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Sample records for technology lisa pathfinder

  1. The LISA Pathfinder mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cañizares, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferrone, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hernández, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H.-B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission, a precursor mission aimed at demonstrating key technologies for future space-based gravitational wave detectors, like LISA. Since much of the flight hardware has already been constructed and tested, we will show that performance measurements and analysis of these flight components lead to an expected performance of the LISA Pathfinder which is a significant improvement over the mission requirements, and which actually reaches the LISA requirements over the entire LISA Pathfinder measurement band.

  2. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future spaceborne gravitational wave detectors, such as the proposed eLISA mission. LISA Pathfinder, and its scientific payload - the LISA Technology Package - will test, in flight, the critical technologies required for low frequency gravitational wave detection: it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. This is achieved through technology comprising inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control and an ultra-precise micro-Newton propulsion system. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in mid-2015, with first results on the performance of the system being available 6 months thereafter. The paper introduces the LISA Pathfinder mission, followed by an explanation of the physical principles of measurement concept and associated hardware. We then provide a detailed discussion of the LISA Technology Package, including both the inertial sensor and interferometric readout. As we approach the launch of the LISA Pathfinder, the focus of the development is shifting towards the science operations and data analysis - this is described in the final section of the paper

  3. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Paul

    2013-04-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future interferometric spaceborne gravitational wave observatories, for example the proposed eLISA mission. The technologies required for eLISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise, led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical eLISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the eLISA constellation by shrinking the 1 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the eLISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. Here I will present an overview of the mission, focusing on scientific and technical goals, followed by the current status of the project.

  4. LISA Pathfinder: mission and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The technologies required for LISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical LISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the LISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in 2013 on-board a dedicated small launch vehicle (VEGA). After a series of apogee raising manoeuvres using an expendable propulsion module, LISA Pathfinder will enter a transfer orbit towards the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). After separation from the propulsion module, the LPF spacecraft will be stabilized using the micro-Newton thrusters, entering a 500 000 km by 800 000 km Lissajous orbit around L1. Science results will be available approximately 2 months after launch.

  5. LISA Pathfinder: mission and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, F; Cavalleri, A; Congedo, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Armano, M [European Space Astronomy Centre, European Space Agency, Villanueva de la Canada, 28692 Madrid (Spain); Audley, H; Bogenstahl, J; Danzmann, K [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik und Universitaet Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Auger, G; Binetruy, P [APC UMR7164, Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Benedetti, M [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e Tecnologie Industriali, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Boatella, C [CNES, DCT/AQ/EC, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse, Cedex 9 (France); Bortoluzzi, D; Bosetti, P; Cristofolini, I [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Strutturale, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Caleno, M; Cesa, M [European Space Technology Centre, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Chmeissani, M [IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ciani, G [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Conchillo, A [ICE-CSIC/IEEC, Facultat de Ciencies, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cruise, M, E-mail: Paul.McNamara@esa.int [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-07

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The technologies required for LISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical LISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the LISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in 2013 on-board a dedicated small launch vehicle (VEGA). After a series of apogee raising manoeuvres using an expendable propulsion module, LISA Pathfinder will enter a transfer orbit towards the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). After separation from the propulsion module, the LPF spacecraft will be stabilized using the micro-Newton thrusters, entering a 500 000 km by 800 000 km Lissajous orbit around L1. Science results will be available approximately 2 months after launch.

  6. LISA Pathfinder data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gesa, L.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    As the launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) draws near, more and more effort is being put in to the preparation of the data analysis activities that will be carried out during the mission operations. The operations phase of the mission will be composed of a series of experiments that will be carried out on the satellite. These experiments will be directed and analysed by the data analysis team, which is part of the operations team. The operations phase will last about 90 days, during which time the data analysis team aims to fully characterize the LPF, and in particular, its core instrument the LISA Technology Package. By analysing the various couplings present in the system, the different noise sources that will disturb the system, and through the identification of the key physical parameters of the system, a detailed noise budget of the instrument will be constructed that will allow the performance of the different subsystems to be assessed and projected towards LISA. This paper describes the various aspects of the full data analysis chain that are needed to successfully characterize the LPF and build up the noise budget during mission operations.

  7. LISA Pathfinder data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, F; Cavalleri, A; Congedo, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Armano, M [European Space Astronomy Centre, European Space Agency, Villanueva de la Canada, 28692 Madrid (Spain); Audley, H; Bogenstahl, J; Danzmann, K [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik und Universitaet Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Auger, G; Binetruy, P [APC UMR7164, Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Benedetti, M [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e Tecnologie Industriali, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Boatella, C [CNES, DCT/AQ/EC, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse, Cedex9 (France); Bortoluzzi, D; Bosetti, P; Cristofolini, I [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Strutturale, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Caleno, M; Cesa, M [European Space Technology Centre, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Chmeissani, M [IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Ciani, G [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Conchillo, A [ICE-CSIC/IEEC, Facultat de Ciencies, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Cruise, M, E-mail: martin.hewitson@aei.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-07

    As the launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) draws near, more and more effort is being put in to the preparation of the data analysis activities that will be carried out during the mission operations. The operations phase of the mission will be composed of a series of experiments that will be carried out on the satellite. These experiments will be directed and analysed by the data analysis team, which is part of the operations team. The operations phase will last about 90 days, during which time the data analysis team aims to fully characterize the LPF, and in particular, its core instrument the LISA Technology Package. By analysing the various couplings present in the system, the different noise sources that will disturb the system, and through the identification of the key physical parameters of the system, a detailed noise budget of the instrument will be constructed that will allow the performance of the different subsystems to be assessed and projected towards LISA. This paper describes the various aspects of the full data analysis chain that are needed to successfully characterize the LPF and build up the noise budget during mission operations.

  8. Mission design for LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Landgraf, M; Kemble, S

    2004-01-01

    Here we describe the mission design for SMART-2/LISA Pathfinder. The best trade-off between the requirements of a low-disturbance environment and communications distance is found to be a free-insertion Lissajous orbit around the first co-linear Lagrange point of the Sun-Earth system L1, 1.5x 10^6 km from Earth. In order to transfer SMART-2/LISA Pathfinder from a low Earth orbit, where it will be placed by a small launcher, the spacecraft carries out a number of apogee-raise manoeuvres, which ultimatively place it to a parabolic escape trajectory towards L1. The challenges of the design of a small mission are met, fulfilling the very demanding technology demonstration requirements without creating excessive requirements on the launch system or the ground segment.

  9. The LISA Pathfinder Radiation Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, P. J.; Araújo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Hajdas, W.; Lobo, A.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sumner, T.

    2006-11-01

    We present the concept, design and testing of the radiation monitor for LISA Pathfinder. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) will cause charging of the LISA Pathfinder test masses producing unwanted disturbances which could be significant during a large solar eruption. A radiation monitor on board LISA Pathfinder, using silicon PIN diodes as particle detectors, will measure the particle flux responsible for charging. It will also be able to record spectral information to identify solar energetic particle events. The design of the monitor was supported by Monte Carlo simulations which allow detailed predictions of the radiation monitor performance. We present these predictions as well as the results of high-energy proton tests carried out at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The tests show good agreement with our simulations and confirm the capability of the radiation monitor to perform well in the space environment, meeting all science requirements.

  10. Free-flight experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, LI; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this ‘suspension noise’. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlying disturbances that are of interest to the designers of LISA-like instruments. This article provides a high-level overview of these experiments and the methods under development to analyze the resulting data.

  11. Spacetime Metrology with LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    LISA is the proposed ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector in the 0.1 mHz - 0.1 Hz band. LISA Pathfinder is the down-scaled version of a single LISA arm. The arm -- named Doppler link -- can be treated as a differential accelerometer, measuring the relative acceleration between test masses. LISA Pathfinder -- the in-flight test of the LISA instrumentation -- is currently in the final implementation and planned to be launched in 2014. It will set stringent constraints on the ability to put test masses in geodesic motion to within the required differential acceleration of 3\\times10^{-14} m s^{-2} Hz^{-1/2} and track their relative motion to within the required differential displacement measurement noise of 9\\times10^{-12} m Hz^{-1/2}, around 1 mHz. Given the scientific objectives, it will carry out -- for the first time with such high accuracy required for gravitational wave detection -- the science of spacetime metrology, in which the Doppler link between two free-falling test masses measures the curvature. Thi...

  12. Electrostatic disturbances aboard LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Valerio

    Test mass charging and stray electrostatic fields are a potentially important source of force noise for the LISA Pathfinder mission. During the flight we plan to measure the relevant stray electrostatic fields on the surfaces of both the test mass and the electrode housing and compensate them with DC electrode bias voltages. In addition we monitor the charge and reduce it to near zero by UV illumination. We describe the analysis techniques used during the mission and explain the importance of periodic charging/discharging and of long-term charge measurements to limit the force noise at low frequency, which is particularly relevant for the eLISA mission.

  13. Free-flight experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Armano, M; Auger, G; Baird, J; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Bursi, A; Caleno, M; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Cruise, M; Cutler, C; Danzmann, K; Diepholz, I; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fitzsimons, E; Freschi, M; Gallegos, J; Marirrodriga, C Garcia; Gerndt, R; Gesa, LI; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Grimani, C; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hueller, M; Huesler, J; Inchauspe, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C; Lloro, I; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Madden, S; Maghami, P; Mance, D; Martin, V; Martin-Porqueras, F; Mateos, I; McNamara, P; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Moroni, A; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Perez, J A Romera; Robertson, D; Rozemeijer, H; Russano, G; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J; Trenkel, C; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Waschke, S; Wass, P; Wealthy, D; Wen, S; Weber, W; Wittchen, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2014-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this `suspension noise'. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlyi...

  14. LISA Pathfinder: OPD loop characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Michael; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The optical metrology system (OMS) of the LISA Pathfinder mission is measuring the distance between two free-floating test masses with unprecedented precision. One of the four OMS heterodyne interferometers reads out the phase difference between the reference and the measurement laser beam. This phase from the reference interferometer is common to all other longitudinal interferometer read outs and therefore subtracted. In addition, the phase is fed back via the digital optical pathlength difference (OPD) control loop to keep it close to zero. Here, we analyse the loop parameters and compare them to on-ground measurement results.

  15. In-flight Diagnostics in LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuan, J.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Xirgu, X.; Araujo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Grimani, C.; Puigdengoles, C.; Wass, P.; García-Berro, E.; García, S.; Martínez, L. M.; Montero, G.

    2006-11-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies for LISA. However its sensitivity goals are, for good reason, one order of magnitude less than those which LISA will have to meet, both in drag-free and optical metrology requirements, and in the observation frequency band. While the expected success of LPF will of course be of itself a major step forward to LISA, one might not forget that a further improvement by an order of magnitude in performance will still be needed. Clues for the last leap are to be derived from proper disentanglement of the various sources of noise which contribute to the total noise, as measured in flight during the PathFinder mission. This paper describes the principles, workings and requirements of one of the key tools to serve the above objective: the diagnostics subsystem. This consists in sets of temperature, magnetic field, and particle counter sensors, together with generators of controlled thermal and magnetic perturbations. At least during the commissioning phase, the latter will be used to identify feed-through coefficients between diagnostics sensor readings and associated actual noise contributions. A brief progress report of the current state of development of the diagnostics subsystem will be given as well.

  16. In-flight Diagnostics in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, A; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Conchillo, A; Ortega, J A; Xirgu, X; Araujo, H; Boatella, C; Chmeissani, M; Grimani, C; Puigdengoles, C; Wass, P; García-Berro, E; García, S; Martínez, L; Montero, G; Lobo, Alberto; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep; Conchillo, Aleix; Ortega, Jose Antonio; Xirgu, Xevi; Araujo, Henrique; Boatella, Cesar; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Grimani, Catia; Puigdengoles, Carles; Wass, Peter; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Garcia, Sergi; Martinez, Lluis; Montero, Gustau

    2007-01-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies for LISA. However its sensitivity goals are, for good reason, one order of magnitude less than those which LISA will have to meet, both in drag-free and optical metrology requirements, and in the observation frequency band. While the expected success of LPF will of course be of itself a major step forward to LISA, one might not forget that a further improvement by an order of magnitude in performance will still be needed. Clues for the last leap are to be derived from proper disentanglement of the various sources of noise which contribute to the total noise, as measured in flight during the PathFinder mission. This paper describes the principles, workings and requirements of one of the key tools to serve the above objective: the diagnostics subsystem. This consists in sets of temperature, magnetic field, and particle counter sensors, together with generators of controlled thermal and magnetic perturbations. At least durin...

  17. From laboratory experiments to LISA Pathfinder: achieving LISA geodesic motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Giardini, D.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the performance of the upcoming LISA Pathfinder geodesic explorer mission. The findings are based on the results of extensive ground testing and simulation campaigns using flight hardware, flight control and operations algorithms. The results show that, for the central experiment of measuring the stray differential acceleration between the LISA test masses, LISA Pathfinder will be able to verify the overall acceleration noise to within a factor 2 of the LISA requirement at 1 mHz and within a factor 6 at 0.1 mHz. We also discuss the key elements of the physical model of disturbances, coming from LISA Pathfinder and ground measurement that will guarantee the LISA performance.

  18. From laboratory experiments to LISA Pathfinder: achieving LISA geodesic motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, F; Cavalleri, A; Congedo, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Armano, M [European Space Astronomy Centre, European Space Agency, Villanueva de la Canada, 28692 Madrid (Spain); Audley, H; Bogenstahl, J [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik und Universitaet Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Auger, G; Binetruy, P [APC UMR7164, Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Benedetti, M [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e Tecnologie Industriali, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Boatella, C [CNES, DCT/AQ/EC, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse, Cedex 9 (France); Bortoluzzi, D; Bosetti, P; Cristofolini, I [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Strutturale, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Mesiano, Trento (Italy); Brandt, N [Astrium GmbH Claude-Dornier-Strasse, 88090 Immenstaad (Germany); Caleno, M; Cesa, M [European Space Technology Centre, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Chmeissani, M [IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ciani, G [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Conchillo, A [ICE-CSIC/IEEC, Facultat de Ciencies, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Cruise, M, E-mail: Stefano.Vitale@unitn.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-07

    This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the performance of the upcoming LISA Pathfinder geodesic explorer mission. The findings are based on the results of extensive ground testing and simulation campaigns using flight hardware, flight control and operations algorithms. The results show that, for the central experiment of measuring the stray differential acceleration between the LISA test masses, LISA Pathfinder will be able to verify the overall acceleration noise to within a factor 2 of the LISA requirement at 1 mHz and within a factor 6 at 0.1 mHz. We also discuss the key elements of the physical model of disturbances, coming from LISA Pathfinder and ground measurement that will guarantee the LISA performance.

  19. From laboratory experiments to LISA Pathfinder: achieving LISA geodesic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Antonucci, F; Audley, H; Auger, G; Benedetti, M; Binetruy, P; Boatella, C; Bogenstahl, J; Bortoluzzi, D; Bosetti, P; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Cavalleri, A; Cesa, M; Chmeissani, M; Ciani, G; Conchillo, A; Congedo, G; Cristofolini, I; Cruise, M; Danzmann, K; De Marchi, F; Diaz-Aguilo, M; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Fauste, J; Ferraioli, L; Fertin, D; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E; Freschi, M; Marin, A García; Marirrodriga, C García; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Giardini, D; Gibert, F; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Guillaume, B; Guzmán, F; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Huesler, J; Jeannin, O; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johlander, B; Killow, C; Llamas, X; Lloro, I; Lobo, A; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Madden, S; Mance, D; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendestì, J; Mitchell, E; Monsky, A; Nicolini, D; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Pedersen, F; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Perreca, A; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Racca, G D; Rais, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Perez, J A Romera; Robertson, D; Rozemeijer, H; Sanjuan, J; Schleicher, A; Schulte, M; Shaul, D; Stagnaro, L; Strandmoe, S; Steier, F; Sumner, T J; Taylor, A; Texier, D; Trenkel, C; Tombolato, D; Vitale, S; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Waschke, S; Wass, P; Weber, W J; Zweifel, P

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the performance of the upcoming LISA Pathfinder geodesic explorer mission. The findings are based on the results of extensive ground testing and simulation campaigns using flight hardware and flight control and operations algorithms. The results show that, for the central experiment of measuring the stray differential acceleration between the LISA test masses, LISA Pathfinder will be able to verify the overall acceleration noise to within a factor two of the LISA requirement at 1 mHz and within a factor 10 at 0.1 mHz. We also discuss the key elements of the physical model of disturbances, coming from LISA Pathfinder and ground measurement, that will guarantee the LISA performance.

  20. Design of the magnetic diagnostics unit onboard LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Lobo, Alberto; García-Berro, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) is a joint mission of ESA and NASA which aims to be the first space-borne gravita- tional wave observatory. Due to the high complexity and technological challenges that LISA will face, ESA decided to launch a technological demonstrator, LISA Pathfinder. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, and will be the highest sensitivity geodesic explorer flown to date. The LISA Technology Package is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall (geodesic motion). The magnetic, thermal and radiation disturbances affecting the payload are monitored and dealt by the diagnostics subsystem. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, and one of these is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of differential acceleration noise between test masses due to the magnetic effects. To do so, it has to determine the magnetic characteristics of the test masses, namely their magne...

  1. Dynamic Control System Performance during Commissioning of the Space Technology 7-Disturbance Reduction System Experiment of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Oscar; Maghami, Peiman; O’Donnell, James R., Jr.; Ziemer, John; Romero-Wolf, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) launched aboard the European Space Agency's LISA Pathfinder spacecraft on December 3, 2015, after more than a decade in development. DRS consists of three primary components: an Integrated Avionics Unit (IAU), Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters, and Dynamic Control System (DCS) algorithms implemented on the IAU. During the portions of the mission in which the DRS was under control, the DCS was responsible for controlling the spacecraft and the free-floating test masses that were part of the LISA Test Package. The commissioning period was originally divided into two periods: before propulsion separation and after propulsion separation. A recommissioning period was added after an anomaly occurred in the thruster system. The paper will describe the activities used to commission DRS, present results from the commissioning of the DCS and the recommissioning activities per-formed after the thruster anomaly.

  2. Bayesian Model Selection for LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Karnesis, Nikolaos; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Gibert, Ferran; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Ferraioli, Luigi; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Korsakova, Natalia; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, and Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is to fully characterize the acceleration noise models and to test key technologies for future space-based gravitational-wave observatories similar to the LISA/eLISA concept. The Data Analysis (DA) team has developed complex three-dimensional models of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) experiment on-board LPF. These models are used for simulations, but more importantly, they will be used for parameter estimation purposes during flight operations. One of the tasks of the DA team is to identify the physical effects that contribute significantly to the properties of the instrument noise. A way of approaching to this problem is to recover the essential parameters of the LTP which describe the data. Thus, we want to define the simplest model that efficiently explains the observations. To do so, adopting a Bayesian framework, one has to estimate the so-called Bayes Factor between two competing models. In our analysis, we use three main different methods to estimate...

  3. LISA and LISA PathFinder, the endeavour to detect low frequency GWs

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, H; Chmeissani, M; Conchillo, A; García-Berro, E; Grimani, C; Hajdas, W; Lobo, A; Martínez, L; Nofrarias, M; Ortega, J A; Puigdengoles, C; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Wass, P; Xirgu, X; Araujo, Henrique; Boatella, Cesar; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Conchillo, Aleix; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Grimani, Catia; Hajdas, Wojtek; Lobo, Alberto; Martinez, Lluis; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ortega, Jose Antonio; Puigdengoles, Carles; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep; Wass, Peter; Xirgu, Xevi

    2006-01-01

    This is a review about LISA and its technology demonstrator, LISA PathFinder. We first describe the conceptual problems which need to be overcome in order to set up a working interferometric detector of low frequency Gravitational Waves (GW), then summarise the solutions to them as currently conceived by the LISA mission team. This will show that some of these solutions require new technological abilities which are still under development, and which need proper test before being fully implemented. LISA PathFinder (LPF) is the the testbed for such technologies. The final part of the paper will address the ideas and concepts behind the PathFinder as well as their impact on LISA.

  4. Detection of Micrometeoroids with LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Ira; Littenberg, Tyson; Janchez, Diego; Baker, John; The LISA Pathfinder Team Team

    2017-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF), a joint ESA/NASA technology demonstration mission currently operating at the Sun-Earth L1 point, contains the most precise accelerometry system ever flown. Analysis suggests that LPF should have sufficient sensitivity to detect impacts of small micrometeoroids and dust through their transfer of momentum to the spacecraft. Moreover, LPF's ability to fully resolve both the linear and angular momentum transfer in three dimensions allows a magnitude, direction, and location to be estimated for each impact. We present preliminary results from a systematic search of the LISA Pathfinder data for such impacts and discuss the prospects for using these and future results to inform models of the formation and evolution of dust populations in the inner solar system. These models have wide applicability to both pure and applied space science, ranging from the physics of planet formation and dynamics of minor Solar System bodies to estimates of the micrometeorite hazard for future spacecraft. 2017 NASA Science Innovation Fund.

  5. Inflight magnetic characterization of the test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Lobo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, the latter aiming to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, one of which is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of the differential acceleration noise between the test masses due to magnetic effects. This subsystem is composed of two onboard coils intended to produce controlled magnetic fields at the location of the test masses. These magnetic fields couple with the remanent magnetic moment and susceptibility and produce forces and torques on the test masses. These, in turn, produce kinematic excursions of the test masses which are sensed by the onboard interferometer. We prove that adequately processing these exc...

  6. Parameter estimation in LISA Pathfinder operational exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Nofrarias, Miquel; Congedo, Giuseppe; Hueller, Mauro; Armano, M; Diaz-Aguilo, M; Grynagier, A; Hewitson, M

    2011-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder data analysis team has been developing in the last years the infrastructure and methods required to run the mission during flight operations. These are gathered in the LTPDA toolbox, an object oriented MATLAB toolbox that allows all the data analysis functionalities for the mission, while storing the history of all operations performed to the data, thus easing traceability and reproducibility of the analysis. The parameter estimation methods in the toolbox have been applied recently to data sets generated with the OSE (Off-line Simulations Environment), a detailed LISA Pathfinder non-linear simulator that will serve as a reference simulator during mission operations. These operational exercises aim at testing the on-orbit experiments in a realistic environment in terms of software and time constraints. These simulations, so called operational exercises, are the last verification step before translating these experiments into tele-command sequences for the spacecraft, producing therefore ve...

  7. Testing MOND/TEVES with LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Trenkel, Christian; Bevis, Neil; Magueijo, Joao

    2010-01-01

    We suggest that LISA Pathfinder could be used to subject TEVES, and in particular the non-relativistic MOND phenomenology it incorporates, to a direct, controlled experimental test, in just a few years' time. The basic concept is to fly LISA Pathfinder through the region around the Sun-Earth saddle point, following its nominal mission, in order to look for anomalous gravity gradients. We examine various strategies to reach the saddle point, and conclude that the preferred strategy, resulting in relatively short transfer times of order one year, probably involves a lunar fly-by. We present robust estimates of the MOND gravity gradients that LISA Pathfinder should be exposed to, and conclude that if the gradiometer on-board the spacecraft achieves its nominal performance, these gradients will not just be detected, but measured and characterised in some detail, should they exist. Conversely, given the large predicted signal based on standard assumptions, a null result would most likely spell the end of TEVES/MON...

  8. Closed loop simulations of the thermal experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Díaz-Aguiló, Marc; Mateos, Ignacio; Lobo, Alberto; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; Lloro, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The thermal experiments to be carried out onboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will provide essential information of the dependences of the instrument with respect to temperature variations. These thermal experiments must be modelled and simulated both to be validated for mission operations purposes and also to develop a data analysis tool able to characterise the temperature noise contribution to the instrument performance. Here we will present the models developed and the simulated signals for some of the experiments together with the corresponding interferometer readouts, the latter being computed by combining the thermal models with the global LTP (LISA Technology Package) simulator of the LTP Data Analysis team.

  9. The LISA Pathfinder DMU and Radiation Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizares, P.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Diaz–Aguiló, M.; García-Berro, E.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Araújo, H. M.; Wass, P.

    2011-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder DMU (Data Management Unit) flight model was formally accepted by ESA and ASD on 11 February 2010, after all hardware and software tests had been successfully completed. The diagnostics items are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2010. In this paper, we review the requirements and performance of this instrumentation, specially focusing on the Radiation Monitor and the DMU, as well as the status of their programmed use during mission operations, on which work is ongoing at the time of writing.

  10. The LISA Pathfinder DMU and Radiation Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canizares, P; Conchillo, A; Gesa, L; Lloro, I; Lobo, A; Mateos, I; Sopuerta, Carlos F [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, CSIC, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Chmeissani, M [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Edifici CN, UAB Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Diaz-Aguilo, M; GarcIa-Berro, E; Gibert, F [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Grimani, C [Universita degli Studi di Urbino, MFI Department, Via Santa Chiara 27, 61029 Urbino, and INFN Florence (Italy); Nofrarias, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Ramos-Castro, J [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Edifici C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Sanjuan, J [Department of Physics, University of Florida, NPB-22258 PO Box 118 440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Araujo, H M; Wass, P, E-mail: lobo@ieec.fcr.es [High Energy Physics Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-07

    The LISA Pathfinder DMU (Data Management Unit) flight model was formally accepted by ESA and ASD on 11 February 2010, after all hardware and software tests had been successfully completed. The diagnostics items are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2010. In this paper, we review the requirements and performance of this instrumentation, specially focusing on the Radiation Monitor and the DMU, as well as the status of their programmed use during mission operations, on which work is ongoing at the time of writing.

  11. LISA Pathfinder: First steps to observing gravitational waves from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Paul; LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves a little over a year ago, the gravitational window to the Universe has been opened. The gravitational wave spectrum spans many orders of magnitude in frequency, with several of the most interesting astronomical sources emitting gravitational waves at frequencies only observable from space The European Space Agency (ESA) has been active in the field of space-borne gravitational wave detection for many years, and in 2013 selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the third large class mission in the Cosmic Vision science programme. In addition, ESA took the step of developing the LISA Pathfinder mission to demonstrate the critical technologies required for a future mission. The goal of the LISA Pathfinder mission is to place a test body in free fall such that any external forces (acceleration) are reduced to levels lower than those expected from the passage of a gravitational wave LISA Pathfinder was launched on the 3rd December 2015 from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. After a series of 6 apogee raising manoeuvres, the satellite left earth orbit, and travelled to its final science orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). Following a relatively short commissioning phase, science operations began on 1st March 2016. In the following 3 months over 100 experiments and over 1500hours of noise measurements have been performed, demonstrating that the observation of gravitational waves from space can be realised.

  12. Bayesian statistics for the calibration of the LISA Pathfinder experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The main goal of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is to estimate the acceleration noise models of the overall LISA Technology Package (LTP) experiment on-board. This will be of crucial importance for the future space-based Gravitational-Wave (GW) detectors, like eLISA. Here, we present the Bayesian analysis framework to process the planned system identification experiments designed for that purpose. In particular, we focus on the analysis strategies to predict the accuracy of the parameters that describe the system in all degrees of freedom. The data sets were generated during the latest operational simulations organised by the data analysis team and this work is part of the LTPDA Matlab toolbox.

  13. LISA and LISA PathFinder, the endeavour to detect low frequency GWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; García-Berro, E.; Grimani, C.; Hajdas, W.; Lobo, A.; Martínez, Ll; Nofrarias, M.; Ortega, J. A.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Wass, P.; Xirgu, X.

    2007-05-01

    This is a review about LISA and its technology demonstrator, LISAPathFinder. We first describe the conceptual problems which need to be overcome in order to set up a working interferometric detector of low frequency Gravitational Waves (GW), then summarise the solutions to them as currently conceived by the LISA mission team. This will show that some of these solutions require new technological abilities which are still under development, and which need proper test before being fully implemented. LISAPathFinder (LPF) is the the testbed for such technologies. The final part of the paper will address the ideas and concepts behind the PathFinder as well as their impact on LISA.

  14. LISA and LISA PathFinder, the endeavour to detect low frequency GWs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, H [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Boatella, C [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Conchillo, A [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia-Berro, E [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Grimani, C [Universita degli Studi di Urbino, and INFN Florence, Istituto di Fisica, Via Santa Chiara 27, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Hajdas, W [Department of Particles and Matter, Paul Scherrer Institut, ODRA 120, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Lobo, A [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, L [AtIpic, Parc Tecnologic del Valles, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Nofrarias, M [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ortega, J A [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Puigdengoles, C [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Edif. C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Sanjuan, J [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Wass, P [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Xirgu, X [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    This is a review about LISA and its technology demonstrator, LISAPathFinder. We first describe the conceptual problems which need to be overcome in order to set up a working interferometric detector of low frequency Gravitational Waves (GW), then summarise the solutions to them as currently conceived by the LISA mission team. This will show that some of these solutions require new technological abilities which are still under development, and which need proper test before being fully implemented. LISAPathFinder (LPF) is the the testbed for such technologies. The final part of the paper will address the ideas and concepts behind the PathFinder as well as their impact on LISA.

  15. Relevance and feasibility of Diagnostics Subsystems in LISA PathFinder and LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Alberto; Grimani, Catia; Canizares, Priscilla; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Diaz-Aguilo, Marc; Conchillo, Aleix; Gesa, Lluis; Lloro, Ivan; Mateos, Ignacio; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep; Sopuerta, Carlos

    LISA PathFinder will fly equipped with a Diagnostics Subsystem which includes: 1) a Radi-ation Monitor, providing almost real time charged particle counting and spectral resolution, 2) a thermal diagnostics set with high sensitivity temperature sensors and precision heaters, and 3) four fluxgate vector magnetometers plus a pair of induction coils. The role of this in-strumentation in LISA PathFinder is to provide the necessary tools to evaluate the effect of charging, temperature and magnetic fluctuations on the interferometer readout. The use of this is to understand how the mentioned fluctuations in the LTP (LISA Technology Package) can be modelled, then use the measured data to quantify their contribution to the overall LTP noise. In this presentation we will review the LPF Diagnostics System, recently delivered for LTP and spacecraft integration. We will also make some considerations on the meaning of the diagnostics for the future LISA, and propose lines of action to meet the more severe requirements which LISA will impose on environmental conditions.

  16. LISA Pathfinder: First steps to observing gravitational waves from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the European Space Agency’s technology demonstrator mission for future spaceborne gravitational wave observatories, was launched on 3 December 2015, from the European space port of Kourou, French Guiana. After a short duration transfer to the final science orbit, the mission has been gathering science data since. This data has allowed the science community to validate the critical technologies and measurement principle for low frequency gravitational wave detection and thereby confirming the readiness to start the next generation gravitational wave observatories, such as LISA. This paper will briefly describe the mission, followed by a description of the science operations highlighting the performance achieved. Details of the various experiments performed during the nominal science operations phase can be found in accompanying papers in this volume.

  17. State Space Modelling and Data Analysis Exercises in LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofrarias, M.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolodi, D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency (ESA) to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionality required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

  18. State space modelling and data analysis exercises in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Nofrarias, M; Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Benedetti, M; Binetruy, P; Bogenstahl, J; Bortoluzzi, D; Bosetti, P; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Cañizares, P; Cavalleri, A; Cesa, M; Chmeissani, M; Conchillo, A; Congedo, G; Cristofolin, I; Cruise, M; Danzmann, K; De Marchi, F; Diaz-Aguilo, M; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Fauste, J; Ferraioli, L; Fichter, V Ferroni W; Fitzsimons, E; Freschi, M; Marin, A García; Marirrodriga, C García; Gesa, R Gerndt L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Guillaume, B; Guzmán, F; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hernández, V; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Huesler, J; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johlander, B; Killow, C; Llamas, X; Lloro, I; Lobo, A; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Madden, S; Mance, D; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mitchell, E; Monsky, A; Nicolini, D; Nicolodi, D; Pedersen, F; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Racca, G D; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Perez, J A Romera; Robertson, D; Rozemeijer, H; Sanjuan, J; Schleicher, A; Schulte, M; Shaul, D; Stagnaro, L; Strandmoe, S; Steier, F; Sumner, T J; Taylor, A; Texier, D; Trenkel, C; Vitale, H-B Tu S; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Waschke, S; Wass, P; Weber, W J; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionalities required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

  19. Discrete derivative estimation in LISA Pathfinder data reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Vitale, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Data analysis for the LISA Technology package (LTP) experiment to be flown aboard the LISA Pathfinder mission requires the solution of the system dynamics for the calculation of the force acting on the test masses (TMs) starting from interferometer position data. The need for a solution to this problem has prompted us to implement a discrete time domain derivative estimator suited for the LTP experiment requirements. We first report on the mathematical procedures for the definition of two methods; the first based on a parabolic fit approximation and the second based on a Taylor series expansion. These two methods are then generalized and incorporated in a more general class of five point discrete derivative estimators. The same procedure employed for the second derivative can be applied to the estimation of the first derivative and of a data smoother allowing defining a class of simple five points estimators for both. The performances of three particular realization of the five point second derivative estimat...

  20. Laying the Foundation for Space-based Gravitational Wave Detection: LISA Pathfinder, the LISA Test Package, and ST7-DRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James

    2014-08-01

    Efforts to develop space-based observatories of gravitational waves, such as the long-standing Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) or the more recent eLISA concept that motivated ESA’s selection of a gravitational wave mission for the L3 Mission Opportunity, have traditionally been praised for their scientific potential and criticized for their technological readiness. The LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is a dedicated technology demonstrator for such missions. Led by ESA and a consortium of European national agencies and with a minority contribution from NASA, LPF will demonstrate several key technologies for the LISA concept. LPF includes two scientific payloads: the European LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the NASA-provided ST7-DRS. The mission will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, micro-Newton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. LPF is currently in the late stages of integration and test and is planned to launch in 2015. We will present the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission and the LTP and ST7-DRS payloads as well as the expected impact on the larger gravitational-wave effort.

  1. Neural network interpolation of the magnetic field for the LISA Pathfinder Diagnostics Subsystem

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aguilo, Marc; García-Berro, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, which aims to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. Its disturbances are monitored and dealt by the diagnostics subsystem. This subsystem consists of several modules, and one of these is the magnetic diagnostics system, which includes a set of four tri-axial fluxgate magnetometers, intended to measure with high precision the magnetic field at the positions of the test masses. However, since the magnetometers are located far from the positions of the test masses, the magnetic field at their positions must be interpolated. It has been recently shown that because there are not enough magnetic channels, classical interpolation methods fail to derive reliable measurements at the positions of the test m...

  2. The end-to-end testbed of the Optical Metrology System on-board LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Steier, Frank; Marín, Antonio F García; Gerardi, Domenico; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten; 10.1088/0264-9381/26/9/094010

    2012-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The main experiment on-board LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package (LTP) which has the aim to measure the differential acceleration between two free-falling test masses with an accuracy of 3x10^(-14) ms^(-2)/sqrt[Hz] between 1 mHz and 30 mHz. This measurement is performed interferometrically by the Optical Metrology System (OMS) on-board LISA Pathfinder. In this paper we present the development of an experimental end-to-end testbed of the entire OMS. It includes the interferometer and its sub-units, the interferometer back-end which is a phasemeter and the processing of the phasemeter output data. Furthermore, 3-axes piezo actuated mirrors are used instead of the free-falling test masses for the characterisation of the dynamic behaviour of the system and some parts of the Drag-free and Attitude Control System (DFACS) which controls the test masses and the satellite. The end-to-end testbe...

  3. Detection and Characterization of Micrometeoroids with LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Thorpe, James Ira; Trigo-Rodriguez, Josep

    2015-01-01

    The Solar System contains a population of dust and small particles originating from asteroids, comets, and other bodies. These particles have been studied using a number of techniques ranging from in-situ satellite detectors to analysis of lunar microcraters to ground-based observations of zodiacal light. In this paper, we describe an approach for using the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission as an instrument to detect and characterize the dynamics of dust particles in the vicinity of Earth-Sun L1. Launching in late 2015, LPF is a dedicated technology demonstrator mission that will validate several key technologies for a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. The primary science instrument aboard LPF is a precision accelerometer which we show will be capable of sensing discrete momentum impulses as small as $4\\times 10^{-8}\\,\\textrm{N}\\cdot\\textrm{s}$. We then estimate the rate of such impulses resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids based on standard models of the micrometeoroid environment in the in...

  4. Simulation and template generation for LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, Boutheina; Grynagier, Adrien; Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Armano, Michele

    The LISA PathFinder (LPF) mission is a technology demonstration mission which aims at testing a number of critical technical challenges that the future LISA (Gravitational wave detection in space) mission will face: LPF can be seen as a complex laboratory experiment in space. It is therefore critical to be able to define which measurements and which actuations will be applied during the scientific part of the mission. The LISA Technology Package (LTP), part of ESA's hardware contribution to LPF, outlines hence the importance of developing an appropriate simulation tool in order to test these strate-gies before launch and to analyse the dynamical behaviour of the system during the mission. The detailed model of the simulation can be used in an off-line mode for further planning: cor-rect estimation of timeline priorities, risk factors, duty cycles, data analysis readiness. The Lisa Technology Package Data Analysis (LTPDA) team has developed an object-oriented MATLAB toolbox for general case of data analysis needs. However, to meet specific needs of LPF mis-sion, a template generation tool has been developed. It provides a recognizable data pattern, avoiding the risk of missing the model during mission's analysis. The aim of the template generator tool is to provide tools to analyse LTP system modeled in State Space Model (SSM). The SSM class, the aim of this poster, includes this tools within the LTPDA toolbox. It can be used to generate the time-domain response for any given actuation and/or noise, the frequency response using bode diagrams and the steady state of the system. It allows the user to project noises on system outputs to get spectra of outputs for given input noises spectra. This class is sufficiently general to be used with a variety of systems once the SSM of the system is provided in the library. Furthermore, one of the main objectives of the data analysis for LPF (the estimation of different parameters of the system), can be achieved by a new

  5. Thermo-elastic induced phase noise in the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    Gibert, F; Nofrarias, M; Karnesis, N; Gesa, L.; Martín, V.; Mateos, I; Lobo, A; Flatscher, R.; Gerardi, D; Burkhardt, J.; Gerndt, R.; Robertson, D; Ward, H; McNamara, P; Guzman, F.

    2014-01-01

    During the On-Station Thermal Test campaign of the LISA Pathfinder the data and diagnostics subsystem was tested in nearly space conditions for the first time after integration in the satellite. The results showed the compliance of the temperature measurement system, obtaining temperature noise around $10^{-4}\\,{\\rm K}\\, {\\rm Hz}^{-1/2}$ in the frequency band of $1-30\\;{\\rm mHz}$. In addition, controlled injection of heat signals to the suspension struts anchoring the LISA Technology Package ...

  6. The LISA PathFinder DMU and Radiation Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Canizares, Priscilla; Diaz--Aguilo, Marc; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Gesa, Lluis; Gibert, Ferran; Grimani, Catia; Lloro, Ivan; Lobo, Alberto; Mateos, Ignacio; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep; Sopuerta, Carlos F

    2010-01-01

    The LISA PathFinder DMU (Data Management Unit) flight model was formally accepted by ESA and ASD on 11 February 2010, after all hardware and software tests had been successfully completed. The diagnostics items are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2010. In this paper we review the requirements and performance of this instrumentation, specially focusing on the Radiation Monitor and the DMU, as well as the status of their programmed use during mission operations, on which work is ongoing at the time of writing.

  7. The eLISA gravitational reference sensor and its test aboard LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, William Joseph; Dolesi, Rita; Vitale, Stefano

    The upcoming LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission represents the state-of-the-art in realizing a set of free-falling reference test masses for gravitational wave astronomy. The key hardware for achieving the smallest possible deviation from pure geodesic motion lies in the gravitational reference sensor or GRS. We present the GRS designed for achieving sub-femto-g/sqrt{mathrm{Hz}} performance with LPF and eLISA and discuss our current experimental estimates for the upcoming mission, including the latest results from the flight hardware test campaigns. Finally, we will address the LPF in-flight tests that will complete our physical model for test mass acceleration noise for eLISA and other possible experimental gravitational measurements in space.

  8. Disentangling the magnetic force noise contribution in LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetically-induced forces on the inertial masses on-board LISA Pathfinder are expected to be one of the dominant contributions to the mission noise budget, accounting for up to 40%. The origin of this disturbance is the coupling of the residual magnetization and susceptibility of the test masses with the environmental magnetic field. In order to fully understand this important part of the noise model, a set of coils and magnetometers are integrated as a part of the diagnostics subsystem. During operations a sequence of magnetic excitations will be applied to precisely determine the coupling of the magnetic environment to the test mass displacement using the on-board magnetometers. Since no direct measurement of the magnetic field in the test mass position will be available, an extrapolation of the magnetic measurements to the test mass position will be carried out as a part of the data analysis activities. In this paper we show the first results on the magnetic experiments during an end- to-end LISA Pathfinder simulation, and we describe the methods under development to map the magnetic field on-board.

  9. Improving Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms in LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnesis, N.; Nofrarias, M.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Lobo, A.

    2012-06-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF) aims to test key technologies for the future LISA mission. The LISA Technology Package (LTP) on-board LPF will consist of an exhaustive suite of experiments and its outcome will be crucial for the future detection of gravitational waves. In order to achieve maximum sensitivity, we need to have an understanding of every instrument on-board and parametrize the properties of the underlying noise models. The Data Analysis team has developed algorithms for parameter estimation of the system. A very promising one implemented for LISA Pathfinder data analysis is the Markov Chain Monte Carlo. A series of experiments are going to take place during flight operations and each experiment is going to provide us with essential information for the next in the sequence. Therefore, it is a priority to optimize and improve our tools available for data analysis during the mission. Using a Bayesian framework analysis allows us to apply prior knowledge for each experiment, which means that we can efficiently use our prior estimates for the parameters, making the method more accurate and significantly faster. This, together with other algorithm improvements, will lead us to our main goal, which is no other than creating a robust and reliable tool for parameter estimation during the LPF mission.

  10. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  11. The LISA Pathfinder interferometry—hardware and system testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audley, H.; Danzmann, K.; García Marín, A.; Heinzel, G.; Monsky, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Steier, F.; Gerardi, D.; Gerndt, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Johann, U.; Luetzow-Wentzky, P.; Wand, V.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    Preparations for the LISA Pathfinder mission have reached an exciting stage. Tests of the engineering model (EM) of the optical metrology system have recently been completed at the Albert Einstein Institute, Hannover, and flight model tests are now underway. Significantly, they represent the first complete integration and testing of the space-qualified hardware and are the first tests on an optical system level. The results and test procedures of these campaigns will be utilized directly in the ground-based flight hardware tests, and subsequently during in-flight operations. In addition, they allow valuable testing of the data analysis methods using the MATLAB-based LTP data analysis toolbox. This paper presents an overview of the results from the EM test campaign that was successfully completed in December 2009.

  12. The case for testing MOND using LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, Joao

    2011-01-01

    We quantify the potential for testing MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with LISA Pathfinder (LPF), should a saddle point flyby be incorporated into the mission. We forecast the expected signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a variety of instrument noise models and trajectories past the saddle. For standard theoretical parameters the SNR reaches middle to high double figures even with modest assumptions about instrument performance and saddle approach. Obvious concerns, like systematics arising from LPF self-gravity, or the Newtonian background, are examined and shown not to be a problem. We also investigate the impact of a negative observational result upon the free-function determining the theory. We demonstrate that, if Newton's gravitational constant is constrained not be re-normalized by more than a few percent, only very contrived MONDian free-functions would survive a negative result. Finally we scan the structure of all proposed relativistic MONDian theories. We conclude that only the Einstein-Aether formu...

  13. The LTP Experiment on LISA Pathfinder: Operational Definition of TT Gauge in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Armano, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in order to detect GW. The need of accurate testing of free-fall and knowledge of noise in a space environment similar to LISA's is considered mandatory a pre-phase for the project. Therefore the LISA Pathfinder mission has been designed by ESA to fly the LISA Technology Package (LTP), aiming at testing free-fall by measuring the residual acceleration between two test-bodies in the dynamical scheme we address as "drag-free". The spectral map of the residual acceleration as function of frequency will convey information on the local noise level, thus producing a picture of the environmental working conditions for LISA itself. The thesis contains abundant material on the problem of compensating static gravity, the development of a theory of orthogonalization of reference and cross-talk for the LTP experiment. The construction of the laser detection proced...

  14. State-space modelling for heater induced thermal effects on LISA Pathfinder's Test Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Lobo, Alberto; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Mateos, Ignacio; Sanjuán, Josep; Lloro, Ivan; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; 10.1088/1742-6596/363/1/012044

    2012-01-01

    The OSE (Offline Simulations Environment) simulator of the LPF (LISA Pathfinder) mission is intended to simulate the different experiments to be carried out in flight. Amongst these, the thermal diagnostics experiments are intended to relate thermal disturbances and interferometer readouts, thereby allowing the subtraction of thermally induced interferences from the interferometer channels. In this paper we report on the modelling of these simulated experiments, including the parametrisation of different thermal effects (radiation pressure effect, radiometer effect) that will appear in the Inertial Sensor environment of the LTP (LISA Technology Package). We report as well how these experiments are going to be implemented in the LTPDA toolbox, which is a dedicated tool for LPF data analysis that will allow full traceability and reproducibility of the analysis thanks to complete recording of the processes.

  15. Thermo-elastic induced phase noise in the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Karnesis, N.; Gesa, L.; Martín, V.; Mateos, I.; Lobo, A.; Flatscher, R.; Gerardi, D.; Burkhardt, J.; Gerndt, R.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; McNamara, P. W.; Guzmán, F.; Hewitson, M.; Diepholz, I.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-02-01

    During the on-station thermal test campaign of the LISA Pathfinder, the diagnostics subsystem was tested in nearly space conditions for the first time after integration in the satellite. The results showed the compliance of the temperature measurement system, obtaining temperature noise around {{10}-4} K H{{z}-1/2} in the frequency band 1-30 mHz. In addition, controlled injection of heat signals to the suspension struts anchoring the LISA Technology Package (LTP) core assembly to the satellite structure allowed us to experimentally estimate, for the first time, the phase noise contribution through thermo-elastic distortion of the LTP interferometer, the satellite's main instrument. Such contribution was found to be at {{10}-12} mH{{z}-1/2}, a factor of 30 below the measured noise at the lower end of the measurement bandwidth (1 mHz).

  16. Theory and modeling of the magnetic field measurement in LISA PathFinder

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aguilo, M; Lobo, A

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic diagnostics subsystem of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) on board the LISA PathFinder (LPF) spacecraft includes a set of four tri-axial fluxgate magnetometers, intended to measure with high precision the magnetic field at their respective positions. However, their readouts do not provide a direct measurement of the magnetic field at the positions of the test masses, and hence an interpolation method must be designed and implemented to obtain the values of the magnetic field at these positions. However, such interpolation process faces serious difficulties. Indeed, the size of the interpolation region is excessive for a linear interpolation to be reliable while, on the other hand, the number of magnetometer channels does not provide sufficient data to go beyond the linear approximation. We describe an alternative method to address this issue, by means of neural network algorithms. The key point in this approach is the ability of neural networks to learn from suitable training data representing t...

