WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology japan future

  1. Breeding research on sake yeasts in Japan: history, recent technological advances, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Sake is an alcoholic beverage of Japan, with a tradition lasting more than 1,300 years; it is produced from rice and water by fermenting with the koji mold Aspergillus oryzae and sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Breeding research on sake yeasts was originally developed in Japan by incorporating microbiological and genetic research methodologies adopted in other scientific areas. Since the advent of a genetic paradigm, isolation of yeast mutants has been a dominant approach for the breeding of favorable sake yeasts. These sake yeasts include (a) those that do not form foams (produced by isolating a mutant that does not stick to foams, thus decreasing the cost of sake production); (b) those that do not produce urea, which leads to the formation of ethyl carbamate, a possible carcinogen (isolated by positive selection in a canavanine-, arginine-, and ornithine-containing medium); (c) those that produce an increased amount of ethyl caproate, an apple-like flavor (produced by isolating a mutant resistant to cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty-acid synthesis); and (d) those that produce a decreased amount of pyruvate (produced by isolating a mutant resistant to an inhibitor of mitochondrial transport, thus decreasing the amount of diacetyl). Given that sake yeasts perform sexual reproduction, sporulation and mating are potent approaches for their breeding. Recently, the genome sequences of sake yeasts have been determined and made publicly accessible. By utilizing this information, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the brewing characteristics of sake yeasts have been identified, which paves a way to DNA marker-assisted selection of the mated strains. Genetic engineering technologies for experimental yeast strains have recently been established by academic groups, and these technologies have also been applied to the breeding of sake yeasts. Sake yeasts whose genomes have been modified with these technologies correspond to genetically modified organisms (GMOs

  2. THE CURRENT ACTIVITIES ON ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION TECHNOLOGY IN JAPAN AND ITS FUTURE PROSPECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the environmental regulations have been enacted to prevent pollution, the Japanese oil industry has responded by adopting a number of new technologies from over seas countries and by developing its own technologies.   Oil industry has been making great efforts to protect the environment for over three decades mentioned above. Even so we will have to make a strict commitment toward further improvements in air quality, such as the carbon dioxide, automobile emission and so on.   Since the environment protection will be more and more important in the future, oil industry must continue to try hard to preserve environment.

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    This is Japan Report with Science and Technology. It contains the issues with different topics on biotecnology , defense industry, nuclear engineering, Marine technology, science and technology policy.

  4. Advanced USC technology in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Masafumi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). High Temperature Materials Center

    2010-07-01

    The 600deg-C class Ultra Super-Critical(USC) steam condition technology was mainly developed through projects led by J-Power in the '80s and 90s'. In 2001, the project was successfully finished with newly developed 9-12% chromium steels. These materials were selected for the major parts of the USC power plants in Japan and almost half of the coal power plants have the USC steam condition today. However, aged plants, which were built in the '70s and early '80s will reach the point where they will need to be rebuilt or refurbished in the near future. The steam temperatures of the older plants are 538 deg-C or 566deg-C. We did a case study, retrofitting these plants with the USC and an advanced USC technology that takes a 700deg-C class steam temperature to increase thermal efficiency and to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The study showed that the advanced USC Technology(A-USC) is suitable for the retrofitting of aged plants and can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 15%. The Japanese government launched the ''Cool Earth-Innovative Energy Technology Program'' in 2008 March to promote international cooperation and actively contribute to substantial global greenhouse gas emissions reductions. 21 technologies that will contribute to substantial reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions by efficiency improvement and low carbonization were selected. The A-USC that aims at 46% (net, HHV) thermal efficiency of coal power generation is included in the technologies. We started a large-scale development project of the A-USC technology in 2008 August. 700deg-C class boiler, turbine and valve technologies, which include high temperature material technology, will be developed. Some candidate materials for boilers are being tested. Turbine rotor and casing materials are being developed and tested, as well. Two years from the beginning of the project, we have obtained some useful test results regarding the candidate materials. (orig.)

  5. [Neuroethics in Japan--current view and future visions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Tamami; Sakura, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Neuroethics was originated in 2002 in the United States. In 2004, the Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX), a subsection of Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), launched a neuroethics research group as the first research group to focus on the academic study and public engagement in neuroethics in Japan. In this article, the authors summarize the activities of RISTEX, JST during the brief history of neuroethics in Japan, and subsequently compare their current activities in neuroethics to those in other Western countries. We also introduce brief results of public survey of neuroscience research in Japan that suggest the significance of ethics and education regarding neuroscience to overview the future vision on neuroethics. We further discuss the role of neuroscientists in the future progress in neuroethics.

  6. High Technology Ceramics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-14

    of evolutionary charoge T’LE i a Markt She of tlh-T o Japan. 1m (in 4min t4 dolkla)" Japaman Percer""g Sector Appkhi DoamiC Sale" of Total Etcvo... segments populated by buyers willing to acquire products embodying the new technology, even though the cost ma, he somewhat grcmterthan that of...looking for new ways to segment the market in order ,o rekindle consumer interest. New technology like ceramics may well be onewa, to do this. for there is

  7. Japan Report, Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Ishikawa; OPTRONICS, Oct 86) 47 NEW MATERIALS /9986 High Thermal Conductive Aluminum Nitride Discussed (Kazuo Shinozaki, Akihiko Tsuge; CERAMICS...cooling systems (kerosene and gas) in terms of convenience, safety, and cleanliness . It will attract consumers’ attention in the future if its thermal...constant demands for safety, cleanliness , low cost, and convenience. The development of technology is indispensable to the management of electric

  8. Japan Report, Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    include water temperature, water quality, ocean currents, sea ice, wave conditions, coastal conditions, and marine resources. Environmental polution ... air , and food supplies (procured in Japan) to the station for use by its crew. It is also a real possibility that Japan’s data relay satellite (DRTS...the pressurized unit via a mechanical manipulator and an air lock to permit the exchange of equipment and samples and the assembly of space

  9. Future Information Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Stojmenovic, Ivan; Choi, Min; Xhafa, Fatos; FutureTech 2013

    2014-01-01

    Future technology information technology stands for all of continuously evolving and converging information technologies, including digital convergence, multimedia convergence, intelligent applications, embedded systems, mobile and wireless communications, bio-inspired computing, grid and cloud computing, semantic web, user experience and HCI, security and trust computing and so on, for satisfying our ever-changing needs. In past twenty five years or so, Information Technology (IT) influenced and changed every aspect of our lives and our cultures. These proceedings foster the dissemination of state-of-the-art research in all future IT areas, including their models, services, and novel applications associated with their utilization.

  10. Current state and future prospects for psychosomatic medicine in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masato; Nakai, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    functioning at a high level, there remain areas that could be improved. Among the 81 medical schools in Japan, just eight university hospitals have an independent department of PSM and of 29 dental schools only three dental university hospitals have a department of psychosomatic dentistry. Further accumulation of evidence regarding the mind-body relationship in clinical and basic science that is based on the latest advanced technology is necessary. The psychosomatic medicine community needs to make an even greater contribution to meeting the needs of modern society. The possibilities for the future development of PSM in Japan must be widely discussed.

  11. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    8 MOX to Undergo Post-Irradiation Test for Plutonium Thermal Use [GENSHIR YOKU SANGYO SHIMB UN, I Mar 90...Irradiation Testing of MOX Fuel Rods for Water Reactors: Thermal Behavior of IFA-529 Fuel Rods [K. Kamimura, et al; ATOMIC ENERGY SOCIETY OF JAPAN, 2...Apr 90] ........................................... 16 Irradiation Testing of MOX Fuel Rods for Water Reactors: Mechanical Behavior of IFA-529 Fuel

  12. Japan Report - Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-17

    Stock of Bacillus Subtilis Bacillus subtilis is a relative of bacillus natto that has been in use in Japan from the ancient times. It is safe and...secretes a large volume of pro- tein. Thus it is used industrially. By using this bacillus subtilis as a base, an ambitious research concerning (1...the said secretion vector were tried. Follow- ing results were obtained. (1) Neutral proteazoa genes of bacillus subtilis were processed to suit the

  13. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu, E-mail: yamashita.kiyonobu@jaea.go.jp [Visiting Professor, at the Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering, University Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); General Advisor Nuclear HRD Centre, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, TOKAI-mura, NAKA-gun, IBARAKI-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  14. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    energy conservation technology R&D: (international cooperation on S&T related high- efficency gas turbines, new batteries, to mining and manufacturing...297 20. Nuclear Energy Peace-Use Technology ...... 301 Part 1. Research Plans of the Government Industrial 21. Environmental Pollution...25 Scale Project) .............................................. 359 (2) Mechanical Engineering Lab ....................... 28 2. New Energy

  15. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-10

    34Prediction and automatic measurement technologies for changes of plankton composition in the coastal areas" (budget of Y5 million through FY92), will...try to develop a system which processes information on the number and variety of plankton and is necessary for the observation of nutriment-rich...functional sheet materials to be made from acid polysaccharides, the main constituent of seaweed . As a technology to collect rare and scarce solubilized

  16. JPRS Report; Science & Technology Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    be fully used at a temperature exceeding 1,350°C. References 1. Kazumori Kishi, Masaki Umebayashi, Eiji Tani, and Kazuo Kobayashi, Journal of...Recently, the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Prof. Yoshikawa , et al, has successfully developed a new polishing technique for diamond thin films. The

  17. JPRS Report. Science & Technology: Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    prerequisite of the new materials is that the environment not be damaged . The characteristic as a fusion material is a factor to limit ways of...thermoelastic stress in the thermal stationary state has been possible up to now, we also wish to conduct an elastoplastic analysis taking into consideration...the heat history, and to establish a prestrain design on this basis. Moreover, in the future we wish to conduct analysis of elastoplastic thermal

  18. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    personalization of information use and access. In the coming information society , all fields of human activities will be connected by information...of infrastructure and qualitative aspects of information technology utilization. To realize an advanced information society , it is necessary to...Software Promotion Programs A stable supply of high-quality software is essential to the realization of an advanced information society . The rapid

  19. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-29

    Accelerated The discovery of perovskite -based superconductivity substances by Müller of IBM Zurich Research Institute in Switzerland created the...intensity of 10 roentgens per hour. For this effort, the Institute is earmarking 69 million yen from this year’s budget. Nuclear power plants have a...development of a basic technology toward the construction of a harsh environment sensor system capable of withstanding a radiation rate of 10 roentgens

  20. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    space infrastructure. Structural materials, specially composite materials, technology is an important theme, so we are putting emphasis on research...attack is large, we also prepared a winglet -shaped main wing. A tail wing with a 90 degree angle of intersection was also prepared due to fears that...studies on aerodynamically flexible tailoring techniques for main wings, the models used in flutter wind tunnel tests are built with composite

  1. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Ford Aerospace of the U.S. or Aerospatiale of France. It will be equipped with two infrared-ray cameras to improve observation capabilities. The...and by scanning it with a laser beam. An X-ray fiber is not only effective as a sensor technology but expected to trigger social demand more than...omitted]. With regard to the Compton type free electron laser using high-energy small- current electron beam sources (linear accelerator, electron

  2. The Present State and Future Perspective of Biomedical Engineering in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The Present State and Future Perspective of Biomedical Engineering in Japan Shunsuke Sato (Osaka University, Graduate School of Engineering...21st century is a century of life sciences. Biomedical engineering is a field of integrated science and biotechnology, a paradigm where the basic... biomedical engineering and technological development in Japan. The number of members of the society was 900 at the time of establishment, but has

  3. Japan’s Strategic Future: Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    of life only through sufferance, and in a search of further plunder abroad furnished the tools for the military to embark upon its ill-fated venture...all the amenities of home including a gym, internet café, library, and of course a karaoke bar. All JSDF personnel will be confined to the camp...the Indian 106 J Sean Curtin, "Japan’s ’Fortress of Solitude’ in Iraq-plus karaoke ." Asia Times Online, 20 February 2004

  4. Teaching, Technology, and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and technology and the future are discussed in 15 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching at New Mexico State University. Titles and authors are as follows: "Technology, Teaching, and the Future" (William F. May); "Bauhaus Experience: A Team Method of Teaching Technology" (Euguene…

  5. Robotics Technology In Japan And Its Impact On Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kazuhiko

    1984-08-01

    Japan's capabilities in robotics technology has developed with amazing speed. The nation has gone from an importer of robotics technology to the leading exporter in a little more than fifteen years. How did Japan manage to achieve such a feat? Are workers happy with this new technology? In order to answer these and other questions, the author spent several weeks in Japan in the summer of 1983 visiting many organizations and interviewing individuals. This paper summarizes the author's findings on the current status of Japan's robotization and its implications to workers.

  6. PWR fuel in Japan; Progress and future trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokote, Mitsuhiro (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)); Kondo, Yoshiaki; Abeta, Sadaaki (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    Twenty years ago, in the early years of the Japanese civil nuclear power programme, the fuel used was imported from Westinghouse in the USA. However, it was always intended that there would be a move towards fuel fabrication in Japan and by the end of 1993 around 10,000 Mitsubishi PWR fuel assemblies had been supplied to 21 PWRs in Japan. The highest burnup achieved so far is 46 GWd/t. Design changes to reduce abnormalities have been made, reliability is improving all the time and further improvements in burnup are being developed. This progress in PWR cores and fuel including MOX fuel in Japan is charted and future research and development is outlined. (UK).

  7. Development and future perspectives of behavioral medicine in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Shinobu

    2016-01-01

    Development and Future Perspectives of Behavioral Medicine in Japan The study of the “Type A behavior pattern and myocardial infarction” was one of the main themes in the early stage of Behavioral Medicine. After that, behavior modification came to be widely applied to the treatment of various kinds of chronic diseases, and a general concept of Behavioral Medicine was subsequently formed. The Japanese Society of Behavioral Medicine was established in 1992 and is comprised of researchers in th...

  8. Future information technology II

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yi; Kim, Cheonshik; Yang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The new multimedia standards (for example, MPEG-21) facilitate the seamless integration of multiple modalities into interoperable multimedia frameworks, transforming the way people work and interact with multimedia data. These key technologies and multimedia solutions interact and collaborate with each other in increasingly effective ways, contributing to the multimedia revolution and having a significant impact across a wide spectrum of consumer, business, healthcare, education, and governmental domains. This book aims to provide a complete coverage of the areas outlined and to bring together the researchers from academic and industry as well as practitioners to share ideas, challenges, and solutions relating to the multifaceted aspects of this field.

  9. Faster and more efficient [maritime technology in Japan]; Hoe sneller hoe zuiniger [maritieme technologie in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroeks, R.

    2010-01-15

    By means of technological innovations marine superpower Japan anticipates a growing market for sea ships that are both fast and efficient. The combinations of fast and efficient offers Japan large benefits. Next to political motives for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, fuel savings also mean lower costs and smaller dependency on foreign energy sources. Moreover, the maritime transport sector is positioning itself as a better alternative for road and air transport and the international competitive position of Japan on the maritime market is strengthened. [Dutch] Met technologische vernieuwingen anticipeert marinegrootmacht Japan op een groeiende markt voor zeeschepen die tegelijkertijd snel en zuinig zijn. Voor Japan levert de combinatie van snel en zuinig grote voordelen op. Naast politieke motieven om de emissie van broeikasgassen terug te dringen, betekent brandstofbesparing lagere kosten en minder afhankelijkheid van buitenlandse energiebronnen. Daarnaast positioneert de maritieme transportsector zich beter als alternatief voor weg- en luchttransport en versterkt de internationale concurrentiepositie van Japan op de maritieme markt.

  10. A WAY TO A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE: THE SOLAR INDUSTRY IN JAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara V. Akimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is considered one of the most promising and rapidly growing sectors of the world economy. In line with the international trend of switching to renewable energy sources, particularly solar, and because of the tragic events at the Fukushima nuclear power station, Japan is experiencing a real “solar boom.” However, despite all obvious advantages of using solar power (ensuring national energy security, overcoming concerns about environmental consequences of using fossil energy sources, etc., Japan is facing several problems in its development. The most important one is the fact that technological and social progresses in Japan do not match each other as a result of a unique history of the nation. In order to promote renewable technology, the emphasis should be made on the role of the governmental policy and the effects of built-in tariffs for renewable energy sources. Considering dynamics and character of solar energy development in Japan, new energy strategy, and megasolar plants construction, the conclusion might be drawn that in the nearest future Japan will keep its place among the leaders in this field.

  11. Development of clean coal technologies in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M. [Electric Power Research Industry, Yokosuka (Japan). Central Research Inst.

    2013-07-01

    In Japan, we have to import almost of primary energy resources from all over the world. We depend on foreign countries for 96% of our primary energy supply. Following the two oil crises in the 1970s, Japan has diversified its energy resources through increased use of nuclear energy, natural gas and coal as well as the promotion of energy efficiency and conservation.

  12. History of healthcare technology assessment in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisashige, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    There has been a rapid growth of healthcare technology assessment (HTA) activities among health service researchers and physicians in Japan in the younger generation since the mid-1980s. HTA has become visible since the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) set up the several committees related to HTA in the late 1990s. The MHLW had to participate in regulatory and administrative reform, coping with the serious economic stagnation since 1991, following the economic recession in the 1980s. However, HTA has not been developed as expected. The most important failure is that the application of HTA to health policy has been neglected by the MHLW. Only application to clinical practice has been implemented by developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The MHLW had the main aim of containing costs by reducing excess or useless healthcare services through guidelines, rather than to implement a radical reform. Without a central organization for HTA, several researchers have still continued to do HTA studies, but most researchers and physicians promoting HTA have been moved into diverse related areas. Ultimately, increasing efficiency may be the only way of reconciling rising demands for health care with public financing constraints. Therefore, the reconsideration and reorganization of HTA, which covers not only healthcare services but also the healthcare system as a whole, is becoming an urgent matter for healthcare reform.

  13. Research; BOSS Study Trip Japan '09: Architecture, Urbanism, Real Estate & Housing and Technology in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Japan is a land of many faces as we discovered: from seasonal changes, and thereby heavy rainfall, high humidity, tropical cyclones; to a stunning 127,300,000 inhabitants; or what about the only 10% buildable surface of the continent; seismic activity; fast going technological developments like electronic gadgets, robots, and supersonic trains without even a second delay (in contrast of the Dutch situation)... Even in its names Nihon, Nippen, Nippon, Japon or Japan, one gets fascinated by the...

  14. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The jet engine is the prime flight controller in post-stall flight domains where conventional flight control fails, or when the engine prevents catastrophes in training, combat, loss of all airframe hydraulics (the engine retains its own hydraulics), loss of one engine, pilot errors, icing on the wings, landing gear and runway issues in takeoff and landing and in bad-whether recoveries. The scientific term for this revolutionary technology is "jet-steering", and in engineering practice - "thrust vectoring", or "TV". Jet-Steering in advanced fighter aircraft designs is integrated with stealth technology. The resulting classified Thrust-Vectoring-Stealth ("TVS") technology has generated a second jet-revolution by which all Air-&-Sea-Propulsion Science and R&D are now being reassessed. Classified F-22, X-47B/C and RQ-180 TVS-vehicles stand at the front of this revolution. But recent transfers of such sensitive technologies to South Korea and Japan [1-5], have raised various fundamental issues that are evaluated by this editorial-review. One, and perhaps a key conclusion presented here, means that both South Korea and Japan may have missed one of their air-&-sea defenses: To develop and field low-cost unmanned fleets of jet-drones, some for use with expensive, TVS-fighter aircraft in highly congested areas. In turn, the U.S., EU, Russia and China, are currently developing such fleets at various TVS levels and sizes. China, for instance, operates at least 15,000 drones ("UAVs") by 2014 in the civilian sector alone. All Chinese drones have been developed by at least 230 developers/manufacturers [1-16]. Mobile telecommunication of safe links between flyers and combat drones ("UCAVs") at increasingly deep penetrations into remote, congested areas, can gradually be purchased-developed-deployed and then operated by extant cader of tens of thousands "National Champion Flyers" who have already mastered the operation of mini-drones in free-to-all sport clubs under national

  15. Research; BOSS Study Trip Japan '09: Architecture, Urbanism, Real Estate & Housing and Technology in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, R.; Van Beelen, C.; Wamelink, J.W.F.; Geraedts, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    Japan is a land of many faces as we discovered: from seasonal changes, and thereby heavy rainfall, high humidity, tropical cyclones; to a stunning 127,300,000 inhabitants; or what about the only 10% buildable surface of the continent; seismic activity; fast going technological developments like elec

  16. Research; BOSS Study Trip Japan '09: Architecture, Urbanism, Real Estate & Housing and Technology in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, R.; Van Beelen, C.; Wamelink, J.W.F.; Geraedts, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    Japan is a land of many faces as we discovered: from seasonal changes, and thereby heavy rainfall, high humidity, tropical cyclones; to a stunning 127,300,000 inhabitants; or what about the only 10% buildable surface of the continent; seismic activity; fast going technological developments like

  17. Firefly: embracing future web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, W.; Wu, X.; Goldina, T.; Joliet, E.; Ly, L.; Mi, W.; Wang, C.; Zhang, Lijun; Ciardi, D.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.

    2016-07-01

    At IPAC/Caltech, we have developed the Firefly web archive and visualization system. Used in production for the last eight years in many missions, Firefly gives the scientist significant capabilities to study data. Firefly provided the first completely web based FITS viewer as well as a growing set of tabular and plotting visualizers. Further, it will be used for the science user interface of the LSST telescope which goes online in 2021. Firefly must meet the needs of archive access and visualization for the 2021 LSST telescope and must serve astronomers beyond the year 2030. Recently, our team has faced the fact that the technology behind Firefly software was becoming obsolete. We were searching for ways to utilize the current breakthroughs in maintaining stability, testability, speed, and reliability of large web applications, which Firefly exemplifies. In the last year, we have ported the Firefly to cutting edge web technologies. Embarking on this massive overhaul is no small feat to say the least. Choosing the technologies that will maintain a forward trajectory in a future development project is always hard and often overwhelming. When a team must port 150,000 lines of code for a production-level product there is little room to make poor choices. This paper will give an overview of the most modern web technologies and lessons learned in our conversion from GWT based system to React/Redux based system.

  18. A mainstay of functional food science in Japan--history, present status, and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, S; Osawa, T; Ohigashi, H; Yoshikawa, M; Kaminogawa, S; Watanabe, M; Ogawa, T; Okubo, K; Watanabe, S; Nishino, H; Shinohara, K; Esashi, T; Hirahara, T

    2001-01-01

    The development of food science in the near future probably depends on the advance in functional food science, the concept of which was proposed first in Japan nearly 15 years ago. The new science has been internationally distributed and accepted as conceptually being beyond nutrition. In Japan, however, it traced a unique path of progress in the form of a product-driven rather than concept-driven science. Actually, a number of substances and products with potential for disease risk reduction rather than simply for health maintenance have been investigated for their body-modulating functions. Some of them have been applied in practice to the industrialization of functional foods in terms of "foods for specified health uses" legally defined by new legislation. A variety of sophisticated methods have been introduced as well, including the so-called "XYZ" evaluation system, database construction for assessment of the function, and even the DNA microarray technique. The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries (MAFF) and the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW) also commenced their scientific as well as political activity, with its spread to industries which almost simultaneously began to vigorously investigate functional food products for enlargement of the food market. With all of this as a background, the Japan Liaison of the International Union of Food Science and Technology (IUFoST) hold a function food science symposium on behalf of related scientific bodies including the Japan Section of the International Life Science Institute (ILSI). This paper is an overview compiled from 12 presentations made in the symposium, with the aim of internationally publicizing the activity of functional food science in Japan.

  19. Future directions in VLBI technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, A. R.

    Three technology areas are examined to measure their impact on VLBI and the capa bilities that may be offered to VLBI practioners in the near future: VLBI Standard Interface: An international committee has recently agr eed on a standard interface definition for all future VLBI data systems. This s hould, at long last, allow interoperability between various VLBI data systems. New Recording Technologies: Courtesy of large investments by the co mputer industry, moderately priced high-data rate digital recorders that may be suitable for VLBI are on the near horizon. Small arrays of these machines, appr opriately interfaced, promise to support 1-8 Gbps recording over the next few ye ars at an attractive price. e-VLBI: With the advent of optical fiber being laid at a prodigious rate, real-time (or near-real time) VLBI on an international scale is close to b eing a technical possibility. However, questions remain about costs to lease th e necessary bandwidth and to lay the 'last mile' of fiber to remote antennas.

  20. Japan: Super-Aging Society Preparing for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Naoko; Akiyama, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    Japan has the highest proportion of older adults in the world. Aging is not only an immediate personal issue but also a salient factor in crucial public policies, such as pensions, health, and long-term care. The Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disaster of March 2011 has highlighted current and emerging issues of a…

  1. Japan: Super-Aging Society Preparing for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Naoko; Akiyama, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    Japan has the highest proportion of older adults in the world. Aging is not only an immediate personal issue but also a salient factor in crucial public policies, such as pensions, health, and long-term care. The Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disaster of March 2011 has highlighted current and emerging issues of a…

  2. Japan society for software science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Reiji; Hagino, Tatsuya

    1990-01-01

    Advances in Software Science and Technology, Volume 1 provides information pertinent to the advancement of the science and technology of computer software. This book discusses the various applications for computer systems.Organized into three parts encompassing 13 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the phase structure grammar for Japanese called JPSG, and a parser based on this grammar. This text then explores the logic-based knowledge representation called Uranus, which uses a multiple world mechanism. Other chapters consider the optimal file segmentation techniques for multi-at

  3. Neuropsychology in Japan: history, current challenges, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Maiko

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this special issue was to describe the cross-cultural differences in neuropsychology throughout the world. The current state of neuropsychology in Japan is discussed in this manuscript. Information on six topics, including (1) the history of Japanese neuropsychology, (2) licensure system, (3) job opportunities, (4) neuropsychological clinical services, (5) neuropsychological tests, and (6) neuropsychological research, was gathered via literature searches, official organization websites, and personal communication with clinical psychologists and other professionals in Japan. Neuropsychology reached Japan from the west in the late 1800s, a period of rapid political and social modernization. Professional associations were founded in the 1960s and 1970s and continued to grow. The need for neuropsychological assessment in Japan is growing; however, credential requirements for neuropsychologists have not yet been established. To practice clinical psychology in Japan, one must obtain a Master's degree and pass a licensure examination that is administered by a private professional foundation. Clinical psychologists often conduct neuropsychological tests; however, they have little training in neuropsychological assessment. While many western neuropsychological tests have been translated into Japanese and are used in clinical settings, the majority of translated tests have not been standardized and their psychometric properties remain poorly understood. Standardization and development of normative data in Japan is warranted. Given that needs for neuropsychological services are increasing, it is essential for clinical psychologists in Japan to improve their skills in neuropsychological evaluations. Japanese graduate schools must work to establish neuropsychology programs to educate and train clinical neuropsychologists.

  4. [CPR education in Japan--past, present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hideharu; Nakao, Ami; Mizumoto, Hanako; Kinoshi, Tomoya; Nakayama, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Shimazaki, Shuji

    2011-04-01

    the last 7 years, more than 300,000 automated external defibrillators(AEDs) installed nationwide in Japan, and at least one AED has placed in 38,634 schools. Therefore, only 0.7% of bystanders used the AEDs(By-AED) in all OHCA cases with th 48 % of ROSC. In recent years, elementary and junior high school student has interested in AED results in each school has at least one AED. Therefore, introduction of CPR education starting from elementary school was extremely important. CPR education is not yet ubiquitous, and the promotion of AEDs and CPR education on a nationwide scale remains an urgent issue. Therefore, to solve this problem, we investigated the status of CPR education in schools teachers. We conducted surveys targeting for school teachers in Tokyo. Question; "What age do you think suitable for CPR training ?" Most of teachers answered"Suitable age for start CPR education from the upper grades of elementary school to a junior high school". Reason is, physically, continuous high quality chest compression could performed age of junior high. However, 'Importance of life' could teach from lower grade of elementary school because of child have a good long time memory. In this reason, CPR education is extremely important. Also teachers need 'more time', 'curriculum for CPR education and 'good CPR instruction tool for teaching'. The solution to teacher's request, we prepared follows. A 90 minutes hands only CPR curriculum should be introduced to elementary school CPR for basic CPR education. CPR +AED education should be started in lower grade of elementary school with AED trainer. In conclusion, school CPR programs are extremely important for awareness both in skill and knowledge of CPR among the entire school. Future research is warranted to improve the resuscitation rate by school CPR program.

  5. Intellectual Assessment of Children and Youth in Japan: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikuma, Toshinori; Matsuda, Osamu; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the history of intellectual assessment with children and youth in Japan, as well as current practices and future directions. The history of intelligence test use in Japan began in the early 20th century. Since the 21st century, three major intelligence tests, namely, the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, the Kaufman…

  6. Latest trends in natural gas vehicle technology in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshiharu [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Higashino, Koji [Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Usui, Akira [Toho Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Yamaguchi, Eiji [Saibu Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Out of the necessity for finding a solution to the air pollution and alternative fuel in Japan, the gas companies have been promoting the development and introduction of natural gas vehicles (NGVs) with the cooperation of vehicle manufacturers. The target was the development of dedicated CNG (Compressed Natural Gas) vehicles with cleaner emissions, and several types of vehicles have been achieved, from small vans to large transit buses. As at September 1996, 800 NGVs have been introduced in Japan. It is increasing steadily. They are modified from gasoline or diesel vehicles. But the vehicle manufacturers themselves are doing the modifications and much dedicated CNG vehicle technology is being included. For instance, engine combustion systems include conventional stoichiometric air fuel ratio combustion with a three-way catalyst, the lean burn system without catalyst and a combination of both using lean burn for low loads and stoichiometric ratio combustion for high loads. This report summarizes the latest trends in natural gas vehicle technology in Japan based on examples of representative types of vehicles. (au)

  7. Regulation of Generic Drugs in Japan: the Current Situation and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Ryosuke; Matsuhama, Maki; Mikami, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are interchangeable with original proprietary drugs, as they have the same active pharmaceutical ingredients, dosage forms, strength, quality, indications, effects, directions, and dosage. The cost of generic drugs is lower than original drugs, because the developmental cost is lower. The expansion of medical expenses is an important issue in many countries, including Japan, the USA, and Europe, and promotion of generic drugs has been demanded to solve this issue in Japan. Generic drug approval review in Japan is conducted by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), which reviews the equivalence of the original drugs from the viewpoint of quality, efficacy, and safety, based on documentation submitted by the generic drug applicants. However, the details of the generic drug review in Japan have not been reported. In this report, we introduce the application types, the number of applications and approvals, and the review timeline of generic drugs in Japan. In addition, we discuss recent consultations and future prospects.

  8. Information and communication technology for home care in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko

    2013-12-01

    This paper discusses how nurses can utilize information and communication technology (ICT) to provide care to patients with chronic diseases who are receiving home care, with particular focus on the development, basic principles, research trends, recent evidence, and future direction of telenursing and telehealth in Japan and overseas. This review was based on a published work database search. Telenursing and telehealth use telecommunications technology to provide nursing care to patients living at a distance from healthcare facilities. This system is based on patient-nurse interaction and can provide timely health guidance to patients in any area of residence. Because of the increase in the rate of non-communicable diseases, the World Health Organization established and adopted a resolution (WHA58.28) to promote the e-health program, which uses ICT. This strategy, which was introduced throughout the world from the 1990s up to 2000, was used for the healthcare of patients with chronic diseases and pregnant women and was implemented through cooperation with various professionals. A telenursing practice model has been reported along with the principles involved in its implementation. Telenursing and telehealth are effective in decreasing the costs borne by patients, decreasing the number of outpatient and emergency room visits, shortening hospital stays, improving health-related quality of life, and decreasing the cost of health care. © 2013 The Author. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  9. [Prevalence of dementia in Japan: past, present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    As the aging society with low birth rate progresses, the burden of care for the dementia elderly increases. Thus, an increasing attention has been paid to the epidemiology of dementia in Japan. This phenomenon is also observed in many developing countries all over the world. In this paper, the author reports the prevalence of dementia among the elderly people aged 65 years and older in Japan using the data from a recent nation-wide survey. According to the results of this survey which was conducted at seven sites in Japan, the prevalence rate was estimated to be 15.75% (95% CI: 12.4-22.2%) which was much higher than that had been estimated before. Alzheimer disease is the most common illness that causes dementia, and followed by vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. As the limitation of this nation-wide survey, no study was conducted in urban area with low percentage of elderly in a population. Thus, additional studies are ongoing into the prevalence of dementia in urban areas.

  10. Present status and future trends of R and D for HTS rotational machines in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Osami, E-mail: osami-t@ynu.ac.jp

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • R and D statuses of various HTS rotating machines developed in Japan are overviewed. • Design studies of various types of HTS wind power generators conducted in Japan are assessed. • Based on the present R and D statuses, future technical trends of HTS machines are discussed. • Introduction of iron cores into HTS windings drastically reduces amount of HTS wires and cost of HTS machines. - Abstract: Various HTS rotating machines, from multiple MW class to several 10 kW class, are being developed in Japan. R and D statuses of those machines are reviewed. Design studies of various types of HTS wind power generators are also conducted in Japan and their merits and demerits are discussed. Based on the present R and D statuses, future technical trends of HTS machines are discussed.

  11. Introduction to the Special Issue on "State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Japan 2015".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-08-23

    This Special Issue, "State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Japan 2015", collected papers on different kinds of sensing technology: fundamental technology for intelligent sensors, information processing for monitoring humans, and information processing for adaptive and survivable sensor systems.[...].

  12. Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Japan consists of 3900 islands and lies off the east coast of Asia. Even though Japan is one of the most densely populated nations in the world, its growth rate has stabilized at .5%. 94% of all children go to senior high school and almost 90% finish. Responsibility for the sick, aged, and infirmed is changing from the family and private sector to government. Japan was founded in 600 BC and its 1st capital was in Nara (710-1867). The Portuguese, the 1st Westerners to make contact with Japan in 1542, opened trade which lasted until the mid 17th century. US Navy Commodore Matthew Perry forced Japan to reopen in 1854. Following wars with China and Russia in the late 1800s and early 1900s respectively, Japan took part in World Wars I and II. In between these wars Japan invaded Manchuria and China. The US dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrendered in September, 1945 ending World War II (WWII). Following, WWII, the Allied Powers guided Japan's establishment as a nonthreatening nation and a democratic parliamentary government (a constitutional monarchy) with a limited defense force. Japan remains one of the most politically stable of all postwar democracies. The Liberal Democratic Party's Noboru Takeshita became prime minister in 1987. Japan has limited natural resources and only 19% of the land is arable. Japanese ingenuity and skill combine to produce one of the highest per hectare crop yields in the world. Japan is a major economic power, and its and the US economies are becoming more interdependent. Its exports, making up only 13% of the gross national product, mainly go to Canada and the US. Many in the US are concerned, however, with the trade deficit with Japan and are seeking ways to make trade more equitable. Japan wishes to maintain good relations with its Asian neighbors and other nations. The US and Japan enjoy a strong, productive relationship.

  13. Status and issue of coal mine safety technology development in Japan and international co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakmura, K. [Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Tokyo (Japan). Mine Safety Division, Environmental Protection and Industrial Location Bureau

    2001-03-01

    Recent trends in coal mine accidents in Japan are reviewed and the incident of mine fire at the Ikeshima coal mine in Nagasaki Prefecture in February 2000 reported. An overview is given of safety projects underway in Japan or jointly with Australia. Cooperative projects to prevent spontaneous combustion to develop underground monitoring techniques, and to transfer safety technologies from Japan abroad are outlined. Other projects carried out by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) are listed. Japan's long-term policy for safety technology development is outlined. 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. [Stem cell research and science and technology policy in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashiro, Yoshimi

    2011-12-01

    In this paper I review the present condition of the regeneration medicine research using pluripotency and a somatic stem cell, and I describe the subject of the science and technology policy in Japan towards realization of regeneration medicine. The Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) supported research promotion by the prompt action in 2007 when establishment of the iPS cell was reported by Shinya Yamanaka. Although the hospitable support of the Japanese government to an iPS cell is continued still now, there are some problems in respect of the support to other stem cell researches, and industrialization of regeneration medicine. In order to win a place in highly competitive area of investigation, MEXT needs to change policy so that funds may be widely supplied also to stem cell researches other than iPS cell research.

  15. [Current Status and Future Perspectives of SCRUM-Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Atsushi; Goto, Koichi; Yoshino, Takayuki; Okamoto, Wataru; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2017-08-01

    SCRUM-Japan was launched as a nation-wide genome screening consortium for recruiting patients to 35 sponsor-/investigator- initiated registration trials in collaboration with 15 pharmaceutical companies and 240 hospitals. During the first period between February 2015 and March 2017, a total of 4,805 patients have been enrolled. Genomic profiling of each cancer were analyzed and newdrug applications of label expansion are in preparation based on the results of several registration studies including investigator-initiated trial of vandetanib for RET fusion gene positive non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, on-time clinical-genome data sharing with industries and academic institutions and prospective cohort registry for new drug evaluation as a historical control data have already initiated, which will facilitate new agent development in Japan. In the second period started from April 2017, new studies using cutting-edge liquid biopsy and immune-genome panel for precision medi- cine will start soon. These efforts are attempted towards a leading group for innovative clinical/translations researches in the world.

  16. Future Possibilities in Information Technology and Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Milton, Ed.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes two articles that discuss science fiction and future possibilities in information technology: "'Jurassic Park' and Al Jolson: Thinking about the Information Revolution" (Connie Willis) and "The Good and the Bad: Outlines of Tomorrow" (David Brin). (LRW)

  17. Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Japan is composed of 4 main islands and more than 3900 smaller islands and has 317.7 persons/square kilometer. This makes it one of the most densely populated nations in the world. Religion is an important force in the life of the Japanese and most consider themselves Buddhists. Schooling is free through junior high but 90% of Japanese students complete high school. In fact, Japan enjoys one of the highest literacy rates in the world. There are over 178 newspapers and 3500 magazines published in Japan and the number of new book titles issued each year is greater than that in the US. Since WW1, Japan expanded its influence in Asia and its holdings in the Pacific. However, as a direct result of WW2, Japan lost all of its overseas possessions and was able to retain only its own islands. Since 1952, Japan has been ruled by conservative governments which cooperate closely with the West. Great economic growth has come since the post-treaty period. Japan as a constitutional monarchy operates within the framework of a constitution which became effective in May 1947. Executive power is vested in a cabinet which includes the prime minister and the ministers of state. Japan is one of the most politically stable of the postwar democracies and the Liberal Democratic Party is representative of Japanese moderate conservatism. The economy of Japan is strong and growing. With few resources, there is only 19% of Japanese land suitable for cultivation. Its exports earn only about 19% of the country's gross national product. More than 59 million workers comprise Japan's labor force, 40% of whom are women. Japan and the US are strongly linked trading partners and after Canada, Japan is the largest trading partner of the US. Foreign policy since 1952 has fostered close cooperation with the West and Japan is vitally interested in good relations with its neighbors. Relations with the Soviet Union are not close although Japan is attempting to improve the situation. US policy is based on

  18. - History, Technology, and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    This paper begins with the history of electrochromism, first discovered in the 1880's. The physics, electrochemistry, device design and materials are covered. The science of electrochromism involves the coloration of a variety of metal oxides, organics and polymers. Dual ion and electron intercalation is used to color and bleach electrochromic materials. Considerable science has been undertaken to make devices that resemble thin film transparent batteries in their structure. A number of materials have been developed to make layers for electrochromic devices. Applications for electrochromics include low information content displays, such as banner displays, smart windows and mirrors for automotive applications. Several companies throughout the world are developing dynamic glazing. Switchable glazing for building and vehicle application is very attractive for energy and light management. From the standpoint of materials much research and development in electrochromics focuses on the development or improvement of materials with ionic and electronic properties. Much of the work on electrochromics draws on the vast knowledge developed for advanced batteries. National Laboratory and university groups are researching new materials and processes to improve electrochromic materials. Also, much industrial work is directed towards deposition and fabrication processes for glass and possibly plastic that can make electrochromics cost effective. Plastic can yield both flexibility and weight savings for many applications. Although plastics are permeable, outgas and require lower processing temperatures, they can be more universally applied. Some developments in plastics may come from OLED sealing technology. Comparisons are made between the properties of electrochromics and other switchable technologies. Technology comparisons are made between suspended particles, polymer dispersed liquid crystals, themotropics and gas-chromics.

  19. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Advanced jet engines do not operate in an application vacuum. Their optimal use in advanced military applications drives much of their basic innovative research and development, especially when new needs arise in the rapidly changing domains of stealth-agile, fighter aircraft and tailless-stealth, Jet-Steered, Unmanned Air Vehicles (JS-UAV). For these reasons we periodically update this Journal with new trends that affect, and sometimes control, research and development of future jet-engines. One relevant example is the recently unmasked RQ-180 stealth-tailless drone, which is an improved version of the smaller, RQ-170 captured by Iran. Most important, with the new X-47B/C tailless-stealth JS-UAV, it is to dominate future uses of fuel-efficient jet-engines, especially for operating in dusty environments. The RQ-180 has been secretly designed and funded since 2008. It is based on a classified, 1986, parent Israeli Patents 78402, which protect hundreds design and testing trade secrets taken from 1986 to 1997 by the United States Government (USG) via classified contracts with USG-Contractors Boeing, Lockheed, General Dynamics and General Electric, as revealed by a December 6, 2013 Aviation Week [1-3] and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Case 2014-5028, Docket 12 [4]. The new RQ-180 design explains the recent U.S. Air Force ISR shift away from "permissive" environments - such as Iraq and Afghanistan, where non-stealthy Global Hawk and General Atomics' Reaper operate - toward new missions in highly "contested" or strongly "denied" enemy airspaces.

  20. Proton beam therapy in Japan: current and future status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The number of patients treated by proton beam therapy in Japan since 2000 has increased; in 2016, 11 proton facilities were available to treat patients. Notably, proton beam therapy is very useful for pediatric cancer; since the pediatric radiation dose to normal tissues should be reduced as much as possible because of the effect of radiation on growth, intellectual development, endocrine organ function and secondary cancer development. Hepatocellular carcinoma is common in Asia, and most of the studies of proton beam therapy for liver cancer have been reported by Japanese investigators. Proton beam therapy is also a standard treatment for nasal and paranasal lesions and lesions at the base of the skull, because the radiation dose to critical organs such as the eyes, optic nerves and central nervous system can be reduced with proton beam therapy. For prostate cancer, comparative studies that address adverse effects, safety, patient quality of life and socioeconomic issues should be performed to determine the appropriate use of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer. Regarding new proton beam therapy applications, experience with proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is limited, although favorable outcomes have been recently reported for locally advanced lung cancer, esophageal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, 'chemoproton' therapy appears to be a very attractive field for further clinical investigations. In conclusion, there are cost issues and considerations regarding national insurance for the use of proton beam therapy in Japan. Further studies and discussions are needed to address the use of proton beam therapy for several types of cancers, and for maintaining the quality of life of patients while retaining a high cure rate.

  1. Present status of phosphorus removal technology and its future prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kazuaki

    1988-10-10

    This report outlines the special features of two representative processes of the technology for phosphorus removal from municipal sewage: a physical and chemical method and a biological method. In Japan, coagulating precipitation is carried out using aluminum sulphate or polyaluminum chloride but it is pointed out that this method increases the developed amount of sludge and drops the concentration and dehydration of sludge. Recently, crystallization dephosphorization technology is drawing much attention. This technology precipitates phosphorus as hydroxyapatite using phosphorus ore and bone black as crystal druse under the condition of the addition of lime. For biological dephosphorization, a phostrip method and an anaerobic-aerobic method are being developed. According to the estimation in Japan, it is possible to lower the concentration of total phosphorus in municipal sewage from 5mg*1/sup /minus/1/ to less than 1.0mg*1/sup /minus/1/ by this anaerobic-aerobic method. It is desirable that in the future technical features of the physical and chemical phosphorus removal method and the biological phosphorus removal method will be comparatively studied and a most effective and economic method of preventing eutrophication will be developed and selected. 6 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Heat supply from municipal solid waste incineration plants in Japan: Current situation and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Tomohiro; Tsai, Peii

    2016-02-01

    The use of waste-to-energy technology as part of a municipal solid waste management strategy could reduce the use of fossil fuels and contribute to prevention of global warming. In this study, we examined current heat and electricity production by incineration plants in Japan for external use. Herein, we discuss specific challenges to the promotion of heat utilisation and future municipal solid waste management strategies. We conducted a questionnaire survey to determine the actual conditions of heat production by incineration plants. From the survey results, information of about 498 incineration plants was extracted. When we investigated the relationship between heat production for external use and population density where incineration plants were located, we found that regions with a population density heat. We also found that external use of such energy for factories, markets, and related use, was noted in cities with a population density of 2000 to 4000 persons (km(2))(-1). Several incineration plants have poor performance for heat production because there are few facilities near them to provide demand for the energy. This is the result of redundant capacity, and is reflected in the heat production performance. Given these results, we discussed future challenges to creating energy demand around incineration plants where there is presently none. We also examined the challenges involved in increasing heat supply beyond the present situation.

