacy might be an asset to enhance patient participation in medical decision-making.

  7. Embracing early literacy indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik; Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2010-01-01

    Abstract til paper om early literacy indikatorer. Det paper abstractet er knyttet til var en del af et inviteret, selvorganiseret symposium som afrapporterede EASE-projektet (www.ease-eu.com) på OMEP's 26. verdenskongres.......Abstract til paper om early literacy indikatorer. Det paper abstractet er knyttet til var en del af et inviteret, selvorganiseret symposium som afrapporterede EASE-projektet (www.ease-eu.com) på OMEP's 26. verdenskongres....

  8. Information Literacy Journal Club

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Michelle; Tumelty, Niamh

    2014-01-01

    The Information Literacy Journal Club (http://infolitjournalclub.blogspot.co.uk/) is an online discussion group that focuses on information literacy and other aspects of user education. The journal club was originally set up on the Blogger platform in December 2012 by Niamh Tumelty (University of Cambridge) and Sheila Webber (University of Sheffield), and since then the community involved has grown to include a range of professionals interested in the area.

  9. Health literacy skills for informed decision making in colorectal cancer screening: Perceptions of screening invitees and experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, Anke J.; Timmermans, Daniëlle R. M.; Uiters, Ellen; Dekker, Evelien; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Fransen, Mirjam P.

    2017-01-01

    The process of informed decision making (IDM) requires an adequate level of health literacy. To ensure that all individuals have equal opportunity to make an informed decision in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, it is essential to gain more insight into which health literacy skills are needed for

  10. San Junior Secondary Students' Home-School Literacy Disconnection: A Case Study of a Remote Area Dweller School in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketsitlile, Lone Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated how San students of Botswana, in a junior community secondary school, understood literacy in school and at home. A qualitative, narrative case study approach was used to gain a deeper understanding of what students value and understand by literacy from co-participants' and informants' perspectives. Findings across…

  11. Learn and gain

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Alami, Suhair Eyad Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Initiating the slogan ""love it, live it"", Learn and Gain includes eight short stories, chosen to illustrate various modes of narration, as well as to provoke reflection and discussion on a range of issues. All texts utilized here illustrate how great writers can, with their insight and gift for words, help us to see the world we live in, in new probing and exciting ways. What characterises the book, the author believes, is the integration of the skills of literary competence, communicative c...

  12. Morphing Literacy: Boys Reshaping Their School-Based Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Heather A.; Stanford, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Details about a two-year ethnographic case study research in middle school boys to understand school literacy are presented. The study revealed that boys resist many school-based practices by transforming the assigned literacy work.

  13. A Changing Literacy in Morocco: A Contextual and Pedagogical Overview (Changes in Literacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzaki, Abdelkader

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of literacy and literacy education in Morocco. Sketches the historical context, and then discusses literacy in formal school settings, adult programs, and needed improvements. (SR)

  14. Can Braille be revived? A possible impact of high-end Braille and mainstream technology on the revival of tactile literacy medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiazowski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    With a decline in use of Braille, very few attractive technological options can be offered to young learners. Various research data confirm that teachers of the visually impaired do not have sufficient skills to introduce their students to modern devices. The Mountbatten Brailler can be considered as a tool that combines Braille technology with mainstream tools commonly used by students and teachers. This combination of devices opens new possibilities for the teachers and their students to reverse the trend in the use of Braille. Thanks to features offered by the Brailler and iOS devices, sighted and blind users receive a tool for unimpaired written communication.

  15. Literacy of the Other: The Inner Life of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarc, Aparna Mishra

    2015-01-01

    My paper situates literacy in the pre-symbolic implications of the maternal relation. Turning to child psychoanalysis, particularly Melanie Klein's theories of infancy and symbolization, my paper discusses the role the child's inner life plays in her engagements with literacy. Citing cases of second language learning, I pose literacy as…

  16. Critical Literacy for Adult Literacy in Language Learners. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Carol; Florez, MaryAnn Cunningham

    This digest examines critical literacy and discusses why it is important to include it in instruction for adults learning English as a Second Language (ESL). Critical literacy takes learners beyond the development of basic literacy skills such as decoding, predicting, and summarizing and asks them to become critical consumers of the information…

  17. Reform in Literacy Education in China. Literacy Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yianwei, Wang; Jiyuan, Li

    Literacy in China is mainly concerned with illiteracy in rural areas. Therefore, reforming literacy education is largely a problem of how to eliminate rural literacy within the general framework of reform in contemporary China. From 1949 to 1988, the illiteracy rate among the population decreased from 80 percent to 20 percent. There are still…

  18. Literacy journeys: home and family literacy practices in immigrant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I conclude that immigrant children have far greater language and literacy skills than presumed, and that schools need to recognize language and literacy practices that children engage in at home and in the community, and emphasize that social justice for all requires educational shifts. Keywords: family literacy practices; ...

  19. ICT Literacy of Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraj, Y. Z.; Rohendi, D.; Yannuar; Nurhabibah; Wendi, H. F.

    2018-02-01

    The development of information and communication technology (ICT) has brought about change in education in Indonesia. With ICT students can easily access a variety of information in supporting the learning process. But there was a problem where ICT infrastructure across Indonesia including in the uneven Siak Regency, this can lead to gaps in technology and also weak ICT literacy. This research aims to know the ICT literacy of the students of SMK in Siak Regency. The research method used was survey with the quantitative approach. The results of this study showed that the use of ICT (computers, Internet) has been used by students of SMK, but usability of ICT has not been fullest support the learning process.

  20. Teaching Digital Natives: Promoting Information Literacy and Addressing Instructional Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    Technology must be used as a teaching and learning tool to help students succeed. However, educators must be proactive in identifying some of the pitfalls of technology, such as information illiteracy. The phenomenological study covers how English instructors from Indianapolis, who teach first year students, address information literacy and the…

  1. Teaching and Reaching the Millennial Generation through Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, David; Horton, Julie; Moorman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    These are times of rapid technological change that challenge all educators. The children currently in school--often referred to as the "Millennial Generation"--have always been immersed in Information Communication Technology. Millennials bring to school a rich set of literacy skills that allows them instant communication and access to a wealth of…

  2. Developmental Milestones of Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Developmental Milestones of Early Literacy Page Content ​In the spirit of making both ... at the well-defined developmental milestones of early literacy. Younger Than 6 Months: Never Too Young Unlike ...

  3. The Place of the Classroom and the Space of the Screen: Relational Pedagogy and Internet Technology. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies, Volume 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm

    2011-01-01

    This book examines how common e-learning technologies open up compelling, if limited, experiential spaces for users, similar to the imaginary worlds opened up by works of fiction. However, these experiential worlds are markedly different from the "real" world of physical objects and embodied relations. This book shows these differences to be of…

  4. Information and Communication Technology Literacy: What Do Businesses Expect and What Do Business Schools Teach? Research Report. ETS RR-10-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Radwan; Katz, Irvin R.