  17. Thermo-elastic induced phase noise in the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; Mateos, Ignacio; Lobo, Alberto; Flatscher, Reinhold; Gerardi, Domenico; Burkhardt, Johannes; Guzmán, Felipe; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    During the On-Station Thermal Test campaign of the LISA Pathfinder the data and diagnostics subsystem was tested in nearly space conditions for the first time after integration in the satellite. The results showed the compliance of the temperature measurement system, obtaining temperature noise around $10^{-4}\\,{\\rm K}\\, {\\rm Hz}^{-1/2}$ in the frequency band of $1-30\\;{\\rm mHz}$. In addition, controlled injection of heat signals to the suspension struts anchoring the LISA Technology Package (LTP) Core Assembly to the satellite structure allowed to experimentally estimate for the first time the phase noise contribution through thermo-elastic distortion of the LTP interferometer, the satellite's main instrument. Such contribution was found to be at $10^{-12}\\,{\\rm m}\\, {\\rm Hz}^{-1/2}$, a factor of 30 below the measured noise at the lower end of the measurement bandwidth ($1\\,{\\rm mHz}$).

  18. MONDian three-body predictions for LISA Pathfinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevis, Neil; Magueijo, Joao [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Trenkel, Christian; Kemble, Steve, E-mail: n.bevis@imperial.ac.u, E-mail: magueijo@ic.ac.u, E-mail: Christian.Trenkel@astrium.eads.ne [Astrium Ltd, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage SG1 2AS (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-07

    In previous work it was shown that modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theories predict anomalously strong tidal stresses near the saddle points of the Newtonian gravitational potential. An analytical examination of the saddle between two bodies revealed a linear and a nonlinear solution, valid for the outer and inner regions. Here we present a numerical algorithm for solving the MOND equations. We check the code against the two-body analytical solutions and explore the region transitioning between them. We then develop a realistic model for the MONDian effects on the saddles of the Sun-Earth-Moon system (including further sources is straightforward). For the Sun-Earth saddle we find that the two-body results are almost unchanged, with corrections increasing from full to new Moon. In contrast, the Moon saddle is an intrinsically three-body problem, but we numerically find a recipe for adapting the two-body solution to this case, by means of a suitable rescaling and axis reorientation. We explore possible experimental scenarios for LISA Pathfinder and the prospect of a visit to the saddle(s) at the end of the mission. Given the chaotic nature of the orbits, awareness of the full range of the possibilities is crucial for a realistic prediction. We conclude that even with very conservative assumptions on the impact parameter, the accelerometers are abundantly sensitive to vindicate or rule out the theory.

  19. Coupling characterization and noise studies of the optical metrology system onboard the LISA Pathfinder mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald; Gerndt, Rüdiger; Johann, Ulrich; Luetzow-Wentzky, Peter; Wand, Vinzenz; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Garcia-Marin, Antonio; Heinzel, Gerhard; Nofrarias, Miquel; Steier, Frank

    2010-10-10

    We describe the first investigations of the complete engineering model of the optical metrology system (OMS), a key subsystem of the LISA Pathfinder science mission to space. The latter itself is a technological precursor mission to LISA, a spaceborne gravitational wave detector. At its core, the OMS consists of four heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometers, a highly stable laser with an external modulator, and a phase meter. It is designed to monitor and track the longitudinal motion and attitude of two floating test masses in the optical reference frame with (relative) precision in the picometer and nanorad range, respectively. We analyze sensor signal correlations and determine a physical sensor noise limit. The coupling parameters between motional degrees of freedom and interferometer signals are analytically derived and compared to measurements. We also measure adverse cross-coupling effects originating from system imperfections and limitations and describe algorithmic mitigation techniques to overcome some of them. Their impact on system performance is analyzed within the context of the Pathfinder mission.

  20. Initial Results from ST7-Disturbance Reduction System on LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Charles; Barela, Phillip; Cutler, Curt; Denzin, Richard; Franklin, Garth; Gorelik, Jacb; Hsu, Oscar; Javidnia, Shahram; Li, Irena; Maghami, Peiman; Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Mehta, Jitendra; O'Donnell, James; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Slutsky, Jacob; Thorpe, Ira; Umfress, S. Harper; Ziemer, John

    2017-01-01

    The European Space Agency LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched on December, 2, 2015 carrying the NASA contribution ST7-Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS). The objective of ST7-DRS is to demonstrate drag-free control and noise reduction technologies for future missions, especially a future space-based gravitational wave observatory. The system consists of a pair of Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster clusters and a computer with control algorithms. Data from the host platform is used for inertial and attitude sensing. ST7-DRS was initially powered on in January 2016 for an on-orbit check out and was fully commissioned in late June and early July. This presentation will report results relative to the 0.1 micro-Newton/ rt Hertz thrust noise requirement and the 10 nanometer/rt Hertz position control requirement. Preliminary extended mission results will be discussed. The work described here was funded by NASA.

  1. Constraints on LISA Pathfinder's self-gravity: design requirements, estimates and testing procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Ferroni, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder satellite has been launched on 3th December 2015 toward the Sun-Earth first Lagrangian point (L1) where the LISA Technology Package (LTP), which is the main science payload, will be tested. With its cutting-edge technology, the LTP will provide the ability to achieve unprecedented geodesic motion residual acceleration measurements down to the order of $3 \\times 10^{-14}\\,\\mathrm{m/s^2/{Hz^{1/2}}}$ within the $1-30\\,\\mathrm{mHz}$ frequency band. The presence of the spacecraft itself is responsible of the local gravitational field which will interact with the two proof test-masses. Potentially, such a force interaction might prevent to achieve the targeted free-fall level originating a significant source of noise. We balanced this gravitational force with sub $\\mathrm{nm/s^2}$ accuracy, guided by a protocol based on measurements of the position and the mass of all parts that constitute the satellite, via finite element calculation tool estimates. In the following, we will introduce requirements,...

  2. A Strategy to Characterize the LISA-Pathfinder Cold Gas Thruster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; Garcia Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The cold gas micro-propulsion system that will be used during the LISA-Pathfinder mission will be one of the most important component used to ensure the "free-fall" of the enclosed test masses. In this paper we present a possible strategy to characterize the effective direction and amplitude gain of each of the 6 thrusters of this system.

  3. A torsion pendulum ground test of the LISA Pathfinder Free-fall mode

    CERN Document Server

    Russano, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is the technological demonstrator space mission for the future gravitational waves observatory in space eLISA, with the aim of measure the differential acceleration between free-falling test masses orbiting in the same apparatus at a level of 30 fm/s-2Hz-1/2 at 1 mHz. Because the satellite can't follow the two masses at the same time, the second mass must be forced to follow either the other one or the spacecraft. The actuation force applied to compensate this effect introduces a dominant source of force noise in the mission noise budget at frequency near and below the mHz. The free-fall mode actuation control scheme has been designed to suppress this noise source and avoid actuation instabilities: actuation is limited to brief periodic impulses, with test masses in free fall in between two kicks. This actuation-free motion is then analyzed for the remaining sources of acceleration ultra noise. A free-fall mode parallel testing has been successfully implemented on torsion pendulum facility at ...

  4. Qualifciation test series of the indium needle FEEP micro-propulsion system for LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlemann, C.; Buldrini, N.; Killinger, R.; Jentsch, M.; Polli, A.; Ceruti, L.; Serafini, L.; DiCara, D.; Nicolini, D.

    2011-11-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna project (LISA) is a co-operative program between ESA and NASA to detect gravitational waves by measuring distortions in the space-time fabric. LISA Pathfinder is the precursor mission to LISA designed to validate the core technologies intended for LISA. One of the enabling technologies is the micro-propulsion system based on field emission thrusters necessary to achieve the uniquely stringent propulsion requirements. A consortium consisting of Astrium GmbH and the University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt (formerly AIT) was commissioned by ESA to develop and qualify the micro-propulsion system based on the Indium Needle FEEP technology. Several successful tests have verified the proper Needle Field Emission Electric Propulsion (FEEP) operation and the thermal and mechanical design of subcomponents of the developed system. For all functional tests, the flight representative Power Control Unit developed by SELEX Galileo S.p.A (also responsible for the Micro-Propulsion Subsystem (MPS) development) was used. Measurements have shown the exceptional stability of the thruster. An acceptance test of one Thruster Cluster Assembly (TCA) over 3600 h has shown the stable long term operation of the developed system. During the acceptance test compliance to all the applicable requirements have been shown such as a thrust resolution of 0.1 μN, thrust range capability between 0 and 100 μN, thrust overshoot much lower than the required 0.3 μN+3% and many others. In particular important is the voltage stability of the thruster (±1% over the duration of the testing) and the confirmation of the very low thrust noise. Based on the acceptance test the lifetime of the thruster is expected to exceed 39,000 h generating a total impulse bit of 6300 Ns at an average thrust level of 50 μN. A flight representative qualification model of the Needle FEEP Cluster Assembly (DM1) equipped with one active TCA has performed a qualification program

  5. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  6. An Analysis of Coupling between the x1 and x12 Interferometers for LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Brittany

    2017-01-01

    Due to tolerances in the manufacturing process, noise from the jittering of the spacecraft housing LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is appearing in the differential measurement between its two test masses (TM's). This phenomenon manifests as a small but measurable coupling between the readouts of LPF's two heterodyne interferometers, x1 and x12. In this study, two LISA Pathfinder experiments are analyzed using three methods in an effort to characterize and quantify the coupling as well as to potentially identify its source. The main question considered is this: does the coupling change with the absolute displacement between the TM's? As a result of this work, reliable values for coupling between LPF's x1 and x12 interferometers are found, and they are seen to depend on the absolute displacement between the test masses to some degree. Completed at the Albert Einstein Institute for Gravitational Physics under the International REU program from the University of Florida.

  7. Milli-Hertz Gravitational Waves: LISA and LISA PathFinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, H.; Cañizares, P.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Díaz-Aguiló, M.; García-Berro, E.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Hajdas, W.; Hollington, D.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Sopuerta, Cf; Wass, P.

    2011-09-01

    Ground based GW detectors are limited at their lower frequency band (1-10 Hz) by settlement gravity gradients and seismic noise, and their sensitivity peaks at around 100 Hz. Sources in this band are mostly short duration signals, and their rates uncertain. Going down to milli-Hertz frequencies significantly increases the number and types of available sources. LISA was planned with the idea to explore a likely richer region of the GW spectrum, beyond that accessible to ground detectors; the latter are however expected to produce the first GW observations. In this paper I will present the main LISA concepts; in particular, emphasis will be placed on LISAPathFinder, the ESA precursor of LISA, in which our research group in Barcelona is heavily involved.

  8. Milli-Hertz Gravitational Waves: LISA and LISA PathFinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, H; Hollington, D; Wass, P [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Canizares, P; Conchillo, A; Gesa, L; Lloro, I; Lobo, A; Mateos, I; Sopuerta, CF [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio, CSIC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C-5 Parell, 2a Planta, E-08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Valles), Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M; Puigdengoles, C [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, (Barcelona) (Spain); Diaz-Aguilo, M; Garcia-Berro, E; Gibert, F [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Edifici Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Grimani, C [Universita degli Studi di Urbino, and INFN Florence, Dipartimento DiSBeF, Via Santa Chiara 27, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Hajdas, W [Department of Particles and Matter, Paul Scherrer Institut, ODRA 120, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Nofrarias, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Ramos-Castro, J [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Edif. C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Sanjuan, J, E-mail: lobo@ieec.fcr.es [Department of Physics, University of Florida, NPB-22258 PO Box 118 440, Gainesville FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2011-09-22

    Ground based GW detectors are limited at their lower frequency band (1-10 Hz) by settlement gravity gradients and seismic noise, and their sensitivity peaks at around 100 Hz. Sources in this band are mostly short duration signals, and their rates uncertain. Going down to milli-Hertz frequencies significantly increases the number and types of available sources. LISA was planned with the idea to explore a likely richer region of the GW spectrum, beyond that accessible to ground detectors; the latter are however expected to produce the first GW observations. In this paper I will present the main LISA concepts; in particular, emphasis will be placed on LISAPathFinder, the ESA precursor of LISA, in which our research group in Barcelona is heavily involved.

  9. On the role of radiation monitors on board LISA Pathfinder and future space interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, C.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Fabi, M.; Finetti, N.; Laurenza, M.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Storini, M.

    2012-05-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and its precursor mission LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) will carry particle monitors for noise diagnostics. It was proposed to build and place radiation detectors on board the ASTROD missions as well. We present here a study of the solar energetic particle (SEP) events that the LISA-PF radiation monitors are able to detect above the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) background predicted at the time of the mission data taking in 2015. In order to optimize the correlation between radiation monitor measurements and gravitational sensor test-mass charging, the energy threshold for particles traversing both detectors should be approximately the same. In LISA-PF, the radiation monitor particle energy cut-off was conservatively set at 75 MeV per nucleon (MeV/n) for protons and ion normal incidence, while the minimum energy of the same particles reaching the test masses is 100 MeV/n. We find that SEP events detectable on LISA-PF are characterized by peak fluxes and fluences at energies >75 MeV/n larger than about 45%, on average, with respect to those at energies >100 MeV/n. We conclude that for an accurate correlation between radiation monitor count rates and test-mass charging, it is mandatory to benefit from absolute flux measurements of both galactic and high-energy solar particles provided by experiments carrying magnetic spectrometers in space at the time of LISA-PF (PAMELA, AMS). On the other hand, the role of the radiation detectors on board LISA-PF is crucial allowing for SEP event onset and dynamics monitoring.

  10. The diagnostics subsystem on board LISA PathFinder and LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Canizares, P; García-Berro, E; Gesa, L; Grimani, C; Lloro, I; Lobo, A; Mateos, I; Nofrarias, M; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Sopuerta, CF

    2008-01-01

    The Data and Diagnostics Subsystem of the LTP hardware and software are at present essentially ready for delivery. In this presentation we intend to describe the scientific and technical aspects of this subsystem, which includes thermal diagnostics, magnetic diagnostics and a Radiation Monitor, as well as the prospects for their integration within the rest of the LTP. We also sketch a few lines of progress recently opened up towards the more demanding diagnostics requirements which will be needed for LISA.

  11. LISA Pathfinder test-mass charging during galactic cosmic-ray flux short-term variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Telloni, D.

    2015-02-01

    Metal free-floating test masses aboard the future interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection in space are charged by galactic and solar cosmic rays with energies \\gt 100 MeV/n. This process represents one of the main sources of noise in the lowest frequency band (\\lt 10-3 Hz) of these experiments. We study here the charging of the LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) gold-platinum test masses due to galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons and helium nuclei with the Fluka Monte Carlo toolkit. Projections of the energy spectra of GCRs during the LISA-PF operations in 2015 are considered. This work was carried out on the basis of the solar activity level and solar polarity epoch expected for LISA-PF. The effects of GCR short-term variations are evaluated here for the first time. Classical Forbush decreases, GCR variations induced by the Sun rotation, and fluctuations in the LISA-PF frequency bandwidth are discussed.

  12. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  13. Charge-Induced Force Noise on Free-Falling Test Masses: Results from LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Killow, C. J.; Korsakova, N.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C.; Sumner, T. J.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.; LISA Pathfinder Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We report on electrostatic measurements made on board the European Space Agency mission LISA Pathfinder. Detailed measurements of the charge-induced electrostatic forces exerted on free-falling test masses (TMs) inside the capacitive gravitational reference sensor are the first made in a relevant environment for a space-based gravitational wave detector. Employing a combination of charge control and electric-field compensation, we show that the level of charge-induced acceleration noise on a single TM can be maintained at a level close to 1.0 fm s-2 Hz-1 /2 across the 0.1-100 mHz frequency band that is crucial to an observatory such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Using dedicated measurements that detect these effects in the differential acceleration between the two test masses, we resolve the stochastic nature of the TM charge buildup due to interplanetary cosmic rays and the TM charge-to-force coupling through stray electric fields in the sensor. All our measurements are in good agreement with predictions based on a relatively simple electrostatic model of the LISA Pathfinder instrument.

  14. A noise simulator for eLISA: Migrating LISA Pathfinder knowledge to the eLISA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new technical simulator for the eLISA mission, based on state space modeling techniques and developed in MATLAB. This simulator computes the coordinate and velocity over time of each body involved in the constellation, i.e. the spacecraft and its test masses, taking into account the different disturbances and actuations. This allows studying the contribution of instrumental noises and system imperfections on the residual acceleration applied on the TMs, the latter reflecting the performance of the achieved free-fall along the sensitive axis. A preliminary version of the results is presented.

  15. Integration and Testing of the Inertial Sensor for LISA Pathfinder mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarra, Paolo

    High-precision technologies are essential for space-borne gravitational wave observatory, but full on-ground testing is not feasible. The ESA (European Space Agency) mission LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is aimed to perform in-flight verification of these key technologies, among them the Inertial Sensor, also known as Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS). The core of the Inertial Sensor is the gravitational reference test mass: a cube of 46 mm made of Au/Pt used as mirror of the LPF interferometer. The “free floating” test mass is surrounded by a capacitive sensor providing the information to perform the “drag-free” control loop required to keep the spacecraft centred with respect to some fiducial points. The Inertial Sensor is equipped with two mechanisms. The caging and venting mechanism lock the test mass during on-ground activities and at launch. It also open the valve for Inertial Sensor venting to space. The grabbing, positioning and release mechanism controls the test mass during in-flight operational phases from caged to free-floating condition. Charge control of the free floating test mass is performed by illuminating its surface, or the electrodes surfaces, with UV light. The Inertial Sensor is equipped with optical fibers and feed-throughs for UV photons supply. Another key component of the Inertial Sensor is the balance mass. Balance masses are required to null the self-gravitational fields seen by the test mass. The test mass, the sensing electrodes, the mechanisms, the balance masses and the UV optical fibers are accommodated inside a dedicated high-vacuum chamber. The vacuum chamber is maintained in static vacuum during on-ground phase an then vented to space to provide the required in-flight vacuum environment around the test mass. A challenging alignment accuracy is required for the manufacturing, assembly and integration of the various equipment composing the Inertial Sensor. In particular for the test mass and the capacitance sensor micron level

  16. Technology development for the LISA using the UF Torsion Pendulu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, John W.; Chilton, Andrew; Olatunde, Taiwo; Apple, Stephen; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido

    2015-08-01

    Space-based gravitational wave observatories like LISA measure picometer changes in the distances between free falling test masses separated by millions of kilometers caused by gravitational waves. A test mass and its associated sensing, actuation, charge control and caging subsystems are referred to as a gravitational reference sensor (GRS). LISA will observe gravitational wave sources ranging from super-massive black hole mergers to compact galactic binaries in the millihertz region, and LISA science has consistently been ranked in the top two for future large space missions in the last two NASA astrophysics decadal reviews. With the 2015 launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) and the expected detection of gravitational waves by aLIGO and/or Pulsar Timing Arrays within in the next several years, this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Following a successful demonstration of the baseline LISA GRS by LPF, the measurement principle will be carried forward, but improvements in several GRS components are possible over the next ten years that will lead to cost savings and potential noise reductions. The UF LISA group has constructed the UF Torsion Pendulum to increase U.S. competency in this critical area and to have a facility where new technologies can be developed and evaluated. This experimental facility is based on the design of a similar facility at the University of Trento, and consists of a vacuum enclosed torsion pendulum that suspends mock-ups of the LISA test masses, surrounded by electrode housings. This presentation will describe this facility, focusing on its mechanical design, capacitive sensing and electrostatic actuation systems, and overall acceleration noise performance

  17. A torsion pendulum test of the Lisa Pathfinder free-fall mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russano, Giuliana; Dolesi, Rita; Cavalleri, Antonella; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph; Tu, HaiBo

    The LISA Pathfinder geodesic explorer mission for gravitational wave astronomy aims to demonstrate the proof of a low acceleration noise level. The relative acceleration between two test masses free falling in orbit is perturbed by the presence of a larger constant relative acceleration that must be actively compensated in order to keep the test particles centered inside an orbiting apparatus. The actuation force applied to compensate this effect introduces a dominant source of force noise. To suppress this noise source, a “free-fall” actuation control scheme has been designed: actuation is limited to brief impulses, with test masses in free fall in between two “kicks”, with this actuation-free motion then analyzed for the remaining sources of acceleration ultra noise. In this work, we will discuss and present preliminary data for an on-ground torsion pendulum experiment to test this technique, and the associated analysis algorithms, at a level nearing the sub-femto-g/sqrt(Hz) performance required for LISA Pathfinder.

  18. Coupling of relative intensity noise and pathlength noise to the length measurement in the optical metrology system of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Andreas; the LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the space-based gravitational wave observatory, LISA. It demonstrated that the performance requirements for the interferometric measurement of two test masses in free fall can be met. An important part of the data analysis is to identify the limiting noise sources. [1] This measurement is performed with heterodyne interferometry. The performance of this optical metrology system (OMS) at high frequencies is limited by sensing noise. One such noise source is Relative Intensity Noise (RIN). RIN is a property of the laser, and the photodiode current generated by the interferometer signal contains frequency dependant RIN. From this electric signal the phasemeter calculates the phase change and laser power, and the coupling of RIN into the measurement signal depends on the noise frequency. RIN at DC, at the heterodyne frequency and at two times the heterodyne frequency couples into the phase. Another important noise at high frequencies is path length noise. To reduce the impact this noise is suppressed with a control loop. Path length noise not suppressed will couple directly into the length measurement. The subtraction techniques of both noise sources depend on the phase difference between the reference signal and the measurement signal, and thus on the test mass position. During normal operations we position the test mass at the interferometric zero, which is optimal for noise subtraction purposes. This paper will show results from an in-flight experiment where the test mass position was changed to make the position dependant noise visible.

  19. Bayesian Inference for LISA Pathfinder using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Plagnol, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We present a parameter estimation procedure based on a Bayesian framework by applying a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to the calibration of the dynamical parameters of a space based gravitational wave detector. The method is based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and a two-stage annealing treatment in order to ensure an effective exploration of the parameter space at the beginning of the chain. We compare two versions of the algorithm with an application to a LISA Pathfinder data analysis problem. The two algorithms share the same heating strategy but with one moving in coordinate directions using proposals from a multivariate Gaussian distribution, while the other uses the natural logarithm of some parameters and proposes jumps in the eigen-space of the Fisher Information matrix. The algorithm proposing jumps in the eigen-space of the Fisher Information matrix demonstrates a higher acceptance rate and a slightly better convergence towards the equilibrium parameter distributions in the application to...

  20. Theoretical foundations for on-ground tests of LISA PathFinder thermal diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, A; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Lobo, Alberto; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the methods and results of a theoretical analysis to design an insulator which must provide a thermally quiet environment to test on ground delicate temperature sensors and associated electronics. These will fly on board ESA's LISA PathFinder (LPF) mission as part of the thermal diagnostics subsystem of the LISA Test-flight Package (LTP). We evaluate the heat transfer function (in frequency domain) of a central body of good thermal conductivity surrounded by a layer of a very poorly conducting substrate. This is applied to assess the materials and dimensions necessary to meet temperature stability requirements in the metal core, where sensors will be implanted for test. The analysis is extended to evaluate the losses caused by heat leakage through connecting wires, linking the sensors with the electronics in a box outside the insulator. The results indicate that, in spite of the very demanding stability conditions, a sphere of outer diameter of the order one metre is sufficient.

  1. On-ground testing of the role of adhesion in the LISA-Pathfinder test mass injection phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Zanoni, C.; Conklin, J. W.

    2017-05-01

    Many space missions share the need to fly a free-falling body inside the spacecraft, as a reference for navigation and/or as a probe for the local gravitational field. When a mechanism is required to cage such an object during the launch phase, the need arises to release it to free-fall once the operational phase must be initiated in orbit. The criticality of this phase increases when the mechanical interfaces between the body and the mechanism are affected by adhesion and the actuation authority of the control system on the free-falling body is limited. Both conditions are realized in the LISA Pathfinder mission, which aims at injecting a gold-coated 2 kg cubic test mass into a nearly perfect geodesic trajectory to demonstrate the readiness of the developed technology for in-space gravity wave detection. The criticality of adhesion is widely recognized in space technology, because it can affect and jeopardize the functionality of mechanisms, when arising between moving parts. In the LISA Pathfinder case, metallic adhesion potentially plays a relevant role, mainly for two reasons. First, thanks to its properties (ductility, high surface energy) the gold coating on the proof mass easily produces cold weldings, especially in vacuum conditions. Second, the detachment of the proof mass from the releasing device occurs abruptly and a relevant influence of the separation velocity is expected on the strength of the welding. This can produce an excessive velocity of the proof mass at the retraction of the releasing device for the following capture and centring phase on behalf of the control system. A testing activity is performed to characterize the dynamic behaviour of the adhesive bonds between the proof mass and the releasing device, which can be used to predict their contribution on the residual velocity of the proof mass after in-flight release. The study of such a dynamic phenomenon sets some challenging requirements on the measurement technique, both on the

  2. PETER: A Hardware Simulator for the Test Mass-GRS System of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, L.; Stanga, R.; Bassan, M.; De Marchi, F.; Pucacco, G.; Visco, M.; Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; Garufi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Each LISA PathFinder test mass (TM) will be sensitive to forces along all its 6 Degrees of Freedom (DoFs). Extensive ground testing is required in order to evaluate the influence of cross-talks from the read-out and actuator channels. In the INFN laboratory of Firenze we have developed a facility for a good representation of the free fall conditions of the TM on flight. A hollow replica of a TM hanging from a double torsion pendulum can move inside a Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) with quasi free fall condition on two Dofs, in the frequency band (0.1 ÷ 100)mHz. On both DoFs, the target residual accelerations (yet to be achieved) at the low end frequency range are ≤ 3 × 10-13ms-2, limited by the thermal noise of the fibres. At higher frequencies, the sensitivity is limited by the readout noise of the readout, a replica of the flight electronics. After a long commissioning, we are now in operating conditions, and can carry out a series of experiments to better qualify the interaction between TM and GRS. In this paper we will show some significant qualification measurements and a first scientific measurements, i.e. the measurement and compensation of the DC bias in the GRS using two independent channels, as well as a measurement of the residual acceleration of the translational DoF, with the feedback loop closed on the rotational one, and viceversa.

  3. On-ground tests of LISA PathFinder thermal diagnostics system

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, A; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Lobo, Alberto; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Thermal conditions in the LTP, the LISA Technology Package, are required to be very stable, and in such environment precision temperature measurements are also required for various diagnostics objectives. A sensitive temperature gauging system for the LTP is being developed at IEEC, which includes a set of thermistors and associated electronics. In this paper we discuss the derived requirements applying to the temperature sensing system, and address the problem of how to create in the laboratory a thermally quiet environment, suitable to perform meaningful on-ground tests of the system. The concept is a two layer spherical body, with a central aluminium core for sensor implantation surrounded by a layer of polyurethane. We construct the insulator transfer function, which relates the temperature at the core with the laboratory ambient temperature, and evaluate the losses caused by heat leakage through connecting wires. The results of the analysis indicate that, in spite of the very demanding stability conditio...

  4. Analysis of the residual force noise for the LISA Technology Package

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diaz-Aguilo, Marc; De Marchi, Fabrizio; Grynagier, Adrien; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Monsky, Anneke; Nofrarias, Miquel; Plagnol, Eric; Rais, Boutheina; Vitale, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the noise sources perturbing a test mass (TM) geodesic motion is the main scientific objective of the LISA Technology Package experiment (LTP) on board of the LISA Pathfinder space mission. Information on force noise acting on TMs are obtained with a data reduction procedure involving system parameters. Such parameters can be estimated from dedicated experimental runs. Therefore the final estimation of force noise is affected by two sources of uncertainty. One is statistical and connected to the random nature of noisy signals. The other is connected to the uncertainties on the system parameters. The analysis of simulated LTP data is indicating that the major contribution to the force noise power spectral density uncertainties is coming from the statistical properties of the spectrum estimator.

  5. High-stability temperature control for ST-7/LISA Pathfinder gravitational reference sensor ground verification testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, S.; Allen, G.; Bencze, W.; Byer, R.; Dang, A.; DeBra, D. B.; Lauben, D.; Dorlybounxou, S.; Hanson, J.; Ho, L.; Huffman, G.; Sabur, F.; Sun, K.; Tavernetti, R.; Rolih, L.; Van Patten, R.; Wallace, J.; Williams, S.

    2006-03-01

    This article demonstrates experimental results of a thermal control system developed for ST-7 gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability δT control of the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiate 1/f fluctuations. Although for ground testing these specifications can be met fairly readily with sufficient insulation and thermal mass, in contrast, for spacecraft the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can simultaneously meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements in the presence of long time delay; a considerable design challenge. Simple control laws presently provide ~ 1mK/surdHz for >24 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feedforward control algorithm will extend performance to <1 mK/surdHz at f < 0.01 mHz and possibly lower, extending LISA coverage of super massive black hole mergers.

  6. LISA Beyond Einstein: From the Big Bang to Black Holes. LISA Technology Development at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work that has been ongoing at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in the development of the technology to be used in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) spacecrafts. The prime focus of LISA technology development efforts at NASA/GSFC has been in LISA interferometry. Specifically efforts have been made in the area of laser frequency noise mitigation. Laser frequency noise is addressed through a combination of stabilization and common-mode rejection. Current plans call for two stages of stabilization, pre-stabilization to a local frequency reference and further stabilization using the constellation as a frequency reference. In order for these techniques to be used simultaneously, the pre-stabilization step must provide an adjustable frequency offset. This presentation reports on a modification to the standard modulation/demodulation technique used to stabilize to optical cavities that generates a frequency-tunable reference from a fixed length cavity. This technique requires no modifications to the cavity itself and only minor modifications to the components. The measured noise performance and dynamic range of the laboratory prototype meet the LISA requirements.

  7. Fundamental Performance Determining Factors of the Ultrahigh-Precision Space-Borne Optical Metrology System for the LISA Pathfinder mission

    CERN Document Server

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission to space employs an optical metrology system (OMS) at its core to measure the distance and attitude between two freely floating test-masses to picometer and nanorad accuracy, respectively, within the measurement band of [1 mHz, 30 mHz]. The OMS is based upon an ultra-stable optical bench with 4 heterodyne interferometers from which interference signals are read-out and processed by a digital phase-meter. Laser frequency noise, power fluctuations and optical path-length variations are suppressed to uncritical levels by dedicated control loops so that the measurement performance approaches the sensor limit imposed by the phase-meter. The system design is such that low frequency common mode noise which affects the read-out phase of all four interferometers is generally well suppressed by subtraction of a reference phase from the other interferometer signals. However, high frequency noise directly affects measurement performance and its common mode rejection depends strongly on the rel...

  8. Recent progress at NASA in LISA formulation and technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, R T [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 663, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)], E-mail: Robin.T.Stebbins@nasa.gov

    2008-06-07

    Over the last year, the NASA half of the joint LISA project has focused its efforts on responding to a major review, and advancing the formulation and technology development of the mission. The NAS/NRC Beyond Einstein program assessment review will be described, including the outcome. The basis of the LISA science requirements has changed from detection determined by integrated signal-to-noise ratio to observation determined by uncertainty in the estimation of astrophysical source parameters. The NASA team has further defined the spacecraft bus design, participated in many design trade studies and advanced the requirements flow down and the associated current best estimates of performance. Recent progress in technology development is also summarized.

  9. Heliospheric influences on LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.; Finetti, N.; Tombolato, D.; Marconi, L.; Stanga, R.; Lobo, A.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2009-05-01

    Laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is the first interferometer devoted to the detection of low frequency gravitational waves in space. Control of the environment and the study of the effects of energetic particles traversing the LISA apparatus are mandatory for this experiment to be fully successful. Telescopes for solar and cosmic-ray particle monitoring will be placed on board LISA and its precursor mission LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF). In particular, proton, helium and electron detection is recommended on LISA. In this paper, we report expected incident galactic proton and helium fluxes at the time of LISA and LISA-PF missions. The number of solar events with the fluence ranging between 106 and 1011 protons cm-2 above 30 MeV occurring during the LISA missions is estimated as well. Finally, we discuss the importance of electron detection on LISA to forecast upcoming solar energetic protons.

  10. Heliospheric influences on LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C; Fabi, M [Istituto di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Urbino, Urbino (Italy); Finetti, N [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Tombolato, D [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova, Gruppo collegato di Trento, Trento (Italy); Marconi, L; Stanga, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy); Lobo, A [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M; Puigdengoles, C, E-mail: catia.grimani@uniurb.i [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-07

    Laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is the first interferometer devoted to the detection of low frequency gravitational waves in space. Control of the environment and the study of the effects of energetic particles traversing the LISA apparatus are mandatory for this experiment to be fully successful. Telescopes for solar and cosmic-ray particle monitoring will be placed on board LISA and its precursor mission LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF). In particular, proton, helium and electron detection is recommended on LISA. In this paper, we report expected incident galactic proton and helium fluxes at the time of LISA and LISA-PF missions. The number of solar events with the fluence ranging between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 11} protons cm{sup -2} above 30 MeV occurring during the LISA missions is estimated as well. Finally, we discuss the importance of electron detection on LISA to forecast upcoming solar energetic protons.

  11. Subtraction of test mass angular noise in the LISA Technology Package interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán; Wanner, Gudrun; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We present recent sensitivity measurements of the LISA Technology Package interferometer with articulated mirrors as test masses, actuated by piezo-electric transducers. The required longitudinal displacement resolution of 9 pm/sqrt[Hz] above 3 mHz has been demonstrated with an angular noise that corresponds to the expected in on-orbit operation. The excess noise contribution of this test mass jitter onto the sensitive displacement readout was completely subtracted by fitting the angular interferometric data streams to the longitudinal displacement measurement. Thus, this cross-coupling constitutes no limitation to the required performance of the LISA Technology Package interferometry.

  12. Evaluation of new technologies for the LISA gravitational reference sensor using the UF torsion pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, John; Chilton, Andrew; Olatunde, Taiwo; Apple, Stephen; Aitken, Michael; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space. The LISA design has been studied for more than 20 years as a joint effort between NASA and the European Space Agency. LISA consists of three Sun-orbiting spacecraft that form an equilateral triangle, with each side measuring 1-5 million kilometers in length. Each spacecraft houses two free-floating test masses, which are protected from all disturbing forces so that they follow pure geodesics. A single test mass together with its protective housing and associated components is referred to as a gravitational reference sensor. A drag-free control system is supplied with measurements of the test mass position from these sensors and commands external micronewton thrusters to force the spacecraft to fly in formation with the test masses. Laser interferometry is used to measure the minute variations in the distance, or light travel time, between these purely free-falling TMs, caused by gravitational waves. We have constructed a new torsion pendulum facility with a force sensitivity in the range of pN/Hz1/2 around 1 mHz for testing new gravitational reference sensor technologies. This experimental facility consists of a vacuum enclosed torsion pendulum that suspends mock-ups of the LISA test masses, surrounded by their electrode housings. With the aid of this facility, we are (a) developing a novel test mass charge control scheme based on ultraviolet LEDs, (b) examining alternate test mass and electrode housing coatings, and (c) evaluating alternate operational modes of the LISA gravitational reference sensor. This presentation will describe this facility and the development status of these new technologies.

  13. LISA Experience from GRACE-FO Optical Payload (LEGOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kirk

    arm-locking to be used on LISA. We will modify the LISA arm- locking controller for GRACE-FO mission parameters and perform a hardware-in-the- loop simulation. GRACE-FO is the planned follow-on to the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. In addition to the microwave link used to sense micron-level changes in the separation between a pair of satellites in a following orbit, GRACE-FO will include a 2-way laser link as a technology demonstrator package. LISA is a planned gravitational wave observatory consisting of three drag-free spacecraft arranged in an equilateral triangle with 5 million km separation in a heliocentric orbit. LISA will have three 2-way laser links to allow LISA to observe low frequency astrophysical and cosmological sources. Demonstration of inter-spacecraft interferometry using GRACE-FO has the potential to retire several of the highest-risk procedures for LISA and complements the drag-free performance technology demonstration of the LISA Pathfinder mission. Similarities between the GRACE-FO and LISA flight systems means we will not need to develop or deploy any new hardware to achieve this goal. Rather, we propose to develop algorithms that could be deployed on the existing GRACE-FO control and diagnostics system.

  14. LISA: Science and Prospects for Gravitational Wave Detection in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    Spaceborne gravitational wave observatories with million kilometer armlengths will probe gravitational waves with kilosecond periods. This part of the spectrum is populated by a diverse menagerie of high energy astrophysical systems that will give new insights into stellar evolution, the formation and evolution of super-massive black holes, and the growth of structure in the Universe. LISA is a laser interferometric observatory that will be sensitive to gravitational wave frequencies from about 10 microHertz to about 1 Hertz, providing gravitational wave observations of these phenomena that will enable population studies, detailed characterization of the structure and bulk motion of matter in these systems, as well as enabling new, detailed tests of physics in strong gravitational fields. The core LISA measurement has been demonstrated by the successful flight of LISA Pathfinder, paving the way for the start of LISA mission design and planning. In this talk, we will discuss the science that low-frequency gravitational wave observations will reveal and enable, as well as the current technology status and progress forward toward an eventual LISA flight.

  15. Technology for Future NASA Missions: Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    SEPTEMBER 1988 PACE Space Research and Technology Overview 1 Frederick P. Povinelli Civil Space Technology Initiative 15 Judith H. Ambrus...Peterson Peterson Pierson Pietsch Pilcher Pistole Piszczor Pittian Plotkin Portnoy Poucher Povinelli Povell Pozarovski Priebe Prior Pyle

  16. Rightsizing LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Stebbins, R T

    2009-01-01

    The LISA science requirements and conceptual design have been fairly stable for over a decade. In the interest of reducing costs, the LISA Project at NASA has looked for simplifications of the architecture, at downsizing of subsystems, and at descopes of the entire mission. This is a natural activity of the formulation phase, and one that is particularly timely in the current NASA budgetary context. There is, and will continue to be, enormous pressure for cost reduction from both ESA and NASA, reviewers and the broader research community. Here, the rationale for the baseline architecture is reviewed, and recent efforts to find simplifications and other reductions that might lead to savings are reported. A few possible simplifications have been found in the LISA baseline architecture. In the interest of exploring cost sensitivity, one moderate and one aggressive descope have been evaluated; the cost savings are modest and the loss of science is not.

  17. Rightsizing LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, R T, E-mail: Robin.T.Stebbins@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 663, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-05-07

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) science requirements and conceptual design have been fairly stable for over a decade. In the interest of reducing costs, the LISA Project at NASA has looked for simplifications of the architecture, at downsizing of subsystems and at descopes of the entire mission. This is a natural activity of the formulation phase and one that is particularly timely in the current NASA budgetary context. There is, and will continue to be, enormous pressure for cost reduction from both ESA and NASA, reviewers and the broader research community. Here, the rationale for the baseline architecture is reviewed, and recent efforts to find simplifications and other reductions that might lead to savings are reported. A few possible simplifications have been found in the LISA baseline architecture. In the interest of exploring cost sensitivity, one moderate and one aggressive descope have been evaluated; the cost savings are modest and the loss of science is not.

  18. LISA and the LTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennrich, O.

    The primary objective of the LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission is the detection and observation of gravitational waves from massive black holes (MBH) and galactic binaries in the frequency range 10 -4 Hz … 10 -1 Hz. This low-frequency range is inaccessible to ground-based interferometers due to the background of local gravitational noise and because ground-based interferometers are limited in length to a few kilometres. LISA is envisaged as an ESA/NASA collaborative project, selected an ESA cornerstone mission and included in NASA's strategic plan and with a nominal launch date in 2011. SMART-2 is primarily intended to demonstrate the key technologies for the ESA/NASA collaborative LISA cornerstone mission. The synergy with the technology being used for Darwin motivates the utilization of SMART-2 for both missions. To this end, SMART-2 will accommodate a LISA technology package (LTP), provided by European institutes and industry and possibly also a Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) that is very similar to the LTP and has the same goals but is provided by US institutes and industry.

  19. Pathfinder Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, John R., III; Rogacki, Row (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The topics in this viewgraph include: 1) High visibility Flight Projects; 2) Pathfinder Flight Experiments; 3) X-37 Configuration Modification Options; 4) Flight Testing for a Multistage Reusable System; 5) X-34 Vehicle Description; 6) X-34 Expanded View; 7) Vehicle Size Comparison; 8) X-34 Experiment Status; 9) Government Participation; 10) Government and Industry Participants; 11) X-34 Project Status; 12) X-34 Captive Carry Fight; 13) Little Joe III; 14) Fastpac; and 15) Islunar Tug.

  20. Short-term forecasting of solar energetic ions on board LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (PU) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy); Araujo, H M; Shaul, D N A; Sumner, T J [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Fabi, M [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' (Italy); Finetti, N [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Gruppo collegato dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Lobo, A; Mateos, I, E-mail: catia.grimani@uniurb.i [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) free-falling test-masses are charged by galactic and solar energetic particles. This process generates spurious forces on the test masses which appear as noise in the experiments. It was shown that relativistic solar electron detection can be used for up-to-one-hour forecasting of incoming energetic ions at 1 AU. Warning of incoming solar energetic particle events could allow us to optimize the test-mass discharging. The current LISA-PF radiation monitor design needs to be upgraded if solar electron detection is to be implemented in LISA.

  1. VR for Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has played an integral role for Mars Pathfinder mission, operations Using an automated machine vision algorithm, the 3d topography of the Martian surface was rapidly recovered fro -a the stereo images captured. by the Tender camera to produce photo-realistic 3d models, An advanced, interface was developed for visualization and interaction with. the virtual environment of the Pathfinder landing site for mission scientists at the Space Flight Operations Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The VR aspect of the display allowed mission scientists to navigate on Mars in Bud while remaining here on Earth, thus improving their spatial awareness of the rock field that surrounds the lenders Measurements of positions, distances and angles could be easily extracted from the topographic models, providing valuable information for science analysis and mission. planning. Moreover, the VR map of Mars has also been used to assist with the archiving and planning of activities for the Sojourner rover.

  2. LISA telescope assembly optical stability characterization for ESA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, A.L.; Hogenhuis, H.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.; Lemmen, M.H.J.; Lucarelli, S.; Scheulen, D.; Ende, D.

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Optical Stability Characterization project is part of the LISA CTP activities to achieve the required Technonlogy Readiness Level (TRL) for all of the LISA technologies used. This activity aims demonstration of the Telescope Assembly (TA), with a structure based on CFRP technology, that a C

  3. Breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gerberding, Oliver; Bykov, Ioury; Danzmann, Karsten; Enggaard, Anders; Esteban, Juan Jose; Gianolio, Alberto; Hansen, Torben Vendt; Heinzel, Gerhard; Hornstrup, Allan; Jennrich, Oliver; Kullmann, Joachim; Pedersen, Søren Møller; Rasmussen, Torben; Reiche, Jens; Sodnik, Zoran; Suess, Martin

    2012-01-01

    An elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter is currently under development by a Danish-German consortium. The breadboard is build in the frame of an ESA technology development activity to demonstrate the feasibility and readiness of the LISA metrology baseline architecture. This article gives an overview about the breadboard design and its components, including the distribution of key functionalities.

  4. Human Mars EDL Pathfinder Study: Assessment of Technology Development Gaps and Mitigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Randolph; Olejniczak, Joe; Polsgrove, Tara; Cianciolo, Alice Dwyer; Munk, Michelle; Whetsel, Charles; Drake, Bret

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a NASA initiated Agency-wide assessment to better characterize the risks and potential mitigation approaches associated with landing human class Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems on Mars. Due to the criticality and long-lead nature of advancing EDL techniques, it is necessary to determine an appropriate strategy to improve the capability to land large payloads. A key focus of this study was to understand the key EDL risks and with a focus on determining what "must" be tested at Mars. This process identified the various risks and potential risk mitigation strategies along with the key near term technology development efforts required and in what environment those technology demonstrations were best suited. The study identified key risks along with advantages to each entry technology. In addition, it was identified that provided the EDL concept of operations (con ops) minimized large scale transition events, there was no technology requirement for a Mars pre-cursor demonstration. Instead, NASA should take a direct path to a human-scale lander.

  5. A new torsion pendulum for testing enhancements to the LISA Gravitational Reference Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, John; Chilton, A.; Ciani, G.; Mueller, G.; Olatunde, T.; Shelley, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), the most mature concept for observing gravitational waves from space, consists of three Sun-orbiting spacecraft that form a million km-scale equilateral triangle. Each spacecraft houses two free-floating test masses (TM), which are protected from disturbing forces so that they follow pure geodesics in spacetime. A single test mass together with its housing and associated components is referred to as a gravitational reference sensor (GRS). Laser interferometry is used to measure the minute variations in the distance between these free-falling TMs, caused by gravitational waves. The demanding acceleration noise requirement of 3E-15 m/sec^2Hz^1/2 for the LISA GRS has motivated a rigorous testing campaign in Europe and a dedicated technology mission, LISA Pathfinder, scheduled for launch in 2015. Recently, efforts have begun in the U.S. to design and assemble a new, nearly thermally noise limited torsion pendulum for testing GRS technology enhancements and for understanding the dozens of acceleration noise sources that affect the performance of the GRS. This experimental facility is based on the design of a similar facility at the University of Trento, and will consist of a vacuum enclosed torsion pendulum that suspends mock-ups of the LISA test masses, surrounded by electrode housings. The GRS technology enhancements under development include a novel TM charge control scheme based on ultraviolet LEDs, simplified capacitive readout electronics, and a six degree-of-freedom, all-optical TM sensor. This presentation will describe the design of the torsion pendulum facility, its expected performance, and the potential technology enhancements.

  6. The Mars Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1996-09-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission is a Discovery class mission that will place a small lander and rover on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997. The Pathfinder flight system is a single small lander, packaged within an aeroshell and back cover with a back-pack-style cruise stage. The vehicle will be launched, fly independently to Mars, and enter the atmosphere directly on approach behind the aeroshell. The vehicle is slowed by a parachute and 3 small solid rockets before landing on inflated airbags. Petals of a small tetrahedron shaped lander open up, to right the vehicle. The lander is solar powered with batteries and will operate on the surface for up to a year, downlinking data on a high-gain antenna. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, with 3 imagers and an alpha proton X-ray spectrometer, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The rover (includes a series of technology experiments), the instruments (including a stereo multispectral surface imager on a pop up mast and an atmospheric structure instrument-surface meteorology package) and the telemetry system will allow investigations of: the surface morphology and geology at meter scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products and early environments and conditions on Mars.

