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Sample records for technology incubator nsti

  1. National Security Technology Incubator Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-02-28

    This report documents the action plan for developing the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) program for southern New Mexico. The NSTI program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). This action plan serves as a tool in measuring progress in the development process and delivery of services for the NSTI program. Continuous review and evaluation of the action plan is necessary in the development process of the NSTI. The action plan includes detailed steps in developing the NSTI program based on recommended best practices in incubator development by the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA). Included are tasks required to implement the NSTI, developed within a work breakdown structure. In addition, a timeline is identified for each task.

  2. National Security Technology Incubator Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-04-30

    This report documents the operations plan for developing the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) program for southern New Mexico. The NSTI program will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. The NSTI program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The operation plan includes detailed descriptions of the structure and organization, policies and procedures, scope, tactics, and logistics involved in sustainable functioning of the NSTI program. Additionally, the operations plan will provide detailed descriptions of continuous quality assurance measures based on recommended best practices in incubator development by the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA). Forms that assist in operations of NSTI have been drafted and can be found as an attachment to the document.

  3. National Security Technology Incubation Project Continuation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-09-30

    This document contains a project continuation plan for the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI). The plan was developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This continuation plan describes the current status of NSTI (staffing and clients), long-term goals, strategies, and long-term financial solvency goals.The Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University (NMSU) is the operator and manager of the NSTI. To realize the NSTI, Arrowhead Center must meet several performance objectives related to planning, development, execution, evaluation, and sustainability. This continuation plan is critical to the success of NSTI in its mission of incubating businesses with security technology products and services.

  4. National Security Technology Incubator Evaluation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the process by which the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) will be evaluated. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of the components, steps, and measures of the proposed evaluation process. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. The NSTI will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. An effective evaluation process of the NSTI is an important step as it can provide qualitative and quantitative information on incubator performance over a given period. The vision of the NSTI is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety and security. The mission of the NSTI is to identify, incubate, and accelerate technologies with national security applications at various stages of development by providing hands-on mentoring and business assistance to small businesses and emerging or growing companies. To achieve success for both incubator businesses and the NSTI program, an evaluation process is essential to effectively measure results and implement corrective processes in the incubation design if needed. The evaluation process design will collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative data through performance evaluation system.

  5. National Security Technology Incubator Business Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-12-31

    This document contains a business plan for the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI), developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) and performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This business plan describes key features of the NSTI, including the vision and mission, organizational structure and staffing, services, evaluation criteria, marketing strategies, client processes, a budget, incubator evaluation criteria, and a development schedule. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. The NSTI will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. The vision of the NSTI is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety, security, and protection of the homeland. The NSTI is operated and managed by the Arrowhead Center, responsible for leading the economic development mission of New Mexico State University (NMSU). The Arrowhead Center will recruit business with applications for national security technologies recruited for the NSTI program. The Arrowhead Center and its strategic partners will provide business incubation services, including hands-on mentoring in general business matters, marketing, proposal writing, management, accounting, and finance. Additionally, networking opportunities and technology development assistance will be provided.

  6. External Service Providers to the National Security Technology Incubator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-02-28

    This report documents the identification and assessment of external service providers to the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) program for southern New Mexico. The NSTI is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant to Arrowhead Center, New Mexico State University. This report contains 1) a summary of the services to be provided by NSTI; 2) organizational descriptions of external service providers; and 3) a comparison of NSTI services and services offered by external providers.

  7. Input from Key Stakeholders in the National Security Technology Incubator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-01-31

    This report documents the input from key stakeholders of the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) in developing a new technology incubator and related programs for southern New Mexico. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes identification of key stakeholders as well as a description and analysis of their input for the development of an incubator.

  8. Technology business incubators as engines of growth: towards a distinction between technology incubators and non-technology incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.; Langan Fox, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Business incubators are an increasingly popular tool for promoting job and wealth creation. Yet given the heterogeneity of incubation models, it is not always clear how incubators operate, what their main characteristics are and how can they best contribute to job and wealth creation. If technology

  9. Technology Business Incubators as Engines of Growth: Towards a distinction between Technology Incubators and Non-Technology Incubators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2009-01-01

    Business incubators are an increasingly popular tool for promoting job and wealth creation. Yet given the heterogeneity of incubation models, it is not always clear how incubators operate, what their main characteristics are and how can they best contribute to job and wealth creation. If technology

  10. Technology Business Incubators in China and India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Mingfeng; Baskaran, Angathevar; Pancholi, Jatin

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparative case study of Technology Business Incubators (TBIs) in two major emerging economies in Asia - China and India. We employ an integrative analytical framework that combines three broad categories of indicators (originally developed by developed by Mian, 1997): Management...... policies and practices; Services and their impacts; and Performance outcomes; with the national system of innovation (NSI) concept. At the micro (TBI) level, we mainly focus on: objectives, structure and governance of incubators, selection of tenants, funding for incubators and tenants, services provided...... the NSIs of China and India, as major components of NSI such as macroeconomic conditions, national S&T policy framework, industrial structure and the nature of financial institutions have played significant role in shaping the nature and rate of TBIs development in both countries. This suggests...

  11. Continuous High Technology Business Incubation : cross-sectoral comparison of approaches to high technology business incubation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davey, Todd; Kliewe, Thorsten; Sijde, van der Peter; McIntyre, Matt

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how organisations can foster high technology businesses in an incubation-type environment. We compare the approaches taken by a large private firm with a successful University entrepreneurial program to outline successful elements in creating a successful high te

  12. Towards a distinction between technology incubators and non-technology incubators: can they contribute to economic growth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.; Fink, M.; Hatak, I.

    2010-01-01

    Business incubators are an increasingly popular tool for promoting job and wealth creation. Yet given the heterogeneity of incubation models, it is not always clear how incubators operate, what their main characteristics are and how can they best contribute to job and wealth creation. If technology

  13. Marketing Plan for the National Security Technology Incubator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-31

    This marketing plan was developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University. The vision of the National Security Technology Incubator program is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety and security. The plan defines important aspects of developing the incubator, such as defining the target market, marketing goals, and creating strategies to reach the target market while meeting those goals. The three main marketing goals of the incubator are: 1) developing marketing materials for the incubator program; 2) attracting businesses to become incubator participants; and 3) increasing name recognition of the incubator program on a national level.

  14. New York Nano-Bio Molecular Information Technology (NYNBIT) Incubator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Digendra K

    2008-12-19

    This project presents the outcome of an effort made by a consortium of six universities in the State of New York to develop a Center for Advanced technology (CAT) in the emerging field of Nano-Bio-Molecular Information Technology. The effort consists of activities such as organization of the NYNBIT incubator, collaborative research projects, development of courses, an educational program for high schools, and commercial start-up programs.

  15. Incubating incubators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée; Pötz, Katharina Anna

    Setting up business incubators has become and industry in its own right. In this article, we return to incubator development studies but focus on the specific process through which involved stakeholders develop the new organization that should deliver services to future incubatees and become a self......-sustaining, dynamic business. In particular, we raise the question of how incubators should be set-up with regard to the context-dependent balance between business planning and venture creation approaches. We illustrate this challenge through providing insight into a case of a project-based and mainly planning...... to inspire further research on incubator development processes....

  16. Business incubators as support mechanisms for the economic development: Case of Maringá's Technology Incubator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Helen Mansano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In an environment where competition is increasingly fierce, it is essential to create an innovation system, that ranges from basic research to the transfer of developments for the companies and the whole society. To verify this process, the most of the works are using the record number of patents as a proxy, given the difficulty of measuring new products, services and process for the market. Based in incubators of technology-based enterprises, in this article this problem was overcome, by measuring their products, services and processes. Thus, we developed this work with the main objective to assess whether there is interaction between the resident enterprises in technological incubator of Maringá, external companies and university.   The methodology includes a literature review on the subject, the development of variables related to incubator´s characteristics, the application of a questionnaire to the companies linked to Technological Incubator of Maringá, in order to verify the new products, services and process related to research that hit the market. The results point indicates the need for facilitating the process of innovation and interaction with university and industry by developed innovations.

  17. APPLICATION OF THE MODEL CERNE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CRITERIA INCUBATION SELECTION IN TECHNOLOGY BASED BUSINESSES : A STUDY IN INCUBATORS OF TECHNOLOGICAL BASE OF THE COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clobert Jefferson Passoni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators are a great source of encouragement for innovative projects, enabling the development of new technologies, providing infrastructure, advice and support, which are key elements for the success of new business. The technology-based firm incubators (TBFs, which are 154 in Brazil. Each one of them has its own mechanism for the selection of the incubation companies. Because of the different forms of management of incubators, the business model CERNE - Reference Center for Support for New Projects - was created by Anprotec and Sebrae, in order to standardize procedures and promote the increase of chances for success in the incubations. The objective of this study is to propose selection criteria for the incubation, considering CERNE’s five dimensions and aiming to help on the decision-making in the assessment of candidate companies in a TBF incubator. The research was conducted from the public notices of 20 TBF incubators, where 38 selection criteria were identified and classified. Managers of TBF incubators validated 26 criteria by its importance via online questionnaires. As a result, favorable ratings were obtained to 25 of them. Only one criterion differed from the others, with a unfavorable rating.

  18. Cellular Automata with network incubation in information technology diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseo, Renato; Guidolin, Mariangela

    2010-06-01

    Innovation diffusion of network goods determines direct network externalities that depress sales for long periods and delay full benefits. We model this effect through a multiplicative dynamic market potential driven by a latent individual threshold embedded in a special Cellular Automata representation. The corresponding mean field approximation of its aggregate version is a Riccati equation with a closed form solution. This allows the detection of a change-point time separating an incubation period from a subsequent take-off due to a collective threshold (critical mass). Weighted nonlinear least squares are the main inferential methodology. An application is analysed with reference to USA fax machine diffusion.

  19. CAXIAS DO SUL TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR: TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION THROUGH THE TRIPLE HELIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Bresolin Tisott

    2014-09-01

    on investment in the form of registered patents, attracting new students and recognition as a technological, entrepreneurial and innovative university. The perceived benefits for the industrial sector are training and development for businesses and entrepreneurs, while the municipal government perceives the reduced number of businesses failing and the financial returns, in the form of taxes, as benefits. The findings show that the Triple Helix concept developed by Etzkowitz (2009 plays a cooperative and participatory role in the Technology Incubator, even though it could be applied to more segments of society.

  20. Adopting Disruptive Technologies in Traditional Universities: Continuing Education as an Incubator for Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Walter; Anderson, Terry; Garrison, Randy

    1999-01-01

    Traditional universities are feeling the impact of "disruptive technologies" such as distance education. Seeing how businesses have responded to such disruptions, universities should "incubate" innovations in a semiautonomous unit such as continuing education, which can address new markets with low margins. (SK)

  1. Adopting Disruptive Technologies in Traditional Universities: Continuing Education as an Incubator for Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Walter; Anderson, Terry; Garrison, Randy

    1999-01-01

    Traditional universities are feeling the impact of "disruptive technologies" such as distance education. Seeing how businesses have responded to such disruptions, universities should "incubate" innovations in a semiautonomous unit such as continuing education, which can address new markets with low margins. (SK)

  2. Can incubators work in Africa? Acorn Technologies and the entrepreneur-centric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Peter A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incubators are organizations that support the growth of new and typically technology-based enterprises, by providing business support services that bring together human and financial capital. Although the traditional role of incubators has been for economic development, they may also be a useful policy lever to tackle global health, by fostering the development and delivery of local health innovation. Given its high disease burden, life sciences incubators hold particular potential for Africa. As the most industrially advanced African nation, South Africa serves as a litmus test for identifying effective incubator policies. The case study method was used to illustrate how one such publicly funded incubator founded in 2002, Acorn Technologies, helped to catalyze local health product innovation. Discussion Acorn helped to support twelve biomedical device firms. One of them, Real World Diagnostics, was founded by a trainee from Acorn’s innovative internship program (Hellfire. It developed rapid strip diagnostic tests for locally prevalent diseases including schistosomiasis and HIV, and reported $2 million (USD in revenue in 2009. Acorn achieved this success by operating as a non-profit virtual incubator with little physical infrastructure. Employing a virtual model in combination with stringent selection criteria of capital efficiency for clients proved to be effective in reducing its own fixed costs. Acorn focused on entrepreneurship training and networking, both critical at an early stage in an environment dominated by multinational biomedical device companies. Acorn and its clients learned that employing a cross-subsidy business model allowed one to generate royalty revenue through imports to subsidize R&D for local diseases. However, funding constraints and government expectations for rapid self-sustainability forced Acorn to merge with its sister biotechnology incubator in 2009. Summary A key to Acorn’s achievements was

  3. Can incubators work in Africa? Acorn Technologies and the entrepreneur-centric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakma, Justin; Masum, Hassan; Singer, Peter A

    2010-12-13

    Incubators are organizations that support the growth of new and typically technology-based enterprises, by providing business support services that bring together human and financial capital. Although the traditional role of incubators has been for economic development, they may also be a useful policy lever to tackle global health, by fostering the development and delivery of local health innovation.Given its high disease burden, life sciences incubators hold particular potential for Africa. As the most industrially advanced African nation, South Africa serves as a litmus test for identifying effective incubator policies. The case study method was used to illustrate how one such publicly funded incubator founded in 2002, Acorn Technologies, helped to catalyze local health product innovation. Acorn helped to support twelve biomedical device firms. One of them, Real World Diagnostics, was founded by a trainee from Acorn's innovative internship program (Hellfire). It developed rapid strip diagnostic tests for locally prevalent diseases including schistosomiasis and HIV, and reported $2 million (USD) in revenue in 2009.Acorn achieved this success by operating as a non-profit virtual incubator with little physical infrastructure. Employing a virtual model in combination with stringent selection criteria of capital efficiency for clients proved to be effective in reducing its own fixed costs. Acorn focused on entrepreneurship training and networking, both critical at an early stage in an environment dominated by multinational biomedical device companies.Acorn and its clients learned that employing a cross-subsidy business model allowed one to generate royalty revenue through imports to subsidize R&D for local diseases. However, funding constraints and government expectations for rapid self-sustainability forced Acorn to merge with its sister biotechnology incubator in 2009. A key to Acorn's achievements was identifying entrepreneurs with technologies with health and

  4. Progress of the Photovoltaic Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment totals nearly $ 1.3 billion.

  5. Mentoring Entrepreneurial Networks: mapping conceptions of participants in technological-based business incubators in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontes Regis, Helder

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent entrepreneurship research agenda includes the analysis of cognitive structures of successful entrepreneurs, revealing an important tool for the examination of an entrepreneurial career. Using techniques of cognitive maps, this study explores the concepts of a successful career and the network itself, as a whole, for career development. Fifty-three entrepreneurs were studied, in seven technological incubators in the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Specifically, this study aimed to map the shared meanings of the incubated entrepreneurs regarding informal support networks. Such networks support the entrepreneurial career and the present study explores the characteristics and the conceptual model that underlies the networks. The data collection was achieved through interviews through a free evocation technique. The shared meanings indicate the existence of inherent thought categories that support network context in the incubator environment, mainly the mentoring networks. The results endorse the interpretation of an informal mentoring model emerging from the dominant evocations concerning a successful career and of the network itself as promoter of career development.