    2010-01-01

    Today's information and communications technology (ICT) provides unprecedented amounts of information to organizations and their employees. This overabundance challenges workers, placing an increasing premium on skills of sifting through information of sometimes dubious quality, integrating information critically, and producing well-reasoned…

  5. Multilevel Classification of PISA 2015 Research Participant Countries' Literacy and These Classes' Relationship with Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Seher

    2018-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to distinguish the reading skills of students participating in PISA 2015 application into multi-level latent classes at the student and country level. Furthermore, it is aimed to examine how the clusters emerged at country-level is predicted by variables as students have the information and communication technology (ICT)…

  6. Occupational Task Profiles: A Pan-Canadian Snapshot of the Canadian Literacy and Essential Skills Workforce--A Think Paper. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Because Literacy and Essential Skills are so important to economic development, it is vital to know the competencies needed by the educators who deliver Literacy and Essential Skills programming. Likewise, Literacy and Essential Skills are crucial for labour market attachment. Low-skilled work has been most affected by technological change. There…

  7. Using Aurasma to Promote Literacy in Deaf Students

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Alyssa Marie

    2015-01-01

    The use of technology in classrooms is a new, slowly emerging concept in many Deaf schools and programs even though the technological revolution is moving rapidly, as seen in our everyday lives. Thus, technology is rarely used as a tool to connect ASL and English while promoting literacy. This curriculum is an attempt to provide an innovative way to connect ASL and English using a relatively simple technology program, Aurasma, which is an augmented reality platform that can be an optimal conn...

  8. The Geography of Financial Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher B. Bumcrot; Judy Lin; Annamaria Lusardi

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores how well equipped today’s households are to make complex financial decisions in the face of often high-cost and high-risk financial instruments. Specifically we focus on financial literacy. Most importantly, we describe the geography of financial literacy, i.e., how financial literacy is distributed across the fifty US states. We describe the correlation of financial literacy and some important aggregate variables, such as state-level poverty rates. Finally, we examine the...

  9. Advancing Health Literacy Measurement: A Pathway to Better Health and Health System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The concept of health literacy initially emerged and continues to gain strength as an approach to improving health status and the performance of health systems. Numerous studies clearly link low levels of education, literacy, and health literacy with poor health, poor health care utilization, increased barriers to care, and early death. However, theoretical understandings and methods of measuring the complex social construct of health literacy have experienced a continual evolution that remains incomplete. As a result, the seemingly most-cited definition of health literacy proposed in the now-decade-old Institute of Medicine report on health literacy is long overdue for updating. Such an effort should engage a broad and diverse set of health literacy researchers, practitioners, and members of the public in creating a definition that can earn broad consensus through validation testing in a rigorous scientific approach. That effort also could produce the basis for a new universally applicable measure of health literacy. Funders, health systems, and policymakers should reconsider their timid approach to health literacy. Although the field and corresponding evidence base are not perfect, health literacy—especially when combined with a focus on prevention and integrative health—is one of the most promising approaches to advancing public health. PMID:25491583

  10. The Technology Acceptance Model for Resource-Limited Settings (TAM-RLS): A Novel Framework for Mobile Health Interventions Targeted to Low-Literacy End-Users in Resource-Limited Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Aturinda, Isaac; Mwesigwa, Evans; Burns, Bridget; Santorino, Data; Haberer, Jessica E; Bangsberg, David R; Holden, Richard J; Ware, Norma C; Siedner, Mark J

    2017-11-01

    Although mobile health (mHealth) technologies have shown promise in improving clinical care in resource-limited settings (RLS), they are infrequently brought to scale. One limitation to the success of many mHealth interventions is inattention to end-user acceptability, which is an important predictor of technology adoption. We conducted in-depth interviews with 43 people living with HIV in rural Uganda who had participated in a clinical trial of a short messaging system (SMS)-based intervention designed to prompt return to clinic after an abnormal laboratory test. Interviews focused on established features of technology acceptance models, including perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness, and included open-ended questions to gain insight into unexplored issues related to the intervention's acceptability. We used conventional (inductive) and direct content analysis to derive categories describing use behaviors and acceptability. Interviews guided development of a proposed conceptual framework, the technology acceptance model for resource-limited settings (TAM-RLS). This framework incorporates both classic technology acceptance model categories as well as novel factors affecting use in this setting. Participants described how SMS message language, phone characteristics, and experience with similar technologies contributed to the system's ease of use. Perceived usefulness was shaped by the perception that the system led to augmented HIV care services and improved access to social support from family and colleagues. Emergent themes specifically related to mHealth acceptance among PLWH in Uganda included (1) the importance of confidentiality, disclosure, and stigma, and (2) the barriers and facilitators downstream from the intervention that impacted achievement of the system's target outcome. The TAM-RLS is a proposed model of mHealth technology acceptance based upon end-user experiences in rural Uganda. Although the proposed model requires validation, the TAM

  11. Scientific literacy and the social constructivist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antić Slobodanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term scientific literacy is already common in our educational rhetoric. Although the term is widely used, there are no papers that analyse the definition of the term and the rangeitencompasses in Serbia. If scientific literacy is a necessary outcome of education, this analysis is an important base for designing the teaching/learning process which is intended to develop such an outcome. Therefore, this paper provides an analysis of the concept of scientific literacy (SL, the different viewpoints on SL and the nature of the concept. Furthermore, five key lines as courses of action in the teaching/learning process, necessary for the development of these competencies, are defined: appreciation ofstudents' previous knowledge, encouragement of students' basic functional literacy and reading comprehension skills, the development of students' understanding of the socio-cultural perspective on the origin and use of scientific knowledge and technological products, and practicing of scientific research, either through school science or science applied in the context of cooperation between school and the local community, i.e. in the socio-cultural background where students live.

  12. Information literacy: using LISTEN project strategies to equip nurses worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ramona; Carter-Templeton, Heather; Russell, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    The 21st century presents a major challenge in the form of information overload. In a profession where new knowledge is ever expanding, nurse educators must equip nurses to find the information they need to provide safe evidence-based care. Information literacy and information technology competencies have become a priority in nursing education, but inconsistencies in definitions, frameworks, content, and design, combined with ill-equipped faculty have hindered the development of a transferable model geared toward improving nurses' information literacy. Challenges are compounded for nurses in developing nations, where access to information and training for information literacy are both problematic. This paper describes experiences from the LISTEN project, during the 1st year of a 3-year funded Nurse Education Practice and Retention grant. Designed to improve information literacy competencies of student and workforce nurses, using individualized learning via interactive web-based modules, LISTEN provides on its' website a Did You Know video dramatizing the importance of information literacy to nurses, and offers resources for information literacy, information technology, and evidence-based nursing practice. Preliminary findings from beta testing reveal the module content is realistic, complete, and logical. The website and video have generated worldwide interest. Future possibilities include nationwide implementation and adaptation for the international arena.