  7. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-07-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the Symposium started in NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place at the city of Barcelona, Spain, from 16-20 June 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern Science Museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the Symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, Gravitational Wave Science, and Astronomy, as well as Engineers, attended LISA 7 and produced state-of-the-art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and 8 parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into 7 major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. 138 abstracts for communications were received, of which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the Symposium website: http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was however a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main Conference Room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who had boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas of

  8. Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    First of NASA's Discovery missions. Launched in December 1996 and arrived at Mars on 4 July 1997. Mainly intended as a technology demonstration mission. Used airbags to cushion the landing on Mars. The Carl Sagan Memorial station returned images of an ancient flood plain in Ares Vallis. The 10 kg Sojourner rover used an x-ray spectrometer to study the composition of rocks and travelled about 100 ...

  9. Data and Diagnostics in LISA PathFinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos, J.; Sanjuan, J.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Xirgu, X.; Araujo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Grimani, C.; Puigdengoles, C.; Wass, P.; Anza, S.; Díaz Michelena, M.; García-Berro, E.; Pérez del Real, R.

    2006-06-01

    The Diagnostics measurement set is a subsystem of the LTP which is intended to monitor a number of spurious disturbances, even if the satellite complies with all cleanliness requirements. It monitors thermal and magnetic perturbations, and incorporates a charged particle counter. The purpose of this communication is to discuss the conceptual aspects of the mentioned subsystem, and to summarise its current status of development.

  10. MONDian three-body predictions for LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bevis, Neil; Trenkel, Christian; Kemble, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In previous work it was shown that MOND theories predict anomalously strong tidal stresses near the saddle points of the Newtonian gravitational potential. An analytical examination of the saddle between two bodies revealed a linear and a non-linear solution, valid for the outer and inner regions. Here we present a numerical algorithm for solving the MOND equations. We check the code against the two-body analytical solutions and explore the region transitioning between them. We then develop a a realistic model for the MONDian effects on the saddles of the Sun-Earth-Moon system (including further sources is straightforward). For the Sun-Earth saddle we find that the two-body results are almost unchanged, with corrections increasing from full to new Moon. In contrast, the Moon saddle is an intrinsically three-body problem, but we numerically find a recipe for adapting the two-body solution to this case, by means of a suitable re-scaling and axis re-orientation. We explore possible experimental scenarios for LIS...

  11. School libraries Pathfinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shideh Taleban

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available School library represents one of the important locations suited for offering reference services. The skill set necessary in order to use information resources, is called information literacy. When discussing information literacy and means of enhancing it, the first thing that comes to mind is the classroom for it is in schools that the foundation for learning skills is laid. Pathfinders have been used by libraries and librarians for guiding patrons to the required sources and answering their research questions since 1970’s. It is far different from a bibliography in as much as it does not necessarily include a complete list of available resources on a given topic. Nevertheless it provides sufficient basic resources for research for the patrons. Nowadays pathfinders are prepared by teacher-librarian or with the help of teachers at school so as to assist students in searching their prescribed assignments. The present paper offers definition of pathfinder, creation of pathfinders in schools, type of pathfinders, pathfinders characteristics, pathfinder elements as well as how to design pathfinders for children and teenagers.

  12. Exploring Parameter Space Coverage of Various LISA Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    With the success of LISA Pathfinder, the measurement of gravitational waves in space has taken an important step forward. We conduct an analysis of the measurement abilities of distinctive LISA detector designs, examining how the low-frequency band-edge behavior of the detector sensitivity curve affects measurement capabilities. We are particularly interested in LISA’s ability to measure massive black holes that are merging near the band-edge, with masses in the range of $\\sim 10^6-10^{10}M_\\odot$. We examine the ringdown and insprial detectability over a wide range of Massive Black Hole (MBH) binaries along with a broad palette of possible LISA design parameters.

  13. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008 Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-05-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the symposium started at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place in the city of Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June, 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern science museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, gravitational wave science, and astronomy, as well as engineers, attended LISA #7 and produced state of the art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and eight parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into seven major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave Sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. Abstracts for 138 communications were received, from which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the symposium website:http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was, however, a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main conference room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas

  14. LISA thermal design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peabody, Hume [Swales Aerospace, Inc., 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Merkowitz, Stephen [NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, a space-based gravitational wave detector, uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 x 10{sup -15} m s{sup -2} Hz{sup -1/2} at 0.1 mHz. Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below about 40 pm Hz{sup -1/2} over 1-100 mHz. Noise due to spacecraft thermal distortions, temperature difference variations across the proof mass housing and other thermal effects are expected to be significant contributors to these noise budgets. The LISA Integrated Modelling team developed a detailed thermal model that is currently being used to drive the design of LISA. Several new thermal analysis techniques are also being developed in order to achieve model accuracies to LISA levels. We present here an overview of the LISA thermal design and modelling efforts. The latest thermal results calculated using the current baseline design of LISA are also discussed.

  15. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010 Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Sasha; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2011-05-01

    The international research community interested in the Laser Interferometric Space Antenna (LISA) program meets every two years to exchange scientific and technical information. From 28 June-2 July 2010, Stanford University hosted the 8th International LISA Symposium. The symposium was held on the campus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Many of the foremost scientific and technological researchers in LISA and gravitational wave theory and detection presented their work and ideas. Over one hundred engineers and graduate students attended the meeting. The leadership from NASA and ESA research centers and programs joined the symposium. A total of 280 delegates participated in the 8th LISA Symposium, and enjoyed the scientific and social programs. The scientific program included 46 invited plenary lectures, 44 parallel talks, and 77 posters, totaling 167 presentations. The one-slide introduction presentation of the posters is a new format in this symposium and allowed graduate students the opportunity to talk in front of a large audience of scientists. The topics covered included LISA Science, LISA Interferometry, LISA PathFinder (LPF), LISA and LPF Data Analysis, Astrophysics, Numerical Relativity, Gravitational Wave Theory, GRS Technologies, Other Space Programs, and Ground Detectors. Large gravitational wave detection efforts, DECIGO, and LIGO were presented, as well as a number of other fundamental physics space experiments, with GP-B and STEP being examples. A public evening lecture was also presented at the symposium. Professor Bernard Schutz from the Albert Einstein Institute gave a general audience, multimedia presentation on `Gravitational waves: Listening to the music of spheres'. For more detailed information about the symposium and many presentation files, please browse through the website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/lisasymposium The Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium are jointly published by Classical and Quantum Gravity

  16. Pathfinder Innovation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pathfinder program supports high-risk, high-reward research ideas with funding and staff time. The goal is to feed a culture of innovation in the Agency and integrate innovative ideas in EPA research programs.

  17. Pathfinder Climate Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder climate data CD-ROM contains seven data sets: Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)Land and Ocean, TIROS Operational Vertical...

  18. A new torsion pendulum for testing the limits of free-fall for LISA test masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, A.; Ciani, G.; Dolesi, R.; Heptonstall, A.; Hueller, M.; Nicolodi, D.; Rowan, S.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wass, P. J.; Weber, W. J.

    2009-05-01

    On-ground verification of the precision with which a test mass can be in perfect free-fall, without any stray forces, is among the most challenging aspects of preparing for LISA and LISA Pathfinder. This study aims at improving the sensitivity in torsion pendulum measurements of the stray forces arising in the interaction between a test mass and the capacitive position sensor that surrounds it. Measurements are performed with pendulum suspensions based on both tungsten and higher quality factor uncoated fused silica torsion fibers. The results achieved with the fused silica pendulum establish more stringent upper limits on the excess force noise attributable to the sensor—at a level that roughly coincides with the LISA Pathfinder flight goal around 1 mHz. Additionally, these measurements demonstrate a force sensitivity improvement over what can be achieved with thermal noise-limited tungsten over a wide range of frequencies, with significant further improvements still possible.

  19. Constraints on LISA Pathfinder’s self-gravity: design requirements, estimates and testing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; Desiderio, D.; Piersanti, E.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Tomlinson, R.; Trenkel, C.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-12-01

    LISA Pathfinder satellite was launched on 3 December 2015 toward the Sun-Earth first Lagrangian point (L1) where the LISA Technology Package (LTP), which is the main science payload, will be tested. LTP achieves measurements of differential acceleration of free-falling test masses (TMs) with sensitivity below 3× {10}-14 {{m}} {{{s}}}-2 {{Hz}}-1/2 within the 1-30 mHz frequency band in one-dimension. The spacecraft itself is responsible for the dominant differential gravitational field acting on the two TMs. Such a force interaction could contribute a significant amount of noise and thus threaten the achievement of the targeted free-fall level. We prevented this by balancing the gravitational forces to the sub nm s-2 level, guided by a protocol based on measurements of the position and the mass of all parts that constitute the satellite, via finite element calculation tool estimates. In this paper, we will introduce the gravitational balance requirements and design, and then discuss our predictions for the balance that will be achieved in flight.

  20. The Use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology to Mitigate Vacuum Chamber Contamination During Pathfinder Testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  1. The Mona Lisa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方海昌

    2004-01-01

    Mona Lisa Was One Of Leonardo da Vincis favourite paintings he carried it with him until he died.Today it is regarded as the most famous painting in the world and is visited by many thousands of ople every year.

  2. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  3. Mechanical design of the Mars Pathfinder mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Howard Jay; Buck, Carl W.; Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Umland, Jeffrey W.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission and the Sojourner rover is reported on, with emphasis on the various mission steps and the performance of the technologies involved. The mechanical design of mission hardware was critical to the success of the entry sequence and the landing operations. The various mechanisms employed are considered.

  4. Time scales in LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Pireaux, S

    2007-01-01

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  5. Laser development for LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troebs, M [Laser Zentrum Hannover, Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Wessels, P [Laser Zentrum Hannover, Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Fallnich, C [Laser Zentrum Hannover, Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Bode, M [Innolight GmbH, Garbsener Landstr. 10, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Freitag, I [Innolight GmbH, Garbsener Landstr. 10, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Skorupka, S [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Heinzel, G [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Danzmann, K [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2006-04-21

    The two most promising configurations for the LISA laser are a stand-alone diode-pumped nonplanar ring oscillator (NPRO) or a fibre amplifier seeded by a low-power NPRO. The stand-alone laser was stabilized in frequency to a ULE cavity and in power to an electronic reference. For the first time the LISA requirement of relative power noise below 2 x 10{sup -4}/Hz{sup 1/2} was fulfilled in the whole frequency range from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz. The LISA goal of frequency noise below 30 Hz/Hz{sup 1/2} was achieved for frequencies above 3 mHz. As a first step in the characterization of an oscillator-amplifier system, the excess frequency noise of an ytterbium-doped fibre amplifier was measured. For frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz the excess noise was measured to be below 0.1 Hz/Hz{sup 1/2}, which is significantly below the free-running frequency noise of NPROs.

  6. The LISA accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.

    2003-10-01

    In the frame of investigating the fundamental nature of gravity, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission could open the way to a new kind of observations unreachable from ground. The experiment, based on a V-formation of six drag-free spacecraft, uses the cubic proof masses of inertial sensors to reflect the laser light, acting as reference mirrors of a 5 × 10 9 m arm length interferometer. The proof masses are also used as inertial references for the drag-free control of the spacecraft which constitute in return a shield against external forces. Derived from space electrostatic accelerometers developed at ONERA, such as GRADIO for the ESA ARISTOTELES and now GOCE mission (Bernard and Touboul, 1991), the proposed LISA sensor should shield its proof mass from any accelerometric disturbance at a level of 10 -15ms-2Hz- 1/2. The accurate capacitive sensing of the mass provides its position relative to the satellite with a resolution better than 10 -9m Hz- 1/2 in order to control the satellite orbit and to minimise the disturbances induced by the satellite self gravity or by the proof mass charge. The sensor configuration and accomodation has to be specifically optimised for the mission requirements. Fortunately, the sensor will benefit from the thermal stability of the LISA optical bench environment, i.e. 10 -6K Hz- 1/2, and of the selected materials that exhibit a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), ensuring a high geometrical stability. Apart from the modeling and the evaluation of the flight characteristics, the necessary indirect ground demonstration of the performance and the interfaces with the drag-free control will have to be considered in detail in the future.

  7. Dynamic Control System Mode Performance of the Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Hsu, Oscar; Maghami, Peiman

    2017-01-01

    The Space Technology-7 (ST-7) Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is an experiment package aboard the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder spacecraft, launched on December 3, 2015. DRS consists of three primary components: Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters (CMNTs), an Integrated Avionics Unit (IAU), and flight-software implementing the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) and Dynamic Control System (DCS) algorithms. The CMNTs were designed to provide thrust from 5 to 30 micro Newton, with thrust controllability and resolution of 0.1 micro Newton and thrust noise of 0.1 micro Newton/(square root of (Hz)) in the measurement band from 1-30 mHz. The IAU hosts the C&DH and DCS flight software, as well as interfaces with both the CMNT electronics and the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft. When in control, the DCS uses star tracker attitude data and capacitive or optically-measured position and attitude information from LISA Pathfinder and the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to control the attitude and position of the spacecraft and the two test masses inside the LTP. After completion of the nominal ESA LISA Pathfinder mission, the DRS experiment was commissioned followed by its nominal mission. DRS operations extended over the next five months, interspersed with station keeping, anomaly resolution, and periods where control was handed back to LISA Pathfinder for them to conduct further experiments. The primary DRS mission ended on December 6, 2016, with the experiment meeting all of its Level 1 requirements. The DCS, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, consists of five spacecraft control modes and six test mass control modes, combined into six 'DRS Mission Modes'. Attitude Control and Zero-G were primarily used to control the spacecraft during initial handover and during many of the CMNT characterization experiments. The other Mission Modes, Drag Free Low Force, 18-DOF Transitional, and 18-DOF, were used to provide drag-free control of the spacecraft about the test

  8. Preparing for LISA in the post-detection era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, John

    2017-01-01

    In 2016 we saw the first direct detections of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and the positive results from LISA Pathfinder. In this context, NASA has decided to partner with the ESA on their L3 gravitational wave observatory, whose science goals are outlined in the white paper, The Gravitational Universe. The current launch date for L3 is 2034, but with the success of Pathfinder and the increased scientific interest in gravitational waves caused by LIGO, ESA and its member states are exploring ways to move up the launch date. In the U.S., the National Academy's Astronomy Midterm Assessment has recommended that NASA restore support for a gravitational wave mission in this decade with the goal of realizing the full scientific capability of the mission envisioned in the 2020 decadal. NASA has appointed the L3 Study Team, charged with providing analysis of potential U.S. contributions to the European-led L3 mission and preparing for the next decadal survey. The LISA mission concept, proposed for L3, will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, provide predictions of black hole binary mergers in the LIGO frequency band, and enable searches for new physics.

  9. LISA and its in-flight test precursor SMART-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, S.; Bender, P.; Brillet, A.; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Cerdonio, M.; Cruise, M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Dolesi, R.; Folkner, W.; Gianolio, A.; Jafry, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Heinzel, G.; Hogan, C.; Hueller, M.; Hough, J.; Phinney, S.; Prince, T.; Richstone, D.; Robertson, D.; Rodrigues, M.; Ruediger, A.; Sandford, M.; Schilling, R.; Shoemaker, D.; Schutz, B.; Stebbins, R.; Stubbs, C.; Sumner, T.; Thorne, K.; Tinto, M.; Touboul, P.; Ward, H.; Weber, W.; Winkler, W

    2002-07-01

    LISA will be the first space-home gravitational wave observatory. It aims to detect gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz/1 Hz range from sources including galactic binaries, super-massive black-hole binaries, capture of objects by super-massive black-holes and stochastic background. LISA is an ESA approved Cornerstone Mission foreseen as a joint ESA-NASA endeavour to be launched in 2010-11. The principle of operation of LISA is based on laser ranging of test-masses under pure geodesic motion. Achieving pure geodesic motion at the level requested for LISA, 3x10{sup -15} ms{sup -2}/{radical}Hz at 0.1 mHz, is considered a challenging technological objective. To reduce the risk, both ESA and NASA are pursuing an in-flight test of the relevant technology. The goal of the test is to demonstrate geodetic motion within one order of magnitude from the LISA performance. ESA has given this test as the primary goal of its technology dedicated mission SMART-2 with a launch in 2006. This paper describes the basics of LISA, its key technologies, and its in-flight precursor test on SMART-2.

  10. Pathfinder - flight preparation on lakebed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    AeroVironment, Inc., crew members prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for its first flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its configuration was shanged from 8 electric motors to 6. Bob Curtin of AeroVironment is in the foreground of the photo. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  11. Interpolation of the magnetic field at the test masses in eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I.; Díaz-Aguiló, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; García-Berro, E.; Lobo, A.

    2015-08-01

    A feasible design for a magnetic diagnostics subsystem for eLISA will be based on that of its precursor mission, LISA Pathfinder. Previous experience indicates that magnetic field estimation at the positions of the test masses has certain complications. This is due to two reasons. The first is that magnetometers usually back-act due to their measurement principles (i.e., they also create their own magnetic fields), while the second is that the sensors selected for LISA Pathfinder have a large size, which conflicts with space resolution and with the possibility of having a sufficient number of them to properly map the magnetic field around the test masses. However, high-sensitivity and small-sized sensors that significantly mitigate the two aforementioned limitations exist, and have been proposed to overcome these problems. Thus, these sensors will be likely selected for the magnetic diagnostics subsystem of eLISA. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the new magnetic subsystem, as it is currently conceived, and assess the feasibility of selecting these sensors in the final configuration of the magnetic diagnostic subsystem.

  12. Interpolation of the magnetic field at the test masses in eLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Ramos-Castro, J; García-Berro, E; Lobo, A

    2016-01-01

    A feasible design for a magnetic diagnostics subsystem for eLISA will be based on that of its precursor mission, LISA Pathfinder. Previous experience indicates that magnetic field estimation at the positions of the test masses has certain complications. This is due to two reasons. The first one is that magnetometers usually back-act due to their measurement principles (i.e., they also create their own magnetic fields), while the second is that the sensors selected for LISA Pathfinder have a large size, which conflicts with space resolution and with the possibility of having a sufficient number of them to properly map the magnetic field around the test masses. However, high-sensitivity and small-size sensors that significantly mitigate the two aforementioned limitations exist, and have been proposed to overcome these problems. Thus, these sensors will be likely selected for the magnetic diagnostics subsystem of eLISA. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the new magnetic subsystem, as it is currently con...

  13. Magnetic Back Action Effect of Magnetic Sensors for eLISA/NGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Gibert, F.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.

    2013-01-01

    The fluxgate magnetometers used in LISA Pathfinder mission are able to perform very low noise measurements at milli-Hertz frequency, however they need to be kept somehow away from the Test Masses (TMs) due to the quantity of ferromagnetic material contained in the fluxgate's core, which constitutes a potential source of disturbance to the performance. As a result, the estimation of the magnetic field and gradient in the TMs is very problematic, despite the excellent quality of the readout data. The design of a magnetic diagnostic measuring system able to deal with the magnetic constraints for eLISA/NGO will imply the magnetic characterization of the sensors in order to estimate the magnetic back action effect on their environment. The magnetic impact caused by the magnetometers also depends on the noise reduction techniques used in the signal conditioning circuit, which is being studied to develop criteria for the best choice of magnetic sensors for eLISA/NGO.

  14. Gravitational Reference Sensor Technology Development at the University of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, John; Chilton, Andrew; Chiani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Shelley, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, consists of three Sun-orbiting spacecraft that form a million kilometer-scale equilateral triangle. Each spacecraft houses two free-floating test masses (TM), which are protected from disturbing forces so that they follow pure geodesics. A single TM together with its protective housing and associated components is referred to as a gravitational reference sensor (GRS). Laser interferometry is used to measure the minute variations in the distance, or light travel time, between these purely free-falling TMs, caused by gravitational waves. The demanding acceleration noise requirement of 3 x 10-15 m/sec^2Hz^1/2 for the LISA GRS has motivated a rigorous testing campaign in Europe and a dedicated technology mission, LISA Pathfinder, scheduled for launch in 2014. In order to increase U.S. competency in GRS technologies, various research activities at the University of Florida (UF) have been initiated. The first is the development of a nearly thermally noise limited torsion pendulum for testing the GRS and for understanding the dozens of acceleration noise sources that affect the performance of the LISA GRS. The team at UF also collaborates with Stanford and NASA Ames on a small satellite mission that will test the performance of UV LEDs for ac charge control in space. This presentation will describe the design of the GRS testing facility at UF, the status of the UV LED small satellite mission, and plans for UF participation in the LISA Pathfinder mission.

  15. LISA and its in-flight test precursor SMART-2

    CERN Document Server

    Vitale, S; Brillet, A; Buchman, S; Cavalleri, A; Cerdonio, M; Cruise, M; Cutler, C; Danzmann, K; Dolesi, R; Folkner, W; Gianolio, A; Jafry, Y; Hasinger, G; Heinzel, G; Hogan, C; Hüller, M; Hough, J; Phinney, S; Prince, T; Richstone, D O; Robertson, D; Rodrigues, M; Rüdiger, A; Sandford, M; Schilling, R; Shoemaker, D; Schutz, B; Stebbins, R; Stubbs, C; Sumner, T; Thorne, K; Tinto, M; Touboul, P; Ward, H; Weber, W; Winkler, W

    2002-01-01

    LISA will be the first space-home gravitational wave observatory. It aims to detect gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz/1 Hz range from sources including galactic binaries, super-massive black-hole binaries, capture of objects by super-massive black-holes and stochastic background. LISA is an ESA approved Cornerstone Mission foreseen as a joint ESA-NASA endeavour to be launched in 2010-11. The principle of operation of LISA is based on laser ranging of test-masses under pure geodesic motion. Achieving pure geodesic motion at the level requested for LISA, 3x10 sup - sup 1 sup 5 ms sup - sup 2 /sq root Hz at 0.1 mHz, is considered a challenging technological objective. To reduce the risk, both ESA and NASA are pursuing an in-flight test of the relevant technology. The goal of the test is to demonstrate geodetic motion within one order of magnitude from the LISA performance. ESA has given this test as the primary goal of its technology dedicated mission SMART-2 with a launch in 2006. This paper describes the basi...

  16. Study of test-mass charging process in the LISA missions due to diffuse γ-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, N.; Scrimaglio, R.; Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.

    2009-03-01

    Gravitational inertial sensors will be placed on board the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and aboard its precursor mission LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) in order to detect low frequency gravitational waves in space. Free-floating test-masses (Au7Pt3 cubes) will be housed in inertial sensors for detecting possible laser signal variations induced by gravitational waves. Charging of the LISA test-masses due to exposure of the spacecraft to cosmic radiation and energetic solar particles will affect operation of gravitational inertial sensors. In this paper we report on the role of diffuse γ-rays in charging the LISA and LISA-PF test-masses with respect to protons and helium nuclei. The diffuse γ-ray flux in the Galaxy has been interpolated taking into account the outcomes of recent calculations. A comparison with γ-ray observations gathered by different experiments (COMPTEL and EGRET, Milagro, Whipple, HEGRA, TIBET) has been carried out. Simulations of the test-mass charging process have been performed by means of the FLUKA2006.3b package. Monte Carlo simulations of the interaction of cosmic particles with the LISA spacecraft indicate that the diffuse γ-ray contribution to the average steady-state test-mass charging rate and to the single-sided power spectrum of the charge rate noise is marginal with respect to that due to galactic cosmic-rays.

  17. Study of test-mass charging process in the LISA missions due to diffuse gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finetti, N; Scrimaglio, R [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila and Gruppo INFN dell' Aquila collegato ai Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); Grimani, C; Fabi, M, E-mail: noemi.finetti@aquila.infn.i [Istituto di Fisica dell' Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Via S. Chiara, 27, 61029, Urbino (Italy)

    2009-03-01

    Gravitational inertial sensors will be placed on board the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and aboard its precursor mission LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) in order to detect low frequency gravitational waves in space. Free-floating test-masses (Au{sub 7}Pt{sub 3} cubes) will be housed in inertial sensors for detecting possible laser signal variations induced by gravitational waves. Charging of the LISA test-masses due to exposure of the spacecraft to cosmic radiation and energetic solar particles will affect operation of gravitational inertial sensors. In this paper we report on the role of diffuse gamma-rays in charging the LISA and LISA-PF test-masses with respect to protons and helium nuclei. The diffuse gamma-ray flux in the Galaxy has been interpolated taking into account the outcomes of recent calculations. A comparison with gamma-ray observations gathered by different experiments (COMPTEL and EGRET, Milagro, Whipple, HEGRA, TIBET) has been carried out. Simulations of the test-mass charging process have been performed by means of the FLUKA2006.3b package. Monte Carlo simulations of the interaction of cosmic particles with the LISA spacecraft indicate that the diffuse gamma-ray contribution to the average steady-state test-mass charging rate and to the single-sided power spectrum of the charge rate noise is marginal with respect to that due to galactic cosmic-rays.

  18. Drag-free Spacecraft Technologies: criticalities in the initialization of geodesic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Present and future space missions rely on systems of increasingly demanding performance for being successful. Drag-free technology is one of the technologies that is fundamental for LISA-Pathfinder, an ESA mission whose launch is planned for the end of September 2015. A purely drag-free object is defined by the absence of all external forces other than gravity. This is not a natural condition and thus requires a proper design of a spacecraft, whose core is an object in free-fall, called test mass (TM). The purity of the drag-free orbit depends on the spacecraft capability of protecting the TM from disturbances, which indeed has limitations. According to a NASA study, such a concept provides substantial economies for LEO satellites. At the same time, a drag-free motion is required in many missions of fundamental physics. eLISA is an ESA concept mission aimed at opening a new window to the universe, black holes, and massive binary systems by means of gravitational waves. LISA-Pathfinder is in charge of proving ...

  19. LISA: a linear structured system analysis program

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Martinez, Sinuhé; Mader, Theodor; Boukhobza, Taha; Hamelin, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In this paper the program LISA is presented. LISA is a flexible and portable program which has been developed to analyse structural properties of large scale linear and bilinear structured systems. More precisely, the program LISA contains programmed algorithms which allow us to apply recent results in the analysis of structured systems to some particular cases.

  20. Interview with Lisa Shipley. Interviewed by Lisa Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    Lisa Shipley is Vice President of Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism at Merck Research Laboratories. She is responsible for preclinical and clinical ADME activities and molecular biomarker assay development activities at all Merck research sites and support of all programs from discovery through to post-product launch. Prior to joining Merck in 2008, Shipley spent over 20 years at Eli Lilly and Company in roles of increasing responsibility, including the positions of executive director at Lean Six Sigma and vice president of Drug Disposition, PK/PD and Trial Simulations. Shipley obtained her undergraduate degree from McDaniel College and her doctoral degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. This interview was conducted by Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  1. Lisa Jevbratt / Lisa Jevbratt ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jevbratt, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    1967. a. Rootsis sündinud ja USA-s elavast kunstnikust Lisa Jevbrattist ning tema loomingust, 2000. a. jaanuaris tehtud meiliintervjuu kunstnikuga. L. Jevbratt kuulub rühmitusse C5, tema teosed keskenduvad pigem Interneti struktuurile kui selle sisule. Pikemalt võrguteosest "1:1" (2000), mille teemaks on IP-aadressid., lühidalt tööst "The Stillman Project" (1997), kunstniku galeriist "Non-Site"

  2. Lisa Jevbratt / Lisa Jevbratt ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jevbratt, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    1967. a. Rootsis sündinud ja USA-s elavast kunstnikust Lisa Jevbrattist ning tema loomingust, 2000. a. jaanuaris tehtud meiliintervjuu kunstnikuga. L. Jevbratt kuulub rühmitusse C5, tema teosed keskenduvad pigem Interneti struktuurile kui selle sisule. Pikemalt võrguteosest "1:1" (2000), mille teemaks on IP-aadressid., lühidalt tööst "The Stillman Project" (1997), kunstniku galeriist "Non-Site"

  3. Upper limits to surface-force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Ludovico; Ciani, Giacomo; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Tombolato, David; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph; Cavalleri, Antonella

    2007-02-01

    We have measured surface-force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA proof mass surrounded by its capacitive motion sensor. Forces are detected through the torque exerted on the proof mass by means of a torsion pendulum in the 0.1 30 mHz range. The sensor and electronics have the same design as for the flight hardware, including 4 mm gaps around the proof mass. The measured upper limit for forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal-to-noise ratio up to ≈40 for 1 yr integration. We also discuss how LISA Pathfinder will substantially improve this limit, approaching the LISA performance.

  4. Optical testbed for the LISA phasemeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, T. S.; Fernández Barranco, G.; Penkert, D.; Gerberding, O.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2016-05-01

    The planned spaceborne gravitational wave detector LISA will allow the detection of gravitational waves at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. A breadboard model for the metrology system aka the phasemeter was developed in the scope of an ESA technology development project by a collaboration between the Albert Einstein Institute, the Technical University of Denmark and the Danish industry partner Axcon Aps. It in particular provides the electronic readout of the main interferometer phases besides auxiliary functions. These include clock noise transfer, ADC pilot tone correction, inter-satellite ranging and data transfer. Besides in LISA, the phasemeter can also be applied in future satellite geodesy missions. Here we show the planning and advances in the implementation of an optical testbed for the full metrology chain. It is based on an ultra-stable hexagonal optical bench. This bench allows the generation of three unequal heterodyne beatnotes with a zero phase combination, thus providing the possibility to probe the phase readout for non-linearities in an optical three signal test. Additionally, the utilization of three independent phasemeters will allow the testing of the auxiliary functions. Once working, components can individually be replaced with flight-qualified hardware in this setup.

  5. Long Memory of Pathfinding Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a new dynamic (i.e., space-time model to measure aesthetic values in pathfinding for videogames. The results we report are important firstly because the artificial intelligence literature has given relatively little attention to aesthetic considerations in pathfinding. Secondly, those investigators who have studied aesthetics in pathfinding have relied largely on anecdotal arguments rather than metrics. Finally, in those cases where metrics have been used in the past, they show only that aesthetic paths are different. They provide no quantitative means to classify aesthetic outcomes. The model we develop here overcomes these deficiencies using rescaled range (R/S analysis to estimate the Hurst exponent, . It measures long-range dependence (i.e., long memory in stochastic processes and provides a novel well-defined mathematical classification for pathfinding. Indeed, the data indicates that aesthetic and control paths have statistically significantly distinct signatures. Aesthetic paths furthermore have more long memory than controls with an effect size that is large, more than three times that of an alternative approach. These conclusions will be of interest to researchers investigating games as well as other forms of entertainment, simulation, and in general nonshortest path motion planning.

  6. Subtraction of temperature induced phase noise in the LISA frequency band

    CERN Document Server

    Nofrarias, M; Karnesis, N; Garcia, A F; Hewitson, M; Heinzel, G; Danzmann, K

    2013-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations are expected to be one of the limiting factors for gravitational wave detectors in the very low frequency range. Here we report the characterisation of this noise source in the LISA Pathfinder optical bench and propose a method to remove its contribution from the data. Our results show that temperature fluctuations are indeed limiting our measurement below one millihertz, and that their subtraction leads to a factor 5.6 (15 dB) reduction in the noise level at the lower end of the LISA measurement band 10^{-4} Hz, which increases to 20.2 (26 dB) at even lower frequencies, i.e., 1.5x10^{-5} Hz. The method presented here can be applied to the subtraction of other noise sources in gravitational wave detectors in the general situation where multiple sensors are used to characterise the noise source.

  7. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the

  8. The Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Hsu, O. C.; Hanson, J.; Hruby, V.

    The Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is an in-space technology demonstration designed to validate technologies that are required for future missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM). The primary sensors that will be used by DRS are two Gravitational Reference Sensors (GRSs) being developed by Stanford University. DRS will control the spacecraft so that it flies about one of the freely-floating Gravitational Reference Sensor test masses, keeping it centered within its housing. The other GRS serves as a cross-reference for the first as well as being used as a reference for the spacecraft's attitude control. Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters being developed by the Busek Co. will be used to control the spacecraft's position and attitude using a six degree-of-freedom Dynamic Control System being developed by Goddard Space Flight Center. A laser interferometer being built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will be used to help validate the results of the experiment. The DRS will be launched in 2008 on the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder spacecraft along with a similar ESA experiment, the LISA Test Package.

  9. The role of interplanetary electrons at the time of the LISA missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C; Fabi, M [Istituto di Fisica, Universtita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (Italy); Finetti, N [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Tombolato, D, E-mail: catia.grimani@uniurb.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2009-11-07

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) is the first space interferometer devoted to the detection of gravitational waves in the frequency range 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -1} Hz. Free-fall gold-platinum test masses constitute the mirrors of the interferometer. Solar and galactic particles charging the test masses induce spurious forces that might mimic genuine gravitational wave signals. Proton and helium nuclei are more than 98% in composition of both galactic and energetic solar particles. The charging due to these ions was carefully studied. However, highly penetrating interplanetary electrons play a role similar to helium nuclei at solar minimum and balance more than half of the net charge induced by galactic protons at solar maximum. In this paper, we report the study of LISA test-mass charging and radiation monitor countrate due to interplanetary electrons under different conditions of solar modulation and global solar magnetic field (GSMF) polarity. The radiation monitors designed for the LISA precursor mission, LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF), were considered. Solar electrons do not produce any detectable signal in the radiation monitors. No relevant increase in the test-mass charging is generated by solar electrons with respect to protons as well. However, we point out that the detection of electrons of solar origin on-board LISA will allow us to short-forecast incoming, intense solar ion fluxes. An optimized environmental survey would lead us to further improve the test-mass discharging process, reduce the overall noise and, possibly, extend the mission lifetime. Important contributions to solar physics and space-weather investigations will be provided as well.

  10. Delivery of Colloid Micro-Newton Thrusters for the Space Technology 7 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, John K.; Randolph, Thomas M.; Franklin, Garth W.; Hruby, Vlad; Spence, Douglas; Demmons, Nathaniel; Roy, Thomas; Ehrbar, Eric; Zwahlen, Jurg; Martin, Roy; Connolly, William

    2008-01-01

    Two flight-qualified clusters of four Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) systems have been delivered to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The clusters will provide precise spacecraft control for the drag-free technology demonstration mission, Space Technology 7 (ST7). The ST7 mission is sponsored by the NASA New Millennium Program and will demonstrate precision formation flying technologies for future missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The ST7 disturbance reduction system (DRS) will be on the ESA LISA Pathfinder spacecraft using the European gravitational reference sensor (GRS) as part of the ESA LISA Technology Package (LTP). Developed by Busek Co. Inc., with support from JPL in design and testing, the CMNT has been developed over the last six years into a flight-ready and flight-qualified microthruster system, the first of its kind. Recent flight-unit qualification tests have included vibration and thermal vacuum environmental testing, as well as performance verification and acceptance tests. All tests have been completed successfully prior to delivery to JPL. Delivery of the first flight unit occurred in February of 2008 with the second unit following in May of 2008. Since arrival at JPL, the units have successfully passed through mass distribution, magnetic, and EMI/EMC measurements and tests as part of the integration and test (I&T) activities including the integrated avionics unit (IAU). Flight software sequences have been tested and validated with the full flight DRS instrument successfully to the extent possible in ground testing, including full functional and 72 hour autonomous operations tests. Delivery of the cluster assemblies along with the IAU to ESA for integration into the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft is planned for the summer of 2008 with a planned launch and flight demonstration in late 2010.

  11. LISA propulsion module separation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkowitz, S M [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ahmad, A [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hyde, T T [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sweetser, T [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ziemer, J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Conkey, S [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); III, W Kelly [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Shirgur, B [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is a space-borne gravitational wave detector consisting of three sciencecraft in heliocentric orbit. Each sciencecraft is delivered to its operational orbit by a propulsion module. Because of the strict thermal and mass balancing requirements of LISA, the baseline mission concept requires that the propulsion module separate from the sciencecraft after delivery. The only propulsion system currently included in the sciencecraft design are micronewton level thrusters, such as field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) or colloid thrusters, that are used to balance the 30-40 {mu}N of solar radiation pressure and provide the drag-free and attitude control of the sciencecraft. Due to these thrusters' limited authority, the separation of the propulsion module from the sciencecraft must be well controlled to not induce a large tip-off rotation of the sciencecraft. We present here the results of a study of the propulsion module separation system requirements that are necessary to safely deliver the three LISA sciencecraft to their final operational orbits.

  12. The Breadboard Model of the LISA Telescope Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Stefano; Scheulen, Dietmar; Kemper, Daniel; Sippel, Rudolf; Ende, David

    2012-07-01

    The primary goal of the LISA mission is the detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources in a frequency range of 10-4 to 1 Hz. This requires operational stabilities in the picometer range as well as highly predictable mechanical distortions upon cooling down, outgassing in space, and gravity release. In March 2011 ESA announced a new way forward for the L-class candidate missions, including LISA. ESA and the scientific community are now studying options for European-only missions that offer a significant reduction of the costs, while maintaining their core science objectives. In the context of this reformulation exercise LISA has become the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO) [1]. Despite this reformulation, the need for dimensional stability in the picometer range remains valid, and ESA have continued the corresponding LISA Technology Development Activities (TDA’s) also in view of NGO. In such frame Astrium GmbH and xperion (Immenstaad/Friedrichshafen, Germany) have designed and manufactured an ultra-stable CFRP breadboard of the LISA telescope in order to experimentally demonstrate that the structure and the M1 & M2 mirror mounts are fulfilling the LISA requirements in the mission operational thermal environment. Suitable techniques to mount the telescope mirrors and to support the M1 & M2 mirrors have been developed, with the aim of measuring a system CTE of less than 10-7 K-1 during cooling down to -80 °C. Additionally to the stringent mass and stiffness specifications, the required offset design makes the control of relative tilts and lateral displacements between the M1 and M2 mirrors particularly demanding. The thermo-elastic performance of the telescope assembly is going to be experimentally verified by TNO (Delft, The Netherlands) starting from the second half of 2012. This paper addresses challenges faced in the design phase, and shows the resulting hardware.

  13. Heterodyne stabilization as a possible laser frequency stabilization technique for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichholz, Johannes

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is a joint NASA/ESA mission aimed at the detection of gravitational wave radiation in the frequency range from 30 uHz to 0.1 Hz. LISA uses a modified Michelson interferometer setup consisting of three identical spacecraft, arranged in an equilateral triangular constellation. It measures the differential length changes of the 5 · 109 m long interferometer arms between free-floating proof masses housed within each spacecraft. Laser pre-stabilization is required in conjunction with Time-Delay Interferometry data post-processing to monitor the armlength changes with picometer precision. A modulation/demodulation technique to stabilize the frequency of the lasers to an optical reference cavity has been proposed for a long time, but it requires several additional optical components and would need to be built as a separate system. Using a different sensing tech-nique, heterodyne interferometry, we propose a modified stabilization scheme, which similarly transfers the stability of an optical reference cavity to the laser frequency. It only uses com-ponents that are already available in the LISA assembly and can easily be integrated into the optical bench design. A similar stabilization scheme is going to be used in LISA Pathfinder. We will discuss this technique in detail and present initial experimental results, as well as predicted performances on the LISA bench.

  14. ADC non-linear error corrections for low-noise temperature measurements in the LISA band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjuan, J; Lobo, A; Mateos, N [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, CSIC, Fac. de Ciencies, Torre C5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J [Dep. Eng. Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Ed. C4, J Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); DIaz-Aguilo, M, E-mail: sanjuan@ieec.fcr.e [Dep. Fisica Aplicada, UPC, Campus Nord, Ed. B4/B5, J Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Temperature fluctuations degrade the performance of different subsystems in the LISA mission. For instance, they can exert stray forces on the test masses and thus hamper the required drag-free accuracy. Also, the interferometric system performance depends on the stability of the temperature in the optical elements. Therefore, monitoring the temperature in specific points of the LISA subsystems is required. These measurements will be useful to identify the sources of excess noise caused by temperature fluctuations. The required temperature stability is still to be defined, but a figure around 10{mu}K Hz{sup -1/2} from 0.1 mHz to 0.1 Hz can be a good rough guess. The temperature measurement subsystem on board the LISA Pathfinder mission exhibits noise levels of 10{mu}K Hz{sup -1/2} for f >0.1 mHz. For LISA, based on the above hypothesis, the measurement system should overcome limitations related to the analog-to-digital conversion stage which degrades the performance of the measurement when temperature drifts. Investigations on the mitigation of such noise will be here presented.

  15. A Space-Qualified Single Frequency Fiber Laser for LISA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Single frequency high power lasers have been considered to be an enabling technology for NASA's Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). PolarOnyx proposes, for...

  16. LISA telescope spacer design investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan, Josep; Mueller, Guido; Livas, Jeffrey; Preston, Alix; Arsenovic, Petar; Castellucci, Kevin; Generie, Joseph; Howard, Joseph; Stebbins, Robin

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a space-based gravitational wave observa-tory with the goal of observing Gravitational Waves (GWs) from astronomical sources in a frequency range from 30 µHz to 0.1 Hz. The detection of GWs at such low frequency requires measurements of distances at the pico-meter level between bodies separated by 5 million kilo-meters. The LISA mission consists of three identical spacecraft (SC) separated by 5 × 106 km forming an equilateral triangle. Each SC contains two optical assemblies and two vacuum en-closures housing one proof mass (PM) in geodesic (free fall) motion each. The two assemblies on one SC are each pointing towards an identical assembly on each of the other two SC to form a non-equal arm interferometer. The measurement of the GW strain is done by measuring the change in the length of the optical path between the PMs of one arm relative to the other arms caused by the pass of a GW. An important element of the Interferometric Measurement System (IMS) is the telescope which, on one hand, gathers the light coming from the far SC (˜100 pW) and, on the other hand, expands and collimates the small outgoing beam ( 1 W) and sends it to the far SC. Due to the very demanding sensitivity requirements care must be taken in the design and validation of the telescope not to degrade the IMS performance. For instance, the diameter of the telescope sets the the shot noise of the IMS and depends critically on the diameter of the primary and the divergence angle of the outgoing beam. As the telescope is rather fast telescope, the divergence angle is a critical function of the overall separation between the primary and secondary. Any long term changes of the distance of more than a a few micro-meter would be detrimental to the LISA mission. Similarly challenging are the requirements on the in-band path-length noise for the telescope which has to be kept below 1 pm Hz-1/2 in the LISA band. Different configurations (on-axis/off axis

  17. The Mona Lisa effect: is 'our' Lisa fame or fake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Leder, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    This demonstration uses one of the most famous human faces, the portrait of Mona Lisa, La Gioconda, by Leonardo da Vinci. Usually, we have a very accurate and stable representation of the exact configuration of such a familiar face. Typically, we are able to rapidly recognise even subtle configural changes. However, here we show that an exposure to specific alterations performed on a familiar face substantially reduces this ability even over a time period as long as 80 min. This demonstration illustrates the flexibility of the perceptual system and adaptation to new information.

  18. Mona Lisa, lesbiahvid ja seksilaulud / Kaivo Kopli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kopli, Kaivo

    2003-01-01

    Ameerika Teaduse Edendamise Assotsiatsiooni (AAA) konverentsil esitatud uusimatest teadusuuringutest. Artiklid: Mona Lisa naeratuse saladus paljastatud ; Lesbilised Jaapani makaagid seljatavad Darwini ; Linnud õpivad uusi laule uue partneri leidmiseks

  19. Strategic Team AI Path Plans: Probabilistic Pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tng C. H. John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method to generate strategic team AI pathfinding plans for computer games and simulations using probabilistic pathfinding. This method is inspired by genetic algorithms (Russell and Norvig, 2002, in that, a fitness function is used to test the quality of the path plans. The method generates high-quality path plans by eliminating the low-quality ones. The path plans are generated by probabilistic pathfinding, and the elimination is done by a fitness test of the path plans. This path plan generation method has the ability to generate variation or different high-quality paths, which is desired for games to increase replay values. This work is an extension of our earlier work on team AI: probabilistic pathfinding (John et al., 2006. We explore ways to combine probabilistic pathfinding and genetic algorithm to create a new method to generate strategic team AI pathfinding plans.

  20. Characterization of photoreceivers for LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, F Guzman; Livas, J; Silverberg, R; Buchanan, E; Stebbins, R, E-mail: felipe.guzman@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 663, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    LISA will use quadrant photoreceivers as front-end devices for the phasemeter measuring the motion of drag-free test masses in both angular orientation and separation. We have set up a laboratory testbed for the characterization of photoreceivers. Some of the limiting noise sources have been identified and their contribution has been either measured or derived from the measured data. We have built a photoreceiver with a 0.5 mm diameter quadrant photodiode with an equivalent input current noise of better than 1.8 pA Hz{sup -1/2} below 20 MHz and a 3 dB bandwidth of 34 MHz.

  1. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, Chiara; Tamanini, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift 1 lesssim z lesssim 8, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from ΛCDM (i.e. the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at z lesssim 6. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination era, current cosmological probes (especially the cosmic microwave background) are more efficient than eLISA in constraining these models, except possibly in the interacting dark energy model if the energy exchange is proportional to the energy density of dark energy.

  2. Doing Science with eLISA: Astrophysics and Cosmology in the Millihertz Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Amanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N.; Lobo, Albsrto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T.; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Stebbins, Robin; Vallisneri, Michele

    2012-01-01

    clear to those familiar with the previous proposal, as will its incorporation of key elements of hardware from the LISA Pathfinder mission, scheduled for launch by ESA in 2014. But eLISA is fundamentally a new mission, one that will pioneer the completely new science of low-frequency gravitational wave astronomy. 4 of

  3. Disturbance reduction requirements for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    2003-05-01

    An overview is given of the sources and magnitudes of acceleration disturbances to the LISA proof masses (PMs). They are classified according to their sources as environmental noise, PM position sensor back-action, control-loop noise and PM-spacecraft (SC) stiffness. A general control model is used to establish relations among the noise sources, sensor errors and control-loop elements. Quantitative estimates are derived for the noise sources, and minimum requirements are inferred for sensor resolution and SC drag-free control-loop gain that are consistent both with the baseline in-band LISA budget for total acceleration noise and a possible extension to lower frequencies. For brevity, explicit expressions for each noise source are provided in tables, together with quantitative estimates for indicated parameter values. Additional tables list assumed parameter definitions and values; acceleration-noise goals and estimated totals; and minimum requirements for sensor resolution and SC control-loop gain, for frequencies ranging from 3 mHz down to 5 × 10-6 Hz.

  4. Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2009-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are central to many key science objectives of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). For many systems the strongest part of the signal is only understood by numerical simulations. Gravitational wave emissions are understood by simulations of vacuum General Relativity (GR). I discuss numerical simulation results from the perspective of LISA's needs, with indications of work that remains to be done. Some exciting scientific opportunities associated with LISA observations would be greatly enhanced if prompt electromagnetic signature could be associated. I discuss simulations to explore this possibility. Numerical simulations are important now for clarifying LISA's science potential and planning the mission. We also consider how numerical simulations might be applied at the time of LISA's operation.