  6. The Creative Economy on the Environmental of the Technological Parks and Incubators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Emmanuil Inglesis Barcellos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The creative economy has become a key element in generating ideas, products and services being an evolving concept based on creative assets, which modifies the profile of industry and global market, from the partnership between creativity and economics combined with innovation and technology. In Brazil, Technological Parks and Incubators, in turn, have not devoted themselves with real interest in this emerging sector; they are involved primarily with technologies for areas such as biotechnology, environment, embedded electronics, alternative energy, oil, software and, mainly, IT (ICT. This article identifies how the economy and creative industry have changed the entrepreneurial profile in the national and global environment and how these trends are applicable in relation to the environment of the Parks and Incubators for the inclusion of creativity in the current Brazilian scenario. Shows that the creative production promotes skills that constitute the knowledge of Design, Architecture,Cultural Heritage, Media, Culture and Arts, acting democratically, adding knowledge, diversity and differentiation, overcoming social and regional barriers and making social inclusion. It shows that a market segment that involved about US $ 624 billion in 2011, more than doubling between 2002 and 2011, maintains a growth trajectory has only 2% of the featured activities of the Parks aimed at its development and promotion.

  7. APPLICATION OF THE MODEL CERNE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CRITERIA INCUBATION SELECTION IN TECHNOLOGY BASED BUSINESSES : A STUDY IN INCUBATORS OF TECHNOLOGICAL BASE OF THE COUNTRY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clobert Jefferson Passoni; Izabel Cristina Zattar; Jessica Werner Boschetto; Rosangela Rosa Luciane da Silva

    2017-01-01

    .... Because of the different forms of management of incubators, the business model CERNE - Reference Center for Support for New Projects - was created by Anprotec and Sebrae, in order to standardize...

  8. The Business Engineering Surgical Technologies (BEST) teaching method: incubating talents for surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, V; Halvax, P; Dallemagne, B; Swanström, L; Marescaux, J; Perretta, S

    2015-01-01

    Technological innovation in surgical science and healthcare is vital and calls for close collaboration between engineering and surgery. To meet this objective, BEST was designed as a free sustainable innovative teaching method for young professionals, combining surgery, engineering, and business in a multidisciplinary, high-quality, low-cost, and learning-by-doing philosophy. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions of this innovative educational method. BEST educational method is delivered in two parts: the first component consisting of live streaming or pre-recorded online lectures, with an interdisciplinary profile focused on surgery, engineering, and business. The second component is an annual 5-day on-site course, organized at IRCAD-IHU, France. The program includes workshops in engineering, entrepreneurship team projects, and in-depth hands-on experience in laparoscopy, robotic surgery, interventional radiology, and flexible endoscopy with special emphasis on the interdisciplinary aspect of the training. A panel of surgeons, engineers, well-established entrepreneurs, and scientists assessed the team projects for potential patent application. From November 2011 till September 2013, 803 individual and institutional users from 79 different countries attended the online course. In total, 134 young professionals from 32 different countries applied to the onsite course. Sixty participants were selected each year for the onsite course. In addition, five participants were selected for a web-based team. Thirteen provisional patents were filed for the most promising projects. BEST proved to be a global talent incubator connecting students to high-quality education despite institutional and economical boundaries. Viable and innovative ideas arose from this revolutionary approach which is likely to spin-off significant technology transfer and lead the way for future interdisciplinary hybrid surgical

  9. Factors Affecting The Success of Incubators and The Moderating Role of Information and Communication Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadri Kamal Alzaghal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators can help young firms to survive during their first years. They are considered to be an entrepreneurial and economic development instrument that can increase the creativity of new firms including small and mid-sized enterprises and that can support them in the early stage of development which is the most vulnerable stage of their existence. Small and mid-sized enterprises are crucial for enhancing innovation, productivity, competitiveness, social cohesion, and economic development in developed and developing countries. They are also crucial in minimizing unemployment; they create a lot of jobs and significant output in many countries. The economy in many developing countries, especially Arab countries, is in a critical state. The unemployment rate is very high and gross domestic product is very low compared to developed countries. Many types of success models have been proposed and used to measure the success and performance of business incubators in developed countries. However, a limited number of studies and success models have been published on this topic in the case of the developing world. Therefore, the main objective of this paper is to propose a model using a combination of well-known and new success factors for business incubator success in developing countries.

  10. Grassroots Innovations to Techno-Entrepreneurship through GIAN – Technology Business Incubator in India: A Case Study of Nature Technocrats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemantkumar P. Bulsara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is the solution to solve a problem of unemployment in any economy. Normally, we think of Technology innovations, we think of Engineers from top Technology Institutions. But innovations may also come from Grassroots people. This paper gives the Case study of Nature Technocrats – small business firm of Arvindbhai who has been supported by GIAN (Grassroots Innovations Augmentation Network, Technology Business Incubator for Grassroots Innovations in India. In India, there are many Technology Business Incubation centers but approach of GIAN is unique as it supports Grassroots innovators. This paper has come out of a larger study with Research design: Multiple Embedded Descriptive Case Study. The process of GIAN with unique mechanism of commercializing the Grassroots innovations is described. The problems in this area are also described. This case study may inspire other agencies in India or other countries too for working in the area of Grassroots innovations to Techno-entrepreneurship.   Keywords: Grassroots innovations; Technology innovations; Techno-Entrepreneurship; GIAN; Technology Transfer.

  11. Measuring Efficiency and Productivity Growth of New Technology-Based Firms in Business Incubators: The Portuguese Case Study of Madan Parque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grilo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators can play a major role in helping to turn a business idea into a technology-based organization that is economically efficient. However, there is a shortage in the literature regarding the efficiency evaluation and productivity evolution of the new technology-based firms (NTBFs in the incubation scope. This study develops a model based on the data envelopment analysis (DEA methodology, which allows the incubated NTBFs to evaluate and improve the efficiency of their management. Moreover, the Malmquist index is used to examine productivity change. The index is decomposed into multiple components to give insights into the root sources of productivity change. The proposed model was applied in a case study with 13 NTBFs incubated. From that study, we conclude that inefficient firms invest excessively in research and development (R&D, and, on average, firms have a productivity growth in the period of study.

  12. Measuring efficiency and productivity growth of new technology-based firms in business incubators: the Portuguese case study of Madan Parque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, A; Santos, J

    2015-01-01

    Business incubators can play a major role in helping to turn a business idea into a technology-based organization that is economically efficient. However, there is a shortage in the literature regarding the efficiency evaluation and productivity evolution of the new technology-based firms (NTBFs) in the incubation scope. This study develops a model based on the data envelopment analysis (DEA) methodology, which allows the incubated NTBFs to evaluate and improve the efficiency of their management. Moreover, the Malmquist index is used to examine productivity change. The index is decomposed into multiple components to give insights into the root sources of productivity change. The proposed model was applied in a case study with 13 NTBFs incubated. From that study, we conclude that inefficient firms invest excessively in research and development (R&D), and, on average, firms have a productivity growth in the period of study.

  13. Training Programmes as Incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Truls; Gjellan, Are

    2003-01-01

    A European technological university conducts quarterly incubator programs in which teams develop ideas into viable business plans. Analysis indicates that 57 of 102 ideas resulted in successful technology-based businesses and more than 400 students received hands-on experience in business start-up. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  14. 科技孵化园商业运营模式探讨%Technology Incubator Park and Its Business Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李炜

    2013-01-01

      科技企业孵化器事业从最初的科技成果转化战术路径,已上升为建立创新型国家战略最为有效的战略性工具和载体。在维持科技转化功能,实施市场化运营,保持企业良性循环发展方面,深圳科技企业孵化园“科技企业孵化+种子期投资+孵化社区(科技地产)”三位一体的服务体系,提供了可持续商业化运营模式。%From the beginning of scientific and technological achievements transformation path, science and technology business incubator has risen to the most strategic tools and carrier for the national innovation strategy, It pushes forward technology transfer, market-oriented operation, and sustainable development. Through the“science and technology business incubator+seed stage investment+incubation community (Technology Real Estate)”service system, shenzhen science and technology business incubator park provides a sustainable business operation mode.

  15. Anhui Science and Technology Enterprise Growth of Incubation Environment Analysis%安徽省科技型企业成长孵化环境探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王可可

    2011-01-01

    安徽省的科技型中小企业孵化器近些年来发展比较迅速,但是在发展的过程中也存在着很多的问题,如孵化能力不足与孵化功能欠佳,孵化器发展的方式、区域差距较大等。本文针对科技型中小企业孵化环境的问题提出了一些建议。%In recent years, Anhui scientific-technological SMES have developed very fast. But, a lot of problems exist in the process of development. For example, the shortages function of incubator, the poor function of incubator, great disparity incubator function

  16. 区域创新要素与STBI创新孵化绩效--在孵企业资源拼凑的中介作用%Regional Innovation Factors and Innovation Incubation Performance of Science and Technology Business Incubator---The Mediating Effect of Incubated Enterprises' Resource Bricolage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜骞; 刘强

    2016-01-01

    Based on regional innovation theory, innovation network theory, inter-organizational relationship theory and strategic management theory, we constructed conceptual framework of regional innovation factors, resource bricolage and innovation incubation performance of science and technology business incubator, through a large research sample, implemented construct validity with smart PLS and AMOS software to test its effectiveness and rationality. The Empirical results show that regional innovation factors (regional innovation initiatives, incubation network characteris-tics and value chain information sources) have positive influence on resource bricolage. Resource bricolage has positive influence on innovation incubation performance.%文章以区域创新理论、创新网络理论、组织间关系理论以及战略管理理论为基础,构建了区域创新要素、在孵企业资源拼凑与科技企业孵化器(STBI)创新孵化绩效的概念框架及研究假设,通过大样本的数据调查,运用区间数拓展DEMATEL、smartPLS软件对概念框架进行信效度检验和结构方程模型分析。实证结果显示,区域创新要素(区域创新举措、孵化网络特征和价值链信息资源)对在孵企业资源拼凑具有显著的正向影响;在孵企业资源拼凑与创新孵化绩效之间具有显著正向相关关系。

  17. Final Technical Report: The Incubation of Next-Generation Radar Technologies to Lower the Cost of Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Hirth, Brian [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Guynes, Jerry [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The National Wind Institute (NWI) at Texas Tech University (TTU) has had an impressive and well documented 46-year history of wind related research activities (http://www.depts.ttu.edu/nwi/). In 2011 with funding from the United States Department of Energy (DOE), an NWI team applied radar technologies and techniques to document the complex flows occurring across a wind plant. The resulting efforts yielded measurements that exceeded the capabilities of commercial lidar technologies with respect to maximum range, range resolution and scan speed. The NWI team was also the first to apply dual-Doppler synthesis and objective analysis techniques to resolve the full horizontal wind field (i.e. not just the line-of-sight wind speeds) to successfully define turbine inflow and wake flows across large segments of wind plants. While these successes advanced wind energy interests, the existing research radar platforms were designed to serve a diversity of meteorological applications, not specifically wind energy. Because of this broader focus and the design choices made during their development, the existing radars experienced technical limitations that inhibited their commercial viability and wide spread adoption. This DOE project enabled the development of a new radar prototype specifically designed for the purpose of documenting wind farm complex flows. Relative to other “off the shelf” radar technologies, the specialized transmitter and receiver chains were specifically designed to enhance data availability in non-precipitating atmospheres. The new radar prototype was integrated at TTU using components from various suppliers across the world, and installed at the Reese Technology Center in May 2016. Following installation, functionality and performance testing were completed, and subsequent comparative analysis indicated that the new prototype greatly enhances data availability by a factor of 3.5-50 in almost all atmospheric conditions. The new prototype also provided

  18. 大鲵人工催产与孵化技术研究%Study on Spawning Induction and Incubation Technology of the Giant Salamander (Andrias davidianus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红星; 沈建忠; 赵虎; 王启军; 王中乾

    2012-01-01

    The spawning and incubation technology of giant salamanders {Andrias davidianus) was studied. The results showed that LRH-A2 and HCG oxytocin were better spawning agents. By human control, gonad maturities of giant salamanders would be at ideal state. By controling water temperature at 18-21℃, dissolved oxygen higher than 5 mg/L, light intensity at 300 lx and water flow, the hatching rate could be up to 76.4% by artificial incubation.%对大鲵(A ndrias davidianus)的人工催产和孵化技术进行了研究.结果表明,LRH-A2和HCG催产效果较好,经人为调控可使大鲵性腺成熟度状态良好;人工孵化时通过严格控制水温18~21℃、溶氧保持在5 mg/L以上、光照度300 lx以下,给予适当的流水刺激,孵化率可达76.4%.

  19. BUSINESS INCUBATORS AND SUSTAINABLE INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schebesch Klaus Bruno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovative businesses are often the result of collective action of organisations involved in many-sided market structures, which can be found in and around business incubators or technology centres. Within such frame environments, many group interests beyond those of single producers and their immediate clients exist and interfere. Rather generically, important economic outcomes of innovations are sequences of cost reduction events at the level of economic sectors, where the nature of (sector-wise technology is influencing the pace of these events. At the conceptual level, we describe the social learning and social innovation process which leads to sustainable innovation by means of the influence exerted by firms on each other within constrained environments such as business incubators. These environments need not to be organized according to any sector logic. We propose that the influence exerted between firms is increasing in firm similarity, in the degree of product complementarity, and also to depend on (mutual trust relations. We note that, very much in symmetry with the role of sustainability in society as a whole, in the world of firms and markets, the incubation process may be viewed as a moderator, which attempts to overcome the disadvantages of highly paced, short-term oriented capitalist economies. In sections 2 and 3 a concept for representing the societal forces shaping sustainability and incubation for the innovating firm is described and ways of transforming the concept into concrete tools of assessment and valuation are pointed at.

  20. Gestão por indicadores de desempenho: resultados na incubadora empresarial tecnológica Management through performance indicators: results in a technological business incubator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pacheco Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Em função da relevância de mecanismos fortes de suporte à gestão empresarial nas incubadoras, para que possam auxiliar de forma eficiente no processo de negócio das novas empresas e, conseqüentemente, aumentar suas chances de sucesso, este artigo visa apresentar uma proposta de gestão por indicadores de desempenho para empresas de base tecnológica em formação e crescimento. Logo, compreende a conceituação necessária à concepção do modelo, o estabelecimento de uma empresa padrão no contexto de incubação, a definição das bases de direcionamento para o estabelecimento de indicadores de desempenho e a formatação de uma planilha de indicadores de desempenho e coleta de dados para avaliação. De forma conclusiva, apresenta considerações positivas sobre o modelo desenvolvido na prática.Based in the relevance of strong support mechanisms for business management, that can help in an efficient manner in the business process of new enterprises and as a consequence increases their chances of success, this paper aims to present a proposal of management through performance indicators to technological based enterprises in development and growth. It consists on the theoretical grounding needed for the conception of a model, the estabilishment of a standard enterprise in the context of incubation, the definition of the directing bases for the establishment of performance indicators and the formatting of a performance indicator spreadsheet and collecting data for evaluation. In a conclusive way, it presents positive consideration about the developed model in practical application.