  13. Disciplinary Literacy: "Adapt" Not Adopt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that every teacher is not a teacher of literacy, but instead posits that teachers in content areas must adapt literacy strategies to the content being taught and to the context in which that teaching occurs. Examples of adaptations of a literacy strategy for use in English/language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies…

  14. Literacy in an Information Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Patricia Senn

    1991-01-01

    Today's definition of literacy must include the ability to find and evaluate needed information. Proposes a national literacy agenda to change the way information is used in educational settings and provide greater access to expanding information resources. Considers information literacy a means of personal and national empowerment. (DMM)

  15. The Value of Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Lucio; Kebede, Bereket; Maddox, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    The concepts of literacy events and practices have received considerable attention in educational research and policy. In comparison, the question of value, that is, "which literacy practices do people most value?" has been neglected. With the current trend of cross-cultural adult literacy assessment, it is increasingly important to…

  16. Bilingual Literacy in Creole Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This article examines whether the conventional notion of bilingual literacy is applicable to speakers of creole languages in terms of autonomy, codification, instrumentalisation, education and literacy practices. It then goes on to describe alternative conceptions of both literacy and bilingualism that appear to be more relevant to creole…

  17. Bodies Matter in Literacy Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Reading the implicit invitation in new literacies scholarship to reimagine pedagogy that leans into the lives of youth, Vasudevan reminds readers how the teacher's body is central to the meaning making of students in literacy classrooms. She extends this notion of embodiment to the work of the literacy coach and reiterates Skinner, Hagood,…

  18. Information Literacy: A Bogus Bandwagon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrank, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the concept of information literacy and its target audience of library users. Topics discussed include the relationship of information literacy to bibliographic instruction (BI) and other library instruction; the role of librarians; terminology problems in librarianship; and the effects of information literacy on the value of information…

  19. Transient optical gain in germanium quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sangam; Lange, Christoph; Koester, Niko S.; Schaefer, Martin; Kira, Mackillo; Koch, Stephan W. [Faculty of Physics and Materials Sciences Center, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Chrastina, Daniel; Isella, Giovanni; Kaenel, Hans von [CNISM, Como (Italy); L-NESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano, Como (Italy); Sigg, Hans [Laboratory for Micro and Nanotecnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    One of today's most-sought goals in semiconductor technology is the monolithic integration of microelectronics and photonics on Si. Optical gain is, in general, not expected for Si and Ge or its alloys due to the indirect nature of the band gap in this material system. Here, we show that Ge/SiGe QWs show transient optical gain and may thus be used as an optically-pumped amplifier at room temperature. Further, the nonequilibrium effects which govern the relaxation dynamics of the optically injected carrier distributions in this material were observed and analyzed using a microscopic many-body theory. Strong non-equilibrium gain was obtained on a sub-100 fs time scale. Long-lived gain arising from {gamma}-point transitions is overcompensated by a process bearing the character of free carrier absorption.

  20. STUDENTS’ SCIENCE LITERACY ABILITY PROFILE IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION AND GLOBAL WARMING MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laela Ulfa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research head for measure profile of students’ science literacy ability in environmental pollution and global warming material. The study was conducted in one of SMP Negeri Semarang with samples of 70 students from grade VII D and VII E. The profile of literacy science of students from the highest percentage till the lowest was science as a body of a knowledge was 70,36%, science as a way of thinking was 61,71%, the interaction between science, technology, and society was 61,43% categorized enough level, and science as a way for investigating was 38,21 categorized too less. keywords: science literacy, scince literacy ability

  1. The App Map: A Tool for Systematic Evaluation of Apps for Early Literacy Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Madeleine Heins

    2015-01-01

    As portable devices become increasingly available in elementary classrooms teachers are expected to use these new technologies to engage students in both traditional print-based literacy learning and digital literacies practices, such as multimodal composing. Teachers face the daunting task of integrating apps into their current research-based…

  2. Marine Science Summer Enrichment Camp's Impact Ocean Literacy for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Victoria Jewel

    2017-01-01

    Although careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics have expanded in the United States, science literacy skills for K-12 students have declined from 2001 to 2011. Limited research has been conducted on the impact of science enrichment programs on the science literacy skills of K-12 students, particularly in marine science. The…

  3. "Grand Theft South Africa": Games, Literacy and Inequality in Consumer Childhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marion; Pallitt, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of "game literacy" focus on the informal learning and literacies associated with games but seldom address the diversity in young people's gaming practices, and the highly differentiated technologies of digital gaming in use. We use available survey data to show how, in South Africa, income inequalities influence consumption…

  4. Literacy and Capital in Immigrant Youths' Online Networks across Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wan Shun Eva

    2014-01-01

    Communication technologies are playing an increasingly prominent role in facilitating immigrants' social networks across countries and the transnational positioning of immigrant youth in their online language and literacy practices. Drawing from a comparative case study of the digital literacy practices of immigrant youth of Chinese descent,…

  5. How serious do we need to be? Improving Information Literacy skills through gaming and interactive elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meegen, van A.E.; Limpens, I.A.M.

    Nowadays technology makes information accessible for everyone everywhere. The art of selecting the best information in a short period of time and use it correctly is called information literacy. Information literacy training provides students with the tools necessary to efficiently find and

  6. The Northeast Texas Adult Education Rural Workplace Literacy Program. Annual Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Sue; Burns, Kathryn; Bowers, Jana; Pruitt, Jeanni; Pate, Sally

    The Northeast Texas Adult Education Rural Education Workplace Literacy Program, which is a partnership between Northeast Texas Community College and area businesses, offers workplace literacy instruction designed around job-specific basic skills. Training is offered in the following: applied workplace technology; applied math skills; measurements…

  7. Embedding Literacy Strategies in Social Studies for Eighth-Grade Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, James; Gaston, Alishia; Martin, Ellice P.

    2016-01-01

    This action research study evaluated the effects of literacy strategies on academic achievement, motivation, and engagement of eighth-grade social studies students. Incorporating literacy strategies included teaching students to construct meaning, think critically, and build content knowledge, while stimulating their interests, using multiple texts and technology, and providing collaborative opportunities and high engagement during instructional activities. Students were divided i...

  8. A Tri-Part Model for Genetics Literacy: Exploring Undergraduate Student Reasoning about Authentic Genetics Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan; Stephenson, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Genetics literacy is becoming increasingly important as advancements in our application of genetic technologies such as stem cell research, cloning, and genetic screening become more prevalent. Very few studies examine how genetics literacy is applied when reasoning about authentic genetic dilemmas. However, there is evidence that situational…

  9. New Tools for New Literacies Research: An Exploration of Usability Testing Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marlene; Moayeri, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Competency in the new literacies of the Internet is essential for participating in contemporary society. Researchers studying these new literacies are recognizing the limitations of traditional methodological tools and adapting new technologies and new media for use in research. This paper reports our exploration of usability testing software to…

  10. Assessing the Computational Literacy of Elementary Students on a National Level in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, SooJin; Han, SunGwan; Kim, HyeonCheol; Lee, WonGyu

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) literacy education has become an important issue, and the necessity of computational literacy (CL) has been increasing in our growing information society. CL is becoming an important element for future talents, and many countries, including the USA, are developing programs for CL education.…

  11. The Effect of STEM Learning through the Project of Designing Boat Model toward Student STEM Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tati, T.; Firman, H.; Riandi, R.