  5. Thematic Categorization and Analysis of Peer Reviewed Articles in the LISA Database, 2004-2005. A Review of: Gonzalez-Alcaide, Gregorio, Lourdes Castello-Cogolles, Carolina Navarro-Molina, et al. “Library and Information Science Research Areas: Analysis of Journal Articles in LISA.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 59.1 (2008: 150-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Perryman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To provide an updated categorization of Library and Information Science (LIS publications and to identify trends in LIS research.Design – Bibliometric study.Setting – The Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA database via the CSA Illumina interface.Subjects – 11,273 item records published from 2004-2005 and indexed in LISA.Methods – First, a search was set up to retrieve all records from 2004-2005, limited to peer review items (called “arbitrated works” by the authors (150 and excluding book reviews. Second, thematic descriptor terms used for the records were identified. Frequency counts for descriptor term occurrence were compiled using Microsoft Access and Pajek software programs. From the results of this search, the top terms were analyzed using the Kamada-Kawai algorithm in order to eliminate descriptor term co-occurrence frequencies under 30. A cluster analysis was used to depict thematic foci for the remaining records, providing a co-word network that visually identified topic areas of most frequent publication. Conclusions were drawn from these findings, and recommendations for further research were provided.Main Results – The authors identified 18 “thematic research core fields” (152 clustered around three large categories, “World Wide Web”, “Education”, and “Libraries”, plus 12 additional peripheral categories, and provided a schematic of field interrelationships.Conclusion – Domains of greatest focus for research “continue to be of practical and applied nature,” (153 but include increased emphasis on the World Wide Web and communications technologies, as well as on user studies. A table of the most frequently occurring areas of research along with their top three descriptor terms is provided (Table1, 152 (e.g., “World Wide Web” as the top area of research, with “online information retrieval” (268 occurrences, “searching” (132 occurrences, and “web sites” (115

  6. Birdseye View of Pathfinder Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This image is one frame of an animation that was created by using two mosaics: a color image of the Gallery Pan and an image which indicates the distance to the nearest object at each pixel location, referred to as a range image. The range data set is treated as a displacement map with respect to a sphere's surface, and the color image mosaic is draped onto the inside of the sphere. The position of the camera is fixed at the sphere's center, while its viewing direction is in this case looking at the south pole of the sphere. The mosaics were projected onto a continuous cylindrical/perspective coordinate system spanning 360 degrees of azimuth. The distortion visible near the edges of this image is due to the large field of view, as well as the limitation introduced by using cylindrically-projected images on the sphere - the effects of which are less apparent when smaller fields of view are used.The image has been rotated so that the main points of interest, which are the 'Rock Garden,' the rover Sojourner and the rock 'Yogi,' are easily seen arching across the upper hemisphere. In fixed Mars Surface coordinates, the top of the image looks out towards a point a few degrees north of West. Color has been enhanced to improve contrast in features, and is derived from IMP spectral filters 5, 9 and 0.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  7. Symbolic PathFinder v7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckow, Kasper Søe; Păsăreanu, Corina

    2014-01-01

    We describe Symbolic PathFinder v7 in terms of its updated design addressing the changes of Java PathFinder v7 and of its new optimization when computing path conditions. Furthermore, we describe the Symbolic Execution Tree Extension; a newly added feature that allows for outputting the symbolic ...

  8. What makes Mona Lisa smile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontsevich, Leonid L; Tyler, Christopher W

    2004-01-01

    To study the ability of humans to read subtle changes in facial expression, we applied reverse correlation technique to reveal visual features that mediate understanding of emotion expressed by the face. Surprising findings were that (1) the noise added to a test face image had profound effect on the facial expression and (2) in almost every instance the new expression was meaningful. To quantify the effect, we asked naïve observers to rank the face of Mona Lisa superimposed with noise, based on their perception of her emotional state along the sad/happy dimension. Typically, a hundred trials (with 10 or more samples for each rank category) were sufficient to reveal areas altering the facial expression, which is about two orders of magnitude less than in the other reverse correlation studies. Moreover, the perception of smiling in the eyes was solely attributable to a configurational effect projecting from the mouth region.

  9. Fiber laser development for LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kenji [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 20742 (United States); Chen, Jeffrey R [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laser and electro-optics branch, Code 554, Greenbelt, Maryland, 20771 (United States); Camp, Jordan, E-mail: kenji.numata@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Gravitational astrophysics branch, Code 663, Greenbelt, Maryland, 20771 (United States)

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064 nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100 kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  10. Fiber laser development for LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  11. Fiber Laser Development for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  12. LISA (Localhost Information Service Agent)

    CERN Document Server

    Legrand, Iosif C; Voicu, Ramiro; Stratan, Corina; Cirstoiu, Catalin; Musat, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Grid computing has gained an increasing importance in the last years, especially in the academic environments, offering the possibility to rapidly solve complex scientific problems. The monitoring of the Grid jobs has a vital importance for analyzing the system's performance, for providing the users an appropriate feed-back, and for obtaining historical data which may be used for performance prediction. Several monitoring systems have been developed, with different strategies to collect and store the information. We shall present here a solution based on MonALISA, a distributed service for monitoring, control and global optimization of complex systems, and LISA, a component application of MonALISA which can help in optimizing other applications by means of monitoring services. The advantages of this system are, among others, flexibility, dynamic configuration, high communication performance.

  13. Technology Development Roadmap: A Technology Development Roadmap for a Future Gravitational Wave Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Conklin, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; McKenzie, Kirk; Mueller, Guido; Mueller, Juergen; Thorpe, James Ira; Arsenovic, Peter; Baker, John; Bender, Peter; Brinker, Edward; Crow, John; Spero, Robert; deVine Glenn; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Humankind will detect the first gravitational wave (GW) signals from the Universe in the current decade using ground-based detectors. But the richest trove of astrophysical information lies at lower frequencies in the spectrum only accessible from space. Signals are expected from merging massive black holes throughout cosmic history, from compact stellar remnants orbiting central galactic engines from thousands of close contact binary systems in the Milky Way, and possibly from exotic sources, some not yet imagined. These signals carry essential information not available from electromagnetic observations, and which can be extracted with extraordinary accuracy. For 20 years, NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and an international research community have put considerable effort into developing concepts and technologies for a GW mission. Both the 2000 and 2010 decadal surveys endorsed the science and mission concept of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). A partnership of the two agencies defined and analyzed the concept for a decade. The agencies partnered on LISA Pathfinder (LPF), and ESA-led technology demonstration mission, now preparing for a 2015 launch. Extensive technology development has been carried out on the ground. Currently, the evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) concept, a LISA-like concept with only two measurement arms, is competing for ESA's L2 opportunity. NASA's Astrophysics Division seeks to be a junior partner if eLISA is selected. If eLISA is not selected, then a LISA-like mission will be a strong contender in the 2020 decadal survey. This Technology Development Roadmap (TDR) builds on the LISA concept development, the LPF technology development, and the U.S. and European ground-based technology development. The eLISA architecture and the architecture of the Mid-sized Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO Mid)-a competitive design with three measurement arms from the recent design study for a NASA

  14. Pathfinder - flight preparation on lakebed at sunrise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Crew members prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for its first flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its configuration was changed from 8 motors to 6. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  15. Pathfinder on lakebed preparing for test flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Support crew prepare the Pathfinder solar-powered aircraft for a research flight on Rogers Dry Lake at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  16. True Color of Mars - Pathfinder Sol 39 Sunrise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Sunrise, sol 39. This true color, pre-sunrise image (approximately 0530LST) is composed of six images extending 30 o in azimuth and 45 o in elevation and shows the brownish gray predawn sky. A description of the techniques used to generate this color image from IMP data can be found in Maki et al., 1999. Note: a calibrated output device is required accurately reproduce the correct colors.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  17. Demonstration of the zero-crossing phasemeter with a LISA test-bed interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S. E.; Stebbins, R. T.

    2006-06-01

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is being designed to detect and study in detail gravitational waves from sources throughout the Universe such as massive black hole binaries. The conceptual formulation of the LISA space-borne gravitational wave detector is now well developed. The interferometric measurements between the sciencecraft remain one of the most important technological and scientific design areas for the mission. Our work has concentrated on developing the interferometric technologies to create a LISA-like optical signal and to measure the phase of that signal using commercially available instruments. One of the most important goals of this research is to demonstrate the LISA phase timing and phase reconstruction for a LISA-like fringe signal, in the case of a high fringe rate and a low signal level. We present current results of a test-bed interferometer designed to produce an optical LISA-like fringe signal previously discussed in Jennrich O, Stebbins R T, Bender P L and Pollack S (2001 Class. Quantum Grav. 18 4159 64) and Pollack S E, Jennrich O, Stebbins R T and Bender P (2003 Class. Quantum Grav. 20 S291 00).

  18. Demonstration of the zero-crossing phasemeter with a LISA test-bed interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, S E [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Stebbins, R T [NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2006-06-21

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is being designed to detect and study in detail gravitational waves from sources throughout the Universe such as massive black hole binaries. The conceptual formulation of the LISA space-borne gravitational wave detector is now well developed. The interferometric measurements between the sciencecraft remain one of the most important technological and scientific design areas for the mission. Our work has concentrated on developing the interferometric technologies to create a LISA-like optical signal and to measure the phase of that signal using commercially available instruments. One of the most important goals of this research is to demonstrate the LISA phase timing and phase reconstruction for a LISA-like fringe signal, in the case of a high fringe rate and a low signal level. We present current results of a test-bed interferometer designed to produce an optical LISA-like fringe signal previously discussed in Jennrich O, Stebbins R T, Bender P L and Pollack S (2001 Class. Quantum Grav. 18 4159-64) and Pollack S E, Jennrich O, Stebbins R T and Bender P (2003 Class. Quantum Grav. 20 S291-00)

  19. A demonstration of LISA laser communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, S E [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Stebbins, R T [NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2006-06-21

    Over the past few years, questions have been raised concerning the use of laser communications links between sciencecraft to transmit phase information crucial to the reduction of laser frequency noise in the LISA science measurement. The concern is that applying medium frequency phase modulations to the laser carrier could compromise the phase stability of the LISA fringe signal. We have modified the table-top interferometer presented in Pollack and Stebbins (2006 Demonstration of the zero-crossing phasemeter with a LISA test-bed interferometer Class. Quantum Grav.) by applying phase modulations to the laser beams in order to evaluate the effects of such modulations on the LISA science fringe signal. We have demonstrated that the phase resolution of the science signal is not degraded by the presence of medium frequency phase modulations.

  20. A demonstration of LISA laser communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S. E.; Stebbins, R. T.

    2006-06-01

    Over the past few years, questions have been raised concerning the use of laser communications links between sciencecraft to transmit phase information crucial to the reduction of laser frequency noise in the LISA science measurement. The concern is that applying medium frequency phase modulations to the laser carrier could compromise the phase stability of the LISA fringe signal. We have modified the table-top interferometer presented in Pollack and Stebbins (2006 Demonstration of the zero-crossing phasemeter with a LISA test-bed interferometer Class. Quantum Grav.) by applying phase modulations to the laser beams in order to evaluate the effects of such modulations on the LISA science fringe signal. We have demonstrated that the phase resolution of the science signal is not degraded by the presence of medium frequency phase modulations.

  1. Lisa's Lemonade Stand: Exploring Algebraic Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Esther M. H.; Lakatos, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity, "Lisa's Lemonade Stand," that actively engages students in algebraic thinking as they analyze change by investigating relationships between variables and gain experience describing and representing these relationships graphically. (YDS)

  2. Lisa's Lemonade Stand: Exploring Algebraic Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Esther M. H.; Lakatos, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity, "Lisa's Lemonade Stand," that actively engages students in algebraic thinking as they analyze change by investigating relationships between variables and gain experience describing and representing these relationships graphically. (YDS)

  3. Constraining early and interacting dark energy with gravitational wave standard sirens: the potential of the eLISA mission

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the capability of the eLISA space-based interferometer to constrain models of early and interacting dark energy using gravitational wave standard sirens. We employ simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by eLISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. We consider three-arms mission designs with arm length of 1, 2 and 5 million km, 5 years of mission duration and the best-level low frequency noise as recently tested by the LISA Pathfinder. Standard sirens with eLISA give access to an intermediate range of redshift $1\\lesssim z \\lesssim 8$, and can therefore provide competitive constraints on models where the onset of the deviation from $\\Lambda$CDM (i.e.~the epoch when early dark energy starts to be non-negligible, or when the interaction with dark matter begins) occurs relatively late, at $z\\lesssim 6$. If instead early or interacting dark energy is relevant already in the pre-recombination er...

  4. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pathfinder NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  5. Using Map Decomposition to Improve Pathfinding

    OpenAIRE

    Kári Halldórsson 1979

    2015-01-01

    Artificial intelligence in games performs computationally expensive searches in large state spaces, i.e. for pathfinding and strategic decisions. Breaking the state space down into regions, with clear connections, can greatly benefit these algorithms, allowing decision making on a higher level and guiding searches in a more focused way through the search space. We present an improved heuristic for pathfinding search that takes advantage of such decompositions, as well as a fully automated m...

  6. Lisa-S 2.8g autopilot for GPS-based flight of MAVs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remes , B.D.W.; Esden-Tempski , P.; Van Tienen , F.; Smeur , E.; De Wagter , C.; De Croon, G.C.H.E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor miniaturization have enabled the development of a miniaturized fully functional autopilot. In this article, the open hardware and open software Paparazzi-UAV Lisa-S micro autopilot is presented, weighing only 2.8 grams and measuring 2 by 2 centimeters. It incorporates 2-way

  7. Self-gravity modelling for LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Haile, William B [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Conkey, Shelly [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); III, William Kelly [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Peabody, Hume [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, a space-based gravitational wave detector, uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three sciencecraft. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 x 10{sup -15} m s{sup -2} Hz{sup -1/2} at 0.1 mHz. Self-gravity noise due to sciencecraft distortion and motion is expected to be a significant contributor to the acceleration noise budget. To minimize these effects, the gravitational field at each proof mass must be kept as small, flat and constant as possible. It is estimated that the static (non-fluctuating) self-gravity acceleration must be kept below 5 x 10{sup -10} m s{sup -2} with a gradient below 3 x 10{sup -8} s{sup -2} in order to meet the required noise levels. Most likely it will not be possible to directly verify that the LISA sciencecraft meets these requirements by measurements; they must be verified by models. The LISA integrated modelling team developed a new self-gravity tool that calculates the gravitational forces and moments on the proof masses to aid in the design and verification of the LISA sciencecraft. We present here an overview of the tool and the latest self-gravity results calculated using the current baseline design of LISA.

  8. Mona Lisa: the enigma of the smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, J E

    1992-11-01

    The Mona Lisa, painted by Leonardo Da Vinci, 1503, pictures a smile that has been long the subject of conjecture. It is believed, however, that the Mona Lisa does not smile; she wears an expression common to people who have lost their front teeth. A closeup of the lip area shows a scar that is not unlike that left by the application of blunt force. The changes evident in the perioral area are such that occur when the anterior teeth are lost. The scar under the lower lip of the Mona Lisa is similar to that created, when, as a result of force, the incisal edges of the teeth have pierced the face with a penetrating wound.

  9. LISA parameter estimation using numerical merger waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorpe, J I; McWilliams, S T; Kelly, B J; Fahey, R P; Arnaud, K; Baker, J G, E-mail: James.I.Thorpe@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-05-07

    Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of coalescing massive black hole binaries (MBHBs), expected to be the strongest detectable LISA sources. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to MBHB parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform for equal-mass, non-spinning holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response, and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of 10{sup 6} M{sub o-dot} at a redshift of z approx 1 were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two for signals with merger as compared to signals truncated at the Schwarzchild ISCO.

  10. LISA parameter estimation using numerical merger waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Thorpe, J I; Kelly, B J; Fahey, R P; Arnaud, K; Baker, J G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of coalescing massive black hole binaries (MBHBs), expected to be the strongest detectable LISA sources. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to MBHB parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform for equal-mass, non-spinning holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of one million Solar masses at a redshift of one were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two for signals with merger as compared to signals truncated at the Schwarzchild ISCO.

  11. Recent results from MoNA-LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Artemisia

    2012-03-01

    Studies of the nuclear properties of nuclei close and even beyond the limits of stability have revealed exotic modes of decay and new structural characteristics. The MoNA-LISA array is used at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University to study nuclei along the neutron dripline. In a typical experiment, a radioactive beam is employed to produce the neutron-unbound state of interest. This state/resonance immediately decay into a neutron, which is detected by MoNA-LISA and a remaining charged nucleus detected by the sweeper magnet detector suite. In this talk, new exciting findings from recent MoNA-LISA experiments will be presented. These include the first observation of a dineutron decay from ^16Be, the exploration of the ``south shore'' of the Island of Inversion and the first evidence of the decay of the troubling nucleus ^26O.

  12. Reconstructing the dark sector interaction with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Tamanini, Nicola; Yang, Tao

    2017-05-01

    We perform a forecast analysis of the ability of the LISA space-based interferometer to reconstruct the dark sector interaction using gravitational wave standard sirens at high redshift. We employ Gaussian process methods to reconstruct the distance-redshift relation in a model independent way. We adopt simulated catalogues of standard sirens given by merging massive black hole binaries visible by LISA, with an electromagnetic counterpart detectable by future telescopes. The catalogues are based on three different astrophysical scenarios for the evolution of massive black hole mergers based on the semi-analytic model of E. Barausse, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 423 (2012) 2533. We first use these standard siren datasets to assess the potential of LISA in reconstructing a possible interaction between vacuum dark energy and dark matter. Then we combine the LISA cosmological data with supernovae data simulated for the Dark Energy Survey. We consider two scenarios distinguished by the time duration of the LISA mission: 5 and 10 years. Using only LISA standard siren data, the dark sector interaction can be well reconstructed from redshift z~1 to z~3 (for a 5 years mission) and z~1 up to z~5 (for a 10 years mission), though the reconstruction is inefficient at lower redshift. When combined with the DES datasets, the interaction is well reconstructed in the whole redshift region from 0z~ to z~3 (5 yr) and z~0 to z~5 (10 yr), respectively. Massive black hole binary standard sirens can thus be used to constrain the dark sector interaction at redshift ranges not reachable by usual supernovae datasets which probe only the zlesssim 1.5 range. Gravitational wave standard sirens will not only constitute a complementary and alternative way, with respect to familiar electromagnetic observations, to probe the cosmic expansion, but will also provide new tests to constrain possible deviations from the standard ΛCDM dynamics, especially at high redshift.

  13. Optimal Source Tracking and Beaming of LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Pai, A

    2007-01-01

    We revisit the directionally optimal data streams of LISA first introduced in Nayak etal. It was shown that by using appropriate choice of Time delay interferometric (TDI) combinations, a monochromatic fixed source in the barycentric frame can be optimally tracked in the LISA frame. In this work, we study the beaming properties of these optimal streams. We show that all the three streams V+, Vx and Vo with maximum, minimum and zero directional SNR respectively are highly beamed. We study in detail the frequency dependence of the beaming.

  14. Mona Lisa kuulsa naeratuse saladus leidis lahenduse / Johannes Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Johannes, 1965-

    2004-01-01

    Firenze kunstiajalooõpetaja Giuseppe Pallanti jõudis 25-aastase arhiivitöö tulemusena järeldusele, et Leonardo da Vinci Mona Lisa modelliks on siidikaupmehe Francesco del Giocondo abikaasa Lisa Gerardini

  15. Mona Lisa kuulsa naeratuse saladus leidis lahenduse / Johannes Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Johannes, 1965-

    2004-01-01

    Firenze kunstiajalooõpetaja Giuseppe Pallanti jõudis 25-aastase arhiivitöö tulemusena järeldusele, et Leonardo da Vinci Mona Lisa modelliks on siidikaupmehe Francesco del Giocondo abikaasa Lisa Gerardini

  16. The Mars Pathfinder Mission and Science Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, the first low-cost, quick Discovery class mission to be completed, successfully landed on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, deployed and navigated a small rover, and collected data from 3 science instruments and 10 technology experiments. The mission operated on Mars for 3 months and returned 2.3 Gbits of new data, including over 16,500 lander and 550 rover images, 16 chemical analyses of rocks and soil, and 8.5 million individual temperature, pressure and wind measurements. The rover traversed 100 m clockwise around the lander, exploring about 200 square meters of the surface. The mission captured the imagination of the public, and garnered front page headlines during the first week. A total of about 566 million internet "hits" were registered during the first month of the mission, with 47 million "hits" on July 8th alone, making the Pathfinder landing by far the largest internet event in history at the time. Pathfinder was the first mission to deploy a rover on Mars. It carried a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which provided a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The combination of spectral imaging of the landing area by the lander camera, chemical analyses aboard the rover, and close-up imaging of colors, textures and fabrics with the rover cameras offered the potential of identifying rocks (petrology and mineralogy). With this payload, a landing site in Ares Vallis was selected because it appeared acceptably safe and offered the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types expected to be deposited by catastrophic floods, which enabled addressing first-order scientific questions such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early Martian environment and its subsequent evolution. The 3 instruments and rover allowed seven areas of scientific investigation: the

  17. Thematic Categorization and Analysis of Peer Reviewed Articles in the LISA Database, 2004-2005. A Review of: Gonzalez-Alcaide, Gregorio, Lourdes Castello-Cogolles, Carolina Navarro-Molina, et al. “Library and Information Science Research Areas: Analysis of Journal Articles in LISA.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 59.1 (2008): 150-4.

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Perryman

    2009-01-01

    Objective – To provide an updated categorization of Library and Information Science (LIS) publications and to identify trends in LIS research.Design – Bibliometric study.Setting – The Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA) database via the CSA Illumina interface.Subjects – 11,273 item records published from 2004-2005 and indexed in LISA.Methods – First, a search was set up to retrieve all records from 2004-2005, limited to peer review items (called “arbitrated works” by the authors...

  18. Improved analytic extreme-mass-ratio inspiral model for scoping out eLISA data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Chua, Alvin J K

    2015-01-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave detector eLISA has been selected as the ESA L3 mission, and the mission design will be finalised by the end of this decade. To prepare for mission formulation over the next few years, several outstanding and urgent questions in data analysis will be addressed using mock data challenges, informed by instrument measurements from the LISA Pathfinder satellite launching at the end of 2015. These data challenges will require accurate and computationally affordable waveform models for anticipated sources such as the extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) of stellar-mass compact objects into massive black holes. Previous data challenges have made use of the well-known analytic EMRI waveforms of Barack and Cutler, which are extremely quick to generate but dephase relative to more accurate waveforms within hours, due to their mismatched radial, polar and azimuthal frequencies. In this paper, we describe an augmented Barack-Cutler model that uses a frequency map to the correct Kerr freq...

  19. Surviving on Mars: test with LISA simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Galletta, G; Bertoloni, G; Castellani, F; Visentin, R

    2009-01-01

    We present the biological results of some experiments performed in the Padua simulators of planetary environments, named LISA, used to study the limit of bacterial life on the planet Mars. The survival of Bacillus strains for some hours in Martian environment is shortly discussed.

  20. Visualizing and analyzing the Mona Lisa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgeat, Louis; Godin, Guy; Massicotte, Philippe; Poirier, Guillaume; Blais, François; Beraldin, J Angelo

    2007-01-01

    Size and scale issues present a complexity problem in visualizing detailed 3D models built from sensor data. A model of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, with its thin pictorial layer, illustrates the need for intuitive real-time processing tools that are seamlessly integrated with a multiresolution visualization environment.

  1. Progress in Interferometry for LISA at JPL

    CERN Document Server

    Spero, Robert; de Vine, Glenn; Dickson, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; Ozawa, Tetsuo; McKenzie, Kirk; Shaddock, Daniel; Robison, David; Sutton, Andrew; Ware, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances at JPL in experimentation and design for LISA interferometry include the demonstration of Time Delay Interferometry using electronically separated end stations, a new arm-locking design with improved gain and stability, and progress in flight readiness of digital and analog electronics for phase measurements.

  2. Progress in interferometry for LISA at JPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spero, Robert; Bachman, Brian; De Vine, Glenn; Dickson, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; Ozawa, Tetsuo; McKenzie, Kirk; Shaddock, Daniel; Robison, David; Ware, Brent [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sutton, Andrew, E-mail: robert.spero@jpl.nasa.gov [Centre for Gravitational Physics, The Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-05-07

    Recent advances at JPL in experimentation and design for LISA interferometry include the demonstration of time delay interferometry using electronically separated end stations, a new arm-locking design with improved gain and stability, and progress in flight readiness of digital and analog electronics for phase measurements.

  3. The Mona Lisa of modern science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Martin

    2003-01-23

    No molecule in the history of science has reached the iconic status of the double helix of DNA. Its image has been imprinted on all aspects of society, from science, art, music, cinema, architecture and advertising. This review of the Mona Lisa of science examines the evolution of its form at the hands of both science and art.

  4. Engineering the LISA Project: Systems Engineering Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jordan P.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint NASA/ESA mission to detect and measure gravitational waves with periods from 1 s to 10000 s. The systems engineering challenges of developing a giant interferometer, 5 million kilometers on a side, an: numerous. Some of the key challenges are presented in this paper. The organizational challenges imposed by sharing the engineering function between three centers (ESA ESTEC, NASA GSFC, and JPL) across nine time zones are addressed. The issues and approaches to allocation of the acceleration noise and measurement sensitivity budget terms across a traditionally decomposed system are discussed. Additionally, using LISA to detect gravitational waves for the first time presents significant data analysis challenges, many of which drive the project system design. The approach to understanding the implications of science data analysis on the system is also addressed.

  5. Mapping the Milky Way Galaxy with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Jose A.; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors in the mHz band (such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, or LISA) will observe thousands of compact binaries in the galaxy which can be used to better understand the structure of the Milky Way. To test the effectiveness of LISA to measure the distribution of the galaxy, we simulated the Close White Dwarf Binary (CWDB) gravitational wave sky using different models for the Milky Way. To do so, we have developed a galaxy density distribution modeling code based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The code uses different distributions to construct realizations of the galaxy. We then use the Fisher Information Matrix to estimate the variance and covariance of the recovered parameters for each detected CWDB. This is the first step toward characterizing the capabilities of space-based gravitational wave detectors to constrain models for galactic structure, such as the size and orientation of the bar in the center of the Milky Way

  6. Measuring Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    The coalescence of two massive black holes produces gravitational waves (GWs) which can be detected by the space-based detector LISA. By measuring these waves, LISA can determine the various parameters which characterize the source. Measurements of the black hole masses and spins will provide information about the growth of black holes and their host galaxies over time. Measurements of a source's sky position and distance may help astronomers identify an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW event. The counterpart's redshift, combined with the GW-measured luminosity distance, can then be used to measure the Hubble constant and the dark energy parameter $w$. Because the potential science output is so high, it is useful to know in advance how well LISA can measure source parameters for a wide range of binaries. We calculate expected parameter estimation errors using the well-known Fisher matrix method. Our waveform model includes the physics of spin precession, as well as subleading harmonics. When these higher-order effects are not included, strong degeneracies between some parameters cause them to be poorly determined by a GW measurement. When precession and subleading harmonics are properly included, the degeneracies are broken, reducing parameter errors by one to several orders of magnitude.

  7. Testing Alternative Theories of Gravity using LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Will, Clifford M

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the possible bounds which could be placed on alternative theories of gravity using gravitational wave detection from inspiralling compact binaries with the proposed LISA space interferometer. Specifically, we estimate lower bounds on the coupling parameter \\omega of scalar-tensor theories of the Brans-Dicke type and on the Compton wavelength of the graviton \\lambda_g in hypothetical massive graviton theories. In these theories, modifications of the gravitational radiation damping formulae or of the propagation of the waves translate into a change in the phase evolution of the observed gravitational waveform. We obtain the bounds through the technique of matched filtering, employing the LISA Sensitivity Curve Generator (SCG), available online. For a neutron star inspiralling into a 10^3 M_sun black hole in the Virgo Cluster, in a two-year integration, we find a lower bound \\omega > 3 * 10^5. For lower-mass black holes, the bound could be as large as 2 * 10^6. The bound is independent of LISA arm...

  8. General relativistic treatment of LISA optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Dhurandhar, S V; Nayak, K Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    LISA is a joint space mission of the NASA and the ESA for detecting low frequency gravitational waves in the band $10^{-5} - 1$ Hz. In order to attain the requisite sensitivity for LISA, the laser frequency noise must be suppressed below the other secondary noises such as the optical path noise, acceleration noise etc. This is achieved by combining time-delayed data for which precise knowledge of time-delays is required. The gravitational field, mainly that of the Sun and the motion of LISA affect the time-delays and the optical links. Further, the effect of the gravitational field of the Earth on the orbits of spacecraft is included. This leads to additional flexing over and above that of the Sun. We have written a numerical code which computes the optical links, that is, the time-delays with great accuracy $\\sim 10^{-2}$ metres - more than what is required for time delay interferometry (TDI) - for most of the orbit and with sufficient accuracy within $\\sim 10$ metres for an integrated time window of about s...

  9. Direction Oriented Pathfinding In Video Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Cui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathfinding has been one of major research areas in video games for many years. It is a key problem that most video games are confronted with. Search algorithm such as Dijkstra’s algorithm and A* algorithm are representing only half of the picture. The underlying map representations such as regular grid, visibility graph and navigation mesh also have significant impact on the performance. This paper reviews the current widely used solutions for pathfinding and proposes a new method which is expected to generate a higher quality path using less time and memory than other existing solutions. The deployment of methodology and techniques is described in detail. The aim and significance of the proposed method in future video games is addressed and the conclusion is given at the end.

  10. Darwin Meets Einstein: LISA Data Analysis Using Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, J; Reddinger, L; Cornish, Neil J.; Crowder, Jeff; Reddinger, Lucas

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the first application of the method of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) to data analysis for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). In the low frequency regime of the LISA band there are expected to be tens of thousands galactic binary systems that will be emitting gravitational waves detectable by LISA. The challenge of parameter extraction of such a large number of sources in the LISA data stream requires a search method that can efficiently explore the large parameter spaces involved. As signals of many of these sources will overlap, a global search method is desired. GAs represent such a global search method for parameter extraction of multiple overlapping sources in the LISA data stream. We find that GAs are able to correctly extract source parameters for overlapping sources. Several optimizations of a basic GA are presented with results derived from applications of the GA searches to simulated LISA data.

  11. A Bayesian-style approach to estimating LISA science capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Marsat, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    A full understanding of LISA's science capability will require accurate models of incident waveform signals and the instrumental response. While Fisher matrix analysis is useful for some estimates, a Bayesian characterization of simulated probability distributions is needed for understanding important cases at the limit of LISA's capability. We apply fast analysis algorithms enabling accurate treatment using EOB waveforms with relevant higher modes and the full-featured LISA response to study these aspects of LISA science capability. Supported by NASA grant 11-ATP-046.

  12. Constraining Gravity with LISA Detections of Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizares, P.; Gair, J. R.; Sopuerta, C. F.

    2013-01-01

    General Relativity (GR) describes gravitation well at the energy scales which we have so far been able to achieve or detect. However, we do not know whether GR is behind the physics governing stronger gravitational field regimes, such as near neutron stars or massive black-holes (MBHs). Gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy is a promising tool to test and validate GR and/or potential alternative theories of gravity. The information that a GW waveform carries not only will allow us to map the strong gravitational field of its source, but also determine the theory of gravity ruling its dynamics. In this work, we explore the extent to which we could distinguish between GR and other theories of gravity through the detection of low-frequency GWs from extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) and, in particular, we focus on dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity (DCSMG). To that end, we develop a framework that enables us, for the first time, to perform a parameter estimation analysis for EMRIs in DCSMG. Our model is described by a 15-dimensional parameter space, that includes the Chern-Simons (CS) parameter which characterises the deviation between the two theories, and our analysis is based on Fisher information matrix techniques together with a (maximum-mismatch) criterion to assess the validity of our results. In our analysis, we study a 5-dimensional parameter space, finding that a GW detector like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) or eLISA (evolved LISA) should be able to discriminate between GR and DCSMG with fractional errors below 5%, and hence place bounds four orders of magnitude better than current Solar System bounds.

  13. Direct Reactions with MoNA-LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchera, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear reactions can be used to probe the structure of nuclei. Direct reactions, which take place on short time scales, are well-suited for experiments with beams of short-lived nuclei. One such reaction is nucleon knockout where a proton or neutron is removed from the incoming beam from the interaction with a target. Single nucleon knockout reactions have been used to study the single-particle nature of nuclear wave functions. A recent experiment at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory was performed to measure cross sections from single nucleon knockout reactions for several p-shell nuclei. Detection of the residual nucleus in coincidence with any gamma rays emitted from the target allowed cross sections to ground and excited states to be measured. Together with input from reaction theory, ab initio structure theories can be tested. Simultaneously the accuracy of knockout reaction models can be validated by detecting the knocked out neutron with the Modular Neutron Array and Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (MoNA-LISA). Preliminary results from this experiment will be shown. Knockout reactions can also be used to populate nuclei which are neutron unbound, thus emit neutrons nearly instantaneously. The structure of these nuclei, therefore, cannot be probed with gamma ray spectroscopy. However, with large neutron detectors like MoNA-LISA the properties of these short-lived nuclei are able to be measured. Recent results using MoNA-LISA to study the structure of neutron-rich nuclei will be presented. The author would like to acknowledge support from the NNSA and NSF.

  14. The pLISA project in ASTERICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, Giulia; Bozza, Cristiano

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of Horizon 2020, the European Commission approved the ASTERICS initiative (ASTronomy ESFRI and Research Infrastructure CluSter) to collect knowledge and experiences from astronomy, astrophysics and particle physics and foster synergies among existing research infrastructures and scientific communities, hence paving the way for future ones. ASTERICS aims at producing a common set of tools and strategies to be applied in Astronomy ESFRI facilities. In particular, it will target the so-called multi-messenger approach to combine information from optical and radio telescopes, photon counters and neutrino telescopes. pLISA is a software tool under development in ASTERICS to help and promote machine learning as a unified approach to multivariate analysis of astrophysical data and signals. The library will offer a collection of classification parameters, estimators, classes and methods to be linked and used in reconstruction programs (and possibly also extended), to characterize events in terms of particle identification and energy. The pLISA library aims at offering the software infras tructure for applications developed inside different experiments and has been designed with an effort to extrapolate general, physics-related estimators from the specific features of the data model related to each particular experiment. pLISA is oriented towards parallel computing architectures, with awareness of the opportunity of using GPUs as accelerators demanding specifically optimized algorithms and to reduce the costs of pro cessing hardware requested for the reconstruction tasks. Indeed, a fast (ideally, real-time) reconstruction can open the way for the development or improvement of alert systems, typically required by multi-messenger search programmes among the different experi mental facilities involved in ASTERICS.

  15. P-LISA技术%P-LISA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恩; 齐锦生

    2010-01-01

    原位邻近式连接分析(proximity ligation in situ assay,P-LISA)是一种用来研究蛋白质-蛋白质相互作用的新方法.该方法能够对原位,瞬时、微弱的蛋白质-蛋白质相互作用进行定量分析和亚细胞定位,在药物研发和临床诊断中将有着重要的应用价值.

  16. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Enables the Detection of Losses in Infusion Set Actuation (LISAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Howsmon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable continuous glucose monitoring (CGM enables a variety of advanced technology for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. In addition to artificial pancreas algorithms that use CGM to automate continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII, CGM can also inform fault detection algorithms that alert patients to problems in CGM or CSII. Losses in infusion set actuation (LISAs can adversely affect clinical outcomes, resulting in hyperglycemia due to impaired insulin delivery. Prolonged hyperglycemia may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis—a serious metabolic complication in type 1 diabetes. Therefore, an algorithm for the detection of LISAs based on CGM and CSII signals was developed to improve patient safety. The LISA detection algorithm is trained retrospectively on data from 62 infusion set insertions from 20 patients. The algorithm collects glucose and insulin data, and computes relevant fault metrics over two different sliding windows; an alarm sounds when these fault metrics are exceeded. With the chosen algorithm parameters, the LISA detection strategy achieved a sensitivity of 71.8% and issued 0.28 false positives per day on the training data. Validation on two independent data sets confirmed that similar performance is seen on data that was not used for training. The developed algorithm is able to effectively alert patients to possible infusion set failures in open-loop scenarios, with limited evidence of its extension to closed-loop scenarios.

  17. Coherent observations of gravitational radiation with LISA and gLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo; de Araujo, José C. N.

    2016-10-01

    The geosynchronous Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (gLISA) is a space-based gravitational wave (GW) mission that, for the past 5 years, has been under joint study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Stanford University; the National Institute for Space Research (I.N.P.E., Brazil); and Space Systems Loral. If flown at the same time as the LISA mission, the two arrays will deliver a joint sensitivity that accounts for the best performance of both missions in their respective parts of the millihertz band. This simultaneous operation will result in an optimally combined sensitivity curve that is "white" from about 3 ×10-3 Hz to 1 Hz, making the two antennas capable of detecting, with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) with masses in the range (10 -1 08)M⊙ . Their ability of jointly tracking, with enhanced SNR, signals similar to that observed by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (aLIGO) on September 14, 2015 (the GW150914 event) will result in a larger number of observable small-mass binary black holes and an improved precision of the parameters characterizing these sources. Together, LISA, gLISA and aLIGO will cover, with good sensitivity, the (10-4-1 03) Hz frequency band.

  18. Optimising LISA orbits: The projectile solution

    CERN Document Server

    Dhurandhar, S V; Vinet, J-Y

    2008-01-01

    LISA is a joint space mission of the NASA and the ESA for detecting low frequency gravitational waves (GW) in the band $10^{-5} - 0.1$ Hz. The proposed mission will use coherent laser beams which will be exchanged between three identical spacecraft forming a giant (almost) equilateral triangle of side $5 \\times 10^6$ kilometres. The plane of the triangle will make an angle of $\\sim 60^{\\circ}$ with the plane of the ecliptic. The spacecraft constituting LISA will be freely floating in the ambient gravitational field of the Sun and other celestial bodies. To achieve the requisite sensitivity, the spacecraft formation should remain stable, one requirement being, the distances between spacecraft should remain as constant as possible - that is the flexing of the arms should be minimal. In this paper we present a solution - the projectile solution - which constrains the flexing of the arms to below 5.5 metres/sec in a three year mission period. This solution is obtained in the field of the Sun and Earth only, which...

  19. Analysis of Teacher's Mission from Mona Lisa Smile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾显宇

    2013-01-01

    Miss. Catherine in the film Mona Lisa Smile upholds the modern educational concept-equality,innovation and love. She is equipped with noble professional quality to perform a teacher’s mission. This paper makes attempt to discuss what missions the teacher should perform in the educational process through analysis of the film Mona Lisa Smile.

  20. Laser frequency stabilization by locking to a LISA arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Benjamin S.; Gray, Malcolm B.; McClelland, David E.; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2003-12-22

    We analyze a technique for suppressing laser frequency noise for the laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) gravitational wave detector. We demonstrate that the laser frequency can be stabilized to a LISA arm by high gain feedback. It is shown that the feedback bandwidth is not limited by the 33 second round-trip propagation time and example frequency controller designs are presented.

  1. Scientific results of the Mars Pathfinder mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    The author, project scientist of the Mars Pathfinder mision, presents a summary of the most important scientific results from the space probe, which descended to the Martian surface on July 4, 1997. These results include the strong evidence for catastrophic water floods in the history of the planet; close-up studies of the morphology and mineralogy of Martian rocks; the characteristics, chemistry, and origin of the magnetic dust particles deposited on the Martian surface; and meteorological measurements of temperature fluctuations, pressure variations, and wind velocities.

  2. Upper limits to surface force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, L; Ciani, G; Dolesi, R; Hüller, M; Tombolato, D; Vitale, S; Weber, W J; Carbone, Ludovico; Cavalleri, Antonella; Ciani, Giacomo; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Tombolato, David; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph

    2006-01-01

    We report on the measurement of parasitic surface force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for the observation of gravitational waves) proof mass surrounded by a faithful representation of its in flight surroundings, namely the capacitive sensor used to detect proof-mass motion. Parasitic forces are detected through the corresponding torque exerted on the proof mass and measured with a torsion pendulum in the frequency range 0.1 30 mHz. The sensor electrodes, electrode housing and associated readout electronics have the same nominal design as for the flight hardware, including 4 mm gaps around the proof mass along the sensitive laser interferometry axis. We show that the measured upper limit for surface forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal to noise ratio up to approximately 40 for 1 year integration. We also discuss how the flight test under development, LISA Pathfinder, will substantially improve this limit, approaching the per...

  3. Why we use AT.Lisa multifocals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, M; Nicolae, Miruna; Filip, A; Dragne, Carmen; Triantafyllidis, G; Antonescu, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors try to motivate their preference for implanting AT.Lisa Multifocals from all other premium IOL's from the market. It is emphasized, through clinical examples, that their choice comes after a long experience with this type of mul- tifocals IOL's. We make a short presentation of this particular type of MIOL's with their good but also weak points and try to motivate our decision to change from other types. We present the steps that each patient has to follow in our clinic prior to surgery itself, stressing out the idea that the discussion with the patient is very important in taking a decision regarding the implantation of a Premium IOL.

  4. Pathfinder aircraft prepared for flight at dawn on lakebed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Pathfinder solar-powered research aircraft is silhouetted by the morning sun on the bed of Rogers Dry Lake as technicians prepare it for flight. The unique remotely piloted flying wing flew for two hours under control of a ground-based pilot on Nov. 19, 1996, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, while engineers checked out various aircraft systems. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  5. eLISA and the Gravitational Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-08-01

    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of the Universe. We know the life cycles of stars, the structure of galaxies, the remnants of the big bang, and have a general understanding of how the Universe evolved. We have come remarkably far using electromagnetic radiation as our tool for observing the Universe. However, gravity is the engine behind many of the processes in the Universe, and much of its action is dark. Opening a gravitational window on the Universe will let us go further than any alternative. Gravity has its own messenger: Gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime. They travel essentially undisturbed and let us peer deep into the formation of the first seed black holes, exploring redshifts as large as z ~ 20, prior to the epoch of cosmic re-ionisation. Exquisite and unprecedented measurements of black hole masses and spins will make it possible to trace the history of black holes across all stages of galaxy evolution, and at the same time constrain any deviation from the Kerr metric of General Relativity. eLISA will be the first ever mission to study the entire Universe with gravitational waves. eLISA is an all-sky monitor and will offer a wide view of a dynamic cosmos using gravitational waves as new and unique messengers to unveil The Gravitational Universe. It provides the closest ever view of the early processes at TeV energies, has guaranteed sources in the form of verification binaries in the Milky Way, and can probe the entire Universe, from its smallest scales around singularities and black holes, all the way to cosmological dimensions.

  6. Calibration of the MoNA and LISA Arrays for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grovom, A.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Rogers, W. F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The new LISA (the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) neutron detector array, designed to be used in conjunction with MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) at the NSCL was recently commissioned in an experiment designed to investigate excited states of neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes near the neutron drip-line. In order for the trajectories of neutrons arising from decay to be determined with sufficient precision to allow reconstruction of the invariant mass of the decaying system, all 288 scintillator bars must be precisely position-calibrated and time-synchronized to within a few tenths of a nanosecond, and the time origin for neutron time-of-flight determination must coincide precisely with the secondary beam particle/target interaction. The former was accomplished using cosmic muons passing through the array, and the latter using detection of gamma-rays produced at the target in each of the 18 layers of the MoNA-LISA array. Several Root C++ macros were developed in order to produce these calibrations. Results for the LISA commissioning run experiment will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  7. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bandura, Kevin; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-Francois; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Hofer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Michael; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-01-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beamforming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37\\,m long by 20\\,m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument ...

  8. Selective metallization of polymers using laser induced surface activation (LISA)—characterization and optimization of porous surface topography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Grave, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Laser induced selective activation (LISA) is a molded interconnected devices technique for selective metallization of polymers. On the working piece, only the laser-machined area can be metalized in the subsequent plating. The principle of the technology is introduced. Surface analysis was perfor...

  9. Constraining properties of the black hole population using LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Berti, Emanuele; Volonteri, Marta

    2010-01-01

    LISA should detect gravitational waves from tens to hundreds of systems containing black holes with mass in the range from 10 thousand to 10 million solar masses. Black holes in this mass range are not well constrained by current electromagnetic observations, so LISA could significantly enhance our understanding of the astrophysics of such systems. In this paper, we describe a framework for combining LISA observations to make statements about massive black hole populations. We summarise the constraints that LISA observations of extreme-mass-ratio inspirals might be able to place on the mass function of black holes in the LISA range. We also describe how LISA observations can be used to choose between different models for the hierarchical growth of structure in the early Universe. We consider four models that differ in their prescription for the initial mass distribution of black hole seeds, and in the efficiency of accretion onto the black holes. We show that with as little as 3 months of LISA data we can cle...

  10. Construction of an optical test-bed for eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieser, Maike; Fitzsimons, E.; Isleif, K.-S.; Killow, C.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D.; Schuster, S.; Tröbs, M.; Veith, S.; Ward, H.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2016-05-01

    In the planned eLISA mission a key part of the system is the optical bench that holds the interferometers for reading out the inter-spacecraft distance and the test mass position. We report on ongoing technology development for the eLISA optical system like the back-link between the optical benches and the science interferometer where the local beam is interfered with the received beam from the distant spacecraft. The focus will be on a setup to investigate the tilt-to-pathlength coupling in the science interferometer. To test the science interferometer in the lab a second bench providing a laser beam and a reference interferometer is needed. We present a setup with two ultra-stable low expansion glass benches and bonded optics. To suppress the tilt-to-pathlength coupling to the required level (few μm/rad) imaging optics are placed in front of the interferometer photo diodes.

  11. Pathfinder landing sites at candidate SNC impact ejection sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, Matthew P.

    1994-01-01

    If Mars Pathfinder were able to land at a site on Mars from which the SNC meteorites were ejected by impact, the Pathfinder mission would essentially represent a very inexpensive sample return mission. Geologic units that contain four potential impact craters from which SNC meteorites could have been ejected from Mars are accessible to the Mars Pathfinder lander. Determining that SNC meteorites came from a particular spot on Mars raises the intriguing possibility of using Pathfinder as a sample return mission and providing a radiometric age for the considerably uncertain martian crater-age timescale. Pathfinder instruments are capable of determining if the rock type at the landing site is similar to that of one or more of the SNC meteorites, which would strengthen the hypothesis that the SNC meteorites did, in fact, come from Mars. Unfortunately, instrument observations from Pathfinder are probably not capable of determining if the geologic unit sampled by the lander is definitively the unit from which a SNC meteorite came from as opposed to Mars in general or perhaps a particular region on Mars. This abstract evaluates the possibility of landing at potential SNC ejection sites and the ability of Pathfinder to identify the landing site as the place from which an SNC meteorite came.