  3. Future Jet Technologies, Part C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2013-06-01

    This updated, PART C REVIEW, covers the dangerous global spread of JS-stealth, drone technology [1-91], canard-free, stealth, new agile drones and the highly debated, 480 billion F-35 International Program as reported on March 13, 2013 to the U.S. Congress [92]. Due to serious design issues, spiraling high costs and years in delays, alternatives are analyzed here, depicted and proposed, mainly from the propulsion-design point of view. These include fleets of low-cost, stealth, jet-steered-drones mixed with non-stealthy, low-cost, ready-to-be-delivered, U.S. or European or Russian fighter aircraft. Can a few F-35s win against large fleets of stealth agile drones? To understand the dangers and critical issues involved, the author's own, past classified information is partly disclosed, while resorting to images in Figs. 2(a) and 2(b) taken from his book [2] and from Wikipedia, the "Free Encyclopedia", in all other images.

  4. Progress of ITER full tungsten divertor technology qualification in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezato, K., E-mail: ezato.koichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyma, Naka-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, S.; Seki, Y.; Mohri, K.; Yokoyama, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyma, Naka-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Escourbiac, F.; Hirai, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Kuznetcov, V. [NIIEFA, 3 doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JAEA has demonstrated tungsten monoblock technology for ITER divertor that needs to withstand the repetitive heat load as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. This includes as follows; • Bonding technologies between W and Cu interlayer, and between Cu interlayer and CuCrZr tube. • Non-destructive examination techniques, especially, ultrasonic testing method, and. • Load carrying capability of W monoblock attachment to support structure of ITER divertor. - Abstract: Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is in progress for technology qualification toward full-tungsten (W) ITER divertor outer vertical target (OVT), especially, tungsten monoblock technology that needs to withstand the repetitive heat load as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. To demonstrate the armor heat sink bonding technology and heat removal capability, 6 small-scale W monoblock mock-ups manufactured by different bonding technologies using different W materials in addition to 4 full-scale prototype plasma-facing units (PFUs). After non-destructive test, the W components were tested under high heat flux (HHF) in ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) at NIIEFA. Consequently, all of the W monoblocks endured the repetitive heat load at 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 1000 cycles (requirements 20 MW/m{sup 2} for 300 cycles) without any failure. In addition to the armor to heat sink joints, the load carrying capability test on the W monoblock with a leg attachment was carried out. In uniaxial tensile test, all of the W monoblock attachments with different bonding technologies such as brazing and HIPping withstand the tensile load exceeding 20 kN that is the value more than twice the design value. The failures occurred at the leg attachments or the W monoblocks, rather than the bonding interface of the W monoblocks to the leg attachment.

  5. Technology and the future of healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Thimbleby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare changes dramatically because of technological developments, from anesthetics and antibiotics to magnetic resonance imaging scanners and radiotherapy. Future technological innovation is going to keep transforming healthcare, yet while technologies (new drugs and treatments, new devices, new social media support for healthcare, etc will drive innovation, human factors will remain one of the stable limitations of breakthroughs. No predictions can satisfy everybody; instead, this article explores fragments of the future to see how to think more clearly about how to get where we want to go.

  6. Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John N.

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes the intergroup relations in Japanese society and Japan's educational system. Challenges the view that Japan is a homogeneous society by presenting the various forms of discrimination against Koreans, Ainu, and the burakumin. Suggests that despite ostracism and isolation, groups can affect public policy and achieve social advancement. (SA)

  7. Future Computing Technology (2/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Computing of the future will be affected by a number of fundamental technologies in development today, many of which are already on the way to becoming commercialized. In this series of lectures, we will discuss hardware and software development that will become mainstream in the timeframe of a few years and how they will shape or change the computing landscape - commercial and personal alike. Topics range from processor and memory aspects, programming models and the limits of artificial intelligence, up to end-user interaction with wearables or e-textiles. We discuss the impact of these technologies on the art of programming, the data centres of the future and daily life. On the second day of the Future Computing Technology series, we will talk about ubiquitous computing. From smart watches through mobile devices to virtual reality, computing devices surround us, and innovative new technologies are introduces every day. We will briefly explore how this propagation might continue, how computers can take ove...

  8. Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2013-01-01

    I 1500- og 1600-tallet dannedes tidligt moderne stater i Europa, men samtidig eksisterede der ligeså avancerede statsdannelser uden for Europa, bl.a. i Kina, Indien og Japan. I det følgende ser vi nærmere på dannelsen af den moderne stat i Japan. Hvorfor blev Japan aldrig en europæisk koloni......? Hvordan havde japanske magthavere igennem 300 år forberedt Japan og de mennesker, der boede på de japanske øer, til at kunne udvikle en nation, der skulle blive den stærkeste og rigeste i Asien i mere end 100 år? Hvem bestemte i Japan? Kejseren eller shogunen?...

  9. Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2013-01-01

    I 1500- og 1600-tallet dannedes tidligt moderne stater i Europa, men samtidig eksisterede der ligeså avancerede statsdannelser uden for Europa, bl.a. i Kina, Indien og Japan. I det følgende ser vi nærmere på dannelsen af den moderne stat i Japan. Hvorfor blev Japan aldrig en europæisk koloni......? Hvordan havde japanske magthavere igennem 300 år forberedt Japan og de mennesker, der boede på de japanske øer, til at kunne udvikle en nation, der skulle blive den stærkeste og rigeste i Asien i mere end 100 år? Hvem bestemte i Japan? Kejseren eller shogunen?...

  10. A Study on Cooperation between Japan and ASEAN in Science and Technology%日本与东盟科技合作研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕世鸿

    2005-01-01

    Japan has been for long seeking opportunities to explore the South - East Asian market and continuously to enhance its cooperation with ASEAN countries in science and technology. Currently, Japan has become the most important resource of capital and technology for ASEAN countries, which plays a significant role in boosting economic development in those countries. In future, Japan will continue such close cooperation as well as providing them with corresponding aid so as to strengthen its influence on regional affairs in South - East Asia and its further expansion in ASEAN economy.

  11. Use of radiation for plant breeding in Japan: results and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, I. [National Institute of Agricultural Resource, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    In 1966, as the first breeds by radiation mutation in Japan, `Reimei`, a rice variety with increased lodging resistance by short culm mutation and Raiden`, an early variety by mutation of soybean obtained by extreme late variety with nematoda resistance were bred and registered in the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. Since these characteristics of `short culm` and early maturing` have a comparatively high mutation rate and ease of selection, among seed propagation crops many kinds of those varieties improved to have either of these characteristics or both of them at the same time by mutation breeding are bred. In Japan, varieties bred by use of mutation breeding count 107 (as of April 1998). Among crops, that with the most varieties is chrysanthemum, which has 20 varieties and the next is rice with 15 varieties. The other 38 varieties of crops such as grains, beans, industrial crops, vegetables, flowering plants, flowering trees and fruit trees, mutation breeding varieties are widely bred. Among mutagens used, gamma ray holds 80%. The recent development in the research of DNA recombination is amazing and plant bodies which have introduced useful genes which other plants have are being obtained. Radiation mutation breeding, however, has the advantages of breeding new varieties by improving only one or two characteristics of excellent races. Radiation mutation breeding and DNA recombination technologies, therefore, may need to be utilized separately according to respective purposes. In the future, for radiation mutation breeding, mutants with quality characteristics which others do not have, corresponding to the diverse demand on agricultural products must come to be required. On the other hand, by the crops like banana for which ordinary breeding is almost impossible, the expectation for radiation mutation breeding will be more and more heightened. In addition, the accumulation of studies on controlling the direction of mutation which has been regarded

  12. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  13. Progress and Future of Manufacturing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yongxiang

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of manufacturing technology and the progress that has so far been made in this field.It points out that manufacturing technology is not only the pillar of material civilization and the base of spiritual civilization of man,but also the foundation of a country's competitivendess.The paper also attempts to review the future of manufacturing technology through the description of the new pattern of manufacturing market,new features of manufactured products,new characteristics of technologies as well as the emerging trends of manufacturing enterprises and man-agement in the 21 st cetury.

  14. New stage of clean coal technology in Japan; Clean coal technology no aratana tenkai ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Y. [Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The paper described the positioning and new development of clean coal technology. Coal is an important resource which supplies approximately 30% of the energy consumed in all the world. In the Asian/Pacific region, especially, a share of coal in energy is high, around 60% of the world, and it is indispensable to continue using coal which is abundantly reserved. Japan continues using coal as an important energy among petroleum substituting energies taking consideration of the global environment, and is making efforts for development and promotion of clean coal technology aiming at further reduction of environmental loads. Moreover, in the Asian region where petroleum depends greatly upon outside the region, it is extremely important for stabilization of Japan`s energy supply that coal producing countries in the region promote development/utilization of their coal resources. For this, it is a requirement for Japan to further a coal policy having an outlook of securing stable coal supply/demand in the Asian region. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Database use and technology in Japan: JTEC panel report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiederhold, G.; Beech, D.; Bourne, C.; Farmer, N.; Jajodia, Sushil; Kahaner, D.; Minoura, Toshi; Smith, D.; Smith, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the findings of a group of database experts, sponsored by the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center (JTEC), based on an intensive study trip to Japan during March 1991. Academic, industrial, and governmental sites were visited. The primary findings are that Japan is supporting its academic research establishment poorly, that industry is making progress in key areas, and that both academic and industrial researchers are well aware of current domestic and foreign technology. Information sharing between industry and academia is effectively supported by governmental sponsorship of joint planning and review activities, and enhances technology transfer. In two key areas, multimedia and object-oriented databases, the authors can expect to see future export of Japanese database products, typically integrated into larger systems. Support for academic research is relatively modest. Nevertheless, the senior faculty are well-known and respected, and communicate frequently and in depth with each other, with government agencies, and with industry. In 1988 there were a total of 1,717 Ph.D.`s in engineering and 881 in science. It appears that only about 30 of these were academic Ph.D.`s in the basic computer sciences.

  16. Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kazujo Suzuki

    2000-01-01

    This contribution aims to introduce the situation of qualitative research in social science in Japan, with an emphasis on qualitative research in psychology. At first, the history of psychology in Japan is briefly discussed and qualitative research in the history of the Japanese psychology is described. Then trends and problems of qualitative research in present-day psychology are mentioned. Finally, qualitative research in the other social sciences are briefly touched on. URN: urn:nbn:de:...

  17. Hybrid Nanoelectronics: Future of Computer Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang; Ming Liu; Andrew Hsu

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology may well prove to be the 21st century's new wave of scientific knowledge that transforms people's lives. Nanotechnology research activities are booming around the globe. This article reviews the recent progresses made on nanoelectronic research in US and China, and introduces several novel hybrid solutions specifically useful for future computer technology. These exciting new directions will lead to many future inventions, and have a huge impact to research communities and industries.

  18. Cooperating internationally. US/Japan Civil Industrial Technologies (CIT) Arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Civil Industrial Technologies (CIT) Arrangement was signed in July 1994 between governments of the US and Japan. Areas of research range from scientific and technical databases and bioprocessing to precompetitive processing of functionally-gradient materials and ceramics. Papers presented in this symposium include studies on thin polymer films generated by vapor deposition polymerization, development of manufacturing technique of fusing 3D C/C composite materials, measurement and analysis for high performance computing systems, low-cost fabrication of ceramic components, bioprocessing, data exchange for mass spectral databases, development of high performance aluminum nitride ceramics, precompetitive processing of functionally-gradient materials, purity determination of organic reference materials, definitive methods traceable to SI unit, development of biocompatible artificial hard tissue materials, development of photoassisted catalysis technologies, surface analysis for catalysts by electron spectroscopy, development of ultra-solid lubricant with cluster diamond, precise determination of impurities in high-purity rare-earth metals, and highly accurate acceleration measurement system. 22 refs., 86 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. National Registry of Designated Intractable Diseases in Japan: Present Status and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    KANATANI, Yasuhiro; TOMITA, Naoko; SATO, Yoko; ETO, Akiko; OMOE, Hiroe; MIZUSHIMA, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Japan promotes research related to intractable diseases and financially supports patients with these diseases. Intractable diseases are designated as those that fulfill the following criteria: (1) rarity (affecting less than 0.1% of the population in Japan), (2) unknown etiology, (3) lack of effective treatment, (4) necessity of long-term treatment, and (5) existence of objective diagnostic criteria and not necessarily equal to rare diseases in other countries. The construction of a national database is required to promote research to clarify the pathogenesis of these diseases and to develop pharmaceutical products and medical devices. The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare launched an online registration system in 2001, but many problems associated with gathering and utilizing information on patients with intractable diseases remain. In this paper, we describe the present status of the national registry of designated intractable diseases in Japan and discuss future prospects. PMID:27666154

  20. Present status and future perspectives of research and test reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaieda, Keisuke [Department of Research Reactor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Since 1957, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has constructed several research and test reactors to fulfill a major role in the study of nuclear energy and fundamental research. At present four reactors, the Japan Research Reactor No. 3 and No. 4 (JRR-3M and JRR-4 respectively), the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) are in operation, and a new High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has recently reached first criticality and now in the power up test. In 1966, the Kyoto University built the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and started its operation for joint use program of the Japanese universities. This paper introduces these reactors and describes their present operational status and also efforts for aging management. The recent tendency of utilization and future perspectives is also reported. (author)

  1. Touching the Future Technology for Autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    apps designed to develop social and daily life skills in young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), should be developed and implemented in the future. We also set out a roadmap for a future research agenda, indicating further promising lines of enquiry that could potentially lead......We position the HANDS project in the wider context of developments in mobile technology and consider what legacy the project leaves. We identify a series of overall conclusions and recommendations from the project about the ways in which “HANDS-like” technology, i.e. integrated suites of mobile...... to the development of effective assistive mobile technology that has the potential to make a difference to the lives of young people with ASD and other people with social and cognitive impairments....

  2. Touching the Future Technology for Autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    We position the HANDS project in the wider context of developments in mobile technology and consider what legacy the project leaves. We identify a series of overall conclusions and recommendations from the project about the ways in which “HANDS-like” technology, i.e. integrated suites of mobile...... apps designed to develop social and daily life skills in young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), should be developed and implemented in the future. We also set out a roadmap for a future research agenda, indicating further promising lines of enquiry that could potentially lead...... to the development of effective assistive mobile technology that has the potential to make a difference to the lives of young people with ASD and other people with social and cognitive impairments....

  3. A technology roadmap of assistive technologies for dementia care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Taro; Fujinami, Tsutomu; Phaal, Robert; Ikawa, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The number of elderly people in Japan is growing, which raises the issue of dementia, as the probability of becoming cognitively impaired increases with age. There is an increasing need for caregivers, who are well-trained, experienced and can pay special attention to the needs of people with dementia. Technology can play an important role in helping such people and their caregivers. A lack of mutual understanding between caregivers and researchers regarding the appropriate uses of assistive technologies is another problem. A vision of person-centred care based on the use of information and communication technology to maintain residents' autonomy and continuity in their lives is presented. Based on this vision, a roadmap and a list of challenges to realizing assistive technologies have been developed. The roadmap facilitates mutual understanding between caregivers and researchers, resulting in appropriate technologies to enhance the quality of life of people with dementia.

  4. A study on future nuclear reactor technology and development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, D. S.; Suk, S. D.; Zee, S. K.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Park, W. S

    2000-12-01

    Development of nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technology for future is essential to meet the current issues such as enhancement of nuclear power reactor safety, economically competitive with gas turbine power generation, less production of radioactive waste, proliferation resistant fuel cycle, and public acceptance in consideration of lack of energy resources in the nuclear countries worldwide as well as in Korea. This report deals with as follows, 1) Review the world energy demand and supply perspective and analyse nature of energy and sustainable development to set-up nuclear policy in Korea 2) Recaptitulate the current long term nuclear R and D activities 3) Review nuclear R and D activities and programs of USA, Japan, France, Russia, international organizations such as IAEA, OECD/NEA 4) Recommend development directions of nuclear reactors and fuels.

  5. Ubiquitous Technology for Language Learning: The U-Japan Movement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the u-Japan movement and recent reforms in the higher educational system in Japan, examines the needs as well as readiness for ubiquitous learning in Japanese universities, and reports on a selection of mobile-assisted language learning projects (MALL). It analyzes the current status of ubiquitous technology applications in…

  6. Ubiquitous Technology for Language Learning: The U-Japan Movement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the u-Japan movement and recent reforms in the higher educational system in Japan, examines the needs as well as readiness for ubiquitous learning in Japanese universities, and reports on a selection of mobile-assisted language learning projects (MALL). It analyzes the current status of ubiquitous technology applications in…

  7. Future Computing Technology (3/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Computing of the future will be affected by a number of fundamental technologies in development today, many of which are already on the way to becoming commercialized. In this series of lectures, we will discuss hardware and software development that will become mainstream in the timeframe of a few years and how they will shape or change the computing landscape - commercial and personal alike. Topics range from processor and memory aspects, programming models and the limits of artificial intelligence, up to end-user interaction with wearables or e-textiles. We discuss the impact of these technologies on the art of programming, the data centres of the future and daily life. On the third day of the Future Computing Technology series, we will touch on societal aspects of the future of computing. Our perception of computers may at time seem passive, but in reality we are a vital chain of the feedback loop. Human-computer interaction, innovative forms of computers, privacy, process automation, threats and medica...

  8. Japan

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Japan. To allow useful comparison, it also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2017 is the 14th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing bus...

  9. Achievements and Future Plan of Interplanetary CubeSats and Micro-Sats in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funase, Ryu

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces Japanese achievements and future plans of CubeSats and Micro-Sats for deep space exploration. As the first step toward deep space mission by such tiny spacecraft, University of Tokyo and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) developed the world's first deep space micro-spacecraft PROCYON (Proximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation). Its mission objective is to demonstrate a micro-spacecraft bus technology for deep space exploration and proximity flyby to asteroids performing optical measurements. PROCYON was launched into the Earth departure trajectory on December 3, 2014 together with Japanese asteroid sample return mission Hayabusa-2. PROCYON successfully completed the bus system demonstration mission in its interplanetary flight. Currently, Japan is not only pursuing the improvement and utilization of the demonstrated micro-sat deep space bus system with a weight of tens of kg or more for more practical scientific deep space missions, but also trying to develop smaller spacecraft with a weight of less than tens of kg, namely CubeSats, for deep space exploration. We are proposing a self-contained 6U CubeSat mission for the rideshare opportunity on the USA's SLS EM-1 mission, which will fly to a libration orbit around Earth-Moon L2 point and perform scientific observations of the Earth and the Moon. We are also seeking the possibility of CubeSats which is carried by a larger spacecraft to the destination and supports the mission by taking advantage of its low-cost and risk-tolerable feature. As an example of such style of CubeSat missions, we are studying a CubeSat for close observations of an asteroid, which will be carried to the target asteroid by a larger mother spacecraft. This CubeSat is released from the mother spacecraft to make a close flyby for scientific observations, which is difficult to be performed by the mother spacecraft if we consider the risk of the collision to the target asteroid or dust particles ejected

  10. Touching the Future Technology for Autism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    as snapshots of an evolutionary process, but the conclusions drawn here are significant for future developments with mobile assistive technology for people with ASD, as well as for other conditions. The book will be of interest to professionals working with young people with ASD, human-computer interaction......International interest in the use of assistive and ambient information and communication technologies to support people with a range of cognitive impairments is growing rapidly. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which affect social skills, communicative abilities and behavior, are of particular...... of various fields, the widely shared view is that innovative ICT may hold the key to more efficient support and intervention in the near future. This book summarizes the results and conclusions of HANDS, an international research and development project supported by the 7th Framework Programme...

  11. FUTURE-ORIENTED MINDSET'S CONTRIBUTION TO MANAGEMENT OF CORPORATE R&D PERSONNEL MOTIVATION IN JAPAN

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the decreasing motivation of R&D personnel in Japan, this paper analyzes the relations between motivation and R&D personnel's future-oriented mindset and the time-climate in their workplace. Questionnaires were given to 240 corporate R&D personnel in six Japanese companies. ANOVA results show that highly motivated personnel have longer-term perspectives about ability growth than do personnel with low motivation levels. In a Japanese automobile company we confirmed the positive impa...

  12. University of Michigan Japan Technology Management Prgm U.S.-Japan Industry and Technology Management Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Involvement in Automotive Component Design: Are there really large US/Japan differences?," Research Policy , Vol. 25: 59-89, 1996. David T. Meth6, "Living...Japan differences’?," to appear in Research Policy . Jeffrey K. Liker, Durward Sobek, Allan C. Ward, and John Cristiano, "Involving Suppliers in Product

  13. Technology thrusts for future Earth science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2001-02-01

    This paper presents NASA's recent direction to invest in the critical science instrument and platform technologies in order to realize more reliable, frequent and versatile missions for future Earth Science measurements. Historically, NASA's Earth Science Enterprise has developed and flown science missions that have been large in size, mass and volume. These missions have taken much longer to implement due to technology development time, and have carried a large suite of instruments on a large spacecraft. NASA is now facing an era where the budget for the future years is more or less flat and the possibility for any major new start does not vividly appear on the horizon. Unfortunately, the scientific measurement needs for remote sensing have not shrunk to commensurate with the budget constraints. In fact, the challenges and scientific appetite in search of answers to a score of outstanding questions have been gradually expanding. With these factors in mind, for the last three years NASA has been changing its focus to concentrate on how to take advantage of smaller missions by relying on industry, and minimizing the overall mission life cycle by developing technologies that are independent of the mission implementation cycle. The major redirection of early investment in the critical technologies should eventually have its rewards and significantly reduce the mission development period. Needless to say, in the long run this approach should save money, minimize risk, promote or encourage partnering, allow for a rapid response to measurement needs, and enable frequent missions making a wider variety of earth science measurements. This paper gives an overview of some of the identified crucial technologies and their intended applications for meeting the future Earth Science challenges.

  14. Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazujo

    2000-01-01

    Mit diesem Beitrag wird das Ziel verfolgt, einen ersten Überblick über die Lage der qualitativen Forschung in den Sozialwissenschaften in Japan zu geben. Dabei werden u.a. folgende Themenbereiche fokussiert: Qualitativ-psychologische Forschung (auch unter einer historischen Perspektive), das japanische Verständnis von Sozialwissenschaften, verwendete qualitative Verfahren, sowie die aktuelle Situation der qualitativen Forschung in der Psychologie und in anderen Sozial- und Humanwissenschaften...

  15. Future Computing Technology (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Computing of the future will be affected by a number of fundamental technologies in development today, many of which are already on the way to becoming commercialized. In this series of lectures, we will discuss hardware and software development that will become mainstream in the timeframe of a few years and how they will shape or change the computing landscape - commercial and personal alike. Topics range from processor and memory aspects, programming models and the limits of artificial intelligence, up to end-user interaction with wearables or e-textiles. We discuss the impact of these technologies on the art of programming, the data centres of the future and daily life. Lecturer's short bio: Andrzej Nowak has 10 years of experience in computing technologies, primarily from CERN openlab and Intel. At CERN, he managed a research lab collaborating with Intel and was part of the openlab Chief Technology Office. Andrzej also worked closely and initiated projects with the private sector (e.g. HP and Go...

  16. Nanofluid technology : current status and future research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S. U.-S.

    1998-10-20

    Downscaling or miniaturization has been a recent major trend in modern science and technology. Engineers now fabricate microscale devices such as microchannel heat exchangers, and micropumps that are the size of dust specks. Further major advances would be obtained if the coolant flowing in the microchannels were to contain nanoscale particles to enhance heat transfer. Nanofluid technology will thus be an emerging and exciting technology of the 21st century. This paper gives a brief history of the Advanced Fluids Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), discusses the concept of nanofluids, and provides an overview of the R and D program at ANL on the production, property characterization, and performance of nanofluids. It also describes examples of potential applications and benefits of nanofluids. Finally, future research on the fundamentals and applications of nanofluids is addressed.

  17. Future of IT, PT and superconductivity technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2003-10-01

    Recently the Information Technology is developing very rapidly and the total traffic on the Internet is increasing dramatically. The numerous equipments connected to the Internet must be operated at very high-speed and the electricity consumed in the Internet is also increasing. Superconductivity devices of very high-speed and very low power consumption must be introduced. These superconducting devices will play very important roles in the future information society. Coated conductors will be used to generate extremely high magnetic fields of beyond 20 T at low temperatures. At the liquid nitrogen temperature they can find many applications in a wide range of Power Technology and other industries, since we have already large critical current and brilliant magnetic field dependences in some prototypes of coated conductors. It is becoming certain that the market for the superconductivity technology will be opened between the years of 2005 and 2010.

  18. Future Aeronautical Communication Infrastructure Technology Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Bergerm Jason; Henriksen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to investigate technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts for air traffic management (ATM) in the timeframe of 2020 and beyond, and includes the associated findings and recommendations made by ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The work was completed as the final phase of a multiyear NASA contract in support of the Future Communication Study (FCS), a cooperative research and development program of the United States FAA, NASA, and EUROCONTROL. This final report focuses on an assessment of final five candidate technologies, and also provides an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations.

  19. Medical technology in Japan the politics of regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Altenstetter, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Compared to its American and European counterparts, Japan lags in adopting innovative medical devices and making new treatments and procedures available. Christa Altenstetter examines the contextual conditions of Japan's medical profession and its regulatory framework. Altenstetter looks into how physicians and device companies connect to the government and bureaucracy, the relationships connecting Japanese patients to their medical system and governmental bureaucracy, and how relationships between policymakers and the medical profession are changing.

  20. Japan sharpens its waste processing technologies; Le Japon affute ses technologies de traitement des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantelet, J.

    2000-09-01

    With the inevitable saturation of rubbish tips in Japan, the mastery of waste processing techniques has become a priority for the government. The law about plastics recycling was enforced in April 2000 and the new standard about dioxins emission has led the industrialists of this sector to develop new technologies. This paper gives an overview of the recent advances in this domain: recycling of packaging materials (liquefaction, gasification, liquefaction, use as fuel substitutes), recycling of biological wastes (dehydration, food processing, methane production), control of dioxins emission from incinerators (treatment of smokes and ashes). (J.S.)

  1. Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Future Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Alekseev, Alexander; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-06-07

    Future energy systems will be determined by the increasing relevance of solar and wind energy. Crude oil and gas prices are expected to increase in the long run, and penalties for CO2 emissions will become a relevant economic factor. Solar- and wind-powered electricity will become significantly cheaper, such that hydrogen produced from electrolysis will be competitively priced against hydrogen manufactured from natural gas. However, to handle the unsteadiness of system input from fluctuating energy sources, energy storage technologies that cover the full scale of power (in megawatts) and energy storage amounts (in megawatt hours) are required. Hydrogen, in particular, is a promising secondary energy vector for storing, transporting, and distributing large and very large amounts of energy at the gigawatt-hour and terawatt-hour scales. However, we also discuss energy storage at the 120-200-kWh scale, for example, for onboard hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles using compressed hydrogen storage. This article focuses on the characteristics and development potential of hydrogen storage technologies in light of such a changing energy system and its related challenges. Technological factors that influence the dynamics, flexibility, and operating costs of unsteady operation are therefore highlighted in particular. Moreover, the potential for using renewable hydrogen in the mobility sector, industrial production, and the heat market is discussed, as this potential may determine to a significant extent the future economic value of hydrogen storage technology as it applies to other industries. This evaluation elucidates known and well-established options for hydrogen storage and may guide the development and direction of newer, less developed technologies.

  2. The future for weed control and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Dale L; Beckie, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    This review is both a retrospective (what have we missed?) and prospective (where are we going?) examination of weed control and technology, particularly as it applies to herbicide-resistant weed management (RWM). Major obstacles to RWM are discussed, including lack of diversity in weed management, unwillingness of many weed researchers to conduct real integrated weed management research or growers to accept recommendations, influence or role of agrichemical marketing and governmental policy and lack of multidisciplinary research. We then look ahead to new technologies that are needed for future weed control in general and RWM in particular, in areas such as non-chemical and chemical weed management, novel herbicides, site-specific weed management, drones for monitoring large areas, wider application of 'omics' and simulation model development. Finally, we discuss implementation strategies for integrated weed management to achieve RWM, development of RWM for developing countries, a new classification of herbicides based on mode of metabolism to facilitate greater stewardship and greater global exchange of information to focus efforts on areas that maximize progress in weed control and RWM. There is little doubt that new or emerging technologies will provide novel tools for RMW in the future, but will they arrive in time? © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Pest Management Science © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Forecasting Trends in Disability in a Super-Aging Society: Adapting the Future Elderly Model to Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian K; Jalal, Hawre; Hashimoto, Hideki; Suen, Sze-Chuan; Eggleston, Karen; Hurley, Michael; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2016-12-01

    Japan has experienced pronounced population aging, and now has the highest proportion of elderly adults in the world. Yet few projections of Japan's future demography go beyond estimating population by age and sex to forecast the complex evolution of the health and functioning of the future elderly. This study estimates a new state-transition microsimulation model - the Japanese Future Elderly Model (FEM) - for Japan. We use the model to forecast disability and health for Japan's future elderly. Our simulation suggests that by 2040, over 27 percent of Japan's elderly will exhibit 3 or more limitations in IADLs and social functioning; almost one in 4 will experience difficulties with 3 or more ADLs; and approximately one in 5 will suffer limitations in cognitive or intellectual functioning. Since the majority of the increase in disability arises from the aging of the Japanese population, prevention efforts that reduce age-specific morbidity can help reduce the burden of disability but may have only a limited impact on reducing the overall prevalence of disability among Japanese elderly. While both age and morbidity contribute to a predicted increase in disability burden among elderly Japanese in the future, our simulation results suggest that the impact of population aging exceeds the effect of age-specific morbidity on increasing disability in Japan's future.

  4. Sensing technology current status and future trends

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun

    2014-01-01

    This book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective.  The book is intended to give a broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.  

  5. Evolution and Future of Torque Measurement Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. W. Krimmel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The journey to the past of torque measurement technology begins in the 17th century. It takes us from the first incipiencies of torque measurement to the problem of the transfer of the measurement signal from a rotating shaft, which existed for several decades. This task was solved by the integration of high-precise digital measuring amplifiers in the torque sensors, which is expressed by broad application fields, today. The future will appertain to highly dynamic measuring sensors as well as to intelligent torque sensors, which are able to transmit their sensor-specific characteristics to evaluation devices.

  6. Transient expression technologies: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisse, Sabine; Voedisch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The first protocols describing transient gene expression in mammalian cells for the rapid generation of recombinant proteins emerged more than 10 years ago as an alternative to the establishment of stable, often amplified clonal cell lines, and relieved somewhat the bias against mammalian cell systems as being too complicated, labor intensive, and tedious to serve as a source for tool proteins in industrial research and academia. Over the past decade, these attempts have been refined and optimized, giving rise to expression protocols applicable in every lab in dependence on available tools, equipment, and envisaged outcome. This chapter summarizes the development of transient expression technologies over the past decade up to its current status and provides an outlook into what may be the future of transient technology development.

  7. Electromagnetic DM technology meets future AO demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten; Doelman, Niek

    New deformable mirror technology is developed by the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Delft University of Technology and TNO Science and Industry. Several prototype adaptive deformable mirrors are realized mirrors, up to 427 actuators and ∅150mm diameter, with characteristics suitable for future AO systems. The prototypes consist of a 100µm thick, continuous facesheet on which low voltage, electromagnetic, push-pull actuators impose out-of-plane displacements. The variable reluctance actuators with ±10µm stroke and nanometer resolution are located in a standard actuator module. Each module with 61 actuators connects to a single PCB with dedicated, 16 bit, PWM based, drivers. A LVDS multi-drop cable connects up to 32 actuator modules. With the actuator module, accompanying PCB and multi-drop system the deformable mirror technology is made modular in its mechanics and electronics. An Ethernet-LVDS bridge enables any commercial PC to control the mirror using the UDP standard. Latest results of the deformable mirror technology development are presented.

  8. Prospects for new technology of meat processing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ryoichi

    2010-09-01

    This review starts by introducing the history and underlying culture of meat production and consumption in Japan since early times, and the effects of social change on these parameters. Meat processing in Japan is described, and certain other related papers are also introduced. Automatic machines for meat cutting have been developed by the Japanese food industry and are currently being used throughout the world, particularly in Europe. Soft meat products specially produced for the elderly, along with diet meat products low in salt and calorie content for middle aged persons have recently gone into production. The intensification of color formation of meat using naturally occurring materials, and tenderization of sausage casing are discussed.

  9. Self-regulation of recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Nukaga, Yoshio; Saeki, Koji; Akabayashi, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant DNA technology was developed in the United States in the early 1970s. Leading scientists held an international Asilomar Conference in 1975 to examine the self regulation of recombinant DNA technology, followed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health drafting the Recombinant DNA Research Guidelines in 1976. The result of this conference significantly affected many nations, including Japan. However, there have been few historical studies on the self-regulation of recombinant technologies conducted by scientists and government officials in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the Science Council of Japan, the Ministry of Education, Science adn Culture, and the Science and Technology Agency developed self-regulation policies for recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s. Groups of molecular biologist and geneticists played a key role in establishing guidelines in cooperation with government officials. Our findings suggest that self-regulation policies on recombinant DNA technology have influenced safety management for the life sciences and establishment of institutions for review in Japan.

  10. Nursing Leadership in a Rapidly Aging Society: Implications of “The Future of Nursing” Report in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harue Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent US Institute of Medicine (IOM report about the future of nursing highlights the areas where nurses can serve, contribute, and move forward to improve health care in the United States. Japanese nursing scholars examined the IOM report for its implications in the Japanese context and explored the future of nursing in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to provide support for the premise that the report’s recommendations could have implications for the future of nursing outside of the United States, especially in Japan. Particular areas and activities by nurses in Japan will be presented as examples of nurses taking leadership in designing care for the rapidly aging society of Japan.

  11. 75 FR 67804 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... Hotel Washington, DC, Diplomat Room. ADDRESSES: 2500 Calvert Street, NW., Washington, DC 20008... Security independent advice and recommendations on the future of systems technology and electronic services...

  12. JPRS Report, Science and Technology Japan, 18th FRP Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    user part ( ISUP ) for line switching, and X.75 interface for packet switching. It is expected that Japan will adopt these interfaces. terminal ISD...terminal-to-terminal transfers will become possible in 1990 when the No 7 ISUP signal mode is introduced for communications between international terminal

  13. Science and Technology in Japan -- A Brief Analytic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    on fermentation processes to produce such foods and beverages as sake, soy sauce, and soy paste. This is perhaps the major reason the Japanese...Professor M. Gato , built Japan’s first relay computers, and Fujitsu, which cooperated on the ETL project, produced the first commercial relay computer, the

  14. Past, present and future of macrolide therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Suzaki, Harumi

    2016-04-01

    In 1984, the effectiveness of low-dose, long-term erythromycin treatment (macrolide therapy) for diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) was first reported in Japan. The 5-year survival rate for DPB improved from 62.9 to 91.4% after implementation of macrolide therapy. The usefulness of this treatment has since been demonstrated in patients with other chronic airway diseases, such as chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchial asthma, and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The new 14-membered macrolides clarithromycin and roxithromycin and the 15-membered macrolide azithromycin are also effective for treating these inflammatory diseases. The mechanism of action of the 14- and 15-membered macrolides may involve anti-inflammatory rather than anti-bacterial activities. Macrolide therapy is now widely used for the treatment of CRS in Japan; it is particularly effective for treating neutrophil-associated CRS and is useful for suppressing mucus hypersecretion. However, macrolide therapy is not effective for eosinophil-predominant CRS, which is characterized by serum and tissue eosinophilia, high serum IgE levels, multiple polyposis, and bronchial asthma. Recent reports have described the clinical efficacy of macrolides in treating other inflammatory diseases and new biological activities (e.g., anti-viral). New macrolide derivatives exhibiting anti-inflammatory but not anti-bacterial activity thus have therapeutic potential as immunomodulatory drugs. The history, current state, and future perspectives of macrolide therapy for treating CRS in Japan will be discussed in this review.

  15. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers.

  16. Mobile display technologies: Past developments, present technologies, and future opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    It has been thirty years since the first active matrix (AM) flat panel display (FPD) was industrialized for portable televisions (TVs) in 1984. The AM FPD has become a dominant electronic display technology widely used from mobile displays to large TVs. The development of AM FPDs for mobile displays has significantly changed our lives by enabling new applications, such as notebook personal computers (PCs), smartphones and tablet PCs. In the future, the role of mobile displays will become even more important, since mobile displays are the live interface for the world of mobile communications in the era of ubiquitous networks. Various developments are being conducted to improve visual performance, reduce power consumption and add new functionality. At the same time, innovative display concepts and novel manufacturing technologies are being investigated to create new values.

  17. Technology and the Future of Mental Health Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Intervention Technology? Join a Study Learn More Technology and the Future of Mental Health Treatment Introduction ... What is NIMH’s Role in Mental Health Intervention Technology? Between FY2009 and FY2015, NIMH awarded 404 grants ...

  18. Future information communication technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jung; Sahama, Tony; Yang, Chung-Huang; 2013 International Conference on Future Information & Communication Engineering (ICFICE 2013)

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings are based on the 2013 International Conference on Future Information & Communication Engineering (ICFICE 2013), which will be held at Shenyang in China from June 24-26, 2013. The conference is open to all over the world, and participation from Asia-Pacific region is particularly encouraged. The focus of this conference is on all technical aspects of electronics, information, and communications ICFICE-13 will provide an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of FICE. In addition, the conference will publish high quality papers which are closely related to the various theories and practical applications in FICE. Furthermore, we expect that the conference and its publications will be a trigger for further related research and technology improvements in this important subject.  "This work was supported by the NIPA (National IT Industry Promotion Agency) of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (Ministry of Science, ICT...

  19. Touching the Future Technology for Autism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the European Commission. The aim of the HANDS project was to develop and test a smartphone-based cognitive support system for intellectually able young people with ASDs, with a focus on use in secondary school environments. The results presented here include the HANDS system: a partly mobile, partly web...... Design and its philosophical foundations; a mapping of key ethical issues related to developing and applying mobile ICT for individuals with autism and other cognitive impairments. The experiences of teachers who implemented the system in school environments are also summarized. These results can be seen...... as snapshots of an evolutionary process, but the conclusions drawn here are significant for future developments with mobile assistive technology for people with ASD, as well as for other conditions. The book will be of interest to professionals working with young people with ASD, human-computer interaction...

  20. US/Japan workshop on mitigation and adaptation technologies related to global climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernthal, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    It is a great pleasure for me to have the honor of delivering the keynote address for this important gathering, an honor enhanced further because of the many activities and historic relationships represented by this workshop. First of all, it represents the spirit of continuing cooperation and good relations between the United States and Japan. With the aid of the framework provided by the U.S./Japan Science and Technology Agreement, our two nations can come together to address a problem that has no national boundaries {hor_ellipsis} and we can think about solutions of potential benefit to all citizens of the global community. This workshop also symbolizes the spirit of cooperation so characteristic of the conduct of research in science and technology -- cooperation between us as individual scientists and engineers, between the various institutions we represent, and across our diverse disciplines. This workshop is only the second of its kind. The first US/Japan Workshop on global climate change was held last year in Japan. That workshop focused on cooperative scientific research in the United States and Japan. Out of it came a general agreement to continue collaborative work and to extend cooperation into the area of global change-related technologies, in particular those technologies that hold promise for mitigation and adaptation.

  1. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pododimenko Inna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of innovative approaches to the training of future ІТ specialists with the aim to increase their professional level. The content of standards of professional training and development of information technologies specialists in foreign countries, particularly in Japan, has been analyzed and generalized. On the basis of analysis of educational and professional standards of Japan, basic requirements to the engineer in industry of information communication technology in the conditions of competitive environment at the labour market have been comprehensively characterized. The competencies that graduate students of educational qualification level of bachelor in the conditions of new state policy concerning upgrading the quality of higher education have been considered. The constituents of professional competence in the structure of an engineer-programmer’s personality, necessary on different levels of professional improvement of a specialist for the development of community of highly skilled ІТ specialists, have been summarized. Positive features of foreign experience and the possibility of their implementation into the native educational space have been distinguished. Directions for modernization and upgrading of the quality of higher education in Ukraine and the prospects for further scientific research concerning the practice of specialists in information technologies training have been suggested

  2. Transforming healthcare with information technology in Japan: a review of policy, people, and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Chon; Nishihara, Eitaro; Akiyama, Miki

    2011-03-01

    Healthcare reform as part of the economic recovery plan in Japan is placing emphasis on the use of healthcare information technology (HIT). This research mainly focuses on the HIT efforts in Japan with reference to the US for context. The purpose is to: (a) provide detail on governmental policy impacting promotion of HIT adoption to provide services to the people of Japan, (b) describe the outcomes of past and present policy impacting progress based on a case study of HIT use in the Kyoto Yamashina area, and (c) discuss issues for refinement of current policy. The method is case study, and data collection techniques include: (a) interviews of people involved in policy making for HIT in Japan (Japanese healthcare professionals, government officials, and academics involved in HIT research in Japan) and use in the medical community of HIT in the Kyoto Yamashina area, (b) archived document analysis of reports regarding government policy for HIT policy and user assessment for HIT mainly in the case study site, and (c) the literature review about HIT progression and effectiveness assessments to explore and describe issues concerning the transformation with HIT in Japan. This study reveals the aspects of governmental policy that have been effective in promoting successful HIT initiatives as well as some that have been detriments in Japan to help solve pressing social issues regarding healthcare delivery. For example, Japan has stipulated some standardized protocols and formats for HIT but does not mandate exactly how to engage in inter-organizational or intra-organizational health information exchange. This provides some desired autonomy for healthcare organizations and or governments in medical communities and allows for more advanced organizations to leverage current resources while providing a basis for lesser equipped organizations to use in planning the initiative. The insights gained from the Kyoto Yamashina area initiative reflect the success of past governmental

  3. Platinum availability for future automotive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Elisa; Field, Frank R; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-12-04

    Platinum is an excellent catalyst, can be used at high temperatures, and is stable in many aggressive chemical environments. Consequently, platinum is used in many current industrial applications, notably automotive catalytic converters, and prospective vehicle fuel cells are expected to rely upon it. Between 2005 and 2010, the automotive industry used approximately 40% of mined platinum. Future automotive industry growth and automotive sales shifts toward new technologies could significantly alter platinum demand. The potential risks for decreased platinum availability are evaluated, using an analysis of platinum market characteristics that describes platinum's geophysical constraints, institutional efficiency, and dynamic responsiveness. Results show that platinum demand for an automotive fleet that meets 450 ppm greenhouse gas stabilization goals would require within 10% of historical growth rates of platinum supply before 2025. However, such a fleet, due largely to sales growth in fuel cell vehicles, will more strongly constrain platinum supply in the 2050 time period. While current platinum reserves are sufficient to satisfy this increased demand, decreasing platinum ore grade and continued concentration of platinum supply in a single geographic area are availability risk factors to platinum end-users.

  4. The Impact of Information and Communication Technology on Script Policy in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratne, Dilhara D.

    2009-01-01

    Information and communication technology appears to have had a profound impact on language use in Japan. An important issue arising from this is said to be the increase in the use of Chinese characters (kanji) outside the official standard. This development has made a re-appraisal of the existing script policy necessary in order to accommodate the…

  5. Childcare support at nursery schools in Japan: current services and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Chiemi; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Hirayama, Munehiro

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to survey childcare support being undertaken by nursery school teachers in Japan and to identify the theories and skills necessary for nursery school teachers to carry out childcare support in the future. In 2007, a postal questionnaires was sent to 1200 teachers at 850 nursery schools, with responses from 712 teachers from 456 nursery schools. In terms of knowledge and skills considered necessary by nursery school teachers in local childcare support centers, 'knowledge and skills of giving advice' was the most common response, followed by 'understanding of children's growth and development'. Nursery school teachers need to receive sufficient education before and after graduation to gain these skills. It is also clear that there is a need for nursery school teachers to make use of their expertise by co-ordinating collaboration among professionals and in the community.

  6. Sustainable Development, Knowledge Society and Smart Future Manufacturing Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leal Filho, Walter; Úbelis, Arnolds; Bērziņa, Dina

    2015-01-01

    .... The book highlights sustainable development in relation to the knowledge society and smart future manufacturing technologies, and it helps provide a better understanding of the interplay between...

  7. Decomposition analysis of green chemical technology inventions from 1971 to 2010 in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hidemichi; Shirakawa, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Green chemistry plays an important role in achieving sustainable development. This study examines the determinant factors for technology invention related to green chemistry in Japan using patent application data and a decomposition analysis framework. Our main findings are that the number of green chemical technologies applied to production processes have increased because of the scale-up of overall research activities and increased priority. Additionally, the number of patent applications f...

  8. Japan's long road back to a nuclear future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitev, Lubomir [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear can still have a key role to play in Japan's energy policy, but the restart process for offline reactors is strict and time-consuming. Japan Atomic Industrial Forum's president Takuya Hattori spoke to NucNet about the current developments related to the restart of nuclear power plants and further developments in this field in Japan. Takuya Hattori is president of the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (Jaif) and president of the Jaif International Cooperation Centre.