    2017-09-01

    STEM Learning focusses on development of STEM-literate society, the research about implementation of STEM learning to develope students’ STEM literacy is still limited. This study is aimed to examine the effect of implementation STEM learning through the project of designing boat model on students STEM literacy in energy topic. The method of this study was a quasi-experiment with non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design. There were two classes involved, the experiment class used Project Based Learning with STEM approach and control class used Project-Based Learning without STEM approach. A STEM Literacy test instrument was developed to measure students STEM literacy which consists of science literacy, mathematics literacy, and technology-engineering literacy. The analysis showed that there were significant differences on improvement science literacy, mathematics technology-engineering between experiment class and control class with effect size more than 0.8 (large effect). The difference of improvement of STEM literacy between experiment class and control class is caused by the existence of design engineering activity which required students to apply the knowledge from every field of STEM. The challenge that was faced in STEM learning through design engineering activity was how to give the students practice to integrate STEM field in solving the problems. In additional, most of the students gave positive response toward implementation of STEM learning through design boat model project.

  12. REFLEXÕES TEÓRICAS E PRÁTICAS SOBRE OS NOVOS LETRAMENTOS E TECNOLOGIAS DIGITAIS: RELATO DE FORMAÇÃO DOCENTE. THEORETICAL REFLECTIONS AND PRACTICES RELATED TO NEW LITERACIES AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES: A TEACHER TRAINING REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo S. Junqueira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta o relato de experiência de formação, realizada no âmbito do Programa Mais Educação do MEC (Ministério da Educação, Brasil, de um grupo de professores de escolas públicas do estado do Ceará no eixo temático dos novos letramentos e das tecnologias digitais. A formação foi articulada em duas unidades que contemplaram três instâncias da temática trabalhada: a perspectiva sociocultural da cibercultura, a dimensão institucional da escola e a esfera profissional e pessoal do professor. A segunda unidade centrou-se ainda na análise crítica de uma experiência prática de uso de tecnologias digitais com fins educativos em um projeto de aprendizagem desenvolvido em parceria com a Universidade de Michigan, dos Estados Unidos, a partir da experiência contrastante de dois professores. A partir desses elementos a formação estabeleceu um processo dialogado e reflexivo com os professores participantes, contribuindo para sua compreensão sobre os dilemas e possíveis formas de atuação no Programa para uso educativo das tecnologias digitais a partir do paradigma da cibercultura e com fins de melhoria da aprendizagem. The paper presents the experience of teacher training conducted under the Mais Educação (More Education Program from the Ministry of Education, Brazil, and attended by a group of public school teachers in the state of Ceará in order to learn about digital technologies and new literacies. The course was developed in two units; the first one addressed conceptual elements related to teacher identity in transition and their new professional roles, the dissonance between the paradigm of cyberspace and the space-time of schools. The second unit featured a review of a practical experience in the use of digital technologies for educational purposes on a learning project developed in partnership with the University of Michigan, U.S.A., based on the contrasting experiences of two teachers. The course established

  13. Gains from quota trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Levring; Bogetoft, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We provide a framework for evaluating potential effects of introducing tradable quotas to a sector. The effects depend on the economies of scale and scope of the production technology, and on firms' ability and willingness to learn best practice methods (catching up) and to change their input and...

  14. Innovative Approaches in Chronic Disease Management: Health Literacy Solutions and Opportunities for Research Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaire, Michael; Gonzalez, Diana Peña; Johnson, Kirby L

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses the need for innovative health literacy solutions to combat extensive chronic disease prevalence and costs. The authors explore the intersection of chronic disease management and health literacy. They provide specific examples of successful health literacy interventions for managing several highly prevalent chronic diseases. This is followed by suggestions on pairing research and practice to support effective disease management programs. In addition, the authors discuss strategies for collection and dissemination of knowledge gained from collaborations between researchers and practitioners. They identify current challenges specific to disseminating information from the health literacy field and offer potential solutions. The chapter concludes with a brief look at future directions and organizational opportunities to integrate health literacy practices to address the need for effective chronic disease management.

  15. Production of different literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Wanderley Geraldi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we question the "modern" concept of literacy, observing it as it is a new theory aiming at replacing the concept of "alphabetization" and its practices so as to produce effective ways of inserting the subject in the worlds of writing and reading. We especially employ the Bakhtinian concepts of speech genres and responsible act on concrete utterances that exemplify the current teaching practice in order to show that the key problem in education is not the name change of a teaching practice, but it is both the mixture of two different realities when it comes to different levels of literacy or to different literacies and the unequal distribution of cultural goods in society.

  16. Health Literacy and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Cajita, Tara Rafaela; Han, Hae-Ra

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy affects millions of Americans, putting those who are affected at a disadvantage and at risk for poorer health outcomes. Low health literacy can act as a barrier to effective disease self-management; this is especially true for chronic diseases such as heart failure (HF) that require complicated self-care regimens. Purpose This systematic review examined quantitative research literature published between 1999 and 2014 to explore the role of health literacy among HF patients. The specific aims of the systematic review are to (1) describe the prevalence of low health literacy among HF patients, (2) explore the predictors of low health literacy among HF patients, and (3) discuss the relationship between health literacy and HF self-care and common HF outcomes. Methods A systematic search of the following databases was conducted, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Embase, PsycINFO, and Scopus, using relevant keywords and clear inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions An average of 39% of HF patients have low health literacy. Age, race/ethnicity, years of education, and cognitive function are predictors of health literacy. In addition, adequate health literacy is consistently correlated with higher HF knowledge and higher salt knowledge. Clinical Implications Considering the prevalence of low health literacy among in the HF population, nurses and healthcare professionals need to recognize the consequences of low health literacy and adopt strategies that could minimize its detrimental effect on the patient's health outcomes. PMID:25569150

  17. Literacy research methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Nell K

    2012-01-01

    The definitive reference on literacy research methods, this book serves as a key resource for researchers and as a text in graduate-level courses. Distinguished scholars clearly describe established and emerging methodologies, discuss the types of questions and claims for which each is best suited, identify standards of quality, and present exemplary studies that illustrate the approaches at their best. The book demonstrates how each mode of inquiry can yield unique insights into literacy learning and teaching and how the methods can work together to move the field forward.   New to This Editi

  18. Improvement of Students’ Environmental Literacy by Using Integrated Science Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, D.; Sinaga, P.; Surakusumah, W.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to determine the improvement of student environmental literacy through the use of integrated science teaching materials on pollution topics. The research is used weak experiment method with the one group pre-test post-test design. The sample of the study were junior high school students in Bandung amounted to 32 people of 7th grade. Data collection in the form of environmental literacy test instrument consist of four components of environmental literacy that is (1) Knowledge, (2) Competencies (Cognitive Skill), (3) Affective and (4) Environmentally Responsible Behavior. The results show that the student’s environmental literacy ability is improved after using integrated science teaching materials. An increase in the medium category is occurring in the knowledge (N-gain=46%) and cognitive skill (N-gain=31%), while the increase in the low category occurs in the affective component (N-gain=25%) and behaviour (N-gain=24%). The conclusions of this study as a whole the improvement of students’ environmental literacy by using integrated science teaching material is in the medium category (N-gain=34%).