  12. APECS - The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Muders, D; Hafok, H; Hatchell, J; Koenig, C; Polehampton, E; Schaaf, R; Schuller, F; Tak, F; Wyrowski, F

    2006-01-01

    APECS is the distributed control system of the new Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope located on the Llano de Chajnantor at an altitude of 5107 m in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. APECS is based on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) software and employs a modern, object-oriented design using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) as the middleware. New generic device interfaces simplify adding instruments to the control system. The Python based observer command scripting language allows using many existing software libraries and facilitates creating more complex observing modes. A new self-descriptive raw data format (Multi-Beam FITS or MBFITS) has been defined to store the multi-beam, multi-frequency data. APECS provides an online pipeline for initial calibration, observer feedback and a quick-look display. APECS is being used for regular science observations in local and remote mode since August 2005.

  13. Model Checking JAVA Programs Using Java Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Pressburger, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a translator called JAVA PATHFINDER from JAVA to PROMELA, the "programming language" of the SPIN model checker. The purpose is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programs based on model checking. This work should be seen in a broader attempt to make formal methods applicable "in the loop" of programming within NASA's areas such as space, aviation, and robotics. Our main goal is to create automated formal methods such that programmers themselves can apply these in their daily work (in the loop) without the need for specialists to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. This work is a continuation of an effort to formally verify, using SPIN, a multi-threaded operating system programmed in Lisp for the Deep-Space 1 spacecraft, and of previous work in applying existing model checkers and theorem provers to real applications.

  14. Modal analysis of PATHFINDER unmanned air vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehrle, T.G.; Costerus, B.W.; Lee, C.L.

    1994-10-19

    An experimental modal analysis was performed on PATHFINDER, a 450-lb, 100-ft wing span, flying-wing-design aircraft powered by solar/electric motors. The aircraft was softly suspended and then excited using random input from a long-stroke shaker. Modal data was taken from 92 measurement locations on the aircraft using newly designed, lightweight, tri-axial accelerometers. A conventional PC-based data acquisition system provided data handling. Modal parameters were calculated, and animated mode shapes were produced using SMS STARStruct{trademark} Modal Analysis System software. The modal parameters will be used for validation of finite element models, optimum placement of onboard accelerometers during flight testing, and vibration isolation design of sensor platforms.

  15. Java PathFinder User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    The JAVA PATHFINDER, JPF, is a translator from a subset of JAVA 1.0 to PROMELA, the programming language of the SPIN model checker. The purpose of JPF is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programming based on model checking. The main goal is to automate program verification such that a programmer can apply it in the daily work without the need for a specialist to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. The system is especially suited for analyzing multi-threaded JAVA applications, where normal testing usually falls short. The system can find deadlocks and violations of boolean assertions stated by the programmer in a special assertion language. This document explains how to Use JPF.

  16. PAPPA: Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Fixsen, D; Hinshaw, G F; Limon, M; Moseley, S H; Phillips, N; Sharp, E; Wollack, E J; U-Yen, K; Cao, N; Stevenson, T; Hsieh, W; Devlin, M; Dicker, S; Semisch, C; Irwin, K

    2006-01-01

    The Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array (PAPPA) is a balloon-based instrument to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and search for the signal from gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. PAPPA will survey a 20 x 20 deg patch at the North Celestial Pole using 32 pixels in 3 passbands centered at 89, 212, and 302 GHz. Each pixel uses MEMS switches in a superconducting microstrip transmission line to combine the phase modulation techniques used in radio astronomy with the sensitivity of transition-edge superconducting bolometers. Each switched circuit modulates the incident polarization on a single detector, allowing nearly instantaneous characterization of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. We describe the instrument design and status.

  17. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F.; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Characterizing Spinning Black Hole Binaries in Eccentric Orbits with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Key, Joey Shapiro

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is designed to detect gravitational wave signals from astrophysical sources, including those from coalescing binary systems of compact objects such as black holes. Colliding galaxies have central black holes that sink to the center of the merged galaxy and begin to orbit one another and emit gravitational waves. Some galaxy evolution models predict that the binary black hole system will enter the LISA band with significant orbital eccentricity, while other models suggest that the orbits will already have circularized. Using a full seventeen parameter waveform model that includes the effects of orbital eccentricity, spin precession and higher harmonics, we investigate how well the source parameters can be inferred from simulated LISA data. Defining the reference eccentricity as the value one year before merger, we find that for typical LISA sources, it will be possible to measure the eccentricity to an accuracy of parts in a thousand. The accuracy with which the ec...

  19. Dual-Cylinder Laser Reference Cavities for LISA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "Summary: The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is under consideration by NASA and ESA as a joint mission to study gravitational wave signals from a...

  20. Distinguishing Between Formation Channels for Binary Black Holes with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Rasio, Frederic A

    2016-01-01

    The recent detections of GW150914 and GW151226 imply an abundance of stellar-mass binary-black-hole mergers in the local universe. While ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are limited to observing the final moments before a binary merges, space-based detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), can observe binaries at lower orbital frequencies where such systems may still encode information about their formation histories. In particular, the orbital eccentricity of binary black holes in the LISA frequency band can be used discriminate between binaries formed in isolation in galactic fields, and those formed in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters. In this letter, we explore the differences in orbital eccentricities of binary black hole populations as they evolve through the LISA frequency band. Overall we find that there are three distinct populations of orbital eccentricities discernible by LISA. We show that, depending on gravitational-wave frequency, anywhere fro...

  1. Status of LISA phase measurement work in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, S E [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Jennrich, O [ESTEC, Noordwijk, The (Netherlands); Stebbins, R T [NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bender, P [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2003-05-21

    Currently there are two implementations for LISA phase measurement being investigated in the United States. In this paper, we present the current status of one of these implementations, the so-called zero-crossing approach or stopwatch method. This method uses a technique of counting and timing to make phase measurements. Herein we present a description of the status of an experiment which produces an optical LISA-like fringe which we use to test our phase meter.

  2. An Interview with Lisa Summer: Discussing GIM and its adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Anne Montgomery

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This interview with Lisa Summer discusses her path to music therapy, GIM, and Helen Bonny. Lisa speaks about her adaptations to the Bonny Method of GIM and how these have been incorporated into her latest GIM trainings. Her recent doctoral work, including music-centered guiding and the use of repeated music in GIM sessions is discussed. The work of Helen Bonny and key Bonny Method GIM concepts are outlined.

  3. Current error estimates for LISA spurious accelerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, R T [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bender, P L [JILA-University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hanson, J [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hoyle, C D [University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Schumaker, B L [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Vitale, S [University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2004-03-07

    The performance of the LISA gravitational wave detector depends critically on limiting spurious accelerations of the fiducial masses. Consequently, the requirements on allowable acceleration levels must be carefully allocated based on estimates of the achievable limits on spurious accelerations from all disturbances. Changes in the allocation of requirements are being considered, and are proposed here. The total spurious acceleration error requirement would remain unchanged, but a few new error sources would be added, and the allocations for some specific error sources would be changed. In support of the recommended revisions in the requirements budget, estimates of plausible acceleration levels for 17 of the main error sources are discussed. In most cases, the formula for calculating the size of the effect is known, but there may be questions about the values of various parameters to use in the estimates. Different possible parameter values have been discussed, and a representative set is presented. Improvements in our knowledge of the various experimental parameters will come from planned experimental and modelling studies, supported by further theoretical work.

  4. LISA as a dark energy probe

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Iyer, B R; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sinha, Siddhartha

    2008-01-01

    Recently it was shown that the inclusion of higher signal harmonics in the inspiral signals of binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) leads to dramatic improvements in parameter estimation with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). In particular, the angular resolution becomes good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster, in which case the redshift can be determined by electromagnetic means. The gravitational wave signal also provides the luminosity distance with high accuracy, and the relationship between this and the redshift depends sensitively on the cosmological parameters, such as the equation-of-state parameter $w=p_{\\rm DE}/\\rho_{\\rm DE}$ of dark energy. With a single binary SMBH event at $z < 1$ having appropriate masses and orientation, one would be able to constrain $w$ to within a few percent. We show that, if the measured sky location is folded into the error analysis, the uncertainty on $w$ goes down by an additional factor of 2-3, leaving weak lensing as the only limiti...

  5. Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Batteries for the Mars Pathfinder Microrover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deligiannis, F.; Frank, H.; Staniewicz, R.J.; Willson, J. [SAFT America, Inc., Cockeysville, MD (United States)

    1996-02-01

    A discussion of the power requirements for the Mars Pathfinder Mission is given. Topics include: battery requirements; cell design; battery design; test descriptions and results. A summary of the results is also included.

  6. Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Batteries for the Mars Pathfinder Microrover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Frank, Harvey; Staniewicz, R. J.; Willson, John

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of the power requirements for the Mars Pathfinder Mission is given. Topics include: battery requirements; cell design; battery design; test descriptions and results. A summary of the results is also included.

  7. CRED REA Algal Assessment, Pathfinder Bank 2003 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Random collections of algae were made at 2 sites at Pathfinder Bank in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in August and September, 2003 from the NOAA...

  8. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Narrative report: Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January through December, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Coherent observations of gravitational radiation with LISA and gLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Tinto, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The geosynchronous Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (gLISA) is a space-based gravitational wave (GW) mission that, for the past five years, has been under joint study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Stanford University, the National Institute for Space Research (I.N.P.E., Brazil), and Space Systems Loral. If flown at the same time as the LISA mission, the two arrays will deliver a joint sensitivity that accounts for the best performance of both missions in their respective parts of the mHz band. This simultaneous operation will result in an optimally combined sensitivity curve that is "white" from a few mHz to 1 Hz, making the two antennas capable of detecting, with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) with masses in the range (10 - 100 million) solar masses. Their ability of jointly tracking, with enhanced SNR, signals similar to that observed by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (aLIGO) on September 14, 2015 (the GW150914 event) will re...

  17. Mona Lisa Effect of Eyes and Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Sato

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A person depicted in portrait paintings does not appear slanted even when observers move around. The gaze is also fixed to the observer. This constancy in angle of face/body orientation or gaze direction is called the Mona Lisa effect. Do observers realize the portrait was physically slanted when the effect occurs? What is the relationship between the effect for face/body and gaze? To answer these questions, we separately measured the perceived angle of face, gaze, and background while varying the physical slant of portrait itself. The stimulus was a computer generated face (19 × 12 deg presented on a 3D LCD display. It was surrounded by a 24 × 24 deg black-contour frame filled with a noise texture. There were also no-frame and/or no-texture conditions. The slant was varied between ±30 deg. The observer was asked to judge the direction of gaze and the orientation of face or background in separate sessions. It was found that the perceived gaze almost always directed toward the observer regardless of slant angle or existence of frame or background. In contrast, the face orientation was judged facing the observer only in 40–50% of trials, and it was facing at the correct angle in 50–60% of trials. The background was perceived correctly in most trials. These results demonstrate special characteristics of eyes. The gaze is always directed to you even when the portrait is slanted and the background is perceived slanted. The face has intermediate characteristics: it is sometimes directed to you, but sometimes it appears slanted.

  18. Antenna Deployment for a Pathfinder Lunar Radio Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, Robert J.; Minetto, F. A.; Lazio, T. W.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Burns, J. O.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    A first step in the development of a large radio observatory on the moon for cosmological or other astrophysical and planetary goals is to deploy a few antennas as a pathfinder mission. In this presentation, we describe a mechanism being developed to deploy such antennas from a small craft, such as a Google Lunar X-prize lander. The antenna concept is to deposit antennas and leads on a polyimide film, such as Kapton, and to unroll the film on the lunar surface. The deployment technique utilized is to launch an anchor which pulls a double line from a reel at the spacecraft. Subsequently, the anchor is set by catching on the surface or collecting sufficient regolith. A motor then pulls in one end of the line, pulling the film off of its roller onto the lunar surface. Detection of a low frequency cutoff of the galactic radio background or of solar radio bursts by such a system would determine the maximum lunar ionospheric density at the time of measurement. The current design and testing, including videos of the deployment, will be presented. These activities are funded in part by the NASA Lunar Science Institute as an activity of the Lunar University Network for Astrophysical Research (LUNAR) consortium. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Rapid, Automated, and Specific Immunoassay to Directly Measure Matrix Metalloproteinase-9–Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Interactions in Human Plasma Using AlphaLISA Technology: A New Alternative to Classical ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Pulido-Olmo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The protocol describes a novel, rapid, and no-wash one-step immunoassay for highly sensitive and direct detection of the complexes between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs based on AlphaLISA® technology. We describe two procedures: (i one approach is used to analyze MMP-9–TIMP-1 interactions using recombinant human MMP-9 with its corresponding recombinant human TIMP-1 inhibitor and (ii the second approach is used to analyze native or endogenous MMP-9–TIMP-1 protein interactions in samples of human plasma. Evaluating native MMP-9–TIMP-1 complexes using this approach avoids the use of indirect calculations of the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio for which independent MMP-9 and TIMP-1 quantifications by two conventional ELISAs are needed. The MMP-9–TIMP-1 AlphaLISA® assay is quick, highly simplified, and cost-effective and can be completed in less than 3 h. Moreover, the assay has great potential for use in basic and preclinical research as it allows direct determination of native MMP-9–TIMP-1 complexes in circulating blood as biofluid.

  20. Data Acquisition System for the UFFO Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Na, G W; Choi, H S; Choi, Y J; Grossan, B; Hermann, I; Jeong, S; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, S -W; Kim, Y W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Nam, J W; Nam, K H; Panayuk, M I; Park, I H; Smoot, G F; Suh, Y D; Svelitov, S; Vedenken, N; Yashin, I; Zhao, M H

    2011-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) Pathfinder is a payload on the Russian Lomonosov satellite, scheduled to be launched in November 2011. The Observatory is designed to detect early UV/Optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). There are two telescopes and one main data acquisition system: the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope (UBAT), the Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), and the UFFO Data Acquisition (UDAQ) system. The UDAQ controls and manages the operation and communication of each telescope, and is also in charge of the interface with the satellite. It will write the data taken by each telescope to the NOR flash memory and sends them to the satellite via the Bus-Interface system (BI). It also receives data from the satellite including the coordinates and time of an external trigger from another payload, and distributes them to two telescopes. These functions are implemented in field programmable gates arrays (FPGA) for low power consumption and fast processing without a microprocessor. The UD...

  1. Rectangle expansion A∗ pathfinding for grid maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang An

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Search speed, quality of resulting paths and the cost of pre-processing are the principle evaluation metrics of a pathfinding algorithm. In this paper, a new algorithm for grid-based maps, rectangle expansion A∗ (REA∗, is presented that improves the performance of A∗ significantly. REA∗ explores maps in units of unblocked rectangles. All unnecessary points inside the rectangles are pruned and boundaries of the rectangles (instead of individual points within those boundaries are used as search nodes. This makes the algorithm plot fewer points and have a much shorter open list than A∗. REA∗ returns jump and grid-optimal path points, but since the line of sight between jump points is protected by the unblocked rectangles, the resulting path of REA∗ is usually better than grid-optimal. The algorithm is entirely online and requires no offline pre-processing. Experimental results for typical benchmark problem sets show that REA∗ can speed up a highly optimized A∗ by an order of magnitude and more while preserving completeness and optimality. This new algorithm is competitive with other highly successful variants of A∗.

  2. Distinguishing Between Formation Channels for Binary Black Holes with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Katelyn; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-01-01

    The recent detections of GW150914 and GW151226 imply an abundance of stellar-mass binary-black-hole mergers in the local universe. While ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are limited to observing the final moments before a binary merges, space-based detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), can observe binaries at lower orbital frequencies where such systems may still encode information about their formation histories. In particular, the orbital eccentricity and mass of binary black holes in the LISA frequency band can be used together to discriminate between binaries formed in isolation in galactic fields and those formed in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters. In this letter, we explore the orbital eccentricity and mass of binary-black-hole populations as they evolve through the LISA frequency band. Overall we find that there are two distinct populations discernible by LISA. We show that up to ~90% of binaries formed either dynamically or in isolation have eccentricities measurable by LISA. Finally, we note how measured eccentricities of low-mass binary black holes evolved in isolation could provide detailed constraints on the physics of black-hole natal kicks and common-envelope evolution.

  3. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  4. Distinguishing between Formation Channels for Binary Black Holes with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Katelyn; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-10-01

    The recent detections of GW150914 and GW151226 imply an abundance of stellar-mass binary black hole (BBH) mergers in the local universe. While ground-based gravitational wave detectors are limited to observing the final moments before a binary merges, space-based detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), can observe binaries at lower orbital frequencies where such systems may still encode information about their formation histories. In particular, the orbital eccentricity and mass of BBHs in the LISA frequency band can be used together to discriminate between binaries formed in isolation in galactic fields and those formed in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters. In this letter, we explore the orbital eccentricity and mass of BBH populations as they evolve through the LISA frequency band. Overall we find that there are two distinct populations discernible by LISA. We show that up to ∼ 90 % of binaries formed either dynamically or in isolation have eccentricities that are measurable with LISA. Finally, we note how measured eccentricities of low-mass BBHs evolved in isolation could provide detailed constraints on the physics of black hole natal kicks and common-envelope evolution.

  5. Optical Attenuation in MoNA and LISA Detector Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Logan; Wong, Jonathan; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The MoNA collaboration is a research group of students and faculty from 13 primarily undergraduate institutions, with detectors at the NSCL: MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) and the newly-built LISA (Large multi-Institutional Scintillating Array). These arrays each have 144 plastic scintillating bars. When a neutron collides with a hydrogen nucleus within the plastic, photomultiplier tubes at either end of the bar detect the scintillation photons. Their arrival times are used to determine the position of the event, but as the light travels through the detector it loses intensity exponentially. How dramatic this loss is can be described by a parameter called the attenuation length, with larger attenuation lengths corresponding to lower loss. Recently the MoNA collaboration conducted its LISA commissioning experiment investigating two-neutron decay states of 25O. As a part of LISA's commissioning, we measured the attenuation lengths of the individual detector bars that make up the LISA array and compared these lengths with those of the older MoNA array. We found that the LISA bars had a larger attenuation length on average with impacts on detector efficiency and effective threshold. The authors wish to acknowledge the contributions of the members of the MoNA Collaboration.

  6. Mona Lisa is always happy - and only sometimes sad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaci, Emanuela; Fischer, Andreas; Heinrichs, Markus; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz; Kornmeier, Jürgen

    2017-03-10

    The worldwide fascination of da Vinci's Mona Lisa has been dedicated to the emotional ambiguity of her face expression. In the present study we manipulated Mona Lisa's mouth curvature as one potential source of ambiguity and studied how a range of happier and sadder face variants influences perception. In two experimental conditions we presented different stimulus ranges with different step sizes between stimuli along the happy-sad axis of emotional face expressions. Stimuli were presented in random order and participants indicated the perceived emotional face expression (first task) and the confidence of their response (second task). The probability of responding 'happy' to the original Mona Lisa was close to 100%. Furthermore, in both conditions the perceived happiness of Mona Lisa variants described sigmoidal functions of the mouth curvature. Participants' confidence was weakest around the sigmoidal inflection points. Remarkably, the sigmoidal functions, as well as confidence values and reaction times, differed significantly between experimental conditions. Finally, participants responded generally faster to happy than to sad faces. Overall, the original Mona Lisa seems to be less ambiguous than expected. However, perception of and reaction to the emotional face content is relative and strongly depends on the used stimulus range.

  7. Higher harmonics increase LISA's mass reach for supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sinha, Siddhartha

    2007-01-01

    Current expectations on the signal to noise ratios and masses of supermassive black holes which the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can observe are based on using in matched filtering only the dominant harmonic of the inspiral waveform at twice the orbital frequency. Other harmonics will affect the signal-to-noise ratio of systems currently believed to be observable by LISA. More significantly, inclusion of other harmonics in our matched filters would mean that more massive systems that were previously thought to be {\\it not} visible in LISA should be detectable with reasonable SNRs. Our estimates show that we should be able to significantly increase the mass reach of LISA and observe the more commonly occurring supermassive black holes of masses $\\sim 10^8M_\\odot.$ More specifically, with the inclusion of all known harmonics LISA will be able to observe even supermassive black hole coalescences with total mass $\\sim 10^8 M_\\odot (10^9M_\\odot)$ (and mass-ratio 0.1) for a low frequency cut-off of $10...

  8. First stage of LISA data processing. II. Alternative filtering dynamic models for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-08-01

    Space-borne gravitational wave detectors, such as (e)LISA, are designed to operate in the low-frequency band (mHz to Hz), where there is a variety of gravitational wave sources of great scientific value [arXiv:1305.5720 and S. Babak et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 114001 (2011)]. To achieve the extraordinary sensitivity of these detectors, the precise synchronization of the clocks on the separate spacecraft and the accurate determination of the interspacecraft distances are important ingredients. In our previous paper [Y. Wang et al., Phys. Rev. D 90, 064016 (2014)], we have described a hybrid-extend Kalman filter with a full state vector to do this job. In this paper, we explore several different state vectors and their corresponding (phenomenological) dynamic models to reduce the redundancy in the full state vector, to accelerate the algorithm, and to make the algorithm easily extendable to more complicated scenarios.

  9. First stage of LISA data processing II: Alternative filtering dynamic models for LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan; Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Space-borne gravitational wave detectors, such as (e)LISA, are designed to operate in the low-frequency band (mHz to Hz), where there is a variety of gravitational wave sources of great scientific value. To achieve the extraordinary sensitivity of these detector, the precise synchronization of the clocks on the separate spacecraft and the accurate determination of the interspacecraft distances are important ingredients. In our previous paper (Phys. Rev. D 90, 064016 [2014]), we have described a hybrid-extend Kalman filter with a full state vector to do this job. In this paper, we explore several different state vectors and their corresponding (phenomenological) dynamic models, to reduce the redundancy in the full state vector, to accelerate the algorithm, and to make the algorithm easily extendable to more complicated scenarios.

  10. Black-hole Merger Simulations for LISA Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan M.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    The strongest expected sources of gravitational waves in the LISA band are the mergers of massive black holes. LISA may observe these systems to high redshift, z>10, to uncover details of the origin of massive black holes, and of the relationship between black holes and their host structures, and structure formation itself. These signals arise from the final stage in the development of a massive black-hole binary emitting strong gravitational radiation that accelerates the system's inspiral toward merger. The strongest part of the signal, at the point of merger, carries much information about the system and provides a probe of extreme gravitational physics. Theoretical predictions for these merger signals rely on supercomputer simulations to solve Einstein's equations. We discuss recent numerical results and their impact on LISA science expectations.

  11. Accreting Double White Dwarf Binaries: Implications for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2017-09-01

    We explore the long-term evolution of mass-transferring white dwarf (WD) binaries undergoing both direct-impact and disk accretion and explore implications of such systems to gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. We cover a broad range of initial component masses and show that these systems, the majority of which lie within the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) sensitivity range, exhibit prominent negative orbital frequency evolution (chirp) for a significant fraction of their lifetimes. Using a galactic population synthesis, we predict ∼2700 of these systems will be observable with a negative chirp of 0.1 yr‑2 by a space-based GW detector like LISA. We also show that detections of mass-transferring double WD systems by LISA may provide astronomers with unique ways of probing the physics governing close compact object binaries.

  12. Working Towards the LISA Optical Benches at UF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Andrew; Hillsberry, Daniel; Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John; Mueller, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The first space-based gravitational wave observatory will likely be a six-link LISA-like observatory with three million km scale arms. LISA aims at detecting gravitational waves from super-massive black hole mergers, compact galactic binaries, and many other exciting sources which emit gravitational waves in the 10 µHz to 1Hz frequency band. LISA will use laser interferometry to measure changes in the distance between free floating test masses at the pm/Hz level. At the core of the interferometry are the optical benches (two on each spacecraft) which receive, manipulate and redirect the different laser beams. The optical bench has been identified as a critical item in the design, manufacturing, and testing phases of this mission. Our group studies different components of the optical bench with the goal to simplify the design and manufacturing process of the optical bench.

  13. Eccentric double white dwarfs as LISA sources in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Willems, B; Vecchio, A; Ivanova, N; Rasio, F A; Fregeau, J M; Belczynski, K

    2007-01-01

    We consider the formation of double white dwarfs (DWDs) through dynamical interactions in globular clusters. Such interactions can readily give rise to eccentric DWDs, in contrast to the exclusively circular population that is expected to form in the Galactic disk. We show that for a 5-year Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission and distances as far as the Large Magellanic Cloud, multiple harmonics from eccentric DWDs can be detected at a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 8 for at least a handful of eccentric DWDs, given their formation rate and typical merger lifetimes estimated from current cluster simulations. Consequently the association of eccentricity with stellar-mass LISA sources does not uniquely involve neutron stars, as is usually assumed. Due to the difficulty of detecting these systems with present and planned electromagnetic observatories, LISA could provide unique dynamical identifications of eccentric DWDs in globular clusters.

  14. Higher signal harmonics, LISA's angular resolution and dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sinha, Siddhartha; Broeck, Chris Van Den

    2007-01-01

    It is generally believed that the angular resolution of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) for binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) will not be good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster. This conclusion, based on using only the dominant harmonic of the binary SMBH signal, changes dramatically when higher signal harmonics are included in assessing the parameter estimation problem. We show that in a subset of the source parameter space the angular resolution increases by more than a factor of 10, thereby making it possible for LISA to identify the host galaxy/galaxy cluster. Thus, LISA's observation of certain binary SMBH coalescence events could constrain the dark energy equation of state to within a few percent, comparable to the level expected from other dark energy missions.

  15. E. Yiannopoulou on Lisa Blackman’s The Body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Blackman, Lisa. The Body. Oxford and New York: Berg, 2008. 160 pp. “Is there anything natural about the human body?” (1. This is how Lisa Blackman begins her all too daunting task of reviewing and critically evaluating what has come to be known as “body theory” in the field of sociology. Carefully picking her way among numerous theories on the corporeal that have been produced across the humanities in the last twenty years, Blackman lays out her problematic from the start by asking to know w...

  16. Mona Lisa:. the Stochastic View and Fractality in Color Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedram, Pouria; Jafari, G. R.

    A painting consists of objects which are arranged in specific ways. The art of painting is drawing the objects, which can be considered as known trends, in an expressive manner. Detrended methods are suitable for characterizing the artistic works of the painter by eliminating trends. It means that the study of paintings, regardless of its apparent purpose, as a stochastic process. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis is applied to characterize the statistical properties of Mona Lisa, as an instance, to exhibit the fractality of the painting. The results show that Mona Lisa is a long-range correlated and almost behaves similar in various scales.

  17. LISA and NASA's Physics of the Cosmos Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2008-01-01

    In the past year, the LISA Project at NASA has completed a major review and has thoroughly reviewed its cost estimates. This talk will summarize the conclusions of the Beyond Einstein Program Assessment, and review the main conclusions of the cost estimation work done at NASA, including reduced mission concepts. Astro2010, the decadal review which sets priorities for astronomy and astrophysics projects in the U.S., is getting organized. Preparing for and participating in Astro2010 will be a crucial activity for the NASA side of the LISA Project in thc next 18 months.

  18. CBM a Pathfinder of Petroleum System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan Kumar Bhattacharya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to understand if there is any relation of commercial methane in CBM producers with oil producing kerogen. This is necessary because methane in coal, by default, is assigned to be sourced by bacterial/thermal actions on biomass during coalification process but critical analysis suggests it cannot be commercial because coal bears a ratio of molar concentrations of Hydrogen to Carbon (H/C around 0.8 whereas methane require H/C = 4.0. A simple calculation reveals 1Tcf of methane generation may come from around 25 trillion tonnes of coal, suggesting commercial methane cannot be sourced only from coal. Generation of methane can be biogenic or thermogenic, either from coal or related organic biomass or from oil generating kerogen. Technically, we can distinguish biogenic methane from thermogenic but we cannot distinguish same methane either from coal or from oil generating kerogen unless it is evident that one is distinctly biogenic and the other is thermogenic. Further, a review of successful major CBM projects also reveals that most of them are geologically associated with some producing petroliferous basin. This suggests that a close genetic relationship between the occurrence of coal bed methane and petroliferous basin probably exists whereby adsorbed methane in coal bed is possibly sourced from the same oil generating kerogen in the basin. Therefore, discovery of commercial coal bed methane may suggest possible existence of mature source rock in the basin and may act as pathfinder of possible new petroleum system attached to it.

  19. SST, Pathfinder Ver 5.0, Night, 4.4 km, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — AVHRR Pathfinder Oceans Project seeks to create a long-term, continuous sea surface temperature data series for use in climate research. The Pathfinder SST data...

  20. SST, Pathfinder Ver 5.0, Day, 4.4 km, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — AVHRR Pathfinder Oceans Project seeks to create a long-term, continuous sea surface temperature data series for use in climate research. The Pathfinder SST data...

  1. SST, Pathfinder Ver 5.0, Day and Night, 4.4 km, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — AVHRR Pathfinder Oceans Project seeks to create a long-term, continuous sea surface temperature data series for use in climate research. The Pathfinder SST data...

  2. Design Overview of the DM Radio Pathfinder Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Dawson, Carl; Graham, Peter; Irwin, Kent; Kuenstner, Stephen; Li, Dale; Mardon, Jeremy; Moseley, Harvey; Mule, Richard; Phipps, Arran; Rajendran, Surjeet; Steffen, Zach; Young, Betty

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the DM Radio, a dual search for axion and hidden photon dark matter using a tunable superconducting lumped-element resonator. We discuss the prototype DM Radio Pathfinder experiment, which will probe hidden photons in the 500 peV (100 kHz)-50 neV (10 MHz) mass range. We detail the design of the various components: the LC resonant detector, the resonant frequency tuning procedure, the differential SQUID readout circuit, the shielding, and the cryogenic mounting structure. We present the current status of the pathfinder experiment and illustrate its potential science reach in the context of the larger experimental program.

  3. Holographic Beam Mapping of the CHIME Pathfinder Array

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Philippe; Amiri, Mandana; Bandura, Kevin; Cliche, Jean-Francois; Connor, Liam; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gilbert, Adam J; Good, Deborah; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Hofer, Carolin; Johnson, Andre M; Landecker, Tom L; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Parra, Juan Mena; Oppermann, Niels; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; Recnik, Andre; Robishaw, Timothy; Shaw, J Richard; Siegel, Seth; Sigurdson, Kris; Smith, Kendrick; Storer, Emilie; Tretyakov, Ian; Van Gassen, Kwinten; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder radio telescope is currently surveying the northern hemisphere between 400 and 800 MHz. By mapping the large scale structure of neutral hydrogen through its redshifted 21 cm line emission between $z \\sim 0.8-2.5$ CHIME will contribute to our understanding of Dark Energy. Bright astrophysical foregrounds must be separated from the neutral hydrogen signal, a task which requires precise characterization of the polarized telescope beams. Using the DRAO John A. Galt 26 m telescope, we have developed a holography instrument and technique for mapping the CHIME Pathfinder beams. We report the status of the instrument and initial results of this effort.

  4. Lincoln Pathfinder: Internet Resources on Studying and Teaching Abraham Lincoln

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hübner

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Apart from encouraging an innumerable quantity of scholarly works and projects, the subject matter of Lincoln’s Legacy has also produced an increasing amount of online ventures and digital resource collections. The Lincoln Pathfinder aims to provide a quick guide to these Web sites and to initiate a controversial debate, likely to take place in the EFL classroom. Divided into five categories—general, primary, secondary, visual, and teaching resources—the Lincoln Pathfinder may function as a helpful research tool and a basis of discussion.

  5. Implementasi Algoritma A* Berbasis Pathfinding Dalam Pengembangan Game Menanam Pohon

    OpenAIRE

    Pohan, Rahmat Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Anyone would take the path that they consider to be the shortest path when they travel from one place to another. But it would be difficult for such a person to choose which path is the shortest, because it could be the chosen path is not the shortest path. The method for determining the shortest path is pathfinding. Pathfinding is widely used in various fields of Computer Science, one of them on the field of video game development. In this research, the authors will design and analyze the pa...

  6. Mona Lisa syndrome: solving the enigma of the Gioconda smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adour, K K

    1989-03-01

    The Mona Lisa smile is presented as a possible example of facial muscle contracture that develops after Bell's palsy when the facial nerve has undergone partial wallerian degeneration and has regenerated. The accompanying synkinesis would explain many of the known facts surrounding the painting and is a classic example of Leonardo da Vinci as the compulsive anatomist who combined art and science.

  7. Structural, thermal, optical and gravitational modelling for LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Conkey, Shelly [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Haile, William B [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); KellyIII, William R [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Peabody, Hume [Swales Aerospace, 5050 Powder Mill Rd, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Dumont, Philip J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2004-03-07

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) mission uses laser interferometry to detect and observe gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. Modelling of LISA ultimately needs to forecast and interrelate the behaviour of the science input, structure, optics, control systems and many other factors that affect the performance of the flight hardware. These models include high precision STOP (structural-thermal-optical) analyses. In addition, self-gravity analyses of the spacecraft, based on the structural-thermal modelling results, are required for each analysis cycle to understand the gravitational interaction between the spacecraft components. The complete analysis cycle is called STOP-G. Several aspects of this analysis require unprecedented precision due to LISA's challenging design requirements. We present here a modelling approach designed to minimize analysis errors, particularly those that enter when mapping results from one modelling step to the next. Central to the approach is the use of a single model topology for all phases of the STOP-G analysis cycle. The feasibility of this approach was verified using a simplified model of the LISA spacecraft.

  8. Time-delay interferometry for LISA with one arm dysfunctional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhurandhar, S V [IUCAA, Postbag 4, Ganeshkind, Pune, 411 007 (India); Nayak, K Rajesh [IISER-Kolkata, PO: BCKV Campus Main Office, Mohanpur, 741252 (India); Vinet, J-Y, E-mail: rajesh@iiserkol.ac.i [ARTEMIS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice (France)

    2010-07-07

    In order to attain the requisite sensitivity for LISA (Laser Interferometric Space Antenna)-a joint space mission of the ESA and NASA-the laser frequency noise must be suppressed below the secondary noises such as the optical path noise, acceleration noise etc. By combining six appropriately time-delayed data streams containing fractional Doppler shifts-a technique called time-delay interferometry (TDI)-the laser frequency noise may be adequately suppressed. We consider the general model of LISA where the armlengths vary with time, so that second-generation TDI are relevant. However, we must envisage the possibility that not all the optical links of LISA will be operating at all times, and therefore, we here consider the case of LISA operating with two arms only. As shown earlier in the literature, obtaining even approximate solutions of TDI to the general problem is very difficult. Since here only four optical links are relevant, the algebraic problem simplifies considerably. We are then able to exhibit a large number of solutions (from a mathematical point of view an infinite number) and further present an algorithm to generate these solutions.

  9. Mona Lisa is always happy – and only sometimes sad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaci, Emanuela; Fischer, Andreas; Heinrichs, Markus; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz; Kornmeier, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide fascination of da Vinci’s Mona Lisa has been dedicated to the emotional ambiguity of her face expression. In the present study we manipulated Mona Lisa’s mouth curvature as one potential source of ambiguity and studied how a range of happier and sadder face variants influences perception. In two experimental conditions we presented different stimulus ranges with different step sizes between stimuli along the happy-sad axis of emotional face expressions. Stimuli were presented in random order and participants indicated the perceived emotional face expression (first task) and the confidence of their response (second task). The probability of responding ‘happy’ to the original Mona Lisa was close to 100%. Furthermore, in both conditions the perceived happiness of Mona Lisa variants described sigmoidal functions of the mouth curvature. Participants’ confidence was weakest around the sigmoidal inflection points. Remarkably, the sigmoidal functions, as well as confidence values and reaction times, differed significantly between experimental conditions. Finally, participants responded generally faster to happy than to sad faces. Overall, the original Mona Lisa seems to be less ambiguous than expected. However, perception of and reaction to the emotional face content is relative and strongly depends on the used stimulus range. PMID:28281547

  10. LISA Astronomy of Double White Dwarf Binary Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeer, A.; Vecchio, A.; Nelemans, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will provide us with the largest observational sample of (interacting) double white dwarf binaries, whose evolution is driven by the radiation reaction and other effects, such as tides and mass transfer. We show that, depending on the actual physical par

  11. Angular Resolution of the LISA Gravitational Wave Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cutler, C

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the angular resolution of the planned LISA detector, a space-based laser interferometer for measuring low-frequency gravitational waves from galactic and extragalactic sources. LISA is not a pointed instrument; it is an all-sky monitor with a quadrupolar beam pattern. LISA will measure simultaneously both polarization components of incoming gravitational waves, so the data will consist of two time series. All physical properties of the source, including its position, must be extracted from these time series. LISA's angular resolution is therefore not a fixed quantity, but rather depends on the type of signal and on how much other information must be extracted. Information about the source position will be encoded in the measured signal in three ways: 1) through the relative amplitudes and phases of the two polarization components, 2) through the periodic Doppler shift imposed on the signal by the detector's motion around the Sun, and 3) through the further modulation of the signal caused by the d...

  12. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: White Dwarf Binaries, LISA and GAIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Michael; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves has ushered in a new era in astronomy. The low-frequency band covered by the future LISA detector provides unprecedented opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy. With the Global Astrometric Interferometer for Astrophysics (GAIA) mission, we expect to discover about 1,000 eclipsing binary systems composed of a WD and a main sequence star - a sizeable increase from the approximately 34 currently known binaries of this type. In advance of the first GAIA data release and the launch of LISA within the next decade, we used the Binary Stellar Evolution (BSE) code simulate the evolution of White Dwarf Binaries (WDB) in a fixed galaxy population of about 196,000 sources. Our goal is to assess the detectability of a WDB by LISA and GAIA using the parameters from our population synthesis, we calculate GW strength h, and apparent GAIA magnitude G. We can then use a scale factor to make a prediction of how many multi- messenger sources we expect to be detectable by both LISA and GAIA in a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. We create binaries 10 times to ensure randomness in distance assignment and average our results. We then determined whether or not astronomical chirp is the difference between the total chirp and the GW chirp. With Astronomical chirp and simulations of mass transfer and tides, we can gather more information about the internal astrophysics of stars in ultra-compact binary systems.

  13. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance , horizontal wind speed variance , vertical wind speed variance , viscous dissipation rate , and turbu- lent kinetic energy have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances and . On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity of the convective mixed layer similarity. This theory

  14. Mechanical design of the University of Florida Torsion Pendulum for testing the LISA Gravitational Reference Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Ryan; Chilton, Andrew; Olatunde, Tawio; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Conklin, John

    2014-03-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) requires free falling test masses, whose acceleration must be below 3 fm/s2/rtHz in the lower part of LISA's frequency band ranging from 0.1 to 100 mHz. Gravitational reference sensors (GRS) house the test masses, shield them from external disturbances, control their orientation, and sense their position at the nm/rtHz level. The GRS torsion pendulum is a laboratory test bed for GRS technology. By decoupling the system of test masses from the gravity of the Earth, it is possible to identify and quantify many sources of noise in the sensor. The mechanical design of the pendulum is critical to the study of the noise sources and the development of new technologies that can improve performance and reduce cost. The suspended test mass is a hollow, gold-coated, aluminum cube which rests inside a gold-coated, aluminum housing with electrodes for sensing and actuating all six degrees of freedom. This poster describes the design, analysis, and assembly of the mechanical subsystems of the UF Torsion Pendulum.

  15. Silicon Carbide Telescope Investigations for the LISA Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan, J.; Spannagel, R.; Braxmaier, C.; Korytov, D.; Mueller, G.; Preston, A.; Livas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors are conceived to detect GWs in the low frequency range (mili-Hertz) by measuring the distance between free-falling proof masses in spacecraft (SC) separated by 5 Gm. The reference in the last decade has been the joint ESA-NASA mission LISA. One of the key elements of LISA is the telescope since it simultaneously gathers the light coming from the far SC (approximately or equal to 100 pW) and expands, collimates and sends the outgoing beam (2 W) to the far SC. Demanding requirements have been imposed on the telescope structure: the dimensional stability of the telescope must be approximately or equal to 1pm Hz(exp-1/2) at 3 mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5 micrometer over the mission lifetime to prevent defocussing. In addition the telescope structure must be light, strong and stiff. For this reason a potential on-axis telescope structure for LISA consisting of a silicon carbide (SiC) quadpod structure has been designed, constructed and tested. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the LISA expected temperature range has been measured with a 1% accuracy which allows us to predict the shrinkage/expansion of the telescope due to temperature changes, and pico-meter dimensional stability has been measured at room temperature and at the expected operating temperature for the LISA telescope (around -6[deg]C). This work is supported by NASA Grants NNX10AJ38G and NX11AO26G,

  16. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Mission and Synergies with LISA and LIGO-Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Spergel, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is a NASA space mission in study for launch in 2024. It has a 2.4 m telescope, wide-field IR instrument operating in the 0.7 - 2.0 micron range and an exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument operating in the 400 - 1000 nm range. The observatory will perform galaxy surveys over thousands of square degrees to J=27 AB for dark energy weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements and will monitor a few square degrees for dark energy SN Ia studies. It will perform microlensing observations of the galactic bulge for an exoplanet census and direct imaging observations of nearby exoplanets with a pathfinder coronagraph. The mission will have a robust and wellfunded guest observer program for 25% of the observing time. WFIRST will be a powerful tool for time domain astronomy and for coordinated observations with gravitational wave experiments. Gravitational wave events produced by mergers of nearby binary neutron stars (LIGO-Virgo) or extragalactic supermassive black hole binaries (LISA) will produce electromagnetic radiation that WFIRST can observe.

  17. Update on The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) Pathfinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossan, B.; Brandt, Søren; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    , the Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), is planned to use an array of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) mirrors, with negligible moments of inertia, to steer its beam rapidly and accurately. The UFFO Pathfinder is scheduled to be launched into orbit by 2012 January. In this presentation, we give the current design...

  18. A Pathfinder for Animal Research and Animal Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David C.

    1992-01-01

    This pathfinder was originally prepared for "Biomedical Research and Animal Rights," a session sponsored by the Veterinary Medical Libraries and Research Libraries Sections of the Medical Library Association. Current resources are described, from bibliographies to electronic bulletin boards, which relate to the issue of laboratory animal welfare…

  19. A Pathfinder for Animal Research and Animal Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David C.

    1992-01-01

    This pathfinder was originally prepared for "Biomedical Research and Animal Rights," a session sponsored by the Veterinary Medical Libraries and Research Libraries Sections of the Medical Library Association. Current resources are described, from bibliographies to electronic bulletin boards, which relate to the issue of laboratory animal…

  20. Pathfinding the Flight Advanced Stirling Convertor Design with the ASC-E3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Kyle; Smith, Eddie; Collins, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) was initially developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as a technology development project. The ASC technology fulfills NASA's need for high efficiency power convertors for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Early successful technology demonstrations between 2003 to 2005 eventually led to the expansion of the project including the decision in 2006 to use the ASC technology on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). Sunpower has delivered 22 ASC convertors of progressively mature designs to date to GRC. Currently, Sunpower with support from GRC, Lockheed Martin Space System Company (LMSSC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the flight ASC-F in parallel with the ASC-E3 pathfinders. Sunpower will deliver four pairs of ASC-E3 convertors to GRC which will be used for extended operation reliability assessment, independent validation and verification testing, system interaction tests, and to support LMSSC controller verification. The ASC-E3 and -F convertors are being built to the same design and processing documentation and the same product specification. The initial two pairs of ASC-E3 are built before the flight units and will validate design and processing changes prior to implementation on the ASC-F flight convertors. This paper provides a summary on development of the ASC technology and the status of the ASC-E3 build and how they serve the vital pathfinder role ahead of the flight build for ASRG. The ASRG is part of two of the three candidate missions being considered for selection for the Discovery 12 mission.

  1. Lightweight Innovative Solar Array (LISA): Providing Higher Power to Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John; Fabisinski, Leo; Russell,Tiffany; Smith, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Affordable and convenient access to electrical power is essential for all spacecraft and is a critical design driver for the next generation of smallsats, including cubesats, which are currently extremely power limited. The Lightweight Innovative Solar Array (LISA), a concept designed, prototyped, and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provides an affordable, lightweight, scalable, and easily manufactured approach for power generation in space. This flexible technology has many wide-ranging applications from serving small satellites to providing abundant power to large spacecraft in GEO and beyond. By using very thin, ultra-flexible solar arrays adhered to an inflatable structure, a large area (and thus large amount of power) can be folded and packaged into a relatively small volume. The LISA array comprises a launch-stowed, orbit-deployed structure on which lightweight photovoltaic devices and, potentially, transceiver elements are embedded. The system will provide a 2.5 to 5 fold increase in specific power generation (Watts/kilogram) coupled with a >2x enhancement of stowed volume (Watts/cubic-meter) and a decrease in cost (dollars/Watt) when compared to state-of-the-art solar arrays.

  2. Rapid, automated, parallel quantitative immunoassays using highly integrated microfluidics and AlphaLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    TakYu, Zeta; Guan, Huijiao; Ki Cheung, Mei; McHugh, Walker M.; Cornell, Timothy T.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fu, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Immunoassays represent one of the most popular analytical methods for detection and quantification of biomolecules. However, conventional immunoassays such as ELISA and flow cytometry, even though providing high sensitivity and specificity and multiplexing capability, can be labor-intensive and prone to human error, making them unsuitable for standardized clinical diagnoses. Using a commercialized no-wash, homogeneous immunoassay technology (‘AlphaLISA’) in conjunction with integrated microfluidics, herein we developed a microfluidic immunoassay chip capable of rapid, automated, parallel immunoassays of microliter quantities of samples. Operation of the microfluidic immunoassay chip entailed rapid mixing and conjugation of AlphaLISA components with target analytes before quantitative imaging for analyte detections in up to eight samples simultaneously. Aspects such as fluid handling and operation, surface passivation, imaging uniformity, and detection sensitivity of the microfluidic immunoassay chip using AlphaLISA were investigated. The microfluidic immunoassay chip could detect one target analyte simultaneously for up to eight samples in 45 min with a limit of detection down to 10 pg mL-1. The microfluidic immunoassay chip was further utilized for functional immunophenotyping to examine cytokine secretion from human immune cells stimulated ex vivo. Together, the microfluidic immunoassay chip provides a promising high-throughput, high-content platform for rapid, automated, parallel quantitative immunosensing applications.