  9. R & D Activities and the Technology Game: A Dynamic Model of U.S.-JapanCompetition

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuzo Sato

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an international comparison of R&D activities in basic and applied research. The commonly-held view that Japan is not spending much on basic technology development cannot be empirically substantiated from the study of the historical trends. However, the fact that in the U.S.A. the largest proportion of industrial R&D expenditures is spent on the defense and aero-space related industries (60%) ,while Japan is spending the largest proportion (60%) on the chemical, electronic...

  10. Identifying Advanced Technologies for Education's Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gwendolyn B.; Yin, Robert K.

    A study to determine how three advanced technologies might be applied to the needs of special education students helped inspire the development of a new method for identifying such applications. This new method, named the "Hybrid Approach," combines features of the two traditional methods: technology-push and demand-pull. Technology-push involves…

  11. Japan acts to speed technology transfer from universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Saegusa, A

    1999-01-01

    A Japanese law will take effect in the autumn to promote technology transfer from universities and laboratories. The new measures aim to encourage collaborations with the commercial sector and allow industrial research partners to retain title to inventions (1 page).

  12. Technology and Thematic Units: An Elementary Example on Japan (Technology Links to Literacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepner, Shelley B.

    1993-01-01

    Uses a thematic unit on Japan to show how software can become an additional resource for elementary students' literacy learning in social studies, science, language arts, and art. Notes that the five-week unit addresses Japan's culture and customs. (RS)

  13. [What should the radiation education in Japan in the future be like?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In respect to policy and involvement in social cognition of Advanced Science and Technology, people desire to recognize the scientific understanding and social understanding hierarchically and simultaneously. However, the understandings of some sciences and technologies are dependent on the amount of information given and how easy it is to understand it. Nuclear power and radiation are a typical example of such sciences and technologies because their advantages and disadvantages are clear. On the other hand, the Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident that occurred in March 2011 caused the myth about the safety and security of nuclear power to collapse. Concerns about nuclear power and radiation increased abruptly after the accident. Also the scientific understanding of 'nuclear power' and radiation increased. The content and level of radiation education was highly significant than before the accident. However, it is essential to propose a more detailed explanation for people that are concerned about radioactive contamination of food and also for people living in areas that still have relatively high dose of radioactive material. Although some technical problems such as the influences on the human body by low-dose exposure remain unresolved, not only specialists on nuclear power and radiation, but also the persons that have studied the radiation are desired to explain radiation for familiar people. As a result, in Japan, the learning of individuals spread to society because the Japanese are highly interested in nuclear power and radiation and the understanding of historical background.

  14. Technology and society building our sociotechnical future

    CERN Document Server

    Wetmore, Jameson M

    2009-01-01

    Technological change does not happen in a vacuum; decisions about which technologies to develop, fund, market, and use engage ideas about values as well as calculations of costs and benefits. This anthology focuses on the interconnections of technology, society, and values. It offers writings by authorities as varied as Freeman Dyson, Laurence Lessig, Bruno Latour, and Judy Wajcman that will introduce readers to recent thinking about technology and provide them with conceptual tools, a theoretical framework, and knowledge to help understand how technology shapes society and how society shapes technology. It offers readers a new perspective on such current issues as globalization, the balance between security and privacy, environmental justice, and poverty in the developing world. The careful ordering of the selections and the editors' introductions give Technology and Society a coherence and flow that is unusual in anthologies. The book is suitable for use in undergraduate courses in STS and other disciplines...

  15. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  16. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z. -X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Stohr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  17. Teaching Mathematics to Electrical Engineering Students by Electrical Engineering Staff in College of Technology in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Fujimoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical engineering staff (reorganized to Electrical and Computer engineering in 2004 has taught electrical engineering students for mathematics classes in Wakayama National College of Technology (WNCT in Japan from 2007. Effects of the mathematics classes by the electrical engineering staff were evaluated by using the results of the mathematics placement tests. The results of the tests are compared with averages of other National Colleges of Technology in Japan and other divisions of WNCT. As a result, an ability of electrical engineering students for mathematics improved dramatically with increasing the ratio of mathematics classes by the electrical engineering staff. It should seem that these good results were achieved by eagerness and strong motivation of the staff with electrical specialty for improving the ability of their division's students. The reasons for the improvement are discussed and the unique class of mathematics for college of technology is also introduced.

  18. Grounding the Innovation of Future Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Oulasvirta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile and ubiquitous technologies can potentially change the role of information and communication technology in human lives. Empirical, human-centered approaches are emerging as an alternative to technology-driven approaches in the innovation of these technologies. Three necessary empirical stages, intertwined with analytical ones and with each informing and grounding the succeeding stages, are analyzed. First, needfinding is utilized to discover societal and individual demands for technology. Second, observational and experimental studies examine the social and cognitive preconditions for interaction. From these two steps, a hypothesis is formulated regarding how technology will change existing practices. Finally, this hypothesis, embodied in the design of a prototype, is tested in a field trial. Four design cases illustrate the value of empirical grounding.

  19. Optical Network Technologies for Future Digital Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Nazir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has transformed the information flow and support infrastructure for numerous application domains, such as cellular communications. Cinematography, traditionally, a film based medium, has embraced digital technology leading to innovative transformations in its work flow. Digital cinema supports transmission of high resolution content enabled by the latest advancements in optical communications and video compression. In this paper we provide a survey of the optical network technologies for supporting this bandwidth intensive traffic class. We also highlight the significance and benefits of the state of the art in optical technologies that support the digital cinema work flow.

  20. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL; Grubb, Kimberly R [ORNL; Lee, Russell [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  1. Career choice and future design of dental students in China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Zhang, Xinwen; Jinno, Yohei; Tachibana, Keishu; Gao, Jie; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ai, Hongjun; Shen, Yong

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare career choice and future plans of dental students in China and Japan. Information was derived from a self-answered questionnaire. Significant differences were detected for eight items between the two countries. Regarding motivation towards career choice, 41% of Japanese students indicated positive motives related to helping others, achieving self-worth and health-care related interests, whereas Chinese students indicated that their choice was mainly for financial and prestige reasons, and for 32% of them, dentistry was a passive choice. More Chinese dental students (74%) wanted further education compared with Japanese students (22%). The majority of Japanese students (56.9%) planned to work as general dentists. Conversely, Chinese students were more likely to specialise (50%). More than 50% of Japanese students wanted to work in dental offices, but the majority of Chinese students (65%) preferred university hospital. We found it is strange that nearly one-fourth of the Chinese students did not want to be a clinical dentist mainly because of the poor health-care environment. This study provides a description of the perspectives of Japanese and Chinese dental students and enables a better understanding of career choices and future course design issues.

  2. The Future of Learning Technology: Some Tentative Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a snapshot of an evolving vision of what the future may hold for learning technology. It offers three personal visions of the future and raises many questions that need to be explored if learning technology is to realise its full potential.

  3. 75 FR 1446 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA...:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Location: The Latham Hotel Georgetown. ADDRESSES: 3000 M Street, Northwest... independent advice and recommendations on the future of systems technology and electronic services at the...

  4. Ubiquitous Learning Project Using Life-Logging Technology in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Li, Mengmeng; Uosaki, Noriko; Mouri, Kosuke; Liu, Songran

    2014-01-01

    A Ubiquitous Learning Log (ULL) is defined as a digital record of what a learner has learned in daily life using ubiquitous computing technologies. In this paper, a project which developed a system called SCROLL (System for Capturing and Reusing Of Learning Log) is presented. The aim of developing SCROLL is to help learners record, organize,…

  5. Ubiquitous Learning Project Using Life-Logging Technology in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Li, Mengmeng; Uosaki, Noriko; Mouri, Kosuke; Liu, Songran

    2014-01-01

    A Ubiquitous Learning Log (ULL) is defined as a digital record of what a learner has learned in daily life using ubiquitous computing technologies. In this paper, a project which developed a system called SCROLL (System for Capturing and Reusing Of Learning Log) is presented. The aim of developing SCROLL is to help learners record, organize,…

  6. Teens and Technology: Preparing for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    In the past two decades, economic, technological, demographic, and political forces have stimulated major change in the learning and working landscape for young people. Understanding how to use computers and other technology for learning, productivity, and performance has become as fundamental to a person's ability to navigate through school and…

  7. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  8. Converging technologies: shaping the future of medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj nabipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The miniaturization and virtualization processes drive converging technologies from interactions between the NBIC (Nano, Bio, Info, and Cogno technologies. The converging technologies stimulate innovation, promote research and development in different fields and produce revolutionary progresses in medicine. These technologies enable us to create contacts between brains and machines, the growth in molecular nanotechnology, the construction of respirocytes, chromallocytes, clottocytes, nanorobotic phagocytes, and nanobots. Nanobots would enter the nucleus of a cell and extract all of the genetic material and replace it with a synthetically produced copy of the original that has been manufactured in a laboratory to contain only non-defective base-pairs. It is predicted that “the regenerative medicine”, as a megatrend, will have an enormous effect on medical technologies and clinical sciences. Regenerative medicine is an application field of converging technologies in translational medicine. It attempts to translate the results of tissue engineering to construct 3D tissues and organs. Regenerative medicine is also an exciting field for induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and promises to bring about a paradigm shift to health care. Accumulating evidence indicates that converging technologies will offer great potentials for regenerative medicine to create innovative treatments for diseases that the traditional therapies have not been effective yet.

  9. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, White Paper on Science & Technology 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    apparent in many areas such as resources, energy, market and so on. We are-therefore required to find ways and means of achieving a "sustainable development...3 Reseacher /engineer exchanges between Japan and other countries (1989) Japan _e_ _ departure> <departure> Developed 112 thousands <departure> 35...of Single Market in 1992. (Figure 21) 18 Figure 20 Percentage of private corporations having overseas R&D facility M% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

  10. Constructing a Once-and-Future History of Learning Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Betram C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a course on the use of technologies for learning that studies the World Wide Web, multimedia, communication and collaboration software, tutoring systems, virtual reality, and other new digital technologies. Explores what educators are beginning to learn from this investigation of the past and future of learning technologies through use…

  11. Future Research in Health Information Technology: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat, Morteza; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Saghafi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Currently, information technology is considered an important tool to improve healthcare services. To adopt the right technologies, policy makers should have adequate information about present and future advances. This study aimed to review and compare studies with a focus on the future of health information technology. This review study was completed in 2015. The databases used were Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, Ovid Medline, and PubMed. Keyword searches were used to identify papers and materials published between 2000 and 2015. Initially, 407 papers were obtained, and they were reduced to 11 papers at the final stage. The selected papers were described and compared in terms of the country of origin, objective, methodology, and time horizon. The papers were divided into two groups: those forecasting the future of health information technology (seven papers) and those providing health information technology foresight (four papers). The results showed that papers related to forecasting the future of health information technology were mostly a literature review, and the time horizon was up to 10 years in most of these studies. In the health information technology foresight group, most of the studies used a combination of techniques, such as scenario building and Delphi methods, and had long-term objectives. To make the most of an investment and to improve planning and successful implementation of health information technology, a strategic plan for the future needs to be set. To achieve this aim, methods such as forecasting the future of health information technology and offering health information technology foresight can be applied. The forecasting method is used when the objectives are not very large, and the foresight approach is recommended when large-scale objectives are set to be achieved. In the field of health information technology, the results of foresight studies can help to establish realistic long-term expectations of the future of health information

  12. Future networks and technologies supporting innovative communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    Within a fully interconnected world, the distinct relationship between end users, consumers and providers rapidly changes towards a scenario of collaboration and competition of multiple parties within one system. ‘Convergence’, ‘ubiquitous’ and ‘smart’ are key words describing future networks...

  13. Macro, mini, micro and nano (M(sup 3)N) technologies for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Craig R.; Warrington, Robert O.; Gao, Robert X.; Lin, Gang

    1993-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro systems technologies (MST), and micromanufacturing are relatively recent phrases or acronyms that have become synonymous with the design, development, and manufacture of 'micro' devices and systems. Micromanufacturing encompasses MEMS or MST and, in addition, includes all of the processes involved in the production of micro things. Integration of mechanical and electrical components, including built-in computers, can be formed into systems which must be connected to the macroworld. Macro, mini, micro, and nano technologies are all a part of MEMS or micromanufacturing. At this point in the development of the technology, it is becoming apparent that mini systems, with micro components, could very well be the economic drivers of the technology for the foreseeable future. Initial research in the fabrication of microdevices using IC processing technology took place over thirty years ago. Anisotropic etching of silicon was used to produce piezoresistive diaphragms. Since the early 60's, there has been gradual progress in MEMS until the early 1980's when worldwide interest in the technology really started to develop. During this time high aspect ratio micromachining using x rays was started in Germany. In 1987 the concept of a 'silicon micromechanics foundry' was proposed. Since then the interest in the U.S., Germany, and Japan has increased to the point where hundreds of millions of dollars of research monies are being funneled into the technology (at least in Germany and Japan) and the technology has been classified as critical or as a technology or national importance by the U.S. government.

  14. Materials Technology; 200 Years and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadon, James N.; Steeb, Ralph V.

    Focus in this paper is on the importance of materials technology, the matter and energy crises, and the interrelatedness of our increasing need for materials, and the implications for education. Following a short history of what materials have done for man and what man has done with materials, particularly in the development of various metals and…

  15. Naval Science & Technology: Enabling the Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Peer Competitors • Security of Global Commons (Cyber/Piracy) • Climate Change & Natural Disasters • Revised Defense Strategy, Re-Balance to Pacific... corn for disruptive technologies Laser Cooling Spintronics Bz 1st U.S. Intel satellite GRAB Semiconductors GaAs, GaN, SiC GPS

  16. Cost of ownership for future lithography technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Andrew J.; Wüest, Andrea; Hughes, Greg; Litt, Lloyd C.; Goodwin, Frank

    2008-11-01

    The cost of ownership (COO) of candidate technologies for 32 nm and 22 nm half-pitch lithography is calculated. To more accurately compare technologies with different numbers of process steps, a model that includes deposition, etching, metrology, and other costs is created. Results show lithography COO for leading edge layers will increase by roughly 50% from the 45 nm to the 32 nm half-pitch nodes. Double patterning and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technologies have roughly the same COO under certain conditions. For 22 nm half-pitch nodes, EUVL has a significant cost advantage over other technologies under certain mask cost assumptions. Double patterning, however, may be competitive under worst case EUVL mask cost assumptions. Sensitivity studies of EUVL COO to throughput and uptime show EUVL may be cost-competitive at lower uptime and throughput conditions. In spite of these higher costs, total lithography costs for 32 nm and 22 nm half-pitches remain within reach of the Moore's Law trend. Finally, the COO of 450 mm lithography is calculated and shows the expected cost reduction is between 0% and 15%.

  17. On the future of Internet Management Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönwälder, Jürgen; Schonwalder, J.; Pras, Aiko; Martin-Flatin, Jean-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    As the Internet continues to grow, it becomes more and more apparent that existing Internet management technologies need to be improved, extended or replaced in order to extend functionality and reduce development time and operational costs. Within the IETF, IRTF, and IAB, several new approaches are

  18. The role of technology in influencing future civil communications satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, James W.; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1990-01-01

    Technology, both as an enabler and as a driver of new and improved communication satellites, is discussed. A brief look at the beginnings and evolution of satellite communications is given to reveal the continuing influence of technology over the past 25 years. An assessment of the current state of the art which serves as a benchmark representing how far technology has come and as a basis for comparison for future possibilities is presented. A short tutorial on communications satellite basics is presented, followed by an assessment of technologies used for satellite antennas and signal amplification and routing. A discussion of future service requirements follows, and emerging technologies are identified along with possible improved communications capabilities that can result from them. The outlook for the role of technology for future communication satellites is summarized.

  19. US hospital payment adjustments for innovative technology lag behind those in Germany, France, and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, John; Machacz, Susanne F; Robinson, James C

    2015-02-01

    Medicare pioneered add-on payments to facilitate the adoption of innovative technologies under its hospital prospective payment system. US policy makers are now experimenting with broader value-based payment initiatives, but these have not been adjusted for innovation. This article examines the structure, processes, and experience with Medicare's hospital new technology add-on payment program since its inception in 2001 and compares it with analogous payment systems in Germany, France, and Japan. Between 2001 and 2015 CMS approved nineteen of fifty-three applications for the new technology add-on payment program. We found that the program resulted in $201.7 million in Medicare payments in fiscal years 2002-13-less than half the level anticipated by Congress and only 34 percent of the amount projected by CMS. The US program approved considerably fewer innovative technologies, compared to analogous technology payment mechanisms in Germany, France and Japan. We conclude that it is important to adjust payments for new medical innovations within prospective and value-based payment systems explicitly as well as implicitly. The most straightforward method to use in adjusting value-based payments is for the insurer to retrospectively adjust spending targets to account for the cost of new technologies. If CMS made such retrospective adjustments, it would not financially penalize hospitals for adopting beneficial innovations. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  20. The Development of the Counseling Profession in Japan: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabosky, Tomoko Kudo; Ishii, Harue; Mase, Shizuno

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a sociohistorical overview of the development of the counseling profession in Japan. They describe Japan's major social, cultural, and political changes; growing psychological problems in Japanese society; and an increased need for counseling services. Historical overviews and the current state of counseling are presented with…

  1. CERN: The Future of Information Technology

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; QEII Conference Centre

    2004-01-01

    Sell to CERN, partner with CERN and learn about its pivotal role in European Grids and e-business This afternoon event will highlight the key areas of distributed computing and enterprise applications to Information and Communication Technology companies. The meeting will be held as a joint forum with First Tuesday Geneva, a networking organisation for business and investors in the Geneva region. The CERN Openlab for DataGrid applications is a means by which companies may partner with CERN to testbed their hardware and software products for Grid applications. Grid technology developed at CERN is already being used for particle physics and healthcare applications, making the laboratory an ideal site for collaborative development. British companies are already participating in this initiative and the opportunity is now available to medium-sized IT companies. In addition, a number of enterprise applications will be described. This software has been developed to manage the unique engineering and administrative ch...

  2. The NASA technology push towards future space mission systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Povinelli, Frederick P.; Rosen, Robert

    1988-01-01

    As a result of the new Space Policy, the NASA technology program has been called upon to a provide a solid base of national capabilities and talent to serve NASA's civil space program, commercial, and other space sector interests. This paper describes the new technology program structure and its characteristics, traces its origin and evolution, and projects the likely near- and far-term strategic steps. It addresses the alternative 'push-pull' approaches to technology development, the readiness levels to which the technology needs to be developed for effective technology transfer, and the focused technology programs currently being implemented to satisfy the needs of future space systems.

  3. Hydrocarbon Boost Technology for Future Spacelift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    Demonstration Program IVHM/ EHM MondaloyTM ALREST Combustion Stability Mid Term Implementation 3GRB Risk Reduction 3GRB Demo (Subscale) Far Term...the development of the next generation of rocket engine technology – Drive towards model driven development – Strong emphasis on Systems Engineering...Critical tech for high performance domestic ORSC liquid rocket engine – Program goals defined by DoD, NASA and industry partnership – Strong focus

  4. R744 ejector technology future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Armin; Banasiak, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Carbon Dioxide, CO2 (R744) was one of the first commonly applied working fluids in the infancy of refrigeration more than 100 years ago. In contrast to ammonia it mainly disappeared after the first generation of synthetic refrigerants have been introduced to the market after 1930. One reason was that the transition from low-rpm belt driven compressors towards the direct electrical motor driven compressors (50-60 Hz) was not performed for CO2 compressors before the revival introduced by Gustav Lorentzen in the 90is of last century. Since 1988 an enormous R & D effort has been made to further develop CO2 refrigeration technology in spite of the opposition from the chemical industry. Today CO2 refrigeration and heat pumping technologies are accepted as viable and sustainable alternatives for several applications like commercial refrigeration, transport refrigeration, vehicle air conditioning & heat pumping, domestic hot water heat pumps and industrial applications. For some applications, the current threshold to introduce R744 technology can be overcome when the system design takes into account the advantage of the thermo dynamical- and fluid properties of CO2. I.e. the system is designed for transcritical operation with all it pros and cons and takes into consideration how to minimize the losses, and to apply the normally lost expansion work. Shortcut-designs, i.e. drop in solutions, just replacing the H(C)FC refrigeration unit with an CO2 systems adapted for higher system pressures will not result in energy efficient products. CO2 systems do offer the advantage of enabling flooded evaporators supported with adapted ejector technology. These units offer high system performances at low temperature differences and show low temperature air mal-distributions across evaporators. This work gives an overview for the development possibilities for several applications during the next years. Resulting in a further market share increase of CO2 refrigeration and heat pump

  5. Future Technology Workshop: A Collaborative Method for the Design of New Learning Technologies and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoula, Giasemi N.; Sharples, Mike

    2007-01-01

    We describe the future technology workshop (FTW), a method whereby people with everyday knowledge or experience in a specific area of technology use (such as using digital cameras) envision and design the interactions between current and future technology and activity. Through a series of structured workshop sessions, participants collaborate to…

  6. Progress and prospects of nuclear fuel development in Japan, (2). Progress and future plan of research and development on PWR fuel in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Yoshiaki; Abeta, Sadaaki; Aisu, Hideo; Teranishi, Tomoyuki

    1982-06-01

    13 years have elapsed since the first PWR plant started the operation in Japan, and at present, 11 PWR plants are in operation. During this period, much results of use and experience have been accumulated for the PWR fuel. The improvement and development of the fuel have been performed to meet the supply of the fuel sufficiently adaptable to the severe environment in Japan. In this paper, the evaluation of soundness and the improvement of reliability of PWR fuel made so far are reported, and the response of fuel side to long cycle operation and load following-up operation, which will be required in near future, is explained. The inspection of fuel has been performed at reactor sites for the purpose of sufficiently observing the irradiation behavior of fuel and detecting the points out of order. Effort has been exerted to perform various inspections thoroughly on total number of fuel and reflect the results to the improved design. Fuel leak scarcely occurred from the beginning, accordingly, improvement has been made to reduce the bending of fuel rods. The change of PWR fuel design, the evaluation of soundness and the improvement of reliability of PWR fuel, and the improvement for the future are reported.

  7. Commentary: The Future Impact of Science and Technology on Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lewis

    1974-01-01

    Examines past achievements and discusses the future impact that applied science and medical technology will have in combating disease and illness. Suggests that long-range planning and organization on a national scale are essential. (JR)

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Key Tech Center Advanced Communications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    information society . Today, information telecommunication systems are being networked through interconnections, and it is expected that such systems will play a leading role in the future flow of advanced information. Therefore in order to predict future technological developments, it is necessary to elucidate the themes of the development of communication technologies related both to network construction and administration, and to analyze user needs sufficiently. From this perspective, the Key Technology Center initiated its ’Research in Advanced Communications

  9. Future payload isolation and pointing system technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, R. A.; Sirlin, S. W.

    Pointing requirements for spaceborne scientific instruments are getting progressively more stringent. At the same time the instruments are likely to fly in an increasingly disturbance rich environment characterized by large basebody and instrument to instrument dynamic interactions. It is not clear that current state-of-the-art pointing technology will be able to adequately address the needs of the mid 1990's. Design options to meet these needs are suggested herein including an innovative 'softmount' concept. The advantages of the softmount approach as compared to the traditional gimbal architecture are illustrated through a planar stability and disturbance response analysis.

  10. Future Trends of Software Technology and Applications: Software Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense © 2006 by Carnegie Mellon University 1 Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890 Future Trends of Software Technology ...COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Future Trends of Software Technology and Applications: Software Architecture 5a. CONTRACT...and Applications: Software Architecture Paul Clements Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Report Documentation Page Form

  11. A comparative analysis of Photovoltaic Technological Innovation Systems including international dimensions: the cases of Japan and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasseur, V.; Kamp, L.M.; Negro, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the development and diffusion of photovoltaic (PV) technology in Japan and The Netherlands. Both cases are analysed with the Technological Innovation Systems (TIS) framework, which focuses on a particular technology and includes all those factors that influence the developmen

  12. A comparative analysis of Photovoltaic Technological Innovation Systems including international dimensions: the cases of Japan and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasseur, V.; Kamp, L.M.; Negro, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the development and diffusion of photovoltaic (PV) technology in Japan and The Netherlands. Both cases are analysed with the Technological Innovation Systems (TIS) framework, which focuses on a particular technology and includes all those factors that influence the developmen

  13. Thermoelectricity for future sustainable energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenkaff, Anke

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectricity is a general term for a number of effects describing the direct interconversion of heat and electricity. Thermoelectric devices are therefore promising, environmental-friendly alternatives to conventional power generators or cooling units. Since the mid-90s, research on thermoelectric properties and their applications has steadily increased. In the course of years, the development of high-temperature resistant TE materials and devices has emerged as one of the main areas of interest focusing both on basic research and practical applications. A wide range of innovative and cost-efficient material classes has been studied and their properties improved. This has also led to advances in synthesis and metrology. The paper starts out with thermoelectric history, basic effects underlying thermoelectric conversion and selected examples of application. The main part focuses on thermoelectric materials including an outline of the design rules, a review on the most common materials and the feasibility of improved future high-temperature thermoelectric converters.

  14. Changing Knowledge, Changing Technology: Implications for Teacher Education Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Kevin; Aubusson, Peter; Brindley, Sue; Schuck, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in teacher education futures has identified two themes that require further study: the changing nature of knowledge and the changing capabilities of technologies. This article examines the intersection of these two themes and their implications for teacher education. The research employed futures methodologies based on scenario…

  15. Technological novelty profile and invention's future impact

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Daniel; Jeong, Hawoong; Youn, Hyejin

    2015-01-01

    We consider inventions as novel combinations of existing technological capabilities. Patent data allow us to explicitly identify such combinatorial processes in invention activities. Unconsidered in the previous research, not every new combination is novel to the same extent. Some combinations are naturally anticipated based on patent activities in the past or mere random choices, and some appear to deviate exceptionally from existing invention pathways. We calculate a likelihood that each pair of classification codes is put together at random, and a deviation from the empirical observation so as to assess its overall novelty (or conventionality) the patent brings forth at each year. An invention is considered as unconventional if a pair of codes therein is unlikely to be used together given the statistics in the past. Temporal evolution of the distribution indicates the patenting activities become more being established with occasional cross-over combinations. Our analyses show that patents introducing novel...

  16. Materials, Chemistry, and Simulation for Future Energy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Special Issue: The Future of Energy. The science and engineering of clean energy now is becoming a multidisciplinary area, typically when new materials, chemistry, or mechanisms are met. "Trial and error" is the past. Exploration of new concepts for future clean energy can be accomplished through computer-aided materials design and reaction simulation, thanks to innovations in information technologies. This special issue, a fruit of the Energy Future Conference organized by UNSW Australia, has compiled some excellent examples of such approaches.

  17. COMPUGIRLS: Stepping Stone to Future Computer-Based Technology Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Husman, Jenefer; Scott, Kimberly A.; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2015-01-01

    The COMPUGIRLS: Culturally relevant technology program for adolescent girls was developed to promote underrepresented girls' future possible selves and career pathways in computer-related technology fields. We hypothesized that the COMPUGIRLS would promote academic possible selves and self-regulation to achieve these possible selves. We compared…

  18. COMPUGIRLS: Stepping Stone to Future Computer-Based Technology Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Husman, Jenefer; Scott, Kimberly A.; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2015-01-01

    The COMPUGIRLS: Culturally relevant technology program for adolescent girls was developed to promote underrepresented girls' future possible selves and career pathways in computer-related technology fields. We hypothesized that the COMPUGIRLS would promote academic possible selves and self-regulation to achieve these possible selves. We compared…

  19. Wayfinding Technology: A Road Map to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the future of wayfinding technologies for individuals with visual impairments and the need for environmental literacy. It describes smart computer chips that can be embedded into the environment, robots that can assist individuals with disabilities, and GPS wheelchairs. Recommendations for advancing these technologies are…

  20. The role of research in nuclear regulation: Status and future activities in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chyiyodaku, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    The role of nuclear regulation is grouped into the three categories in the Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants, the INSAG-3 document of IAEA published in 1988. First category is to specify and develop standards and regulations for safety, and to issue licenses to operating organization. Second category is to inspect, monitor and review the safety performances of nuclear power plants and operating organizations. In the second category, corrective action may be ordered if it is found necessary after inspection, monitoring and review. The third category is to advocate safety research and disseminate safety information. Nuclear safety research is closely related to nuclear regulation. The licensing procedures of nuclear facilities requires a two step approach in Japan, that is, those who wish to construct and operate a nuclear plant must apply for a government approval for construction and operation. Safety examination is then performed first by the government, and the second examination is carried out by the Nuclear Safety Commission. In this process, research information is supplied to the Advisory Committee on Technical Matters which is under the Ministry of Trade and Industry and to the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety which is under the Science and Technology Agency. Research organizations are asked by those Committees to provide data needed for safety examination and to perform safety analyses for verification of analyses submitted to the Committees by the licensees. in addition in the licensing procedures, examination guides needed for the safety examination are based on experimental data and analyses performed by research organizations by the government request.

  1. Personalized Learning and the Future of Educational Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the cognitive science of learning have important implications for instructional practices at all levels of education. Educational technology is becoming pervasive, yet very little of it is designed around principles of learning from cognitive science. This talk discusses current trends in educational technologies, including personalized online learning systems and MOOCs, and how new advanced learning technologies will impact education in the future.

  2. Technology-based suicide prevention: current applications and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; June, Jennifer D; Kinn, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    This review reports on current and emerging technologies for suicide prevention. Technology-based programs discussed include interactive educational and social networking Web sites, e-mail outreach, and programs that use mobile devices and texting. We describe innovative applications such as virtual worlds, gaming, and text analysis that are currently being developed and applied to suicide prevention and outreach programs. We also discuss the benefits and limitations of technology-based applications and discuss future directions for their use.

  3. SMART-1 technology preparation for future planetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A. E.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.

    SMART-1 is the first ESA Small Mission for Advanced Research in Technology, with the prime objective of demonstrating the use of Solar Electric Primary Propulsion in a planetary mission. Further to this, SMART-1 will test novel spacecraft technologies and will host six instruments carrying out nine technology and science experiments, all aimed at preparing future ESA Cornerstones, including the ESA Mercury Cornerstone (now named BepiColombo) and other future planetary missions under study, as well as solar and fundamental physics missions.

  4. Job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians on remote islands in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Yoshiaki; Kumakura, Shunichi; Onoda, Keiichi; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Kiyoshi

    2015-05-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians in rural and remote islands in Japan. A cross-sectional study was conducted for physicians who reside or resided on the Oki islands: isolated islands situated in the Sea of Japan between the Eurasian continent and the mainland of Japan. A questionnaire was sent to physicians on the Oki islands to evaluate physician satisfaction regarding job environment, career development, living conditions, salary, and support by local government. Data was analysed for 49 physicians; 47 were male and 2 were female, and the mean ± SD age was 44.3 ± 10.9 years. Among the variables related to physicians' satisfaction, most of the physicians (>90%) were satisfied with "team work" and "salary". On the other hand, the majority of physicians (approximately 70%) were not satisfied with the "opportunity to continue professional development". Age ≥ 50 years, graduates of medical schools other than Jichi Medical University (established in 1972 with the aim to produce rural physicians), self-selected the Oki islands as a practice location, and satisfaction in "work as a doctor", "opportunity to consult with peers about patients", "relationship with people in the community", and "acceptance by community" were found to be significant factors influencing the choice of the Oki islands as a future practice location. Factors influencing future practice locations on the remote islands were included in a self-reported questionnaire which illustrated the importance of factors that impact both the spouses and children of physicians. Improving work satisfaction, providing outreach support programmes for career development and professional support in rural practice, and building appropriate relationships between physicians and people in the community, which can in turn improve work satisfaction, may contribute to physicians' choices of practising medicine on rural and

  5. CONTRACEPTION TECHNOLOGY: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and non-hormonal modern contraceptives have improved women’s lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol (E2) and estradiol valerate (E2V) with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Alhough clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of non-hormonal methods are still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as

  6. Health economic evaluation in Japan: a case study of one aspect of health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Adam

    2003-02-01

    There is a burgeoning literature in health economic evaluation, with this form of analysis becoming increasingly influential at the health policy making level in a number of countries. However, a search of the literature reveals that in Japan, the world's second largest health care market, very little health economic evaluation has been undertaken. The main reason for the lack of interest in economic evaluation is that the fee-for-service and strict price regulation that characterises the system of health care financing in Japan is not conducive to this form of analysis. Moreover, the government and many researchers are satisfied that the current organisation of health care has given long life and low infant mortality at low cost. Even if it is accepted that low health care costs and good health prevail in Japan, slower economic growth rates, an ageing population and the development of new medical technologies will place increasing pressure on health care resources and will necessitate a more rational use of these resources. Good economic evaluation, by weighing benefits against costs, has an important role to play.

  7. Overview of the 80(th) Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society - The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan - - The 5(th) Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jun; Satoh, Kimio; Fukuda, Koji; Sugimura, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Yasuharu; Nakano, Makoto; Tsuburaya, Ryuji; Aoki, Tatsuo; Hao, Kiyotaka; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Ito, Kenta; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-07-25

    The 80(th)Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society was held in Sendai, Japan, on March 18-20, 2016, which coincided with the 5(th)anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake that hit the Tohoku area on March 11, 2011. Thus, the main themes for this meeting were "The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan" and "The 5(th)Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake". Despite the provincial location, approximately 15,000 people attended during the 3-day meeting, and there were in-depth discussions in each of the various sessions on these themes. Especially, to our great pleasure, the Japanese Royals, Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, kindly visited the panel exhibition of the Great East Japan Earthquake and spoke words of appreciation to us. The meeting successfully completed and we sincerely appreciate the great cooperation and support from all affiliates. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1689-1694).

  8. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  9. Bodies, technologies, and aging in Japan: thinking about old people and their silver products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Susan O

    2012-06-01

    Contemporary Japan is known both for its high tech culture and its rapidly aging population, with 22 % of people currently 65 years and older. Yet there has been little attention to the material culture of the elderly. This paper explores the way aging bodies, official ideology, and consumption of what are called "assistive devices" and "life technologies" come together in the experience of frail old people who depend not only on human caregivers but on "things" such as walkers, kidney dialysis machines, and electric massage chairs. It begins to consider the questions: What technology to aid failing bodies is available, and to whom? How does the advocacy of independence create new forms of consumption? How do "things" mediate ideological change regarding elder care and help to create new understandings of self and one's relation to others? Data come from interviews conducted in 2003-2007 as part of a study of elder care in Japan under the public long term care insurance system that began in 2000. These interviews point both to acceptance of the technology as a way to avoid over-dependence on caregivers, and to resistance to the limitations of aging and to its 21st century definition by the state.

  10. Gender differences in information technology usage: a U.S.-Japan comparison

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This study examines whether there are differences in men’s and women’s use of computers and the Internet in the United States and Japan and how any such gender gaps have changed over time. The authors focus on these two countries because information technology is widely used in both, but there are substantial differences in institutions and social organizations. They use microdata from several surveys during the 1997–2001 period to examine differences and trends in computer and Internet usage...

  11. Radioactive iodine (131I) therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer in Japan: current issues with historical review and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Kudo, Takashi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2012-02-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI, (131)I) has been used as a therapeutic agent for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with over 50 years of history. Recently, it is now attracting attention in medical fields as one of the molecular targeting therapies, which is known as targeted radionuclide therapy. Radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) for DTC, however, is now at stake in Japan, because Japan is confronting several problems, including the recent occurrence of the Great East Japan Disaster (GEJD) in March 2011. RIT for DTC is strictly limited in Japan and requires hospitalization. Because of strict regulations, severe lack of medical facilities for RIT has become one of the most important medical problems, which results in prolonged waiting time for Japanese patients with DTC, including those with distant metastasis, who wish to receive RIT immediately. This situation is also due to various other factors, such as prolonged economic recession, super-aging society, and subsequent rapidly changing medical environment. In addition, due to the experience of atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japanese people have strong feeling of "radiophobia". There is fear that GEJD and related radiation contamination may worsen this feeling, which might be reflected in more severe regulation of RIT. To overcome these difficulties, it is essential to collect and disclose all information about the circumstances around this therapy in Japan. In this review, we would like to look at this therapy through several lenses, including historical, cultural, medical, and socio-economic points of view. We believe that clarifying the problems is sure to lead to the resolution of this complicated situation. We have also included several recommendations for future improvements.

  12. Impact of emerging technologies on future combat aircraft agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Gilert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    The foreseeable character of future within-visual-range air combat entails a degree of agility which calls for the integration of high-alpha aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, intimate pilot/vehicle interfaces, and advanced weapons/avionics suites, in prospective configurations. The primary technology-development programs currently contributing to these goals are presently discussed; they encompass the F-15 Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator Program, the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Program, the High Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, and the X-29 Technology Demonstrator Program.

  13. 7th FTRA International Conference on Future Information Technology (FutureTech 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Victor; Wang, Cho-Li; Shon, Taeshik; Advances in Complex Data Modeling and Computational Methods in Statistics

    2012-01-01

    This book is about Future Information Technology, Application, and Service (FutureTech 2012 volume 2). The topics of FutureTech 2012 cover the current hot topics satisfying the world-wide ever-changing needs. The FutureTech 2012 is intended to foster the dissemination of state-of-the-art research in all future IT areas, including their models, services, and novel applications associated with their utilization. The FutureTech 2012 will provide an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in this area. In addition, the conference will publish high quality papers which are closely related to the various theories, modeling, and practical applications in many types of future technology. The main scope of FutureTech 2012 is as follows. Hybrid Information Technology Cloud and Cluster Computing Ubiquitous Networks and Wireless Communications Multimedia Convergence Intelligent and Pervasive Applications Security and Trust Computing IT Management and Service Bioinfo...

  14. Healthcare Databases in Thailand and Japan: Potential Sources for Health Technology Assessment Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saokaew, Surasak; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kamae, Isao; Pratoomsoot, Chayanin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2015-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) has been continuously used for value-based healthcare decisions over the last decade. Healthcare databases represent an important source of information for HTA, which has seen a surge in use in Western countries. Although HTA agencies have been established in Asia-Pacific region, application and understanding of healthcare databases for HTA is rather limited. Thus, we reviewed existing databases to assess their potential for HTA in Thailand where HTA has been used officially and Japan where HTA is going to be officially introduced. Existing healthcare databases in Thailand and Japan were compiled and reviewed. Databases' characteristics e.g. name of database, host, scope/objective, time/sample size, design, data collection method, population/sample, and variables were described. Databases were assessed for its potential HTA use in terms of safety/efficacy/effectiveness, social/ethical, organization/professional, economic, and epidemiological domains. Request route for each database was also provided. Forty databases- 20 from Thailand and 20 from Japan-were included. These comprised of national censuses, surveys, registries, administrative data, and claimed databases. All databases were potentially used for epidemiological studies. In addition, data on mortality, morbidity, disability, adverse events, quality of life, service/technology utilization, length of stay, and economics were also found in some databases. However, access to patient-level data was limited since information about the databases was not available on public sources. Our findings have shown that existing databases provided valuable information for HTA research with limitation on accessibility. Mutual dialogue on healthcare database development and usage for HTA among Asia-Pacific region is needed.

  15. Technologies for the people: a future in the making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, D.C.

    2004-09-01

    India's post-independence policy of using science and technology for national development, and investment in research and development infrastructure resulted in success in space, atomic energy, missile development and supercomputing. Use of space technology has impacted directly or indirectly the vast majority of India's billion plus population. Developments in a number of emerging technologies in recent years hold the promise of impacting the future of ordinary Indians in significant ways, if a proper policy and enabling environment are provided. New telecom technologies - a digital rural exchange and a wireless access system - are beginning to touch the lives of common people. Development of a low-cost hand held computing device, use of hybrid telemedicine systems to extend modem healthcare to the unreached, and other innovative uses of IT at the grassroots also hold promise for the future. Biotechnology too has the potential to deliver cost-effective vaccines and drugs, but the future of GM crops is uncertain due to growing opposition. Some of these emerging technologies hold promise for future, provided a positive policy and enabling environment. (author)

  16. Technology and market future prospects of photovoltaic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past 20 years there has been a significant growth of the solar photovoltaic (PV technology and today is considered by many countries as an important technology for the future. Many countries have already established or are in the process of establishing support programs to encourage the adoption of this new technology following in this way the examples of the major players of the PV market. In this work, an investigation of the technology and market future prospects of PV systems is carried out. In particular the PV key benefits are presented and the various PV solar cell technologies are described and compared. Emphasis has been given to the current and future PV solar systems market demand including their current and future economics. Solar PV has two big challenges that need to be resolved. Production costs need to go down before it becomes economically sustainable, while production capacity must continue to grow in order for PV to become a significant player in the global energy market.

  17. Evaluation of New European Technologies for Future Avionics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupat, Jean-Luc; Chevalier, Laurent; Monchaux, David; Le Meur, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    With the support of CNES DLA as operator, and Airbus DS Space System as architect, Airbus DS Electronics in Elancourt has developed a modular platform to evaluate new technologies for future avionics.This paper presents the Avionic-X project that has initiated this development, the modular platform itself and the status on this activity performed on this evaluation platform which has allowed the use of European technologies such as ARM processing cores or TTEthernet communication bus.

  18. Japan-U.S. Joint Ventures in Higher Education: Language Education in an Uncertain Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Examines Japanese-U.S. joint venture language or U.S.-style education programs in Japan. These programs offer language and cultural education classes for those interested in English and for students who have failed in the Japanese education system. Problems facing these programs and the need to explore new, English-language education markets are…

  19. Japan-U.S. Joint Ventures in Higher Education: Language Education in an Uncertain Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Examines Japanese-U.S. joint venture language or U.S.-style education programs in Japan. These programs offer language and cultural education classes for those interested in English and for students who have failed in the Japanese education system. Problems facing these programs and the need to explore new, English-language education markets are…

  20. NanoJapan: international research experience for undergraduates program: fostering U.S.-Japan research collaborations in terahertz science and technology of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sarah R.; Matherly, Cheryl A.; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-09-01

    The international nature of science and engineering research demands that students have the skillsets necessary to collaborate internationally. However, limited options exist for science and engineering undergraduates who want to pursue research abroad. The NanoJapan International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program is an innovative response to this need. Developed to foster research and international engagement among young undergraduate students, it is funded by a National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) grant. Each summer, NanoJapan sends 12 U.S. students to Japan to conduct research internships with world leaders in terahertz (THz) spectroscopy, nanophotonics, and ultrafast optics. The students participate in cutting-edge research projects managed within the framework of the U.S-Japan NSF-PIRE collaboration. One of our focus topics is THz science and technology of nanosystems (or `TeraNano'), which investigates the physics and applications of THz dynamics of carriers and phonons in nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this article, we will introduce the program model, with specific emphasis on designing high-quality international student research experiences. We will specifically address the program curriculum that introduces students to THz research, Japanese language, and intercultural communications, in preparation for work in their labs. Ultimately, the program aims to increase the number of U.S. students who choose to pursue graduate study in this field, while cultivating a generation of globally aware engineers and scientists who are prepared for international research collaboration.

  1. Futurism in nursing: Technology, robotics and the fundamentals of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Mandy M; Barnard, Alan

    2017-09-21

    To explore the concept of futurism and the emergence of robotics in relation to the fundamentals of care, highlighting how nurses need a more anticipatory and contemporary position towards technology to maintain relevance in the future. The future of nursing in Western countries will soon be linked with the emergence of robotics for efficient and cost effective provision of fundamental care. Their emergence and roles with care of the body and more broadly assisting people with their daily living activities has enormous implications for the profession and health care. Despite this importance, how nursing understands and will respond to technological trends and developments is insufficiently reflected in the professions discourse. A discursive article METHODS: Literature from nursing fundamentals of care / fundamental care, information science, technology, humanities and philosophy informed the arguments in this paper. This paper examines the intersection of futurism and the fundamentals of care and how adopting an anticipatory and post-human perspective towards technological-care integration is necessary amidst a robot revolution in the techno-era. Nurses are currently challenged to understand, prioritize and deliver fundamental care. Health systems are challenged by a lack of care predicated by shortfalls in skilled staff and deficiencies in their mobilization. Both challenges can be compounded or alleviated by further integration of technology, but to maximize benefit requires forethought and understanding. This article can help open needed dialogue around planning for the future and is a call to action for the nursing profession to conceptualize their position on exponential technological growth and fundamental care provision. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced Microelectronics Technologies for Future Small Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalai, Leon

    1999-01-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjointed markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  3. The Development of Future Technology Teachers’ Artistic-Projective Abilities: Foreign Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurach Mykola

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The necessity to form and develop future technology teachers’ creative abilities has been stressed in the article. The psychologic-pedagogical researches of the leading specialists from Europe, the USA and Japan in the field of creative work and creativity have been analyzed. The main problems of the creative artistic-projective abilities development have been determined based on the analysis and synthesis of foreign and native philosophic, pedagogical and psychological literature dedicated to characteristics of such notions as “creative work” and “creativity”. Approaches and conceptions providing students – future technology teachers – with creative activities have been singled out. The gist of psychological mechanism for forming teachers’ creative personality has been established and its basic features have been determined as a result of the world experience of the theory and methods of creative abilities development generalization. The main features are as follows: an independence and an inclination towards divergent behavior; flexibility of thinking and readiness for everything new; motivation for self-actualization; striving for self-expressing and ability to creative work; ability to find out how to set and solve the problems. It has been mentioned that the technology teachers’ artistic-projective activity requires their creative abilities development, which, in their turn, are formed on the ground of well-developed general and special (art, projective, technological, pedagogical potencies. Therefore, the effectiveness of the students’ art-projective knowledge and skills forming depends upon the extent their general, special and creative abilities have been developed. That is why skillful and pedagogically correct organization of future technology teachers’ artistic-projective activities will inevitably provide the higher qualitatively new level of their creative abilities and creativity.