  19. Five Fabulous Literacy-Oriented Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlychek, Ken

    1997-01-01

    Profiles six noteworthy web sites on literacy-related information, including sites that deal with issues addressing literacy and deafness, literacy development, family literacy program development, evaluation of family literacy programs, and encouraging young children with deafness to read. Online addresses of the web sites are provided. (CR)

  20. NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University and Research Education Program Promotes Climate Literacy by Engaging Students at Minority Serving Institutions in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Alston, E. J.; Chambers, L. H.; Bynum, A.; Montgomery, C.; Blue, S.; Kowalczak, C.; Leighton, A.; Bosman, L.

    2017-12-01

    NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University Research & Education Program - MUREP (ESTEEM) activities enhance institutional capacity of minority serving institutions (MSIs) related to Earth System Science, Technology and energy education; in turn, increasing access of underrepresented groups to science careers and opportunities. ESTEEM is a competitive portfolio that has been providing funding to institutions across the United States for 10 years. Over that time 76 separate activities have been funded. Beginning in 2011 ESTEEM awards focused on MSIs and public-school districts with high under-represented enrollment. Today ESTEEM awards focus on American Indian/Alaska Native serving institutions (Tribal Colleges and Universities), the very communities most severely in need of ability to deal with climate adaptation and resiliency. ESTEEM engages a multi-faceted approach to address economic and cultural challenges facing MSI communities. PIs (Principal Investigators) receive support from a management team at NASA, and are supported by a larger network, the ESTEEM Cohort, which connects regularly through video calls, virtual video series and in-person meetings. The cohort acts as a collective unit to foster interconnectivity and knowledge sharing in both physical and virtual settings. ESTEEM partners with NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLNTM) in a unique non-traditional model to leverage technical expertise. DLN services over 10,000 participants each year through interactive web-based synchronous and asynchronous events. These events allow for cost effective (no travel) engagement of multiple, geographically dispersed audiences to share local experiences with one another. Events allow PIs to grow their networks, technical base, professional connections, and develop a sense of community, encouraging expansion into larger and broader interactions. Over 256 connections, beyond the 76 individual members, exist within the cohort. PIs report

  1. Picture Books and Literacy Development for Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Slater, Lichelle

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, research has focused on children’s literature and how it can facilitate literacy development (LaCour, McDonald, Tissington, Thomason, 2013; Lee, 2010). Although current research has identified the importance of age-appropriate literacy development for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), few studies have explored the character representations depicted in current picture books, and their cultural and individual impact on children who are DHH. To gain a better und...

  2. Science Literacy of Undergraduates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Science literacy is a matter of broad concern among scientists, educators, and many policy-makers. National Science Foundation surveys of the general public for biannual Science Indicators series show that respondents on average score less than 2/3 correct on a series of science knowledge questions, and less than half display an understanding of the process of scientific inquiry. Both measures are essentially unchanged over two decades. At the University of Arizona, we have gathered over 11,000 undergraduate student responses to a survey of knowledge and beliefs that is tethered in the NSF survey. This non-science major population demographically represents ten million students nationwide. There is a less than 10% gain in performance in the science knowledge score between the incoming freshmen and seniors who graduate having completed their requirement of three science classes. Belief levels in pseudoscience and supernatural phenomena are disconcertingly high, mostly resistant to college science instruction, and weakly correlated with performance on the science knowledge questions. The Internet is rapidly becoming the primary information source for anyone interested in science so students may not get most of their information from the classroom. Educators and policy makers need to decide what aspects of science knowledge and process are important for adults to know. College science educators have major challenges in better in preparing graduates for participation in a civic society largely driven by science and technology.

  3. The Relationship of Health Literacy with Health status, Preventive Behaviors and Health services Utilization in Baluchistan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossien Izadirad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Health Literacy has been defined as the cognitive and social skills that determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access to, understand and use information in ways which promote and maintain good health. People with inadequate health literacy have poorer health status. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the status of health literacy and its relationship with general health status, use of health services and preventive behaviors. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 400 individuals aged 18to 65 years in Balochestan, Iran. Multi-stage cluster sampling was used. Data were collected using Health Literacy for Iranian Adults (HELIA questionnaires. Data analyses were conducted using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney, using SPSS (version 18. Results: The mean age of the studied population was 9.29± 28.7years. Only %32 of adults were found to have adequate health literacy. Inadequate health literacy was more common in older people, ones with fewer years of schooling or lower household income, and females. The health literacy level was associated with outpatient visits, screening, and health status. Individuals with higher levels of health literacy had performed screening more than others. conclusions: Due to the low health literacy level in the target population, educational interventions are needed to develop health literacy skills in the community.

  4. Using a Water Purification Activity to Teach the Philosophy and Nature of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Jerrid; Wilcox, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), with new emphasis on engineering, reflects broadening definitions of scientific and technological literacy. However, engaging in science and engineering practices is necessary, but insufficient, for developing technological literacy. Just as robust scientific literacy includes a deep understanding of the…

  5. A Construction of Global Literacy Indicators for Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Sheng Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the era of glocalization and logloblization, only university graduates who are globally literate can effectively deal with international affairs or work overseas. Therefore, this study aimed to construct a set of global literacy indicators for undergraduates in Taiwan. The global literacy indicators can be used as a guide to assess undergraduates’ global literacy level and serve as the foundation for developing global education curriculums. Employing a theoretical framework, this study drafted global literacy dimensions and indicators from reviewing related literature, and invited 18 practitioners with international experience to participate in this study. During the item development process, fuzzy Delphi method (FDM and analytic hierarchy process (AHP were applied to select and weight global literacy indicators respectively. Consequently, a set of global literacy indicators for undergraduates were constructed, which include the following four dimensions: communication, context, career development, and culture. “Communication” is the most important dimension among them, while “communicate with foreign languages” and “use information and communication technology (ICT to communicate with others” are the most important indicators and items at the second and third hierarchical levels, respectively.

  6. Take-home video for adult literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. The language used is English, but the basic concepts apply to any alphabetic or syllabic writing system. A half-hour cartoon video can help adults and adolescents with learning difficulties. Computer-animated cartoon graphics are attractive to look at, and simplify complex material in a clear, lively way. This video technique is also proving useful for distance learners, children, and learners of English as a second language. Methods and principles are to be extended using interactive compact discs.