  1. SIZE AND INCUBATION PERIOD '

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Chemical and Process Engineering,. University of Dar es Salaam, ... incubation time on biogas production from water hyacinth. Substrate ..... This was attributed to high lignin content in the ..... and steam explosion. Biotechnol ...

  2. Night Heron Incubation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Parental incubation behavior largely influences nest survival, a critical demographic process in avian population dynamics, and behaviors vary across species with...

  3. On Business Incubation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王楠

    2014-01-01

    The paper is organized in three parts. The first part is about the history and development periods of business incubation; the second one is on its three generations defined by scholars; and the third one is on its present situation including various forms of incubators. In the conclusion, a brief reflection is made on its significance in economy and on the value it provides for society.

  4. 基于SCP范式的江苏省科技孵化器产业发展研究%Research on the Development of Science and Technology Incubator Industry in Jiangsu Province Based on SCP Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静云

    2016-01-01

    基于SCP范式对江苏省科技企业孵化器产业的发展情况进行研究。首先从产业规模与产业集中度对市场结构进行分析,其次从价值主张、价值创造与价值获取三个维度对市场行为进行剖析,之后以累计孵化企业个数、提供就业机会与人才培养三个角度对科技孵化器产业的绩效进行评价,从中发现江苏省科技孵化器建设的特点,找出其成就与不足。%Based on the SCP model, this paper studies the development of science and technology incubator industry in Jiangsu Province. Firstly, it analyzes the market structure from the industry scale and industry concentration degree;secondly, it analyzes the market behavior from three dimensions of value proposition, value creation and value acquisition; and finally, it evaluates the performance of science and technology incubator industry from three aspects of cumulative number of business incubators, employment opportunities and personnel training. It finds the characteristics of the construction of science and technology incubator in Jiangsu Province, and finds out its achievements and shortcomings.

  5. Evolution of Incubation Models: Evidence from the Italian Incubation Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Alessandro; Grimaldi, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of incubators in supporting new venture creation. A mapping of four different types of incubator is proposed: corporate private incubators (CPIs), independent private incubators (IPIs), business innovation centres (BICs) and university business incubators (UBIs). This mapping is exemplified through case studies of one…

  6. Humidification of incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpin, V A; Rutter, N

    1985-03-01

    The effect of increasing the humidity in incubators was examined in 62 infants of less than 30 weeks' gestation. Thirty three infants nursed in high humidity for two weeks were compared retrospectively with 29 infants from an earlier study who were nursed under plastic bubble blankets or with topical paraffin but without raised humidity. Humidification reduced skin water loss and improved maintenance of body temperature from birth, but did not delay the normal postnatal maturation of the skin. Infants nursed without humidity frequently became hypothermic in spite of a high incubator air temperature. These advantages must be weighed against the finding that overheating was more common and Pseudomonas was more commonly isolated from the infants. It is recommended that incubator humidity is raised for babies under 30 weeks' gestation in the first days of life but meticulous attention should be paid to fluid balance, avoiding overheating, and cleansing of the humidifier reservoir.

  7. Integrating education and incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée; Riis, Nina Louise Fynbo

    During the last decade student business incubation activities have become mainstream activities in Western universities. This is also the case in Danish higher education where all universities have established in-house student incubators. The models applied are different and place varied emphasis...... on the integration of extracurricular activities with formal credit awarding activities. In a Danish context, such integration has become increasingly important due to recent political reforms aimed at shortening the time it takes students to graduate in order to reduce national higher education expenditures...

  8. 我国科技企业孵化器的发展状况及存在问题分析%The Development and Problems of Enterprise Incubators for Science and Technology Enterprises in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳莉; 曹桂彬; 吕彦昭

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the development in the past 20-odd years,the hatching of science and technology enterprises in China is greatly improved in terms of the number of incubators,site areas,the number of incubating and graduated enterprises,and the annually increasing job opportunities.A relatively perfect technology innovation hatching systemhas been formed and has brought about tremendous economic and social effect.However,to benefit the growth of science and technology enterprises in China,problems are still to be solved on the development positioning,investment model conversion,internationalization,incubating function and staff competence,etc.%经过二十多年的发展,我国科技企业孵化器的数量、孵化场地面积、在孵企业数量、毕业企业数量逐年增加,提供的就业机会呈逐年上升之势,形成了比较完善的科技创新孵化体系,带来了巨大的经济效益和社会效益。与此同时,我国科技企业孵化器在发展过程中存在着的发展定位、投资模式转换、国际化发展、孵化功能、人员素质等方面问题,还有待进一步解决,以利于我国科技企业更好地发育和成长。

  9. Business incubators in China: An inquiry into the variables associated with incubatee success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sonobe, Tetsushi; Zhang, Haiyang

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the association between the outcome of business incubation and the resources used by incubators, by using a small panel of science and technology business incubators (STBIs) in China...

  10. 基于 ZigBee 技术新生儿保温箱中央监控系统的设计%Design of infant incubator center monitor system based on ZigBee technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成才

    2015-01-01

    新生儿保温箱是为满足新生儿生理特点和需求而发明创造出了一种医疗设备。它对保温箱温、湿度实时、精确地监控,有效地保证了保温箱使用的可靠性,避免因保温箱自身温、湿度失控造成医疗事故,对于保温箱在临床中应用显得很重要。新生儿保温箱无线中央监控系统,依据PID控制理论及利用ZigBee无线网络技术,可实现护士站的中央监控,达到单个或多个新生儿保温箱温、湿度的无线实时远程监控,并能为保温箱使用提供多方面保护,使保温箱的应用更加可靠、安全。通过中央监控操作界面,可方便地使医护人员快捷地掌握各台设备运行状态和安全情况,能有效地提高医护人员工作效率,优化工作管理流程。%Infant Incubator is a medical device that is designed to meet the needs of the newborn physiological characteristics and inventions. It is very important in clinical applications that effectively ensure the reliability incubators throng accurately monitoring its temperature and humidity in real time. That can avoid the occurrence of medical malpractice because it is beyond the control of that the temperature and humidity inside the incubator. According to the PID control theory, the incubator’s wireless central monitoring system is using the wireless network technology -ZigBee to achieve the nurse's central monitoring station which implements single or multiple infant incubator temperature and humidity of wireless real-time remote monitoring. And it can be used for the incubator to provide various protections, so that the application of the incubator is more reliable and secure. Through central monitoring interface, medical staff can easily and quickly grasp the operating status of each device and security situation. So it can effectively enhance staff efficiency and optimize work management processes.

  11. 基于创业网络的科技企业孵化器外部创新驱动机制%The external innovation drive mechanism of technology enterprises incubator on the perspective of entrepreneurial network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎明宇

    2014-01-01

    Technology business incubators mainly utilizes the network to provide support for the incu-bated enterprises . T herefore ,the research of technology business incubators entrepreneurial net-work’s main function and external innovation driving mechanism have been emphasized in recent years .Based on the incubation function of technology business incubators ,technology enterprises can easily build its entrepreneurial network .The subjects of this entrepreneurial network include the gov-ernment ,affiliates ,financial institutions ,agencies ,universities and research institutions .T he entrepre-neurial network which make up of these subjects can synergy ,form a drive mechanism which consist of technical supportive drive mechanism ,find supportive drive mechanism and opportunity supportive drive mechanism .It can drive the external technological innovation of new ventures and finally com-bine with the internal technological innovation drive mechanism cultivating competitive strategic re-sources ,w hich is essential to the survival and development of new ventures .%由于科技企业孵化器主要是通过组织网络来为在孵企业提供支持的,因此,基于组织网络角度对科技企业孵化器创业网络主体功能、外部创新驱动机制等的研究,近年来备受重视。认为依托科技企业孵化器的孵化功能,初创的科技企业能够更加容易地构建创业网络,其主体主要包括政府部门、相关企业、金融机构、大学、科研机构以及中介机构。基于这些网络主体构成的创业网络则可以发挥协同作用,形成一个从技术支持、资金支持到机会支持的三大机制相互协调、相互促进的科技企业外部创新驱动机制,从新创科技企业外部寻求驱动其创新的因素。并最终结合企业自身的内部创新驱动机制进行技术创新,培养出具有竞争优势的战略资源,使其具备必要的生存和发展能力。

  12. 项目导向型科技企业孵化器的建设方法研究%Building Approach of the Project-oriented Science and Technology Business Incubators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤荻; 戚安邦

    2012-01-01

    本文基于对天津地区科技企业孵化器的调研和问题分析结果,提出了项目导向型科技企业孵化器这一概念,并从组织结构、管理机制、企业文化和管理能力四方面阐释了该新型组织模式的内涵及特点,进而从以项目团队为核心的组织结构、项目化的管理机制、合作与学习型企业文化以及创新管理能力持续提升几方面对该新型组织模式的建设方法进行了探讨,为有效解决孵化器企业目前存在的问题、进行组织变革和竞争力提升提供了有利借鉴.%Based on the result of investigation and problems analysis of science and technology business incubators in Tiunjin, the concept of project-oriented science and technology business incubator is put forward. By explaining the meaning, features and factors of organizational structure, managerial mechanism, organizational culture and managerial capability, the paper studies the building approach of the incubators, from the respects of team-center organization, management mechanism of projectization, cooperative and learning organization culture and sustainable enhancing of innovation management capability, which can be the preferable ways to resolve current problems.

  13. Ideas about the Building of Science and Technology Public Service Platform of Incubator%关于构建孵化器科技公共服务平台的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明

    2012-01-01

      Based on the summary of the experience of the building of science and technology public service of platform in Jiangsu, the paper puts forward the construction mode, management mode and running mode about how to apply the incuba-tor to build this platform, expounds the building’s main work, while some problems and countermeasures about this platform’ s operation are put forward. And the development trend that applies the incubator to build science and technology public ser-vice of platform is analyzed.%  文章在总结江苏科技公共服务平台建设经验的基础上,提出了科技企业孵化器构建科技公共服务平台的建设模式、管理模式及运营模式,阐述平台建设的主要工作,针对平台运营中可能出现的问题提出对策,分析孵化器构建科技公共服务平台的发展趋势。

  14. Analysis of the role of business incubator in internationalization of basic technology companies Análise do papel da incubadora na internacionalização de empresas de base tecnológica, incubadas e graduadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gonçalves Silveira Fiates

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The technological and economic changes that occurred since the second half of the twentieth century expanded markets, reduced the limits imposed by national borders and promoted a real and indisputable globalization of trade, especially for emerging countries. In this context, Brazil is shown as a major player, along with other countries that make up the BRICS - Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, a group with growing political power given the relevance of their markets. Nevertheless, Brazil's share in global trade is small compared to other emerging countries. The level of internationalization is particularly low in relation to products with higher added value, with components of technological innovation. Most of the products exported by Brazil in 2011 (65.8% consists of products of low and medium-low technology, 27.9% is medium-high technology and only 6.2% is high-tech (MDIC, 2012. Thus, this article proposes to analyze the characteristics of the internationalization of small and medium-sized technology-based companies, incubated and graduated in order to identify the role of incubators in the process. We started from three basic premises: that the technology-based companies are essentially innovative companies; business incubators constitute environments for potentiating networks, both between the incubated and graduated ones with external agents And finally, the third premise is that innovation is a competitive advantage that leverages the process of internationalization of companies and has proven crucial to the competitive performance of the company in foreign markets. The research from cases of small technology-based companies shows it is relevant given the need for Brazil to stimulate the insertion of foreign companies selling  technology-intensive products, review passage The research is descriptive in character, in the form of a multicase study of six companies, three incubated and three graduated. The results show that

  15. Self-Organization Evolution Mechanism of Regional Technology Incubation Networks%区域科技孵化网络的自组织演化机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振华; 赵黎明

    2011-01-01

    区域科技孵化网络是一个涉及大量行为主体和要素之间相互作用的复杂社会经济系统.基于自组织演化理论,研究了区域科技孵化网络自组织演化的基本原理,指出合作竞争是区域科技孵化网络自组织演化的动力来源.根据承担功能的不同,把区域科技孵化网络分成了核心网络、辅助网络和外部网络3 个层次,分析了区域科技孵化网络由核心网络向辅助网络、外部网络自组织演化的过程.研究表明,当核心主体之间的联系不断加强,且大部分核心主体共享某些辅助主体和外部主体时,网络的有序性和有效性将不断提高.%The regional technology incubation network is a complex social economic system which involves interactions of a lot of actors and elements. This study examines the self-organization evolution process of regional technology incubation network based on self-organization theory, indicates that cooperation-competition is the motivation of the networks self-organization evolution. The network can be divided into three layers of core network, assistant network and exterior network based on the actors' function. The study indicates that the order and efficiency of the regional technology incubation network can be improved when the interactions of core actors are strengthened and most of the core actors share assistant and exterior actors.

  16. The e-incubator: a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible mini incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Shadi F; Wartella, Karin; Sharghi, Vahid Khalilzad; Xu, Huihui

    2015-04-01

    The tissue engineering community has been vocal regarding the need for noninvasive instruments to assess the development of tissue-engineered constructs. Medical imaging has helped fulfill this role. However, specimens allocated to a test tube for imaging cannot be tested for a prolonged period or returned to the incubator. Therefore, samples are essentially wasted due to potential contamination and transfer in a less than optimal growth environment. In turn, we present a standalone, miniature, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible incubator, termed the e-incubator. This incubator uses a microcontroller unit to automatically sense and regulate physiological conditions for tissue culture, thus allowing for concurrent tissue culture and evaluation. The e-incubator also offers an innovative scheme to study underlying mechanisms related to the structural and functional evolution of tissues. Importantly, it offers a key step toward enabling real-time testing of engineered tissues before human transplantation. For validation purposes, we cultured tissue-engineered bone constructs for 4 weeks to test the e-incubator. Importantly, this technology allows for visualizing the evolution of temporal and spatial morphogenesis. In turn, the e-incubator can filter deficient constructs, thereby increasing the success rate of implantation of tissue-engineered constructs, especially as construct design grows in levels of complexity to match the geometry and function of patients' unique needs.

  17. Diffusion of student business incubators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée; Honig, Benson; Riis, Nina Louise Fynbo

    This paper undertakes a longitudinal examination of the diffusion of a relatively new organizational activity - university student business incubators - by studying the processes through which actors grounded in three different institutional logics interact in the organizational field of higher...... education. Applying neo-institutional theory, we examine the development of student incubation activities in the field of general state-funded Danish universities. We review institutional pressures from the political sphere that led to the diffusion of student incubation, introducing a three-phase process...