  4. Additional Technologies and Investigations for Provision of Future Aeronautical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Berger, Jason; Henriksen, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The following NASA Contractor Report documents the in-depth studies on select technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts. This work was performed during the third and final phase of NASA s Technology Assessment for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/EUROCONTROL Future Communications Study (FCS) under a multiyear NASA contract. It includes the associated findings of ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the FAA as of the end of May 2007. The activities documented in this report focus on three final technology candidates identified by the United States, and were completed before sufficient information about two additional technology candidates proposed by EUROCONTROL was made available. A separate report to be published by NASA/CR-2008-215144, entitled Final Report on Technology Investigations for Provision of Future Aeronautical Communications will include an assessment of all five final candidate technologies considered by the U.S. agencies (FAA and NASA) and EUROCONTROL. It will also provide an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations. All three phases of this work were performed in compliance with the Terms of Reference for the Action Plan number 17 (AP-17) cooperative research agreement among EUROCONTROL, FAA, and NASA along with the general guidance of the FAA and EUROCONTROL available throughout this study.

  5. Inventing Japan's 'robotics culture': the repeated assembly of science, technology, and culture in social robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanović, Selma

    2014-06-01

    Using interviews, participant observation, and published documents, this article analyzes the co-construction of robotics and culture in Japan through the technical discourse and practices of robotics researchers. Three cases from current robotics research--the seal-like robot PARO, the Humanoid Robotics Project HRP-2 humanoid, and 'kansei robotics' - show the different ways in which scientists invoke culture to provide epistemological grounding and possibilities for social acceptance of their work. These examples show how the production and consumption of social robotic technologies are associated with traditional crafts and values, how roboticists negotiate among social, technical, and cultural constraints while designing robots, and how humans and robots are constructed as cultural subjects in social robotics discourse. The conceptual focus is on the repeated assembly of cultural models of social behavior, organization, cognition, and technology through roboticists' narratives about the development of advanced robotic technologies. This article provides a picture of robotics as the dynamic construction of technology and culture and concludes with a discussion of the limits and possibilities of this vision in promoting a culturally situated understanding of technology and a multicultural view of science.

  6. Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Program Opens New Avenues for Effective Technology Integration into Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Franco; Carlucci, Lisa Marie

    2006-04-01

    Technology is increasingly playing a major role in today's education often integrated into instruction to become one of the teacher's most effective and often indispensable tools used in the classroom. It can be said that the use of technology at the beginning of this new millennium is affecting the instructional process and it is changing some of its basic connotations. The presented work analyzes the impact of various technologies on education emphasizing the advantages provided by a successful integration, the obstacles encountered along the way, and the methodologies currently used in the process. ``Educational exchange can turn nations into people, contributing as no other form of communication can to the humanizing of international relations'' (Senator J.M. Fulbright). Technology of this modern era is providing the indispensable tool to achieve this superior level of communication overcoming historical, cultural, and language barriers. In the context of the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund (JFMF) Teacher Program, we analyze the impact of technology on educational cross-cultural exchanges to raise awareness and interest of the scientific/educational community on the need of establishing stronger international relations promoting world peace and global prosperity.

  7. The future of mothering: reproductive technology and feminist theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchin, A

    1986-01-01

    An exploration of (I) alternative perspectives toward recent innovations in reproductive technology: support for new techniques for the sake of the kind of feminist future they facilitate; unqualified opposition despite therapeutic benefit to individual women; or qualified opposition depending upon specific threats to women's interests and (II) relationships between these positions and values bound up with mothering practices.

  8. Networking Technologies for Future Home Networks Using 60 GHz Radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Networking technologies have been changing the life of people in their private residential space. With the arrival of high definition (HD) multimedia services and broadband communications into the living space, future home networks are expected to support high speed device-to-device connectivity wit

  9. Alvin Toffler: Knowledge Technology and Change in Future Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Fariza Alyati Wan Zakaria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we attempt at analysing the thoughts of Alvin Toffler. Toffler is a prominent futurist and the proponent of the theory of ‘The Third Wave society’. In his theory, Toffler has explicitly discussed the role of knowledge and technology in effecting changes and thus shaping the coming of the new type of society in the future.

  10. Future Directions for Building Services Technologies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2008-01-01

      The hypothesis of this paper is that industrial transformation in the Danish construction sector needs in the future to focus on integrating building services technologies into the buildings. This can be illustrated by analysing historical developments in building services usage, exploring desi...

  11. Networking Technologies for Future Home Networks Using 60 GHz Radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Networking technologies have been changing the life of people in their private residential space. With the arrival of high definition (HD) multimedia services and broadband communications into the living space, future home networks are expected to support high speed device-to-device connectivity

  12. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

    2013-09-17

    For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

  13. The future of seawater desalination: energy, technology, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elimelech, Menachem; Phillip, William A

    2011-08-05

    In recent years, numerous large-scale seawater desalination plants have been built in water-stressed countries to augment available water resources, and construction of new desalination plants is expected to increase in the near future. Despite major advancements in desalination technologies, seawater desalination is still more energy intensive compared to conventional technologies for the treatment of fresh water. There are also concerns about the potential environmental impacts of large-scale seawater desalination plants. Here, we review the possible reductions in energy demand by state-of-the-art seawater desalination technologies, the potential role of advanced materials and innovative technologies in improving performance, and the sustainability of desalination as a technological solution to global water shortages.

  14. Planned obsolescence publishing, technology, and the future of the academy

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Academic institutions are facing a crisis in scholarly publishing at multiple levels: presses are stressed as never before, library budgets are squeezed, faculty are having difficulty publishing their work, and promotion and tenure committees are facing a range of new ways of working without a clear sense of how to understand and evaluate them. Planned Obsolescence is both a provocation to think more broadly about the academy’s future and an argument for reconceiving that future in more communally-oriented ways. Facing these issues head-on, Kathleen Fitzpatrick focuses on the technological changes—especially greater utilization of internet publication technologies, including digital archives, social networking tools, and multimedia—necessary to allow academic publishing to thrive into the future. But she goes further, insisting that the key issues that must be addressed are social and institutional in origin. Springing from original research as well as Fitzpatrick’s own hands-on experiments in ne...

  15. Technology perspectives in the future exploration of extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J.; Balint, T.; Kolawa, El.; Peterson, C.

    2007-08-01

    Solar System exploration is driven by high priority science goals and objectives at diverse destinations, as described in the NRC Decadal Survey and in NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Roadmap. Proposed missions to these targets encounter extreme environments, including high or low temperatures, high pressure, corrosion, high heat flux, radiation and thermal cycling. These conditions are often coupled, such as low temperature and high radiation at Europa; and high temperature and high pressure near the surface of Venus. Mitigation of these environmental conditions frequently reaches beyond technologies developed for terrestrial applications, for example, by the automotive and oil industries. Therefore, space agencies require dedicated technology developments to enable these future missions. Within NASA, proposed missions are divided into three categories. Competed small (Discovery class) and medium (New Frontiers class) missions are cost capped, thus limiting significant technology developments. Therefore, large (Flagship class) missions are required not only to tackle key science questions which can't be addressed by smaller missions, but also to develop mission enabling technologies that can feed forward to smaller missions as well. In a newly completed extreme environment technology assessment at NASA, we evaluated technologies from the current State of Practice (SoP) to advanced concepts for proposed missions over the next decades. Highlights of this report are discussed here, including systems architectures, such as hybrid systems; protection systems; high temperature electronics; power generation and storage; mobility technologies; sample acquisition and mechanisms; and the need to test these technologies in relevant environments. It is expected that the findings - documented in detail in NASA's Extreme Environments Technologies report - would help identifying future technology investment areas, and in turn enable or enhance planned SSE missions

  16. Future teachers' relationships with physical and technological environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Pruneau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Is future teachers’ contact with the physical environment significant enough for them to choose to educate their students about sustainability? These digital natives stand out from previous generations by their way of living, working and learning. Does the use of ICT by these young adults contribute to distancing them from the physical environment? Are future teachers, better informed thanks to technology, committed to environmental action? This research based on grounded theory was aimed at understanding future teachers’ relationships with physical and technological environments. The analysis of individual and group interviews with Moncton and Montreal teacher education students reveals that future teachers maintain a sporadic relation to the natural environment. They are still conscious that nature provides them with calmness, rejuvenation, and beauty. The Internet, visited at least two hours daily, offers them distraction, social affiliation, and personalized information, as well as facilitates their tasks and contact with the World. Future teachers are critical and cautious in their use of ICT, but are not much involved in the environmental cause. This research emphasizes the need to work on future teachers’ relationship to the physical environment with outdoor activities to get to know, appreciate, analyze, and improve the natural and urban environments.Key words: education, environment, Social networks,pedagogy.

  17. Longevity and diet in Okinawa, Japan: the past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, S; Iwama, N; Kawabata, T; Hasegawa, K

    2003-01-01

    Japan has the longest life expectancy at birth (LEB) in the world. Okinawa, Japan's poorest prefecture, previously had the highest longevity indices in the country. However, the latest LEB for men in Okinawa is no higher than the national average. The purpose of this study is to examine why the longevity indices in Okinawa were once the highest in Japan, and to examine the reasons for their recent decline. In 1990, in Okinawa, the age-adjusted death rates (ADR) of the three leading causes of death were lower than their national averages. By 2000, the standard mortality ratios (SMR, Japan=100) of heart disease and cerebrovascular disease for both sexes in Okinawa had increased, compared to their 1990 levels. Both of the ADR of ischemic heart disease and the ADR of cerebrovascular disease for men increased to 45.5 and 63.5 in 2000, up from 42.9 and 59.1 in 1990, respectively, and the SMR of ischemic heart disease for men in Okinawa reached 101 in 2000. Consequently, the national ranking of Okinawa prefecture for LEB of men has dropped. As of 1988, in Okinawa, daily intake of meat and daily intake of pulses were both approximately 90 grams, which is about 20% and 30% higher than the national average, respectively. Also, as of 1988, daily intake of green and yellow vegetables in Okinawa was about 50% higher than the national average. However, by 1998, daily meat intake and fat energy ratio had surpassed 100 grams and 30%, respectively, and daily intake of pulses and green and yellow vegetables had declined to the level of the national average. Recently, young Japanese, particularly young men in Okinawa, have shown a tendency to avoid the traditional dishes of stewed meat and champuru.

  18. Overview of Historical Earthquake Document Database in Japan and Future Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, A.; Satake, K.

    2014-12-01

    In Japan, damage and disasters from historical large earthquakes have been documented and preserved. Compilation of historical earthquake documents started in the early 20th century and 33 volumes of historical document source books (about 27,000 pages) have been published. However, these source books are not effectively utilized for researchers due to a contamination of low-reliability historical records and a difficulty for keyword searching by characters and dates. To overcome these problems and to promote historical earthquake studies in Japan, construction of text database started in the 21 century. As for historical earthquakes from the beginning of the 7th century to the early 17th century, "Online Database of Historical Documents in Japanese Earthquakes and Eruptions in the Ancient and Medieval Ages" (Ishibashi, 2009) has been already constructed. They investigated the source books or original texts of historical literature, emended the descriptions, and assigned the reliability of each historical document on the basis of written age. Another database compiled the historical documents for seven damaging earthquakes occurred along the Sea of Japan coast in Honshu, central Japan in the Edo period (from the beginning of the 17th century to the middle of the 19th century) and constructed text database and seismic intensity data base. These are now publicized on the web (written only in Japanese). However, only about 9 % of the earthquake source books have been digitized so far. Therefore, we plan to digitize all of the remaining historical documents by the research-program which started in 2014. The specification of the data base will be similar for previous ones. We also plan to combine this database with liquefaction traces database, which will be constructed by other research program, by adding the location information described in historical documents. Constructed database would be utilized to estimate the distributions of seismic intensities and tsunami

  19. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Selections from Future Industrial Technology Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    has also expanded in the medical field in addition to industrial utilization. It presently occupies an important position as a hemodialysis membrane...artificial lung. The artificial kidney is the hemodialysis and Ultrafiltration (uF) removal of metabolites such as urea, creatine, uric acid, and...on Alternative Illumination With UV ( ) and VIS Light (---) 3. Photochromism in the Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Phase Field The lack of definition

  20. US-Japan workshops in medical mycology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D M

    2001-01-01

    The Extramural Mycology Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has organized and implemented a five workshop series in medical mycology during a critical period in the evolution of contemporary medical mycology (1992 to 2000; http://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/dmid.htm). The goals of the workshop series were to: initiate interactions; build collaborations; identify research needs; turn needs into opportunities; stimulate molecular research in medical mycology; and summarize recommendations emerging from the workshop proceedings. A recurring recommendation in the series was to foster communications within and beyond the field of medical mycology. US-Japan interactions were noted as one specific example of potential information exchange for mutual benefit. The first formal action directed at this recommendation was the workshop Emergence and Recognition of Fungal Diseases convened under the auspices of the US-Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program (USJCMSP; http://www.niaid. nih.gov/dmid/us%5Fjapan/default.htm) in Bethesda, Maryland USA on 30 June 1999 (D.M. Dixon & T. Matsumoto, co-chairs). A major goal of the workshop was to present contemporary medical mycology to the Joint Committee of the USJCMSP through representative research presentations in order to make the Committee aware of current status in the field, and the potential for scientific interactions. The second formal action is the workshop, under the auspices of the Japanese Society for Medical Mycology Medical Perspectives of Fungal Genome Studies scheduled for 28 November 2000 in Tokyo, Japan (T. Matsumoto & D.M. Dixon, co-chairs). The NIAID Mycology Workshop series recommended interactions between the following groups: academic and pharmaceutical; medical and molecular (model systems); medical and plant pathogens; basic and clinical; mycologists and immunologists. The first two US-Japan workshops can be viewed as consistent

  1. Technology Investment Agendas to Expand Human Space Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops four alternative core-technology advancement specifications, one for each of the four strategic goal options for government investment in human space flight. Already discussed in the literature, these are: Explore Mars; Settle the Moon; accelerate commercial development of Space Passenger Travel; and enable industrial scale-up of Space Solar Power for Earth. In the case of the Explore Mars goal, the paper starts with the contemporary NASA accounting of ?55 Mars-enabling technologies. The analysis decomposes that technology agenda into technologies applicable only to the Explore Mars goal, versus those applicable more broadly to the other three options. Salient technology needs of all four options are then elaborated to a comparable level of detail. The comparison differentiates how technologies or major developments that may seem the same at the level of budget lines or headlines (e.g., heavy-lift Earth launch) would in fact diverge widely if developed in the service of one or another of the HSF goals. The paper concludes that the explicit choice of human space flight goal matters greatly; an expensive portfolio of challenging technologies would not only enable a particular option, it would foreclose the others. Technologies essential to enable human exploration of Mars cannot prepare interchangeably for alternative futures; they would not allow us to choose later to Settle the Moon, unleash robust growth of Space Passenger Travel industries, or help the transition to a post-petroleum future with Space Solar Power for Earth. The paper concludes that a decades-long decision in the U.S.--whether made consciously or by default--to focus technology investment toward achieving human exploration of Mars someday would effectively preclude the alternative goals in our lifetime.

  2. Coal technologies of Japan in 1988 and 1989. 1988, 1989 nen no sekitan gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-25

    The 8th coal policy of Japan which has been in effect since 1987 has passed its half way and during the above period, coal mines such as Mitsubishi Takashima, Mitsui Sunagawa, Hokutan Horonai and Mitsubishi Minami-Ohyubari, etc. were closed and further concentration and rationalization of the production systems has been continued. Total coal production in FY 1988 as well as FY 1989 was 11.1 million tons and 9.7 million tons respectively, and concerning the development surveys of coal resources, maritime geophysical explorations and test drillings were done in Ariake Sea and off Kushiro, etc. and land geophysical explorations and test drillings at Asajino, etc.. International interchange concerning coal technologies was also very active and the amount of imported coal of various kinds exceeded that of the preceding fiscal year in both fiscal years, irrespective of the unconsumed year-end surplus coal storage in the domestic coal production. As shown above, domestic coal is inferior to overseas coal pricewise, hence domestic coal mines are pushing concentration of faces and introduction of larger coal mining machines. With regard to coal mine safety, the research and development of technologies of prediction and safety against gas issue, spontaneous combustion and mine fire, etc. is under way and coal processing technologies as well as coal utilization technologies such as fluidized bed incineration, etc. are now being developed. 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Future Estimation of Convenience Living Facilities Withdrawal due to Population Decline all Over Japan from 2010 TO 2040 - Focus on Supermarkets, Convenience Stores and Drugstores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yuka; Akiyama, Yuki; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Population explosion is considered to be one of the most crucial problems in the world. However, in Japan, the opposite problem: population decline has become serious now. Japanese population is estimated to decrease by twenty millions in 2040. This negative situation will cause to increase areas where many residents cannot make a daily living all over Japan because many convenience living facilities such as supermarkets, convenience stores and drugstores will be difficult to maintain their market area population due to future population decline. In our research, we used point data of convenience living facilities developed by address geocoding of digital telephone directory and point data of future population projection developed by distribution of Japanese official population projection data proportionally among the building volume of digital residential map, which can monitor building volumes all over Japan. In conclusion, we estimated that various convenience living facilities in Japan will shrink and close by population decline in near future. In particular, it is cleared that approximately 14.7% of supermarkets will be possible to withdraw all over Japan by 2040. In addition, it is cleared that over 40% of supermarkets in some countryside prefectures will be possible to withdraw by 2040. Thus, we estimated future distributions of convenience living facilities that cannot maintain their market area population due to future population decline. Moreover, we estimated the number of people that they will become inconvenience in buying fresh foods.

  4. Impressions of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su; Fangyuan

    2013-01-01

    <正>The eight-day visit to Japan seemed to be a beautiful dream that ended before I woke up. However, in the dream I saw the future of China-Japan friendship. On March 4, flying to Japan, I thought all the way: "What kind of a country is Japan? Is it really as orderly and

  5. Advanced Aerodynamic Technologies for Future Green Regional Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin NAE

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Future Green Regional Aircraft (GRA will operate over airports located in the neighborhood of densely populated areas, with high frequency of takeoff/ landing events and, hence, strongly contribute to community noise and gaseous emissions. These issues currently limit further growth of traffic operated by regional airliners which, in the next future, will have to face even more stringent environmental normative worldwide and therefore re-designed to incorporate advanced active aerodynamic technologies. The new concept behind GRA is based on several mainstream technologies: airframe low-noise (LN, aerodynamic load control (LC and load alleviation (LA. These technologies integrate relevant concepts for hybrid and natural laminar flow (HLC/NLF wing, active control of wing movables and aeroelastic tailoring for LC/LA functions, passive means (micro-riblets for turbulent flow drag reduction, innovative gapless architectures (droop nose, morphing flap beside conventional high-lift devices (HLDs, active flow control through synthetic jets, low-noise solutions applied to HLDs (liners, fences, and to fuselage-mounted main and nose landing gears (bay/doors acoustic treatments, fairings, wheels hub cap. The paper deals with the technological readiness level (TRL assessment of the most promising technologies and overall integration in the new generation of GRA, as a highly optimized configuration able to meet requirements for FlighPath 2050.

  6. Multichannel demultiplexer/demodulator technologies for future satellite communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Budinger, James M.; Staples, Edward J.; Abramovitz, Irwin; Courtois, Hector A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Lewis' Space Electronics Div. supports ongoing research in advanced satellite communication architectures, onboard processing, and technology development. Recent studies indicate that meshed VSAT (very small aperture terminal) satellite communication networks using FDMA (frequency division multiple access) uplinks and TDMA (time division multiplexed) downlinks are required to meet future communication needs. One of the critical advancements in such a satellite communication network is the multichannel demultiplexer/demodulator (MCDD). The progress is described which was made in MCDD development using either acousto-optical, optical, or digital technologies.

  7. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O' Brien, J.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  8. Present and future of non-woven fabric technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Issei (Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo, (Japan))

    1989-07-01

    Non-woven fabrics which had been in the background as an auxiliary material is now on the surface as such disposable household merchandise as paper diapers, disposable pocket warmes and wet tissue, etc. rapidly get popular. The non-wovens show a large variety of performances according to the difference of the raw materials and the method of manufacture. What is important in the future is the technology of 'order-made' non-wovens, i.e., the complex texturing and the post-fabrication technology. This report describes on the following items: Definition and concept of non-woven fabrics. Market and applications. Production method (Wet process and dry process, bonding and entangling). Type and features (staple type, needle punched type, stitch bonded type, spun bond type, and wet type). Future trends. Reciprocal process. Melt-blown non-woven fabric. Spun-lace non-woven fabric. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Knowledge and Innovation: A Comparative Study of the USA, the UK and Japan. Routledge Studies in Innovation, Organizations and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This new book presents case studies from the US, the UK and Japan. Packed full of vignettes from cases studies and subscribing to a socio-cultural approach rather than the often tacit assumption that knowledge and "technology transfer" is a logistical problem, this excellent volume illuminates the often misunderstood process of knowledge transfer.…

  10. Current Status and Future Outlook of Nuclear Power Generation in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuro; Yoshii, Ryosuke

    2007-07-01

    For Japan, a country poor in natural resources, in light of the tough energy situation in recent times, a National Energy Strategy with energy security at its core was established in May 2006. The key point of the Strategy is nuclear power generation, and the aim is to ensure that nuclear power generation continues to account for 30 to 40 percent or more of total electricity generated even after 2030. The first step to achieving this goal is to make maximum use of existing plants (55 plants, 49580MWe), and the aim is to achieve a 60-year service life by making improvements to plant operation and maintenance, such as extending current monitoring and maintenance of plant condition, and the implementation of plant aging management. In Japan, plant construction has been continuous since the 1970s. The current new plant construction plan (13 plants, 17230MWe) is to be achieved with a concerted, cohesive national effort. In addition, in order to complete the nuclear fuel cycle, a reprocessing plant is being constructed strictly for peaceful use, and construction of a site for disposing of high-level radioactive waste is also proceeding. Development of the next generation light water reactors and fast breeder reactor cycle is also underway. (auth)

  11. The economic impact of future biological nitrogen fixation technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Tauer, Loren W.

    1988-01-01

    The economic impact of some future biological nitrogen fixation technologies are estimated using AGSIM, a dynamic, partial equilibrium, econometric model of the U.S. agricultural sector. Five separate scenarios were modeled: (1) legumes fix more nitrogen, (2) legumes fix more nitrogen with an increase in legumes yields of 10 percent, (3) nitrogen fertilization requirements on all crops are reduced 50 percent with no yield changes, (4) total elimination of nitrogen fertilization and (5) total ...

  12. The technological future of 7 T MRI hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, A G; Van de Moortele, P F

    2016-09-01

    In this article we present our projections of future hardware developments on 7 T human MRI systems. These include compact cryogen-light magnets, improved gradient performance, integrated RF-receive and direct current shimming coil arrays, new RF technology with adaptive impedance matching, patient-specific specific absorption rate estimation and monitoring, and increased integration of physiological monitoring systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Addressing Future Technology Challenges Through Innovation and Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    thank my loving wife and children for their undying support during my fellowship and career to this point.   1   Chapter 1   Addressing...Future Technology Challenges: Innovate or Die!   I thoroughly disapprove of duels . If a man should challenge me, I would take him kindly and...forgivingly by the hand and lead him to a quiet place and kill him. - Mark Twain Duels are foolish. Mark Twain’s approach to conflict resolution is

  14. Wireless Technology Use Case Requirement Analysis for Future Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Ali; Wilkerson, DeLisa

    2016-01-01

    This report presents various use case scenarios for wireless technology -including radio frequency (RF), optical, and acoustic- and studies requirements and boundary conditions in each scenario. The results of this study can be used to prioritize technology evaluation and development and in the long run help in development of a roadmap for future use of wireless technology. The presented scenarios cover the following application areas: (i) Space Vehicles (manned/unmanned), (ii) Satellites and Payloads, (iii) Surface Explorations, (iv) Ground Systems, and (v) Habitats. The requirement analysis covers two parallel set of conditions. The first set includes the environmental conditions such as temperature, radiation, noise/interference, wireless channel characteristics and accessibility. The second set of requirements are dictated by the application and may include parameters such as latency, throughput (effective data rate), error tolerance, and reliability. This report provides a comprehensive overview of all requirements from both perspectives and details their effects on wireless system reliability and network design. Application area examples are based on 2015 NASA Technology roadmap with specific focus on technology areas: TA 2.4, 3.3, 5.2, 5.5, 6.4, 7.4, and 10.4 sections that might benefit from wireless technology.

  15. Information technology in health care--what the future holds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgiba, A M

    2004-01-01

    In 1998, Malaysia opened its first hospital based on the "paperless and filmless" concept. Two are now in operation, with more to follow. Telemedicine is now being used in some hospitals and is slated to be the technology to watch. Future use of technology in health care will centre on the use of centralised patient databases and more effective use of artificial intelligence. Stumbling blocks include the enormous capital costs involved and difficulty in getting sufficient bandwidth to support applications on a national scale. Problems with the use of information technology in developing countries still remain; mainly inadequate skilled resources to operate and maintain the technology, lack of home-grown technology, insufficient experience in the use of information technology in health care and the attitudes of some health staff. The challenge for those involved in this field will not be in building new "paperless and filmless" institutions but in transforming current "paper and film-based" institutions to "paperless and filmless" ones and changing the mindset of health staff. Universities and medical schools must be prepared to respond to this new wave by incorporating elements of medical/health informatics in their curriculum and assisting governments in the planning and implementation of these projects. The experience of the UMMC is highlighted as an example of the difficulty of transforming a paper-based hospital to a "paperless and filmless" hospital.

  16. Possible future environmental issues for fossil fuel technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaway, L.D.

    1979-07-01

    The work reported here was carried out for the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy to identify and assess 15 to 20 major environmental issues likely to affect the implementation of fossil energy technologies between 1985 and 2000. The energy technologies specifically addressed are: oil recovery and processing; gas recovery and processing; coal liquefaction; coal gasification (surface); in situ coal gasification; direct coal combustion; advanced power systems; magnetohydrodynamics; surface oil shale retorting; and true and modified in situ oil shale retorting. Environmental analysis of these technologies included, in addition to the main processing steps, the complete fuel cycle from resource extraction to end use. The 16 environmental issues identified as those most likely for future regulatory actions and the main features of, and the possible regulatory actions associated with, each are as follows: disposal of solid waste from coal conversion and combustion technologies; water consumption by coal and oil shale conversion technologies; siting of coal conversion facilities; the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect; emission of polycyclic organic matter (POM); impacts of outer continental shelf (OCS) oil development; emission of trace elements; groundwater contamination; liquefied natural gas (LNG), safety and environmental factors; underground coal mining - health and safety; fugitive emissions from coal gasification and liquefaction - health and safety; boomtown effects; emission of fine particulates from coal, oil and oil shale technologies; emission of radioactivity from the mining and conversion of coal; emission of nitrogn oxides; and land disturbance from surface mining. (LTN)

  17. Cloud Computing : Goals, Issues, SOA, Integrated Technologies and Future -scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Madhu Viswanatham

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of networking infrastructure has provided a novel way to store and access resources in a reliable, convenient and affordable means of technology called the Cloud. The cloud has become so popular and established its dominance in many recent world innovations and has highly influenced the trend of the Business process Management with the advantage of shared resources. The ability to remain disaster tolerant, on-demand scalability, flexible deployment and cost effectiveness has made the future world technologies like Internet of Things, to determine the cloud as their data and processing center. However, along with the implementation of cloud based technologies, we must also address the issues involved in its realization. This paper is a review on the advancements, scopes and issues involved in realizing a secured cloud powered environments.

  18. Environmental Consequences of Future Biogas Technologies based on Separated Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    the volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises......This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involving...... different slurry separation technologies have been assessed and compared to a business-as-usual reference slurry management scenario. The results show that the environmental benefits of such biogas production are highly dependent upon the efficiency of the separation technology used to concentrate...

  19. The Future of Superconducting Technology for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: - Colliders constructed and operated - Future High Energy Colliders under Study - Superconducting Phases and Applications - Possible Choices among SC Materials Superconducting Magnets and the Future - Advances in SC Magnets for Accelerators - Nb3Sn for realizing Higher Field - NbTi to Nb3Sn for realizing High Field (> 10 T) - HL-LHC as a critical milestone for the Future of Acc. Magnet Technology - Nb3Sn Superconducting Magnets (> 11 T)and MgB2 SC Links for HL-LHC - HL-LHC, 11T Dipole Magnet - Nb3Sn Quadrupole (MQXF) at IR - Future Circular Collider Study - Conductor development (1998-2008) - Nb3Sn conductor program - 16 T Dipole Options and R&D sharing - Design Study and Develoment for SppC in China - High-Field Superconductor and Magnets - HTS Block Coil R&D for 20 T - Canted Cosine Theta (CCT) Coil suitable with Brittle HTS Conductor - A topic at KEK: S-KEKB IRQs just integrated w/ BELLE-II ! Superconducting RF and the Future - Superconducting Phases and Applications - Poss...

  20. Congenital hypothyroidism after assisted reproductive technology in Japan: comparison between multiples and singletons, 2005–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooki Syuichi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between congenital hypothyroidism (CH and multiple pregnancy has not been fully studied in Japan. Methods Complete nationwide data of assisted reproductive technology (ART in Japan from 2005 to 2009 presented by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, which include information on CH and birth defects were used for analyses. Diseases were reclassified according to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth edition (ICD-10, 2003 version. The relative risk (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI of the incidence rate for CH was calculated with singletons as the reference group. Additional birth defects with CH were examined. The probandwise concordance rate of multiples and recurrence risk ratio were calculated. Results There were 18 patients with CH, consisting of 12 singletons and 6 multiples. The incidence rates of CH per 1,000 live births in singletons and multiples are 0.14 (=12/87,145 and 0.31 (=6/19,533, respectively. The incidence rate was more than twofold higher in multiple births than in singleton births, but the difference was not statistically significant (RR=2.2, 95% CI 0.8–5.9. Additional birth defects were present in three patients with CH (17%=3/18. The multiples were affected by other birth defects more frequently (33%=2/6 than the singletons (8%=1/12. The six multiple-births patients were derived from one concordant twin pair, which consisted of two twin patients; three discordant twin pairs, which consisted of three twin patients; and one discordant triplets set, which consisted of one triplet patient. Thus, the probandwise concordance rate was 33.3% (=2/(2+4. The estimated recurrence risk ratio was 1976 (for the total ART population or 609 (for the Japanese general population. Conclusions CH was more frequent in multiples compared to singletons. A higher percentage of additional birth defects was also observed in multiples compared to singletons. The familial aggregation of CH

  1. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan: Symposium on Applications of Advanced Technology: Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-02

    R + E/ FADH 2 (1) uses the purple membrane. Needless to say, the construc- E/FADH2 + 02 , E/FAD + H 2 0 2 (2) tion of "molecular composite systems...technologies. In that sense, some of oxidized version, while E/FAD and E/ FADH 2 represent, our attempts are still in their infancy and the distance...1992 CH-oH RCONH HA 0 H S-CH2CHCOOH lo. ""-• (--NADP----’ I • S-CH2 CHCOOH H OH Glucose Flovin adenine a-:-glucose dehydrogenose dinucleolide FADH 2

  2. Networking Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    Human Resource Development was the first and remains an important pillar in Japanese foreign aid. I will argue that Japan has access to a global network of alumni who will co-define Japanese foreign aid in the future, because Japan has encouraged alumni societies and networking since 1965. A total...... of more than a million people in more than 100 countries have attended courses in Japan funded fully or partly by Japanese ODA since the inception of the technical assistance programs in 1954 through the Colombo Plan and since 1959 through the Association of Overseas Technical Scholarships (AOTS from 2009...... HIDA). Many of these alumni have and will in the future exchange ideas and keep contact not only to Japan, but also to fellow alumni around the globe and, thereby, practice south-south exchanges, which are made possible and traceable by their established alumni network and the World Network of Friends...

  3. Characteristics of “Abstracts of Science and Technology in Japan, Agro-Industries” and Related Agricultural Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Shukuko; Sasaki, Toshio

    Japan Agricultural Library Council has cooperated with JICST in making abstracts of “Abstracts of Science and Technology in Japan, Agro-Industries” published by JICST over these five years. Taking this opportunity of starting computerized edition of the Title and changing the coverage the author and others reviewed the abstracting work so far. The outline of the Title is first described. Then the number of journals and citations covered in it by subject are compared with those of Japan Agriculture Literature Article Index of which main users are agricultural scientists and researchers and which is used as reference tool of selecting papers to be included in English titles. The characteristics and points to be improved are explained. Characteristics of agriculture literature, which are seen through making English abstracts are also described.

  4. Empirical Laws and Foreseeing the Future of Technological Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Lopes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Moore’s law (ML is one of many empirical expressions that is used to characterize natural and artificial phenomena. The ML addresses technological progress and is expected to predict future trends. Yet, the “art” of predicting is often confused with the accurate fitting of trendlines to past events. Presently, data-series of multiple sources are available for scientific and computational processing. The data can be described by means of mathematical expressions that, in some cases, follow simple expressions and empirical laws. However, the extrapolation toward the future is considered with skepticism by the scientific community, particularly in the case of phenomena involving complex behavior. This paper addresses these issues in the light of entropy and pseudo-state space. The statistical and dynamical techniques lead to a more assertive perspective on the adoption of a given candidate law.

  5. Energy Sources Management and Future Automotive Technologies: Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Mariasiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the environmental impact created through the introduction of introducing new technologies in transportation domain. New electric vehicles are considered zero-emission vehicles (ZEV. However, electricity produced in power plants is still predominantly based on fossil fuel usage (required for recharge electric vehicle batteries and thus directly affects the quantity of pollutant emissions and greenhouse gases (CO2, NOx and SOx. Given the structure of EU-wide energy sources used for electricity generation, the potential pollutant emissions stemming from these energy sources, related to energy consumption of an electric vehicle, was determined under the projected environmental impact of specific market penetration of electric vehicles. In addition to the overall impact at the EU level, were identified the countries for which the use of electric vehicles is (or not feasible in terms of reaching the lower values ​​of future emissions compared to the present and future European standards.

  6. NASA technology program for future civil air transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. T.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of the development status of technology, applicable to future civil air transport design, which is currently undergoing conceptual study or testing at NASA facilities. The NASA civil air transport effort emphasizes advanced aerodynamic computational capabilities, fuel-efficient engines, advanced turboprops, composite primary structure materials, advanced aerodynamic concepts in boundary layer laminarization and aircraft configuration, refined control, guidance and flight management systems, and the integration of all these design elements into optimal systems. Attention is given to such novel transport aircraft design concepts as forward swept wings, twin fuselages, sandwich composite structures, and swept blade propfans.

  7. Trends in AFIS technology: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Guy; Bavarian, Behnam

    1997-01-01

    Automated Fingerprint Identification has a history of more than 20 years. In the last 5 years, there has been an explosion of technologies that have dramatically changed the face of AFIS. Few other engineering and science fields offer such a widespread use of technology as does computerized fingerprint recognition. Optics, computer vision, computer graphics, artificial intelligence, artificial neural networks, parallel processing, distributed client server applications, fault tolerant computing, scaleable architectures, local and wide area networking, mass storage, databases, are a few of the fields that have made quantum leaps in recent years. All of these improvements have a dramatic effect on the size, speed, and accuracy of automated fingerprint identification systems. ThIs paper offers a historical overview of these trends and discuss the state of the art. It culminates with an overview an educated forecast on future systems, especially those 'real time' systems for use in area of law enforcement and civil/commercial applications.

  8. Clean Coal Technologies in China: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyan Chang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coal is the dominant primary energy source in China and the major source of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. To facilitate the use of coal in an environmentally satisfactory and economically viable way, clean coal technologies (CCTs are necessary. This paper presents a review of recent research and development of four kinds of CCTs: coal power generation; coal conversion; pollution control; and carbon capture, utilization, and storage. It also outlines future perspectives on directions for technology research and development (R&D. This review shows that China has made remarkable progress in the R&D of CCTs, and that a number of CCTs have now entered into the commercialization stage.

  9. Superconducting RF Technology R&D for Future Accelerator Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reece, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting rf technology (SRF) is evolving rapidly as are its applications. While there is active exploitation of what one may term the current state-of-the-practice, there is also rapid progress expanding in several dimensions the accessible and useful parameter space. While state-of-the-art performance sometimes outpaces thorough understanding, the improving scientific understanding from active SRF research is clarifying routes to obtain optimum performance from present materials and opening avenues beyond the standard bulk niobium. The improving technical basis understanding is enabling process engineering to both improve performance confidence and reliability and also unit implementation costs. Increasing confidence in the technology enables the engineering of new creative application designs. We attempt to survey this landscape to highlight the potential for future accelerator applications.

  10. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  11. Technological Innovations in Agricultural Tractors: Adopters’ behaviour towards new technological trajectories and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Ester Ferrari; Luigi Bollani; Mario Coccia; Eugenio Cavallo

    2013-01-01

    Latest advancements in tractors engineering have allowed farmers to increase productivity, and simultaneously to reduce operator’s hazards. However, little attention has been given to farmers’ behaviour and attitude toward the adoption of technological innovations concerning agricultural tractors. The study explores farmers’ behaviours on agricultural tractors current and future technological trajectories. A main case study concerning Italy is analyzed. Results show three different behaviours...

  12. Patent and intellectual property rights related to pharmaceuticals: global future perspectives: Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatani, Takeshi S

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese patent system is reviewed and summarized from pharmaceutical industrial point of view. Current systems and practice are introduced and current problems in pharma patent are discussed, and perspective for future patent system in the field of pharmaceutical industry is discussed and proposed.

  13. Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

  14. VRdose: an exposure dose evaluation system based on virtual reality technology - current status and future possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Louka, Michael; Johnsen, Terje

    2004-07-01

    The Fugen Nuclear Power Station (NPS) was shut down permanently in March 2003, and preparatory activities are underway to decommission the Fugen NPS. It is necessary to accomplish the decommissioning economically and rationally by optimizing the workload, exposure dose and waste mass. This is important at the planning stage of the decommissioning. Virtual reality (VR) technology may prove beneficial to this process with regard to minimizing the workers' radiation exposure as well as contributing towards achieving efficient use of manpower. It could also be a valuable tool in the actual dismantling phase. In addition to this, VR provides an effective medium in presentations for public acceptance as well as for communication with relevant engineers. The VRdose project conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Halden Virtual Reality Centre is doing research and development of VR technology for use in the decommissioning process at the Fugen NPS. This is technically an extensive project, touching on many of the present challenges in the VR area such as visual simulation and animation, interaction with objects in a virtual environment and scenario generation and optimisation. This paper describes the present status and future of the system. (Author)

  15. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Socio-Technological Influences on Future Water Demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Zadeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional water supply management approach focuses on (perceived community requirements that must be met, but not on community demands, which are variable. Therefore a paradigm-shift is required to the way water is considered. In this paper two fundamental management measures to influence daily water demand and therefore conservation are considered: (1 Technological efficiency measures (i.e., via adopting water-saving devices; and (2 User behaviour (i.e., how users interact with and use the technologies. Through a newly developed futures framework, the individual and combined impact of these approaches within residential and office buildings are examined. Results show each in isolation has similar impacts (i.e., 55% reduction on domestic water consumption per capita, although the ranges over which user behaviour can operate appears to be far more diverse. Most strikingly, when these measures are considered in combination, greater impact (i.e., 80% reduction could be achieved. Conclusions are drawn as to how far water demand management, through a dual track approach, can go in terms of reducing indoor water consumption of both residential and office users within the UK. The paper provides philosophical arguments for what else is needed in order to secure sufficient, sustainable water supplies within a “liveable” future.

  17. Past and future cadmium emissions from municipal solid-waste incinerators in Japan for the assessment of cadmium control policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kyoko

    2013-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a harmful pollutant emitted from municipal solid-waste incinerators (MSWIs). Cd stack emissions from MSWIs have been estimated between 1970 and 2030 in Japan. The aims of this study are to quantify emitted Cd by category and to analyze Cd control policies to reduce emissions. Emissions were estimated using a dynamic substance flow analysis (SFA) that took into account representative waste treatment flows and historical changes in emission factors. This work revealed that the emissions peaked in 1973 (11.1t) and were ten times those in 2010 (1.2 t). Emission from MSWIs was two-thirds of that from non-ferrous smelting in 2010. The main Cd emission source was pigment use in the 1970s, but after 2000 it had shifted to nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries. Future emissions were estimated for 2030. Compared to the business-as-usual scenario, an intensive collection of used Ni-Cd batteries and a ban on any future use of Ni-Cd batteries will reduce emissions by 0.09 and 0.3 1t, respectively, in 2030. This approach enables us to identify the major Cd emission source from MSWIs, and to prioritize the possible Cd control policies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NASA Fixed Wing Project: Green Technologies for Future Aircraft Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosario, Ruben; Koudelka, John M.; Wahls, Rich; Madavan, Nateri

    2014-01-01

    Commercial aviation relies almost entirely on subsonic fixed wing aircraft to constantly move people and goods from one place to another across the globe. While air travel is an effective means of transportation providing an unmatched combination of speed and range, future subsonic aircraft must improve substantially to meet efficiency and environmental targets.The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. Multidisciplinary advances are required in aerodynamic efficiency to reduce drag, structural efficiency to reduce aircraft empty weight, and propulsive and thermal efficiency to reduce thrust-specific energy consumption (TSEC) for overall system benefit. Additionally, advances are required to reduce perceived noise without adversely affecting drag, weight, or TSEC, and to reduce harmful emissions without adversely affecting energy efficiency or noise.The paper will highlight the Fixed Wing project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe

  19. Critical Technologies for the Development of Future Space Elevator Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A space elevator is a tether structure extending through geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) to the surface of the earth. Its center of mass is in GEO such that it orbits the earth in sync with the earth s rotation. In 2004 and 2005, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. worked under a cooperative agreement to research the feasibility of space elevator systems, and to advance the critical technologies required for the future development of space elevators for earth to orbit transportation. The discovery of carbon nanotubes in the early 1990's was the first indication that it might be possible to develop materials strong enough to make space elevator construction feasible. This report presents an overview of some of the latest NASA sponsored research on space elevator design, and the systems and materials that will be required to make space elevator construction possible. In conclusion, the most critical technology for earth-based space elevators is the successful development of ultra high strength carbon nanotube reinforced composites for ribbon construction in the 1OOGPa range. In addition, many intermediate technology goals and demonstration missions for the space elevator can provide significant advancements to other spaceflight and terrestrial applications.

  20. Conventional engine technology. Volume 3: Comparisons and future potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    The status of five conventional automobile engine technologies was assessed and the future potential for increasing fuel economy and reducing exhaust emission was discussed, using the 1980 EPA California emisions standards as a comparative basis. By 1986, the fuel economy of a uniform charge Otto engine with a three-way catalyst is expected to increase 10%, while vehicles with lean burn (fast burn) engines should show a 20% fuel economy increase. Although vehicles with stratified-charge engines and rotary engines are expected to improve, their fuel economy will remain inferior to the other engine types. When adequate NO emissions control methods are implemented to meet the EPA requirements, vehicles with prechamber diesel engines are expected to yield a fuel economy advantage of about 15%. While successful introduction of direct injection diesel engine technology will provide a fuel savings of 30 to 35%, the planned regulation of exhaust particulates could seriously hinder this technology, because it is expected that only the smallest diesel engine vehicles could meet the proposed particulate requirements.

  1. The Empirical Studies on IT Management Effectiveness in Japan:2000, 2002 and the Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KADONO Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    Many corporate senior managers have not been fully convinced of successful IT management over a period of decades. In order to clarify the mechanism of IT management in companies,we conducted the surveys on IT management in 2000 and 2002. Through the surveys and analyses, we found the causal structure in IT management, developed "IT Management Effectiveness" as a new measurement tool, published ranking lists of high scored companies, and analyzed characteristics of industry/sizes of respondents and so on. Based on the surveys and researches so far, we would suggest future works, such as comparison of Japanese companies with overseas companies, time series analyses.