  7. Integrating information literacy across a BSN curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Lisa Sue; Gasiewicz, Nanci; Delpier, Terry

    2010-02-01

    Although research regarding effective informatics teaching strategies is sparse and informatics competencies have not yet been finalized, nurse educators have been challenged to include informatics throughout the curriculum. Nurse educators are confronted with how best to incorporate informatics into an already burgeoning curriculum. This article offers a systematic approach to incorporating information literacy, a vital component of informatics, across a baccalaureate of science in nursing curriculum. Motivated by the Institute of Medicine report, guided by the initial Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform competency framework, and using the specific Quality and Safety Education for Nurses informatics competencies, the proposed integrated approach emphasizes clinical applications. The five assignments are designed to incrementally increase students' abilities to recognize the need for information (i.e., knowledge); advance students' abilities to locate, evaluate, and use information (i.e., skills); and foster a positive appreciation for information literacy (i.e., attitudes) when planning safe, effective patient care. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Writing for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Shannon Marie

    Scientific literacy is the foundation on which both California's currently adopted science standards and the recommended new standards for science are based (CDE, 2000; NRC, 2011). The Writing for Science Literacy (WSL) curriculum focuses on a series of writing and discussion tasks aimed at increasing students' scientific literacy. These tasks are based on three teaching and learning constructs: thought and language, scaffolding, and meta-cognition. To this end, WSL is focused on incorporating several strategies from the Rhetorical Approach to Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking to engage students in activities designed to increase their scientific literacy; their ability to both identify an author's claim and evidence and to develop their own arguments based on a claim and evidence. Students participated in scaffolded activities designed to strengthen their written and oral discourse, hone their rhetorical skills and improve their meta-cognition. These activities required students to participate in both writing and discussion tasks to create meaning and build their science content knowledge. Students who participated in the WSL curriculum increased their written and oral fluency and were able to accurately write an evidence-based conclusion all while increasing their conceptual knowledge. This finding implies that a discourse rich curriculum can lead to an increase in scientific knowledge.

  9. The 1971 Literacy Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Budd L., Ed.

    Results of a study of the campaigns to eliminate illiteracy in five districts of Tanzania are reported. Using case study methods, researchers from the Institute of Adult Education followed a common outline in collecting data from the Mafia, Ukerewe, Masasi, Kilimanjaro, and Pare Districts regarding their literacy campaigns. The outline was 1.…

  10. An Information Literacy Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielich, Paul; Page, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Describes a pilot partnership formed by a science teacher and a science library media specialist between Detroit's Northwestern High School and the David Adamany Undergraduate Library at Wayne State University to develop student information literacy in high school. Discusses activities; teacher attitudes; introduction of the Big6 Skills; and…

  11. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  12. Adolescents and media literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCannon, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the face of media industry consolidation, fewer people control media content which makes it harder for parents and citizens to know the research about media-related issues, such as video game violence, nutrition, and sexual risk-taking. Media literacy offers a popular and potentially successful way to counter the misinformation that is spread by Big Media public relations.

  13. Learning Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehm, Rae-Anne; Lupton, Mandy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on university students' experiences of learning information literacy. Method: Phenomenography was selected as the research approach as it describes the experience from the perspective of the study participants, which in this case is a mixture of undergraduate and postgraduate students studying education at an…

  14. Literacy before Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Emilia; Teberosky, Ana

    The reflections and theses on preschool children's literacy development presented in this book are the result of an experimental project carried out in Buenos Aires from 1974 to 1976. Chapter 1 discusses the educational situation in Latin America, traditional methods of reading instruction, contemporary psycholinguistics, the pertinence of…

  15. Embracing Physical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roetert, E. Paul; Jefferies, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    At the most recent SHAPE America National Convention held in St. Louis, MO, an international perspective of the term "physical literacy" was introduced. Experts representing North America, Europe, and Asia provided insight into the increased acceptance and implementation of the term. Since the terms "physical education" and…

  16. Marketing Manual: Workplace Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanshawe Coll., Strathroy (Ontario).

    This manual applies marketing concepts and methods, selling techniques and principles to the workplace literacy program for the purpose of assisting individuals involved in promoting and selling these programs. Part I provides a rationale for marketing and discusses the following: the role of the sponsor in marketing, market versus marketing,…

  17. Extending Cultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Ted J.; Court, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    Advocates defining cultural literacy to recognize the mass media's role in transmitting and maintaining cultural stereotypes and shaping values and beliefs. Distinguishes between ideational and material aspects of culture. Advocates teaching critical thinking and respect for persons in light of questionable moral perspectives in certain media…

  18. Literacy and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the ambiguous attitude toward literacy in ancient Athenian society. Asserts that few Athenian citizens could read, yet reading was regarded as intrinsic to democratic practices. Maintains that the democratic power of writing rests in the active, social interaction of citizens. (CFR)

  19. Exploring Consumer Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Virginia; Sumrall, William; Mott, Michael; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Theobald, Becky

    2015-01-01

    Methods for facilitating students' standards-based consumer literacy are addressed via the use of problem solving with food and product labels. Fifth graders will be able to: (1) provide detailed analysis of food and product labels; (2) understand large themes, including production, distribution, and consumption; and (3) explore consumer…

  20. Stewards of Digital Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheingold, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Participatory culture, in which citizens feel and exercise the agency of being cocreators of their culture and not just passive consumers of culture created by others, depends on widespread literacies of participation. One can't participate without knowing how. And cultural participation depends on a social component that is not easily learned…

  1. Writing and Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Magasic, Coleen

    2012-01-01

    Writing activities are a sure way to assess and enhance students' science literacy. Sometimes the author's students use technical writing to communicate their lab experiences, just as practicing scientists do. Other times, they use creative writing to make connections to the topics they're learning. This article describes both types of writing…

  2. Nuclear literacy - Hungarian experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, E.; Marx, G.

    1996-01-01

    The operation of nuclear power plants and the related environmental sentiments make basic nuclear education to a precondition of modern democratic decision making. Nuclear chapters of the curriculum used to treat the topics in historical and descriptive, thus less convincing way. The question arises: how to offer nuclear literacy to the youth in general, to show its empirical aspects and relevance to citizens. (author)

  3. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Newland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:• Learning and teaching• Research• Communication and collaboration• AdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to resources and training opportunities. After an initial pilot, the DLF website was launched in the summer of 2014. This paper discusses the strategic context and policy development of the DLF, its initial conception and subsequent development based on a pilot phase, feedback and evaluation. It critically analyses two of the ways that engagement with the DLF have been promoted: (1 formal professional development schemes and (2 the use of a ‘School-based’ approach. It examines the successes and challenges of the University of Brighton's scheme and makes some suggestions for subsequent steps including taking a course-level approach.

  4. The Geography of Financial Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bumcrot

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how well equipped today’s households are to make complex financial decisions in the face of often high-cost and high-risk financial instruments. Specifically we focus on financial literacy. Most importantly, we describe the geography of financial literacy, i.e., how financial literacy is distributed across the fifty US states. We describe the correlation of financial literacy and some important aggregate variables, such as state-level poverty rates. Finally, we examine the extent to which differences in financial literacy can be explained by states’ demographic and economic characteristics. To assess financial literacy, five questions were added to the 2009 National Financial Capability Study, covering fundamental concepts of economics and finance encountered in everyday life: simple calculations about interest rates and inflation, the workings of risk diversification, the relationship between bond prices and interest rates, and the relationship between interest payments and maturity in mortgages. We constructed an index of financial literacy based on the number of correct answers provided by each respondent to the five financial literacy questions. The financial literacy index reveals wide variation in financial literacy across states. Much of the variation is attributable to differences in the demographic makeup of the states; however, a handful of states have either higher or lower levels of financial literacy than is explained by demographics alone. Also, there is a significant correlation between the financial literacy of a state and that state’s poverty level. The findings indicate directions for policy makers and practitioners interested in targeting areas where financial literacy is low.