  18. Infant incubators and radiant warmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E F

    1983-10-01

    Incubators and radiant warmers are used to maintain the body temperature of newborn infants. This is best done so that the energy expended for metabolic heat production is minimized. The heat output of these devices is usually regulated by servocontrol to keep the skin temperature constant at a site on the abdomen where a thermistor probe is attached. In incubators, air temperature can also be controlled as an alternative to skin temperature servocontrol. Increased ambient humidity, heat shields and clothing have been used to decrease the evaporative or nonevaporative heat loss of infants in incubators under certain conditions. Double-walled incubators, by adding a second inner layer of Plexiglas, reduce radiant heat loss. They may also reduce total heat loss, but only if air temperature is controlled rather than skin temperature. The minimal oxygen consumption under a radiant warmer is the same or perhaps slightly higher than it is for the same infant in an incubator. Compared with incubators, the partition of body heat loss is quite different under radiant warmers. Radiant warmers increase convective and evaporative heat loss and insensible water loss but eliminate radiant heat loss or change it to net gain. A heat shield of thin polyethylene film can be used with a radiant warmer to reduce heat loss by convection and evaporation. The major advantage of the radiant warmer is the easy access it provides to critically-ill infants without disturbing the thermal environment. Its major disadvantage is the increase in insensible water loss produced by the radiant warmer. Most infants can be safely and adequately cared for in either incubator or radiant warmer bed.

  19. Business support within business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2009-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established worldwide as tools for company creation and small businesses support. BIs claim to help their tenants by providing them with the optimal conditions for increasing early stage survival. Practitioners and researchers agree that business support is a

  20. National Alliance for Clean Energy Incubators New Mexico Clean Energy Incubator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Suzanne S.

    2004-12-15

    The National Alliance for Clean Energy Incubators was established by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop an emerging network of business incubators for entrepreneurs specializing in clean energy enterprises. The Alliance provides a broad range of business services to entrepreneurs in specific geographic locales across the U.S. and in diverse clean energy technology areas such as fuel cells, alternative fuels, power generation, and renewables, to name a few. Technology Ventures Corporation (TVC) participates in the Alliance from its corporate offices in Albuquerque, NM, and from its sites in Northern and Southern New Mexico, California, and Nevada. TVC reports on the results of its attempts to accelerate the growth and success of clean energy and energy efficiency companies through its array of business support services. During the period from September 2002 through September 2004, TVC describes contributions to the Alliance including the development of 28 clients and facilitating capital raises exceeding $35M.

  1. Fundamentals of Business Incubator Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marchis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of the European Union, including Romania as a member state, determines the reconfiguration of Romanian way of acting inorder to develop new business. Learning from others with much more experience in the field of regional economic development may be the key toaccomplish the goal of economic and social cohesion. The gap between Romania and EU-27 average in economic development terms may bereduced only by promoting small businesses to enhance. Creating jobs and building wealth is the only solution available to the current problems ofRomanian economy. The paper intends to respond to basic questions of creating a business incubator. Also, it may be a tool to local and regionalpromoters that want to give rise, in a proper manner, to a Business Incubator.

  2. The evolution of business incubators: comparing demand and supply of business incubation services across different incubator generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruneel, J.; Ratinho, Tiago; Clarysse, B.; Groen, Arend J.

    2012-01-01

    Business incubators (BIs) have been established around the world to stimulate new business creation. Whilst it is accepted that incubation models have evolved, little is known about whether existing incubators have adjusted their value proposition to incorporate recent incubation paradigms or have

  3. Innovation Incubator: Whisker Labs Technical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparn, Bethany F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Frank, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Earle, Lieko [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scheib, Jennifer G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Wells Fargo Innovation Incubator (IN2) is a program to foster and accelerate startup companies with commercial building energy-efficiency and demand management technologies. The program is funded by the Wells Fargo Foundation and co-administered by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Whisker Labs, an Oakland, California-based company, was one of four awardees in the first IN2 cohort and was invited to participate in the program because of its novel electrical power sensing technology for circuit breakers. The stick-on Whisker meters install directly on the front face of the circuit breakers in an electrical panel using adhesive, eliminating the need to open the panel and install current transducers (CTs) on the circuit wiring.

  4. What determines a successful business incubator?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Sophia; Brem, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Business incubators have become an important pillar in the attraction and the support of innovation and entrepreneurship – in practice, and to a greater extent in theory as well. Based on earlier research, we give an overview of business incubator literature between 2001 and 2013. We review...... these results in a generic business incubation process model, which is elaborated in a pre-, main- and after-incubation phase. Finally, we introduce an incubator guide, which is summarizing the key areas into a questionnaire. Hence, on the one hand, we foster future research on business incubation with our...

  5. Navigating the Role of Business Incubators: A Review on the Current Literature on Business Incubation in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thobekani Lose

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators (BIs are a significant tool in promoting the development of entrepreneurial firms, technology-based growth firms and economic growth in South Africa. The study reviewed the current literature on business incubation in South Africa. BIs in South Africa emerged as a popular strategy in the 1990s and most of the current literature was established in the same period. However, the current literature is still limited. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of existing knowledge on the role and effectiveness of business incubation in supporting the development of new small startup businesses. The quantitative and qualitative literature published by the academic and practitioner communities is reviewed. The searches indicated that incubation has encouraged many studies in South Africa. The studies can be categorised under the following themes: the role and contribution of incubators, success factors for business incubation, obstacles, and the relationship between incubators and entrepreneurship. The areas for further research are suggested. Two major areas that new research can explore focus on the creation of the model and selfsustainability of BIs.

  6. INNOVATION CLUSTERS: SOCIAL LEARNING AND BUSINESS INCUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Deac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable innovation is more expensive than a regular one but it may lead to long termbenefits and durable competitive advantage, especially if many firms from the networkcollude or act within constrained environments such as business incubators. The opinionformation process, which leads to sustainable innovation, may be viewed as a collectivecognitive process resembling that of branding and re-branding. Technological innovationscan be viewed as sequences of cost reduction events and, in a many-firm setting, sociallearning which leads to sustainability-oriented behaviour depends on (mutual trustrelations. The experimental modelling part of the paper illustrates selected aspects of theconcept just outlined by developing a stylized dynamic model of the firm.

  7. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of...

  8. The Upgrade to Hybrid Incubators in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Gao, Yuchen

    with the integration of the advantages of non-for-profit and for-profit TBIs at same time. However, research on specific paths or key factors for integration of non-for- and for-profit TBIs to be one hybrid incubator are in sufficient. In addition, there are few relevant investigations about incubators in developing...... countries and emerging economics. Based on a single in-depth case-study of Tuspark Incubator, this study explores key factors and specific ways for the upgrade to hybrid incubators in the context of China. By using categorical analysis, three factors, i.e. incubation subdivision, intermediary platform...... TBIs in China requires further study....

  9. The business incubator in a network perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøllingtoft, Anne; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2003-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of a new incubator model, the "networked incubator", which is a hybrid form of the archetypal business incubators, based on territorial synergy, relational symbiosis and economices of scale, to the benefit of the participating 'incubatees'. The question...... addressed in this paper is why this new model has emerged and what distinguishes it from the more traditional incubator model. The theoretical basis of the research is social capital theory. Empirically, the paper is based on 6 months' ethnographic data collected in one of the first known networked...... incubators. The closing section of the paper addresses the implications for research and practitioners....

  10. Decisions for the IVF laboratory: comparative analysis of embryo culture incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Jason E

    2014-05-01

    Incubators in the IVF laboratory play a pivotal role in providing a stable and appropriate culture environment required for optimizing embryo development and clinical outcomes. With technological advances, several types of incubators are now available and careful consideration is required for selection. Examination of variables, such as recovery/stabilization of temperature, gas atmosphere and humidity, as well as understanding various approaches utilized by each device to regulate these variables, is critical. Additionally, a comprehensive examination of clinical studies that compare various incubators may provide insight into their efficacy. Other factors, both technical and practical, must also be considered when selecting an incubator. Importantly, proper management, including patient volume and workflow, is paramount in optimizing function of any incubator, regardless of the technology incorporated. This review highlights incubator function and reviews key environmental variables controlled and the technology utilized in various units. Additionally, existing comparative studies focused on incubator recovery and clinical outcomes are critically analysed. Finally, strategies employed for incubator management, as well as future potential incubator improvements are discussed. While existing reports indicate that smaller benchtop/topload incubators provide faster recovery of environmental variables, there is no clear advantage of any particular incubator based on clinical outcomes.

  11. A Study of Business Incubators: Models, Best Practices, and Recommendations for NASA and Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted to provide NASA-Kennedy Space Center with information and recommendations to support establishing one or more technology-based business incubators In Florida. The study involved assembling information about incubators: why they succeed, why they fail, how they are organized, and what services they provide. Consequently, this study focuses on widely-recognized "best practices," needed to establish successful technology- based business incubators. The findings are used to optimize the design and implementation of one or more technology-based business incubators to be established in Florida. Recommendations reflect both the essential characteristics of successful incubators and the optimal business demographics in Florida. Appendix A provides a fuller description of the objectives of the study. Technology-based business incubators are an increasing catalyst of new business development across the USi Incubators focus on providing entrepreneurs and small start-up firms with a wide array of support services necessary to bring forth new products and processes based on technologies developed in the nation's federal and private laboratories and universities. Appendix B provides extensive discussion of findings relative to technology- based business incubators.

  12. Indirect calorimetry during incubation of hatching eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Kemp, B.

    2015-01-01

    Indirect calorimetry can be used during incubation of avian eggs to monitor the quality of the incubation process, the development of the embryo and the utilization of nutrients. Indirect calorimetry has several benefits above direct calorimetry, particularly in hatching eggs. However, to obtain rel

  13. Embryo temperature during incubation: practice and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, A.

    2008-01-01

    (Key words: incubation, embryo temperature, embryonic development, heat production, heat loss) Until recently, all incubator studies were performed using a constant machine temperature (MT). But it is embryo temperature (ET) that is of importance to the embryo, and not MT. In practice, MT is often

  14. Understanding management practices in business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Vincent; Thijssen, Sander; Pascucci, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Following the call for process-oriented research on business incubation processes, this paper investigates the process of business incubation (BI) via an understanding of management practices and interactions. Based on a comprehensive literature review and empirical evidence of management practices

  15. [Formaldehyde sediment in incubators following disinfection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartner, R; Kegel, M; Meyer, H D; Schlüter, G; Wegner, J; Werner, E

    1983-12-01

    Measurements in incubators revealed the presence of formaldehyde concentrations involving a health risk for premature and normal newborns kept and cared for in incubators. Prior to measurements, the incubators had been disinfected by means of formaldehyde vapours in an "Aseptor" disinfecting cabinet (Drägerwerk AG, Lübeck) and then ventilated in strict adherence to operating instructions. The elevated formaldehyde concentrations found had been due to residues of paraformaldehyde and urotropin on the surfaces of the disinfected apparatus, liberating formaldehyde by hydrolysis depending on temperature and relative humidity. There should be a basic reconsideration of the present practice of incubator disinfection. From experiments with activated-carbon filters in incubators it would seem that there is a chance of reducing such formaldehyde concentrations.

  16. Innovation, incubation and entrepreneurship case studies from IIT Kanpur

    CERN Document Server

    Khandekar, Sameer

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on promoting entrepreneurial ecosystems within universities and educational institutes. It especially emphasizes the thriving systems and practices existing within the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (IITK). It discusses cases and successes of the SIDBI Incubation and Innovation Centre in the Institute. This edited volume highlights the vision of IITK and describes a few of the major achievements of the past few years. It especially showcases the requirements and challenges of creating, sustaining, and boosting such entrepreneurial ecosystems and incubation centres. The contents of this book will be useful to researchers, administrators, and corporate collaborators working in the area of monetizing technology coming from educational institutions by converting it to successful products and business ideas. .

  17. UNIVERSITIES AND INCUBATORS: KEY FACTORS DRIVING ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIOECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Mahlmann Kipper

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic diversification is an utterly important factor for regions that are directly or indirectly related to any productive mechanisms and seek to strengthen their foundations for the generation of jobs and income. Within this context, to invest in business preparation and maturation, especially in the ones related to the technological area, turns out to be an interesting mean of diversifying a regional economy that is facing the risk of stagnation. This study considers the importance of the role taken on by universities and their incubators in driving entrepreneurship and supporting the creation of new companies and the innovative capacity of a country through knowledge transfer amongst universities and companies, generating benefits and socioeconomic progress in a country. It also conducts a case study on a company of the information technology area, recently incubated and whose major objective consists in becoming part of this economic diversification basis.

  18. Incubation and intuition in creative problem solving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth James Gilhooly

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Creative problem solving, in which novel solutions are required, has often been seen as involving a special role for unconscious processes (Unconscious Work which can lead to sudden intuitive solutions (insights when a problem is set aside during incubation periods. This notion of Unconscious Work during incubation periods is supported by a review of experimental studies and particularly by studies using the Immediate Incubation paradigm. Other explanations for incubation effects, in terms of Intermittent Work or Beneficial Forgetting are considered. Some recent studies of divergent thinking, using the Alternative Uses task, carried out in my laboratory regarding Immediate v. Delayed Incubation and the effects of resource competition from interpolated activities are discussed. These studies supported a role for Unconscious Work as against Intermittent Conscious work or Beneficial Forgetting in incubation.What form might unconscious work take? On theoretical grounds, the notion that Unconscious Work involves the same processing steps as Conscious Work but minus conscious awareness is discounted, despite some recent arguments that the unconscious can duplicate any conscious function. A candidate account in terms of spreading activation, coupled with below-threshold but active goal representations, is put forward. This account could explain the emergence of subjectively sudden intuitive solutions (Aha-insight solutions as a result of unconscious processes (Unconscious Work during incubation periods.

  19. Modeling incubation temperature: the effects of incubator design, embryonic development, and egg size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, N A

    1997-01-01

    A simple model to describe the relationship between the temperature of the developing embryo, incubator temperature, embryo heat production, and thermal conductivity of the egg and surrounding air is presented. During early incubation, embryo temperature is slightly lower than incubator temperature because of evaporative cooling. However, from midincubation onwards, metabolic heat production from the embryo raises embryo temperature above incubator temperature. The extent of the rise in embryo temperature depends on thermal conductivity, which, in turn, is mainly influenced by the air speed over the egg. The importance of air speed and restrictions to air flow within artificial incubators is discussed. Exact determinations of optimum incubation temperatures from studies reported in the literature are difficult because only incubator temperatures are reported. Embryo temperatures can differ from incubator temperature because of differences in thermal conductivity between different incubation systems and differences between incubators in their ability to control temperatures uniformly. It is suggested that shell surface temperatures are monitored in experiments to investigate temperature effects to allow consistent comparisons between trials. Monitoring shell temperatures would also make it easier to translate optimum temperatures derived in small experimental incubators to the large commercial incubators used by the poultry industry. The relationship between egg temperature, the metabolism of the developing embryo and egg size is discussed.