  2. In-house R&D versus external technology acquisitions : small technology-based firms in the U.S. and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kurokawa, Susumu

    1992-01-01

    This research is an investigation of the relationship between in-house R&D and external technology acquisitions--e.g.,licensing,R&D contracts,collaborative R&D projects,joint ventures or mergers--based on the data derived from small technology-based firms in the U.S. and Japan. There are three major parts to this research.In Part 1. we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of in-house R&D versus external technology acquisitions,and examine key factors which affect "make-or-buy. decisions i...

  3. Graduate Ethics Curricula for Future Geospatial Technology Professionals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. J.; Dibiase, D.; Harvey, F.; Solem, M.

    2009-12-01

    Professionalism in today's rapidly-growing, multidisciplinary geographic information science field (e.g., geographic information systems or GIS, remote sensing, cartography, quantitative spatial analysis), now involves a commitment to ethical practice as informed by a more sophisticated understanding of the ethical implications of geographic technologies. The lack of privacy introduced by mobile mapping devices, the use of GIS for military and surveillance purposes, the appropriate use of data collected using these technologies for policy decisions (especially for conservation and sustainability) and general consequences of inequities that arise through biased access to geospatial tools and derived data all continue to be challenging issues and topics of deep concern for many. Students and professionals working with GIS and related technologies should develop a sound grasp of these issues and a thorough comprehension of the concerns impacting their use and development in today's world. However, while most people agree that ethics matters for GIS, we often have difficulty putting ethical issues into practice. An ongoing project supported by NSF seeks to bridge this gap by providing a sound basis for future ethical consideration of a variety of issues. A model seminar curriculum is under development by a team of geographic information science and technology (GIS&T) researchers and professional ethicists, along with protocols for course evaluations. In the curricula students first investigate the nature of professions in general and the characteristics of a GIS&T profession in particular. They hone moral reasoning skills through methodical analyses of case studies in relation to various GIS Code of Ethics and Rules of Conduct. They learn to unveil the "moral ecologies" of a profession through actual interviews with real practitioners in the field. Assignments thus far include readings, class discussions, practitioner interviews, and preparations of original case

  4. Scenario drafting to anticipate future developments in technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retèl Valesca P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Technology Assessment (HTA information, and in particular cost-effectiveness data is needed to guide decisions, preferably already in early stages of technological development. However, at that moment there is usually a high degree of uncertainty, because evidence is limited and different development paths are still possible. We developed a multi-parameter framework to assess dynamic aspects of a technology -still in development-, by means of scenario drafting to determine the effects, costs and cost-effectiveness of possible future diffusion patterns. Secondly, we explored the value of this method on the case of the clinical implementation of the 70-gene signature for breast cancer, a gene expression profile for selecting patients who will benefit most from chemotherapy. Methods To incorporate process-uncertainty, ten possible scenarios regarding the introduction of the 70-gene signature were drafted with European experts. Out of 5 most likely scenarios, 3 drivers of diffusion (non-compliance, technical failure, and uptake were quantitatively integrated in a decision-analytical model. For these scenarios, the cost-effectiveness of the 70-gene signature expressed in Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs was compared to clinical guidelines, calculated from the past (2005 until the future (2020. Results In 2005 the ICER was €1,9 million/quality-adjusted-life-year (QALY, meaning that the 70-gene signature was not yet cost-effective compared to the current clinical guideline. The ICER for the 70-gene signature improved over time with a range of €1,9 million to €26,145 in 2010 and €1,9 million to €11,123/QALY in 2020 depending on the separate scenario used. From 2010, the 70-gene signature should be cost-effective, based on the combined scenario. The uptake-scenario had strongest influence on the cost-effectiveness. Conclusions When optimal diffusion of a technology is sought, incorporating process

  5. Future Jet Technologies. Part B. F-35 Future Risks v. JS-Education of Pilots & Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    Design of “Next-Generation” airframes based on supermarket-jet-engine-components is nowadays passé. A novel integration methodology [Gal-Or, “Editorial-Review, Part A”, 2011, Gal-Or, “Vectored Propulsion, Supermaneuverability and Robot Aircraft”, Springer Verlag, Gal-Or, Int'l. J. of Thermal and Fluid Sciences 7: 1-6, 1998, “Introduction”, 2011] is nowadays in. For advanced fighter aircraft it begins with JS-based powerplant, which takes up to three times longer to mature vis-à-vis the airframe, unless “committee's design” enforces a dormant catastrophe. Jet Steering (JS) or Thrust Vectoring Flight Control, is a classified, integrated engine-airframe technology aimed at maximizing post-stall-maneuverability, flight safety, efficiency and flight envelopes of manned and unmanned air vehicles, especially in the “impossible-to-fly”, post-stall flight domains where the 100+ years old, stall-spin-limited, Conventional Flight Control fails. Worldwide success in adopting the post-stall, JS-revolution, opens a new era in aviation, with unprecedented design variables identified here for a critical review of F-35 future risks v. future fleets of jet-steered, pilotless vehicles, like the X-47B/C. From the educational point of view, it is also instructive to comprehend the causes of long, intensive opposition to adopt post-stall, JS ideas. A review of such debates may also curb a future opposition to adopt more advanced, JS-based technologies, tests, strategies, tactics and missions within the evolving air, marine and land applications of JS. Most important, re-education of pilots and engineers requires adding post-stall, JS-based studies to curriculum & R&D.

  6. Indian fast reactor technology: Current status and future programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Chetal; P Chellapandi

    2013-10-01

    The paper brings out the advantages of fast breeder reactor and importance of developing closed nuclear fuel cycle for the large scale energy production, which is followed by its salient safety features. Further, the current status and future strategy of the fast reactor programme since the inception through 40 MWt/13 MWe Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), is highlighted. The challenges and achievements in science and technology of FBRs focusing on safety are described with the particular reference to 500 MWe capacity Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), being commissioned at Kalpakkam. Roadmap with comprehensive R&D for the large scale deployment of Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFRs) and timely introduction of metallic fuel reactors with emphasis on breeding gain and enhanced safety are being brought out in this paper.

  7. Recent trends and future of pharmaceutical packaging technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nityanand Zadbuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical packaging market is constantly advancing and has experienced annual growth of at least five percent per annum in the past few years. The market is now reckoned to be worth over $20 billion a year. As with most other packaged goods, pharmaceuticals need reliable and speedy packaging solutions that deliver a combination of product protection, quality, tamper evidence, patient comfort and security needs. Constant innovations in the pharmaceuticals themselves such as, blow fill seal (BFS vials, anti-counterfeit measures, plasma impulse chemical vapor deposition (PICVD coating technology, snap off ampoules, unit dose vials, two-in-one prefilled vial design, prefilled syringes and child-resistant packs have a direct impact on the packaging. The review details several of the recent pharmaceutical packaging trends that are impacting packaging industry, and offers some predictions for the future.

  8. Robotic technology in spine surgery: current applications and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüer, Carsten; Ringel, Florian; Stoffel, Michael; Reinke, Andreas; Behr, Michael; Meyer, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Medical robotics incrementally appears compelling in nowadays surgical work. The research regarding an ideal interaction between physician and computer assistance has reached a first summit with the implementation of commercially available robots (Intuitive Surgical's® da Vinci®). Moreover, neurosurgery--and herein spine surgery--seems an ideal candidate for computer assisted surgery. After the adoption of pure navigational support from brain surgery to spine surgery a meanwhile commercially available miniature robot (Mazor Surgical Technologies' The Spine Assist®) assists in drilling thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. Pilot studies on efficacy, implementation into neurosurgical operating room work flow proved the accuracy of the system and we shortly outline them. Current applications are promising, and future possible developments seem far beyond imagination. But still, medical robotics is in its infancy. Many of its advantages and disadvantages must be delicately sorted out as the patients safety is of highest priority. Medical robots may achieve a physician's supplement but not substitute.

  9. Recent trends and future of pharmaceutical packaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadbuke, Nityanand; Shahi, Sadhana; Gulecha, Bhushan; Padalkar, Abhay; Thube, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical packaging market is constantly advancing and has experienced annual growth of at least five percent per annum in the past few years. The market is now reckoned to be worth over $20 billion a year. As with most other packaged goods, pharmaceuticals need reliable and speedy packaging solutions that deliver a combination of product protection, quality, tamper evidence, patient comfort and security needs. Constant innovations in the pharmaceuticals themselves such as, blow fill seal (BFS) vials, anti-counterfeit measures, plasma impulse chemical vapor deposition (PICVD) coating technology, snap off ampoules, unit dose vials, two-in-one prefilled vial design, prefilled syringes and child-resistant packs have a direct impact on the packaging. The review details several of the recent pharmaceutical packaging trends that are impacting packaging industry, and offers some predictions for the future. PMID:23833515

  10. Recent trends and future of pharmaceutical packaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadbuke, Nityanand; Shahi, Sadhana; Gulecha, Bhushan; Padalkar, Abhay; Thube, Mahesh

    2013-04-01

    The pharmaceutical packaging market is constantly advancing and has experienced annual growth of at least five percent per annum in the past few years. The market is now reckoned to be worth over $20 billion a year. As with most other packaged goods, pharmaceuticals need reliable and speedy packaging solutions that deliver a combination of product protection, quality, tamper evidence, patient comfort and security needs. Constant innovations in the pharmaceuticals themselves such as, blow fill seal (BFS) vials, anti-counterfeit measures, plasma impulse chemical vapor deposition (PICVD) coating technology, snap off ampoules, unit dose vials, two-in-one prefilled vial design, prefilled syringes and child-resistant packs have a direct impact on the packaging. The review details several of the recent pharmaceutical packaging trends that are impacting packaging industry, and offers some predictions for the future.

  11. PAST AND FUTURE APPLICATIONS OF 3-D (VIRTUAL REALITY TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Foreman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality (virtual environment technology, VET has been widely available for twenty years. In that time, the benefits of using virtual environments (VEs have become clear in many areas of application, including assessment and training, education, rehabilitation and psychological research in spatial cognition. The flexibility, reproducibility and adaptability of VEs are especially important, particularly in the training and testing of navigational and way-finding skills. Transfer of training between real and virtual environments has been found to be reliable. However, input device usage can compromise spatial information acquisition from VEs, and distances in VEs are invariably underestimated. The present review traces the evolution of VET, anticipates future areas in which developments are likely to occur, and highlights areas in which research is needed to optimise usage.

  12. How wearable technologies will impact the future of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Rick; Shea, J Timothy

    2004-01-01

    After four hundred years of delivering health care in hospitals, industrialized countries are now shifting towards treating patients at the "point of need". This trend will likely accelerate demand for, and adoption of, wearable computing and smart fabric and interactive textile (SFIT) solutions. These healthcare solutions will be designed to provide real-time vital and diagnostic information to health care providers, patients, and related stakeholders in such a manner as to improve quality of care, reduce the cost of care, and allow patients greater control over their own health. The current market size for wearable computing and SFIT solutions is modest; however, the future outlook is extremely strong. Venture Development Corporation, a technology market research and strategy firm, was founded in 1971. Over the years, VDC has developed and implemented a unique and highly successful methodology for forecasting and analyzing highly dynamic technology markets. VDC has extensive experience in providing multi-client and proprietary analysis in the electronic components, advanced materials, and mobile computing markets.

  13. Future of printing: changes and challenges, technologies and markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipphan, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    Digitalization within the graphic arts industry is described and it is explained how it is improving and changing the print production strategies and which new kinds of print production systems are developed or can be expected. The relationship of printed media and electronic media is analyzed and a positioning for the next century is given. The state of the art of conventional printing technologies, especially using direct imagine techniques, and their position within the digital workflow are shortly described. Non-impact printing multicolor printing systems are explained, based on general design criteria and linked to existing and newly announced equipment. The use of high-tech components for building up successful systems with high reliability, high quality and low production costs is included with some examples. Digital printing systems open many opportunities in print production: distributed printing, personalization, print and book on demand are explained as examples. The overview of the several printing technologies and their positioning regarding quality and productivity leads to the scenario about the important position of printed media, also in the distant future.

  14. Advanced technologies available for future solid propellant grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépénier, Jean; Fonblanc, Gilles

    2001-03-01

    Significant advances have been made during the last decade in several fields of solid propulsion: the advances have enabled new savings in the motor development phase and recurring costs, because they help limit the number of prototypes and tests. The purpose of the paper is to describe the improvements achieved by SNPE in solid grain technologies, making these technologies available for new developments in more efficient and reliable future SRMs: new energetic molecules, new solid propellants, new processes for grain manufacturing, quick response grain design tools associated with advanced models for grain performance predictions. Using its expertise in chemical synthesis, SNPE develops new molecules to fit new energetic material requirements. Tests based on new propellant formulations have produced good results in the propellant performance/safety behavior ratio. New processes have been developed simultaneously to reduce the manufacturing costs of the new propellants. In addition, the grain design has been optimized by using the latest generation of predictive theoretical tools supported by a large data bank of experimental parameters resulting from over 30 years' experience in solid propulsion: Computer-aided method for the preliminary grain design Advanced models for SRM operating and performance predictions

  15. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  16. The future of microstructure technology — The industry view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, R. T.

    Downscaling of minimum device and circuit geometries has been the primary engine driving exponential improvements in integrated circuit density, performance and cost for 20 years or more. These improvements have permitted concomitant progress in electronic systems, and and are largely responsible for the growth of the market. Semiconductor device and circuit modeling predicts practical limits on these geometries, and analysis of current trends indicates that these limits will be reached for circuits comprising large portions of the IC market by the mid-90's. The limitations on downscaling are both device- and interconnection-related and encompass noise and reliability issues. The practical limits are in the range 0.3 - 0.5 micrometers, but limits of a somewhat more fundamental nature exist around 0.1 - 0.3 micrometers. Since the practical limits are expected to be reached in the early- to mid-'90's, keeping functional density on its current exponential trend for more than a few years after that will require revolutionary approaches to devices, interconnections, noise immunity, and fault-tolerace. The discontinuity which maturation of the evolutionary transistor-based technology will create will present a rare opportunity to "go back to the well" of science to create a new technology of potentially large and immediate impact. In our view, which we believe to be shared by the industry, this must be a technology which leverages the accumulated experience and investment in semiconductor manufacturing in order to maintain the downward cost trend. Much of the required basic research in semiconductor microstructures in the regimes of quantum size effects and tunneling is yet to be done. Filling in this research gap should be a major priority for the immediate future, and the ability to do this will depend on continued progress in microstructure fabrication.

  17. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  18. Technology Vision 2020: A report on technology and the future of the U.S. petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-02-01

    In February 2000, petroleum industry leaders signed a compact with ITP to work together through the Industries of the Future (IOF) initiative. This initiative helped industries articulate their long-term goals, create a unified vision for the future, and focus R&D efforts to achieve the industry vision. The industry defined its major goals for the future and outlined broad technology needs in Technology Vision 2020: A Technology Vision for the U.S. Petroleum Industry.

  19. Pharmaceutical Education in Japan--Past, Present--, and Human Social Pharmacy Education in the Near Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the foundation of the 74 Japanese pharmacy schools was reviewed. From the early Meiji era until the beginning World War II, 21 schools including Tokyo University were established. After the war, the new four-year university system was introduced from America, and the above 21 schools became universities and 25 universities were newly founded. In 2006, clinical pharmacy was introduced from America, and the six-year undergraduate system began. This system was divided into 2 groups, 1) 6 year system of clinical pharmacy plus 4 years doctor course and 2) 4 years system of pharmaceutical sciences and a master degree lasting 2 years plus a 3 year doctor course. These two systems started in 2006. The students of clinical pharmacy course must take the 22 weeks of clerkships in a community pharmacy and hospital pharmacy. The graduates (8,446) in 2015 March took the National License Examination for pharmacist, and the pass rate was 72.65%. The entrance into pharmacy school is not easy; however, the passing of the National License Examination is more difficult. The aim of pharmacy education should be to foster pharmacists with a deeper understanding of society and with richer humanity for the patient. To achieve this, what needs to be included in the curriculum are the subjects of the human social pharmacy, such as philosophy of pharmacy, ethics, religions, history of pharmacy, pharmaceutical affairs law, economics, management, and social pharmacy. The inclusion of such subjects needs to be implemented in the near future. Of course, the study of pharmaceutical sciences is a life-long endeavor.

  20. FY 1997 report on the survey of history and heritages of industrial technology. Survey of the originality and creativity of electrical and electronic engineering in Japan; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (sangyo gijutsu rekishi keisho chosa). Kokunai sangyo no denki denshi gijutsu no dokusosei sozosei no chosahen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    For selection of future technological themes and developmental techniques, survey was made on the history of development of electrical and electronic engineering and industry in Japan. The Technical Committee for History of Electrical Engineering of the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan has diffused various activities on the history research into a society since establishment in April, 1990. Hearing survey which is extremely important for technology succession has been carried out continuously since 1991 for 3 honorary members of this institute who are pioneers of electrical and electronic engineering innovation in Japan. Importance of creative innovative technology development is increasing more and more, and `finding a guide into tomorrow by taking lessons from the past` is one of techniques for technology development. Publication and opening on Internet of the hearing survey results are under consideration as public service. Preparation of the database of the hearing results is also necessary for promotion of these activities. 17 refs.

  1. Past and future cadmium emissions from municipal solid-waste incinerators in Japan for the assessment of cadmium control policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Kyoko, E-mail: kyoko.ono@aist.go.jp

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Cd emissions from municipal solid waste incinerators were estimated for 1970–2030. • Emissions peaked in 1973 (11.1 t) at levels ten times that in 2010 (1.2 t). • In the 1970s, the main source was pigments, but after 2000, it was Ni-Cd batteries. • The effects of two Cd control policies were compared. • Banning Cd use reduced emissions more than intensive collection of batteries. -- Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is a harmful pollutant emitted from municipal solid-waste incinerators (MSWIs). Cd stack emissions from MSWIs have been estimated between 1970 and 2030 in Japan. The aims of this study are to quantify emitted Cd by category and to analyze Cd control policies to reduce emissions. Emissions were estimated using a dynamic substance flow analysis (SFA) that took into account representative waste treatment flows and historical changes in emission factors. This work revealed that the emissions peaked in 1973 (11.1 t) and were ten times those in 2010 (1.2 t). Emission from MSWIs was two-thirds of that from non-ferrous smelting in 2010. The main Cd emission source was pigment use in the 1970s, but after 2000 it had shifted to nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries. Future emissions were estimated for 2030. Compared to the business-as-usual scenario, an intensive collection of used Ni-Cd batteries and a ban on any future use of Ni-Cd batteries will reduce emissions by 0.09 and 0.31 t, respectively, in 2030. This approach enables us to identify the major Cd emission source from MSWIs, and to prioritize the possible Cd control policies.

  2. How Operations in Haiti and Japan Informed Joint Publication 3-08: The Future of Interorganizational Operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Assistance, Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Update ( Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, 2011), 42. 51Karl C. Rohr, Operation Tomodachi: After Action...Humanitarian Assistance. Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Update. Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, 2011. Central Intelligence Agency, "CIA Fact Book" https

  3. Japan's energy sector beyond Fukushima. What direction for a sustainable energy future?; Japans Energiesektor nach Fukushima. Welche nachhaltige Energiezukunft ist moeglich?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhoff, Thomas [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Humangeographie (IHG) und Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Ostasienstudien (IZO)

    2013-03-15

    The 11 March 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster will create long-term challenges for Japans energy security. Energy shortage is a major threat because all facets of the archipelago's economy and society are dependent upon reliable energy supply. Within this context and based on a historical institutionalist approach, this paper reflects on the long-term implications of the disaster for Japan's post-Fukushima energy policies. It argues that institutional change is incremental and path dependent for four major reasons: the massive costs of a major move to alternative energy sources; the rising importance of emission reduction and climate change mitigation policies; vested interests in the status quo of a centralised large-scale energy supply system; and the massive increase in resource nationalism in East Asia as a result of continuing geopolitical tensions. However, promoting energy efficiency, encouraging energy-saving behaviour and focusing on decentralized renewable energy development could help to reduce Japan's energy vulnerability.

  4. Changes in Mothers' Psychosocial Perceptions of Technology-dependent Children and Adolescents at Home in Japan: Acknowledgement of Children's Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Nishigaki, RN, PHN, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: First, mothers gradually accepted the conditions of their child after his/her disease and disability were known. Second, others managed technology-required care and concurrently considered the social participation of their child through daily care at home. Third, the level of preoccupation with the child was affected by the mothers' management of care and their attitude towards the social participation of their child in home care. In this study, as is widely alleged in historical recognition of Japan, mothers provided daily care almost without help from other family members. Additionally, they thought it natural and good for their children. Above all, especially in Japan, professional support for mothers are necessary so that they can take breaks from care.

  5. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  6. The Science and Technology of Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, A.; Fusi, R.; Longoni, F.

    1999-12-01

    The future space missions span over a wide range of scientific objectives. After different successful scientific missions, other international cornerstone experiments are planned to study of the evolution of the universe and of the primordial stellar systems, and our solar system. Space missions for the survey of the microwave cosmic background radiation, deep-field search in the near and mid-infrared region and planetary exploration will be carried out. Several fields are open for research and development in the space business. Three major categories can be found: detector technology in different areas, electronics, and software. At LABEN, a Finmeccanica Company, we are focusing the technologies to respond to this challenging scientific demands. Particle trackers based on silicon micro-strips supported by lightweight structures (CFRP) are studied. In the X-ray field, CCD's are investigated with pixels of very small size so as to increase the spatial resolution of the focal plane detectors. High-efficiency and higly miniaturized high-voltage power supplies are developed for detectors with an increasingly large number of phototubes. Material research is underway to study material properties at extreme temperatures. Low-temperature mechanical structures are designed for cryogenic ( 20 K) detectors in order to maintain the high precision in pointing the instrument. Miniaturization of front end electronics with low power consumption and high number of signal processing channels is investigated; silicon-based microchips (ASIC's) are designed and developed using state-of-the-art technology. Miniaturized instruments to investigate the planets surface using X-Ray and Gamma-Ray scattering techniques are developed. The data obtained from the detectors have to be processed, compressed, formatted and stored before their transmission to ground. These tasks open up additional strategic areas of development such as microprocessor-based electronics for high-speed and parallel data

  7. The future of medical reimbursement for orthopedic surgery in Japan from the viewpoint of the health economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Miki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The financial burden of medical insurance on the government of Japan has recently become severe, which has led to the control of outpatient orthopedic reimbursements for common procedures. On the other hand, the overall disease burden for total hip or knee arthroplasty, decompression for cervical myelopathy or lumbar spinal canal stenosis, and new surgical technologies to treat other painful conditions and the post-surgical care related to these procedures has been reduced. Medical insurance systems in Japan are generally influenced by budget-balancing action. Consequently, the further development of interventional evaluation methods should be promoted. From the viewpoint of health economics, the value (meaning) of medical intervention can partly be explained by its cost-effectiveness. In order for appropriate medical reimbursement levels to be set for orthopedic surgery, the financial status of medical institutions needs to be concurrently reviewed. In particular, the relationship between the expense structure and medical reimbursement must be discussed to evaluate its role in community medicine system. Over the past 10 years, medical expenditures have increased by 9.6% in all fields, whereas the monthly medical reimbursements per patient have dropped by an average of 17.5%. Remarkably, surgery-related costs have increased by 36.5%, while other medical costs have decreased by 19.8%. There are a few reports of cost-utility analyses which investigate interventions such as total hip arthroplasty for hip osteoarthritis patients (US$ 4,600-70,500/QALY) and laminectomy for patients with spinal canal stenosis. Interventions may be an inevitable part of relative expense control under the current trend; however, there has been a slight increase in other parameters in response to changes in medical reimbursement evaluations - specifically, in the total income of medical institutions. If medical professionals such as orthopedic surgeons contribute to the economic value of

  8. Preservice Teachers' Intention to Adopt Technology in Their Future Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Li, Yanju; Franklin, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    This study examined four factors that influence preservice teachers' intentions to adopt technology in classrooms based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and Technology Acceptance Model. These four factors--technology self-efficacy, attitudes toward technology, perceived ease of use of technology, and perceived barriers of technology…

  9. Proceeding of human exoskeleton technology and discussions on future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Xie, Hanxing; Li, Weilin; Yao, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    After more than half a century of intense efforts, the development of exoskeleton has seen major advances, and several remarkable achievements have been made. Reviews of developing history of exoskeleton are presented, both in active and passive categories. Major models are introduced, and typical technologies are commented on. Difficulties in control algorithm, driver system, power source, and man-machine interface are discussed. Current researching routes and major developing methods are mapped and critically analyzed, and in the process, some key problems are revealed. First, the exoskeleton is totally different from biped robot, and relative studies based on the robot technologies are considerably incorrect. Second, biomechanical studies are only used to track the motion of the human body, the interaction between human and machines are seldom studied. Third, the traditional developing ways which focused on servo-controlling have inborn deficiency from making portable systems. Research attention should be shifted to the human side of the coupling system, and the human ability to learn and adapt should play a more significant role in the control algorithms. Having summarized the major difficulties, possible future works are discussed. It is argued that, since a distinct boundary cannot be drawn in such strong-coupling human-exoskeleton system, the more complex the control system gets, the more difficult it is for the user to learn to use. It is suggested that the exoskeleton should be treated as a simple wearable tool, and downgrading its automatic level may be a change toward a brighter research outlook. This effort at simplification is definitely not easy, as it necessitates theoretical supports from fields such as biomechanics, ergonomics, and bionics.

  10. An Analysis of Bluetooth Technology,Features,Future and Security

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Malik Zaka

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis I present my analysis on various aspects of Bluetooth wireless technology. The Bluetooth technology is relatively new as compared to other technologies and there is huge potential of its growth and practical application. Therefore during in this thesis I try to analysis the current status of this technology and issue which are related to this technology. The first section introduces Bluetooth technology, in which I discussed the architecture of Bluetooth and different terminolo...

  11. Solar sorptive cooling. Technologies, user requirements, practical experience, future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treffinger, P. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Hardthausen (Germany); Hertlein, H.P. [eds.] [Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Sorptive cooling techniques permit the use of low-temperature solar heat, i.e. a renewable energy of low cost and world-wide availability. The Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie intends to develop solar sorptive cooling technologies to the prototype stage and, in cooperation with the solar industry and its end users, to promote practical application in air conditioning of buildings and cold storage of food. The workshop presents an outline of the state of development of solar sorptive cooling from the view of users and developers. Exemplary solar cooling systems are described, and the potential of open and closed sorptive processes is assessed. Future central activities will be defined in an intensive discussion between planners, producers, users and developers. [German] Der Einsatz von Sorptionstechniken zur Kaelteerzeugung erlaubt es, als treibende Solarenergie Niedertemperatur-Solarwaerme einzusetzen, also eine regenerative Energie mit sehr geringen Kosten und weltweiter Verfuegbarkeit. Der Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie hat sich als Aufgabe gestellt, die Techniken der solaren Sorptionskuehlung bis zum Prototyp zu entwickeln und mit Industrie und Nutzern die praktische Anwendung voranzubringen. Die Anwendungsfelder sind die Klimatisierung von Gebaeuden und die Kaltlagerung von Lebensmitteln. Der Workshop gibt einen Ueberblick zum Entwicklungsstand der solaren Sorptionskuehlung aus der Sicht der Anwender und Entwickler. Bereits ausgefuehrte Beispiele zur solaren Kuehlung werden vorgestellt und das Potential geschlossener und offener Sorptionsverfahren angegeben. In intensiver Diskussion zwischen Planern, Herstellern, Nutzern und Entwicklern sollen kuenftige Arbeitsschwerpunkte herausgearbeitet werden. (orig.)

  12. The Technology of Technology Transfer. The Case of the Japan-Singapore Technical Institute. Discussion Paper No. 93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo e Oliveira, Joao Batista; Pillay, Gerald F.

    The new economic and industrial policies of the 1980s called for a major restructuring of the industrial profile of Singapore. The government decided to set up three new technical institutes to prepare and supply skilled workers to new investors: French-, German-, and Japan-Singapore Technical Institutes with the collaboration of the government…

  13. Effectiveness of Disaster-prevention Technologies against Quake-induced Damage of MR Scanners during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Machida, Yoshio; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Isoda, Haruo; Noguchi, Takashi; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have performed a statistical analysis to investigate damages in magnetic resonance (MR) scanners caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE, magnitude 9.0) and evaluated whether these disaster-prevention technologies contributed to the reduction of damages in the GEJE or not. It was confirmed that the extent of damage was significantly different between seismic scale (SS) 5 and SS over 6. Our survey study demonstrated that anchoring of MR facilities reduced damages due to quakes and demonstrated that anchoring is an efficient method for quake-induced damage prevention. The odds ratio revealed that base isolation was very useful to prevent damages in MR scanners.

  14. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Molecular Ultrathin Film Control and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-11

    Layers in an [ITO/PDiPF-LB(N-L)/Al] MIM Device 27 References 1. M. Kakimoto , M. Suzuki, Y. Imai, M. Iwamoto, T. Hino, ACS Sympo., Ser. No 346...1987, p 484; idem., CHEM. LETT., Vol 395, 1987, p 823; Kakimoto , Nishikata, Imai, Spring Meeting of Japan Chemical Society, 3 IVA 46. 2. M. Uekita

  15. Information Communication Technology & Crime: the Future of Criminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antinori A.

    2008-12-01

    ? What about Infowar, Netwar & Mediawar? What can be said about criminology and its relationship to technology? What is the impact of Open Source INTelligence? Today criminologists have an obligation to understand the importance of digital culture and acquire the skills in Information Communication Technology required to prevent and counteract crime. They must also use their skills in the open-source ocean to envisage future trends in crime.

  16. Future technological developments to fulfill AG2020 targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mads Ville; Østergård, Hanne; Borch, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    This report constitute an analysis of selected technologies that are anticipated to underpin the images described in Giaoutzi et al (2008) and it proposes policy measures to promote these technologies. It builds on Borch et al (2008) where a more detailed description of technologies can be found....... Based on the technological narratives and imperatives, we select a set of present available technologies that are able to support the society in reaching the targets set up by AG2020. For each of these technologies, we evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the technology to reach the target as well...... as the threats for development of the technology in the respective images. Finally policies for promoting and spreading technologies are proposed....

  17. Management Consulting for Technological Modernization and Industry of the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Davidovich Gitelman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the authors’ study based on the hypothesis that aaddressing the multidimensional highly complex tasks of technological modernization and new industry against the background of a wave of breakthrough innovations is only possible within the framework of proactive management. Its methodological, instrumental and competence basis results from «smart» partnership of regional science, education, and business. In this case, the management сconsulting of a new type, being fundamentally different from the traditional one, plays the role of the partnership coordinator. These differences are expressed in specific intellectual logistics and organizational architecture of consulting projects, close connection to universities, innovation centres and various research structures of the region as well as the high specialization, which is reached by the involvement of the virtual teams of cross-disciplinary experts in the developments, the flexible products designed on the basis of the modular principle. In this regard, the study presents a number of new scientific results proving the hypothesis. The paper substantiates the approach to the organization and methodology of consulting activities for complex, rapidly developing systems which requires expanding the range of competencies and scope of the interaction of various actors — carriers of interdisciplinary knowledge. In accordance with this approach, the authors introduce the concept of integratory consulting for advanced development that offers a package of intellectual services for addressing challenges of the future. We have developed the methodology of the integrated system of research, consultations, training and transforming action that makes it possible to generate pre-emptive actions amid crisis, risk and threats. The article has proposed and tested an organizational mechanism of cooperation between parties (science, education, business involved in smart

  18. Photovoltaic cell and array technology development for future unique NASA missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S.; Curtis, H.; Piszczor, M.; Surampudi, R.; Hamilton, T.; Rapp, D.; Stella, P.; Mardesich, N.; Mondt, J.; Bunker, R.; Nesmith, B.; Gaddy, E.; Marvin, D.; Kazmerski, L.

    2002-01-01

    A technology review committee from NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Air Force Research Lab, was formed to assess solar cell and array technologies required for future NASA science missions.

  19. Survey of Technologies for the Airport Border of the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    market is still nascent but growing quickly. Consulting firms Frost & Sullivan and Acuity Market Intelligence both predict a 20% compound annual...technology detects a potential threat.65 According to a recent market report by Frost and Sullivan (April 2013)66, some of the technologies likely...Technological Breakthroughs in Sensors for Threat Detection - Technology Market Penetration and Roadmapping: Frost and Sullivan ;April 2013. 67. Nicas J. Can

  20. A System Analysis for Determining Alternative Technological Issues for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistrale, V. J.; Small, J.

    1967-01-01

    A systems engineering methodology is provided, by which future technological ventures may be examined utilizing particular national, corporate, or individual value judgments. Three matrix analyses are presented. The first matrix is concerned with the effect of technology on population increase, war, poverty, health, resources, and prejudice. The second matrix explores an analytical technique for determining the relative importance of different areas of technology. The third matrix explores how an individual or corporate entity may determine how its capability may be used for future technological opportunities. No conclusions are presented since primary effort has been placed on the methodology of determining future technological issues.

  1. Application of advanced technologies to future military transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rodney L.; Lange, Roy H.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    Long range military transport technologies are addressed with emphasis of defining the potential benefits of the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) concept currently being flight tested. Results of a 1990's global range transport study are presented showing the expected payoff from application of advanced technologies. Technology forecast for military transports is also presented.

  2. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  3. Disruptive technology disorder: A past, present, and future neurologic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald F

    2017-07-25

    Based upon an analysis of 6 major historical technological advances over the last 150 years, a new syndrome, disruptive technology disorder (DTD), is introduced. DTD describes the human health ailments that accompany the implementation of disruptive technologies. Elevator sickness, railway spine, and bicycle face are representative examples. Though the underlying causative disruptive technologies may differ, many neurologic symptoms (headache, dizziness, weakness) are common to multiple DTDs. Born of technology-driven societal change, DTDs manifest as a complex interplay between biological and psychological symptoms. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Changes in Mothers' Psychosocial Perceptions of Technology-dependent Children and Adolescents at Home in Japan: Acknowledgement of Children's Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Kaori; Kanamori, Yutaka; Ikeda, Mari; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Minowa, Hideko; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2016-06-01

    This research was conducted to reveal Japanese mothers' changing perceptions towards their technology-dependent children in the home care setting. Fourteen Japanese mothers participated in semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. "Degree of preoccupation with the child" emerged as the category representing the mothers' perceptions towards their child. Three categories emerged that represented the progression of maternal perceptions over time: "accepting the child's conditions", "mastering the management of care in various conditions", and "considering social participation for the child". First, mothers gradually accepted the conditions of their child after his/her disease and disability were known. Second, others managed technology-required care and concurrently considered the social participation of their child through daily care at home. Third, the level of preoccupation with the child was affected by the mothers' management of care and their attitude towards the social participation of their child in home care. In this study, as is widely alleged in historical recognition of Japan, mothers provided daily care almost without help from other family members. Additionally, they thought it natural and good for their children. Above all, especially in Japan, professional support for mothers are necessary so that they can take breaks from care. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Setsuro Tamaru and Fritz Haber: links between Japan and Germany in science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hideko Tamaru

    2015-04-01

    Setsuro Tamaru was my grandfather. He worked with Fritz Haber in Germany on researching the ammonia synthesis process and contributed substantially to the development of scientific research and education in Japan. Although I had never met him, I felt his existence while I grew up, since our house was built by him and had many artifacts brought back from Germany by my grandfather; e.g., a Bechstein upright piano upon which I practiced piano every day and Fritz Haber's portrait with his handwritten message hung on the wall. This is an account of my grandfather's life, concentrating on his relationship with Fritz Haber. This story goes back to a time more than a century ago. Copyright © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. JPRS Report Science & Technology Japan Future Prospects of FA-From FA to IMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the interaction of economic mechanisms, and there is the possibility that it will expand general demand in a broad range of related industries...Control systems that introduce new ideas like AI and fuzzy logic will emerge during the creation and operation of systems. In addition, systems...Textiles 3 — Paper and pulp — — Chemicals — 1 Pharmaceuticals 2 — Miscellaneous chemicals 4 1 Oil and coal products — — Rubber products 1

  7. Innovation on Energy Power Technology (8)First HVDC Transmission System in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampei, Masatoshi

    This paper is an episode concerning the Hokkaido-Honshu HVDC Link that is the first High Voltage DC Current transmission system in Japan. The effort to the commissioning of the first stage of this system is explained. Moreover, it explains the research and development executed to achieve 600MW of this system that is the final stage. In addition, the adoption episode of the frequency control method introduced for Hokkaido-Honshu HVDC Link is explained.

  8. Technology Development Roadmap: A Technology Development Roadmap for a Future Gravitational Wave Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Conklin, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; McKenzie, Kirk; Mueller, Guido; Mueller, Juergen; Thorpe, James Ira; Arsenovic, Peter; Baker, John; Bender, Peter; Brinker, Edward; Crow, John; Spero, Robert; deVine Glenn; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    -led mission after 2020-both use the same technologies. Further, NASA participation in an ESA-led mission would likely augment the eLISA architecture with a third arm to become the SGO Mid architecture. For these reasons, this TDR for a future GW mission applies to both designs and both programmatic paths forward. It is adaptable to the different timelines and roles for an ESA-led or a NASA-led mission, and it is adaptable to available resources. Based on a mature understanding of the interaction between technology and risk, the authors of this TDR have chosen a set of objectives that are more expansive than is usual. The objectives for this roadmap are: (1) reduce technical and development risks and costs; (2) understand and, where possible, relieve system requirements and consequences; (3) increase technical insight into critical technologies; and (4) validate the design at the subsystem level. The emphasis on these objectives, particularly the latter two, is driven by outstanding programmatic decisions, namely whether a future GW mission is ESA-led or NASA-led, and availability of resources. The relative emphasis is best understood in the context of prioritization.

  9. Stress transferred by the 1995 Mw = 6.9 Kobe, Japan, shock: Effect on aftershocks and future earthquake probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, S.; Stein, R.S.; Reasenberg, P.A.; Dieterich, J.H.; Yoshida, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Kobe earthquake struck at the edge of the densely populated Osaka-Kyoto corridor in southwest Japan. We investigate how the earthquake transferred stress to nearby faults, altering their proximity to failure and thus changing earthquake probabilities. We find that relative to the pre-Kobe seismicity, Kobe aftershocks were concentrated in regions of calculated Coulomb stress increase and less common in regions of stress decrease. We quantify this relationship by forming the spatial correlation between the seismicity rate change and the Coulomb stress change. The correlation is significant for stress changes greater than 0.2-1.0 bars (0.02-0.1 MPa), and the nonlinear dependence of seismicity rate change on stress change is compatible with a state- and rate-dependent formulation for earthquake occurrence. We extend this analysis to future mainshocks by resolving the stress changes on major faults within 100 km of Kobe and calculating the change in probability caused by these stress changes. Transient effects of the stress changes are incorporated by the state-dependent constitutive relation, which amplifies the permanent stress changes during the aftershock period. Earthquake probability framed in this manner is highly time-dependent, much more so than is assumed in current practice. Because the probabilities depend on several poorly known parameters of the major faults, we estimate uncertainties of the probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. This enables us to include uncertainties on the elapsed time since the last earthquake, the repeat time and its variability, and the period of aftershock decay. We estimate that a calculated 3-bar (0.3-MPa) stress increase on the eastern section of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) near Kyoto causes fivefold increase in the 30-year probability of a subsequent large earthquake near Kyoto; a 2-bar (0.2-MPa) stress decrease on the western section of the ATTL results in a reduction in probability by a factor of 140 to

  10. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter

  11. Youth, Technology, and HIV: Recent Advances and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Muessig, Kathryn E; Bauermeister, Jose; Zhang, Chen; LeGrand, Sara

    2015-12-01

    Technology, including mobile technologies and social media, offers powerful tools to reach, engage, and retain youth and young adults in HIV prevention and care interventions both in the USA and globally. In this report, we focus on HIV, technology, and youth, presenting a synthesis of recently published (Jan 2014-May 2015) observational and experimental studies relevant for understanding and intervening on HIV risk, prevention, and care. We present findings from a selection of the 66 relevant citations identified, highlighting studies that demonstrate a novel approach to technology interventions among youth in regard to content, delivery, target population, or public health impact. We discuss current trends globally and in the USA in how youth are using technology, as well as emergent research issues in this field-including the need for new theories for developing technology-based HIV interventions and new metrics of engagement, exposure, and evaluation.

  12. Summary of Medipix Technology's 3-Years in Space and Plans for Future Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    NASA has evaluated 7 Timepix-based radiation imaging detectors from the CERN-based Medipix2 collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS), collecting more than 3-years of data, as well on the December, 2014 EFT-1 mission testing the new Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. These data along with data collected at ground-based accelerator facilities including the NASA Space Radiation Lab (NSRL) at Brookhaven in the US, as well as at the HIMAC facility at the National Institute for Radiological Sciences in Japan, have allowed the development of software analysis techniques sufficient to provide a stand-alone accurate assessment of the space radiation environment for dosimetric purposes. Recent comparisons of the performance of the Timepix with both n-on-p and p-on-n Si sensors will be presented. The further evolution of the Timepix technology by the Medipix3 collaboration in the form of the Timepix3 chip, which employs a continuous data-driven readout scheme, is being evaluated for possible use in future space research applications. Initial performance evaluations at accelerators will be reported. The Medipix2 Collaboration is also in the process of designing an updated version of the Timepix chip, called the Timepix2, which will continue the frame-based readout scheme of the current Timepix chip, but add simultaneous charge encoding using the Time-Over-Threshold (TOT) and first-hit Time-of-Arrival (TOA) encoding. Current plans are to replace the Timepix by the Timepix2 with minimal reconfiguration of the supporting electronics. Longer-term plans include participation in the currently forming Medipix4 collaboration. A summary of these prospects will also be included.

  13. Department of Defense Laboratories: Finding a Future in Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    investment. There is no mention of DoD even trying. This, then, presents a problem for Defense technology transfer management. The President expects both...effort, but nonetheless felt unable to express their effort quantitatively. The potential size and demand for Defense technology transfer calls for some... Defense technology transfer is taking place, it is doing so on the enthusiasm and drive of a few key individuals. Political demand and legislation

  14. Japan-Australia co-operative program on research and development of technology for the management of high level radioactive wastes. Final report 1985 to 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, K.; Vance, E.; Lumpkin, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Mitamura, H.; Banba, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The overall aim of the Co-operative Program has been to promote the exchange of information on technology for the management of High-Level Wastes (HLW) and to encourage research and development relevant to such technology. During the 13 years that the Program has been carried out, HLW management strategies have matured and developed internationally, and Japan has commenced construction of a domestic reprocessing and vitrification facility for HLW. The HLW management strategy preferred is a national decision. Many countries are using vitrification, direct disposal of spent fuel or a combination of both to handle their existing wastes whereas others have deferred the decision. The work carried out in the Co-operative Program provides strong scientific evidence that the durability of ceramic waste forms is not significantly affected by radiation damage and that high loadings of actinide elements can be incorporated into specially designed ceramic waste forms. Moreover, natural minerals have been shown to remain as closed systems for U and Th for up to 2.5 b y. All of these results give confidence in the ability of second generation waste forms, such as Synroc, to handle future waste arisings that may not be suitable for vitrification 87 refs., 15 tabs., 22 figs.

  15. Critical Technology Determination for Future Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Vangen, Scott D.; Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Stecklein, Jonette M.; Rahman, Shamim A.; Rosenthal, Matthew E.; Hornyak, David M.; Alexander, Leslie; Korsmeyer, David J.; Tu, Eugene L.; Alfano, David D.; Kundrot, Craig E.; Davison, Stephen C.; Balint, Tibor S.

    2012-01-01

    As the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) prepares to extend human presence throughout the solar system, technical capabilities must be developed to enable long duration flights to destinations such as near Earth asteroids, Mars, and extended stays on the Moon. As part of the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team, a Technology Development Assessment Team has identified a suite of critical technologies needed to support this broad range of missions. Dialog between mission planners, vehicle developers, and technologists was used to identify a minimum but sufficient set of technologies, noting that needs are created by specific mission architecture requirements, yet specific designs are enabled by technologies. Further consideration was given to the re-use of underlying technologies to cover multiple missions to effectively use scarce resources. This suite of critical technologies is expected to provide the needed base capability to enable a variety of possible destinations and missions. This paper describes the methodology used to provide an architecture-driven technology development assessment ("technology pull"), including technology advancement needs identified by trade studies encompassing a spectrum of flight elements and destination design reference missions.

  16. ICFA announces launch of technology recommendation process for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators has announced the membership and chair of the 12-person International Technology Recommendation Panel. The ITRP, with four members each from Europe, North America and Asia, is charged with recommending which of two leading accelerating technologies will form the best choice for a future international linear collider (1 page).