  5. Student Perceptions of Using Games to Address Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Cara M.

    The purpose of this qualitative evaluative case study was to gain insight into how students perceived the efficacy of using games to address their science literacy concerns. Scientists in the United States are concerned with the lack of science literacy. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 requires proficiency in reading, mathematics, language arts, and science by the completion of the 2013--2014 school year. The high school participating in this study received substandard test scores on both the 2009 state graduation test and the science portion of the ACT test. The research question included understanding how students perceive the use of games in addressing their science literacy needs. The data from the student journals, field notes, and transcribed class discussions were analyzed using a 6 step method that included coding the data into main themes. The triangulated data were used to both gain insight into student perspective and inform game development. Constructivist theories formed the conceptual framework of the study. The findings of the study suggested that games may prove a valuable tool in science literacy attainment. The study indicated that games were perceived by the students to be effective tools in meeting their learning needs. Implications for positive social change included providing students, educators, and administrators with game resources that can be used to meet the science learning needs of struggling students, thereby improving science scores on high stakes tests.

  6. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  7. PROTOTYPE OF WEB BASED INFORMATION LITERACY TO ENHANCE STUDENT INFORMATION LITERACY SKILL IN STATE ISLAMIC HIGH SCHOOL INSAN CENDEKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Kurnianingsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Information Literacy (IL Program is a library program that aims to improve the ability of library users to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. Information literacy learning is essential to be taught and applied in education from the beginning of the school so that students are able to find and organize information effectively and efficiently particularly regard to the school assignment and learning process. At present, various educational institutions began to implement online learning model to improve the quality of teaching and research quality. Due to the advancement of information technology, the information literacy program should be adjusted with the needs of library users. The purpose of this study was to design web-based information literacy model for school library. This research conducted through several stages which are: identifying the needs of web-based IL, designing web-based IL, determining the model and the contents of a web-based IL tutorial, and creating a prototype webbased IL. The results showed that 90,74% of respondents stated the need of web-based learning IL. The prototype of web-based learning IL is consisted of six main units using combination of the Big6 Skills model and 7 Concept of Information Literacy by Shapiro and Hughes. The main fiveth units are Library Skill, Resource Skill, Research Skill, Reading Skill, and Presenting Literacy. This prototype web-based information literacy is expected to support the information literacy learning in a holistic approach.

  8. Enhancing Science Literacy and Art History Engagement at Princeton Through Collaboration Between the University Art Museum and the Council on Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimaki, C. A.; White, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of innovative science education for social science and humanities students is often under-appreciated by science departments, because these students typically do not take science courses beyond general education requirements, nor do they contribute to faculty research programs. However, these students are vitally important in society—for example as business leaders or consultants, and especially as voters. In these roles, they will be confronted with decisions related to science in their professional and personal lives. The Council on Science and Technology at Princeton University aims to fill this education gap by developing and supporting innovative programs that bring science to cross-disciplinary audiences. One of our most fruitful collaborations has been with the Princeton University Art Museum, which has an encyclopedic collection of over 92,000 works of art, ranging from antiquity to the contemporary. Our work includes 1) bringing introductory environmental science courses to the Museum to explore how original works of art of different ages can serve as paleo-environmental proxies, thereby providing a means for discussing broader concepts in development of proxies and validation of reconstructions; 2) sponsoring a panel aimed at the general public and composed of science faculty and art historians who discussed the scientific and art historical contexts behind Albert Bierstadt's Mount Adams, Washington, 1875 (oil on canvas, gift of Mrs. Jacob N. Beam, accession number y1940-430), including the landscape's subjects, materials, technique, and style; and 3) collaborating on an installation of photographs relevant to a freshman GIS course, with an essay about the artwork written by the students. This first-hand study of works of art encourages critical thinking and an empathetic approach to different historical periods and cultures, as well as to the environment. Our collaboration additionally provides an opportunity to engage more students in

  9. Measuring Ocean Literacy: What teens understand about the ocean using the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greely, T. M.; Lodge, A.

    2009-12-01

    attitudes significantly contributed to ocean literacy. Teens demonstrated a 2-32% increase in content knowledge following the OCG learning experience. The most significant content gains correlated with ocean literacy Essential Principles 1, 2 and 5. Analysis of environmental reasoning patterns revealed that biocentric reasoning (71%) was most important to teens in solving ocean dilemmas. Further, teens reasoning about challenging ocean dilemmas were capable of supporting a position, counter-argument, rebuttal, and accurately use scientific information. Findings provide empirical evidence that connects field studies with ocean literacy. Current guidelines for ocean literacy address cognitive understanding but lack multimodality. The need for ocean literacy that goes beyond content to include reasoning and actions is relevant towards preparing students, teachers and citizens to regularly contribute to decisions about ocean issues and undertake actions as consumer, citizen or steward. This research supports the use of socioscientific issues and stewardship to advance ‘functional’ ocean literacy.

  10. Investigation of Factors Affecting Information Literacy Student Learning Outcomes Fails to Undercover Significant Findings. A Review of: Detlor, B., Julien, H., Willson, R., Serenko, A., & Lavallee, M. (2011. Learning outcomes of information literacy instruction at business schools. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(3, 572-585.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To ascertain the factors influencing student learning during information literacy instruction (ILI and create a theoretical model based on those factors.Design – Mixed methodology consisting of interviews and an assessment test.Setting – Three Canadian business schools.Subjects – Seven librarians, 4 library administrators, 16 business faculty, and 52 undergraduate business students were interviewed, and the Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS test was administered to 1,087 undergraduate business students across three different business schools.Methods – The authors used an interview script to conduct interviews with librarians, library administrators, business school faculty, and undergraduate business school students at three business schools in Canada. The authors also administered the SAILS test to undergraduate business students at the same three Canadian business schools.Main Results – ILI works best when it is related to an assignment, part of the curriculum, periodically evaluated, adequatelyfunded, timely, mandatory, interactive, uses handouts, provides the proper amount of information, and favourably viewed within the school. ILI student learning outcomes are affected by whether the students find the ILI beneficial and relevant, their year in the program, gender, status as international or domestic student, and overall academic achievement.Conclusion – Creation of theoretical model consisting of the three main factors influencing student learning outcomes in information literacy instruction: learning environment, information literacy components, and student demographics.

  11. Cognitive Effects of Technology Over Four Years of College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad N. Loes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Technology permeates higher education, yet less is known about the use of established technologies, such as email and other electronic communication mediums (e.g., discussion boards, listservs for instructional purposes on important student outcomes such as cognitive development. In this study, we use data from the Wabash National Study to estimate the effects of email and other electronic medium use for academic purposes on three measures of cognitive development over four years of college. To investigate this, we regress each measure of cognitive development on email and electronic medium use, while simultaneously controlling for a wide array of potential confounding influences. Net of these influences, we find that email and electronic medium use are positively associated with gains in students’ Need for Cognition. These same technologies fail to have more than a chance influence on students’ critical thinking skills, however. Lastly, email use is associated with gains in the Positive Attitudes Toward Literacy measure for Whites and females, whereas electronic medium use leads to gains in the same outcome for racial and ethnic minorities. While institutions consider newer technologies for instructional purposes, our findings suggest established technologies can play a powerful role in the development of students’ cognitive skills.