  3. Rapid prototyping and evaluation of programmable SIMD SDR processors in LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Hengzhu; Zhang, Botao; Liu, Dongpei

    2013-03-01

    With the development of international wireless communication standards, there is an increase in computational requirement for baseband signal processors. Time-to-market pressure makes it impossible to completely redesign new processors for the evolving standards. Due to its high flexibility and low power, software defined radio (SDR) digital signal processors have been proposed as promising technology to replace traditional ASIC and FPGA fashions. In addition, there are large numbers of parallel data processed in computation-intensive functions, which fosters the development of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture in SDR platform. So a new way must be found to prototype the SDR processors efficiently. In this paper we present a bit-and-cycle accurate model of programmable SIMD SDR processors in a machine description language LISA. LISA is a language for instruction set architecture which can gain rapid model at architectural level. In order to evaluate the availability of our proposed processor, three common baseband functions, FFT, FIR digital filter and matrix multiplication have been mapped on the SDR platform. Analytical results showed that the SDR processor achieved the maximum of 47.1% performance boost relative to the opponent processor.

  4. Visualizing Mars Using Virtual Reality: A State of the Art Mapping Technique Used on Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, C.; Zbinden, E.; Blackmon, T.; Nguyen, L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an interactive terrain visualization system which rapidly generates and interactively displays photorealistic three-dimensional (3-D) models produced from stereo images. This product, first demonstrated in Mars Pathfinder, is interactive, 3-D, and can be viewed in an immersive display which qualifies it for the name Virtual Reality (VR). The use of this technology on Mars Pathfinder was the first use of VR for geologic analysis. A primary benefit of using VR to display geologic information is that it provides an improved perception of depth and spatial layout of the remote site. The VR aspect of the display allows an operator to move freely in the environment, unconstrained by the physical limitations of the perspective from which the data were acquired. Virtual Reality offers a way to archive and retrieve information in a way that is intuitively obvious. Combining VR models with stereo display systems can give the user a sense of presence at the remote location. The capability, to interactively perform measurements from within the VR model offers unprecedented ease in performing operations that are normally time consuming and difficult using other techniques. Thus, Virtual Reality can be a powerful a cartographic tool. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Xanthelasma and lipoma in Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dequeker, Jan; Muls, Erik; Leenders, Kathleen

    2004-08-01

    The painting Mona Lisa in the Louvre, Paris, by Leonardo da Vinci (1503-1506), shows skin alterations at the inner end of the left upper eyelid similar to xanthelasma, and a swelling of the dorsum of the right hand suggestive of a subcutaneous lipoma. These findings in a 25-30 year old woman, who died at the age of 37, may be indicative of essential hyperlipidemia, a strong risk factor for ischemic heart disease in middle age. As far as is known, this portrait of Mona Lisa painted in 1506 is the first evidence that xanthelasma and lipoma were prevalent in the sixteenth century, long before the first description by Addison and Gall in 1851.

  6. DaVinci's Mona Lisa entering the next dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hesslinger, Vera M

    2013-01-01

    For several of Leonardo da Vinci's paintings, such as The Virgin and Child with St Anne or the Mona Lisa, there exist copies produced by his own studio. In case of the Mona Lisa, a quite exceptional, rediscovered studio copy was presented to the public in 2012 by the Prado Museum in Madrid. Not only does it mirror its famous counterpart superficially; it also features the very same corrections to the lower layers, which indicates that da Vinci and the 'copyist' must have elaborated their panels simultaneously. On the basis of subjective (thirty-two participants estimated painter-model constellations) as well as objective data (analysis of trajectories between landmarks of both paintings), we revealed that both versions differ slightly in perspective. We reconstructed the original studio setting and found evidence that the disparity between both paintings mimics human binocular disparity. This points to the possibility that the two Giocondas together might represent the first stereoscopic image in world history.

  7. Performance comparison of MoNA and LISA neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtell, Kimberly; Rethman, Kaitlynne; Haagsma, Autumn; Finck, Joseph; Smith, Jenna; Snyder, Jesse

    2010-11-01

    In 2002 eight primarily undergraduate institutions constructed and tested the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) which has been used to detect high energy neutrons at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Nine institutions have now designed, constructed and tested the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) neutron detector which will be used at the NSCL and the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). Both detectors are comprised of 144 detector modules. Each module is a 200 x 10 x 10 cm^3 bar organic plastic scintillator with a photomultiplier tube mounted on each end. Using cosmic rays and a gamma source, we compared the performance of MoNA and LISA by using the same electronics to check light attenuation, position resolution, rise times, and cosmic ray peak widths. Results will be presented.

  8. [Mona Lisa syndrome: idiopathic facial paralysis during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrand, M-C; Friebe-Hoffmann, U; Bender, H G; Kojda, G; Hoffmann, T K

    2006-08-01

    Mona Lisa has been pregnant shortly before the famous painting of Leonardo da Vinci was created (1503-1506). Recently, it has been speculated that Mona Lisa's famous smile is caused by facial muscle contracture and/or synkinesis after Bell's palsy with incomplete nerval regeneration. During pregnancy the incidence of Bell's palsy is increased up to 3.3 times compared to nonpregnant women. The etiology, associated factors as well as various treatment options aiming at the prevention of associated complications and improving recovery of facial nerve function have intensively been evaluated over the past three decades. However, the preferred mode of therapy management, particularly in pregnant women, remains undecided. Corticosteroids may be beneficial if they are applied after the first trimester.

  9. Development of a US Gravitational Wave Laser System for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan B.; Numata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A highly stable and robust laser system is a key component of the space-based LISA mission architecture.In this talk I will describe our plans to demonstrate a TRL 5 LISA laser system at Goddard Space Flight Center by 2016.The laser system includes a low-noise oscillator followed by a power amplifier. The oscillator is a low-mass, compact 10mW External Cavity Laser, consisting of a semiconductor laser coupled to an optical cavity, built by the laser vendorRedfern Integrated Optics. The amplifier is a diode-pumped Yb fiber with 2W output, built at Goddard. I will show noiseand reliability data for the full laser system, and describe our plans to reach TRL 5 by 2016.

  10. [The Mona Lisa: a compendium of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez García, A

    2006-03-01

    Through the history of art many artists in their works have portrayed different signs of pathologies. In some cases, the illnesses are easily recognised, although in others a well trained specialist is necessary to reach the diagnosis. Within the numerous works of art that have attracted medical interest, there is none comparable to the most famous and enigmatic portrait painted by Leonardo da Vinci, the Mona Lisa.

  11. Cosmological Backgrounds of Gravitational Waves and eLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois

    2012-01-01

    We review cosmological backgrounds of gravitational waves with a particular attention to the scientific potential of the eLISA/NGO mission. After an overview of cosmological backgrounds and detectors, we consider different cosmological sources that could lead to an observable signal. We then study the backgrounds produced by first-order phase transitions and networks of cosmic strings, assessing the prospects for their detection.

  12. LISA-The Library and Information Services in Astronomy Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    WorldCat shows that 107 libraries have copies of these proceedings. Much credit must be given overall to Gart Westerhout, for without his support...the comparatively small number of core journals and databases , coupled with generous funding from space agencies and non-profit organizations, astron...appeared in July 1995. More recent LISA meetings discussed net- worked databases , digitization projects, open access projects in astronomy libraries, digital

  13. Computer Studies Of The Isleworth And Louvre Mona Lisas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, John F.

    1989-07-01

    One of the most pervasive problems in the scholarship of classical paintings is that of authenticity. Traditionally, the attribution of a work of art rests on the subjective opinion of an art historian bolstered by scientific data pertaining to the types and possibly the ages of the materials of the artwork. To expand the range of technical information that may be applied to the painting authentication problem, the methods of computer image processing (IP) have been employed to compare the techniques in two paintings. One is the Mona Lisa del Gioconda by Leonardo da Vinci. The other is known as the Isleworth Mona Lisa and has also been attributed to Leonardo by a few scholars. Computer IP was used to compare statistical and geometrical features of the two paintings. It emerged that the Isleworth work is not a copy of the Louvre painting but does have numerous similarities in composition and execution. These findings lend support to the theory that the Louvre Mona Lisa may be a portrait of Costanza by Leonardo that had been thought lost.

  14. eLISA: Astrophysics and cosmology in the millihertz regime

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Babak, Stanislav; Binétruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohé, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-François; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K; Schutz, Bernard F; Sesana, Alberto; Stebbins, Robin; Sumner, Tim; Vallisneri, Michele; Vitale, Stefano; Volonteri, Marta; Ward, Henry

    2012-01-01

    This document introduces the exciting and fundamentally new science and astronomy that the European New Gravitational Wave Observatory (NGO) mission (derived from the previous LISA proposal) will deliver. The mission (which we will refer to by its informal name "eLISA") will survey for the first time the low-frequency gravitational wave band (about 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), with sufficient sensitivity to detect interesting individual astrophysical sources out to z = 15. The eLISA mission will discover and study a variety of cosmic events and systems with high sensitivity: coalescences of massive black holes binaries, brought together by galaxy mergers; mergers of earlier, less-massive black holes during the epoch of hierarchical galaxy and black-hole growth; stellar-mass black holes and compact stars in orbits just skimming the horizons of massive black holes in galactic nuclei of the present era; extremely compact white dwarf binaries in our Galaxy, a rich source of information about binary evolution and about futur...

  15. Nested sampling as a tool for LISA data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gair, Jonathan R [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, CB3 0HA, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Feroz, Farhan; Graff, Philip; Hobson, Michael P [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Babak, Stanislav; Petiteau, Antoine [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476, Potsdam (Germany); Porter, Edward K, E-mail: jgair@ast.cam.ac.u [APC, UMR 7164, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2010-05-01

    Nested sampling is a technique for efficiently computing the probability of a data set under a particular hypothesis, also called the Bayesian Evidence or Marginal Likelihood, and for evaluating the posterior. MULTINEST is a multi-modal nested sampling algorithm which has been designed to efficiently explore and characterize posterior probability surfaces containing multiple secondary solutions. We have applied the MULTINEST algorithm to a number of problems in gravitational wave data analysis. In this article, we describe the algorithm and present results for several applications of the algorithm to analysis of mock LISA data. We summarise recently published results for a test case in which we searched for two non-spinning black hole binary merger signals in simulated LISA data. We also describe results obtained with MULTINEST in the most recent round of the Mock LISA Data Challenge (MLDC), in which the algorithm was used to search for and characterise both spinning supermassive black hole binary inspirals and bursts from cosmic string cusps. In all these applications, the algorithm found the correct number of signals and efficiently recovered the posterior probability distribution. Moreover, in most cases the waveform corresponding to the best a-posteriori parameters had an overlap in excess of 99% with the true signal.

  16. LISA Framework for Enhancing Gravitational Wave Signal Extraction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Framework for benchmarking and comparing signal-extraction and noise-interference-removal methods that are applicable to interferometric Gravitational Wave detector systems. The primary use is towards comparing signal and noise extraction techniques at LISA frequencies from multiple (possibly confused) ,gravitational wave sources. The Framework includes extensive hybrid learning/classification algorithms, as well as post-processing regularization methods, and is based on a unique plug-and-play (component) architecture. Published methods for signal extraction and interference removal at LISA Frequencies are being encoded, as well as multiple source noise models, so that the stiffness of GW Sensitivity Space can be explored under each combination of methods. Furthermore, synthetic datasets and source models can be created and imported into the Framework, and specific degraded numerical experiments can be run to test the flexibility of the analysis methods. The Framework also supports use of full current LISA Testbeds, Synthetic data systems, and Simulators already in existence through plug-ins and wrappers, thus preserving those legacy codes and systems in tact. Because of the component-based architecture, all selected procedures can be registered or de-registered at run-time, and are completely reusable, reconfigurable, and modular.

  17. Precise timing calibration for MoNA and LISA detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Sierra; Barker, Alyson; Taylor, Nathaniel; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA), working in conjunction with the Sweeper Magnet and Detector Chamber at the NSCL, MSU, are used to determine the properties of neutron-unbound ground and excited states of neutron-rich nuclei. In order to determine the decay energy, precise energy and trajectory for both the charged fragment and the neutron need to be determined. This requires very precise time calibration for each of the 288 scintillator detectors in the two neutron arrays. Initial timing calibrations for all bars in a vertical layer are achieved using muons passing through all 16 detectors, taking into account the muon transit time from bar to bar. Vertical layers are then ``tied'' to one another using the arrival times of gamma rays originating from the target during production runs. In the LISA commissioning experiment, prompt gamma rays from the contaminant beam 29Na were used instead of those from the 26F production beam since they constituted 98% of the beam intensity (compared with the 26F production beam). Results for the LISA commissioning experiment will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  18. Interface Generation and Compositional Verification in JavaPathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Pasareanu, Corina

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for interface generation of software components. Given a component, our algorithm uses learning techniques to compute a permissive interface representing legal usage of the component. Unlike our previous work, this algorithm does not require knowledge about the component s environment. Furthermore, in contrast to other related approaches, our algorithm computes permissive interfaces even in the presence of non-determinism in the component. Our algorithm is implemented in the JavaPathfinder model checking framework for UML statechart components. We have also added support for automated assume-guarantee style compositional verification in JavaPathfinder, using component interfaces. We report on the application of the presented approach to the generation of interfaces for flight software components.

  19. First light of the LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Arcidiacono, C.; Marafatto, L.; Farinato, J.; Baumeister, H.; Bertram, T.; Berwein, J.; Briegel, F.; Conrad, A.; Kittman, F.; Kopon, D.; Hofferbert, R.; Magrin, D.; Radhakrishnan Santhakumari, K. K.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.

    2014-07-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder experiment is a test-bed to verify a very complex sub-system: the Ground-layer Wavefront Sensor, or GWS. Pathfinder will test the GWS in its final working environment and demonstrate on-sky the performance achievable with a multiple natural guide star, ground-layer adaptive optics system with a very wide FoV. The GWS uses up to 12 natural guide stars within a 2.8'-6' annular field of view and drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror to correct the lower layers of atmospheric turbulence. This paper will trace the path of the instrument on its way to First Light on-sky in November 2013, from its installation on the telescope to the calibrations to its final operation, focusing in particular on opto-mechanical and software aspects and how they lead to the main achieved results.

  20. Algoritma Pathfinding A* Pada Game RPG Tanaman Higienis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Pramono

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Penggunaan pestisida kimia pada produkpertanian berakibat buruk terhadap kesehatan manusiadan menimbulkan pencemaran lingkungan. Salah satusolusinya adalah dengan cara membuat media sosialisasipengenalan pertanian higienis kepada masyarakat.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menghasilkan sebuahproduk game tiga dimensi sebagai upaya untukmenyampaikan informasi mengenai konsep pertanianhigienis. Dalam game RPG diperlukan suatu penerapansuatu algoritma pathfinding sebagai implementasipenghalang pada game tanaman higienis.Model perancangan yang digunakan adalah modelprosedural, merupakan model penelitian yang bersifatdeskriptif, yang menggariskan langkah-langkah yangharus di ikuti untuk menghasilkan sebuah produk.Pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan cara studi literaturmengenai algoritma pathfinding A* dan game komputer,serta identifikasi target audiens dan produk kompetitor.Tahap ujicoba pada penerapan algoritma A* inidilakukan dengan 2 pola yaitu uji coba internal dan ujicoba eksternal.Berdasarkan hasil ujicoba yang telah dilakukanterhadap algoritma A* dalam game higienis dapatdisimpulkan algoritma A* dapat diimplementasikandengan perancangan game tanaman organis terutamapada pergerakan penghalang. Kata Kunci: perancangan, algoritma A*, game

  1. RPP Game Edukasi Pathfinding Adventures - Materi Sistem Koordinat - Kelas 8

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayatullah, Aulia Muslim

    2016-01-01

    Pathfinding Adventures bertujuan untuk membantu pemain dalam memahami konsep matematika kelas 8 mengenai sistem koordinat. Pada game ini pemain dapat berpetualang di area khusus untuk mencari dan menggambar peta dari hasil perjalanan dalam melaksanakan misi di setiap tingkatan permainan. Pemain diberikan akses kontrol pada game dalam format “Third Person” atau dari sudut pandang luar karakter pada permainan. Menyelesaikan tantangan-tantangan yang diberikan di setiap tingkatan ...

  2. Analysis of pathfinder SST algorithm for global and regional conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy Kumar; P Minnett; G Podesta; R Evans; K Kilpatrick

    2000-12-01

    As part of the Pathfinder program developed jointly by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) a large database of in situ sea surface temperature (SST) measurements coincident with satellite data is now available to the user community. The Pathfinder Matchup Database (PMDB) is a multi-year, multi-satellite collection of coincident measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and broadly distributed buoy data (matchups). This database allows the user community to test and validate new SST algorithms to improve the present accuracy of surface temperature measurements from satellites. In this paper we investigate the performance of a global Pathfinder algorithm to specific regional conditions. It is shown that for zenith angles less than 45°, the best-expected statistical discrepancy between satellite and buoy data is about ∼0.5 K. In general, the bias of the residuals (satellite - buoy) is negative in most regions, except in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas, where the residuals are always positive. A seasonal signal in SST residuals is observed in all regions and is strongest in the Indian Ocean. The channel-difference term used as a proxy for atmospheric water vapor correction is observed to be unresponsive for columnar water vapor values greater than 45 mm and high zenith angles. This unresponsiveness of the channels leads to underestimation of sea surface temperature from satellites in these conditions.

  3. LISA extreme-mass-ratio inspiral events as probes of the black hole mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Volonteri, Marta

    2010-01-01

    One of the sources of gravitational waves for the proposed space-based gravitational wave detector, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), are the inspirals of compact objects into supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxies - extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs). Using LISA observations, we will be able to measure the parameters of each EMRI system detected to very high precision. However, the statistics of the set of EMRI events observed by LISA will be more important in constraining astrophysical models than extremely precise measurements for individual systems. The black holes to which LISA is most sensitive are in a mass range that is difficult to probe using other techniques, so LISA provides an almost unique window onto these objects. In this paper we explore, using Bayesian techniques, the constraints that LISA EMRI observations can place on the mass function of black holes at low redshift. We describe a general framework for approaching inference of this type --- using multiple observ...

  4. Lightweight Integrated Solar Array (LISA): Providing Higher Power to Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John; Fabisinski, Leo; Lockett, Tiffany Russell

    2015-01-01

    Affordable and convenient access to electrical power is essential for all spacecraft and is a critical design driver for the next generation of smallsats, including CubeSats, which are currently extremely power limited. The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array (LISA), a concept designed, prototyped, and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provides an affordable, lightweight, scalable, and easily manufactured approach for power generation in space. This flexible technology has many wide-ranging applications from serving small satellites to providing abundant power to large spacecraft in GEO and beyond. By using very thin, ultraflexible solar arrays adhered to an inflatable or deployable structure, a large area (and thus large amount of power) can be folded and packaged into a relatively small volume.

  5. Bell's palsy: the answer to the riddle of Leonardo da Vinci's 'Mona Lisa'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, W J

    2011-05-01

    The smile of the famed portrait 'The Mona Lisa' has perplexed both art historians and researchers for the past 500 years. There has been a multitude of theories expounded to explain the nature of the model's enigmatic smile. The origin of the model's wry smile can be demonstrated through a careful analysis of both documented facts concerning the portrait--some gathered only recently through the use of modern technology--and a knowledge of the clinical presentation of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy is more prevalent in women who are either pregnant or who have recently given birth. This paper postulates that the smile of the portrait's model was due to Leonardo da Vinci's anatomically precise representation of a new mother affected by Bell's palsy subsequent to her recent pregnancy.

  6. Laser Stabilization and Material Studies for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Amanda; Mueller, G.; Tanner, D. B.; Arsenovic, P.; Livas, J.; Preston, A.; Sanjuan, J.; Reza, S. A.; Mitryk, S.; Eichholz, J.; Spector, A.; Donelan, D.; Spannagel, R.; Korytov, D.

    2011-05-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint NASA/ESA project designed to detect gravitational waves. The University of Florida (UF) LISA laboratory is currently implementing and testing much of the instrumentation of the LISA interferometer measurement system to ensure the success of the upcoming LISA mission. LISA will consist of three spacecraft (SC) orbiting the sun in an equilateral triangular formation with an arm length of 5 Gm. Each SC will house two free floating proof-masses, two laser interferometer benches and two telescopes to transmit the laser light between SC. The constellation will trail the earth by 20° and be tilted by 60° with respect to the ecliptic. LISA is designed to detect low frequency gravitational waves (GWs) in the frequency band of .1mHz to 1 Hz with optimal strain sensitivity of 10^-21/sqrt(Hz) at 3 mHz corresponding to sources such as galactic binaries and black hole mergers. The dimensional stability of all optical paths within each interferometer arm is imperative for the success of LISA. Changes larger than a pm/sqrt(Hz) in the distance between optical components in the interferometer would limit the sensitivity of LISA. The UF LISA lab is testing materials with low thermal expansion coefficients which could be used as spacer materials for the telescopes or as the base material for the optical benches. Together with the LISA group at Goddard Space Flight Center we currently also test the dimensional stability of a silicon carbide telescope structure for LISA. The most demanding requirement on material stability is the requirement for the optical reference cavity which is used as the frequency reference for the lasers. We currently test different sensing schemes for the laser frequency stabilization system of LISA and will also report about these experiments. This work is supported by NASA Contract #00078244 and NASA Grant NNX08AG75G.

  7. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, D.; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bignall, H. E.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hegarty, S.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; Popping, A.; Raja, W.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bateman, T. J.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Cheng, W.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Feain, I.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G. A.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lensson, E. S.; MacLeod, A.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Mirtschin, P.; Mitchell, D.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R.; Pearce, S.; Qiao, R. Y.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Wark, R. M.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C.; Wilson, T.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Boolardy Engineering Test Array is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarisation beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of Boolardy Engineering Test Array's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties, and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating Boolardy Engineering Test Array that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final Australian Square Kilometre Array Path telescope.

  8. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: System Architecture and Specifications of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    CERN Document Server

    Hotan, A W; Harvey-Smith, L; Humphreys, B; Jeffs, B D; Shimwell, T; Tuthill, J; Voronkov, M; Allen, G; Amy, S; Ardern, K; Axtens, P; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Barker, S; Bateman, T; Beresford, R; Bock, D; Bolton, R; Bowen, M; Boyle, B; Braun, R; Broadhurst, S; Brodrick, D; Brooks, K; Brothers, M; Brown, A; Cantrall, C; Carrad, G; Chapman, J; Cheng, W; Chippendale, A; Chung, Y; Cooray, F; Cornwell, T; Davis, E; de Souza, L; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Edwards, P; Ekers, R; Feain, I; Ferris, D; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Grancea, A; Gupta, N; Guzman, JC; Hampson, G; Haskins, C; Hay, S; Hayman, D; Hoyle, S; Jacka, C; Jackson, C; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Johnston, S; Joseph, J; Kendall, R; Kesteven, M; Kiraly, D; Koribalski, B; Leach, M; Lenc, E; Lensson, E; Li, L; Mackay, S; Macleod, A; Maher, T; Marquarding, M; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Mickle, S; Mirtschin, P; Norris, R; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; O'Sullivan, J; Pathikulangara, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C; Qiao, RY; Reynolds, J E; Rispler, A; Roberts, P; Roxby, D; Schinckel, A; Shaw, R; Shields, M; Storey, M; Sweetnam, T; Troup, E; Turner, B; Tzioumis, A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C; Wilson, T; Wormnes, K; Wu, X

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the system architecture of a newly constructed radio telescope - the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, which is a prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Phased array feed technology is used to form multiple simultaneous beams per antenna, providing astronomers with unprecedented survey speed. The test array described here is a 6-antenna interferometer, fitted with prototype signal processing hardware capable of forming at least 9 dual-polarisation beams simultaneously, allowing several square degrees to be imaged in a single pointed observation. The main purpose of the test array is to develop beamforming and wide-field calibration methods for use with the full telescope, but it will also be capable of limited early science demonstrations.

  9. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, D; Bannister, K; Bell, M E; Bignall, H E; Chippendale, A P; Edwards, P G; Harvey-Smith, L; Hegarty, S; Heywood, I; Hotan, A W; Indermuehle, B T; Lenc, E; Marvil, J; Popping, A; Raja, W; Reynolds, J E; Sault, R J; Serra, P; Voronkov, M A; Whiting, M; Amy, S W; Axtens, P; Ball, L; Bateman, T J; Bock, D C -J; Bolton, R; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Brown, A J; Bunton, J D; Cheng, W; Cornwell, T; DeBoer, D; Feain, I; Gough, R; Gupta, N; Guzman, J C; Hampson, G A; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Jacka, C; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Joseph, J; Koribalski, B S; Leach, M; Lensson, E S; MacLeod, A; Mackay, S; Marquarding, M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Mirtschin, P; Mitchell, D; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R; Pearce, S; Qiao, R Y; Schinckel, A E T; Shields, M; Shimwell, T W; Storey, M; Troup, E; Turner, B; Tuthill, J; Tzioumis, A; Wark, R M; Westmeier, T; Wilson, C; Wilson, T

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA), the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope ASKAP. BETA is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarization beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of BETA's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating BETA that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final ASKAP telescope.

  10. EUSO-BALLOON a pathfinder for detecting UHECR's from the edge of space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotti V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available EUSO-Balloon has been conceived as a pathfinder mission for JEM-EUSO, to perform an end-to-end test of the subsystems and components, and to prove the global detection chain while improving our knowledge of the atmospheric and terrestrial UV background. Through a series of stratospheric balloon flights performed by the French Space Agency CNES, EUSO-BALLOON will serve as an evolutive test-bench for all the key technologies of JEM-EUSO. EUSO-Balloon also has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, marking a key milestone in the development of UHECR science, and paving the way for any future large scale, space-based UHECR observatory.

  11. MONA, LISA and VINCI Soon Ready to Travel to Paranal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    First Instruments for the VLT Interferometer Summary A few months from now, light from celestial objects will be directed for the first time towards ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). During this "First Light" event and the subsequent test phase, the light will be recorded with a special test instrument, VINCI (VLT INterferometer Commissioning Instrument). The main components of this high-tech instrument are aptly named MONA (a system that combines the light beams from several telescopes by means of optical fibers) and LISA (the infrared camera). VINCI was designed and constructed within a fruitful collaboration between ESO and several research institutes and industrial companies in France and Germany . It is now being assembled at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany) and will soon be ready for installation at the telescope on Paranal. With the VLTI and VINCI, Europe's astronomers are now entering the first, crucial phase of an exciting scientific and technology venture that will ultimately put the world's most powerful optical/IR interferometric facility in their hands . PR Photo 31/00 : VINCI during tests at the ESO Headquarters in Garching. The VLT Interferometer (VLTI) ESO Press Photo 31/00 ESO Press Photo 31/00 [Preview; JPEG: 400 x 301; 43k] [Normal; JPEG: 800 x 602;208xk] [Full-Res; JPEG: 1923 x 1448; 2.2Mb] PR Photo 31/00 shows the various components of the complex VINCI instrument for the VLT Interferometer , during the current tests at the Optical Laboratory at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany). It will later be installed in "clean-room" conditions within the Interferometric Laboratory at the Paranal Observatory. This electronic photo was obtained for documentary purposes. VINCI (VLT INterferometer Commissioning Instrument) is the "First Light" instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). Early in 2001, it will be used for the first tests

  12. T.D Lee and Lisa Randall visit ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    Professor Tsung-Dao Lee, who received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1957 for postulating that parity is not conserved in weak interactions, visited the ATLAS detector this month. He is seen here in the company of Peter Jenni, spokesperson for ATLAS. T.D. Lee is still very active at over 80, pursuing his theory work to this day. Professor Lisa Randall from Harvard University, the well-known theorist behind the Randall-Sundrum theory for extra dimensions, was also part of the group visiting the ATLAS detector. She is seen here with Fabiola Gianotti, deputy spokesperson for ATLAS. Lisa Randall's two initial papers have been quoted both more than 2500 times, making her the most cited theoretical physicist in the world in the last five years as of last autumn - a total of about 10,000 citations! One wonders here if Peter is pointing to a CP-violating graviton spotted in the ATLAS cavern... From left to right: Fabiola Gianotti, Gustaaf Brooijmans, convener of the ATLAS Exotics physics gro...

  13. Modeling neutron events in MoNA-LISA using MCNPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliston, Margaret; Peters, Alexander; Stryker, Kristen; Stephenson, Sharon; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The MoNA-LISA collaboration uses time-of-flight techniques and charged particle detectors to determine the structure of exotic nuclei such as 24 O and 12 Be . To determine the decay energy in particular, a neutron that hits the Modular Neutron Array and the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array has its energy, position and angle of incidence recorded if and only if the charged particle detector system detects an appropriate charged-particle fragment. However, the analysis uses only the first neutron to hit the detector array even in the case of 2n events, since the data acquisition system cannot distinguish between simultaneous but random 2n events and events due to 2n reactions. We are using MCNPX to model the reaction channels possible in the MoNA-LISA detector system in an effort to better improve the resolution on decay energy spectra for events with multiple neutrons. This work was supported in part by US National Science Foundation Award 0922335.

  14. Charged Particle Trajectories in Sweeper Magnet for LISA Commissioning Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Alyson; Garrett, Sierra; Taylor, Nathaniel; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) located at NSCL, MSU, is used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Sweeper Magnet for experiments investigating the properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron dripline. In the LISA commissioning experiment, designed to study neutron unstable 24O excited states, decay energy calculations require careful determination of charged fragment and neutron trajectories following breakup. Tracking of charged particles through the Sweeper Chamber is accomplished using two Cathode Readout Drift Chamber (CRDC) detectors separated by 1.8 m. During analysis of individual charged fragment passages through both CRDCs we recognized a majority of events had incomplete charge collection in the center pads. Without correction, standard peak location algorithms incorrectly determined the individual event centroids thereby reducing trajectory resolution. We developed a method and algorithm for correctly determining the centroids to restore trajectory resolution, critical for neutron breakup event reconstruction and decay energy determination. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  15. Using LISA to Learn How Pairs of Black Holes Formed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Artists impression of the European Space Agencys Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, currently planned for a 2034 launch. [NASA]How are black-hole binaries built? Observations of gravitational waves from these systems made using the European Space Agencys upcoming mission, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) may be able to reveal their origins.Formation ChannelsThere are two primary placeswhere stellar-mass black-hole binaries are thought to form:In isolation in the galactic field, as the components of a stellar binary independently evolve into black holes but remain bound to each other.In dense stellar environments like globular clusters, where the high density of already-formed black holes can cause a pair to dynamically interact and form a binary before being ejected from the cluster.Can we differentiate between these origins based on future detections of gravitational waves from black-hole binaries? A team of scientists led by Katelyn Breivik (CIERA, Northwestern University) thinks that we can!The gravitational-wave spectrum and how we detect it (click for a closer look!). While ground-based interferometers like LIGO detect black-hole binaries in the final moments before merger, LISAs lower frequency band will allow it to detect binaries earlier in their inspiral. [NASA Goddard SFC]Differentiation by EccentricityBreivik and collaborators believe that the key clue is the binarys eccentricity. Gravitational-wave emission will eventually circularize all black-hole binaries during their inspiral. But in the first formation scenario, binary evolution processes like tidal circularization and mass transfer will reduce the binarys eccentricity early on whereas in the second scenario, the binaries that form in globular clusters may retain eccentricity in their orbits long enough that we can detect it.Ground-based interferometers wont be up to this task; by the time the binary orbits shrink enough to evolve into the LIGO frequency band, the orbits wont have

  16. Gravitational-wave cosmography with LISA and the Hubble tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Seto, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    We propose that stellar-mass binary black holes like GW150914 will become a tool to explore the local Universe within ˜100 Mpc in the era of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). High calibration accuracy and annual motion of LISA could enable us to localize up to ≈60 binaries more accurately than the error volume of ≈100 Mpc3 without electromagnetic counterparts under moderately optimistic assumptions. This accuracy will give us a fair chance to determine the host object solely by gravitational waves. By combining the luminosity distance extracted from gravitational waves with the cosmological redshift determined from the host, the local value of the Hubble parameter will be determined up to a few % without relying on the empirically constructed distance ladder. Gravitational-wave cosmography would pave the way for resolution of the disputed Hubble tension, where the local and global measurements disagree in the value of the Hubble parameter at 3.4 σ level, which amounts to ≈9 %.

  17. FPGA wavelet processor design using language for instruction-set architectures (LISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Vera, Alonzo; Rao, Suhasini; Lenk, Karl; Pattichis, Marios

    2007-04-01

    The design of an microprocessor is a long, tedious, and error-prone task consisting of typically three design phases: architecture exploration, software design (assembler, linker, loader, profiler), architecture implementation (RTL generation for FPGA or cell-based ASIC) and verification. The Language for instruction-set architectures (LISA) allows to model a microprocessor not only from instruction-set but also from architecture description including pipelining behavior that allows a design and development tool consistency over all levels of the design. To explore the capability of the LISA processor design platform a.k.a. CoWare Processor Designer we present in this paper three microprocessor designs that implement a 8/8 wavelet transform processor that is typically used in today's FBI fingerprint compression scheme. We have designed a 3 stage pipelined 16 bit RISC processor (NanoBlaze). Although RISC μPs are usually considered "fast" processors due to design concept like constant instruction word size, deep pipelines and many general purpose registers, it turns out that DSP operations consume essential processing time in a RISC processor. In a second step we have used design principles from programmable digital signal processor (PDSP) to improve the throughput of the DWT processor. A multiply-accumulate operation along with indirect addressing operation were the key to achieve higher throughput. A further improvement is possible with today's FPGA technology. Today's FPGAs offer a large number of embedded array multipliers and it is now feasible to design a "true" vector processor (TVP). A multiplication of two vectors can be done in just one clock cycle with our TVP, a complete scalar product in two clock cycles. Code profiling and Xilinx FPGA ISE synthesis results are provided that demonstrate the essential improvement that a TVP has compared with traditional RISC or PDSP designs.

  18. Periodontal status among adolescents in Georgia. A pathfinder study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present pathfinder study was to screen and map the periodontal status of Georgian population in accordance with the guidelines of the World Health Organization for population based surveys. Methods. During 2012, a pathfinder study was conducted to collect this data. For the periodontal portion of the study, 15-year-old school children were examined in the capital city of Tbilisi as well as in two other large cities and 4 smaller villages. All participants were examined by a trained dental team in a classroom using a dental mirror and a periodontal probe. Periodontal examination included plaque scores, calculus scores, probing depth measurements and bleeding on probing. These measurements were recorded for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results. A total of 397 15-year-old participants were examined in this pathfinder study. There were 240 females (60.45% and 157 males (39.55%. Of the total participants 196 (49.37% were urban adolescents while 201 (50.63% were from rural communities. Mean probing depth was 3.34 ± 0.57 mm with a range of 1 to 10 mm; a relatively high proportion (34.26% of these subjects presented with at least one site with pockets of 5 mm or deeper. Males presented with greater plaque, calculus and probing depths than females. When urban and rural populations were compared, urban participants presented with more plaque, probing depths and bleeding on probing. Greater pocket depths were found to be related to the presence of plaque calculus and bleeding on probing. Conclusions. Overall, rather high incidences of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm were detected in this population. This data should serve to prepare further more detailed epidemiological studies that will serve to plan and implement prevent and treat strategies for periodontal diseases in Georgia and also help make manpower decisions.

  19. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 1; Data Processing Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Beckley, Brian D.; Ray, Richard D.; Wang, Yan-Ming; Tsaoussi, Lucia; Brenner, Anita; Williamson, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-sedes data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. This report describes the processing schemes used to produce a consistent data set and two of the products derived f rom these data. Other reports have been produced that: a) describe the validation of these data sets against tide gauge measurements and b) evaluate the statistical properties of the data that are relevant to climate change. The use of satellite altimetry for earth observations was proposed in the early 1960s. The first successful space based radar altimeter experiment was flown on SkyLab in 1974. The first successful satellite radar altimeter was flown aboard the Geos-3 spacecraft between 1975 and 1978. While a useful data set was collected from this mission for geophysical studies, the noise in the radar measured and incomplete global coverage precluded ft from inclusion in the Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder program. This program initiated its analysis with the Seasat mission, which was the first satellite radar altimeter flown for oceanography.

  20. Symbolic PathFinder: Symbolic Execution of Java Bytecode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Rungta, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Symbolic Pathfinder (SPF) combines symbolic execution with model checking and constraint solving for automated test case generation and error detection in Java programs with unspecified inputs. In this tool, programs are executed on symbolic inputs representing multiple concrete inputs. Values of variables are represented as constraints generated from the analysis of Java bytecode. The constraints are solved using off-the shelf solvers to generate test inputs guaranteed to achieve complex coverage criteria. SPF has been used successfully at NASA, in academia, and in industry.

  1. Design Overview of the DM Radio Pathfinder Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Dawson, Carl; Graham, Peter; Irwin, Kent; Kuenstner, Stephen; Li, Dale; Mardon, Jeremy; Moseley, Harvey; Mule, Richard; Phipps, Arran; Rajendran, Surjeet; Steffen, Zach; Young, Betty

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the DM Radio, a dual search for axion and hidden photon dark matter using a tunable superconducting lumped-element resonator. We discuss the prototype DM Radio Pathfinder experiment, which will probe hidden photons in the 500 peV (100 kHz)-50 neV (10 MHz) mass range. We detail the design of the various components: the LC resonant detector, the resonant frequency tuning procedure, the differential SQUID readout circuit, the shielding, and the cryogenic mounting structure. We prese...

  2. Dynamic real-time hierarchical heuristic search for pathfinding.

    OpenAIRE

    Naveed, Munir; Kitchin, Diane E.; Crampton, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Movement of Units in Real-Time Strategy (RTS) Games is a non-trivial and challenging task mainly due to three factors which are constraints on CPU and memory usage, dynamicity of the game world, and concurrency. In this paper, we are focusing on finding a novel solution for solving the pathfinding problem in RTS Games for the units which are controlled by the computer. The novel solution combines two AI Planning approaches: Hierarchical Task Network (HTN) and Real-Time Heuristic Search (RHS)....

  3. 77 FR 6554 - Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC; Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC; Duke-American Transmission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC; Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC; Duke... (Commission), 18 CFR 381.302, Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC (Zephyr), Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC (PPT... to exercise its negotiated rate authority for Zephyr Power Transmission Project; (2) that...

  4. Mars Pathfinder. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*Plus database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Mars pathfinder mission launch. Topics discuss instrumentation, altimetry, and previous Mars Observer mission data. Concepts and goals of the Mars pathfinder program are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. eLISA eccentricity measurements as tracers of binary black hole formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Berti, Emanuele; Klein, Antoine; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Up to hundreds of black hole binaries individually resolvable by eLISA will coalesce in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo band within 10 yr, allowing for multiband gravitational wave observations. Binaries formed via dynamical interactions in dense star clusters are expected to have eccentricities e0˜10-3-10-1 at the frequencies f0=10-2 Hz where eLISA is most sensitive, while binaries formed in the field should have negligible eccentricity in both frequency bands. We estimate that eLISA should always be able to detect a nonzero e0 whenever e0≳10-2; if e0˜10-3, eLISA should detect nonzero eccentricity for a fraction ˜90 % (˜25 %) of binaries when the observation time is Tobs=5 (2) yr, respectively. Therefore eLISA observations of black hole binaries have the potential to distinguish between field and cluster formation scenarios.

  6. eLISA eccentricity measurements as tracers of binary black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Klein, Antoine; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Up to hundreds of black hole binaries individually resolvable by eLISA will coalesce in the Advanced LIGO/Virgo band within ten years, allowing for multi-band gravitational wave observations. Binaries formed via dynamical interactions in dense star clusters are expected to have eccentricities $e_0\\sim 10^{-3}$-$10^{-1}$ at the frequencies $f_0=10^{-2}$ Hz where eLISA is most sensitive, while binaries formed in the field should have negligible eccentricity in both frequency bands. We estimate that eLISA should always be able to detect a nonzero $e_0$ whenever $e_0\\gtrsim 10^{-2}$; if $e_0\\sim 10^{-3}$, eLISA should detect nonzero eccentricity for a fraction $\\sim 90\\%$ ($\\sim 25\\%$) of binaries when the observation time is $T_{\\rm obs}=5$ ($2$) years, respectively. Therefore eLISA observations of BH binaries have the potential to distinguish between field and cluster formation scenarios.

  7. Processing TOVS Polar Pathfinder data using the distributed batch controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James; Salem, Kenneth M.; Schweiger, Axel; Livny, Miron

    1997-09-01

    The distributed batch controller (DBC) supports scientific batch data processing. Batch jobs are distributed by the DBC over a collection of computing resources. Since these resources may be widely scattered the DBC is well suited for collaborative research efforts whose resources may not be centrally located. The DBC provides its users with centralized monitoring and control of distributed batch jobs. Version 1 of the DBC is currently being used by the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project to generate Arctic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. Profile generating jobs are distributed and executed by the DBC on workstation clusters located at several sites across the US. This paper describes the data processing requirements of the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project, and how the DBC is being used to meet them. It also describes Version 2 of the DBC. DBC V2 is implemented in Java, and utilizes a number of advanced Java features such as threads and remote method invocation. It incorporates a number of functional enhancements. These include a flexible mechanism supporting interoperation of the DBC with a wider variety of execution resources and an improved user interface.

  8. Obesity, a disorder of nutrient partitioning: the MONA LISA hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, G A

    1991-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying different types of obesity have been gradually clarified. Animal models with hypothalamic, genetic or dietary obesity have been examined with a feedback model. Four common final pathways are involved in this model. One of these final common pathways is the sympathetic nervous system. Most Obesities kNown Are Low In Sympathetic Activity states the MONA LISA Hypothesis. A second common pathway is the endocrine system involving adrenal glucocorticosteroids. The third common pathway is hyperphagia. Although not essential for most obesities, hyperphagia may be essential in animals with injury to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. The final pathway is reduced physical activity. The tonic activity of these systems and their response to changes in the diet affect nutrient partitioning between fat and protein. This framework has been used to review genetic obesity, hypothalamic obesity and dietary obesity.

  9. Bayesian modeling of source confusion in LISA data

    CERN Document Server

    Umstätter, R; Hendry, M; Meyer, R; Simha, V; Veitch, J; Vigeland, S; Woan, G; Umst\\"atter, Richard; Christensen, Nelson; Hendry, Martin; Meyer, Renate; Simha, Vimal; Veitch, John; Vigeland, Sarah; Woan, Graham

    2005-01-01

    One of the greatest data analysis challenges for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is the need to account for a large number of gravitational wave signals from compact binary systems expected to be present in the data. We introduce the basis of a Bayesian method that we believe can address this challenge, and demonstrate its effectiveness on a simplified problem involving one hundred synthetic sinusoidal signals in noise. We use a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo technique to infer simultaneously the number of signals present, the parameters of each identified signal, and the noise level. Our approach therefore tackles the detection and parameter estimation problems simultaneously, without the need to evaluate formal model selection criteria, such as the Akaike Information Criterion or explicit Bayes factors. The method does not require a stopping criterion to determine the number of signals, and produces results which compare very favorably with classical spectral techniques.

  10. The eLISA/NGO Data Processing Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, V.; Petiteau, A.; Porter, E.; Auger, G.; Plagnol, E.; Binétruy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Data analysis for the eLISA/NGO mission is going to be performed in several steps. The telemetry is unpacked and checked at ESA's Science Operations Centre (SOC). The instrument teams are providing the necessary calibration files for the SOC to process the Level 1 data. The next steps, the source identification, parameter extraction and construction of a catalogue of sources is performed at the Data Processing Centre (DPC). This includes determining the physical and astrophysical parameters of the sources and their strain time series. At the end of the processing, the produced Level 2 and Level 3 data are then transferred back to the SOC, which provides the data archive and the interface for the scientific community. The DPC is organised by the member states of the consortium. In this paper we describe a possible outline of the data processing centre, including the tasks to be performed, and the organisational structure.

  11. Orbit design for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerhard; HEINZEL; Albrecht; RDIGER

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA mission for detecting low-frequency gravitational waves in the frequency range from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz, by using accurate laser interferometry between three spacecrafts, which will be launched around 2018 and one year later reach their operational orbits around the Sun. In order to operate successfully, it is crucial for the constellation of the three spacecrafts to have extremely high stability. Based on the study of operational orbits for a 2015 launch, we design the operational orbits of beginning epoch on 2019-03-01, and introduce the method of orbit design and optimization. We design the orbits of the transfer from Earth to the operational orbits, including launch phase and separation phase; furthermore, the relationship between energy requirement and flight time of these two orbit phases is investigated. Finally, an example of the whole orbit design is presented.

  12. SISTINE: a pathfinder for FUV imaging spectroscopy on future NASA astrophysics missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Brian T.; France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kruczek, Nicholas; Kane, Robert; Green, James; Quijada, Manuel A.; Del Hoyo, Javier; Siegmund, Oswald

    2016-07-01

    The University of Colorado ultraviolet sounding rocket program presents the motivation and design capabilities of the new Suborbital Imaging Spectrograph for Transition Region Irradiance from Nearby Exoplanet host stars (SISTINE). SISTINE is a pathfinder for future UV space instrumentation, incorporating advanced broadband refl ective mirror coatings and large format borosilicate microchannel plate detectors that address technology gaps identified by the NASA Cosmic Origins program. The optical design capitalizes on new capabilities enabled by these technologies to demonstrate optical pathlengths in a sounding rocket envelope that would otherwise require a prohibitive effective area penalty in the 1020 - 1150 Å bandpass. This enables SISTINE to achieve high signal-to-noise observations of emission lines from planet-hosting dwarf stars with moderate spectral resolution (R 10,000) and sub-arcsecond angular imaging. In this proceedings, we present the scientific motivation for a moderate resolution imaging spectrograph, the design of SISTINE, and the enabling technologies that make SISTINE, and future advanced FUV-sensitive instrumentation, possible.

  13. Science with the space-based interferometer LISA. IV: probing inflation with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Caprini, Chiara; Domcke, Valerie; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Chiara Guzzetti, Maria; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Petiteau, Antoine; Ricciardone, Angelo; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the potential for the LISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced from different mechanisms during inflation. Focusing on well-motivated scenarios, we study the resulting contributions from particle production during inflation, inflationary spectator fields with varying speed of sound, effective field theories of inflation with specific patterns of symmetry breaking and models leading to the formation of primordial black holes. The projected sensitivities of LISA are used in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. We demonstrate that LISA is able to probe these well-motivated inflationary scenarios beyond the irreducible vacuum tensor modes expected from any inflationary background.