  17. ON IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL TRAINING OF FUTURE TEACHERS OF TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. SIDOROV

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to improving the content of vocational and technological and methodical preparation of the future teachers of technology. The author tells the technology training of students of electro- physical and electrochemical methods of processing of construction materials, which utilizes the integration of natural sciences, engineering and technological disciplines, developed using the existing set of teaching and laboratory facilities. Settings allow students to study the complex physical processes experimental study of the problem. The paper also shows a feature of the organization of a laboratory practical work in the form of educational and research work of students, to teach them to perform the volume of independent work using scientific methods of theoretical and experimental studies. The role of these methods is important for the development of creative thinking of students, forming engineering design knowledge and skills, as well as the skills of independent research, which provides, in turn, higher cognitive and creative activity of students. The author presents the results of his pedagogical experiment. Thus, the introduction in the educational process UIRS going involvement of students in research work, which becomes an important part in the preparation of research methodology equips their scientific and technical thinking, develops an interest in creativity, it helps provide them with in-depth knowledge, and the ability to apply them in practice. The research work of students includes research activities not only in the educational process, but also to participate in the circles of the department in the scientific work of the laboratory.

  18. Competition in a technological niche: the cars of the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, S.; Lente, H. van; Engels, R.

    2012-01-01

    The notion of ‘niche’has proved to be useful to account for the emergence of radical innovations. Most studies, however, deal with the development of single emerging technologies. In this paper we address the competition between multiple niche technologies.Within the niche of the ‘car of the future’

  19. Scenario drafting to anticipate future developments in technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retel, V.P.; Joore, M.A.; Rutgers, E.J.; Harten, van W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Health Technology Assessment (HTA) information, and in particular cost-effectiveness data is needed to guide decisions, preferably already in early stages of technological development. However, at that moment there is usually a high degree of uncertainty, because evidence is limited and d

  20. Solving Real-Life Problems: Future Mobile Technology Sophistication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARHAN SHAFIQ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all the human being real life concerned domains are taking advantage of latest technologies for enhancing their process, procedures and operations. This integration of technological innovations provides ease of access, flexibility, transparency, reliability and speed for the concerned process and procedures. Rapid growth of ICT (Information and Communication Technology and MT (Mobile Technology provides opportunity to redesign and reengineered the human routines? life activities process and procedures. Technology integration and adoption in routine life activities may serves compensatory mechanism to assist the population in different manner such as monitoring older adults and children at homes, provides security assistance, monitoring and recording patients vital signs automatically, controlling and monitoring equipments and devices, providing assistance in shopping, banking and education as well. Disasters happened suddenly, destroy everything indiscriminately. Adoption and integration of latest technologies including ICT and MT can enhance the current disaster management process, procedures and operations. This research study focuses the impacts of latest and emerging technology trends in routine life activities and surrounds their potential strength to improve and enhance disaster management activities. MT is providing a promising platform for facilitating people to enhance their routine life activities. This research argue that integration and adoption of mobile computing in disaster management domain can enhance disaster management activities with promising minimizing error, quick information assembling, quick response based on technology manipulation and prioritizing action.

  1. Magnetic Refrigeration – an Energy Efficient Technology for the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders; Pryds, Nini

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology that has the potential to significantly reduce the energy consumption in the refrigeration sector. The technology relies on the heating and cooling of magnetic materials upon the application and removal of a magnetic field, respectively....... This magnetocaloric effect is inherent to all magnetic materials, but manifests itself stronger in some materials. The thermodynamically reversible nature of the magnetocaloric effect holds out the promise of a more energy efficient method of refrigeration compared to conventional compressor technology. Coupling...... this with an absence of ozone depleting and greenhouse contributing gasses gives magnetic refrigeration the potential to become an environmentally sustainable technology. The magnetic refrigeration group at Risø DTU aims to demonstrate the technology in a prototype magnetic refrigeration device. Our work spans a wide...

  2. Magnetic Refrigeration – an Energy Efficient Technology for the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders; Pryds, Nini

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology that has the potential to significantly reduce the energy consumption in the refrigeration sector. The technology relies on the heating and cooling of magnetic materials upon the application and removal of a magnetic field, respectively....... This magnetocaloric effect is inherent to all magnetic materials, but manifests itself stronger in some materials. The thermodynamically reversible nature of the magnetocaloric effect holds out the promise of a more energy efficient method of refrigeration compared to conventional compressor technology. Coupling...... this with an absence of ozone depleting and greenhouse contributing gasses gives magnetic refrigeration the potential to become an environmentally sustainable technology. The magnetic refrigeration group at Risø DTU aims to demonstrate the technology in a prototype magnetic refrigeration device. Our work spans a wide...

  3. 技术与未来社会%Technology and the Future Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章笑力

    2011-01-01

    技术改变未来社会.首先,技术对未来社会规模的影响;其次,技术造成未来社会的无人化特征以及使未来社会的风险发生改变;再次,技术改变未来社会的人;最后,技术造成未来社会活动单一化.%Technology changes the future of society. First, the technology impacts on the future social scale; Second, the technology results in unmanned characteristics in future society and makes the risk of future society change; Third, technology change in the future people; Finally, technology results in homogenization in future society.

  4. After globalization future security in a technology rich world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmartin, T J

    2000-02-12

    Over the course of the year 2000, five one-day workshops were conducted by the Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on threats that might come against the US and its allies in the 2015 to 2020 timeframe due to the global availability of advanced technology. These workshops focused on threats that are enabled by nuclear, missile, and space technology; military technology; information technology; bio technology; and geo systems technology. In December, an Integration Workshop and Senior Review before national leaders and experts were held. The participants and reviewers were invited from the DOE National Laboratories, the DOD Services, OSD, DTRA, and DARPA, the DOS, NASA, Congressional technical staff, the intelligence community, universities and university study centers, think tanks, consultants on national security issues, and private industry. For each workshop the process of analysis involved identification and prioritization of the participants' perceived most severe threat scenarios (worst nightmares), discussion of the technologies which enabled those threats, and ranking of the technologies' threat potentials. We were not concerned in this exercise with defining responses, although our assessment of each threat's severity included consideration of the ease or difficulty with which it might be countered. At the concluding Integration Workshop and Senior Panel Review, we brought the various workshops' participants together, added senior participant/reviewers with broad experience and responsibility, and discussed the workshop findings to determine what is most certain, and uncertain, and what might be needed to resolve our uncertainties. This document reports the consensus and important variations of both the reviewers and the participants. In all, 45 threats over a wide range of lethality and probability of occurrence were identified. Over 60 enabling technologies were also discussed. These are

  5. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  6. Next-generation sequencing technology:A technology review and future perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in biomedical research,DNA sequencing not only has been improving its productivity at an exponential growth rate but has also been evolving into a new layout of technological territories toward engineering and physical disciplines over the past three decades.In this technical review,we look into technical characteristics of the next-generation sequencers and provide insights into their future development and applications.We envisage that some of the emerging platforms are capable of supporting the USD1000 genome and USD100 genome goals if given a few years for technical maturation.We also suggest that scientists from China should play an active role in this campaign that will have a profound impact on both scientific research and societal healthcare systems.

  7. Technology Status and the Future of Large Deployable Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Akira; Harada, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Hironori; Tsunoda, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Mitsunobu; Mizuno, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    the number of cables in the conventional S-band antenna reflector. An equilibrium shape analysis confirms that the surface error of better than 0.4 mmRMS can be achieved. reliability in defining the difficulty index of ground deployment testing for large deployable antennas. The relationship between the index value and the accuracy of results from ground deployment testing has been estimated by deployment testing of a simple deployment truss structure under both full and micro- gravity conditions. We found that the deployment reliability of a deployable structure can not be evaluated with adequate accuracy if its size exceeds 10 m.The structure must be divided into modules ofappropriate size. Basic studies on inflatable structures and flexible patch elements for future large aperture, sophisticated direct radiation array antennas are underway. Inflatable structures, which consist of rigidized materials and flexible patch elements for feed elements, are interesting candidates. In addition to these studies, distributed sensor/actuator location, non-linear vibration control method, and optimum design methods are also being addressed. They are key technologies for high performance, highly stable, and re-configurable antenna systems.

  8. Future technologies for optical and infrared telescopes and instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Colin

    2009-08-01

    The theme of this conference is the evolution of telescopes over the last 400 years. I present my view on what the major leaps of technology have been, and attempt to predict what new technologies could come along in the next 50 years to change the way we do astronomy and help us make new discoveries. Are we approaching a peak of innovation and discovery, and will this be followed by a slow decline? Or are there prospects for even further technology leaps and consequent new discoveries? Will global resource and financial crises bring an end to our great ambitions, or will we continue with bigger telescopes and more ambitious space observatories?

  9. Technologies for Future Precision Strike Missile Systems (les Technologies des futurs systemes de missiles pour frappe de precision)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    guidage de précision et de guidage optimal. Les technologies des capteurs GPS/INS avec une évaluation de l’intégration à coût modéré du matériel...technologies des autodirecteurs avec une évaluation des autodirecteurs actifs et passifs à ondes millimétriques et infrarouges. Les technologies

  10. Scenarios to explore the futures of the emerging technology of organic and large area electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Parandian, Alireza; Rip, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies pose challenges for futures research because of their uncertainties combined with promises. Actors are anticipating and acting strategically. Sociotechnical scenarios building on endogenous futures support and enlighten actors. Such scenarios contribute to “strategic intelligence” about the technologies and their embedding in society. Organic and large area electronics promise to substitute silicon-based technologies, but firms and potential users are reluctant to invest...

  11. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any imaginable geometry through the translation of radiological images of patients into digital.stl 3D print files. The creation of anatomical models based on the patient’s pathological conditions using 3D printing technologies would provide good models for training and to design surgical approaches. Hence, 3D printing not only will transform medical healthcare industry but also promises new converging technologies in the field of regenerative medicine.

  12. Future Regulations – A Catalyst for Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary of current mobile source regulations and EPA mobile source regulatory authority with an emphasis on how EPA regulations are a driver for the development and introduction of automotive technology.

  13. Bridge to a sustainable future: National environmental technology strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years the Administration has sought the views of Congress, the states, communities, industry, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and interested citizens on ways to spur the development and use of a new generation of environmental technologies. This document represents the views of thousands of individuals who participated in events around the country to help craft a national environmental technology strategy that will put us on the path to sustainable development.

  14. After Globalization Future Security in a Technology Rich World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmartin,T J

    2001-08-17

    Over the course of the year 2000, five workshops were conducted by the Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on threats to international security in the 2015 to 2020 timeframe due to the global availability of advanced technology. These workshops focused on threats that are enabled by nuclear, missile, and space technology; military technology; information technology; bio technology; and geo systems technology. The participants included US national leaders and experts from the Department of Energy National Laboratories; the Department of Defense: Army, Navy, Air Force, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; the Department of State, NASA, Congressional technical staff, the intelligence community, universities and university study centers, think tanks, consultants on security issues, and private industry. For each workshop the process of analysis involved identification and prioritization of the participants' perceived most severe threat scenarios (worst nightmares), discussion of the technologies which enabled those threats, and ranking of the technologies' threat potentials. The threats ranged from local/regional to global, from intentional to unintended to natural, from merely economic to massively destructive, and from individual and group to state actions. We were not concerned in this exercise with defining responses to the threats, although our assessment of each threat's severity included consideration of the ease or difficulty with which it might be executed or countered. At the concluding review, we brought the various workshops' participants together, added senior participant/reviewers with broad experience and national responsibility, and discussed the workshop findings to determine what is most certain or uncertain, and what might be needed to resolve our uncertainties. This paper summarizes the consenses and

  15. Bridge to a sustainable future: National environmental technology strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years the Administration has sought the views of Congress, the states, communities, industry, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and interested citizens on ways to spur the development and use of a new generation of environmental technologies. This document represents the views of thousands of individuals who participated in events around the country to help craft a national environmental technology strategy that will put us on the path to sustainable development.

  16. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-01-01

    3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any ...

  17. [The status quo and future prospects of emergency medical service systems in Japan in view of the tight supply-demand situation for medical resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruga, Tohru

    2016-02-01

    Considering the tight supply-demand situation for medical resources contributing to emergency medical service(EMS) systems at present and in the future in Japan, the author has explained the present states and future prospects of EMS systems in our country. EMS in remote places in this country is now consisting of the concentration of limited human resources, and is therefore suggestive of the EMS systems in the future, because we will have to deal with the possible exhaustion of EMS in our superannuated society progressing now and in the future. And also EMS systems will have to be maintained in the future with concerted efforts of all the medical staffs. The transferring the medical doctors' tasks to those of nurses and other staffs, that is to say the task shifting has just authorized by recent laws, and so the task shifting will be useful in the future EMS systems performed by all kinds of medical workers, in whom general physicians will be included as they are to be distributed throughout this country in the future.

  18. Republic of technology: reflections on our future community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorstin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In this book, Mr. Boorstin illuminates our everyday concerns with the author's reflections on the new meaning of technology for America and of America for technology. He gives us a bold new view of the two kinds of revolution - the political and technological - and shows us how and why they are different, and why technological revolutions are irreversible. We are a center from which radiate forces that converge human experience everywhere. Though people around the world may not love one another any more than they did, yet their ways of life tend to become more and more alike. These same overwhelming forces of technology that homogenize the culture of the human race have disrupted the international community of nations; large and small nations become equal, but each day the word nation grows more meaningless. Ideology, tribalism, nationalism, the crusading spirit in religion, bigotry, censorship, racism, persecution, immigration and emigration restriction, tariffs, and chauvinism do interpose barriers and these are explored in this controversial book. These barriers will only be temporary. The converging powers of technology will eventually triumph.

  19. Nordic Energy Technologies : Enabling a sustainable Nordic energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, Amund; Smith, Benjamin

    2009-10-15

    A high current Nordic competence in energy technology and an increased need for funding and international cooperation in the field are the main messages of the report. This report summarizes results from 7 different research projects relating to policies for energy technology, funded by Nordic Energy Research for the period 2007-2008, and provides an analysis of the Nordic innovation systems in the energy sector. The Nordic countries possess a high level of competence in the field of renewable energy technologies. Of the total installed capacity comprises a large share of renewable energy, and Nordic technology companies play an important role in the international market. Especially distinguished wind energy, both in view of the installed power and a global technology sales. Public funding for energy research has experienced a significant decline since the oil crisis of the 1970s, although the figures in recent years has increased a bit. According to the IEA, it will require a significant increase in funding to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit further climate change. The third point highlighted in the report is the importance of international cooperation in energy research. Nordic and international cooperation is necessary in order to reduce duplication and create the synergy needed if we are to achieve our ambitious policy objectives in the climate and energy issue. (AG)

  20. Unrelated Future Costs and Unrelated Future Benefits: Reflections on NICE Guide to the Methods of Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Alec; Adler, Amanda I; Bell, David; Briggs, Andrew; Brouwer, Werner; Claxton, Karl; Craig, Neil; Fischer, Alastair; McGregor, Peter; van Baal, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    In this editorial, we consider the vexing issue of 'unrelated future costs' (for example, the costs of caring for people with dementia or kidney failure after preventing their deaths from a heart attack). The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance is not to take such costs into account in technology appraisals. However, standard appraisal practice involves modelling the benefits of those unrelated technologies. We argue that there is a sound principled reason for including both the costs and benefits of unrelated care. Changing this practice would have material consequences for decisions about reimbursing particular technologies, and we urge future research to understand this better. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Chapter 2. Transitions in drug-discovery technology and drug-development in Japan (1980-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Noriko; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In 1970s, the material patent system was introduced in Japan. Since then, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies have endeavored to create original in-house products. From 1980s, many of the innovative products were small molecular drugs and were developed using powerful medicinal-chemical technologies. Among them were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive organs and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese companies were able to launch some blockbuster drugs. At the same time, the pharmaceutical market, which had grown rapidly for two decades, was beginning to level off. From the late 1990s, drug development was slowing down due to the lack of expertise in biotechnology such as genetic engineering. In response to the circumstances, the research and development on biotechnology-based drugs such as antibody drugs have become more dynamic and popular at companies than small molecule drugs. In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the transitions in drug discovery and development between 1980 and 2010.

  2. Future of computing technology in physics - the potentials and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, A.E.

    1984-02-01

    The impact of the developments of modern digital computers is discussed, especially with respect to physics research in the future. The effects of large data processing capability and increasing rates at which data can be acquired and processed are considered. (GHT)

  3. Dynamic Business Collaboration in Supply Chains with Future Internet technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundmaeker, H.; Verdouw, C.N.

    2014-01-01

    The European Future Internet Initiative, called FIWARE, targets in its final and third phase at acceleration of Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SME). The ‘FInish’ accelerator provides grants for realisation of intelligent systems and specifically business to business (B2B) oriented apps for supp

  4. Environmental Consequences of Future Biogas Technologies based on Separated Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involvi...

  5. Future of laser electrophotographic technology for color document printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Michael M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent years have witnessed the development of laser electrophotography as one of the major technologies for document printing, serving a wide range of market applications. With the evolution of color and market demand for color hard copy, electrophotography is again taking center stage to serve the customer need in quality, cost and convenience. Today, electrophotographic technology is used to offer products for color document printing for desktop, mid-volume and high-speed applications. Total cost of ownership, convenience and quality today favor the use of this technology over alternatives in many applications. Development of higher speed color electrophotographic engines demands very high speed, Raster Input Processors and pre-press applications that are expected to become available in the market during the next five years. This presentation will cover the changing environment of office communication and the continuing role of electrophotography in color document printing.

  6. NASA Fixed Wing Project: Green Technologies for Future Aircraft Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelRosario, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advances in multidisciplinary technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. The presentation will highlight the FW Project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve the challenging goals of aviation. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe.

  7. Thermoelectric Energy Conversion: Future Directions and Technology Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the process of thermoelectric energy conversion along with key technology needs and challenges. The topics include: 1) The Case for Thermoelectrics; 2) Advances in Thermoelectrics: Investment Needed; 3) Current U.S. Investment (FY07); 4) Increasing Thermoelectric Materials Conversion Efficiency Key Science Needs and Challenges; 5) Developing Advanced TE Components & Systems Key Technology Needs and Challenges; 6) Thermoelectrics; 7) 200W Class Lightweight Portable Thermoelectric Generator; 8) Hybrid Absorption Cooling/TE Power Cogeneration System; 9) Major Opportunities in Energy Industry; 10) Automobile Waste Heat Recovery; 11) Thermoelectrics at JPL; 12) Recent Advances at JPL in Thermoelectric Converter Component Technologies; 13) Thermoelectrics Background on Power Generation and Cooling Operational Modes; 14) Thermoelectric Power Generation; and 15) Thermoelectric Cooling.

  8. Roadmap will point way for future intelligent building technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-12-31

    A project, funded by five government departments, is underway to develop a roadmap, or guide, for intelligent building technologies to help the construction industry by identifying emerging technologies and market niches, and thereby help stakeholders to make investment and policy decisions. The project concentrates on technologies related to high-rise residential, commercial, industrial and institutional buildings, and covers a spectrum from main equipment to sensors, and communications, artificial reasoning and automated controls for energy management, office automation, indoor environment, local area networking, security, fire control, and maintenance scheduling. The project is overseen by the Institute for Research in Construction of the National Research Council. Also participating is the Continental Automated Building Association (CABA) who act as project managers. Steering committee membership includes representatives from Bell Canada, Honeywell, Hydro-Quebec, IBM, NRC, Natural Resources Canada, Nortel Networks, Siemens and Tridel Corporation. The project is expected to be completed in late spring/early summer of 2001.

  9. Current status and future perspectives of research and development cooperation between utilities, research institutions and universities in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Yasuji [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the research and development activity in the field of electric power production, transmission and distribution in Japan. Organizations participating in the research and development are described with emphasis on theirs roles and cooperation between them. Next described are the R and D subjects and projects carried out by respective organizations. The needs and motivations of respective R and D programs are reviewed briefly together with the financial and human resources put into implementation. The R and D activities in the electric power industry are compared with those in other industrial sectors such as automobile, steel, telecommunication, etc. Mainly in terms of R and D fund. A similar comparison is made with the electric power industry in countries other than Japan. Importance of the international cooperation in stressed for further development of electric power industry and economic progress worldwide. (author) 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. A preliminary impact assessment of typhoon wind risk of residential buildings in Japan under future climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishijima, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Graf, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    This paper performs a quantitative impact assessment of the climate change on typhoon wind risk, focusing on residential buildings in Japan. The risk is assessed based on (1) the typhoon event set extracted from the simulation by the super-high resolution atmospheric general circulation model dev...... of the building portfolio remains unchanged. Based on these results, the assumptions and inputs to the assessment are critically reviewed. Thereby, the needs of further research efforts toward more credible and comprehensive assessment are addressed.......This paper performs a quantitative impact assessment of the climate change on typhoon wind risk, focusing on residential buildings in Japan. The risk is assessed based on (1) the typhoon event set extracted from the simulation by the super-high resolution atmospheric general circulation model...

  11. Photovoltaic electricity production in Japan; La production d'electricite d'origine photovoltaique au Japon: le passe, le present, le futur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destruel, P

    2009-07-01

    The author first recalls the early investment of Japan in the solar energy which gave a leadership position to this country. However, it has been recently over-taken by Germany and Spain in terms of installed power. The share of the different technologies for the manufacturing of photovoltaic panels (polycrystalline silicon, mono-crystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, copper-indium-selenium cells) of different sizes, is presented, together with the current measures which are aimed at giving a new boost to this sector. The author tries then to foresee the evolutions of this sector during the next years and in a longer term (market prospective evolutions, factory projects, power station projects)

  12. ``Recent experiences and future expectations in data storage technology''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Jack

    1990-08-01

    For more than 10 years the conventional media for High Energy Physics has been 9 track magnetic tape in various densities. More recently, especially in Europe, the IBM 3480 technology has been adopted while in the United States, especially at Fermilab, 8 mm is being used by the largest experiments as a primary recording media and where possible they are using 8 mm for the production, analysis and distribution of data summary tapes. VHS and Digital Audio tape have recurrently appeared but seem to serve primarily as a back-up storage media. The reasons for what appear to be a radical departure are many. Economics (media and controllers are inexpensive), form factor (two gigabytes per shirt pocket), and convenience (fewer mounts/dismounts per minute) are dominant among the reasons. The traditional data media suppliers seem to have been content to evolve the traditional media at their own pace with only modest enhancements primarily in ``value engineering'' of extant products. Meanwhile, start-up companies providing small system and workstations sought other media both to reduce the price of their offerings and respond to the real need of lower cost back-up for lower cost systems. This happening in a market context where traditional computer systems vendors were leaving the tape market altogether or shifting to ``3480'' technology which has certainly created a climate for reconsideration and change. The newest data storage products, in most cases, are not coming from the technologies developed by the computing industry but by the audio and video industry. Just where these flopticals, opticals, 19 mm tape and the new underlying technologies, such as, ``digital paper'' may fit in the HEP computing requirement picture will be reviewed. What these technologies do for and to HEP will be discussed along with some suggestions for a methodology for tracking and evaluating extant and emerging technologies.

  13. The current status and future perspectives of organ donation in Japan: learning from the systems in other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyama, Akihiko; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The revised Organ Transplant Law came into effect in Japan in July 2010. The law allows for organ procurement from brain-dead individuals, including children, with family consent from subjects who had not previously rejected organ donation. Nevertheless, the number of cadaveric organ donations has not increased as expected. The Spanish Model is widely known as the most successful system in the field of organ donation. The system includes an earlier referral of possible donors to the transplant coordination teams, a new family-based approach and care methods, and the development of additional training courses aimed at specific groups of professionals, which are supported by their corresponding societies. South Korea, a country which neighbors Japan, has recently succeeded in increasing the rates of organ donation by introducing several systems, such as incentive programs, an organ procurement organization, a donor registry, and a system to facilitate potential donor referral. In this review, we present the current status of organ donation in Japan and also explore various factors that may help to improve the country's low donation rate based on the experiences of other developed countries.

  14. Maternal age and birth defects after the use of assisted reproductive technology in Japan, 2004–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooki S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Syuichi OokiDepartment of Health Science, Ishikawa Prefectural Nursing University, Ishikawa, JapanBackground: Older mothers are becoming more common in Japan. One reason for this is the widespread use of assisted reproductive technology (ART. This study assesses the relationship between maternal age and the risk of birth defects after ART.Methods: Nationwide data on ART between 2004 and 2010 in Japan were analyzed. Diseases that were classified as code Q00-Q99 (ie, congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities in the International Classification of Diseases, tenth edition, were selected. There were 219,185 pregnancies and 153,791 live births in total ART. Of these, 1943 abortions, stillbirths, or live births with birth defects were recorded. Percentage of multiple birth defects in total birth defects, the prevalence, crude relative risk and 95% confidence interval per 10,000 pregnancies and per 10,000 live births were analyzed according to the maternal age class (ie, 25–29, 30–34 (reference, 35–39, and 40+ years.Results: Multiple birth defects were observed among 14% of the 25–29 year old class, and 8% among other classes when chromosomal abnormalities were excluded. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities per pregnancy and per live birth became significantly and rapidly higher in mothers in the age classes of 30–35 and 40+ years. Nonchromosomal birth defects per pregnancy decreased linearly with advanced maternal age, while the number of nonchromosomal birth defects per live birth formed a gradual U-shaped distribution. The prevalence per pregnancy of congenital malformations of the nervous system was significantly lower with advanced maternal age. The relative risk per live birth was significant regarding congenital malformations of the circulatory system for a maternal age of 40+ years. Some other significant associations between maternal age and birth defects were observed.Conclusion: Maternal age is

  15. The current status of the development of the technology on 3D computer simulation in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Park, Seung Kook; Chung, Un Soo; Jung, Ki Jung

    2002-05-01

    The development background and property of the COSIDA, which is the 3D computer simulation system for the analysis on the dismantling procedure of the nuclear facilities in Japan was reviewed. The function of the visualization on the work area, Kinematics analysis and dismantling scenario analysis, which are the sub systems of the COSIDA, has been investigated. The physical, geometrical and radiological properties were modelled in 2D or 3D in the sub system of the visualization of the work area. In the sub system of the kinematics analysis, the command set on the basic work procedure for the control of the motion of the models at a cyber space was driven. The suitability of the command set was estimated by the application of COSIDA to the programming on the motion of the remote dismantling tools for dismantling the components of the nuclear facilities at cyber space.

  16. Understanding Technology Adoption: Theory and Future Directions for Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Evan T.

    2009-01-01

    How and why individuals adopt innovations has motivated a great deal of research. This article examines individuals' computing adoption processes through the lenses of three adoption theories: Rogers's innovation diffusion theory, the Concerns-Based Adoption Model, the Technology Acceptance Model, and the United Theory of Acceptance and Use of…

  17. Advanced Budget Technology in Education: The Future Is Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bruce S.; Nisonoff, Philip; Speakman, Sheree T.

    2001-01-01

    The techno-revolution is arriving in school business officials' domain. This article discusses four major effects of technology on budgeting and financial management of schools: enhanced strategic planning and mission building, budget standards without standardized spending, movement from system to student, and integration of multiple reporting…

  18. CRISPR technologies for bacterial systems: Current achievements and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the decades of its history, the advances in bacteria-based bio-industries have coincided with great leaps in strain engineering technologies. Recently unveiled clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) systems are now revolution......Throughout the decades of its history, the advances in bacteria-based bio-industries have coincided with great leaps in strain engineering technologies. Recently unveiled clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) systems are now...... revolutionizing biotechnology as well as biology. Diverse technologies have been derived from CRISPR/Cas systems in bacteria, yet the applications unfortunately have not been actively employed in bacteria as extensively as in eukaryotic organisms. A recent trend of engineering less explored strains in industrial...... microbiology-metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and other related disciplines-is demanding facile yet robust tools, and various CRISPR technologies have potential to cater to the demands. Here, we briefly review the science in CRISPR/Cas systems and the milestone inventions that enabled numerous CRISPR...

  19. Future of health technology assessment studies in gene and cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... The application of new knowledge and technological change is a key driver of the achievements in policy decisions in health ... extension of human life, reduction of pain, disease risk .... of uncertainty, (ii) the transferring of results of evaluations between .... up R&D companies are benefitting especially at the.

  20. Biomass torrefaction technology: Techno-economic status and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batidzirai, B.; Mignot, A.P.R.; Schakel, W.B.; Junginger, H.M.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Torrefaction is a promising bioenergy pre-treatment technology, with potential to make a major contribution to the commodification of biomass. However, there is limited scientific knowledge on the techno-economic performance of torrefaction. This study therefore improves available knowledge on torre

  1. The Future of Higher Education: How Technology Will Shape Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Marie; D'Agostino, Debra, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    On October 20, 2008, the New Media Consortium announced the release of a white paper produced in conjunction with the Economist Magazine and in collaboration with Apple, Inc. This paper reports the results of a study of nearly 300 CIOs and technology leaders inside and outside of education to gain deeper insight into the wider impact of technology…

  2. Role development of nurses for technology-dependent children attending mainstream schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Suzuki, Machiko

    2015-04-01

    To describe the role development of nurses caring for medical technology-dependent children attending Japanese mainstream schools. Semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses caring for technology-dependent children were conducted and analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. Nurses developed roles centered on maintaining technology-dependent children's physical health to support children's learning with each other, through building relationships, learning how to interact with children, understanding the children and the school community, and realizing the meaning of supporting technology-dependent children. These findings support nurses to build relationships of mutual trust with teachers and children, and learn on the job in mainstream schools. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Organization of career-oriented educational environment for future teachers of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Nikonova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors view the various directions of work of the chair of technology and methods of teaching technology of Perm State Social and Pedagogic University, aimed at creating professionalized environment for future teachers of technology. The work includes network communication in the process of study disciplines, quasiprofessional activities, organization of creative and research work of students, methodical maintenance of technological education in the region

  4. JPRS Report Science & Technology Japan STA 1988 White Paper Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-13

    crops, including potatoes and tangerines , in March 1988 at the national research institutes and JAERI. The irradiation of food has come to be...advanced technology seeds cul- tivation research consignment costs 1,253 1,242 100 Seed cultivation by advanced bio- 100 technology...Laboratory, Tsukuba Medicinal Plant Cultivation Laboratory Agricultural Research Center Agricultural Biological Resources Research Institute

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, Chad [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bain, Richard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chapman, Jamie [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Drury, Easan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hall, Douglas G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lantz, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thresher, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bishop, Norman A. [Knight Piesold, Denver, CO (United States); Brown, Stephen R. [HDR/DTA, Portland, ME (Untied States); Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Felker, Fort [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fernandez, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Goodrich, Alan C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hagerman, George [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); O' Neil, Sean [Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition, Portland, OR (United States); Paquette, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Young, Katherine [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  6. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.); Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University); DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC)

    2000-02-01

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  7. Bioreactor technology in marine microbiology: from design to future application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Arends, Jan B A; Van de Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Marine micro-organisms have been playing highly diverse roles over evolutionary time: they have defined the chemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. During the last decades, the bioreactors with novel designs have become an important tool to study marine microbiology and ecology in terms of: marine microorganism cultivation and deep-sea bioprocess characterization; unique bio-chemical product formation and intensification; marine waste treatment and clean energy generation. In this review we briefly summarize the current status of the bioreactor technology applied in marine microbiology and the critical parameters to take into account during the reactor design. Furthermore, when we look at the growing population, as well as, the pollution in the coastal areas of the world, it is urgent to find sustainable practices that beneficially stimulate both the economy and the natural environment. Here we outlook a few possibilities where innovative bioreactor technology can be applied to enhance energy generation and food production without harming the local marine ecosystem.

  8. Current and future assisted reproductive technologies for mammalian farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Reproduction in domestic animals is under control by man and the technologies developed to facilitate that control have a major impact on the efficiency of food production. Reproduction is an energy-intensive process. In beef cattle, for example, over 50 % of the total feed consumption required to produce a unit of meat protein is consumed by the dam of the meat animal (Anim Prod 27:367-379, 1978). Sows are responsible for about 20 % of the total feed needed to produce animals for slaughter (Adv Pork Prod 19:223-237, 2008). Accordingly, energy input to produce food from animal sources is reduced by increasing number of offspring per unit time a breeding female is in the herd. Using beef cattle as an example again, life-cycle efficiency for production of weaned calves is positively related to early age at puberty and short calving intervals (J Anim Sci 57:852-866, 1983). Reproductive technologies also dictate the strategies that can be used to select animals genetically for traits that improve production. Of critical importance has been artificial insemination (AI) (Anim Reprod Sci 62:143-172, 2000; Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci 38:411-441, 2007; Reprod Domest Anim 43:379-385, 2008; J Dairy Sci 92:5814-5833, 2009) and, as will be outlined in this chapter, emerging technologies offer additional opportunities for improvements in genetic selection. Given the central role of reproduction as a determinant of production efficiency and in genetic selection, improvements in reproductive technologies will be crucial to meeting the challenges created by the anticipated increases in world population (from seven billion people in 2011 to an anticipated nine billion by 2050; World population prospects: the 2010 revision, highlights and advance tables. Working Paper No. ESA/P/WP.220, New York) and by difficulties in livestock production wrought by climate change (SAT eJournal 4:1-23, 2007).The purpose of this chapter will be to highlight current and emerging reproductive

  9. Technology and future prospects for lightweight plastic vehicle structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.M.; Bonsignore, P.V.

    1997-08-01

    The state of the technology and the materials and processing issues of using plastics in vehicle body applications (structural and semistructural) were assessed. Plastics are significantly lighter in weight, more easily fabricated into complex shapes, and more corrosion resistance than sheet steel, high-strength steel, or aluminum. However, at their current stage of development, plastics are deficient in one or more necessary properties: heat resistance and dimensional stability, stiffness and tensile strength, toughness, and impact resistance. To upgrade their physical properties for automotive chassis/body applications, plastics need to be compounds with suitable reinforcing fibers. As a short-term approach, the material of choice is a composite structure made with low-cost glass-fiber reinforcement, such as that made in the resin-transfer-molding (RTM) process and used in the body of the Dodge Viper. However, RTM technology based on thermosets requires a processing cycle time that is too long for large production runs. Adaptation of RTM to the formation of thermoplastic composite bodies could have a significant advantage over thermoset technology. Cyclic oligomers, which are precursors to thermoplastic matrix polymers, show promise for this application. Farther on the horizon are advanced composites compounds with the much more expensive (but stronger and stiffer) carbon-fiber reinforcement. However, significant price reductions of precursor materials and advances in processing and fabrication would be needed. Other materials holding promise are liquid crystal polymers (LCP) and LCP blends with other polymers (molecular composites). However, the cost of monomers and the subsequent polymerization technology also remains a considerable drawback to the widespread and increasing acceptance of LCPs.

  10. The Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) technology: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denyer, John; Dyche, Tony

    2010-04-01

    Conventional aerosol delivery systems and the availability of new technologies have led to the development of "intelligent" nebulizers such as the I-neb Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) System. Based on the AAD technology, the I-neb AAD System has been designed to continuously adapt to changes in the patient's breathing pattern, and to pulse aerosol only during the inspiratory part of the breathing cycle. This eliminates waste of aerosol during exhalation, and creates a foundation for precise aerosol (dose) delivery. To facilitate the delivery of precise metered doses of aerosol to the patient, a unique metering chamber design has been developed. Through the vibrating mesh technology, the metering chamber design, and the AAD Disc function, the aerosol output rate and metered (delivered) dose can be tailored to the demands of the specific drug to be delivered. In the I-neb AAD System, aerosol delivery is guided through two algorithms, one for the Tidal Breathing Mode (TBM), and one for slow and deep inhalations, the Target Inhalation Mode (TIM). The aim of TIM is to reduce the treatment time by increasing the total inhalation time per minute, and to increase lung deposition by reducing impaction in the upper airways through slow and deep inhalations. A key feature of the AAD technology is the patient feedback mechanisms that are provided to guide the patient on delivery performance. These feedback signals, which include visual, audible, and tactile forms, are configured in a feedback cascade that leads to a high level of compliance with the use of the I-neb AAD System. The I-neb Insight and the Patient Logging System facilitate a further degree of sophistication to the feedback mechanisms, by providing information on long term adherence and compliance data. These can be assessed by patients and clinicians via a Web-based delivery of information in the form of customized graphical analyses.

  11. Risoe energy report 6. Future options for energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L. (eds.)

    2007-11-15

    Fossil fuels provide about 80% of the global energy demand, and this will continue to be the situation for decades to come. In the European Community we are facing two major energy challenges. The first is sustainability, and the second is security of supply, since Europe is becoming more dependent on imported fuels. These challenges are the starting point for the present Risoe Energy Report 6. It gives an overview of the energy scene together with trends and emerging energy technologies. The report presents status and trends for energy technologies seen from a Danish and European perspective from three points of view: security of supply, climate change and industrial perspectives. The report addresses energy supply technologies, efficiency improvements and transport. The report is volume 6 in a series of reports covering energy issues at global, regional and national levels. The individual chapters of the report have been written by staff members from the Technical University of Denmark and Risoe National Laboratory together with leading Danish and international experts. The report is based on the latest research results from Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, together with available internationally recognized scientific material, and is fully referenced and refereed by renowned experts. Information on current developments is taken from the most up-to-date and authoritative sources available. Our target groups are colleagues, collaborating partners, customers, funding organizations, the Danish government and international organizations including the European Union, the International Energy Agency and the United Nations. (au)

  12. HTS technology - Generating the future of offshore wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Jens

    2010-09-15

    Superconductive generator design is going to become a real competitive alternative in the future. In general, superconductor design is the most competitive out of Direct Drive Systems and best fulfils the needs of the upcoming market - especially in the offshore market, where WECs with higher nominal power up to 10MW are required. Low weight, high reliability and the very good grid behaviour are the main advantages of the superconductor generator design and will lead to lower costs. The other systems are restricted to a smaller energy output range and / or onshore wind power production business.

  13. Special CAM97 Plenary Session on the Future of Science and Technology in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, D. Allan; Good, Mary; Cisneros, Carmen; Robertson, Beverly

    1997-04-01

    Keynote Address: "The Future of American Science and Technology" Mary Good, Assistant Secretary, United States Department of Commerce, Remarks by: Carmen Cisneros, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Beverly Robertson, Canadian Physical Society D. Allan Bromley, The American Physical Society

  14. Physicochemical and biological technologies for future exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, S.; Buchert, M.; Bretschneider, J.; Nathanson, E.; Fasoulas, S.

    2014-08-01

    Life Support Systems (LSS) are essential for human spaceflight. They are the key element for humans to survive, to live and to work in space. Ambitious goals of human space exploration in the next 40 years like a permanently crewed surface habitat on Moon or a manned mission to Mars require technologies which allow for a reduction of system and resupply mass. Enhancements of existing technologies, new technological developments and synergetic components integration help to close the oxygen, water and carbon loops. In order to design the most efficient LSS architecture for a given mission scenario, it is important to follow a dedicated design process: definition of requirements, selection of candidate technologies, development of possible LSS architectures and characterisation of LSS architectures by system drivers and evaluation of the LSS architectures. This paper focuses on the approach of a synergetic integration of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEFC) and microalgae cultivated in photobioreactors (PBR). LSS architectures and their benefits for selected mission scenarios are demonstrated. Experiments on critical processes and interfaces were conducted and result in engineering models for a PEFC and PBR system which fulfil the requirements of a synergetic integrative environment. The PEFC system (about 1 kW) can be operated with cabin air enriched by stored or biologically generated oxygen instead of pure oxygen. This offers further advantages with regard to thermal control as high oxygen concentrations effect a dense heat production. The PBR system consists of an illuminated cultivation chamber (about 5 l), a nutrients supply and harvesting and analytics units. Especially the chamber enables a microgravity adapted cultivation of microalgae. However, the peripheral units still have to be adapted in order to allow for a continuous and automated cultivation and harvesting. These automation processes will be tested and evaluated by means of a parabolic

  15. Big data related technologies, challenges and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Min; Zhang, Yin; Leung, Victor CM

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief provides a comprehensive overview of the background and recent developments of big data. The value chain of big data is divided into four phases: data generation, data acquisition, data storage and data analysis. For each phase, the book introduces the general background, discusses technical challenges and reviews the latest advances. Technologies under discussion include cloud computing, Internet of Things, data centers, Hadoop and more. The authors also explore several representative applications of big data such as enterprise management, online social networks, healthcar

  16. 9th FTRA International Conference on Future Information Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yi; Kim, Cheon-Shik; Yang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The new multimedia standards (for example, MPEG-21) facilitate the seamless integration of multiple modalities into interoperable multimedia frameworks, transforming the way people work and interact with multimedia data. These key technologies and multimedia solutions interact and collaborate with each other in increasingly effective ways, contributing to the multimedia revolution and having a significant impact across a wide spectrum of consumer, business, healthcare, education, and governmental domains.  This book aims to provide a complete coverage of the areas outlined and to bring together the researchers from academic and industry as well as practitioners to share ideas, challenges, and solutions relating to the multifaceted aspects of this field.

  17. Science, technology and the future of small autonomous drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreano, Dario; Wood, Robert J

    2015-05-28

    We are witnessing the advent of a new era of robots - drones - that can autonomously fly in natural and man-made environments. These robots, often associated with defence applications, could have a major impact on civilian tasks, including transportation, communication, agriculture, disaster mitigation and environment preservation. Autonomous flight in confined spaces presents great scientific and technical challenges owing to the energetic cost of staying airborne and to the perceptual intelligence required to negotiate complex environments. We identify scientific and technological advances that are expected to translate, within appropriate regulatory frameworks, into pervasive use of autonomous drones for civilian applications.

  18. Science, technology and the future of small autonomous drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreano, Dario; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    We are witnessing the advent of a new era of robots -- drones -- that can autonomously fly in natural and man-made environments. These robots, often associated with defence applications, could have a major impact on civilian tasks, including transportation, communication, agriculture, disaster mitigation and environment preservation. Autonomous flight in confined spaces presents great scientific and technical challenges owing to the energetic cost of staying airborne and to the perceptual intelligence required to negotiate complex environments. We identify scientific and technological advances that are expected to translate, within appropriate regulatory frameworks, into pervasive use of autonomous drones for civilian applications.

  19. Space Science &Technology in Mauritius: Current Status and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.; Beeharry, G. K.; Golap, K.; Issur, N. H.; Somanah, R.; Rughooputh, H. C. S.; Udayashankar, N.; Mueller, K.

    Space research (with either direct or indirect spin-offs) has been instrumental in leading to accomplishments that are meant to improve our quality of life in its broadest perspective. But are we all acquainted of the now proven-use of these findings and their capabilities? What do these mean to a remote small insular developing state like Mauritius? This paper explores the recent developments in this field in Mauritius and how we intend to optimize the use of the emerging technologies. Initiatives of the University of Mauritius are highlighted.

  20. The Future's Future: Implications of Emerging Technology for Special Education Program Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews emerging technologies, imagines how they can be used to help learners with special needs, and recommends new special education program initiatives to help these students make a meaningful transition from school to work. Wearable computers, personal computing devices, DVD, HDTV, MP3, and personal digital assistants are…

  1. Neuroscience and nanotechnologies in Japan--beyond the hope and hype of converging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushiaki, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnologies are often said to be "converging" with other technologies like biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science. And so-called "NBIC convergence" is thought to enable "enhancement" of human performance. First, I classify various kinds of enhancement. Second, I focus on the "cybernetic enhancement," to which nanotechnologies are supposed to contribute, and analyze the connection and integration of humans with machines, which could lead to the cyborgization of human beings. Third, I examine the portrayal of robot/cyborg technology in Japanese popular media, point out the tendency to empathy or ensoulment concerning robots/cyborgs, and raise the question of "ethical issues of ethical enhancement." Fourth, I compare nanotechnologies with neurotechnology and criticize the hype of "converging technologies."

  2. Contactless thin adaptive mirror technology: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Salinari, Piero; Riccardi, Armando; Mantegazza, Paolo

    2010-07-01

    The contactless, voice coil motor adaptive mirror technology starts from an idea by Piero Salinari in 1993. This idea has progressively evolved to real systems thanks to a fruitful collaboration involving Italian research institutes (INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and Aerospace Department of Politecnico di Milano) and small Italian enterprises (Microgate and ADS). Collaboration between research institutions and industry is still very effectively in place, but nowadays the technology has left the initial R&D phase reaching a stage in which the whole projects are managed by the industrial entities. In this paper we present the baseline concept and its evolution, describing the main progress milestones. These are paced by the actual implementation of this idea into real systems, from MMT, to LBT, Magellan, VLT, GMT and E-ELT. The fundamental concept and layout has remained unchanged through this evolution, maintaining its intrinsic advantages: tolerance to actuators' failures, mechanical de-coupling and relaxed tolerances between correcting mirror and reference structure, large stroke, hysteresis-free behavior. Moreover, this concept has proved its expandability to very large systems with thousands of controlled d.o.f. Notwithstanding the solidity of the fundamentals, the implementation has strongly evolved from the beginning, in order to deal with the dimensional, power, maintainability and reliability constraints imposed by the increased size of the targeted systems.

  3. Conference on Future Automotive Technology Focus Electro Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The increasing trend towards electric cars leads to several challenges for the automobile industry, research institutes and politics as well as for the society. Research and serial development move closer together to meet automotive standards with new components such as traction batteries integrated into hybrid and electrical drivetrains. Furthermore, the influence of e-mobility on the daily mobility behavior, the effects on the automotive supply chain and the impact on industrial production have to be taken into account. According to these complex aspects it is crucial to not only acquire specific knowledge in the particular fields but also to consider their functional interaction. Therefore, it seems essential to merge competence from science, economy and politics. This year, the annual „Conference on Future Automotive Technology“ as the follow-up of the „2. Automobiltechnisches Kolloquium München” focuses on the economical realization of widespread automotive electro mobility. Contents - Energy St...