  20. AND BUSINESS INCUBATORS INTO THE TRIPLE HELIX CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizova, Y.S.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article’s author endeavors to create a practical model of the Russian economy’s development while integrating such tools of supporting and stimulating entrepreneurship as business incubators and research and technology parks into the Triple Helix concept. The article points out that configurations fusing together the nation-state, business and science/education, possess a greater potential for development.

  1. Night Heron Incubation Data will gulls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Parental incubation behavior largely influences nest survival, a critical demographic process in avian population dynamics, and behaviors vary across species with...

  2. What is the incubation period for listeriosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulet Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeriosis is a foodborne infection with a low incidence but a high case fatality rate. Unlike common foodborne diseases, the incubation period can be long. The first incubation periods were documented during a large listeriosis outbreak published in 1987 by Linnan and al. in the New England Journal of Medicine (range: 3 days to 70 days. Data on the incubation period of listeriosis are scarce. Our study aim was to estimate precisely the incubation period of listeriosis using available data since 1987. Methods We estimated the incubation period of listeriosis using available published data and data from outbreak investigations carried out by the French National Institute for Public Health Surveillance. We selected cases with an incubation period calculated when a patient had a single exposure to a confirmed food source contaminated by Listeria monocytogenes. Results We identified 37 cases of invasive listeriosis (10 cases with central nervous system involvement (CNS cases, 15 bacteraemia cases and 12 pregnancy-associated cases and 9 outbreaks with gastroenteritis. The overall median incubation period of invasive listeriosis was 8 days (range: 1–67 days and differed significantly by clinical form of the disease (p Conclusions This information has implications for the investigation of food borne listeriosis outbreaks as the incubation period is used to determine the time period for which a food history is collected. We believe that, for listeriosis outbreaks, adapting the exposure window for documenting patients’ food histories in accordance with the clinical form of infection will facilitate the identification of food products as the source of contamination. We therefore propose to take an exposure window of 14 days before the diagnosis for CNS and bacteraemia cases, and of 6 weeks before the diagnosis, for pregnancy-associated cases.

  3. Theoretical modeling of prion disease incubation

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, R. V.; Slepoy, A.; Singh, R. R. P.; Cox, D. L.; Mobley, D.; Pázmándi, F.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for the laboratory and epidemiological data for incubation times in infectious prion diseases. The central feature of our model is that slow growth of misfolded protein-aggregates from small initial seeds controls the `latent' or `lag' phase, whereas aggregate-fissioning and subsequent spreading leads to an exponential growth or doubling phase. Such a general framework can account for many features of prion diseases including the striking reproducibility of incubation time...

  4. INCUBATORS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladin Stefanovic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators aim to maximize the chances of success of start - up companies by creating a supportive environment. Typically, this involves offering management assistance, mentoring, access to financing, flexible and low - cost leases, office services, etc. There is large number of business incubators in the world. In this paper issues concerned status, development and overview of existing practice in the world will be presented as well as general issues and perspectives for developing countries.

  5. A theoretical model of infant incubator dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B N; Reddy, N P; Kantak, A

    1994-08-01

    A spatially lumped mathematical model was developed and used for a computer simulation of the neonate-incubator system for parametric analysis of the factors that influence neonatal thermo-regulation. The simulation examined the effects of the following parameters: (1) size of the infant; (2) respiratory rate; (3) metabolic rate; (4) heart rate; (5) thermal properties of the mattress; (6) specific heat capacity of the incubator wall; (7) air flow rate; (8) heater control mechanisms.

  6. Temperature variations within and between incubators-a prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Meredith W; Butler, Julia M; Higdon, H Lee; Boone, William R

    2013-12-01

    To determine if there is a temperature variation within and between incubators. This prospective, experimental trial with external controls was performed at an Assisted Reproductive Technology laboratory in a tertiary-care, university hospital. Temperature values were taken at various locations within and between incubators. Even though they were both set to 37.0 °C, the same make and model incubators had significantly different internal temperatures. Temperatures differed significantly among top, middle and bottom shelves and between fronts and backs of shelves. We found temperatures differed within and between our front-loading incubators. Thus, laboratory personnel should evaluate their incubators for temperature variations within and between incubators and, if temperatures differ significantly, develop a plan to deal with discrepancies.

  7. [Audit "Toys and incubators in neonatology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raginel, T; Bigoin-Dupont, M; Aguelon, V; Fines-Guyon, M; Guillemin, M G

    2009-08-01

    Owing to an increase in nosocomial septicaemias in the Neonatalogy department, we've judged it necessary to consider the role of items not linked to the nursing procedures, and nevertheless present in the incubators, as well as the hygiene techniques applied to them. In November 2007, we've made a longitudinal prospective study consisting in an observation audit during 3 successive days, observing every single incubator with a newborn baby. In each incubator, we've checked whether there were or not items that weren't required by the nursing activities, along with their characteristics and the hygiene procedures applied to them. We've inquired as well whether the parents and the nursing staff knew and applied the required hygiene procedures. In 13 among the 17 incubators under survey, at least one item not strictly required by the nursing procedures could be found. The number of toys in each incubator varied from seven to one. Among the 33 toys surveyed, 24 (73%) of them showed a score of maximum fluffiness (4 out of 4), and only 10 wore labels giving cleansing advice from the manufacturers. Without any record about the cleaning/disinfecting of the toys brought in hospital, we have observed that the parents were given varied advice about how to clean the toys at home before putting them in the incubators (only four parents had washed the toys in their washing machines at more than 30 degrees C). From the six samples under scrutiny, all the culture results were tested positive. In particular two of the soft toys sampled were found infected by a Pseudomonas oryzihabitans. These particular toys belonged to a baby who had been diagnosed with a septicaemia characterized by hemocultures positive to a P. oryzihabitans of a different strain. Our audit has been an efficient reminder that any item put in an incubator is a potential vector and reservoir of pathogen organisms. After a general feedback towards the department staff, the medical staff then prescribed to

  8. Pavlovian Incubation of US Signal Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Murray J.

    2013-01-01

    Four experiments with rats examined Pavlovian incubation, in which responding increases when Pavlovian conditioning is followed by a testing delay. In a within-subjects design, Experiment 1 first showed that when a single food pellet unconditioned stimulus (US) signaled the delivery of three additional pellets, responding after the single US was…

  9. Mid Columbia sturgeon incubation and rearing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Michael J.; Kofoot, Eric; Blubaugh, J

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the results from the second year of a three-year investigation on the effects of different thermal regimes on incubation and rearing early life stages of white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. The Columbia River has been significantly altered by the construction of dams resulting in annual flows and water temperatures that differ from historical levels. White sturgeon have been demonstrated to spawn in two very distinct sections of the Columbia River in British Columbia, Canada, which are both located immediately downstream of hydropower facilities. The thermal regimes differ substantially between these two areas. The general approach of this study was to incubate and rear white sturgeon early life stages under two thermal regimes; one mimicking the current, cool water regime of the Columbia River downstream from Revelstoke Dam, and one mimicking a warmer regime similar to conditions found on the Columbia River at the international border. Second-year results suggest that thermal regimes during incubation influence rate of egg development and size at hatch. Eggs incubated under the warm thermal regime hatched sooner than those incubated under the cool thermal regime. Mean length of free embryos at hatch was significantly different between thermal regimes with free embryos from the warm thermal regime being longer at hatch. However, free embryos from the cool thermal regime had a significantly higher mean weight at hatch. This is in contrast with results obtained during 2009. The rearing trials revealed that growth of fish reared in the cool thermal regime was substantially less than growth of fish reared in the warm thermal regime. The magnitude of mortality was greatest in the warm thermal regime prior to initiation of exogenous feeding, but chronic low levels of mortality in the cool thermal regime were higher throughout the period. The starvation trials showed that the fish in the warm thermal regime exhausted their yolk reserves faster

  10. Social capital dimensions among incubated entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ezequiel Quijano Quijano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows contributions from leading researchers in the fi eld of social capital as support of corporate sustainability and the contribution generated by a descriptive case study based on a representative sample from entrepreneurs from the Fundación Parque de Desarrollo Tecnológico (Parquesoft in Colombia, to contrast the theoretical approaches. The findings show a slight presence of social capital in the performance of incubated entrepreneurs.

  11. A Framework of Successful E-Business Incubator for Indonesian Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Gozali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In many developed countries, many business incubators take part to help starts-up company to develop their own business; especially the baby born business cannot compete with the giant industries that have become the old business players. Universities play an important role in motivating young graduates to become technology entrepreneur. Unemployment in Indonesia is still the main issue for the government program to increase welfare in the future. In year 2014 the data from Statistic Center of Indonesia state that Indonesia has 4% unemployment from Indonesia’ work generation. In Indonesia, incubators has been developed since 1992 initiated by the government, Cooperative Department and also universities. This effort continued in 1997 when there was a program called the Development of Entrepreneurship Culture in universities, and of its activity was New Entrepreneur Incubator. The objectives of the research are to investigate the success factor for e-business incubator, and to propose and develop a framework for successful e-business incubator for public universities in Indonesia. Research location is in Indonesia for the public universities that have their e-business incubator. This research will conduct quantitative and qualitative analyses based on data collection from incubator managers and business founders in Indonesia. The result of this research is a framework for successful e-business incubator in Indonesian public universities.

  12. Parasitological diagnosis of onchocerciasis: comparisons of incubation media and incubation times for skin snips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R C; Brandling-Bennett, A D; Holliman, R B; Campbell, C C; Darsie, R F

    1980-01-01

    Tissue culture fluid NCTC 135 (Hank's base) was compared to water and to saline as incubation media for the detection of microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus in skin snips. NCTC 135 allowed detection of significantly more positive persons than did water (P less than 0.001) or saline (P less than 0.05) when two snips per person were incubated for periods of 0.5 or 24 hours. In addition, snips containing microfilariae were incubated in NCTC 135 or in saline and the number of emerged microfilariae was determined at various intervals of time up to 24 hours. After incubation, snips were either fixed in 10% formalin, serially sectioned, and the microfilariae counted, or they were digested in collagenase solution to free unemerged microfilaire. Of the total number of microfilariae present in the snips, 43.9% +/- 18.5, 80.2% +/- 22.2, 83.0% +/- 19.5, and 85.3% +/- 18.0 had emerged by 0.5, 4, 8, and 24 hours of incubation, respectively. Of the microfilariae that remained in the skin after incubation, most were located deep in the dermis.

  13. Vibration in metal and non-metal incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, J M; Lewandowski, W; Casper, G R; Youngblut, W R

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of vibration transmitted to the surface of an incubator mattress. Empty incubators with metal (n = 12) and non-metal (n = 12) bases were monitored for vibration levels when the incubators were turned "off" and when they were turned "on." High levels of low-frequency vibration were detected in both types of incubators in both conditions. The metal incubators transmitted significantly less vibration to the mattress than did the non-metal incubators at several frequencies in the "off," the "on," and the "adjusted" conditions. These results suggest that infants experience significant whole-body vibration while lying in incubators.

  14. Factors related to the artificial incubation of wild bird eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Kondrad, Shannon R.

    2009-01-01

    Attempts to artificially incubate the eggs of wild birds have failed in many respects in duplicating the success of natural incubation. As part of a larger study we had the opportunity to artificially incubate the eggs of 22 species of birds (three domestic and 19 wild species). We report the successes and failures associated with artificial incubation of these eggs. Moisture loss varied widely, not only for Orders of birds but for similar species within an Order. Overall hatching success and success through to 90% of incubation varied for different Orders and for similar species. Humidity and temperature are critical elements in the artificial incubation of wild bird eggs and must be closely monitored throughout incubation to ensure the best possible chance of hatching. Even when these elements are addressed, artificial incubation still can not duplicate the success of incubation by the parent.

  15. Academic spin-offs incubation strategies: the case of the Andalusian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rafael Cáceres Carrasco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the incubation strategies developed in the universities of Andalusia, a relatively low-income region of Spain, to promote the creation of university spin-offs. These strategies are also compared to the incubation models noted in the literature. The performance of the university spin-offs created and its relation to the incubation strategies developed by the university are also analysed. The analysis is based on data from a survey of nine public universities that carry out strategies for the promotion of university spin-offs. The result of the analysis shows that university spin-off incubation strategies in Andalusia present specific characteristics not covered by certain models that are well-known in the literature on innovation. Then, a new stage in the process of the university spin-off incubation is proposed. We consider it to be a pre-strategic stage to the academic spin-off incubation strategies. The analysis also finds certain environmental factors associated to those spin-offs promoted by Andalusian universities that achieve the highest level of performance. This result suggests that previous to making any decision involving investment into developing incubation strategies, universities should gauge whether they have sufficient resources and the possibilities of connecting with a Technology Park.

  16. The infant incubator in the neonatal intensive care unit: unresolved issues and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Roberto; Porcella, Annalisa; Fanos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Since the 19th century, devices termed incubators were developed to maintain thermal stability in low birth weight (LBW) and sick newborns, thus improving their chances of survival. Remarkable progress has been made in the production of infant incubators, which are currently highly technological devices. However, they still need to be improved in many aspects. Regarding the temperature and humidity control, future incubators should minimize heat loss from the neonate and eddies around him/her. An unresolved issue is exposure to high noise levels in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Strategies aimed at modifying the behavior of NICU personnel, along with structural improvements in incubator design, are required to reduce noise exposure. Light environment should be taken into consideration in designing new models of incubators. In fact, ambient NICU illumination may cause visual pathway sequelae or possibly retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), while premature exposure to continuous lighting may adversely affect the rest-activity patterns of the newborn. Accordingly, both the use of incubator covers and circadian lighting in the NICU might attenuate these effects. The impact of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on infant health is still unclear. However, future incubators should be designed to minimize the EMF exposure of the newborn.

  17. Accuracy of egg flotation throughout incubation to determine embryo age and incubation day in waterbird nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

    2010-01-01

    Floating bird eggs to estimate their age is a widely used technique, but few studies have examined its accuracy throughout incubation. We assessed egg flotation for estimating hatch date, day of incubation, and the embryo's developmental age in eggs of the American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana), Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Predicted hatch dates based on egg flotation during our first visit to a nest were highly correlated with actual hatch dates (r = 0.99) and accurate within 2.3 ± 1.7 (SD) days. Age estimates based on flotation were correlated with both day of incubation (r = 0.96) and the embryo's developmental age (r = 0.86) and accurate within 1.3 ± 1.6 days and 1.9 ± 1.6 days, respectively. However, the technique's accuracy varied substantially throughout incubation. Flotation overestimated the embryo's developmental age between 3 and 9 days, underestimated age between 12 and 21 days, and was most accurate between 0 and 3 days and 9 and 12 days. Age estimates based on egg flotation were generally accurate within 3 days until day 15 but later in incubation were biased progressively lower. Egg flotation was inaccurate and overestimated embryo age in abandoned nests (mean error: 7.5 ± 6.0 days). The embryo's developmental age and day of incubation were highly correlated (r = 0.94), differed by 2.1 ± 1.6 days, and resulted in similar assessments of the egg-flotation technique. Floating every egg in the clutch and refloating eggs at subsequent visits to a nest can refine age estimates.