  14. An intensive case analysis of client metacognition in a good-outcome psychotherapy: Lisa's case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, Antonino; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Fiore, Donatella; Nicolo, Giuseppe; Procacci, Michele; Semerari, Antonio; Pedone, Roberto

    2008-11-01

    The authors analyzed the successful case of Lisa, a client with major depression, using the Metacognitive Assessment Scale (MAS). Consistently with the literature on depression, the authors hypothesize that Lisa's ability to reflect on mental states--here metacognition--is marginally affected. The authors found that Lisa was better at describing her own mind rather than understanding the mind of the others. Furthermore, the most severe impairment was in using metacognition to cope with mental state source of distress and to enact strategies to solve interpersonal problems. During the therapy such difficulties improved progressively. Limitations and implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Science with the space-based interferometer LISA. IV: Probing inflation with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Domcke, Valerie; Figueroa, Daniel G; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Guzzetti, Maria Chiara; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Petiteau, Antoine; Ricciardone, Angelo; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the LISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced from different mechanisms during inflation. Focusing on well-motivated scenarios, we study the resulting contributions from particle production during inflation, inflationary spectator fields with varying speed of sound, effective field theories of inflation with specific patterns of symmetry breaking and models leading to the formation of primordial black holes. The projected sensitivities of LISA are used in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. We demonstrate that LISA is able to probe these well-motivated inflationary scenarios beyond the irreducible vacuum tensor modes expected from any inflationary background.

  16. A Comprehensive Study on Pathfinding Techniques for Robotics and Video Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyad Abd Algfoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This survey provides an overview of popular pathfinding algorithms and techniques based on graph generation problems. We focus on recent developments and improvements in existing techniques and examine their impact on robotics and the video games industry. We have categorized pathfinding algorithms based on a 2D/3D environment search. The aim of this paper is to provide researchers with a thorough background on the progress made in the last 10 years in this field, summarize the principal techniques, and describe their results. We also give our expectations for future trends in this field and discuss the possibility of using pathfinding techniques in more extensive areas.

  17. Source-finding for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Whiting, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) presents a number of challenges in the area of source finding and cataloguing. The data rates and image sizes are very large, and require automated processing in a high-performance computing environment. This requires development of new tools, that are able to operate in such an environment and can reliably handle large datasets. These tools must also be able to accommodate the different types of observations ASKAP will make: continuum imaging, spectral-line imaging, transient imaging. The ASKAP project has developed a source-finder known as Selavy, built upon the Duchamp source-finder (Whiting 2012). Selavy incorporates a number of new features, which we describe here. Since distributed processing of large images and cubes will be essential, we describe the algorithms used to distribute the data, find an appropriate threshold and search to that threshold and form the final source catalogue. We describe the algorithm used to define a varying threshold t...

  18. Acquiring multiple stars with the LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baumeister, Harald; Bergomi, Maria; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Farinato, Jacopo; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Kopon, Derek; Marafatto, Luca; Norris, Mark; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder1 (LN-PF), a ground-layer adaptive optics (AO) system recently commissioned at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is one of 4 sensors that provide AO corrected images to the full LINC-NIRVANA instrument. With first light having taken place on November 17, 2013,2, 3 the core goals for the LN-PF have been accomplished. In this report, we look forward to one of the LN-PF extended goals. In particular, we review the acquisition mechanism required to place each of several star probes on its corresponding star in the target asterism. For emerging AO systems in general, co-addition of light from multiple stars stands as one of several methods being pursued to boost sky coverage. With 12 probes patrolling a large field of view (an annulus 6-arcminutes in diameter), the LN-PF will provide a valuable testbed to verify this method.

  19. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  20. Exploring MEDLINE space with random indexing and pathfinder networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-11-06

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search.

  1. The Australian SKA Pathfinder: operations management and user engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the science operations model for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope. ASKAP is a radio interferometer currently being commissioned in Western Australia. It will be operated by a dedicated team of observatory staff with the support of telescope monitoring, control and scheduling software. These tools, as well as the proposal tools and data archive will enable the telescope to operate with little direct input from the astronomy user. The paper also discusses how close engagement with the telescope user community has been maintained throughout the ASKAP construction and commissioning phase, leading to positive outcomes including early input into the design of telescope systems and a vibrant early science program.

  2. Drill/borescope System for the Mars Polar Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, D. A.; Wood, S. E.; Vasavada, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goals of the Mars Polar Pathfinder (MPP) Discovery Mission are to characterize the composition and structure of Mars' north polar ice cap, and to determine whether a climate record may be preserved in layers of ice and dust. The MPP would land as close as possible to the geographic north pole of Mars and use a set of instruments similar to those used by glaciologists to study polar ice caps on Earth: a radar sounder, a drill/borescope system, and a thermal probe. The drill/borescope system will drill approximately 50 cm into the surface and image the sides of the hole at 10 micron resolution for compositional and stratigraphic analysis. Several uncertainties have guided the development of this instrument, and they are discussed.

  3. An interview with Alfredo Falcone and Lisa Salvatore: RECOURSE and trifluridine/tipiracil in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Alfredo; Salvatore, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Professor Alfredo Falcone and Dr Lisa Salvatore speak to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Professor Alfredo Falcone is the Director of the Department of Oncology and the Specialization School at the University Hospital of Pisa, Italy. He trained in Pisa and Genoa, Italy, and has held major positions in Italian oncology since 2000. He currently has more than 300 publications, including papers in peer-reviewed international and national journals, book chapters, and more than 600 abstracts of presentations to international and national conferences. The majority of his papers regard clinical and translational research, with a particular focus on metastatic colorectal cancer. Dr Lisa Salvatore is a medical oncologist in the Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pisa. She has been an author on about 40 publications in major peer-reviewed publications and has made numerous presentations in national and international conferences. Her main interest is focused on clinical and translational research in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Relativistic versus Newtonian orbitography: the Relativistic Motion Integrator (RMI) software. Illustration with the LISA mission

    CERN Document Server

    Pireaux, S

    2008-01-01

    The Relativistic Motion Integrator (RMI) consists in integrating numerically the EXACT relativistic equations of motion, with respect to the appropriate gravitational metric, instead of Newtonian equations plus relativistic corrections. The aim of the present paper is to validate the method, and to illustrate how RMI can be used for space missions to produce relativistic ephemerides of satellites. Indeed, nowadays, relativistic effects have to be taken into account, and comparing a RMI ephemeris with a classical keplerian one helps to quantify such effects. LISA is a relevant example to use RMI. This mission is an interferometer formed by three spacecraft which aims at the detection of gravitational waves. Precise ephemerides of LISA spacecraft are needed not only for the sake of the orbitography but also to compute the photon flight time in laser links between spacecraft, required in LISA data pre-processing in order to reach the gravitational wave detection level. Relativistic effects in LISA orbitography n...

  5. Massive Black Hole Binary Inspirals: Results from the LISA Parameter Estimation Taskforce

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Berti, Emanuele; Cornish, Neil; Cutler, Curt; Gair, Jonathan; Hughes, Scott A; Iyer, Bala R; Lang, Ryan N; Mandel, Ilya; Porter, Edward K; Sathyaprakash, Bangalore S; Sinha, Siddhartha; Sintes, Alicia M; Trias, Miquel; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Volonteri, Marta

    2008-01-01

    The LISA Parameter Estimation (LISAPE) Taskforce was formed in September 2007 to provide the LISA Project with vetted codes, source distribution models, and results related to parameter estimation. The Taskforce's goal is to be able to quickly calculate the impact of any mission design changes on LISA's science capabilities, based on reasonable estimates of the distribution of astrophysical sources in the universe. This paper describes our Taskforce's work on massive black-hole binaries (MBHBs). Given present uncertainties in the formation history of MBHBs, we adopt four different population models, based on (i) whether the initial black-hole seeds are small or large, and (ii) whether accretion is efficient or inefficient at spinning up the holes. We compare four largely independent codes for calculating LISA's parameter-estimation capabilities. All codes are based on the Fisher-matrix approximation, but in the past they used somewhat different signal models, source parametrizations and noise curves. We show ...

  6. EU-LISA, the new model of operational management of the various EU databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Illamola Dausà

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, a new agency, EU-LISA, was created in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice (AFSJ to manage largescale IT systems. From then onwards, the agency has been responsible for the communication infrastructure of SIS II, VIS and Eurodac, without merging those databases. Due to its short time in operation, it is difficult to assess the effectiveness of EU-LISA, but this paper aims to give an overview of the agency to facilitate knowledge about it.

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) product. APP is a fundamental CDR comprised of calibrated and navigated AVHRR channel...

  8. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Pathfinder Reef, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at Pathfinder Reef in the...

  9. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Pathfinder Reef, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA), Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, conducted at 2 sites at Pathfinder Reef...

  10. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Pathfinder Reef, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 2 sites around Pathfinder Reef in...

  11. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  12. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  13. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Extended (APP-X) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of the extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) cryosphere contains 19 geophysical variables over the Arctic and Antarctic for the...

  14. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  15. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  16. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January, February, March, April, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January, February, March, April, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1958. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January, February, March, April, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  2. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January, February, March, April, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by...

  6. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by...

  8. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: January, February, March, April, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1957. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January, February, March, April, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by...

  12. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: January, February, March, April, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by...

  15. [Bamforth, Hutton Lake and Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuges background and operating statement

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a background on Bamforth, Hutton Lake and Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuges in northwestern Colorado. Part I is solely background information...

  16. LISA double black holes: Dynamics in gaseous nuclear discs

    CERN Document Server

    Dotti, M; Haardt, F

    2006-01-01

    We study the inspiral of double black holes, with masses in the LISA window of detectability, orbiting inside a massive circum-nuclear disc. Using high-resolution SPH simulations, we follow the black hole dynamics in the early phase when gas-dynamical friction acts on the black holes individually, and continue our simulation until they form a close binary. We find that in the early sinking the black holes loose memory of their initial orbital eccentricity if they co-rotate with the gaseous disc. As a consequence the massive black holes bind forming a binary with a low eccentricity, consistent with zero within our numerical resolution limit. The cause of circularization resides in the rotation present in the gaseous background where dynamical friction operates. Circularization may hinder gravitational waves from taking over and leading the binary to coalescence. In the case of counter-rotating orbits the initial eccentricity (if present) does not decreases, and the black holes may bind forming an eccentric bin...

  17. Isotope Separation and Decay Energy Calculation for LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nathaniel; Barker, Alyson; Garrett, Sierra; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The commissioning experiment for the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) was designed to investigate properties of neutron-unstable excited states of the 24O. The array is located at the NSCL, MSU and is used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Sweeper Magnet. Oxygen fragments produced by the 26F secondary beam incident on a Be target are directed through the Sweeper Chamber which includes two tracking CRDC detectors, an ion chamber, and a thin and thick scintillator. Plotting the fragment's trajectory position vs. angle vs. time of flight allows for separation of the individual 22 , 23 , and 24 O isotopes, necessary for the calculation of the decay properties of individual states. Anomalous features in the fragments' emittance distribution, believed to result from little understood issues with the tracking detectors, required that we adopt a slightly different approach than that developed recently by the collaboration. Once the isotopes are successfully separated, decay energies are calculated by applying mass-invariant decay spectroscopy by associating the fragment's precise trajectory (determined by inverse-tracking through the Sweeper Magnet) and energy with those of the emitted neutron. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  18. Measuring the dark energy equation of state with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Broeck, Chris Van Den; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sintes, A M

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna's (LISA's) observation of supermassive binary black holes (SMBBH) could provide a new tool for precision cosmography. Inclusion of sub-dominant signal harmonics in the inspiral signal allows for high-accuracy sky localization, dramatically improving the chances of finding the host galaxy and obtaining its redshift. Combined with the measurement of the luminosity distance, this could allow us to significantly constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter $w$ even with a single SMBBH merger at $z \\lesssim 1$. Such an event can potentially have component masses from a wide range ($10^5 - 10^8 \\Ms$) over which parameter accuracies vary considerably. We perform an in-depth study in order to understand (i) what fraction of possible SMBBH mergers allow for sky localization, depending on the parameters of the source, and (ii) how accurately $w$ can be measured when the host galaxy can be identified. We also investigate how accuracies on all parameters improve when a know...

  19. Binary Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Boggs, W.; Kelly, B.; McWilliams, S.; van Meter, J.

    2007-12-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for LISA. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. We will present the results of new simulations of black hole mergers with unequal masses and spins, focusing on the gravitational waves emitted and the accompanying astrophysical "kicks.” The magnitude of these kicks has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive blackholes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters. This work was supported by NASA grant 06-BEFS06-19, and the simulations were carried out using Project Columbia at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (Ames Research Center) and at the NASA Center for Computational Sciences (Goddard Space Flight Center).

  20. Binary Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Boggs, W.; Kelly, B.; McWilliams, S.; vanMeter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for LISA. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. We will present the results of new simulations of black hole mergers with unequal masses and spins, focusing on the gravitational waves emitted and the accompanying astrophysical "kicks." The magnitude of these kicks has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive black holes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters.

  1. Numerical simulation of time delay interferometry for NGO/eLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    NGA/eLISA is a new mission proposal with arm length 106 km and one interferometer down-scaled from LISA (http://elisa-ngo.org/). Just like LISA and ASTROD-GW, in order to attain the requisite sensitivity for NGO/eLISA, laser frequency noise must be suppressed below the secondary noises such as the optical path noise, acceleration noise etc. In previous papers, we have used the CGC 2.7 ephemeris to numerically simulate the time delay interferometry for LISA and ASTROD-GW with one arm dysfunctional and found that they are both well below their respective limits under which the laser frequency noise is required to be suppressed. In this paper, we follow the same procedure to simulate the time delay interferometry numerically. To do this, we work out a set of 1000-day optimized mission orbits of NGO/eLISA spacecraft starting at January 1st, 2021 using the CGC 2.7 ephemeris framework. We then use this numerical solution to calculate the residual optical path differences in the second-generation solutions of our pr...

  2. Constraining stellar binary black hole formation scenarios with eLISA eccentricity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Berti, Emanuele; Klein, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    A space-based interferometer such as eLISA could observe few to few thousands progenitors of black hole binaries (BHBs) similar to those recently detected by Advanced LIGO. Gravitational radiation circularizes the orbit during inspiral, but some BHBs retain a measurable eccentricity at the low frequencies where eLISA is most sensitive. The eccentricity of a BHB carries precious information about its formation channel: BHBs formed in the field, in globular clusters, or close to a massive black hole (MBH) have distinct eccentricity distributions in the eLISA band. We generate mock eLISA observations, folding in measurement errors, and using Bayesian model selection we study whether eLISA measurements can identify the BHB formation channel. We find that a handful of observations would suffice to tell whether BHBs were formed in the gravitational field of a MBH. Conversely, several tens of observations are needed to tell apart field formation from globular cluster formation. A five-year eLISA mission with the lon...

  3. Constraining stellar binary black hole formation scenarios with eLISA eccentricity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Sesana, Alberto; Berti, Emanuele; Klein, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    A space-based interferometer such as the evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) could observe a few to a few thousands of progenitors of black hole binaries (BHBs) similar to those recently detected by Advanced LIGO. Gravitational radiation circularizes the orbit during inspiral, but some BHBs retain a measurable eccentricity at the low frequencies where eLISA is the most sensitive. The eccentricity of a BHB carries precious information about its formation channel: BHBs formed in the field, in globular clusters, or close to a massive black hole (MBH) have distinct eccentricity distributions in the eLISA band. We generate mock eLISA observations, folding in measurement errors, and using a Bayesian model selection, we study whether eLISA measurements can identify the BHB formation channel. We find that a handful of observations would suffice to tell whether BHBs were formed in the gravitational field of an MBH. Conversely, several tens of observations are needed to tell apart field formation from globular cluster formation. A 5-yr eLISA mission with the longest possible armlength is desirable to shed light on BHB formation scenarios.

  4. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T. [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Perera, Surangi N. [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States); Svoboda, Kurt R., E-mail: svobodak@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  5. Pathfinding with Hard Constraints : Mobile Systems and Real Time Strategy Games Combined

    OpenAIRE

    Erdtman, Samuel; Fylling, Johan

    2008-01-01

    There is an abundance of pathfinding solutions, but are any of those solutions suitable for usage in a real time strategy (RTS) game designed for mobile systems with limited processing and storage capabilities (such as the Nintendo DS, PSP, cellular phones, etc.)? The RTS domain puts great requirements on the pathfinding mechanics used in the game; in the form of de- mands on responsiveness and path optimality. Furthermore, the Nintendo DS, and its portable, distant relatives, bring hard con-...

  6. The semantic pathfinder: using an authoring metaphor for generic multimedia indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Cees G M; Worring, Marcel; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark; Koelma, Dennis C; Seinstra, Frank J; Smeulders, Arnold W M

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the semantic pathfinder architecture for generic indexing of multimedia archives. The semantic pathfinder extracts semantic concepts from video by exploring different paths through three consecutive analysis steps, which we derive from the observation that produced video is the result of an authoring-driven process. We exploit this authoring metaphor for machine-driven understanding. The pathfinder starts with the content analysis step. In this analysis step, we follow a data-driven approach of indexing semantics. The style analysis step is the second analysis step. Here, we tackle the indexing problem by viewing a video from the perspective of production. Finally, in the context analysis step, we view semantics in context. The virtue of the semantic pathfinder is its ability to learn the best path of analysis steps on a per-concept basis. To show the generality of this novel indexing approach, we develop detectors for a lexicon of 32 concepts and we evaluate the semantic pathfinder against the 2004 NIST TRECVID video retrieval benchmark, using a news archive of 64 hours. Top ranking performance in the semantic concept detection task indicates the merit of the semantic pathfinder for generic indexing of multimedia archives.

  7. Concept of Science Data Management for the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Hyeon

    2016-10-01

    South Korea has a plan to explore the Moon in 2018 or 2019. For the plan, the Korea Aerospace Research Institute which is a government funded research institute kicked off the Korea Lunar Exploration Development Program in January, 2016 in support of Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, South Korea.As the 1st stage mission of the program, named as the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter(KPLO), will perform acquisition of high resolution images and science data for investigation of lunar environment as well as the core technology demonstration and validation for space explorations. The scientific instruments consists of three Korean domestic developed science instruments except an imaging instrument and several foreign provided instruments. We are developing a science data management plan to encourage scientific activities using science data acquired by the science instruments.I introduce the Korean domestic developed science instruments and present concept of the science data management plan for data delivery, processing, and distribution for the science instruments.

  8. Rectangle expansion A*pathfinding for grid maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang An; Li Chong; Bi Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    Search speed, quality of resulting paths and the cost of pre-processing are the principle evaluation metrics of a pathfinding algorithm. In this paper, a new algorithm for grid-based maps, rectangle expansion A* (REA*), is presented that improves the performance of A* significantly. REA*explores maps in units of unblocked rectangles. All unnecessary points inside the rectangles are pruned and boundaries of the rectangles (instead of individual points within those boundaries) are used as search nodes. This makes the algorithm plot fewer points and have a much shorter open list than A*. REA*returns jump and grid-optimal path points, but since the line of sight between jump points is protected by the unblocked rectangles, the resulting path of REA*is usually better than grid-optimal. The algorithm is entirely online and requires no offline pre-processing. Experi-mental results for typical benchmark problem sets show that REA*can speed up a highly optimized A* by an order of magnitude and more while preserving completeness and optimality. This new algorithm is competitive with other highly successful variants of A*.

  9. Model Checking Real Time Java Using Java PathFinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Gary; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Visser, Willem

    2005-01-01

    The Real Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) is an augmentation of Java for real time applications of various degrees of hardness. The central features of RTSJ are real time threads; user defined schedulers; asynchronous events, handlers, and control transfers; a priority inheritance based default scheduler; non-heap memory areas such as immortal and scoped, and non-heap real time threads whose execution is not impeded by garbage collection. The Robust Software Systems group at NASA Ames Research Center has JAVA PATHFINDER (JPF) under development, a Java model checker. JPF at its core is a state exploring JVM which can examine alternative paths in a Java program (e.g., via backtracking) by trying all nondeterministic choices, including thread scheduling order. This paper describes our implementation of an RTSJ profile (subset) in JPF, including requirements, design decisions, and current implementation status. Two examples are analyzed: jobs on a multiprogramming operating system, and a complex resource contention example involving autonomous vehicles crossing an intersection. The utility of JPF in finding logic and timing errors is illustrated, and the remaining challenges in supporting all of RTSJ are assessed.

  10. Slope Morphology of Twin Peaks, Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Steven; Paine, Colin; Clarke, Jon; Caprarelli, Graziella

    2010-05-01

    Development of slope form over time has long been a concern of geomorphologists, although recently this concern has been moved to slope processes rather than form. There are two basic approaches. The first is theoretical, involving modeling of different types and rates of processes, and calculation of results in terms of slope evolution over time. Comparisons with real-life slopes can follow this approach [1], [2]. The second, inductive, approach involves field measurements to test ideas about slope evolution starting from the assumption that observed slopes represent different stages of an essentially similar evolution [3]. Space is substituted for time, and a number of slopes, assumed to be of increasing age, are measured and placed in an evolutionary sequence (e.g. [4], [5], [6]). [5] showed that slope angles are modally distributed, with the modal angles controlled by the materials (regolith) of which the slopes are formed, and by the processes operating on them. Data can be obtained directly from field work or from digital elevation models (DEM) derived from remote sensing investigations [7]. DEMs are particularly useful to study inaccessible planets, such as Mars, where on site observations are restricted to only a few landing sites. Here we present a study of slopes on the Twin Peaks, two small hills located 780 m north and 910 m south of the Mars Pathfinder landing site at the mouth of the Ares and Tiu flood channels. The presence of streamlined hills, jumbled surfaces and conglomerates suggested the region was modified by massive flooding 1.8 - 3.5 billion years ago [8], [9]. The streamlined forms and terraces of the Twin Peaks were taken to indicate catastrophic flood conditions that were believed to be prevalent in the area [8]. It was also suggested that the northernmost peak was topped by floodwater, causing its flatter appearance. Other researchers postulated alternative geomorphological origins for the features observed at the Pathfinder landing site

  11. Optical Performances of Slewing Mirror Telescope for UFFO-Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Park, I H; Kim, S -W; Choi, H S; Grossan, B; Hermann, I; Jung, A; Kim, Y W; Kim, J E; Linder, E V; Lee, J; Lim, H; Min, K W; Na, G W; Nam, K H; Panasyuk, M I; Smoot, G F; Svelitov, S; Suh, Y D; Vedenken, N; Yashin, I; Zhao, M H

    2011-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-Pathfinder (UFFO-P) is to be launched onboard Lomonosov spacecraft in November 2011. It is to measure early UV/Optical photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) is one of two instruments designed for detection of UV/Optical images of the GRBs. SMT is a Ritchey-Chr\\'etien telescope of 100 mm in diameter with a motorized slewing mirror at the entrance providing 17\\times17 arcmin2 in Field of View (FOV) and 4 arcsec in pixel resolution. Its sky coverage can be further expanded up to 35 degrees in FOV by tilting a motorized slewing mirror. All mirrors were fabricated to about RMS 0.02 waves in wave front error (WFE) and 84.7% (in average reflectivity) over 200nm~650nm range. SMT was aligned to RMS 0.05 waves in WFE (test wavelength 632.8nm). From the static gravity test result, SMT optics system is expected to survive during launch. The technical details of SMT assembly and laboratory performance test results are reported.

  12. Polar Geophysics Products Derived from AVHRR: The "AVHRR Polar Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, James; Fowler, Charles; Scambos, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    This NOAA/NASA Pathfinder effort was established to locate, acquire, and process Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery into geo-located and calibrated radiances, cloud masks, surface clear-sky broadband albedo, clear-sky skin temperatures, satellite viewing times, and viewing and solar geometry for the, high-latitude portions of the northern and southern hemispheres (all area north of 48N and south of 53S). AVHRR GAC data for August 1981 - July 1998 were acquired, with some gaps remaining, and processed into twice-daily 5-km grids, with some products also provided at 25-km resolution. AVHRR LAC data for 3.5 years of coverage in the northern hemisphere and 2.75 years of coverage in the southern hemisphere were processed into 1.25-km grids for the same suite of products. The resulting data sets are presently being transferred to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for archiving and distribution. Using these data, researchers now have at their disposal an extensive AVHRR data set for investigations of high-latitude processes. In addition, the data lend themselves to development and testing of algorithms. The products are particularly relevant for climate research and algorithm development as applied to relatively long time periods and large areas.

  13. Verification of time-delay interferometry techniques using the University of Florida LISA interferometry simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitryk, Shawn J; Wand, Vinzenz; Mueller, Guido, E-mail: smitryk@phys.ufl.ed, E-mail: mueller@phys.ufl.ed [Department of Physics, University of Florida, PO Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2010-04-21

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a cooperative NASA/ESA mission proposed to directly measure gravitational waves (GW) in the frequency range from 30 muHz to 1 Hz with an optimal strain sensitivity of 10{sup -21}/sq root(Hz) at 3 mHz. LISA will utilize a modified Michelson interferometer to measure length changes of 40 pm/sq root(Hz) between drag-free proof masses located on three separate spacecraft (SC) separated by a distance of 5 Gm. The University of Florida has developed a hardware-in-the-loop simulator of the LISA constellation to verify the laser noise cancellation technique known as time-delay interferometry (TDI). We replicate the frequency stabilization of the laser on the local SC and the phase-locking of the lasers on the far SC. The laser photodetector beatnotes are electronically delayed, Doppler shifted and applied with a mock GW signal to simulate the laser link between the SC. The beatnotes are also measured with a LISA-like phasemeter and the data are used to extract the laser phase and residual phase-lock loop noise in post-processing through TDI. This uncovers the GW modulation signal buried under the laser noise. The results are then compared to the requirements defined by the LISA science collaboration.

  14. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of damped guided wave propagation in complex composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave generation, propagation, and interaction with damage in complex composite structures. A local finite element model is deployed to capture the piezoelectric effects and actuation dynamics of the transmitter, while the global domain wave propagation and interaction with structural complexity (structure features and damage) are solved utilizing a local interaction simulation approach (LISA). This hybrid approach allows the accurate modeling of the local dynamics of the transducers and keeping the LISA formulation in an explicit format, which facilitates its readiness for parallel computing. The global LISA framework was extended through the 3D Kelvin-Voigt viscoelasticity theory to include anisotropic damping effects for composite structures, as an improvement over the existing LISA formulation. The global LISA framework was implemented using the compute unified device architecture running on graphic processing units. A commercial preprocessor is integrated seamlessly with the computational framework for grid generation and material property allocation to handle complex structures. The excitability and damping effects are successfully captured by this hybrid model, with experimental validation using the scanning laser doppler vibrometry. To demonstrate the capability of our hybrid approach for complex structures, guided wave propagation and interaction with a delamination in a composite panel with stiffeners is presented.

  15. Experimental and numerical study of the mars pathfinder vehicle; Etude experimentale et numerique sur le mars pathfinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bur, R.; Benay, R.; Chanetz, B.; Galli, A.; Pot, T. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Dept. Fundamental and Experimental Aerodynamics, 92 - Chatillon (France); Hollis, B.; Moss, J. [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia (United States)

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and numerical study on the Mars Pathfinder aero-shell vehicle has been carried out in the framework of an agreement between ONERA and NASA. The experimental work was performed in the ONERA R5Ch hypersonic wind tunnel. Flow-field visualizations and heat-flux measurements along the model have been obtained. Numerical simulations have been performed at ONERA with the RANS solver NASCA and at NASA with a DSMC code. The flow-field structure is correctly reproduced by both computations. The location of the bow shock is well predicted, as well as the expansion waves emanating from the end of the fore-body cone. Both computations also predict the same extension of the separation bubble in the base flow region of the model. Measured and calculated heat-flux distributions along the model have been compared. Both computations give similar results, excepted on the prediction of the heat-flux level on the after-body cone. But computations over-predict the measured heat-flux values on the fore-body and the sting of the model: the value of the stagnation point is overestimated of 28% and the averaged sting level of 35%. (authors)

  16. The Pathfinder Testbed: Exploring Techniques for Achieving Precision Radial Velocities in the Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsey, Larry; Redman, Stephen; Bender, Chad; Roy, Arpita; Zonak, Stephanie; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Wolszczan, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The Penn State Pathfinder is a prototype warm fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph with a Hawaii-1 NIR detector that has already demonstrated 7-10 m/s radial velocity precision on integrated sunlight. The Pathfinder testbed was initially setup for the Gemini PRVS design study to enable a systematic exploration of the challenges of achieving high radial velocity precision in the near-infrared, as well as to test possible solutions to these calibration challenges. The current version of the Pathfinder has an R3 echelle grating, and delivers a resolution of R~50,000 in the Y, J or H bands of the spectrum. We will discuss the on sky-performance of the Pathfinder during an engineering test run at the Hobby Eberly Telescope as well the results of velocity observations of M dwarfs. We will also discuss the unique calibration techniques we have explored, like Uranium-Neon hollow cathode lamps, notch filter, and modal noise mitigation to enable high precision radial velocity observation in the NIR. The Pathfinder is a proto...

  17. Extracting galactic binary signals from the first round of Mock LISA Data Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    We report on the performance of an end-to-end Bayesian analysis pipeline for detecting and characterizing galactic binary signals in simulated LISA data. Our principal analysis tool is the Blocked-Annealed Metropolis Hasting (BAM) algorithm, which has been optimized to search for tens of thousands of overlapping signals across the LISA band. The BAM algorithm employs Bayesian model selection to determine the number of resolvable sources, and provides posterior distribution functions for all the model parameters. The BAM algorithm performed almost flawlessly on all the Round 1 Mock LISA Data Challenge data sets, including those with many highly overlapping sources. The only misses were later traced to a coding error that affected high frequency sources. In addition to the BAM algorithm we also successfully tested a Genetic Algorithm (GA), but only on data sets with isolated signals as the GA has yet to be optimized to handle large numbers of overlapping signals.

  18. Low-frequency Gravitational-wave Science with eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele; eLISA Science Study Team

    2013-01-01

    I review the expected science performance of eLISA, the proposed European-led gravitational-wave detector that may be selected as ESA "L2" Cosmic Vision mission. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  19. Torsion pendulum facility for ground testing of gravitational sensors for LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Hüller, M; Dolesi, R; Vitale, S; Weber, W J

    2002-01-01

    We report here on a torsion pendulum facility for ground-based testing of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational sensors. We aim to measure weak forces exerted by a capacitive position sensor on a lightweight version of the LISA test mass, suspended from a thin torsion fibre. This facility will permit measurement of the residual, springlike coupling between the test mass and the sensor and characterization of other stray forces relevant to LISA drag-free control. The expected force sensitivity of the proposed torsion pendulum is limited by the intrinsic thermal noise at approx 3x10 sup - sup 1 sup 3 N Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 at 1 mHz. We briefly describe the design and implementation of the apparatus, its expected performance and preliminary experimental data.

  20. The Mock LISA Data Challenges: from challenge 3 to challenge 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babak, Stanislav; Petiteau, Antoine; Robinson, Emma L [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm bei Potsdam (Germany); Baker, John G; McWilliams, Sean T; Arnaud, Keith A [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Benacquista, Matthew J [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Cornish, Neil J; Adams, Matt [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Larson, Shane L [Department of Physics, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Mandel, Ilya [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Porter, Edward K [APC, UMR 7164, University Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75025 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Vallisneri, Michele; Cutler, Curt [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Vecchio, Alberto [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT (United Kingdom); Blaut, Arkadiusz [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Bridges, Michael; Feroz, Farhan [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30HE (United Kingdom); Cohen, Michael [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gair, Jonathan R., E-mail: Michele.Vallisneri@jpl.nasa.go [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30HA (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-21

    The Mock LISA Data Challenges are a program to demonstrate LISA data-analysis capabilities and to encourage their development. Each round of challenges consists of one or more datasets containing simulated instrument noise and gravitational waves from sources of undisclosed parameters. Participants analyze the datasets and report best-fit solutions for the source parameters. Here we present the results of the third challenge, issued in April 2008, which demonstrated the positive recovery of signals from chirping galactic binaries, from spinning supermassive-black-hole binaries (with optimal SNRs between approx10 and 2000), from simultaneous extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (SNRs of 10-50), from cosmic-string-cusp bursts (SNRs of 10-100), and from a relatively loud isotropic background with OMEGA{sub gw}(f) approx 10{sup -11}, slightly below the LISA instrument noise.

  1. Torsion pendulum facility for direct force measurements of LISA GRS related disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, L; Ciani, G; Dolesi, R; Hüller, M; Tombolato, D; Vitale, S; Weber, W J

    2007-01-01

    A four mass torsion pendulum facility for testing of the LISA GRS is under development in Trento. With a LISA-like test mass suspended off-axis with respect to the pendulum fiber, the facility allows for a direct measurement of surface force disturbances arising in the GRS. We present here results with a prototype pendulum integrated with very large-gap sensors, which allows an estimate of the intrinsic pendulum noise floor in the absence of sensor related force noise. The apparatus has shown a torque noise near to its mechanical thermal noise limit, and would allow to place upper limits on GRS related disturbances with a best sensitivity of 300 fN/Hz^(1/2) at 1mHz, a factor 50 from the LISA goal. Also, we discuss the characterization of the gravity gradient noise, one environmental noise source that could limit the apparatus performances, and report on the status of development of the facility.

  2. Observing extreme-mass-ratio inspirals with eLISA/NGO

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    The extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) of stellar mass compact objects into massive black holes in the centres of galaxies are an important source of low-frequency gravitational waves for space-based detectors. We discuss the prospects for detecting these sources with the evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), recently proposed as an ESA mission candidate under the name NGO. We show that NGO could observe a few tens of EMRIs over its two year mission lifetime at redshifts z < 0.5 and describe how the event rate changes under possible alternative specifications of the eLISA design.

  3. Keskkonnatoetuste lisa-aasta - kas vastutulek või lõks? / Henno Nurmsalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nurmsalu, Henno

    2014-01-01

    Kuna valitsus ja Euroopa Komisjon ei ole veel kinnitanud maaelu arengukava 2014-2020 ning käesoleval aastal uued meetmed ei käivitu, on põllumajandusminister 24. märtsil 2014 vastu võtnud määruse nr 21, mille kohaselt on võimalik 2014. a võetud keskkonnatoetuse kohustusi pikendada nn lisa-aastaks. Sellest tulenevalt on osal põllumeestel neist endist sõltumatult tekkinud olukord, kus ähvardab lisa-aasta toetuse taotlemisel viie aasta toetuse tagasinõudmine

  4. Preliminary Findings of the Photovoltaic Cell Calibration Experiment on Pathfinder Flight 95-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the photovoltaic (PV) cell calibration experiment for Pathfinder was to develop an experiment compatible with an ultralight UAV to predict the performance of PV cells at AM0, the solar spectrum in space, using the Langley plot technique. The Langley plot is a valuable technique for this purpose and requires accurate measurements of air mass (pressure), cell temperature, solar irradiance, and current-voltage(IV) characteristics with the cells directed normal to the direct ray of the sun. Pathfinder's mission objective (95-3) of 65,000 ft. maximum altitude, is ideal for performing the Langley plot measurements. Miniaturization of electronic data acquisition equipment enabled the design and construction of an accurate and light weight measurement system that meets Pathfinder's low payload weight requirements.

  5. Apc1-mediated antagonism of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is required for retino-tectal pathfinding in the zebrafish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaen, J.T.M.; Danesin, C.; Elas, A.T.; van de Water, S.G.P.; Houart, C.; Zivkovic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Apc1 is an intracellular antagonist of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. We examined the effects of an Apc1 loss-of-function mutation on retino-tectal axon pathfinding in zebrafish. In apc mutants, the retina is disorganized and optic nerves portray pathfinding defects at the optic

  6. Apc1-mediated antagonism of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is required for retino-tectal pathfinding in the zebrafish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaen, J.T.M.; Danesin, C.; Elas, A.T.; van de Water, S.G.P.; Houart, C.; Zivkovic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Apc1 is an intracellular antagonist of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. We examined the effects of an Apc1 loss-of-function mutation on retino-tectal axon pathfinding in zebrafish. In apc mutants, the retina is disorganized and optic nerves portray pathfinding defects at the optic

  7. Transportable setup for amplifier phase fidelity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Troebs, Michael; Bogan, C.; Barke, S.; Kuehn, G.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    One possible laser source for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) consists of an Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier originally developed for inter-satellite communication, seeded by the laser used for the technology demonstrator mission LISA Pathfinder. LISA needs to transmit clock information between its three spacecraft to correct for phase noise between the clocks on the individual spacecraft. For this purpose phase modulation sidebands at GHz frequencies will be imprinted on the la...

  8. Estudo bibliométrico do descritor “Ergonomia” na base LISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Maria dos Santos Bahia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: O estudo analisa a produção científica sobre ergonomia utilizando a base de dados Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA. A base de dados LISA, iniciada em 1969, mantém sua cobertura temática na área de Biblioteconomia e Ciência da Informação.Método: No estudo utilizou-se o método da bibliometria aplicada para verificar a produção científica indexada.Resultados: Entre os resultados da busca de termos indexados na base de dados LISA, encontraram-se 503 artigos com o termo “Ergonomic”; 352 artigos, com a expressão “Design”; 111 artigos com o descritor “Systems”; 110 artigos com o termo “Work”; e , 98 artigos com o termo “Evaluation”. Dentre os 34 títulos de periódicos, 4 títulos cobrem 79% dos artigos que tratam sobre Ergonomia na base LISA. Os demais 30 títulos de periódicos cobrem 21% dos artigos indexados sob essa temática.Conclusões: O presente estudo bibliométrico oferece possibilita um panorama de como a ergonomia é percebida na área da Biblioteconomia e Ciência da Informação.

  9. Gravitational-wave radiation from double compact objects with eLISA in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinzhong

    2014-01-01

    The phase of in-spiral of double compact objects (DCOs: NS+WD, NS+NS, BH+NS, and BH+BH binaries) in the disk field population of the Galaxy provides a potential source in the frequency range from $10^{-4}$ to 0.1 Hz, which can be detected by the European New Gravitational Observatory (NGO: eLISA is derived from the previous LISA proposal) project. In this frequency range, much stronger gravitational wave (GW) radiation can be obtained from DCO sources because they possess more mass than other compact binaries (e.g., close double white dwarfs). In this study, we aim to calculate the gravitational wave signals from the resolvable DCO sources in the Galaxy using a binary population synthesis approach, and to carry out physical properties of these binaries using Monte Carlo simulations. Combining the sensitivity curve of the eLISA detector and a confusion-limited noise floor of close double white dwarfs, we find that only a handful of DCO sources can be detected by the eLISA detector. The detectable number of DCO...

  10. Simulating Neutron Interactions in the MoNA-LISA/Sweeper Setup with Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Magdalene

    2012-10-01

    The sweeper magnet is a superconducting dipole designed to bend charged particles of 4 Tm rigidity 43 degrees at a radius of approximately one meter. In a typical experiment neutron-unbound states are populated in a reaction in front of the magnet and emitted neutrons are subsequently detected with the high-efficiency position sensitive neutron detector arrays, MoNA and LISA. Before the neutrons interact in MoNA or LISA, they have to pass through the walls of the sweeper magnet chamber. A Monte Carlo simulation was written using Geant 4 which included MoNA and LISA, as well as the geometry of the sweeper magnet and the chamber. In a recent experiment LISA was positioned at large angles were the neutrons passed through the sidewalls of the chamber. The impact of the sidewalls on the neutron spectra was explored for neutrons from the decay of 12Li -> 11Li + n produced from 50 MeV/u 14B beams on a beryllium target.

  11. Sky Localization of Complete Inspiral-Merger-Ringdown Signals for Nonspinning Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Lang, Ryan N.; Baker, John G.; Thorpe, James Ira

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the capability of LISA to measure the sky position of equal-mass, nonspinning black hole binaries, including for the first time the entire inspiral-merger-ringdown signal, the effect of the LISA orbits, and the complete three-channel LISA response. For an ensemble of systems near the peak of LISA's sensitivity band, with total rest mass of 2 x l0(exp 6) Stellar Mass at a redshift of z = 1 with random orientations and sky positions, we find median sky localization errors of approximately approx. 3 arcminutes. This is comparable to the field of view of powerful electromagnetic telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, that could be used to search for electromagnetic signals associated with merging black holes. We investigate the way in which parameter errors decrease with measurement time, focusing specifically on the additional information provided during the merger-ringdown segment of the signal. We find that this information improves all parameter estimates directly, rather than through diminishing correlations with any subset of well-determined parameters.

  12. Modulation of LISA free-fall orbits due to the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdonio, Massimo; De Marchi, Fabrizio; De Pietri, Roberto; Jetzer, Philippe; Marzari, Francesco; Mazzolo, Giulio; Ortolan, Antonello; Sereno, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    We calculate the effect of the Earth-Moon (EM) system on the free-fall motion of LISA test masses. We show that the periodic gravitational pulling of the EM system induces a resonance with fundamental frequency 1 yr-1 and a series of periodic perturbations with frequencies equal to integer harmonics of the synodic month (sime 3.92 × 10-7 Hz). We then evaluate the effects of these perturbations (up to the 6th harmonics) on the relative motions between each test mass couple, finding that they range between 3 mm and 10 pm for the 2nd and 6th harmonic, respectively. If we take the LISA sensitivity curve, as extrapolated down to 10-6 Hz in Bender (2003 Class. Quantum Grav. 20 301-10), we obtain that a few harmonics of the EM system can be detected in the Doppler data collected by the LISA space mission. This suggests that the EM system gravitational near field could provide an additional crosscheck to the calibration of LISA, as extended to such low frequencies.

  13. Modulation of LISA free-fall orbits due to the Earth-Moon system

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdonio, M; De Pietri, R; Jetzer, P; Marzari, F; Mazzolo, G; Ortolan, A; Sereno, M

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the effect of the Earth-Moon (EM) system on the free-fall motion of LISA test masses. We show that the periodic gravitational pulling of the EM system induces a resonance with fundamental frequency 1 yr^-1 and a series of periodic perturbations with frequencies equal to integer harmonics of the synodic month (9.92 10^-7 Hz). We then evaluate the effects of these perturbations (up to the 6th harmonics) on the relative motions between each test masses couple, finding that they range between 3mm and 10pm for the 2nd and 6th harmonic, respectively. If we take the LISA sensitivity curve, as extrapolated down to 10^-6 Hz, we obtain that a few harmonics of the EM system can be detected in the Doppler data collected by the LISA space mission. This suggests that the EM system gravitational near field could provide an absolute calibration for the LISA sensitivity at very low frequencies.

  14. LISA sensitivities to gravitational waves from relativistic metric theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo; Alves, Márcio Eduardo Da Silva

    2010-12-01

    The direct observation of gravitational waves will provide a unique tool for probing the dynamical properties of highly compact astrophysical objects, mapping ultrarelativistic regions of space-time, and testing Einstein’s general theory of relativity. LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration and European Space Agency mission to be launched in the next decade, will perform these scientific tasks by detecting and studying low-frequency cosmic gravitational waves through their influence on the phases of six modulated laser beams exchanged between three remote spacecraft. By directly measuring the polarization components of the waves LISA will detect, we will be able to test Einstein’s theory of relativity with good sensitivity. Since a gravitational wave signal predicted by the most general relativistic metric theory of gravity accounts for six polarization modes (the usual two Einstein’s tensor polarizations as well as two vector and two scalar wave components), we have derived the LISA time-delay interferometric responses and estimated their sensitivities to vector- and scalar-type waves. We find that (i) at frequencies larger than roughly the inverse of the one-way light time (≈6×10-2Hz), LISA is more than ten times sensitive to scalar-longitudinal and vector signals than to tensor and scalar-transverse waves, and (ii) in the low part of its frequency band is equally sensitive to tensor and vector waves and somewhat less sensitive to scalar signals.

  15. The effect of different eLISA-like configurations on massive black hole parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, Edward K

    2015-01-01

    As the theme for the future L3 Cosmic Vision mission, ESA has recently chosen the `Gravitational Wave Universe'. Within this call, a mission concept called eLISA has been proposed. This observatory has a current initial configuration consisting of 4 laser links between the three satellites, which are separated by a distance of one million kilometers, constructing a single channel Michelson interferometer. However, the final configuration for the observatory will not be fixed until the end of this decade. With this in mind, we investigate the effect of different eLISA-like configurations on massive black hole detections. This work compares the results of a Bayesian inference study of 120 massive black hole binaries out to a redshift of $z\\sim13$ for a $10^6$m arm-length eLISA with four and six links, as well as a $2\\times10^6$m arm-length observatory with four links. We demonstrate that the original eLISA configuration should allow us to recover the luminosity distance of the source with an error of less than ...

  16. Playing Harry Potter: Essays and interviews on fandom and performance, edited by Lisa S. Brenner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail De Kosnik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lisa S. Brenner, editor. Playing Harry Potter: Essays and interviews on fandom and performance. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2015, paperback, $29.95 (238p ISBN 978-0-7864-9657-0; e-book $14.43 (5374 KB ISBN 978-1-4766-2136-4, ASIN B012E9G0R6.

  17. LISA: a java API for performing simulations of trajectories for all types of balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conessa, Huguette

    2016-07-01

    LISA (LIbrarie de Simulation pour les Aerostats) is a java API for performing simulations of trajectories for all types of balloons (Zero Pressure Balloons, Pressurized Balloons, Infrared Montgolfier), and for all phases of flight (ascent, ceiling, descent). This library has for goals to establish a reliable repository of Balloons flight physics models, to capitalize developments and control models used in different tools. It is already used for flight physics study software in CNES, to understand and reproduce the behavior of balloons, observed during real flights. It will be used operationally for the ground segment of the STRATEOLE2 mission. It was developed with quality rules of "critical software." It is based on fundamental generic concepts, linking the simulation state variables to interchangeable calculation models. Each LISA model defines how to calculate a consistent set of state variables combining validity checks. To perform a simulation for a type of balloon and a phase of flight, it is necessary to select or create a macro-model that is to say, a consistent set of models to choose from among those offered by LISA, defining the behavior of the environment and the balloon. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the main concepts of LISA, and the new perspectives offered by this library.

  18. Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA): A pathfinder for space-based laser altimetry and lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufton, Jack; Blair, Bryan; Cavanaugh, John; Garvin, James

    1995-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment now being integrated for first flight on STS-72 in November 1995. Four Shuttle flights of the SLA are planned at a rate of about a flight every 18 months. They are aimed at the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future alser altimeter sensors such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), an Earth Observing System facility instrument, and the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA), the land and vegetation laser altimeter for the NASA TOPSAT (Topography Satellite) Mission, will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA. The SLA Instrument measures the distance from the Space Shuttle to the Earth's surface by timing the two-way propagation of short (approximately 10 na noseconds) laser pulses. laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength are generated in a laser transmitter and are detected by a telescope equipped with a silicon avalanche photodiode detector. The SLA data system makes the pulse time interval measurement to a precision of about 10 nsec and also records the temporal shape of the laser echo from the Earth's surface for interpretation of surface height distribution within the 100 m diam. sensor footprint. For example, tree height can be determined by measuring the characteristic double-pulse signature that results from a separation in time of laser backscatter from tree canopies and the underlying ground. This is accomplished with a pulse waveform digitizer that samples the detector output with an adjustable resolution of 2 nanoseconds or wider intervals in a 100 sample window centered on the return pulse echo. The digitizer makes the SLA into a high resolution surface lidar sensor. It can also be used for cloud and atmospheric aerosol lidar measurements by lengthening the sampling window and degrading the waveform resolution. Detailed test

  19. Development of Slewing Mirror Telescope Optical System for the UFFO-pathfinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, S.; Nam, J.W.; Ahn, K.-B.