  4. Technology for whom: an old answer to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Pompa, A.

    1978-01-01

    With food production the world's main problem, techniques such as Mexico's chinampa agriculture have become significant examples of how early cultures found solutions to their food problem. Chinampa, combining self-sufficiency with intensive hand labor, is based on a network of irrigation channels surrounding small raised plots of land. Organic debris from aquatic and land plants, seeds, organic mud, and manure constantly replenished the soil. As agriculture developed, the channels served as a transportation network. Specially constructed seed beds for transplanting the highest quality plants were developed when the system became too large to fertilize. Still used in Mexico today, the system yields very high crops. As an ecosystem, it is also applicable to terraced hills and humid tropics and illustrates that world food production levels could be raised by studying and adapting ancient technologies.

  5. Automotive Technology and Human Factors Research: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyuki Akamatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the history of automotive technology development and human factors research, largely by decade, since the inception of the automobile. The human factors aspects were classified into primary driving task aspects (controls, displays, and visibility, driver workspace (seating and packaging, vibration, comfort, and climate, driver’s condition (fatigue and impairment, crash injury, advanced driver-assistance systems, external communication access, and driving behavior. For each era, the paper describes the SAE and ISO standards developed, the major organizations and conferences established, the major news stories affecting vehicle safety, and the general social context. The paper ends with a discussion of what can be learned from this historical review and the major issues to be addressed. A major contribution of this paper is more than 180 references that represent the foundation of automotive human factors, which should be considered core knowledge and should be familiar to those in the profession.

  6. The EDIT school trains future experts in detector technologies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The Excellence in Detectors and Instrumentation Technologies (EDIT) School has just taken place for the first time. The enthusiastic feedback from the organizers and the participants shows how the School’s format is just the right formula for today’s young researchers specializing in experimental physics. To mark the importance of the event, Rolf Heuer dedicated the School to Georges Charpak.   Rolf Heuer and Pier Oddone visit Building 154, which hosted some of the EDIT School laboratory activities. Like many other branches of science, today’s particle physics relies on very complex instruments to provide the performance that unresolved questions require. When we say ‘particle physics’ we actually mean a whole lot of different specializations that young researchers choose to pursue when they are at university. “In the present situation, it might very well happen that an experimental particle physicist at the end of his/her studies has ne...

  7. Centralization or decentralization of technology information: future cooperation or competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, E.

    1982-01-01

    Although advocates of decentralization cite the values of individual privacy, human dimensions, and potential for creativity and innovation, the advent of microcomputer technology during the past five years brought the first real reversal of the trend toward centralization. Both systems have their economic, social, and technical consequences. Centralization, for example, has the advantages of scale economy, coordination, and the control of lower-level activities to meet higher-level goals. At issue are the problems of sharing and data distribution. A hybridism of systems will take place in the next five years along with a conversion to smaller, more-flexible and personal systems as microprocessors come down in price. Application will determine the extent of centralization for each system. The shift will affect education, international forums, the type of work conducted in the service sector, and life styles, and will introduce legal, political, and organizational problems. 7 references. (DCK)

  8. Carbon The Future Material for Advanced Technology Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Messina, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-based materials and their applications constitute a burgeoning topic of scientific research among scientists and engineers attracted from diverse areas such as applied physics, materials science, biology, mechanics, electronics and engineering. Further development of current materials, advances in their applications, and discovery of new forms of carbon are the themes addressed by the frontier research in these fields. This book covers all the fundamental topics concerned with amorphous and crystalline C-based materials, such as diamond, diamond-like carbon, carbon alloys, carbon nanotubes. The goal is, by coherently progressing from growth - and characterisation techniques to technological applications for each class of material, to fashion the first comprehensive state-of-the-art review of this fast evolving field of research in carbon materials.

  9. Driving into the future: how imaging technology is shaping the future of cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Buyue

    2015-03-01

    Fueled by the development of advanced driver assistance system (ADAS), autonomous vehicles, and the proliferation of cameras and sensors, automotive is becoming a rich new domain for innovations in imaging technology. This paper presents an overview of ADAS, the important imaging and computer vision problems to solve for automotive, and examples of how some of these problems are solved, through which we highlight the challenges and opportunities in the automotive imaging space.

  10. Constructing Optimal Futures for Education - Technology Foresight in Educational Policy and Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tryggvi Thayer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on challenges associated with the use of technology foresight for developing long-term strategies for innovative uses of ICT in education with an emphasis on the role of creativity. The outcomes of two international foresight programmes on the future of education are critically examined. The findings demonstrate the need to address programme participants’ capacity to engage in systematic futures thinking and to emphasise creative aspects of constructing shared visions of the future.

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  12. Educational Technology Use in Distance Education: Historical Review and Future Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the potential for using educational technology in distance education in developing countries as well as in established programs. The British Open University is discussed, and technology described includes television, cable, videodisc, satellites, teletext, videotext, computers, and radio. Future trends in the field are also discussed. (15…

  13. Professional values, technology and future health care: The view of health care professionals in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, M.E.; van Hoof, J.; van Hout, A.M.; Aarts, S.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Nieboer, M.E., van Hoof, J., van Hout, A.M., Aarts, S., Wouters, E.J.M. (2014) Professional values, technology and future health care: The view of health care professionals in The Netherlands. Technology in Society 39:10-17 doi: 10.1016/j.techsoc.2014.05.003

  14. Flexible Pedagogies: Technology-Enhanced Learning. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This publication is part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future". It focuses on a better understanding of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) and: (1) identifies key international drivers in the move towards technology-enhanced learning; (2) highlights some of the challenges and opportunities…

  15. Looking to the future following 10 years of induced pluripotent stem cell technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has fundamentally changed our view on developmental cell-fate determination and led to a cascade of technological innovations in regenerative medicine. Here we provide an overview of the progress in the field over the past decade, as well as our perspective on future directions and clinical implications of iPSC technology.

  16. Communications Technology in the Future of Higher Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert P.

    An examination is made of the potential role of communications media and technology in the future of higher education in the United States (U.S.). The status of U.S. higher education is reviewed, important trends are identified, and the rationale for increased technological utilization is discussed. This is followed by a description of selected…

  17. Current status and future tasks of the Sunshine Project. (Development of new energy technology)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, T.

    1983-01-01

    Since its inception in 1974, the Sunshine Project has involved advances in new energy technology in many areas. The present report covers the principal areas of activity in 1980, examining the development status of solar energy, goethermal energy, coal liquefaction and gasification, hydrogen energy, wind power, ocean thermal energy conversion, etc. Future trends and tasks of new energy technology development are discussed. (In Japanese)

  18. The Future: Science & Technology Enter the 21st Century. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezkovich, Jan, Comp.

    Innovations in communications, space, medicine, and other technologies are sure to have an impact on the world of tomorrow and the way we view that world. This guide to the literature on future technology is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set of resources that can be used to focus on…

  19. Social network analysis for technology-enhanced learning: review and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory; Ullmann, Thomas; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Cela, Karina; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sie, R. L. L., Ullmann, T. D., Rajagopal, K., Cela, K., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). Social network analysis for technology-enhanced learning: review and future directions. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(3/4), 172-190.

  20. Global mining risk footprint of critical metals necessary for low-carbon technologies: the case of neodymium, cobalt, and platinum in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansai, Keisuke; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Kondo, Yasushi; Shigetomi, Yosuke; Suh, Sangwon

    2015-02-17

    Meeting the 2-degree global warming target requires wide adoption of low-carbon energy technologies. Many such technologies rely on the use of precious metals, however, increasing the dependence of national economies on these resources. Among such metals, those with supply security concerns are referred to as critical metals. Using the Policy Potential Index developed by the Fraser Institute, this study developed a new footprint indicator, the mining risk footprint (MRF), to quantify the mining risk directly and indirectly affecting a national economy through its consumption of critical metals. We formulated the MRF as a product of the material footprint (MF) of the consuming country and the mining risks of the countries where the materials are mined. A case study was conducted for the 2005 Japanese economy to determine the MF and MRF for three critical metals essential for emerging energy technologies: neodymium, cobalt and platinum. The results indicate that in 2005 the MFs generated by Japanese domestic final demand, that is, the consumption-based metal output of Japan, were 1.0 × 10(3) t for neodymium, 9.4 × 10(3) t for cobalt, and 2.1 × 10 t for platinum. Export demand contributes most to the MF, accounting for 3.0 × 10(3) t, 1.3 × 10(5) t, and 3.1 × 10 t, respectively. The MRFs of Japanese total final demand (domestic plus export) were calculated to be 1.7 × 10 points for neodymium, 4.5 × 10(-2) points for cobalt, and 5.6 points for platinum, implying that the Japanese economy is incurring a high mining risk through its use of neodymium. This country's MRFs are all dominated by export demand. The paper concludes by discussing the policy implications and future research directions for measuring the MFs and MRFs of critical metals. For countries poorly endowed with mineral resources, adopting low-carbon energy technologies may imply a shifting of risk from carbon resources to other natural resources, in particular critical metals, and a trade

  1. PREFACE: 2nd Russia-Japan-USA Symposium on the Fundamental and Applied Problems of Terahertz Devices and Technologies (RJUS TeraTech - 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Valeriy; Ryzhii, Viktor; Yurchenko, Stanislav

    2014-03-01

    The 2nd Russia-Japan-USA Symposium 'The Fundamental & Applied Problems of Terahertz Devices & Technologies' (RJUS TeraTech - 2013) Bauman Moscow State Technical University Moscow, Russia, 3-6 June, 2013 The 2nd Russia-Japan-USA Symposium 'The Fundamental & Applied Problems of Terahertz Devices & Technologies' (RJUS TeraTech - 2013) was held in Bauman Moscow State Technical University on 3-6 June 2013 and was devoted to modern problems of terahertz optical technologies. RJUS TeraTech 2013 was organized by Bauman Moscow State Technical University in cooperation with Tohoku University (Sendai, Japan) and University of Buffalo (The State University of New York, USA). The Symposium was supported by Bauman Moscow State Technical University (Moscow, Russia) and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant number 13-08-06100-g). RJUS TeraTech - 2013 became a foundation for sharing and discussing modern and promising achievements in fundamental and applied problems of terahertz optical technologies, devices based on grapheme and grapheme strictures, condensed matter of different nature. Among participants of RJUS TeraTech - 2013, there were more than 100 researchers and students from different countries. This volume contains proceedings of the 2nd Russia-Japan-USA Symposium 'The Fundamental & Applied Problems of Terahertz Devices & Technologies'. Valeriy Karasik, Viktor Ryzhii and Stanislav Yurchenko Bauman Moscow State Technical University Symposium chair Anatoliy A Aleksandrov, Rector of BMSTU Symposium co-chair Valeriy E Karasik, Head of the Research and Educational Center 'PHOTONICS AND INFRARED TECHNOLOGY' (Russia) Invited Speakers Taiichi Otsuji, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan Akira Satou, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan Michael Shur, Electrical, Computer and System Engineering and Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY, USA Natasha

  2. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gab and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    2004-01-01

    , who represents both "technology push" and "market pull", which we feel are both very important basic driving forces. The aim is to get an idea of the very different roles acience or technology can play in the near future for a specific industry, in this case the Danish food industry, and present...... there are many technologies whose impact can be relevantly studied from a varety of different angles, this is indeed a challing task if we want ot ende up with an overall picture of the impact of technology. In this chapte, we consequently do not start by looking at any particular technology and discussing what...

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Joint Convention of Electrical and Information Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-26

    fabricate the device. 118 Silicon-on-insulator " tecno g Refractory interconnect; A# contact formation technology Seed deposition Throuqhhole technology; fine...adapter I S D N terminal b ) Connection by built-in adaptor Figure 6. Terminal Connection to ISDN DTE T A Call setting [ manual ), Lae L e U. 24 ICall setting...11.4511 [1.441] Layer ISSN Terminal[ tbrmna] u cfon~at~e • 1.431] C 0 D E C Telephone line Hand set Call setting: Manual Automatic: (V.25 bis<->l.451

  4. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds technology: current use and future developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacchi G

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Giacchi, Luis Ortega-Paz, Salvatore Brugaletta, Kohki Ishida, Manel Sabaté Cardiology Department, Clinic Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clinic, August Pi and Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Coronary bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are a new appealing therapeutic option in interventional cardiology. The most used and studied is currently the Absorb BVS™. Its backbone is made of poly-l-lactide and coated by a thin layer of poly-d,l-lactide, it releases everolimus and is fully degraded to H2O and CO2 in 2–3 years. Absorb BVS™ seems to offer several theoretical advantages over metallic stent, as it gives temporary mechanical support to vessel wall without permanently caging it. Therefore, long-term endothelial function and structure are not affected. A possible future surgical revascularization is not compromised. Natural vasomotion in response to external stimuli is also recovered. Several observational and randomized trials have been published about BVS clinical outcomes. The main aim of this review is to carry out a systematic analysis about Absorb BVS™ studies, evaluating also the technical improvements of the Absorb GT1 BVS™. Keywords: Absorb GT1, Absorb BVS™, bioresorbable vascular scaffold, BRS, coronary scaffold

  5. Japan 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørstrup, Finn Rude; Hvass, Sven

    2003-01-01

    Kompendium udarbejdet til en studierejse til Japan  2003 Kunstakademiets Arkitektskole, Studieafdeling 10......Kompendium udarbejdet til en studierejse til Japan  2003 Kunstakademiets Arkitektskole, Studieafdeling 10...

  6. The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1994-10-01

    This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

  7. New technologies for diabetes: a review of the present and the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandani Neesha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review summarizes the technologies in use and in the pipeline for the management of diabetes. The review focuses on glucose meters, continuous glucose monitoring devices, insulin pumps, and getting clinicians connected to technologies. All information presented can be found in the public domain, and was obtained from journal articles, websites, product review tables in patient publications, and professional conferences. The technology concerns, ongoing development and future trends in this area are also discussed.

  8. Technology for Future NASA Missions: Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    SEPTEMBER 1988 PACE Space Research and Technology Overview 1 Frederick P. Povinelli Civil Space Technology Initiative 15 Judith H. Ambrus...Peterson Peterson Pierson Pietsch Pilcher Pistole Piszczor Pittian Plotkin Portnoy Poucher Povinelli Povell Pozarovski Priebe Prior Pyle

  9. Future affective technology for autism and emotion communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Rosalind W

    2009-12-12

    People on the autism spectrum often experience states of emotional or cognitive overload that pose challenges to their interests in learning and communicating. Measurements taken from home and school environments show that extreme overload experienced internally, measured as autonomic nervous system (ANS) activation, may not be visible externally: a person can have a resting heart rate twice the level of non-autistic peers, while outwardly appearing calm and relaxed. The chasm between what is happening on the inside and what is seen on the outside, coupled with challenges in speaking and being pushed to perform, is a recipe for a meltdown that may seem to come 'out of the blue', but in fact may have been steadily building. Because ANS activation both influences and is influenced by efforts to process sensory information, interact socially, initiate motor activity, produce meaningful speech and more, deciphering the dynamics of ANS states is important for understanding and helping people on the autism spectrum. This paper highlights advances in technology that can comfortably sense and communicate ANS arousal in daily life, allowing new kinds of investigations to inform the science of autism while also providing personalized feedback to help individuals who participate in the research.

  10. CRISPR-Based Technologies and the Future of Food Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, Kurt; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    The on-going CRISPR craze is focused on the use of Cas9-based technologies for genome editing applications in eukaryotes, with high potential for translational medicine and next-generation gene therapy. Nevertheless, CRISPR-Cas systems actually provide adaptive immunity in bacteria, and have much promise for various applications in food bacteria that include high-resolution typing of pathogens, vaccination of starter cultures against phages, and the genesis of programmable and specific antibiotics that can selectively modulate bacterial population composition. Indeed, the molecular machinery from these DNA-encoded, RNA-mediated, DNA-targeting systems can be harnessed in native hosts, or repurposed in engineered systems for a plethora of applications that can be implemented in all organisms relevant to the food chain, including agricultural crops trait-enhancement, livestock breeding, and fermentation-based manufacturing, and for the genesis of next-generation food products with enhanced quality and health-promoting functionalities. CRISPR-based applications are now poised to revolutionize many fields within food science, from farm to fork. In this review, we describe CRISPR-Cas systems and highlight their potential for the development of enhanced foods. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Process control systems: integrated for future process technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botros, Youssry; Hajj, Hazem M.

    2003-06-01

    Process Control Systems (PCS) are becoming more crucial to the success of Integrated Circuit makers due to their direct impact on product quality, cost, and Fab output. The primary objective of PCS is to minimize variability by detecting and correcting non optimal performance. Current PCS implementations are considered disparate, where each PCS application is designed, deployed and supported separately. Each implementation targets a specific area of control such as equipment performance, wafer manufacturing, and process health monitoring. With Intel entering the nanometer technology era, tighter process specifications are required for higher yields and lower cost. This requires areas of control to be tightly coupled and integrated to achieve the optimal performance. This requirement can be achieved via consistent design and deployment of the integrated PCS. PCS integration will result in several benefits such as leveraging commonalities, avoiding redundancy, and facilitating sharing between implementations. This paper will address PCS implementations and focus on benefits and requirements of the integrated PCS. Intel integrated PCS Architecture will be then presented and its components will be briefly discussed. Finally, industry direction and efforts to standardize PCS interfaces that enable PCS integration will be presented.

  12. A NASA study of the impact of technology on future carrier based tactical aircraft - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. B., III

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of technology on future carrier based tactical aircraft. The results were used in the Center for Naval Analysis Future Carrier Study. The NASA Team designed three classes of aircraft ('Fighter', 'Attack', and 'Multimission') with two different technology levels. The Multimission aircraft were further analyzed by examining the penalty on the aircraft for both catapult launch/arrested landing recovery (Cat/trap) and short take-off/vertical landing (STOVL). The study showed the so-called STOVL penalty was reduced by engine technology and the next generation Strike Fighter will pay more penalty for Cat/trap than for STOVL capability.

  13. Encyclopedia "Food technology" as a starting stage of the design of future technologies

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Panfilov

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in Russia created the encyclopedia "Food Technologies' industry focus. Basic information on the organization of machine-made staple food of the person in the beginning of XXI systematized in this encyclopedia. The purpose of article - step up the efforts of specialists in technology development and technology of food production of new generations.

  14. Technology Innovation:The Last 1O0 Years and the Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yongxiang

    2001-01-01

    The article gives a general review on the most important achievements of engineering technology in such areas as information technology, materials, microelectronics, optoelectronics, energy, and biological and medical technology. The article also analyzes their social and economic impacts on human beings and the effects on the process of civilization, the driving forces of technology innovation and its necessary social environment, and the roles of scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs and government. The author tries to define the right way and mechanism of technology innovation, in the hope of pushing forward the technology innovation and the industrialization in the new century. The author also predicts the development of engineering technology in the future, which is believed to stir the interest among the publicity and students who care about technology innovation and industrialization.

  15. Ocean Bottom Seismometers technology: current state and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskiy, Dmitry; Ganzha, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The beginning of 2000s was marked by a significant progress in the development and use of self-pop-up sea-bottom seismic recorders (Ocean Bottom Seismometers). In Russia it was a novel solution developed by the Russian Academy of Sciences Experimental Design Bureau of Oceanological Engineering. This recorder and its clones have been widely used not only for the Earth crust studies, but also for investigations of sub-basalt structures and gas hydrate exploration. And what has happened over the last 10 years? Let us look closely at the second generation of ocean bottom stations developed by Geonodal Solutions (GNS) as an illustration of the next step forward in the sea-bottom acquisition technology. First of all, hardware components have changed dramatically. The electronic components became much smaller, accordingly, the power consumption and electronic self-noise were dropped down significantly. This enabled development of compact station 330 mm in diameter instead of previous 450mm. The weight fell by half, while the autonomy increased up to 90 days due to both decreased energy consumption and increased capacity of the batteries. The dynamic range of recorded seismic data has expended as a result of decreased set noise and the application of 24-bit A/D converters. The instruments dimensions have been reduced, power consumption decreased, clock accuracy was significantly improved. At the same time, development of advanced time reference algorithms enabled to retain instrument accuracy around 1 ms during all the autonomous recording period. The high-speed wireless data transfer technology offered a chance to develop "maintenance-free" station throughout its operation time. The station can be re-used at the different sea bottom locations without unsealing of the deep-water container for data download, battery re-charge, clock synchronization. This noticeably reduces the labor efforts of the personnel working with the stations. This is critically important in field

  16. Food traceability systems in China: The current status of and future perspectives on food supply chain databases, legal support, and technological research and support for food safety regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi; Li, Jiajia; Sun, Mei; Lv, Jun; Gai, Ruoyan; Mei, Lin; Xu, Lingzhong

    2015-02-01

    Over the past few decades, the field of food security has witnessed numerous problems and incidents that have garnered public attention. Given this serious situation, the food traceability system (FTS) has become part of the expanding food safety continuum to reduce the risk of food safety problems. This article reviews a great deal of the related literature and results from previous studies of FTS to corroborate this contention. This article describes the development and benefits of FTS in developed countries like the United States of America (USA), Japan, and some European countries. Problems with existing FTS in China are noted, including a lack of a complete database, inadequate laws and regulations, and lagging technological research into FTS. This article puts forward several suggestions for the future, including improvement of information websites, clarification of regulatory responsibilities, and promotion of technological research.

  17. Technology for the future; Technik fuer die Zukunft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennenmoser, Martin; Steininger, Sebastian [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme ISE, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Electrical Energy Systems (EES)

    2013-10-15

    The presented case study by the Fraunhofer Institute ISE shows that the market for stationary electrochemical storage prices are currently too high for economical operation. In winter, a battery in Germany is not always fully loaded because of low sunlight. Therefore, the combination of a battery with a PV system at this time of year does not have enough full cycles to be economical. For more complete cycles of the year and consequently lower specific storage cost wind turbines or other power generators can be connected. Since - in contrast to lead acid batteries - there is no experience with long-term storage in lithium and redox flow batteries, this study is based on current forecasts. Compared to lithium-ion batteries, lead-acid and redox flow batteries have a lower efficiency, so that the investment costs of the battery must be lower because fewer savings can be achieved. Especially for short-term storage, the production costs must be reduced. The cost reduction potential of redox flow and lithium-ion batteries is due to the current technical state of development compared to lead acid batteries very high. This means that an economic operation in the future is possible with constant development of electricity and battery prices. [German] Die vorgestellte Fallstudie des Fraunhofer Instituts ISE zeigt, dass die Marktpreise fuer stationaere elektrochemische Speicher aktuell fuer einen wirtschaftlichen Betrieb zu hoch sind. Im Winter wird eine Batterie in Deutschland aufgrund der niedrigen Sonneneinstrahlung nicht immer komplett geladen. Daher hat die Kombination eines Speichers mit einer PV-Anlage zu dieser Jahreszeit nicht genug Vollzyklen, um wirtschaftlich zu sein. Fuer mehr Vollzyklen im Jahr und demzufolge geringere spezifische Speicherkosten koennen Windkraftanlagen oder andere Stromerzeuger angeschlossen werden. Da es- im Gegensatz zu Bleisaeure- Batterien - noch keine Erfahrung mit Langzeitspeichern im Bereich Lithium und Redox-Flow gibt, beruht diese

  18. Solid Freeform Fabrication: An Enabling Technology for Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.; Dicus, Dennis L.

    2002-01-01

    The emerging class of direct manufacturing processes known as Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) employs a focused energy beam and metal feedstock to build structural parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data. Some variations on existing SFF techniques have potential for application in space for a variety of different missions. This paper will focus on three different applications ranging from near to far term to demonstrate the widespread potential of this technology for space-based applications. One application is the on-orbit construction of large space structures, on the order of tens of meters to a kilometer in size. Such structures are too large to launch intact even in a deployable design; their extreme size necessitates assembly or erection of such structures in space. A low-earth orbiting satellite with a SFF system employing a high-energy beam for high deposition rates could be employed to construct large space structures using feedstock launched from Earth. A second potential application is a small, multifunctional system that could be used by astronauts on long-duration human exploration missions to manufacture spare parts. Supportability of human exploration missions is essential, and a SFF system would provide flexibility in the ability to repair or fabricate any part that may be damaged or broken during the mission. The system envisioned would also have machining and welding capabilities to increase its utility on a mission where mass and volume are extremely limited. A third example of an SFF application in space is a miniaturized automated system for structural health monitoring and repair. If damage is detected using a low power beam scan, the beam power can be increased to perform repairs within the spacecraft or satellite structure without the requirement of human interaction or commands. Due to low gravity environment for all of these applications, wire feedstock is preferred to powder from a containment, handling, and safety

  19. FY 2000 international exchange project on exchanges of engineers - Coal mine technology field. Workshop in Japan; 2000 nendo gijutsusha koryu jigyo (tanko gijutsu bun'ya). Kokusai koryu jigyo (kokunai workshop)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of surveying a possibility of transfer of Japanese technology and strengthening the engineer sending project and engineer receiving/training project, Asia/Pacific Coal Workshop was held in Tokyo on November 29 and 30, 2000. On the 1st day, 9 persons including 5 from overseas and 4 from Japan gave lectures on coal production technology. On the 2nd day, after the session on safety, a panel discussion titled 'How to handle global environmental problems' was made. The lectures given were 'Development of coal resource and technical innovation,' and 'Heightening of production technology and utilization of unused resource.' The titles of the engineers invited from overseas were as follows: Trend of resource assessment/exploration technology in Australia and the subjects; Trend of resource assessment/exploration technology in Russia and the subjects; Auger coal mining - new coal mining system and possibility in the U.S. market; Successful restructure in the coal industry of Germany by technology improvement in long-wall mining/transportation/infrastructure; Present situation and future outlook of Indonesian low-ash/low-sulfur coal. (NEDO)

  20. New technologies of silicon position-sensitive detectors for future tracker systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bassignana, Daniela; Lozano, M

    In view of the new generation of high luminosity colliders, HL-LHC and ILC, a farther investigation of silicon radiation detectors design and technology is demanded, in order to satisfy the stringent requirements of the experiments at such sophisticated machines. In this thesis, innovative technologies of silicon radiation detectors for future tracking systems are proposed. Three dierent devices have been studied and designed with the help of dierent tools for computer simulations. They have been manufactured in the IMB-CNM clean room facilities in Barcelona and characterized with proper experimental set-ups in order to test the detectors capabilities and the quality and suitability of the technologies used for their fabrication. The rst technology deals with the upgrade of dedicated sensors for laser alignment systems in future tracker detectors. The design and technology of common single-sided silicon microstrip detectors have been slightly modied in order to improve IR light transmittance of the devices. T...

  1. Distributed technologies in California's energy future: A preliminary report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.; Craig, P.; McGuire, C.B.; Simmons, M. (eds.)

    1977-09-01

    The chapters in Volume 2 of Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future are: Environmental Impacts of Alternative Energy Technologies for California; Land Use Configurations and the Utilization of Distributive Energy Technology; Land Use Implications of a Dispersed Energy Path; Belief, Behavior, and Technologies as Driving Forces in Transitional Stages--The People Problem in Dispersed Energy Futures; Development of an Energy Attitude Survey; Interventions to Influence Firms Toward the Adoption of ''Soft'' Energy Technology; The Entry of Small Firms into Distributed Technology Energy Industries; Short-Term Matching of Supply and Demand in Electrical Systems with Renewable Sources; Vulnerability of Renewable Energy Systems; and District Heating for California.

  2. In-Space Propulsion Technology Products Ready for Infusion on NASA's Future Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Munk, Michele M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling, for future NASA flagship and sample return missions currently being considered. They have a broad applicability to future competed mission solicitations. The high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, providing higher performance for lower cost, was completed in 2009. Two other ISPT technologies are nearing completion of their technology development phase: 1) NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; and 2) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; aerothermal effect models; and atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars and Venus. This paper provides status of the technology development, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies that have recently completed their technology development and will be ready for infusion into NASA s Discovery, New Frontiers, SMD Flagship, or technology demonstration missions.

  3. In-Space Propulsion Technology Products for NASA's Future Science and Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Munk, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling, for future NASA flagship and sample return missions currently being considered, as well as having broad applicability to future competed mission solicitations. The high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost was completed in 2009. Two other ISPT technologies are nearing completion of their technology development phase: 1) NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; and 2) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; aerothermal effect models: and atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars and Venus. This paper provides status of the technology development, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies that have recently completed their technology development and will be ready for infusion into NASA s Discovery, New Frontiers, Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Flagship, and Exploration technology demonstration missions

  4. The State-of-the Art of Solar Photovoltaics and its Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Kosuke

    The successful history of solar photovoltaic technology in Japan is reviewed quickly and then present photovoltaic implementations in Japan, US and Europe are summarized in short. Japan set up “PV2030 roadmap” in 2004, targeting 25% PV cell efficiency and 100GW installation over Japan. “Cool Earth PV2050”has been being discussed to make innovative technologies clearly contribute to the post-Kyoto mechanism. Finally, the author is directing future solar photovoltaic technology capabilities towards one of possible major energy approach for 21st century.

  5. Technology-Based Healthcare for Nursing Education Within The Netherlands: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ybranda; van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, nearly all Dutch nursing schools are searching for suitable ways to implement technology-based healthcare in their curriculum. Some Universities chose elective education, others a mandatory solution. Several studies were executed to determine competencies needed by nurses in order to work with technology-based healthcare. In 2016 a nationwide new curriculum for nurses has been published. Providing technology-based healthcare is included under the core competencies of this new curriculum. All baccalaureate nursing educational institutes must implement this new curriculum at the start of 2016 which will have a huge impact on the implementation of technology-based healthcare in the education programs. In the future, technology centers from Universities will collaborate and specialize, partner with technology companies and crossovers between information and communication technology and healthcare education will be expanded.

  6. Development of the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence to Assess Functional Capacity in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Iwasa PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in the health of older people and changes in their lifestyles necessitate a scale that can better measure their competence at a higher level. This study describes the development process of the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence (JST-IC by (a refining conceptual definitions and developing preliminary items and (b examining the basic properties of the items. Participants were 1,253 septuagenarians (539 men and 714 women living in communities, who were asked to judge whether they were independent via 88 items. To examine the basic properties of the preliminary items, five different analyses were conducted. Thirty-four items were considered as inappropriate (6 overlapped between the analyses: (a 9 due to very high or low ratios of responders who answered “yes,” (b 4 due to gender or regional differences, (c 5 due to their weak association with health status, (d 9 due to low communalities in factor analysis, and (e 13 due to redundancy of meaning with other items. Conceptual definitions and preliminary items were developed, and the basic properties of the items were examined to create the JST-IC. The next step would be to screen the remaining 54 items to create the final version of the scale.

  7. Japan. Superconductivity for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.

    2012-11-15

    Currently, many smart grid projects are running or planned worldwide. These aim at controlling the electricity supply more efficiently and more stably in a new power network system. In Japan, especially superconductivity technology development projects are carried out to contribute to the future smart grid. Japanese cable makers such as Sumitomo Electric and Furukawa Electric are leading in the production of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. The world's largest electric current and highest voltage superconductivity proving tests have been started this year. Big cities such as Tokyo will be expected to introduce the HTS power cables to reduce transport losses and to meet the increased electricity demand in the near future. Superconducting devices, HTS power cables, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and flywheels are the focus of new developments in cooperations between companies, universities and research institutes, funded by the Japanese research and development funding organization New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Symposium on Trends in Advanced Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    MRI and others. This "lift off" of the superconductivity market is due to its technological advances. As long as the present costs involved in...the simple and easy to use 77K SQUID system is completed, it is expected to open up unexpected markets in the area of sporting facilities. One cannot...c -4< 4 HF4H Hrýr- -H> 4UH ci0 ~ P P C q00 C 4E1C I IW’ P4P P4 P.4 P4 P4P 4P L 4 4P4P 4P l 4P 38 GaAs/AIGaAs MQW ALL-OPTICAL SYSTEM 10’ SEMI

  9. FUTURE PHILOLOGISTS’ PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCES FORMATION BY MEANS OF COMPUTER ORIENTED TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentyna I. Bobrytska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problems of formation of professional competence of future philologists by means of computer oriented technologies in terms of introduction of computer-based education in higher education institutions (HEI. Author determined a model of future philologists professional competence formation by means of computer-oriented information and communication technologies (ICT; singled structural components of the model of professional competence of future philologists formed by means of computer oriented ICT (target, content, technical, productive and revealed their relationship to the specific future linguists’ careers; proved the thesis that the studied problem is of particular importance because of the necessity of informatization of higher education and usage the computer-oriented ICT in the educational process of the university.

  10. Integrating Nuclear and Renewable Electricity in a Low-Carbon World: MIT-Japan Future of Nuclear Power Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haratyk, Geoffrey; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Forsberg, Charles; Fujii, Yasumasa; Omoto, Akira; Taniguchi, Tomihiro; Curtis, Daniel; Sepulveda, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    Affordable reliable energy made possible a large middle class in the industrial world. Concerns about climate change require a transition to nuclear, wind, and solar—but these energy sources in current forms do not have the capability to meet the requirements for variable affordable energy. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Tokyo, the Tokyo Institute of Technology and the Institute for Energy Economics are undertaking a series of studies to address how to make this transition to a low carbon world. Three areas are being investigated. The first area is the development of electricity grid models to understand the impacts of different choices of technologies and different limits on greenhouse gas emissions. The second area is the development of technologies to enable variable electricity to the grid while capital-intensive nuclear, wind and solar generating plants operate at full capacity to minimize costs. Technologies to enable meeting variable electricity demand while operating plants at high-capacity factors include use of heat and hydrogen storage. The third area is the development of electricity market rules to enable transition to a low-carbon grid.

  11. Magnetic materials in Japan research, applications and potential

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This, the third report in Elsevier's Materials Technology in Japan series, concentrates on magnetic materials as a topic gaining worldwide attention, and each chapter looks not only at current research, but also describes the technology as it is being applied and its future potential. Magnetic-related research is the second largest field of research in Japan after semiconductors, with the estimated number of researchers and engineers engaged in magnetics-related activities currently at 20,000. This research report serves as both a review of

  12. Advanced Learning Technologies and Learning Networks and Their Impact on Future Aerospace Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the training workshop on Advanced Learning Technologies and Learning Networks and their impact on Future Aerospace Workforce. The workshop was held at the Peninsula Workforce Development Center, Hampton, Virginia, April 2 3, 2003. The workshop was jointly sponsored by Old Dominion University and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to: 1) provide broad overviews of the diverse activities related to advanced learning technologies and learning environments, and 2) identify future directions for research that have high potential for aerospace workforce development. Eighteen half-hour overviewtype presentations were made at the workshop.

  13. INFLUENCE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ON FORMING OF LOGICAL CULTURE OF THE FUTURE FOREIGN LANGUAGES TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryta V. Lopatych

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The “logical culture” phenomenon that is considered as a required component of practical training for the future foreign languages teachers is defined in the article; the influence of information technologies on the process of logical culture formation is studied as well. The levels of logical culture formation of future foreign languages teachers are specified as well as logical culture components are described for each level. It has been found that the rate of logical culture competence can be improved by implementation of educational information technologies.

  14. Emissions from international shipping: 2. Impact of future technologies on scenarios until 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyring, V.; KöHler, H. W.; Lauer, A.; Lemper, B.

    2005-09-01

    In this study the today's fleet-average emission factors of the most important ship exhausts are used to calculate emission scenarios for the future. To develop plausible future technology scenarios, first upcoming regulations and compliance with future regulations through technological improvements are discussed. We present geographically resolved emission inventory scenarios until 2050, based on a mid-term prognosis for 2020 and a long-term prognosis for 2050. The scenarios are based on some very strict assumptions on future ship traffic demands and technological improvements. The four future ship traffic demand scenarios are mainly determined by the economic growth, which follows the IPCC SRES storylines. The resulting fuel consumption is projected through extrapolations of historical trends in economic growth, total seaborne trade and number of ships, as well as the average installed power per ship. For the future technology scenarios we assume a diesel-only fleet in 2020 resulting in fuel consumption between 382 and 409 million metric tons (Mt). For 2050 one technology scenario assumes that 25% of the fuel consumed by a diesel-only fleet can be saved by applying future alternative propulsion plants, resulting in a fuel consumption that varies between 402 and 543 Mt. The other scenario is a business-as-usual scenario for a diesel-only fleet even in 2050 and gives an estimate between 536 and 725 Mt. Dependent on how rapid technology improvements for diesel engines are introduced, possible technology reduction factors are applied to the today's fleet-average emission factors of all important species to estimate future ship emissions. Combining the four traffic demand scenarios with the four technology scenarios, our results suggest emissions between 8.8 and 25.0 Tg (NO2) in 2020, and between 3.1 to 38.8 Tg (NO2) in 2050. The development of forecast scenarios for CO2, NOx, SOx, CO, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter is driven by the requirements for global model

  15. Manufacturing Concepts of the Future – Upcoming Technologies Solving Upcoming Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadar, Ronen; Bilberg, Arne

    concepts and technologies that are being developed today which may be used to solve manufacturing challenges in the future, such as: (self) reconfigurable manufacturing systems, (focused) flexible manufacturing systems, and AI inspired manufacturing. The paper will try to offer a critical point of view...... on manufacturing challenges, concepts, and technologies, and is meant to address both academia and industry. Keywords: Reconfigurable manufacturing systems, manufacturing challenges, cognitive factory, mass-customization......This paper presents an examination of Western European manufacturers’ future challenges as can be predicted today. Some of the challenges analyzed in the paper are: globalization, individualism and customization and agility challenges. Hereafter, the paper presents a broad analysis on manufacturing...

  16. FACTORS AND CONDITIONS OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ECONOMISTS BY MEANS OF NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia М. Boliubash

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article factors and conditions of formation of professional competence of future economists revealed by the author are considered in case of introduction of network technologies on the basis of information Moodle environment into the system of traditional vocational training. The author has given the characteristic of the designated conditions, made their theoretical substantiation, has opened the importance of their use in vocational training of the future experts and has carried out the scientific substantiation of diagnostics of levels of formation of professional competence. The relevance of the research is caused by needs of society in introduction of the newest information technology into the vocational education.

  17. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gaps and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    What will the impact of science be ten years from now in the food industry? Large or overwhelming most people will probably agree. But before we can be any more specific, we need to address the questions of what type or aspect of science or technology we have in mind and secondly, what kind...... of impact we are talking about. Since there are a large number of technologies whose impact can be relevant to study a variety of different angles, this is indeed a challenging task. In this paper, we consequently do not start by looking at any particular technology and discuss which impact it will have...... in the future. Our approach is to construct a number of likely pictures of the future and then look at the role and impact of technology and science in each of the pictures. We do this by using an industry level scenario technique, in which we rely heavily on expert and industry inputs representing both...

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ENGINEER: FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN COMPUTER INTEGRATED LABORATORY WORKSHOP ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor S. Chernetskyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the category «technological competence» and the definition of its components according to the educational process. A structural and functional model of technological competence of future engineers through forms, means, methods and technologies of computer oriented laboratory work. Selected blocks and elements of the model in the course of a typical student laboratory work on the course of general physics. We consider the possibility of using some type of digital labs «Phywe», «Fourier» and modern electronic media (flash books to optimize laboratory work at the Technical University. The analysis of the future research of structural elements model of technological competence.

  19. Technology and the delivery of the curriculum of the future: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, John

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing availability of a wide range of technology that has the potential to support and enhance the curriculum of the future. Learners expect to use technology for their learning, but this requires the development of information and digital literacy skills to maximise the potential learning opportunities. Learning resources will be increasingly delivered by a variety of mobile devices and also through different immersive and virtual learning environments. Mobile devices and Web 2.0 technology provide opportunities for learners to create their own deep and personalised learning experiences that are relevant for future professional practice. Tutors have a crucial guidance and support role for the effective use of technology for learning. There is a little evidence base to support the impact on learning for many of the potential scenarios and further research is urgently required.

  20. Temporal changes in thermal waters related to volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan: implications for forecasting future eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Shibata, Tomo; Murayama, Yasuji; Ogino, Tagiru; Okazaki, Noritoshi

    2015-01-01

    In order to detect changes in volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan, we have continuously monitored thermal waters discharging at the western to southwestern flank of the volcano since 1986. The steam-heated waters in the Nukkakushi crater discharged with boiling temperature until 2002. Thermal waters at the Tokachidake spa area have similar compositions to fumarolic gas emitted from the summit craters, indicating that the waters formed by absorption of volcanic gas into shallow aquifers. Thermal waters at the Fukiage spa area were derived from the same aquifer as the Tokachidake spa area until early 1986. However, after that time, NaCl-type thermal water entered the Fukiage spa area during the increase in volcanic activity associated with the 1988-1989 eruption, thus leading to a clear increase in Cl concentrations and temperature. After the eruption, the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water was halted, and the Cl concentrations of the thermal waters decreased. In contrast, SO4 concentrations gradually increased in the Fukiage spa area after 1989, and the temperature has been maintained. These observations indicate that SO4-rich thermal water with a relatively high temperature entered the system instead of the NaCl-type thermal water. As was the case for the 1988-1989 eruption, the Cl concentrations at the Fukiage spa area increased in 2012 during an increase in volcanic activity, implying that the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water had resumed. However, the chemical changes in the thermal waters since 2012 are small compared with those before the 1988-1989 eruption, with oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions remaining nearly the same as those of meteoric waters.

  1. Predicting future blood supply and demand in Japan with a Markov model: application to the sex- and age-specific probability of blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Junko; Ohisa, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Aya; Nishida, Kazuo; Inoue, Shingo; Shirasaka, Takuma

    2016-11-01

    Simulation studies were performed to predict the future supply and demand for blood donations, and future shortfalls. Using data from all donations in 2006 to 2009, the Markov model was applied to estimate future blood donations until 2050. Based on data concerning the actual use of blood products, the number of blood products needed was estimated based on future population projections. We estimated that the number of blood donations increased from 5,020,000 in 2008 to 5,260,000 in 2012, but will decrease to 4,770,000 units by 2025. In particular, the number of donors in their 20s and 30s decreased every year. Moreover, the number of donations required to supply blood products would have been increased from 5,390,000 in 2012 to 5,660,000 units in 2025. Thus, the estimated shortfall of blood donations is expected to increase each year from 140,000 in 2012 to 890,000 in 2025 and then more than double to 1,670,000 in 2050. If the current blood donation behaviors continue, a shortfall of blood availability is likely to occur in Japan. Insufficient blood donations are mainly related to a projected reduction in population of 20 to 30 year olds, a significant group of donors. Thus, it is crucial to recruit and retain new donors and to develop recommendations for proper use of blood products to minimize unnecessary use. This study provides useful information that can be used by governments to help ensure the adequacy of the blood supply through promoting donations and conserving blood resources. © 2016 AABB.

  2. Current and future carbon budget at Takayama site, Japan, evaluated by a regional climate model and a process-based terrestrial ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Masatoshi; Noh, Nam-Jin; Saitoh, Taku M.; Ito, Akihiko; Wakazuki, Yasutaka; Muraoka, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    Accurate projection of carbon budget in forest ecosystems under future climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration is important to evaluate the function of terrestrial ecosystems, which serve as a major sink of atmospheric CO2. In this study, we examined the effects of spatial resolution of meteorological data on the accuracies of ecosystem model simulation for canopy phenology and carbon budget such as gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER), and net ecosystem production (NEP) of a deciduous forest in Japan. Then, we simulated the future (around 2085) changes in canopy phenology and carbon budget of the forest by incorporating high-resolution meteorological data downscaled by a regional climate model. The ecosystem model overestimated GPP and ER when we inputted low-resolution data, which have warming biases over mountainous landscape. But, it reproduced canopy phenology and carbon budget well, when we inputted high-resolution data. Under the future climate, earlier leaf expansion and delayed leaf fall by about 10 days compared with the present state was simulated, and also, GPP, ER and NEP were estimated to increase by 25.2%, 23.7% and 35.4%, respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that the increase of NEP in June and October would be mainly caused by rising temperature, whereas that in July and August would be largely attributable to CO2 fertilization. This study suggests that the downscaling of future climate data enable us to project more reliable carbon budget of forest ecosystem in mountainous landscape than the low-resolution simulation due to the better predictions of leaf expansion and shedding.

  3. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, R.L.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    This editorial paper presents a vision for intelligent health care in the home of the future, focusing on technologies with the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. A secure, plug-and-play information framework provides the starting point for identifying technologies that must be developed before home-based devices can know their context and assimilate information to support care decisions.

  4. Shaping Future Green Cities: LEDs Technology adoption as an option for India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, R; Kroesen, J.O.