  18. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible.......There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible....

  19. Development of a Biogas-powered Poultry Egg Incubator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    This study advances the utilization of biogas energy for chick production. ... The eggs were turned using a semi-automated device. ... pollution. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Incubator Description. The still-air incubator, with 12.7 mm thick.

  20. Incubators as tools for entrepreneurship promotion in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Akcomak, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on incubators in developed and developing countries. We show that the concept of incubators has evolved in time according to market and firm needs. Contemporary successful incubators are profit-oriented, provide a wide range of services, focus more on intangible business services, and employ qualified managers and support staff. By drawing lessons from country experiences we assess the appropriateness of incubators as a tool for entrepreneurship promotion in ...

  1. Effects of oil transferred from incubating gulls to their eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, K.A.; LeFever, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    No. 2 fuel oil, or water, was applied to the breast feathers of incubating laughing gulls trapped at their nest site on an island colony in Texas. Gulls were released after treatment and allowed to incubate their eggs for 5 days. Oil was transferred from the feathers of incubating adults to their eggs and resulted in 41% embryo mortality compared with 2% in controls.

  2. Marketing Plan for Demonstration and Validation Assets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-05-30

    The National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), is to be sustained by various programs, including technology demonstration and evaluation (DEMVAL). This project assists companies in developing technologies under the National Security Technology Incubator program (NSTI) through demonstration and validation of technologies applicable to national security created by incubators and other sources. The NSPP also will support the creation of an integrated demonstration and validation environment. This report documents the DEMVAL marketing and visibility plan, which will focus on collecting information about, and expanding the visibility of, DEMVAL assets serving businesses with national security technology applications in southern New Mexico.

  3. Humidity control tool for neonatal incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdiche, M; Farges, G; Delanaud, S; Bach, V; Villon, P; Libert, J P

    1998-03-01

    In the first days of life, the daily evaporative loss from premature neonates can reach up to 20% of body mass. Such loss can be reduced by increasing the air humidity inside the incubator. Neither passive humidification nor open loop systems allow high humidity rates to be maintained or easily controlled: at 34 degrees C, the maximum levels vary with the system from 40% to 77% of relative humidity. The skin evaporative exchanges between the neonate and the environment are directly proportional to the water vapour partial pressure difference between the neonate's skin and the air. An active closed loop system has been designed, which permits reliable and accurate control of humidity according to the water vapour partial pressure set, between 1 and 6 kPa, in an air temperature range of 28-39 degrees C. It is characterised by variations of about 0.05 kPa around the set value and a maximum humidification speed of 0.25 kPa min-1. The algorithm is based on optimal control and the dynamic programming principles. Test results place this active system above usual systems for its power, precision and adaptability. It is an exploitable tool in fundamental and clinical research, to precisely study the humidity effects on neonatal comfort and thermo-regulation evolution.

  4. Cultural Incubators and Spread of Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Enrico R; Lake, Mark W

    2015-07-01

    Several forms of social learning rely on the direct or indirect evaluation of the fitness of cultural traits. Here we argue, via a simple agent-based model, that payoff uncertainty, that is, the correlation between a trait and the signal used to evaluate its fitness, plays a pivotal role in the spread of beneficial innovation. More specifically, we examine how this correlation affects the evolutionary dynamics of different forms of social learning and how each form can generate divergent historical trajectories depending on the size of the sample pool. In particular, we demonstrate that social learning by copying the best model is particularly susceptible to a sampling effect caused by the interaction of payoff uncertainty, the number of models sampled (the sample pool), and the frequency with which a trait is present in the population. As a result, we identify circumstances in which smaller sample pools can act as "cultural incubators" that promote the spread of innovations, while more widespread sampling of the population actually retards the rate of cultural evolution.

  5. Analysis of the Characteristics of an Entrepreneur in Incubation Process and Non Incubated

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This article first, analyzes and identifies a successful entrepreneur from the characteristics of the entrepreneur who made the incubation process and those acting individually. On the other hand, secondary data and an empirical study of this paper intends to contrast according to studies by different authors how an entrepreneur contributes to the development of the regions from the point of view of identifying opportunity and what is the type of entrepreneur who arises in the context of incu...

  6. Sound transmission into incubators in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, A; Cooper-Peel, C; Vos, P

    1999-01-01

    To measure the attenuation of sound by modern incubators. LEQ, LMAX, LPEAK, and frequency distribution were measured simultaneously inside and outside two recent model incubators. The attenuation of sound (outside minus inside) was 15 to 18 dBA with the motor off and 4 to 8 dBA with the motor on. There was a significant difference between incubators in their attenuation of sound. Octave band analysis showed attenuation in frequency bands of > 31.5 Hz with the motor off. With the motor on, the sound level inside the incubator was higher than outside at frequency bands of incubators reduces "averaged" sound exposure to levels near those recommended for the neonatal intensive care unit. Lower frequency sounds are louder inside the incubator and arise from the incubator motor.

  7. Organization of 2012 Cavity Optomechanics Incubator Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    University of Queensland AUSTRALIA David McClelland Australian National University AUSTRALIA Michael Metcalfe Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. UNITED STATES...GERMANY Leopoldo Martin La Laguna University UNITED STATES Nergis Mavalvala Massachusetts Institute of Technology UNITED STATES David McAuslan...Lausanne SWITZERLAND David Vitali Universita di Camerino ITALY Ignacio Wilson-Rae TU Munich GERMANY huan yang Caltech UNITED STATES

  8. A Pratical Benchmark for Quality Certification in Business Incubators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo do Carmo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to create a practical quality benchmark for incubators. The benchmark is a model to be followed in order to help incubators deploy all processes defined by the quality accreditation label called Centro de Referência para Apoio a Novos Empreendimentos [Reference Center for Support to New Ventures] – Cerne. The purpose of this label is to standardize the processes and level the quality of the incubators. The study was based mainly on two tools of quality management. One is the PDCA cycle and the other is the 5W2H. There are countless benefits from this certification. Among such benefits: ensuring the incubated companies higher quality in rendered services; enhancing the visibility and credibility of the incubator and incubated companies; reducing process variability; increasing the competitiveness of the incubator; in addition to benefiting from a more effective and systematic management system. Thus, this practical benchmark will be very useful for any incubator that has an interest in receiving the Cerne accreditation. Those involved with the incubators had a positive experience with the objective material, with clear and organized information. With this material, it will be simpler to systematize and standardize the processes required by Cerne accreditation

  9. INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIES OF BUSINESS INCUBATION: THE USA, GERMANY AND RUSSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evgeny Tsaplin; Yulia Pozdeeva

    2017-01-01

    ...: the USA, Germany, and Russia using both a comparative theoretical analysis of different performance criteria of business incubators and interviewing experts who work directly with startup companies...

  10. EFFECTS OF PRE-INCUBATION STORAGE TIME OF OSTRICH EGGS ON THEIR INCUBATION AND HATCHING RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumturi Sena

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was carried out in the “ANOC” ostrich farm in Patos/Albania, in order to determine the effects of storage period on the hatchability of 197 ostrich (Struthio camelus eggs. One egg setting was monitored, through dividing the eggs into three groups according to their age, as following: 20-30, 10-20 and 1-10 days old, containing respectively 49, 80 and 68 eggs/group. During the hatching process, the respective parameters, such as: fecundity, embryonic mortality, weight egg loss and hatchability were recorded and monitored. After two weeks, the average weight loss of the all eggs resulted to be 0.5% more than the standard, referred as such, the instructions given by the Dutch company PAS REFORM, producer of the ostrich eggs incubation and hatching machines. The reason of the high embryonic mortality (40.7% mainly relates with the long pre-incubation storage time. Higher sterility (42.6% might especially relate with the high temperature stress in the farm, considering the fact that the animals were just transferred from the Netherlands to Albania. The hatching rate (29.9%, compared to the total number of the set eggs is comparable with the same parameter achieved in the UK. Out of these results, it is concluded that: the shorter the egg storage time before the setting the better will the hatching results be.

  11. Business Incubators: Creation of a Fit in Armenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorian, A.; Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which business incubation services meet tenant’s needs. Additionally, we pose the question of whether the current business incubators actually cover the needs of a particular industry. Our empirical setting is a developing country in the Caucasian Region

  12. Incubation Provides Relief from Artificial Fixation in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza, Alan A.; Calvillo, Dustin P.

    2012-01-01

    An incubation effect occurs when taking a break from a problem helps solvers arrive at the correct solution more often than working on it continuously. The forgetting-fixation account, a popular explanation of how incubation works, posits that a break from a problem allows the solver to forget the incorrect path to the solution and finally access…

  13. Incubation Programs from Public Research Organizations as Catalysts for Open Business Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven H. De Cleyn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In many economies, new knowledge and technology creation and transfer towards local entities and new startups have been recognized as catalysts for industry renewal and tools for safeguarding (or even enhancing a region’s employment and prosperity. This article presents a case study of iMinds, a network organization in Flanders, Belgium. The organization fosters interdisciplinary research in information and communication technologies (ICT and strongly engages in transferring these new technologies towards local actors and in creating and supporting new startups. iMinds’ incubation and entrepreneurship programs act as catalysts for open innovation and company startup activities in the Flemish region.

  14. The Pre-Incubator: A Longitudinal Study of 10 Years of University Pre-Incubation in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisey, Pamela; Jones, Paul; Thomas, Brychan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a longitudinal study of over 10 years of university pre-incubation in Wales, using case studies of incubated businesses to track their performance since 2001. Surviving "graduated" businesses were investigated and quantitative and qualitative data were gathered to profile the current status of these businesses and…

  15. Creativity—the unconscious foundations of the incubation period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Simone M.; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is one of the most important assets we have to navigate through the fast changing world of the 21st century. Anecdotal accounts of creative individuals suggest that oftentimes, creative discoveries result from a process whereby initial conscious thought is followed by a period during which one refrains from task-related conscious thought. For example, one may spend an embarrassing amount of time thinking about a problem when the solution suddenly pops into consciousness while taking a shower. Not only creative individuals but also traditional theories of creativity have put a lot of emphasis on this incubation stage in creative thinking. The aim of the present article is twofold. First, an overview of the domain of incubation and creativity is provided by reviewing and discussing studies on incubation, mind-wandering, and sleep. Second, the causes of incubation effects are discussed. Previously, little attention has been paid to the causes of incubation effects and most findings do not really speak to whether the effects should be explained by unconscious processes or merely by consequences of a period of distraction. In the latter case, there is no need to assume active unconscious processes. The findings discussed in the current article support the idea that it is not merely the absence of conscious thought that drives incubation effects, but that during an incubation period unconscious processes contribute to creative thinking. Finally, practical implications and directions for future research will be discussed. PMID:24782742

  16. Aligning business strategy of incubator center and tenants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyawan, Yudha; Agustiani, Elly; Jumayla, Sari

    2017-06-01

    Incubator center is developed to help a particular group of small business players to achieve the expected business growth. In this center, business players often called as tenants will get assistances in pertaining with space, professional network, marketing, investment or funding, and training to improve their business capability. There are three types of incubator center, namely universities that help their alumni or business people in their surrounded area, company that supports small business as the corporate social responsibility, and independent organizations that have specialties in the business development. Some might success in increasing the capacity of the tenants, while other can have difficulties to increase the simplest business capability, e.g., to define the production cost to measure the profit. This study was intended to propose a model to align the business strategy between incubator center and its tenants. The sales and profit growth are the main priorities for the tenants together with their business capability and sustainability. The proposed alignment model provides measurement tools that link the motivation of tenants for joining the incubation process with the mission of incubator center. The linkage covered the key performance indicators (KPI), steps to achieve the target and evaluation tools to improve the current handicaps. An experiment on 4 (four) diverse business fields of the tenants of an incubator center was performed to test the model. As a result, the increase of KPI of incubator center will simultaneously yield a higher value of the tenants' sales.

  17. Principles and Best Practices in Successful Tourism Business Incubators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea F. Şchiopu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The business incubators are entities that provide support to start-up companies, managing the obstacles faced by entrepreneurs and facilitating the hazardous process of business creation. This article aims to identify the existing views on best practices that can contribute to the achieving of business incubators’ objectives. Moreover, the present study investigates how the business incubators can ensure the success of tourism, with evidence grounded in both theory and case studies from around the world. In this paper, the authors have identified several types of incubators that could be used successfully for the benefit of start-ups in the tourism sector, such as network incubators, incubators in ecotourism or nature-based incubators. The authors also propose a new perspective on best practices in business incubation, emphasizing the role of the emotions that entrepreneurs have to cope with. Even though the studies in this area are still scarce, the authors strongly believe that this will be a topic highly discussed in the near future, given the fact that emotion and logical thought are intertwined, interacting in complex ways during problem solving, decision making, and other important forms of cognition that entrepreneurs use when pursuing their ventures.

  18. Toward a fuzzy logic control of the infant incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Narender P; Mathur, Garima; Hariharan, S I

    2009-10-01

    Premature birth is a world wide problem. Thermo regulation is a major problem in premature infants. Premature infants are often kept in infant incubators providing convective heating. Currently either the incubator air temperature is sensed and used to control the heat flow, or infant's skin temperature is sensed and used in the close loop control. Skin control often leads to large fluctuations in the incubator air temperature. Air control also leads to skin temperature fluctuations. The question remains if both the infant's skin temperature and the incubator air temperature can be simultaneously used in the control. The purpose of the present study was to address this question by developing a fuzzy logic control which incorporates both incubator air temperature and infant's skin temperature to control the heating. The control was evaluated using a lumped parameter mathematical model of infant-incubator system (Simon, B. N., N. P. Reddy, and A. Kantak, J. Biomech. Eng. 116:263-266, 1994). Simulation results confirmed previous experimental results that the on-off skin control could lead to fluctuations in the incubator air temperature, and the air control could lead to too slow rise time in the core temperature. The fuzzy logic provides a smooth control with the desired rise time.

  19. Functioning of the students business-incubators on the base of leading Ukrainian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Tulchinska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is the research of business-incubators functioning in Ukraine as a component of innovative infrastructure in general and student business-incubators in particular and developing criteria for evaluating their activity. The results of the analysis. It was determined that purpose of student innovation business incubator should be protection and representation of students interests through innovative transformation of students ideas, projects in the ready-made high technology products and/or existing innovative enterprises by providing organizational, administrative, information and consulting, scientific and methodological support. The result of research is specified on tasks for student innovative business-incubators, and services which they can provide for the creation of innovative businesses. Two components of work of the student innovative business-incubator are delimited. They include projection and educational component. The projection component includes consistent work starting from the student and preparing a business project to realization of projects. Educational component includes activities of students preparing to realization projects. It was established, that the presence at the university of student business incubators generating space for knowledge, allows to get perspective developments which may become the basis for small business. Students will demonstrate their skills not only in innovative developments but also as entrepreneurs. The creation of such innovative structure will help to combine students efforts at engineering, economic, legal, linguistic specialties and provide real practical professional experience during the education at the university. Creation of innovative student business incubators provides better commercialization of innovations, increases rationalization activity and activity as inventor, improves the level of students welfare, combines education, research

  20. Pre-incubation and low temperatures in quantitative radioreceptor assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensing, K.; de Zeeuw, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The detection limits of drugs in quantitative RRA are primarily determined by their affinities towards the receptor. Yet, the concentration of radiolabeled ligand, necessary for quantification of receptor-bound drug, increases the theoretical detection limit. Therefore the influences of low temperatures and pre-incubation on the detection limit was studied. Analysis of experimental data suggests that when a well-defined incubation procedure is used, pre-incubation and low temperatures will increase sensitivity without loss of accuracy and precision. 6 references, 2 figures.