    2013-01-01

    The Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) is the UV/optical telescope of UFFO-pathfinder. The SMT optical system is a Ritchey-Chrétien (RC) telescope of 100 mm diameter pointed by means of a gimbal-mounted flat mirror in front of the telescope. The RC telescope has a 17 × 17arcmin2 in Field of View and ...

  20. Slewing Mirror Telescope and the Data-Acquisition System for the UFFO-Pathfinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) aims to detect the earliest moment of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) which is not well known, resulting into the enhancement of GRB mechanism understanding. The pathfinder mission was proposed to be a scaled-down version of UFFO, and only contains the UFFO Burst A...

  1. Observation of early photons from gamma-ray bursts with the Lomonosov / UFFO-pathfinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, S.; Brandt, Søren; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    UFFO-pathfinder is a pioneering space mission to observe the early evolution of Gamma-ray Bursts using a fast slewing strategy. It consists of the Slewing Mirror Telescope, for rapid pointing at UV/optical wavelengths and the UFFO Burst Alert and Trigger Telescope. It has a total weight of ~ 20 k...

  2. Do Integrated Children's Services Improve Children's Outcomes?: Evidence from England's Children's Trust Pathfinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Margaret; Bachmann, Max O.; Jones, Natalia R.; Reading, Richard; Thoburn, June; Husbands, Chris; Shreeve, Ann; Watson, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five children's trust pathfinders, local cross-sector partnerships, were introduced across England in 2003 to promote greater integration in children's services. Using administrative performance data, this paper tracks yearly trends in child service outputs and child well-being outcomes from 1997 to 2004 in these local areas, including the…

  3. Effective pathfinding for four-wheeled robot based on combining Theta* and hybrid A* algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віталій Геннадійович Михалько

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective pathfinding algorithm based on Theta* and Hybrid A* algorithms was developed for four-wheeled robot. Pseudocode for algorithm was showed and explained. Algorithm and simulator for four-wheeled robot were implemented using Java programming language. Algorithm was tested on U-obstacles, complex maps and for parking problem

  4. Global Climate Change Pathfinder: A Guide to Information Resources. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintozzi, Chestalene; Jones, Douglas E.

    This pathfinder is a guide to scientific and technical aspects of global climate change including meteorological and climatological aspects; biological, agricultural, and public policy implications; and the chemical processes involved. Sources are arranged by type of publication and include: (1) 10 reference sources; (2) 12 bibliographies; (3) 44…

  5. LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder: testing the next generation of wave front sensors at LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baumeister, Harald; Bergomi, Maria; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Juergen; Biddick, Chris; Bizenberger, Peter; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Brunelli, Alessandro; Brynnel, Joar; Busoni, Lorenzo; Cushing, Norm; De Bonis, Fulvio; De La Pena, Michele; Esposito, Simone; Farinato, Jacopo; Fini, Luca; Green, Richard F.; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kuerster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Puglisi, Alfio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Rakich, Andrew; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Trowitzsch, Jan; Viotto, Valentina; Zhang, Xianyu

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA will employ four wave front sensors to realize multi-conjugate correction on both arms of a Fizeau interferometer for LBT. Of these, one of the two ground-layer wave front sensors, together with its infrared test camera, comprise a stand-alone test platform for LINC-NIRVANA. Pathfinder is a testbed for full LINC-NIRVANA intended to identify potential interface problems early in the game, thus reducing both technical, and schedule, risk. Pathfinder will combine light from multiple guide stars, with a pyramid sensor dedicated to each star, to achieve ground-layer AO correction via an adaptive secondary: the 672-actuator thin shell at the LBT. The ability to achieve sky coverage by optically coadding light from multiple stars has been previously demonstrated; and the ability to achieve correction with an adaptive secondary has also been previously demonstrated. Pathfinder will be the first system at LBT to combine both of these capabilities. Since reporting our progress at A04ELT2, we have advanced the project in three key areas: definition of specific goals for Pathfinder tests at LBT, more detail in the software design and planning, and calibration. We report on our progress and future plans in these three areas, and on the project overall.

  6. Optimal path-finding through mental exploration based on neural energy field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihong; Wang, Rubin; Zhu, Yating

    2017-02-01

    Rodent animal can accomplish self-locating and path-finding task by forming a cognitive map in the hippocampus representing the environment. In the classical model of the cognitive map, the system (artificial animal) needs large amounts of physical exploration to study spatial environment to solve path-finding problems, which costs too much time and energy. Although Hopfield's mental exploration model makes up for the deficiency mentioned above, the path is still not efficient enough. Moreover, his model mainly focused on the artificial neural network, and clear physiological meanings has not been addressed. In this work, based on the concept of mental exploration, neural energy coding theory has been applied to the novel calculation model to solve the path-finding problem. Energy field is constructed on the basis of the firing power of place cell clusters, and the energy field gradient can be used in mental exploration to solve path-finding problems. The study shows that the new mental exploration model can efficiently find the optimal path, and present the learning process with biophysical meaning as well. We also analyzed the parameters of the model which affect the path efficiency. This new idea verifies the importance of place cell and synapse in spatial memory and proves that energy coding is effective to study cognitive activities. This may provide the theoretical basis for the neural dynamics mechanism of spatial memory.

  7. A "door-to-door" path-finding approach for indoor navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, L.; Zlatanova, S.

    2011-01-01

    Indoor navigation is gaining an increasing interest among researchers in many domains. In many cases users need to orient quickly in complex environments, which is not always the target of current routing algorithms. The paper reviews current indoor path-finding approaches and discusses some of the

  8. On the warm nearshore bias in Pathfinder monthly SST products over Eastern Boundary upwelling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dufois, F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available , and Benguela Upwelling Systems. This warm bias could at least partly explain the cold bias often found in numerical models of coastal upwelling. The last release of Pathfinder (version 5.2, September 2011) clearly improved the bias found on the previous...

  9. First in...Last Out: History of the U.S. Army Pathfinder (1942-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    assault in to a large, egg shaped area that extended between Niscemi and Gela, on Sicily’s southern shores. However, the turbulence of war began to...height of 30 feet. In a matter of seconds the Pathfinders had rappelled down dangling ropes into the area, and scrambled into the cover of the trees on

  10. Modeling to Mars: a NASA Model Based Systems Engineering Pathfinder Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Lee, Kristopher A.; Miller, Scott T.; Vorndran, Kenneth A.; Vaden, Karl R.; Ross, Eric P.; Powell, Bobby C.; Moses, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) Systems Engineering (SE) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) initiated the Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Pathfinder effort in FY16. The goals and objectives of the MBSE Pathfinder include developing and advancing MBSE capability across NASA, applying MBSE to real NASA issues, and capturing issues and opportunities surrounding MBSE. The Pathfinder effort consisted of four teams, with each team addressing a particular focus area. This paper focuses on Pathfinder team 1 with the focus area of architectures and mission campaigns. These efforts covered the timeframe of February 2016 through September 2016. The team was comprised of eight team members from seven NASA Centers (Glenn Research Center, Langley Research Center, Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center IV&V Facility, Johnson Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Stennis Space Center). Collectively, the team had varying levels of knowledge, skills and expertise in systems engineering and MBSE. The team applied their existing and newly acquired system modeling knowledge and expertise to develop modeling products for a campaign (Program) of crew and cargo missions (Projects) to establish a human presence on Mars utilizing In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Pathfinder team 1 developed a subset of modeling products that are required for a Program System Requirement Review (SRR)/System Design Review (SDR) and Project Mission Concept Review (MCR)/SRR as defined in NASA Procedural Requirements. Additionally, Team 1 was able to perform and demonstrate some trades and constraint analyses. At the end of these efforts, over twenty lessons learned and recommended next steps have been identified.

  11. Software for Application of HHT Technologies to Time Series Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a robust and user-friendly software environment where NASA researchers can customize the latest HHT technologies for the LISA (and LIGO)...

  12. Results from the LISA Commissioning Experiment on the decay of 24O* --> 22O + n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) at NSCL, Michigan State University was constructed and tested by undergraduate students from several institutions in the MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) collaboration. LISA is used in conjunction with MoNA for detection of neutrons at large angles to the beam axis, corresponding to high energy decays from exotic nuclei at or beyond the neutron dripline. The LISA commissioning experiment was designed to measure and resolve neutron decays from the first two excited states (2+ and 1+) of 24O to the 23O ground state, using proton-knockout of 26F on a thin Be target. The trajectories of charged fragments at the site of the decay were identified using the Sweeper Magnet chamber detectors and inverse-tracking through the magnet. The two scintillator arrays measured the time of flight path of neutrons. Decay energies were determined using these decay kinematics and invariant mass spectroscopy. The two 24O states were previously observed, but with insufficient resolution to separate the two cleanly. This experiment provided sufficiently resolution to separate the two states cleanly. Results for the decay energies and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations will be presented. The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) at NSCL, Michigan State University was constructed and tested by undergraduate students from several institutions in the MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) collaboration. LISA is used in conjunction with MoNA for detection of neutrons at large angles to the beam axis, corresponding to high energy decays from exotic nuclei at or beyond the neutron dripline. The LISA commissioning experiment was designed to measure and resolve neutron decays from the first two excited states (2+ and 1+) of 24O to the 23O ground state, using proton-knockout of 26F on a thin Be target. The trajectories of charged fragments at the site of the decay were identified using the Sweeper Magnet chamber detectors and inverse

  13. Review: Lisa Mackenrodt, Swahili Spirit Possession and Islamic Healing in Contemporary Tanzania: The Jinn Fly on Friday (2011 Buchbesprechung: Lisa Mackenrodt, Swahili Spirit Possession and Islamic Healing in Contemporary Tanzania: The Jinn Fly on Friday (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigal Beez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the monograph:Lisa Mackenrodt, Swahili Spirit Possession and Islamic Healing in Contemporary Tanzania: The Jinn Fly on Friday, Hamburg: Verlag Dr. Kovač, 2011, ISBN 978-3-8300-5806-9, 216 pagesBesprechung der Monographie:Lisa Mackenrodt, Swahili Spirit Possession and Islamic Healing in Contemporary Tanzania: The Jinn Fly on Friday, Hamburg: Verlag Dr. Kovač, 2011, ISBN 978-3-8300-5806-9, 216 Seiten

  14. The Mona Lisa effect: Testing the limits of perceptual robustness vis-à-vis slanted images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hecht Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three experiments that test the limits of the Mona Lisa effect. The gaze of a portrait that is looking at us appears to follow us around as we move with respect to the picture. Even if our position is shifted considerably to the side, or if the picture is severely slanted, do we feel the gaze to be directed at us? We determined the threshold where this effect breaks down to be maximally 70° of picture slant relative to the observer. Different factors modulate this remarkable robustness, among them being the display medium and the nature of the picture. The threshold was considerably lower when the picture was mounted on a physical surface as opposed to a computer simulation of slant. Also, the more the portrayed object deviated from the photograph of a human head, the less robust the Mona Lisa effect became. Implications for theories of perspective distortion are discussed.

  15. The new Digital Data Acquisition System for MoNA-LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisman, Dayah; Deyoung, Paul; MoNA Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) are used to detect neutrons emitted during the decay of exotic nuclei near the neutron dripline. The arrays consist of 288 10cm x 10cm x 2m long plastic scintillation detectors coupled to photomultipliers at each end. The Time of Flight (TOF) of these neutrons determines the neutron energy, which is needed to find the decay energy of the exotic nuclei. A Digital Data Acquisition System (DDAS) based on the XIA PXI modules is being developed to read out and record the signals of the MoNA-LISA scintillation detectors. A 500 Mega Samples per Second (MSPS) PXI module was used to test the time and energy resolution as it compares to the existing analog DAQ setup. NSF PHY-1002511, DOE-NNSA DE-NA0000979.

  16. 3D imaging from theory to practice: the Mona Lisa story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Francois; Cournoyer, Luc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Picard, Michel

    2008-08-01

    The warped poplar panel and the technique developed by Leonardo to paint the Mona Lisa present a unique research and engineering challenge for the design of a complete optical 3D imaging system. This paper discusses the solution developed to precisely measure in 3D the world's most famous painting despite its highly contrasted paint surface and reflective varnish. The discussion focuses on the opto-mechanical design and the complete portable 3D imaging system used for this unique occasion. The challenges associated with obtaining 3D color images at a resolution of 0.05 mm and a depth precision of 0.01 mm are illustrated by exploring the virtual 3D model of the Mona Lisa.

  17. Tidally-Induced Apsidal Precession in Double White Dwarfs: a new mass measurement tool with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Willems, Bart; Deloye, Christopher J; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2011-01-01

    Galactic interacting double white dwarfs (DWD) are guaranteed gravitational wave (GW) sources for the GW detector LISA, with more than 10^4 binaries expected to be detected over the mission's lifetime. While the majority of DWDs are expected to be circular, dynamical interactions in globular clusters can lead to a sub-population of eccentric DWDs detectable by LISA. Here we investigate the potential for constraining the white dwarf (WD) properties through apsidal precession in these binaries. We analyze the tidal, rotational, and general relativistic contributions to apsidal precession by using detailed He WD models, where the evolution of the star's interior is followed throughout the cooling phase. In agreement with previous studies of zero-temperature WDs, we find that apsidal precession in eccentric DWDs can lead to a detectable shift in the emitted GW signal when binaries with cool (old) components are considered. This shift increases significantly for hot (young) WDs. We find that apsidal motion in hot ...

  18. Lifetime testing UV LEDs for use in the LISA charge management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollington, D.; Baird, J. T.; Sumner, T. J.; Wass, P. J.

    2017-10-01

    As a future charge management light source, UV light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) offer far superior performance in a range of metrics compared to the mercury lamps used in the past. As part of a qualification program a number of short wavelength UV LEDs have been subjected to a series of lifetime tests for potential use on the laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) mission. These tests were performed at realistic output levels for both fast and continuous discharging in either a DC or pulsed mode of operation and included a DC fast discharge test spanning 50 days, a temperature dependent pulsed fast discharge test spanning 21 days and a pulsed continuous discharge test spanning 507 days. Two types of UV LED have demonstrated lifetimes equivalent to over 25 years of realistic mission usage with one type providing a baseline for LISA and the other offering a backup solution.

  19. Laser frequency stabilization and stray light issues for LISA and other future multi-spacecraft missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint NASA/ESA project which will use laser interferometry between drag-free proof masses to measure...

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Reflectance from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has been superseded by Version 5.3. The Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x) Reflectance data contain derived atmospheric variables from the...

  1. 4 km NODC/RSMAS AVHRR Pathfinder v.5.0 Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Climatologies (1985-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 4 km Pathfinder effort at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) and the University of Miami's...

  2. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge also Bamforth, Hutton Lake and Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Arapaho NWR, Bamforth NWR, Hutton Lake NWR, and Pathfinder NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The...

  3. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Cloud Properties from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of cloud products was produced by the University of Wisconsin using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-X)...

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AVHRR Pathfinder, Version 5.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.2 Sea Surface Temperature data set (PFV52) is a collection of global, twice-daily 4km sea surface temperature data produced in a...

  5. Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2000: Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge, Bamforth, Hutton Lake, Morenson Lake and Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Arapaho NWR, Bamforth NWR, Hutton Lake NWR, Morenson Lake NWR, and Pathfinder NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000...

  6. LISA detection of binary black holes in the Milky Way galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Pierre; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    Using the black hole merger rate inferred from LIGO, we calculate the abundance of tightly bound binary black holes in the Milky Way galaxy. Binaries with a small semimajor axis (≲10 R⊙) originate at larger separations through conventional formation mechanisms and evolve as a result of gravitational wave emission. We find that LISA could detect them in the Milky Way. We also identify possible X-ray signatures of such binaries.

  7. Probing the strong gravity regime with eLISA: Progress on EMRIs

    CERN Document Server

    Sopuerta, Carlos F

    2012-01-01

    The capture of a stellar-mass compact object by a supermassive black hole and the subsequent inspiral (driven by gravitational radiation emission) constitute one of the most important sources of gravitational waves for space-based observatories like eLISA/NGO. In this article we describe their potential as high-precision tools that can be used to perform tests of the geometry of black holes and also of the strong field regime of gravity.

  8. Attentiography of the Body: correlations between Lisa Nelson and Gilbert Simondon’s work from a narrative fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Gaspar Neto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests an interconnection between art and philosophy through approaching the practice of attention upon a section of Tuning Scores, described by the American choreographer and videomaker Lisa Nelson and the individual’s relationship with the environment and with others thought by the French philosopher Gilbert Simondon. Lisa Nelson’s fragment describing the Attentiography of Body is presented in conjunction with Simondon’s characters by covering some interpersonal relationship traits: individuation, individuality, and personality.

  9. Low-Frequency Gravitational-Wave Science with eLISA/ NGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N.; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T.; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Stebbins, Robin; Vallisneri, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  10. Low-frequency gravitational-wave science with eLISA/NGO

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K; Schutz, Bernard F; Sesana, Alberto; Stebbins, Robin; Sumner, Tim; Vallisneri, Michele; Vitale, Stefano; Volonteri, Marta; Ward, Henry

    2012-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  11. Metals in sediments and fish from Sea Lots and Point Lisas harbors, Trinidad and Tobago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Azad; May, Thomas; Echols, Kathy; Walther, Mike; Manoo, Anton; Maraj, Dexter; Agard, John; Orazio, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals were determined in nearshore marine sediments and fish tissue from Sea Lots area on the west coast, at Caroni Lagoon National Park, and in the Point Lisas harbor, Trinidad. The most dominant metals found in sediments were Al, Fe and Zn with mean concentrations highest at Sea Lots (Al-39420 μg/g; Fe-45640 μg/g; Zn-245 μg/g), when compared to sediments from Point Lisas (Al-11936 μg/g; Fe-30171 μg/g; Zn-69 μg/g) and Caroni (Al-0400 μg/g; Fe-19000 μg/g; Zn-32 μg/g), High concentration of Cu, Al, Fe and Zn were also detected in fish tissue from Point Lisas and Caroni. Metal concentrations in fish tissue showed significant correlation with sediment metals concentration, which suggests that tissue levels are influenced by sediment concentration. Of the metals, only Zn, Hg and Cu had a bioaccumulation factor (BAF) greater than one, which suggests a high bioaccumulation potential for these metals.

  12. William Herschel Telescope site characterization using the MOAO pathfinder CANARY on-sky data

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, O A; Gendron, E; Rousset, G; Vidal, F; Morris, T J; Basden, A G; Myers, R M; Ono, Y H; Neichel, B; Fusco, T

    2016-01-01

    Canary is the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) pathfinder for the future MOAO-assisted Integral-Field Units (IFU) proposed for Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT). The MOAO concept relies on tomographically reconstructing the turbulence using multiple measurements along different lines of sight. Tomography requires the knowledge of the statistical turbulence parameters, commonly recovered from the system telemetry using a dedicated profiling technique. For demonstration purposes with the MOAO pathfinder Canary , this identification is performed thanks to the Learn & Apply (L&A) algorithm, that consists in model- fitting the covariance matrix of WFS measurements dependent on relevant parameters: $C_n^2(h)$ profile, outer scale profile and system mis-registration. We explore an upgrade of this algorithm, the Learn 3 Steps (L3S) approach, that allows one to dissociate the identification of the altitude layers from the ground in order to mitigate the lack of convergence of the required empirical covarianc...

  13. Indoor A* Pathfinding Through an Octree Representation of a Point Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenberg, O. B. P. M.; Verbree, E.; Zlatanova, S.

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing demand of 3D indoor pathfinding applications. Researched in the field of robotics during the last decades of the 20th century, these methods focussed on 2D navigation. Nowadays we would like to have the ability to help people navigate inside buildings or send a drone inside a building when this is too dangerous for people. What these examples have in common is that an object with a certain geometry needs to find an optimal collision free path between a start and goal point. This paper presents a new workflow for pathfinding through an octree representation of a point cloud. We applied the following steps: 1) the point cloud is processed so it fits best in an octree; 2) during the octree generation the interior empty nodes are filtered and further processed; 3) for each interior empty node the distance to the closest occupied node directly under it is computed; 4) a network graph is computed for all empty nodes; 5) the A* pathfinding algorithm is conducted. This workflow takes into account the connectivity for each node to all possible neighbours (face, edge and vertex and all sizes). Besides, a collision avoidance system is pre-processed in two steps: first, the clearance of each empty node is computed, and then the maximal crossing value between two empty neighbouring nodes is computed. The clearance is used to select interior empty nodes of appropriate size and the maximal crossing value is used to filter the network graph. Finally, both these datasets are used in A* pathfinding.

  14. Pathfinder. Volume 9, Number 3, May/June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    banquet scheduled for May 11 at the DOD Procurement Con- ference and Training Symposium in Orlando, Fla. NGA has renamed its “Outstanding Women of...capture sensors and capabilities. www.pixim.com Signal Innovations Group: Video analytics and event detection technology. www.siginnovations.com

  15. The Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph Pathfinder Mission for the Detection of Coronal Suprathermal Seed Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Leonard; Laming, J. Martin; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Tun Beltran, Samuel; Socker, Dennis G.; Brown, Charles; Provornikova, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph (UVSC) Pathfinder is a Naval Research Laboratory experiment designed to make the first detection of suprathermal seed particles close to the Sun. It uses an innovative “stacked” occulting system to significantly increase the effective light gathering power of a traditional, 1-meter length, externally occulted coronagraph. The external occultation in combination with a low scatter variable line spaced grating provide the stray light suppression needed to measure non-Maxwellian departures in the wings of the H Lyman alpha emission line profile. After the removal of other factors, these departures may be interpreted as the signature of suprathermal tails of the proton velocity distribution in the corona. UVSC Pathfinder will provide information on the origins and spatial/temporal variability of proton seed particle populations. We will discuss the accuracy needed to make such measurements and describe how the results can be used to develop a capability for predicting the onset of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) storms. The experiment is scheduled for a launch by the DoD Space Test Program in late 2018/early 2019 and should have excellent overlap with the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions.UVSC Pathfinder is supported by funds from the Chief of Naval Research (via the NRL basic research program) and from NASA (via NDPR NNG13WF951 and NNH16AC29I).

  16. Review of A* (A Star) Navigation Mesh Pathfinding as the Alternative of Artificial Intelligent for Ghosts Agent on the Pacman Game

    OpenAIRE

    Moh. Zikky

    2016-01-01

    Shortest pathfinding problem has become a populer issue in Game’s Artificial Intelligent (AI). This paper discussed the effective way to optimize the shortest pathfinding problem, namely Navigation Mesh (NavMesh). This method is very interesting because it has a large area of implementation, especially in games world. In this paper, NavMesh was implemented by using A* (A star) algorithm and examined in Unity 3D game engine. A* was an effective algorithm in shortest pathfinding problem because...

  17. Technical Data Interoperability (TDI) Pathfinder Via Emerging Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Mike; Gill, Paul; Hill, Bradley; Ibach, Brandon; Jones, Corey; Ungar, David; Barch, Jeffrey; Ingalls, John; Jacoby, Joseph; Manning, Josh; Bengtsson, Kjell; Falls, Mark; Kent, Peter; Heath, Shaun; Kennedy, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The TDI project (TDI) investigates trending technical data standards for applicability to NASA vehicles, space stations, payloads, facilities, and equipment. TDI tested COTS software compatible with a certain suite of related industry standards for capabilities of individual benefits and interoperability. These standards not only esnable Information Technology (IT) efficiencies, but also address efficient structures and standard content for business processes. We used source data from generic industry samples as well as NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) data from space systems.

  18. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures. This hybrid approach uses a local finite element model (FEM) to compute the excitability of guided waves generated by piezoelectric transducers, while the global domain wave propagation, wave-damage interaction, and boundary reflections are modeled with the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). A small-size multi-physics FEM with non-reflective boundaries (NRB) was built to obtain the excitability information of guided waves generated by the transmitter. Frequency-domain harmonic analysis was carried out to obtain the solution for all the frequencies of interest. Fourier and inverse Fourier transform and frequency domain convolution techniques are used to obtain the time domain 3-D displacement field underneath the transmitter under an arbitrary excitation. This 3-D displacement field is then fed into the highly efficient time domain LISA simulation module to compute guided wave propagation, interaction with damage, and reflections at structural boundaries. The damping effect of composite materials was considered in the modified LISA formulation. The grids for complex structures were generated using commercial FEM preprocessors and converted to LISA connectivity format. Parallelization of the global LISA solution was achieved through Compute Unified Design Architecture (CUDA) running on Graphical Processing Unit (GPU). The multi-physics local FEM can reliably capture the detailed dimensions and local dynamics of the piezoelectric transducers. The global domain LISA can accurately solve the 3-D elastodynamic wave equations in a highly efficient manner. By combining the local FEM with global LISA, the efficient and accurate simulation of guided wave structural health monitoring procedure is achieved. Two numerical case studies are presented: (1) wave propagation in a unidirectional CFRP composite plate

  19. Automatic system for quantification and visualization of lung aeration on chest computed tomography images: the Lung Image System Analysis - LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, John Hebert da Silva; Cortez, Paulo Cesar, E-mail: jhsfelix@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Teleinformatica; Holanda, Marcelo Alcantara [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Walter Cantidio. Dept. de Medicina Clinica

    2010-12-15

    High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is the exam of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of lung parenchyma diseases. There is an increasing interest for computational systems able to automatically analyze the radiological densities of the lungs in CT images. The main objective of this study is to present a system for the automatic quantification and visualization of the lung aeration in HRCT images of different degrees of aeration, called Lung Image System Analysis (LISA). The secondary objective is to compare LISA to the Osiris system and also to specific algorithm lung segmentation (ALS), on the accuracy of the lungs segmentation. The LISA system automatically extracts the following image attributes: lungs perimeter, cross sectional area, volume, the radiological densities histograms, the mean lung density (MLD) in Hounsfield units (HU), the relative area of the lungs with voxels with density values lower than -950 HU (RA950) and the 15th percentile of the least density voxels (PERC15). Furthermore, LISA has a colored mask algorithm that applies pseudo-colors to the lung parenchyma according to the pre-defined radiological density chosen by the system user. The lungs segmentations of 102 images of 8 healthy volunteers and 141 images of 11 patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were compared on the accuracy and concordance among the three methods. The LISA was more effective on lungs segmentation than the other two methods. LISA's color mask tool improves the spatial visualization of the degrees of lung aeration and the various attributes of the image that can be extracted may help physicians and researchers to better assess lung aeration both quantitatively and qualitatively. LISA may have important clinical and research applications on the assessment of global and regional lung aeration and therefore deserves further developments and validation studies. (author)

  20. LISA, the next generation: from a web-based application to a fat client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierlet, Noëlla; Aerts, Werner; Vanautgaerden, Mark; Van den Bosch, Bart; De Deurwaerder, André; Schils, Erik; Noppe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The LISA application, developed by the University Hospitals Leuven, permits referring physicians to consult the electronic medical records of their patients over the internet in a highly secure way. We decided to completely change the way we secured the application, discard the existing web application and build a completely new application, based on the in-house developed hospital information system, used in the University Hospitals Leuven. The result is a fat Java client, running on a Windows Terminal Server, secured by a commercial SSL-VPN solution.

  1. Massive Black Hole Mergers: Can We "See" what LISA will "Hear"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of massive black holes produces strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. If the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We will review current efforts to simulate these systems, and discuss possibilities for observing the electromagnetic signals they produce.

  2. Massive Black Hole Mergers: Can We "See" what LISA will "Hear"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of massive black holes produces strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. If the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We will review current efforts to simulate these systems, and discuss possibilities for observing the electromagnetic signals they produce.

  3. Massive gravitational waves from f(R) theories of gravity: Potential detection with LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozziello, Salvatore [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)], E-mail: capozzie@na.infn.it; Corda, Christian [Associazione Galileo Galilei, via Pier Cironi 16, 59100 Prato (Italy); Centro di Scienze Naturali, via di Galceti 74, 59100 Prato (Italy)], E-mail: christian.corda@ego-gw.it; De Laurentis, Maria Felicia [Relativity and Gravitation Group, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: mariafelicia.delaurentist@polito.it

    2008-11-27

    This Letter is a generalization of previous results on gravitational waves (GWs) from f(R) theories of gravity. In some previous papers, particular f(R) theories have been linearized for the first time in the literature. Now, the process is further generalized, showing that every f(R) theory can be linearized producting a third massive mode of gravitational radiation. In this framework, previous results are particular cases of the more general problem that is discussed in this Letter. The potential detectability of such massive GWs with LISA is also discussed with the auxilium of longitudinal response functions.

  4. Massive gravitational waves from f(R) theories of gravity: Potential detection with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Maria Felicia

    2008-01-01

    This letter is a generalization of previous results on gravitational waves (GWs) from f(R) theories of gravity. In some previous papers, particular f(R) theories have been linearized for the first time in the literature. Now, the process is further generalized, showing that every f(R) theory can be linearized producting a third massive mode of gravitational radiation. In this framework, previous results are particular cases of the more general problem that is discussed in this letter. The potential detectability of such massive GWs with LISA is also discussed with the auxilium of longitudinal response functions.

  5. Análise experimental de lajes lisas nervuradas de concreto armado com armadura de cisalhamento

    OpenAIRE

    SOUZA, Shirley do Socorro Melo de

    2007-01-01

    Lajes lisas nervuradas bidirecionais são elementos estruturais de concreto armado apoiados diretamente sobre pilares, sujeitas a solicitações importantes nas duas direções, possibilitam maior velocidade na execução da obra e economia considerável de formas e concreto e, conseqüentemente, mão-de-obra. Este trabalho visa contribuir para o estudo do comportamento deste tipo de laje, quanto a resistência ao cisalhamento nas nervuras e à punção na região maciça das lajes, através de ensaios de 8 l...

  6. Pathfinder, v6 n6, Nov/Dec 2008. Foundation Data and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    caused by solar flares or geomagnetic storms, as well as intentional and unintentional radio jamming caused by man-made techniques. DOD’s development...improved DTED® contributed incompara- ble accuracy to everything from geophysics to earthquake research to the best location for cell phone towers to mis

  7. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. II. Gravitational waves from cosmological phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprini, Chiara [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). IPht; CNRS, Gif-sur Yvette (France); Hindmarsh, Mark [Sussex Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics and Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Huber, Stephan [Sussex Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; and others

    2016-04-15

    We investigate the potential for the eLISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by strong first-order cosmological phase transitions. We discuss the resulting contributions from bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves to the stochastic background, and estimate the total corresponding signal predicted in gravitational waves. The projected sensitivity of eLISA to cosmological phase transitions is computed in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. By applying these results to several specific models, we demonstrate that eLISA is able to probe many well-motivated scenarios beyond the Standard Model of particle physics predicting strong first-order cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe.

  8. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. II: Gravitational waves from cosmological phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara; Huber, Stephan; Konstandin, Thomas; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Nardini, Germano; No, Jose Miguel; Petiteau, Antoine; Schwaller, Pedro; Servant, Geraldine; Weir, David J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the eLISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by strong first-order cosmological phase transitions. We discuss the resulting contributions from bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves to the stochastic background, and estimate the total corresponding signal predicted in gravitational waves. The projected sensitivity of eLISA to cosmological phase transitions is computed in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. By applying these results to several specific models, we demonstrate that eLISA is able to probe many well-motivated scenarios beyond the Standard Model of particle physics predicting strong first-order cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe.

  9. Zebrafish foxP2 zinc finger nuclease mutant has normal axon pathfinding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Xing

    Full Text Available foxP2, a forkhead-domain transcription factor, is critical for speech and language development in humans, but its role in the establishment of CNS connectivity is unclear. While in vitro studies have identified axon guidance molecules as targets of foxP2 regulation, and cell culture assays suggest a role for foxP2 in neurite outgrowth, in vivo studies have been lacking regarding a role for foxP2 in axon pathfinding. We used a modified zinc finger nuclease methodology to generate mutations in the zebrafish foxP2 gene. Using PCR-based high resolution melt curve analysis (HRMA of G0 founder animals, we screened and identified three mutants carrying nonsense mutations in the 2(nd coding exon: a 17 base-pair (bp deletion, an 8bp deletion, and a 4bp insertion. Sequence analysis of cDNA confirmed that these were frameshift mutations with predicted early protein truncations. Homozygous mutant fish were viable and fertile, with unchanged body morphology, and no apparent differences in CNS apoptosis, proliferation, or patterning at embryonic stages. There was a reduction in expression of the known foxP2 target gene cntnap2 that was rescued by injection of wild-type foxP2 transcript. When we examined axon pathfinding using a pan-axonal marker or transgenic lines, including a foxP2-neuron-specific enhancer, we did not observe any axon guidance errors. Our findings suggest that foxP2 is not necessary for axon pathfinding during development.

  10. Shh signaling guides spatial pathfinding of raphespinal tract axons by multidirectional repulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Song; Yuehui Liu; YangYu; Xin Duan; Shening Qi; Yaobo Liu

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying spatial pathfinding in the descending serotonergic raphespinal tract (RST) in the developing spinal cord,one of the most important nerve pathways for pain,sensory and motor functions.We provide evidence that ventral floor plate-secreted Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is responsible for the establishment of decreasing gradients in both the anterior-to-posterior (A-P) and the medialto-lateral (M-L) directions in the ventral spinal cord during serotonergic RST axon projection.Downstream components of the Shh pathway,Patched 1 (Ptch1) and Smoothened (Smo),were expressed in the serotonergic caudal raphe nuclei and enriched in the descending serotonergic RST axons.Diffusible Shh repulsion of serotonergic RST axons was shown to be mediated by Shh-Ptch1 interactions and derepression of Smo.Using a co-culture assay,we showed that A-P graded repulsion mediated by Shh signaling pushed the serotonergic axons caudally through the ventral spinal cord and M-L graded repulsion mediated by Shh signaling simultaneously restricted the serotonergic axons to the ventral and ventral-lateral funiculus.Prominent pathfinding errors of serotonergic RST axons were observed in various Shh,Ptch1 and Smo mutants.We conclude that Shh signaling-mediated multidirectional repulsion is required to push descending serotonergic RST axons in the A-P direction,and to restrict these axons to the ventral and ventral-lateral funiculus in the M-L direction.This is the first demonstration that Shh signalingmediated muitidirectional repulsion of serotonergic RST axons maintains spatial axon pathfinding in the developing spinal cord.

  11. Shh signaling guides spatial pathfinding of raphespinal tract axons by multidirectional repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lijuan; Liu, Yuehui; Yu, Yang; Duan, Xin; Qi, Shening; Liu, Yaobo

    2012-04-01

    Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying spatial pathfinding in the descending serotonergic raphespinal tract (RST) in the developing spinal cord, one of the most important nerve pathways for pain, sensory and motor functions. We provide evidence that ventral floor plate-secreted Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is responsible for the establishment of decreasing gradients in both the anterior-to-posterior (A-P) and the medial-to-lateral (M-L) directions in the ventral spinal cord during serotonergic RST axon projection. Downstream components of the Shh pathway, Patched 1 (Ptch1) and Smoothened (Smo), were expressed in the serotonergic caudal raphe nuclei and enriched in the descending serotonergic RST axons. Diffusible Shh repulsion of serotonergic RST axons was shown to be mediated by Shh-Ptch1 interactions and derepression of Smo. Using a co-culture assay, we showed that A-P graded repulsion mediated by Shh signaling pushed the serotonergic axons caudally through the ventral spinal cord and M-L graded repulsion mediated by Shh signaling simultaneously restricted the serotonergic axons to the ventral and ventral-lateral funiculus. Prominent pathfinding errors of serotonergic RST axons were observed in various Shh, Ptch1 and Smo mutants. We conclude that Shh signaling-mediated multidirectional repulsion is required to push descending serotonergic RST axons in the A-P direction, and to restrict these axons to the ventral and ventral-lateral funiculus in the M-L direction. This is the first demonstration that Shh signaling-mediated multidirectional repulsion of serotonergic RST axons maintains spatial axon pathfinding in the developing spinal cord.

  12. A phased approach to commissioning MCAO: Status and plans for the Linc-Nirvana Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Al; Bertram, Thomas; Kürster, Martin; Herbst, Tom; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Viotto, Valentina; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bizenberger, Peter; Briegel, Florian; Hofferbert, Ralph; Gässler, Wolfgang; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Baumeister, Harald; Zhang, Xianyu; Trowitzsch, Jan; Berwein, Jürgen; Kittmann, Frank; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Bonis, De Fulvio

    2011-09-01

    Layer-oriented multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems apply two or more wavefront-sensor/deformable-mirror (WFS/DM) pairs, each conjugate to a different turbulent layer in the atmosphere. Because these pairs apply correction in series, they are largely decoupled from one another, lending them to a phased commissioning approach. Commissioning instruments on large telescopes, while almost always successful in the end, can be, experience has shown, inefficient and difficult to schedule. For Linc-Nirvana we plan to take advantage of the natural decoupling between the ground-layer subsystem (a 12-star pyramid WFS operating in conjunction with the LBT adaptive secondary) and the mid-high subsystem (an 8-star pyramid WFS working in conjunction with a Xynetics 349 actuator DM) to mitigate the difficulties that have been experienced commissioning complex instruments on large, over-subscribed, telescopes. Pathfinder is a test-bed, consisting of only those subsystems needed to operate, stand-alone, one of the two Linc-Nirvana ground-layer subsystems. The Pathfinder effort will tease out top-level interface issues; while at the same time providing a valuable characterization of the Mount Graham ground-layer. To what extent will this ground-layer system provide a seeing-corrected image to the next WFS/DM pair in the Linc-Nirvana system: the mid-high wavefront-sensor (MHWS)? We will present status and plans for the Linc-Nirvana Pathfinder effort, a novel approach for commissioning MCAO systems on large telescopes.

  13. A simple neural network model of the hippocampus suggesting its pathfinding role in episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonovich, Alexei V; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to extend the theoretical understanding of the relationship between hippocampal spatial and memory functions to the level of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying spatial navigation and episodic memory retrieval. The proposed unifying theory describes both phenomena within a unique framework, as based on one and the same pathfinding function of the hippocampus. We propose a mechanism of reconstruction of the context of experience involving a search for a nearly shortest path in the space of remembered contexts. To analyze this concept in detail, we define a simple connectionist model consistent with available rodent and human neurophysiological data. Numerical study of the model begins with the spatial domain as a simple analogy for more complex phenomena. It is demonstrated how a nearly shortest path is quickly found in a familiar environment. We prove numerically that associative learning during sharp waves can account for the necessary properties of hippocampal place cells. Computational study of the model is extended to other cognitive paradigms, with the main focus on episodic memory retrieval. We show that the ability to find a correct path may be vital for successful retrieval. The model robustly exhibits the pathfinding capacity within a wide range of several factors, including its memory load (up to 30,000 abstract contexts), the number of episodes that become associated with potential target contexts, and the level of dynamical noise. We offer several testable critical predictions in both spatial and memory domains to validate the theory. Our results suggest that (1) the pathfinding function of the hippocampus, in addition to its associative and memory indexing functions, may be vital for retrieval of certain episodic memories, and (2) the hippocampal spatial navigation function could be a precursor of its memory function.

  14. The readout system and the trigger algorithm implementation for the UFFO Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, G. W.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jeong, S.; Jung, A.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, Aleksey S.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Nam, J. W.; Park, I. H.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2012-09-01

    Since the launch of the SWIFT, Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science has been much progressed. Especially supporting many measurements of GRB events and sharing them with other telescopes by the Gamma-ray Coordinate Network (GCN) have resulted the richness of GRB events, however, only a few of GRB events have been measured within a minute after the gamma ray signal. This lack of sub-minute data limits the study for the characteristics of the UV-optical light curve of the short-hard type GRB and the fast-rising GRB. Therefore, we have developed the telescope named the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) Pathfinder, to take the sub-minute data for the early photons from GRB. The UFFO Pathfinder has a coded-mask X-ray camera to search the GRB location by the UBAT trigger algorithm. To determine the direction of GRB as soon as possible it requires the fast processing. We have ultimately implemented all algorithms in field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) without microprocessor. Although FPGA, when compared with microprocessor, is generally estimated to support the fast processing rather than the complex processing, we have developed the implementation to overcome the disadvantage and to maximize the advantage. That is to measure the location as accurate as possible and to determine the location within the sub-second timescale. In the particular case for a accuracy of the X-ray trigger, it requires special information from the satellite based on the UFFO central control system. We present the implementation of the UBAT trigger algorithm as well as the readout system of the UFFO Pathfinder.

  15. Mona Lisa: sentidos múltiplos de um sorriso enigmático

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto resgata um pouco da história da famosa pintura de Leonardo da Vinci, a Mona Lisa, ou Gioconda, do século XVI, com objetivo de discorrer a respeito de alguns dos múltiplos sentidos (ou discursos em torno de seu significado, tendo como suporte o respaldo teórico-metodológico da Análise do Discurso de linha francesa, com base especialmente em conceitos desenvolvidos por D. Maingueneau. Como é característico da obra de arte, trata-se de efeitos de sentidos em aberto, o que não exclui a possibilidade de destacamentos, entre os quais se sobressai o "sorriso de Mona Lisa" como um dos principais traços da autoria de Leonardo Da Vinci e, simultaneamente, um traço propício à aforização. Assim, a obra de arte desvincula-se da autoria exclusiva de Da Vinci ao suscitar diversas releituras, as quais ajudam a compor um ethos discursivo em torno desta consagrada pintura e, ao mesmo tempo, fazem circular estereótipos distintos.

  16. Gravitational-wave cosmography with eLISA and the Hubble tension

    CERN Document Server

    Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2016-01-01

    We propose that stellar-mass binary black holes like GW150914 will become a tool to explore the local Universe within ~100Mpc in the era of evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA). High calibration accuracy and annual motion of eLISA could enable us to localize up to ~60 binaries more accurately than the error volume of ~100Mpc^3 without presumably absent electromagnetic counterparts. This accuracy will give us a fair chance to determine the host object solely by gravitational waves. By combining the luminosity distance extracted from gravitational waves with the cosmological redshift determined from the host, the local value of the Hubble parameter will be determined up to a few % without relying on the empirically-constructed distance ladder. Gravitational-wave cosmography would pave the way for resolution of the disputed Hubble tension, where the local and global measurements disagree in the value of the Hubble parameter at 3.4sigma level, which amounts to ~9%.

  17. Preparation for MoNA/LISA VANDLE ^56Ni(d,n) Experiment at the NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Z. J.; Kozub, R. L.; Peters, W. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Howard, M. E.; Bardayan, D. W.; Ikeyama, R.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Madurga, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Deyoung, P. A.; Baumann, T.; Smith, J.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-10-01

    The rp-process is the explosive nucleosynthesis process in novae by which ions rapidly capture hydrogen nuclei, forming heavy, proton-rich nuclei. Most of the rp-process reactions are believed to pass through the ^56Ni(p,γ)^57Cu reaction which cannot presently be measured directly. An experiment to be performed at the NSCL employs the method of (d,n) proton transfer reactions in inverse kinematics to determine pertinent properties of this reaction via ^56Ni(d,n)^57Cu at 30 MeV/nucleon. The experiment will be carried out using two neutron detector arrays of plastic scintillator bars. The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is able to detect neutrons in the 100 keV to 20 MeV range; however, when used in conjunction with MONA/LISA and the Sweeper detectors at the NSCL, the combined arrays allow for the detection of a wider range of neutron energies. Recently, the trigger logic was tested for the VANDLE-Sweeper coincidences and for the left-right coincidence trigger for MoNA/LISA. Results from these tests will be presented along with details of the approved (d,n) experimental setup.

  18. Calibration of the Sweeper Chamber Charged-Particle Detectors for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, J.; Grovom, A.; Rogers, W.; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The new LISA (Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) neutron detector array, designed to be used in conjunction with MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) was recently commissioned at the NSCL in an experiment designed to investigate excited states of neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes near the neutron drip-line. Charged fragments resulting from the neutron decays were swept out of the beam direction by the Sweeper Magnet after which they passed through a series of charged-particle detectors for fragment trajectory and energy determination. In order to achieve isotope separation and identification at the focal plane, which is then used to reconstruct the invariant mass of the unbound states, precise determinations of the fragment and neutron energies and trajectories are required. To correct for time-drifts in the charge-particle detectors that develop over the entire length of the experiment, Root C++ macros were developed to analyze and precisely correct for these detector drifts to within few tenths of a nanosecond. Root macros were also developed to position calibrate the ion chamber and CRDC's. Results for the LISA commissioning run will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  19. Calibration of Charged-Particle Detectors for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, S.; Taylor, N.; Barker, A.; Rogers, W. F.

    2012-10-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA), housed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, were constructed by students at primarily undergraduate institutions. Each array consists of 144 2-m long scintillator detectors with PMTs attached to each end and are used for the detection of neutrons resulting from the breakup of exotic neutron-unbound nuclear states. The commissioning run for LISA was conducted during summer 2011 (in conjunction with MoNA and the Sweeper Magnet) to investigate unbound excited states of the neutron-rich nucleus 24O that breakup via sequential 2-neutron decay. In order to do this the energies and trajectories of both the charged fragments and neutrons need to be determined precisely, which require careful energy, position, and time calibration of the Sweeper Chamber charged particle detectors. Then careful separation of the individual Oxygen isotopes is necessary so that gates can be produced to be used in the calculation of individual decay energies. Results to be presented.

  20. Development of a Micro-Thruster Test Facility which fulfils the LISA requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Franz Georg; Keller, A.; Johann, U.; Braxmaier, C.; Tajmar, M.; Fitzsimons, E.; Weise, D.

    2015-05-01

    In the context of investigations for a sufficient attitude control thruster for LISA, we have developed a thruster test facility which consists of a highly precise thrust balance coupled with plasma diagnostics. In parallel to the test facility development, investigations to downscale a High Efficiency Multistage Plasma Thruster (HEMP-T) are also being carried out. The thruster has been used to demonstrate the measurement capabilities of the facility. The setup allows a parallel operation of all instruments and can also be used for other types of μN propulsion systems including cold gas thrusters. The thrust balance consists of two pendulums. As read out a heterodyne laser interferometer is used. Differential wave front sensing (DWS) enables the measurement of the pendulum tilt which, via suitable calibration using an electrostatic comb, can be converted to a thrust. The whole setup is a symmetric configuration enabling a common-mode rejection of the dominant noise sources (e.g. seismic noise etc.). The thrust balance has a demonstrated precision of 0.1 μN. Based on our unique design, this precision can be attained down to 10-3 Hz. Thus, the measurement setup is especially suitable for characterising the thrust noise of potential eLISA propulsion candidates. We give an overview of the design, the present performance and the future plans.