    2010-01-01

    The sustainable development in developing and newly industrialising countries (China, India, South Africa, and Brazil) is central issue for policy makers, decision makers, academic, and planners. The attainment of sustainability has become a challenge for rapidly urbanising India. The paper focuses on the challenges for building less energy consuming cities. The cities use different technologies for lighting purposes but which technology can decarbonise them in future. Moreover, the question ...

  5. Estimation of excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 in Japan using a high-resolution model for present and future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kayo; Ng, Chris Fook Sheng; Takami, Akinori; Ariga, Toshinori; Matsuhashi, Keisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter with a diameter of less than 2.5 μm, known as PM2.5, can affect human health, especially in elderly people. Because of the imminent aging of society in the near future in most developed countries, the human health impacts of PM2.5 must be evaluated. In this study, we used a global-to-regional atmospheric transport model to simulate PM2.5 in Japan with a high-resolution stretched grid system (∼10 km for the high-resolution model, HRM) for the present (the 2000) and the future (the 2030, as proposed by the Representative Concentrations Pathway 4.5, RCP4.5). We also used the same model with a low-resolution uniform grid system (∼100 km for the low-resolution model, LRM). These calculations were conducted by nudging meteorological fields obtained from an atmosphere-ocean coupled model and providing emission inventories used in the coupled model. After correcting for bias, we calculated the excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 among the elderly (over 65 years old) based on different minimum PM2.5 concentration (MINPM) levels to account for uncertainty using the simulated PM2.5 distributions to express the health effect as a concentration-response function. As a result, we estimated the excess mortality for all of Japan to be 31,300 (95% confidence intervals: 20,700 to 42,600) people in 2000 and 28,600 (95% confidence intervals: 19,000 to 38,700) people in 2030 using the HRM with a MINPM of 5.8 μg/m3. In contrast, the LRM resulted in underestimates of approximately 30% (for PM2.5 concentrations in the 2000 and 2030), approximately 60% (excess mortality in the 2000) and approximately 90% (excess mortality in 2030) compared to the HRM results. We also found that the uncertainty in the MINPM value, especially for low PM2.5 concentrations in the future (2030) can cause large variability in the estimates, ranging from 0 (MINPM of 15 μg/m3 in both HRM and LRM) to 95,000 (MINPM of 0 μg/m3 in HRM) people.

  6. Outline in 1997 Japan compound material academic meeting technological prize winning technology; Kenchiku, doboku kozobutsu no hoshu{center_dot}hokyo yo forukatousito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iba, Yoshitomo.; Uemura, Masahiko.; Murakami, Shinkichi.; Saito, Makoto.; Kobayashi, Akira. [Nittetsu Composite Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-15

    That function declines in the sutra time target, and it is finally destroyed, or a construction structure thing bears putting off that life by managing efficient maintenance it is possible. The factor of the function decline of the structure thing, the degree of the decline, and so on are grasped quantitatively, and efficient repair reinforcement time and a method of construction are chosen, and you must carry it out for that. It is paying attention to the development of the method of construction to reinforce the maintenance repair of the construction structure thing by using the tip compound factor from such a viewpoint. In the beginning, a material cost was very expensive, and the recognition not to use it was very general in such a construction field. In such recognition, in Tonen Corp. incorporated company, it has paid attention to the use possibility in the construction field of the tip compound factor since early, research and development have been done continuously from 1980, that It succeeds in, and it is the method of construction that a repair reinforces a concrete structure thing by the tip material that the method of construction which got the technological prize of the Japan compound material academic meeting in 1997 moved carbon fiber to the center. (NEDO)

  7. Outline in 1997 Japan compound material academic meeting technological prize winning technology. Kenchiku, doboku kozobutsu no hoshu[center dot]hokyo yo forukatousito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iba, Yoshitomo.; Uemura, Masahiko.; Murakami, Shinkichi.; Saito, Makoto.; Kobayashi, Akira. (Nittetsu Composite Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1999-03-15

    That function declines in the sutra time target, and it is finally destroyed, or a construction structure thing bears putting off that life by managing efficient maintenance it is possible. The factor of the function decline of the structure thing, the degree of the decline, and so on are grasped quantitatively, and efficient repair reinforcement time and a method of construction are chosen, and you must carry it out for that. It is paying attention to the development of the method of construction to reinforce the maintenance repair of the construction structure thing by using the tip compound factor from such a viewpoint. In the beginning, a material cost was very expensive, and the recognition not to use it was very general in such a construction field. In such recognition, in Tonen Corp. incorporated company, it has paid attention to the use possibility in the construction field of the tip compound factor since early, research and development have been done continuously from 1980, that It succeeds in, and it is the method of construction that a repair reinforces a concrete structure thing by the tip material that the method of construction which got the technological prize of the Japan compound material academic meeting in 1997 moved carbon fiber to the center. (NEDO)

  8. Current Status and Future Development of Integrated Geophysical Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeZhanxiang

    2003-01-01

    The gap between China''s integrated geophysical technology and the world''s advanced technologies has been significantly narrowed as the result of developments in the last decade.The new technology has played a very important role in oil and gas exploration in China, especially for the purposes of targeting seismically opaque zones, decreasing exploration risk, and improving exploration efficiency in the western territories and complex areas in China. The current status and future development of non-seismic integrated geophysical teams in China is discussed.

  9. Mobile technologies among people with serious mental illness: opportunities for future services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Davis, Kristin E; Kaiser, Susan; Krzsos, Izabela; Drake, Robert E

    2013-07-01

    Several national bodies have proposed using mobile technology to improve mental health services. But rates of current use and interest in using technology to enhance services among individuals with serious mental illness are uncertain. The authors surveyed 1,592 individuals with serious mental illness regarding their use of mobile devices and interest in using mobile technologies to enhance mental health services. Seventy-two percent of survey respondents reported currently owning a mobile device, a rate approximately 12 % lower than the general adult population. The most common uses were for talking, followed by texting, and internet activities. Both mobile device users and nonusers expressed interest in future mobile services.

  10. Joystick control for powered mobility: current state of technology and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A; Coltellaro, John

    2010-02-01

    Recent advancements in control interface technology have made the use of end devices such as power wheelchairs easier for individuals with disabilities, especially persons with movement disorders. In this article, we discuss the current state of control interface technology and the devices available clinically for power wheelchair control. We also discuss our research on novel hardware and software approaches that are revolutionizing joystick interface technology and allowing more customizability for individual users with special needs and abilities. Finally, we discuss the future of control interfaces and what research gaps remain.

  11. ARV robotic technologies (ART): a risk reduction effort for future unmanned systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaster, Jeffrey F.

    2006-05-01

    The Army's ARV (Armed Robotic Vehicle) Robotic Technologies (ART) program is working on the development of various technological thrusts for use in the robotic forces of the future. The ART program will develop, integrate and demonstrate the technology required to advance the maneuver technologies (i.e., perception, mobility, tactical behaviors) and increase the survivability of unmanned platforms for the future force while focusing on reducing the soldiers' burden by providing an increase in vehicle autonomy coinciding with a decrease in the total number user interventions required to control the unmanned assets. This program will advance the state of the art in perception technologies to provide the unmanned platform an increasingly accurate view of the terrain that surrounds it; while developing tactical/mission behavior technologies to provide the Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) the capability to maneuver tactically, in conjunction with the manned systems in an autonomous mode. The ART testbed will be integrated with the advanced technology software and associated hardware developed under this effort, and incorporate appropriate mission modules (e.g. RSTA sensors, MILES, etc.) to support Warfighter experiments and evaluations (virtual and field) in a military significant environment (open/rolling and complex/urban terrain). The outcome of these experiments as well as other lessons learned through out the program life cycle will be used to reduce the current risks that are identified for the future UGV systems that will be developed under the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, including the early integration of an FCS-like autonomous navigation system onto a tracked skid steer platform.

  12. Steam Man and Airships: Technology of the Future in the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Caroline C.; Carano, Kenneth T.; Berson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the Frank Reade dime novels, published in 1882, that are now recognized as the beginnings of the modern science fiction novel in the United States. They illustrate the hope that Americans of the time held for the future that newly invented technology could offer. Although the Frank Reade stories highlighted the promise of…

  13. The Future Role of Instructional Technology in Agricultural Education in North Carolina and Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Antoine J.; Miller, W. Wade; Williams, David L.

    2003-01-01

    A stratified random sample of agriculture teachers in North Carolina (n=210) and Virginia (n=170) returned 85 and 110 usable surveys respectively. Teachers were undecided about future uses of instructional technology although they perceived benefits. Accessing Internet lesson plans was a primary use. Hardware/software costs were the principal…

  14. Visualizing the Future: Technology Competency Development in Clinical Medicine, and Implications for Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Keenan, Craig R.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In this article, the authors ask three questions. First, what will physicians need to know in order to be effective in the future? Second, what role will technology play in achieving that high level of effectiveness? Third, what specific skill sets will physicians need to master in order to become effective? Method: Through three case…

  15. Future Critical Issues and Problems Facing Technology and Engineering Education in the Commonwealth of Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Moye, Johnny J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the future critical issues and problems facing the K-12 technology and engineering education profession in the Commonwealth of Virginia. This study was based on the Wicklein nationwide studies (1993a, 2005). Even though this study did not exactly replicate the Wicklein studies--since it was limited to…

  16. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiNunzio, Camillo A. [Framatome ANP DE& S, Marlborough, MA (United States); Gupta, Abhinav [Univ. of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC (United States); Golay, Michael [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Luk, Vincent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turk, Rich [Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems, Windsor, CT (United States); Morrow, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jin, Geum-Taek [Korea Power Engineering Company Inc., Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-30

    This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  17. Combined analysis of climate, technological and price changes on future arable farming systems in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.; Kanellopoulos, Argyris; Kros, J.; Webber, H.; Zhao, G.; Britz, W.; Reinds, G.J.; Ewert, F.; Vries, de W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compare the relative importance of climate change to technological, management, price and policy changes on European arable farming systems. This required linking four models: the SIMPLACE crop growth modelling framework to calculate future yields under climate change for arable cr

  18. FOREWORD: Focus on nanobiomaterials and technologies for breakthrough in future medicine Focus on nanobiomaterials and technologies for breakthrough in future medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yuji; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Chen, Guoping; Kikuchi, Masanori

    2010-02-01

    In biomedical fields, various materials are used for different purposes such as therapy, diagnostics and drugs. Some of them come into direct contact with blood and tissues in the human body, while many others are used in advanced medical equipment. Without these materials, current advances in medicine would never be achieved. Even in the 21st century, we still face the challenge of incurable or intractable diseases such as cancer, as well as the emergence of new infectious diseases. Global action is necessary to deal with these issues. Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology have provided new strategies for material design that are based on the structural control of atoms and molecules. These strategies have revolutionized the field of advanced functional materials. Their combination with the enormous amount of knowledge in molecular and cellular biology accumulated over the last few decades has lead to the conception of new medical technologies. These technologies are represented in cell therapy, drug targeting and regenerative medicine, and are being widely and intensively investigated for realization at an industrial scale. In order to find solutions to remaining issues in life science, it is necessary to accelerate the fusion between nano- and biotechnologies and to promote research and development in these interdisciplinary fields. In this context, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)—one of the leading research institutes in the field of materials science—held a series of symposia in the week of 21-24 July 2009, 'NIMS Week 2009' and 'Nanobio-materials and technologies: breakthrough for future medicine', that aimed to present advances in medical fields from the perspective of materials science and technologies. During NIMS Week, various activities were carried out, including perspective reviews and invited lectures by international leading researchers in the 'nanobio' field, in addition to four organized sessions and related

  19. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gaps and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    the 'technology push' and 'market pull representatives', whom we feel are both very important basic driving forces. The aim is to get an idea of the very different roles science or technology can take in the near future for a specific industry, in this case the Danish food industry and present a methodological......What will the impact of science be ten years from now in the food industry? Large or overwhelming most people will probably agree. But before we can be any more specific, we need to address the questions of what type or aspect of science or technology we have in mind and secondly, what kind...... of impact we are talking about. Since there are a large number of technologies whose impact can be relevant to study a variety of different angles, this is indeed a challenging task. In this paper, we consequently do not start by looking at any particular technology and discuss which impact it will have...

  20. Technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immich, H.; Alting, J.; Kretschmer, J.; Preclik, D.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper an overview of recent technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines at Astrium, Space Infrastructure Division (SI), is shown. The main technology. developments shown in this paper are: Technologies Technologies for enhanced heat transfer to the coolant for expander cycle engines Advanced injector head technologies Advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies. The main technologies for enhanced heat transfer investigated by subscale chamber hot-firing tests are: Increase of chamber length Hot gas side ribs in the chamber Artificially increased surface roughness. The developments for advanced injector head technologies were focused on the design of a new modular subscale chamber injector head. This injector head allows for an easy exchange of different injection elements: By this, cost effective hot-fire tests with different injection element concepts can be performed. The developments for advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies are based on subscale chamber tests with a new design of the Astrium subscale chamber. The subscale chamber has been modified by introduction of a segmented cooled cylindrical section which gives the possibility to test different manufacturing concepts for cooled chamber technologies by exchanging the individual segments. The main technology efforts versus advanced manufacturing technologies shown in this paper are: Soldering techniques Thermal barrier coatings for increased chamber life. A new technology effort is dedicated especially to LOX/Hydrocarbon propellant combinations. Recent hot fire tests on the subscale chamber with Kerosene and Methane as fuel have already been performed. A comprehensive engine system trade-off between the both propellant combinations (Kerosene vs. Methane) is presently under preparation.

  1. Occupational asthma in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Dobashi, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to adva...

  2. Evaluation of the productivity decrease risk due to a future increase in tropical cyclone intensity in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Miguel; Longarte-Galnares, Gorka

    2010-12-01

    A number of scientists have recently conducted research that shows that tropical cyclone intensity is likely to increase in the future. This would result in an increase in the damage along with a decrease in economic productivity due to precautionary cessation of the economic activity of the affected areas during the passage of the cyclone. The economic effect of this stop in economic activity is a phenomenon that has not received much attention in the past, and the cumulative effect that it can have on the Japanese economy over the next 75 years has never been evaluated. The starting point for the evaluation of the economic risks is the change in the patterns of tropical cyclone intensity suggested by Knutson and Tuleya. The results obtained show how a significant decrease in the overall productivity of the country could be expected, which could lower GDP by between 6% and 13% by 2085.

  3. NASA's Vision for Potential Energy Reduction from Future Generations of Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Through a robust partnership with the aviation industry, over the past 50 years NASA programs have helped foster advances in propulsion technology that enabled substantial reductions in fuel consumption for commercial transports. Emerging global trends and continuing environmental concerns are creating challenges that will very likely transform the face of aviation over the next 20-40 years. In recognition of this development, NASA Aeronautics has established a set of Research Thrusts that will help define the future direction of the agency's research technology efforts. Two of these thrusts, Ultra-Efficient Commercial Vehicles and Transition to Low-Carbon Propulsion, serve as cornerstones for the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) project. The AATT project is exploring and developing high-payoff technologies and concepts that are key to continued improvement in energy efficiency and environmental compatibility for future generations of fixed-wing, subsonic transports. The AATT project is primarily focused on the N+3 timeframe, or 3 generations from current technology levels. As should be expected, many of the propulsion system architectures technologies envisioned for N+3 vary significantly from todays engines. The use of batteries in a hybrid-electric configuration or deploying multiple fans distributed across the airframe to enable higher bypass ratios are just two examples of potential advances that could enable substantial energy reductions over current propulsion systems.

  4. Technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Immich, H.; Alting, J.; Kretschmer, J.; Preclik, D. [Astrium GmbH, Space Infrastructure Div. Advanced Programs and System Engineering, Munich (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    In this paper an overview of recent technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines at Astrium, Space Infrastructure Division (SI), is shown. The main technology developments shown in this paper are: Technologies for enhanced heat transfer to the coolant for expander cycle engines. Advanced injector head technologies. Advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies. The main technologies for enhanced heat transfer investigated by subscale chamber hot-firing tests are: Increase of chamber length. Hot gas side ribs in the chamber. Artificially increased surface roughness. The developments for advanced injector head technologies were focused on the design of a new modular subscale chamber injector head. This injector head allows for an easy exchange of different injection elements: By this, cost effective hot-fire tests with different injection element concepts can be performed. The developments for advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies are based on subscale chamber tests with a new design of the Astrium subscale chamber. The subscale chamber has been modified by introduction of a segmented cooled cylindrical section which gives the possibility to test different manufacturing concepts for cooled chamber technologies by exchanging the individual segments. The main technology efforts versus advanced manufacturing technologies shown in this paper are: Soldering techniques. Thermal barrier coatings for increased chamber life. A new technology effort is dedicated especially to LOX/Hydrocarbon propellant combinations. Recent hot fire tests on the sub scale chamber with Kerosene and Methane as fuel have already been performed. A comprehensive engine system trade-off between the both propellant combinations (Kerosene vs. Methane) is presently under preparation. (Author)

  5. Futurism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jane Loring

    The objectives of this research report are to gain insight into the main problems of the future and to ascertain the attitudes that the general population has toward the treatment of these problems. In the first section of this report the future is explored socially, psychologically, and environmentally. The second section describes the techniques…

  6. Creating Communications, Computing, and Networking Technology Development Road Maps for Future NASA Human and Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul; Hayden, Jeffrey L.

    2005-01-01

    For human and robotic exploration missions in the Vision for Exploration, roadmaps are needed for capability development and investments based on advanced technology developments. A roadmap development process was undertaken for the needed communications, and networking capabilities and technologies for the future human and robotics missions. The underlying processes are derived from work carried out during development of the future space communications architecture, an d NASA's Space Architect Office (SAO) defined formats and structures for accumulating data. Interrelationships were established among emerging requirements, the capability analysis and technology status, and performance data. After developing an architectural communications and networking framework structured around the assumed needs for human and robotic exploration, in the vicinity of Earth, Moon, along the path to Mars, and in the vicinity of Mars, information was gathered from expert participants. This information was used to identify the capabilities expected from the new infrastructure and the technological gaps in the way of obtaining them. We define realistic, long-term space communication architectures based on emerging needs and translate the needs into interfaces, functions, and computer processing that will be required. In developing our roadmapping process, we defined requirements for achieving end-to-end activities that will be carried out by future NASA human and robotic missions. This paper describes: 10 the architectural framework developed for analysis; 2) our approach to gathering and analyzing data from NASA, industry, and academia; 3) an outline of the technology research to be done, including milestones for technology research and demonstrations with timelines; and 4) the technology roadmaps themselves.

  7. Implications of Outside-the-Box Technologies on Future Space Exploration and Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Theodore C.

    2003-01-01

    In general, planning for future manned space exploration either to the moon, Mars, or an asteroid has depended on a somewhat linear extrapolation of our present technologies. Two major prohibitive cost issues regarding such planning are payload lift and in-flight energy generation. The costs of these in both engineering and actual flight costs, coupled with the planning necessary to carry out such exploration have prevented us from actively moving forward. Although, it will be worthwhile to continue to plan for such exploration using ``present'' technologies, I recommend that planning be concerned mainly with mission strategies and goals utilizing both present technology and totally new energy breakthroughs. There are presently in research and development an entire suite of relevant outside-the-box technologies which will include both zero point energy generation and antigravity technologies that will replace our present solar/nuclear/fuel cell energy technologies and liquid/solid fuel rockets. This paper describes some of these technologies, the physics behind them and their potential use for manned space exploration. The companies and countries that first incorporate these technologies into their space programs will lead the way in exploring and colonizing space.

  8. Economic effects of propulsion system technology on existing and future transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an airline study of the economic effects of propulsion system technology on current and future transport aircraft are presented. This report represents the results of a detailed study of propulsion system operating economics. The study has four major parts: (1) a detailed analysis of current propulsion system maintenance with respect to the material and labor costs encountered versus years in service and the design characteristics of the major elements of the propulsion system of the B707, b727, and B747. (2) an analysis of the economic impact of a future representative 1979 propulsion system is presented with emphasis on depreciation of investment, fuel costs and maintenance costs developed on the basis of the analysis of the historical trends observed. (3) recommendations concerning improved methods of forecasting the maintenance cost of future propulsion systems are presented. A detailed method based on the summation of the projected labor and material repair costs for each major engine module and its installation along with a shorter form suitable for quick, less detailed analysis are presented, and (4) recommendations concerning areas where additional technology is needed to improve the economics of future commercial propulsion systems are presented along with the suggested economic benefits available from such advanced technology efforts.

  9. Future yields assessment of bioenergy crops in relation to climate change and technological development in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore L. Cosentino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy crops are expected to play an important role in reducing CO2 emission, in energy supply and in European energy policy. However, a sustainable bioenergy supply must be resilient to climate change and the impacts on agriculture at both global and regional scale. The purpose of this study was to forecast the potential distribution of several bioenergy crops based on agronomic and environmental constrains under current conditions and future scenarios (2020 and 2030 in European Union. Potential biomass yield, according to the category end use product achievable in each environmental zone of Europe at present and in the future available land have been also studied. Future yields were assessed according to two factors: technological development and climate change: the former was based on prospect of DG-Agriculture for conventional crops and expert judgments for bioenergy crops, while the latter based on relevant research papers and literature reviews which used site-specific crop growth models. Yields are expected to increase in northern Europe due to climate change and technological development, while in southerneastern Europe the negative effect of climate change will be mitigated by the technological development. The estimated total biomass production in Europe, on the basis of future yields and surplus land made available for energy crops, may not be sufficient to meet the needs of bioenergy supply as claimed in the European directive 2009/28/EC.

  10. [Responding to patients with home mechanical ventilation after the Great East Japan Earthquake and during the planned power outages. How should we be prepared for a future disaster ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi, Yukako

    2011-12-01

    The unprecedented earthquake(magnitude-9 in the Japanese seismic intensity scale)hit off the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. Consequently, there were planned power outages in the area nearby Tokyo to avoid massive blackouts caused by a stoppage of Fukushima nuclear plants.Our clinic located in Kawasaki city was also hit by the earthquake(magnitude- 5).During the period of two months(March and April 2011), we had a total of 52 patients with home respiratory care (5-TPPV, 11-NPPV and 36-HOT)at that time.Two out of three 24 hour-TPPV users had no external battery.After the earthquake, there was a 7-hour electricity failure in some areas, and a patient with ASV(adaptive servo ventilator)was living there.Moreover, 3-hour/day power outages were carried out from March 14 to March 28, affecting people's everyday lives. However, the patient had no harmful influences from the power failure because a ventilation company lent us an external battery(4-9 hour life capacity)for the patients, and we were able to avoid an emergency situation caused by the power failure.In conclusion, we ought to be prepared for patients with home mechanical ventilation in the future toward unforeseen large scale power outages.

  11. UniMAP e-Lab for Electrical Engineering Technology: Future Online Laboratory Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Mohd Hisam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will describe a proposed design and approaches to the future provision of laboratory experience using communication and control technology. This approach provides broad access for students who can not attend conventional laboratory to laboratory work. The experimental system online (e-Lab is under development for the students to carry out various experiments in engineering and technology education assessment system. In the field of engineering technology, one important element is laboratory work, although there are limitations in terms of space laboratories, distance learning provision. UniMAP e-Lab project aims to address many of the existing constraints. Beyond the educational goals, UniMAP e-Lab system enables experimental knowledge in a particular field of engineering technology and experimental results of the research are disseminated and exploited effectively. Solution design of hardware and software as well as the characteristics of education discussed.

  12. Debating the future of genetically modified plants - bridging knowledge dimensions. A technology foresight study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Kristian; Rasmussen, Birgitte

    2003-01-01

    to offer a coordinating method for developing and strengthening those linkages. To test this, a technological foresight study was performed on genetically modified (GM) crop technology in the Danish context. Thebackground to the study was the conflict and intense debate in Denmark over applications of gene...... technology, and especially over the deliberate release of GM crops. However, the current debate characteristically involves sharply opposed fronts. In it,stakeholders and experts on both side of the conflict advocate widely differing opinions. Without a proper, generally intelligible dialogue, the broader...... public audience finds it hard to comprehend this type of debate. The study pursues the notion thatpublic dialogue can act as a driver of future applications in the technological domain, specifically GM crops. The study concluded with a stakeholder workshop that revealed three key issues that might...

  13. MODERN APPROACHES TO THE USAGE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO FUTURE PHILOLOGISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Yu. Sharyi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the highlighting of the problem of modern approaches to information technologies usage in teaching English to future philologists. The usage of these technologies in the process of formation of professional competence of students of linguistic specialties is conditioned by the necessity of education modernization and working out new strategies of its development as well as realization of grounded changes in higher education strategies. Such aspects of multimedia technologies usage in the educational process as students’ individual work, teaching different kinds of speech activity, control at English classes are studied in the paper. Attention is focused on the necessity of information technologies usage for increasing effectiveness of the educational process.

  14. Assessment of CO2 reduction potentials through clean coal technologies for future power plants in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monna Rozana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents CO2 reduction potentials employing clean coal technologies for power plants in Indonesia. Whenlow ranked coal from huge reserves cannot be excluded from coal-fired power plants to meet electricity demand, it is criticalfor Indonesia to adopt the best available clean coal technologies for its future coal-fired power plants in order to minimizeCO2 emissions in a long term. Several types of coal-fired technologies are considered to be the best match with Indonesia’ssituation by assessing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, levelized costs of electricity generation, and the cost ofCO2 avoidance. As a result, supercritical PC, IGCC, CFB, and PFBC technologies are presented as a consideration for policymaker in Indonesia.

  15. The future of pharmaceutical manufacturing in the context of the scientific, social, technological and economic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven

    2016-07-30

    Healthcare provision is one of the import elements of modern societies. Life sciences and technology has made substantial progress over the past century and is continuing to evolve exponentially in many different areas. The use of genotypic and phenotypic information in drug discovery and drug therapy, the increasing wealth around the world, growing patient involvement through information and communication technology and finally innovations in pharmaceutical manufacturing technology are transforming the provision of healthcare. The adoption of this new science and technology is going to happen due to the synergistic effects and visible benefits for the society and healthcare systems. The different aspects driving advanced pharmaceutical manufacturing are reviewed to identify future research direction to assure overall acceptance and adoption into healthcare practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomass gasification cogeneration – A review of state of the art technology and near future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Thomsen, Tobias; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2013-01-01

    in future energy systems. Thermal gasification of biomass is proved throughout this article to be both highly flexible and efficient if used optimally. Cogeneration processes with production of heat-and-power, heat-power-and-fuel or heat-power-and-fertilizer are described and compared. The following......Biomass is a renewable resource from which a broad variety of commodities can be produced. However, the resource is scarce and must be used with care to avoid depleting future stock possibilities. Flexibility and efficiency in production are key characteristics for biomass conversion technologies...

  17. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  18. Current state-of-the-art and future perspectives of robotic technology in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rodriguez, Abraham Hafiz; Sambhara, Deepak; Mendel, Ehud

    2014-07-01

    Neurosurgery is one of the most demanding surgical specialties in terms of precision requirements and surgical field limitations. Recent advancements in robotic technology have generated the possibility of incorporating advanced technological tools to the neurosurgical operating room. Although previous studies have addressed the specific details of new robotic systems, there is very little literature on the strengths and drawbacks of past attempts, currently available platforms and prototypes in development. In this review, the authors present a critical historical analysis of the development of robotic technology in neurosurgery as well as a comprehensive summary of the currently available systems that can be expected to be incorporated to the neurosurgical armamentarium in the near future. Finally, the authors present a critical analysis of the main technical challenges in robotic technology development at the present time (such as the design of improved systems for haptic feedback and the necessity of incorporating intraoperative imaging data) as well as the benefits which robotic technology is expected to bring to specific neurosurgical subspecialties in the near future.

  19. Intelligence, integration & industrialisation for the building services technologies of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the construction sector's industrial transformation needs to focus on integrating building services technologies in the buildings of the future. This can be achieved by analysing developments in intelligent building services, exploring design strategies...... for effectively integrating building services, and by developing new industrialised solutions for building services technologies. This paper is based on current Danish research and practice, and it is based on linking research knowledge on building services to knowledge on user needs, building design and new...

  20. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  1. A comprehensive guide of remediation technologies for oil contaminated soil - Present works and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mee Wei; Lau, Ee Von; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2016-08-15

    Oil spills result in negative impacts on the environment, economy and society. Due to tidal and waves actions, the oil spillage affects the shorelines by adhering to the soil, making it difficult for immediate cleaning of the soil. As shoreline clean-up is the most costly component of a response operation, there is a need for effective oil remediation technologies. This paper provides a review on the remediation technologies for soil contaminated with various types of oil, including diesel, crude oil, petroleum, lubricating oil, bitumen and bunker oil. The methods discussed include solvent extraction, bioremediation, phytoremediation, chemical oxidation, electrokinetic remediation, thermal technologies, ultrasonication, flotation and integrated remediation technologies. Each of these technologies was discussed, and associated with their advantages, disadvantages, advancements and future work in detail. Nonetheless, it is important to note that no single remediation technology is considered the best solution for the remediation of oil contaminated soil. This review provides a comprehensive literature on the various remediation technologies studied in the removal of different oil types from soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bridging the gap between the technological singularity and mainstream medicine: highlighting a course on technology and the future of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solez, Kim; Bernier, Ashlyn; Crichton, Joel; Graves, Heather; Kuttikat, Preeti; Lockwood, Ross; Marovitz, William F; Monroe, Damon; Pallen, Mark; Pandya, Shawna; Pearce, David; Saleh, Abdullah; Sandhu, Neelam; Sergi, Consolato; Tuszynski, Jack; Waugh, Earle; White, Jonathan; Woodside, Michael; Wyndham, Roger; Zaiane, Osmar; Zakus, David

    2013-09-09

    The "technological singularity" is defined as that putative point in time forecasted to occur in the mid twenty-first century when machines will become smarter than humans, leading humans and machines to merge. It is hypothesized that this event will have a profound influence on medicine and population health. This work describes a new course on Technology and the Future of Medicine developed by a diverse, multi-disciplinary group of faculty members at a Canadian university. The course began as a continuous professional learning course and was later established as a recognized graduate course. We describe the philosophy of the course, the barriers encountered in course development, and some of the idiosyncratic solutions that were developed to overcome these, including the use of YouTube audience retention analytics. We hope that this report might provide a useful template for other institutions attempting to set up similar programs.

  3. Bridging the Gap between the Technological Singularity and Medicine: Highlighting a Course on Technology and the Future of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solez, Kim; Bernier, Ashlyn; Crichton, Joel; Graves, Heather; Kuttikat, Preeti; Lockwood, Ross; Marovitz, William F.; Monroe, Damon; Pallen, Mark; Pandya, Shawna; Pearce, David; Saleh, Abdullah; Sandhu, Neelam; Sergi, Consolato; Tuszynski, Jack; Waugh, Earle; White, Jonathan; Wong, Julielynn; Woodside, Michael; Wyndham, Roger; Zaiane, Osmar; Zakus, David

    2013-01-01

    The “technological singularity” is forecasted to occur in the mid-21st century and is defined as the point when machines will become smarter than humans and thus trigger the merging of humans and machines. It is hypothesized that this will have a profound influence on medicine and population health. This paper describes a new course entitled “Technology and the Future of Medicine” developed by a multi-disciplinary group of experts. The course began as a continuing medical education course and then transitioned to an accredited graduate-level course. We describe the philosophy of the course and the innovative solutions to the barriers that were encountered, with a focus on YouTube audience retention analytics. Our experience may provide a useful template for others. PMID:24171879

  4. Future Capabilities and Technologies for the Air Force in 2030. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    as a foil to evaluate future systems and technologies, to deter- mine the optimum path forward for Air Force investment. These senior officers each...attacks are being designed to degrade adversary command and control and early- warning capabilities. Finally, submarines, destroyers, aircraft, mines ...Paralysis in Military Operations Jan S. Breemer, December 2000 20 Using Lasers in Space: Laser Orbital Debris Removal and Asteroid Deflection Jonathon

  5. Accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V; Romanenko, A; Valishev, A; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    Recent P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near-term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators.

  6. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ricci Nicomel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested.

  7. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicomel, Nina Ricci; Leus, Karen; Folens, Karel; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Du Laing, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested. PMID:26703687

  8. Distributed technologies in California's energy future. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.; Craig, P.; McGuire, C.B.; Simmons, M. (eds.)

    1977-09-01

    This interim report contains eight of the eighteen chapters included in the complete report. In Chapter I, pertinent data, facts, and observations are made following an initial summary. Chapter II is an introduction, citing especially the writings of Amory Lovins. The criteria used in defining distributed systems, suggested by Lovins, are that the technologies be renewable, environmentally benign, local, subject to graceful failure, foolproof, flexible, comprehensible, and matched in energy quality. The following chapters are: The Energy Predicament; The California Setting; Energy Resources for California's Future; Alternative Energy Futures for California; Issues and Problems; and Directions for Future Work. Six appendices deal with residential heating loads and air conditioning, allocations, co-generation, population projections, and the California wind energy resource. (MCW)

  9. Cities for smart environmental and energy futures. Impacts on architecture and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassia, Stamatina T. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. of Technology in Architecture; Pardalos, Panos M. (eds.) [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Industrial and Systems Engneering

    2014-07-01

    Strategies for energy conservation in smart cities. Up-to-date presentation of on-going research. Innovative ideas for sustainable design. Cities for Smart Environmental and Energy Futures presents works written by eminent international experts from a variety of disciplines including architecture, engineering and related fields. Due to the ever-increasing focus on sustainable technologies, alternative energy sources, and global social and urban issues, interest in the energy systems for cities of the future has grown in a wealth of disciplines. Some of the special features of this book include new findings on the city of the future from the macro to the micro level. These range from urban sustainability to indoor urbanism, and from strategies for cities and global climate change to material properties. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers active in architecture, engineering, the social and computational sciences, building physics and related fields.

  10. Japanese challenge to create a low carbon society - 'Clean coal technologies, now and future'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagaki, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Noguchi, Yoshikazu

    2010-09-15

    Under the increase of world energy demand, especially in major developing countries, energy demand will not be satisfied without coal. It is true that 30% of carbon dioxide emission is from coal-fired power stations, and there is no other effective solution than abating these emissions. The key is Clean Coal Technologies (CCT), to make power stations to low carbon. It is necessary to develop and transfer these CCTs together with developed and developing countries. Japan, who has excellent CCTs, should play an important role to develop higher innovative technologies and is challenging to make a low carbon society in the world.

  11. Present Challenges, Critical Needs, and Future Technological Directions for NASA's GN and C Engineering Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently undergoing a substantial redirection. Notable among the changes occurring within NASA is the stated emphasis on technology development, integration, and demonstration. These new changes within the Agency should have a positive impact on the GN&C discipline given the potential for sizeable investments for technology development and in-space demonstrations of both Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) systems and Autonomous Precision Landing (APL) systems. In this paper the NASA Technical Fellow for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) provides a summary of the present technical challenges, critical needs, and future technological directions for NASA s GN&C engineering discipline. A brief overview of the changes occurring within NASA that are driving a renewed emphasis on technology development will be presented as background. The potential benefits of the planned GN&C technology developments will be highlighted. This paper will provide a GN&C State-of-the-Discipline assessment. The discipline s readiness to support the goals & objectives of each of the four NASA Mission Directorates is evaluated and the technical challenges and barriers currently faced by the discipline are summarized. This paper will also discuss the need for sustained investments to sufficiently mature the several classes of GN&C technologies required to implement NASA crewed exploration and robotic science missions.

  12. IMPLEMENTATION OF MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES IN DEVELOPING THE PERSONALITY OF FUTURE ENGINEERS FASHION DESIGNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANILA Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Applying the model of implementation process of modern educational technologies in higher education involved in technical implementation of educational technology in the educational activity based on critical thinking development strategies, future engineers’ personality development of students. Through educational technologies correlation occurs between educators and educated, which places them in a position promoter of educational paradigms. At present, the efficiency of the educational process depends largely on the use of modern technologies. To determine the student's level of development through the integration of modern educational technologies is necessary to reveal aspects of operating in the thinking of students, which is their way of analysis of reality, to compare, to generalize certain concepts or processes. Methodological peculiarities of modern educational technology based on application of interactive engagement between the two actors in the process of training / preparation and which involved the use of interactive teaching methods adapted to technical higher education. These groups have benefited greatly from the introduction in teaching and learning of modern educational strategies. The intervention was the catalyst that accelerated skills training. Qualitative aspects allow us to generalize the results of experiments performed. A student lays views representing a structure, a generalization, reasoning that arises from their previous experience.

  13. An engineering dilemma: sustainability in the eyes of future technology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S

    2013-09-01

    The ability to design technological solutions that address sustainability is considered pivotal to the future of the planet and its people. As technology professionals engineers are expected to play an important role in sustaining society. The present article aims at exploring sustainability concepts of newly enrolled engineering students in Denmark. Their understandings of sustainability and the role they ascribe to sustainability in their future professional practice is investigated by means of a critical discourse analysis including metaphor analysis and semiotic analysis. The sustainability construal is considered to delimit possible ways of dealing with the concept in practice along the engineering education pathway and in professional problem solving. Five different metaphors used by the engineering students to illustrate sustainability are identified, and their different connotative and interpretive implications are discussed. It is found that sustainability represents a dilemma to the engineering students that situates them in a tension between their technology fascination and the blame they find that technological progress bears. Their sustainability descriptions are collected as part of a survey containing among other questions one open-ended, qualitative question on sustainability. The survey covers an entire year group of Danish engineering students in the first month of their degree study.

  14. Emerging CAE technologies and their role in Future Ambient Intelligence Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    Dramatic improvements are on the horizon in Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) and various simulation technologies. The improvements are due, in part, to the developments in a number of leading-edge technologies and their synergistic combinations/convergence. The technologies include ubiquitous, cloud, and petascale computing; ultra high-bandwidth networks, pervasive wireless communication; knowledge based engineering; networked immersive virtual environments and virtual worlds; novel human-computer interfaces; and powerful game engines and facilities. This paper describes the frontiers and emerging simulation technologies, and their role in the future virtual product creation and learning/training environments. The environments will be ambient intelligence environments, incorporating a synergistic combination of novel agent-supported visual simulations (with cognitive learning and understanding abilities); immersive 3D virtual world facilities; development chain management systems and facilities (incorporating a synergistic combination of intelligent engineering and management tools); nontraditional methods; intelligent, multimodal and human-like interfaces; and mobile wireless devices. The Virtual product creation environment will significantly enhance the productivity and will stimulate creativity and innovation in future global virtual collaborative enterprises. The facilities in the learning/training environment will provide timely, engaging, personalized/collaborative and tailored visual learning.

  15. Microfabrication technology for large LEKID arrays : from NIKA2 to future applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Coiffard, G; Hoarau, C; Leclercq, S; Sueur, H Le; Macias-Perez, J; Monfardini, A; Peck, I; Schuster, K

    2016-01-01

    The Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LEKID)demonstrated full maturity in the NIKA (New IRAM KID Arrays)instrument. These results allow directly comparing LEKID performance with other competing technologies (TES, doped silicon) in the mm and sub-mm range. A continuing effort is ongoing to improve the microfabrication technologies and concepts in order to satisfy the requirements of new instruments. More precisely, future satellites dedicated to CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) studies will require the same focal plane technology to cover, at least, the frequency range of 60 to 600 GHz. Aluminium LEKID developed for NIKA have so far demonstrated, under real telescope conditions, performance approaching photon-noise limitation in the band 120-300 GHz. By implementing superconducting bi-layers we recently demonstrated LEKID arrays working in the range 80-120 GHz and with sensitivities approaching the goals for CMB missions. NIKA itself (350 pixels) is followed by a more ambitious project requiring se...

  16. Trends in meat science and technology: the future looks bright, but the journey will be long.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L; Støier, S; Würtz, J; Hinrichsen, L

    2014-11-01

    With an increasing world population, an increase in affluence and a substantial growth in the demand for high quality protein, the meat sector faces a fantastic but challenging century. New scientific knowledge, technology and creative minds are the main ingredients in order to reach out for this great opportunity. Efficiency all the way from breeding and farming to processing and dispatch is crucial for success. Technology has brought us far, and there is still a huge potential for increased efficiency by implementing best practices on a global scale. New challenges include: hyper flexible automation, more accurate and faster measurement systems and meeting special consumer demands already at the production line. Systems for optimal animal welfare will be even more important and sustainability is no longer a consumer trend but a license to operate. The scientific meat society must provide knowledge and technology so we together can reach out for a seemingly bright future.

  17. 日美清洁能源协议及影响分析%Analysis of Japan - U.S.Clean Energy Technologies Action Plan and its Impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔成; 牛建国

    2011-01-01

    After the global financial crisis, Japan and U.S initiated the closer cooperation to reduce the cost of clean energy development and enhance the international competitiveness.METI of Japan and U.S DOE signed the cooperation agreement in the Nov.18 2010, and issued a joint statement.Japan and U.S will be promote a broad and deep cooperation on the energy smart communities initiative (ESCI), clean energy policy dialogue, as well as clean technology innovation and job creation.These kinds of cooperation will make the significant impact on the technology development and framework of the global clean energy, and we have to pay more attention to the process and take some response.%全球金融危机后,美日两国为降低清洁能源开发成本、进一步提高国际竞争力,着手开展更为密切的合作.日本经产省与美国能源部于2010年11月18日签署了相关协议,并发表了联合声明.日美两国将在能源和智能电网开启(ESCI)、日美清洁能源政策对话、以及日美清洁能源技术创新和就业创造促进政策对话等领域开展广泛而深入的合作.日美两国在清洁能源领域的合作将给全球清洁能源产业和技术格局,以及技术进步产生重大影响,值得我们予以密切关注和积极应对.

  18. Faszination Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Árokay, Judit

    2014-01-01

    Japan ist ein Ausnahmeland. Nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg stieg Japan rasand schnell zu einer Wirtschaftsmacht auf, heute ist es das westlichste Land im Fernen Osten. Über das Leben im modernen Japan sowie über Einschätzungen und Fehleinschätzungen dieses faszinierenden Landes in Deutschland sprach der Campus-Reporter Nils Birschmann mit der Professorin für Japanologie an der Universität Heidelberg, Frau Prof. Dr. Judit Árokay. Der Beitrag "Faszination Japan" erschien in der Sendereihe "Camp...

  19. Post-traumatic Stress and Growth Among Medical Student Volunteers After the March 2011 Disaster in Fukushima, Japan: Implications for Student Involvement with Future Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Prioleau, Phoebe; Taku, Kanako; Naruse, Yu; Sekine, Hideharu; Maeda, Masaharu; Yabe, Hirooki; Katz, Craig; Yanagisawa, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The March 2011 "triple disaster" (earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident) had a profound effect on northern Japan. Many medical students at Fukushima Medical University volunteered in the relief effort. We aimed to investigate the nature of students' post-disaster involvement and examine the psychological impact of their experiences using a survey containing elements from the Davidson Trauma Scale and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. We collected 494 surveys (70 % response rate), of which 132 students (26.7 %) had volunteered. Volunteers were more likely to be older, have witnessed the disaster in person, had their hometowns affected, and had a family member or close friend injured. In the month after 3/11, volunteers were more likely to want to help, feel capable of helping, and report an increased desire to become a physician. Both in the month after 3/11 and the most recent month before the survey, there were no significant differences in distressing symptoms, such as confusion, anger, or sadness, between volunteers and non-volunteers. Volunteers reported a significantly higher level of posttraumatic growth than non-volunteers. Participating in a greater variety of volunteer activities was associated with a higher level of posttraumatic growth, particularly in the Personal Strength domain. There may be self-selection in some criteria, since students who were likely to be resistant to confusion/anxiety/sadness may have felt more capable of helping and been predisposed to volunteer. However, participation in post-disaster relief efforts did not appear to have a harmful effect on medical students, an important consideration for mobilizing volunteers after future disasters.

  20. Mobile Technology in the Perioperative Arena: Rapid Evolution and Future Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Brian S; Gupta, Rajnish K; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Throughout the history of medicine, physicians have relied upon disruptive innovations and technologies to improve the quality of care delivered, patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. The implementation of mobile technology in health care is quickly becoming the next disruptive technology. We first review the history of mobile technology over the past 3 decades, discuss the impact of hardware and software, explore the rapid expansion of applications (apps), and evaluate the adoption of mobile technology in health care. Next, we discuss how technology serves as the vehicle that can transform traditional didactic learning into one that adapts to the learning behavior of the student by using concepts such as the flipped classroom, just-in-time learning, social media, and Web 2.0/3.0. The focus in this modern education paradigm is shifting from teacher-centric to learner-centric, including providers and patients, and is being delivered as context-sensitive, or semantic, learning. Finally, we present the methods by which connected health systems via mobile devices increase information collection and analysis from patients in both clinical care and research environments. This enhanced patient and provider connection has demonstrated benefits including reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions, improved perioperative health maintenance coordination, and improved care in remote and underserved areas. A significant portion of the future of health care, and specifically perioperative medicine, revolves around mobile technology, nimble learners, patient-specific information and decision-making, and continuous connectivity between patients and health care systems. As such, an understanding of developing or evaluating mobile technology likely will be important for anesthesiologists, particularly with an ever-expanding scope of practice in perioperative medicine.