  1. Learning Incubator: an instrument to foster entrepreneurship in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Dirce Stein; Obem, Marielle Kulakowski; Pereira, Simone Barbosa; Gomes, Carine Alves; Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    this study aimed to know the contributions of the Learning Incubator to the process of lifelong education in health. this is a qualitative field research whose data was collected from August to December 2014 by the focus group technique. The research had 34 employees of a Teaching Hospital in the central region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul that participated previously in the incubation process. from the data encoded by content analysis, three themes were selected: Learning Incubator - welcoming and integrating space; An instigating instrument that enhances possibilities; Continuous and lifelong education strategy. the Learning Incubator is an important instrument to foster entrepreneurship in nursing and other health areas due to its capacity of rethinking mechanized practices, to the possibility of instigating new ways of being and acting, and to the ability of creating and developing new ideas based on individual and institutional needs.

  2. Networking behavior and contracting relationships among entrepreneurs in business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Ebbers

    2014-01-01

    Many studies focus on the relationship between social networks and performance. I study networking behavior as an antecedent of tie formation among entrepreneurs in business incubators. I distinguish between two types of networking behavior: individual networking orientation or building potentially

  3. Networking behavior and contracting relationships among entrepreneurs in business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies focus on the relationship between social networks and performance. I study networking behavior as an antecedent of tie formation among entrepreneurs in business incubators. I distinguish between two types of networking behavior: individual networking orientation or building potentially

  4. Ostrich (Struthio camelus Egg Embryonic Death During Artificial Incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha E. Faki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intensification of ostrich farming revealed that egg hatchability was remarkably lower than the wild. This review considers the factors leading to, as pertaining to the ostrich, egg and incubator. Ostrich genotype, age, season and congenital problems affect clutch and egg sizes and egg quality- fertility to lead a successful hatch. Egg treatment prior incubation can later reduce hatchability, affected by storage conditions and duration. Most detrimental factors lie in the incubator and hatcher management. Egg correct positioning and turning in the appropriate incubator humidity and temperature are likely to yield high hatch. Variability in egg size, shell quality, pore sizes and numbers govern the water loss and exchange of gases. The hatcher management is important when chicks need intervention. Dead-in-shell embryos, early or late were likely to be affected by all of the above factors plus egg microbial contamination or be merely nutritional.

  5. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Patrick; Glombitza, Clemens; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial...... pressure, which can exceed 1 MPa at in situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in situ conditions, but the partial pressure of dissolved gasses has to be controlled as well. We developed an incubation system that allows for incubations...... and inert PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) incubator sleeve, which is almost impermeable for gases, holds the sample and separates it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the incubator sleeve allows for sub-sampling of the medium without loss of pressure. Experiments can be run in both static and flow...

  6. Ambient-temperature incubation for the field detection of Escherichia coli in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J; Stauber, C; Murphy, J L; Khan, A; Mu, T; Elliott, M; Sobsey, M D

    2011-04-01

     Escherichia coli is the pre-eminent microbiological indicator used to assess safety of drinking water globally. The cost and equipment requirements for processing samples by standard methods may limit the scale of water quality testing in technologically less developed countries and other resource-limited settings, however. We evaluate here the use of ambient-temperature incubation in detection of E. coli in drinking water samples as a potential cost-saving and convenience measure with applications in regions with high (>25°C) mean ambient temperatures.   This study includes data from three separate water quality assessments: two in Cambodia and one in the Dominican Republic. Field samples of household drinking water were processed in duplicate by membrane filtration (Cambodia), Petrifilm™ (Cambodia) or Colilert® (Dominican Republic) on selective media at both standard incubation temperature (35–37°C) and ambient temperature, using up to three dilutions and three replicates at each dilution. Matched sample sets were well correlated with 80% of samples (n = 1037) within risk-based microbial count strata (E. coli CFU 100 ml−1 counts of 1000), and a pooled coefficient of variation of 17% (95% CI 15–20%) for paired sample sets across all methods.   These results suggest that ambient-temperature incubation of E. coli in at least some settings may yield sufficiently robust data for water safety monitoring where laboratory or incubator access is limited.

  7. Effect of incubation period on epidemic spreading in complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wei; Jiang Rui; Hu Mao-Bin; Wu Qing-Song

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of incubation period on epidemic spreading in the Barabasi-Albert scale-free network and the Watts-Strogatz small world network by using a Suspectable-Incubated-Infected-Suspectable model.Our analytical investigations show that the epidemic threshold is independent of incubation period in both networks,which is verified by our large-scale simulation results.We also investigate the effect of incubation period on the epidemic dynamics in a supercritical regime.It is found that with the increase of incubation period Ω,a damped oscillation evolution of ρΤ(the ratio of persons in incubated state)appears and the time needed to reach a saturation value increases.Moreover,the steady value of ρI increases and approaches to an asymptotic constant with the value of Ω increasing.As a result,the infected ratio ρΤ decreases with the increase of Ω according to a power law.

  8. Using Fyrite to monitor incubator carbon dioxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J E; Boone, W R; Lee, S T; Blackhurst, D W

    1995-02-01

    The Fyrite analyzer (Bacharach, Incorporated) was evaluated to ascertain whether it would perform within the range specified by the manufacturer (+/- 0.5%). Fyrite analyzer samples were compared to control samples obtained using an infrared CO2 monitor (Ohmeda, Model Number 5200). Ten Fyrite analyzer measurements from each of three incubators were obtained using two different analyzers by three investigators for a total of 60 measurements per investigator. Twenty control measurements for each of the three incubators were obtained using an infrared monitor calibrated at the 5.0% CO2 level. Fyrite analyzer values fell outside of an acceptable range (Control mean CO2 +/- 0.5%) for 7 of 60 (11.7%) observations for Incubator 1 and 4 of 60 (6.7%) observations for Incubator 2. (Incubator 3 had no values outside the range.) The Fyrite analyzers were significantly different from each other (P = 0.002). The three investigators (I) differed significantly from the control (I1 and I3, P incubator calibration and monthly CO2 checks in concert with daily use of the Fyrite as a monitoring tool only is the better method.

  9. “科技企业孵化器—风险投资—在孵企业”三方合作绩效影响因素的路径分析%Path Analysis of the Influencial Factors of the Tripartite Collaboration's Performance of 'Technology Business Incubator,Venture Capital,Start-ups'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵黎明; 曾鑫

    2012-01-01

    Start-ups gain competitive advantage via embeddedness into strategic alliances,but most alliances' performance is lower than expected.In this article,combining the basic idea of the social network theory,the science of behavior,and the equity theory,we explored the main influencial factors of the alliance's performance,and established the conceptual path model of the performance of the "business incubator,venture capital,incubated enterprises" tripartite collaboration by Pearson correlation analysis.The result of the empirical study offers us new ways to improve the performance and success rate of the tripartite collaboration,which are strengthening the participation of partners,improving the optimizaiton of the coorperation networks,and focusing on the 'brigde' role of incubators and the intangible resources fitting of strategic partners.%创业企业通过嵌入战略联盟获取竞争优势,但合作绩效往往低于预期水平。综合社会网络、行为科学和公平性等理论基本思想,探明合作绩效主要影响因子,并通过Pearson相关分析构建了影响"科技企业孵化器—风险投资—在孵企业"三方合作绩效的路径概念模型。实证分析结果为三方合作绩效与合作成功率提出了加强合作方的参与度、促进合作网络结构优化,并关注科技企业孵化器的"桥梁"作用与战略伙伴选择的无形资源拟合的对策。

  10. Sex effects in mouse prion disease incubation time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion disease incubation time in mice is determined by many factors including PrP expression level, Prnp alleles, genetic background, prion strain and route of inoculation. Sex differences have been described in age of onset for vCJD and in disease duration for both vCJD and sporadic CJD and have also been shown in experimental models. The sex effects reported for mouse incubation times are often contradictory and detail only one strain of mice or prions, resulting in broad generalisations and a confusing picture. To clarify the effect of sex on prion disease incubation time in mice we have compared male and female transmission data from twelve different inbred lines of mice inoculated with at least two prion strains, representing both mouse-adapted scrapie and BSE. Our data show that sex can have a highly significant difference on incubation time. However, this is limited to particular mouse and prion strain combinations. No sex differences were seen in endogenous PrP(C levels nor in the neuropathological markers of prion disease: PrP(Sc distribution, spongiosis, neuronal loss and gliosis. These data suggest that when comparing incubation times between experimental groups, such as testing the effects of modifier genes or therapeutics, single sex groups should be used.

  11. Thermoregulation: incubators, radiant warmers, artificial skins, and body hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, M H

    1991-09-01

    Keeping babies warm whether using incubator or radiant warmers is important in optimizing their chances of survival. Many design changes have occurred in devices for keeping babies warm, while few controlled studies using clinically important end points have been conducted to assess these changes. Radiant warmers produce larger evaporative heat and water losses and slightly higher basal metabolic rate than incubators. The clinical significance of the higher metabolic rate is uncertain. The water losses create an additional problem in managing infants under radiant warmers. The use of hoods made of thin plastic films to raise local humidity and reduce evaporative water loss helps control this problem. In incubators, humidity may be necessary to provide a warm enough environment for the most immature infants. Artificial skins as yet have not supplanted body hoods for this purpose. Both incubators and radiant warmers produce temperature instability when used as skin servocontrolled devices. There are, however, no data currently available to say how much thermal instability can be well tolerated by a baby. Too much thermal instability produces apnea and increased mortality. Air servocontrolling an incubator reduces environmental temperature instability.

  12. An Investigative Study into Perspectives and Experiences of Incubates at the Chandaria Business Innovation and Incubation Centre at the Kenyatta University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Mutsau, Morgen; Rudhumbu, Norman; Svotwa, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The study presents results from an investigative study undertaken at the Kenyatta University (KU) Chandaria Business Innovation and Incubation Centre. A total of 10 incubates representing 10 projects were engaged in face to face interviews. The incubates were appreciative of the value that incubation centre such as the one at KU contributed to…

  13. Incubation times of dinosaur eggs via embryonic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A.

    2016-08-01

    The incubation times for the eggs of 21 dinosaurs are determined from an estimate of their embyronic metabolic rate and the mass of the hatchlings via a mass growth model based on conservation of energy. Embryos in extant birds and crocodiles are studied in order to determine the best model for embryonic metabolism and growth. These results are used to develop a theoretical model that predicts the incubation times of an egg. This model is applied to dinosaur eggs and provides a unique window into dinosaur reproduction. The dinosaurs studied come from both Saurischia and Ornithischia. The incubation times vary from about 28 days for Archaeopteryx lithographica to about 76 days for Alamosaurus sanjuanensis.

  14. Modeling of Incubation Time for Austenite to Ferrite Phase Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao-guang; LIU Zhen-yu; WU Di; WANG Wei; JIAO Si-hai

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the classical nucleation theory, a new model of incubation time for austenite to ferrite transformation has been developed, in which the effect of deformation on austenite has been taken into consideration. To prove the precision of modeling, ferrite transformation starting temperature (Ar3) has been calculated using the Scheil′s additivity rule, and the Ar3 values were measured using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The Ar3 values provided by the modeling method coincide with the measured ones, indicating that the model is precise in predicting the incubation time for austenite to ferrite transformation in hot deformed steels.

  15. Comparative clinical evaluation of a prototype non-electric transport incubator and an electrical infant incubator in a neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadeh, Y; Nili, F; Nayeri, F; Wickramasinghe, Y

    2001-09-01

    A new non-electric transport incubator has been developed for transferring babies between health facilities in developing countries. The temperature performance of this prototype was compared with a commercial electric incubator. The warm-up time for the prototype was 51.8 min, compared with 48.1 min for the electric incubator. Forty-five non-distressed premature babies, aged 24-72 h, with a gestational age of less than 37 weeks, were continuously evaluated for a 2 h period. Twenty-five babies, with a mean weight of 2073 g (range 1500-2500 g), were studied in the prototype, and 20 babies, with a mean weight of 2076g (range 1550-2500 g), were studied in the electrical incubator. The rectal and abdominal skin temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation and respiratory rate of the babies were recorded. The temperature, oxygen and humidity level of the canopy and the room temperature were also measured. The SaO2, heart rate and respiratory rate were within the normal range (in the prototype: 96.5%, 130.5 beats min(-1) and 43 breaths min(-1), respectively; and, in the electric incubator: 96.5%, 128.5 beats min(-1) and 40 breaths min(-1), respectively). No evidence of carbon dioxide narcosis, hypoxia, acidosis or adverse thermoregulatory behaviour were observed in the two groups. The mean rectal temperature for both groups was within the range 36.5 degrees C-37.5 degrees C. There was no significant difference between the measurements of the two groups. The level of oxygen inside the canopy was 21%, and no decrease was observed. The new nonelectric transport incubator confirmed its safety and efficiency in providing a warm environment for non-distressed premature babies over a 2 h period.

  16. Longer incubation times for yeast fungemia: importance for presumptive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, André; Ancelle, Thierry; Lortholary, Olivier; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    Isolation rates of Candida glabrata at ≤2 days were 8.9% and 34.8% at >2 days; for Cryptococcus neoformans, they were 0.9% and 8.6%, respectively (1741 fungemia analyzed). An incubation time >2 days supports candins as presumptive treatment for C. glabrata, keeping in mind the risk of Cryptococcus fungemia.

  17. Designing a Low-Cost Multifunctional Infant Incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kevin; Gibson, Aaron; Wong, Don; Tilahun, Dagmawi; Selock, Nicholas; Good, Theresa; Ram, Geetha; Tolosa, Leah; Tolosa, Michael; Kostov, Yordan; Woo, Hyung Chul; Frizzell, Michael; Fulda, Victor; Gopinath, Ramya; Prasad, J Shashidhara; Sudarshan, Hanumappa; Venkatesan, Arunkumar; Kumar, V Sashi; Shylaja, N; Rao, Govind

    2014-06-01

    Every year, an unacceptably large number of infant deaths occur in developing nations, with premature birth and asphyxia being two of the leading causes. A well-regulated thermal environment is critical for neonatal survival. Advanced incubators currently exist, but they are far too expensive to meet the needs of developing nations. We are developing a thermodynamically advanced low-cost incubator suitable for operation in a low-resource environment. Our design features three innovations: (1) a disposable baby chamber to reduce infant mortality due to nosocomial infections, (2) a passive cooling mechanism using low-cost heat pipes and evaporative cooling from locally found clay pots, and (3) insulated panels and a thermal bank consisting of water that effectively preserve and store heat. We developed a prototype incubator and visited and presented our design to our partnership hospital site in Mysore, India. After obtaining feedback, we have determined realistic, nontrivial design requirements and constraints in order to develop a new prototype incubator for clinical trials in hospitals in India. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  18. State of the art incubator for controlled atmosphere studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1998-01-01

    A state of the art incubator for studies of the biological effect of controlled atmosphere was designed. Working conditions are all combinations of: Temperature (5 to 40°C), Humidity (25 to 98%), oxygen (0.1 to 30%) and nitrogen (0.1 to 50%). Several points were given specific considerations...