  12. Writing is a Humanizing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Walter J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes writing as a technology that changes thought processes and verbal expression and suggests that language and literature teachers become familiar with the processes of primary orality and literacy. (AEA)

  13. A pilot test of the acceptability and efficacy of narrative and non-narrative health education materials in a low health literacy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Meghan Bridgid; Frank, Lauren B; Chatterjee, Joyee S; Murphy, Sheila T; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Although entertainment-education narratives are increasingly being used to communicate health information to a diversity of populations, there is limited evidence examining the use of narrative health education videos in low compared with adequate health literacy populations. There are also very few studies directly comparing narrative materials to more traditional, non-narrative materials. Because individuals with low health literacy are less likely than those with adequate health literacy to benefit from health communication interventions, it is especially important to develop an evidence base supporting the use of narrative health education materials in low literacy populations. This study extends knowledge on the use of narrative health education materials in populations with low health literacy by conducting a randomized trial comparing the acceptability and efficacy (knowledge gain) of two fact-equivalent films, one in a narrative and one in a non-narrative format, on individuals with adequate and low health literacy. This study finds that while both films were well-accepted and produced knowledge gains, the narrative film was more effective in this regard. This effect occurred regardless of health literacy level, indicating that narrative health communication materials are appropriate for individuals with low health literacy and do not exacerbate existing health disparities. These findings add to a small but growing body of evidence testing narrative health education materials in individuals with low health literacy, and provide new evidence supporting narrative, entertainment-education style video as a health communication tool to help reduce health literacy-related health disparities.

  14. Literacy in the contemporary scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B. Kleiman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I examine the relationship between literacy and contemporaneity. I take as a point of departure for my discussion school literacy and its links with literacies in other institutions of the contemporary scene, in order to determine the relation between contemporary ends of reading and writing (in other words, the meaning of being literate in contemporary society and the practices and activities effectively realized at school in order to reach those objectives. Using various examples from teaching and learning situations, I discuss digital literacy practices and multimodal texts and multiliteracies from both printed and digital cultures. Throughout, I keep as a background for the discussion the functions and objectives of school literacy and the professional training of teachers who would like to be effective literacy agents in the contemporary world.

  15. The revelation(s of Asher Levi: An iconographic literacy event as a tool for the exploration of fragmented selves in new literacies studies after 9/11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine M. Staples

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the dynamics of an iconographic literacy event that functions as a tool for explorations of literacy practices and fragmented selves, particularly in relationship to the literate lives of marginalized individuals in the post 9/11 era. The author examines what happened when a group of 10 African American women in an urban area employed new literacies in the teaching/learning spaces of their personal lives (i.e. individual homes, familiar eateries, communicative digital technologies to explore and respond to stories in post 9/11 popular culture narratives. The study employed ethnographic methods (interviews, journaling, email and instant message writing and critical observations with members of the inquiry over the course of two years. The author investigated critically the meeting of biography, fiction and autoethnography as a literacy event used to couch the literacies and fragmented selves of these women in the post 9/11 era. Findings regarding the nature of their post 9/11 literacies, as expressed through fragmented selves, are shared, along with implications for new literacies research and teaching. Findings show that the women’s post 9/11 literacies include a range and variation of critical sensibilities that include, but are not limited to, multiple levels of sociolinguistic integration, sociocultural criticality and heightened awarenesses.

  16. A magical way for educatıon: visual literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Çelik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Visual literacy is education that enhances understanding of the role and function of images in representation and communication, especially in the media.” (Newfield 2011:82. Debes (1969:27 said that; “ Visual Literacy refers to a group of vision-competences a human being can develop by seeing and at the same time having and integrating other sensory experiences.” Education of visual literacy is important for understanding of true meaning of messages in visual elements. Hobbs (2002 cited from Shurtleff 2006:13 claimed, “Epicureans believed that, in fact, the mind cannot think without images.” Samuels and Samuels (1975 cited from Shurtleff 2006:13 also claimed “the archeological record reveals that the first expressions of thougt are visual, not vocal”. In our daily life, visual technology and media literacy has become increasingly popular in our world. We use when we give information, from websites, give PowerPoint presentations, and sketch on Smartboards to get our memories, ideas across. Teenagers, who have come of age in a technological world , they must learn how they can use visual literacy.Teachers should use, in our age, video games, eager consumers of graphic novels, illustrations, photos, diagrams, graphs, symbols, icons and other visual representations.

  17. Childhood roots of financial literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Antonia; Kouwenberg, Roy; Menkhoff, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Financial literacy predicts informed financial decisions, but what explains financial literacy? We use the concept of financial socialization and aim to represent three major agents of financial socialization: family, school and work. Thus we compile twelve relevant childhood characteristics in a new survey study and examine their relation to financial literacy, while controlling for established socio-demographic characteristics. We find in a mediation analysis that both family and school pos...

  18. Literacy in the contemporary scene

    OpenAIRE

    Angela B. Kleiman

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I examine the relationship between literacy and contemporaneity. I take as a point of departure for my discussion school literacy and its links with literacies in other institutions of the contemporary scene, in order to determine the relation between contemporary ends of reading and writing (in other words, the meaning of being literate in contemporary society) and the practices and activities effectively realized at school in order to reach those objectives. Using various exam...

  19. A Reconsideration of Information Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley J. Wilder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on the author's 2005 Chronicle of Higher Education article "Information Literacy Makes All the Wrong Assumptions." In it, the author argues that while library instruction is properly grounded in disciplinary norms, information literacy serves a vital institutional obligation as a means of assessing student learning. The content of library instruction thus serves the University's "vertical" disciplinary agendas, while information literacy serves its "horizontal" institution-wide agenda.

  20. Sudden gains versus gradual gains in a psychotherapy training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Michael F; Gunthert, Kathleen C; Haaga, David A F

    2011-01-01

    Sudden gains are abrupt and substantial improvements in symptoms. This study used the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45; Lambert et al., 1996) to characterize sudden gains occurring in a cognitive-behavioral therapy training clinic. Also, gradual gainers were identified and used as a comparison group. Sudden gains were identified in 23% of patients and in 29% of those who entered treatment in the clinical range on the OQ, within the range of prevalence established by previous sudden gain studies in the context of randomized controlled trials (RCT's). As in earlier research, sudden gains tended to occur early in therapy. However, sudden gains were more likely to be reversed than in RCT's. Gradual gains occurred for 54% of nonsudden gainers; they were of similar magnitude to sudden gains but occurred later in therapy. Sudden gainers showed significantly better outcomes at the end of treatment than did gradual gainers. Sudden gains have clear prognostic significance, but more research is needed to determine why they may be more transient in naturalistic studies or studies involving less experienced therapists than they are in RCT's. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.