  19. Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubation Environments: A Framework of Key Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dajani, Haya; Dedoussis, Evangelos; Watson, Erika; Tzokas, Nikalaos

    2014-01-01

    The benchmarking framework developed in this study is specifically designed for higher education institutions to consider when developing environments to encourage entrepreneurship among their students, graduates and staff. The objective of the study was to identify key success factors of Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubator Environments (GEIEs)…

  20. Mind Wandering and the Incubation Effect in Insight Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tengteng; Zou, Hong; Chen, Chuansheng; Luo, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Although many anecdotes suggest that creative insights often arise during mind wandering, empirical research is still sparse. In this study, the number reduction task (NRT) was used to assess whether insightful solutions were related to mind wandering during the incubation stage of the creative process. An experience sampling paradigm was used to…

  1. Human-centered incubator: beyond a design concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, R.H.M.; Willemsen, H.

    2013-01-01

    We read with interest the paper by Ferris and Shepley1 on a human-centered design project with university students on neonatal incubators. It is interesting to see that in the design solutions and concepts as presented by Ferris and Shepley,1 human-centered design played an important role. In 2005,

  2. Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubation Environments: A Framework of Key Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dajani, Haya; Dedoussis, Evangelos; Watson, Erika; Tzokas, Nikalaos

    2014-01-01

    The benchmarking framework developed in this study is specifically designed for higher education institutions to consider when developing environments to encourage entrepreneurship among their students, graduates and staff. The objective of the study was to identify key success factors of Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubator Environments (GEIEs)…

  3. Encapsulation of Aloe Vera and Its Effect During Yogur Incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Adolfo Parra Huertas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The yogurt is milk derivative highly consumed around the world,as well as aloe vera. Both have reports tocontribute to human health. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of the addition of capsules with aloe vera during the incubation of yogurt. Aloeverawas encapsulated in alginate at two different concentrations, 1% and 2%,addingthe capsules from the moment of incubation and comparing the effect of the addition of capsules withthe non-addition of them. For these samples were determined: pH, acidity, syneresis, lactic acid bacteria count, sensory evaluation and proximate analysis. The results indicated that for the three treatments pH values and acid behaved similarly to each characteristic of the yogurt during incubation. The lactic acid bacteria count indicated that treatment with capsules containing 2% sodium alginate had higher counts. Sensorially, three treatments had a favorable acceptability; proximate analysis had favorable values . In conclusion,the tests showed the viability of encapsulated aloe vera in the manufacture of yogurt during incubation time without being affected by the concentration of sodium alginate.

  4. What determines hatchling weight: breeder age or incubated egg weight?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AB Traldi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out to determine which factor influences weight at hatch of broiler chicks: breeder age or incubated egg weight. In Experiment 1, 2340 eggs produced by 29- and 55-week-old Ross® broiler breeders were incubated. The eggs selected for incubation weighed one standard deviation below and above average egg weight. In Experiment 2, 2160 eggs weighing 62 g produced by breeders of both ages were incubated. In both experiments, 50 additional eggs within the weight interval determined for each breeder age were weighed, broken, and their components were separated and weighed. At hatch, hatchlings were sexed and weighed, determining the average initial weight of the progeny of each breeder age. Data were analyzed using the Analyst program of SAS® software package. In Experiment 1, the weight difference between eggs produced by young and mature breeders was 10.92 g, and the component that mostly influenced this difference was the yolk (7.51 g heavier in mature breeders, compared with 4.23 g difference in albumen and 0.8 g in eggshell weights. Hatchling weight difference was 9.4 g higher in eggs from mature breeders. In Experiment 2, egg weight difference was only 0.74 g, but yolk weight was 4.59 g higher in the eggs of mature breeders. The results obtained in the present study indicate that hatchling weight is influenced by egg weight, and not by breeder age.

  5. Meeting embryonic requirements of broilers throughout incubation: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, R.; Reijrink, I.A.M.; Meijerhof, R.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    During incubation of chicken embryos, environmental conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 concentration, must be controlled to meet embryonic requirements that change during the different phases of embryonic development. In the current review, the effects of embryo temperature,

  6. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Patrick; Glombitza, Clemens; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed 1 MPa at in situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in situ conditions, but the partial pressure of dissolved gasses has to be controlled as well. We developed an incubation system that allows for incubations at hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa, temperatures up to 120°C, and at high gas partial pressure. The composition and partial pressure of gasses can be manipulated during the experiment. To keep costs low, the system is mainly made from off-the-shelf components with only very few custom-made parts. A flexible and inert PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) incubator sleeve, which is almost impermeable for gases, holds the sample and separates it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the incubator sleeve allows for sub-sampling of the medium without loss of pressure. Experiments can be run in both static and flow-through mode. The incubation system described here is usable for versatile purposes, not only the incubation of microorganisms and determination of growth rates, but also for chemical degradation or extraction experiments under high gas saturation, e.g., fluid-gas-rock-interactions in relation to carbon dioxide sequestration. As an application of the system we extracted organic compounds from sub-bituminous coal using H(2)O as well as a H(2)O-CO(2) mixture at elevated temperature (90°C) and pressure (5 MPa). Subsamples were taken at different time points during the incubation and analyzed by ion chromatography. Furthermore we demonstrated the applicability of the system for studies of microbial activity, using samples from the Isis mud volcano. We could

  7. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSauer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed one MPa at in-situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in-situ conditions, but the partial pressure of dissolved gasses has to be controlled as well.We developed an incubation system that allows for incubations at hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa, temperatures up to 120° C and at high gas partial pressure. The composition and partial pressure of gasses can be manipulated during the experiment. The system is mainly made from off-the-shelf components with only very few custom-made parts. A flexible and inert PVDF incubator sleeve, which is almost impermeable for gases, holds the sample and separates it from the pressure fluid. The flexibility of the incubator sleeve allows for sub-sampling of the medium without loss of pressure. Experiments can be run in both static and flow through mode. The incubation system described here is usable for versatile purposes, not only the incubation of microorganisms and determination of growth rates, but also for chemical degradation or extraction experiments under high gas saturation, e.g. fluid-gas-rock-interactions in relation to carbon dioxide sequestration.As an application of the system we extracted organic acids from sub-bituminous coal using H2O as well as a H2O-CO2 mixture at elevated temperature (90°C and pressure (5 MPa. Subsamples were taken during the incubation and analysed by ion chromatography. Furthermore we demonstrated the applicability of the system for studies of microbial activity, using samples from the Isis mud volcano. We could detect an increase in sulphate reduction rate upon the addition of

  8. Internal incubation and early hatching in brood parasitic birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, T R; Hemmings, N; Spottiswoode, C N; Mikulica, O; Moskát, C; Bán, M; Schulze-Hagen, K

    2011-04-07

    The offspring of brood parasitic birds benefit from hatching earlier than host young. A proposed but little-known strategy to achieve this is 'internal incubation', by retaining the egg in the oviduct for an additional 24 h. To test this, we quantified the stage of embryo development at laying in four brood parasitic birds (European cuckoo, Cuculus canorus; African cuckoo, Cuculus gularis; greater honeyguide, Indicator indicator; and the cuckoo finch, Anomalospiza imberbis). For the two cuckoos and the honeyguide, all of which lay at 48 h intervals, embryos were at a relatively advanced stage at laying; but for the cuckoo finch (laying interval: 24 h) embryo stage was similar to all other passerines laying at 24 h intervals. The stage of embryo development in the two cuckoos and honeyguide was similar to that of a non-parasitic species that lay at an interval of 44-46 h, but also to the eggs of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata incubated artificially at body temperature immediately after laying, for a further 24 h. Comparison with the zebra finch shows that internal incubation in the two cuckoos and honeyguide advances hatching by 31 h, a figure consistent with the difference between the expected and the observed duration of incubation in the European cuckoo predicted from egg mass. Rather than being a specific adaptation to brood parasitism, internal incubation is a direct consequence of a protracted interval between ovulation (and fertilization) and laying, but because it results in early hatching may have predisposed certain species to become brood parasitic.

  9. 78 FR 61383 - Certain Thermal Support Devices For Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers, and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Certain Thermal Support Devices For Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers, and Components... United States after importation of certain thermal support devices for infants, infant incubators, infant... certain thermal support devices for infants, infant incubators, infant warmers, and components thereof...

  10. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  11. Incubating Innovation: A standard model for nurturing new businesses, the incubator gains prominence in the world of biotech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Incubators, accelerators, innovation centers, launch pads. Everyone defines the idea a bit differently, but, generally, these infrastructures refer to a subsidized space where fledgling companies get support?a combination of mentorship, funding, low rent, networking opportunities, and other training?with the goal of propelling early businesses to success.

  12. Being flexible through customization : The impact of incubator focus and customization strategies on incubate survival and growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderstraeten, J.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen; Matthyssens, P.; Andreassi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Given the increased importance of flexibility in company development models, it is not surprising that start-up support structures such as business incubators give more attention to flexible service offerings. In this paper, we argue that an incubator’s service customization strategy is ideal in sit

  13. Nitrification Potential of Soils Under Liquid Incubation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Fei; RAN Wei; SHEN Qi-Rong

    2005-01-01

    A red soil, a fluvo-aquic soil and a permeable paddy soil were used in a long-term investigation to study changes in nitrification with treatments: 1) soil incubation, 2) liquid incubation inoculated with soil samples, and 3) liquid incubation inoculated with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) from the soils. There were significant differences (P < 0.001) in nitrification rates among the three soils when measured for 28 days by adding (NH4)2SO4 at the rate of 154 mg N kg-1 dry soil to fresh soil. However, the amounts of nitrifying bacteria in the three soils were not related to soil nitrification capacity. When the soil samples or the isolates of AOB enriched from the corresponding soil were incubated in liquid with pH 5.8, 7.0 and 8.0 buffers and 10 mmol L-1 ammonium nitrogen, there were no significant nitrification differences in the same soil type at each pH. The ability to oxidize ammonia through AOB from different types of soils in a homogeneous culture medium was similar, and the soil nitrification capacity could reflect the inherent properties of a soil. Altering the culture medium pH of individual soil type also showed that acidification of an alkaline fluvo-aquic soil decreased nitrification capacity, whereas alkalinization of the acidic red soil and permeable paddy soil increased their nitrification. For a better insight into factors influencing soil nitrification processes, soil properties including texture and clay composition should be considered.

  14. Incubation temperature modifies neonatal thermoregulation in the lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rachel M; Walguarnery, Justin W

    2007-08-01

    The thermal environment experienced during embryonic development can profoundly affect the phenotype, and potentially the fitness, of ectothermic animals. We examined the effect of incubation temperature on the thermal preferences of juveniles in the oviparous lizard, Anolis carolinensis. Temperature preference trials were conducted in a laboratory thermal gradient within 48 hr of hatching and after 22-27 days of maintenance in a common laboratory environment. Incubation temperature had a significant effect on the upper limit of the interquartile range (IQR) of temperatures selected by A. carolinensis within the first 2 days after hatching. Between the first and second trials, the IQR of selected temperatures decreased significantly and both the lower limit of the IQR and the median selected temperature increased significantly. This, along with a significant incubation temperature by time interaction in the upper limit of the IQR, resulted in a pattern of convergence in thermoregulation among treatment groups. The initial differences in selected temperatures, as well as the shift in selected temperatures between first and second trials, demonstrate plasticity in temperature selection. As a previous study failed to find environmentally induced plasticity in temperature selection in adult A. carolinensis, this study suggests that this type of plasticity is exclusive to the period of neonatal development.

  15. Aerobic and anaerobic incubation: Biological indexes of soil nitrogen availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresović Mirjana M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Our researches have been made on brown forest soil that had been used in long-term experiments set up according to specified fertilization system for over 30 years. We have chosen those experiment variants in which quantities of nitrogen fertilizers were gradually increased. The soil samples taken from 0 cm to 30 cm depth were used to determine biological indexes of nitrogen availability (aerobic and anaerobic incubation. The same samples were also used for pot experiments with oat. Plant and soil parameters obtained in controlled conditions were used for determination of biological indexes reliability in measuring the soil nitrogen availability. On the grounds of correlation analysis, it can be concluded that biological index of nitrogen availability achieved by the anaerobic incubation (without substraction of the initial content of available nitrogen of the investigated brown forest soil is the reliable indicator of soil nitrogen availability. That is not the case with the aerobic incubation in which reliability has not been established.

  16. Prolonged incubation of processed human spermatozoa will increase DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, A; Khalili, M A; Halvaei, I; Roodbari, F

    2014-05-01

    One of the causes of failure in ART is sperm DNA fragmentation which may be associated with long period of spermatozoa incubation at 37 °C. The objective was to evaluate the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation using the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test after swim-up at different time intervals prior to use. In this prospective study, 21 normozoospermic specimens were analysed. The samples were incubated at 37 °C after preparation by direct swim-up. DNA fragmentation was assessed at different time intervals (0, 1, 2 and 3 h) using SCD test. Spermatozoa with no DNA fragmentation showed large- or medium-sized halos, and sperm cells with DNA fragmentation showed either a small halo or no halo. The rates of normal morphology and progressive motility after sperm processing were 72.33 ± 2.53% and 90 ± 1.02%, respectively. The rate of sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly higher after 2 h (8.81 ± 0.93%, P = 0.004) and 3 h (10.76 ± 0.89%, P fragmentation. Therefore, sperm samples intended for ART procedures should be used within 2 h of incubation at 37 °C. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  18. Cot-nursing versus incubator care for preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter H; Flenady, Vicki

    2011-08-10

    Preterm infants are usually nursed in incubators, but cot-nursing may provide an alternative. While there may be benefits of nursing preterm infants in open cots, there may be potential risks such as nosocomial infection caused by more handling due to easier access. To assess effects of cot-nursing versus incubator care on temperature control and weight gain in preterm infants. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library), Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE, as well as previous reviews including cross references through November 2009. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation in which infants receiving care in standard newborn cots were compared to infants managed in a conventional air heated incubator. The authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data for the primary outcomes of temperature control and weight gain. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed-effect model. Eleven potential studies were identified of which five, involving 247 infants, were included in this review. When compared to incubator care, cot-nursing resulted in no significant difference in mean body temperature (MD 0.02 degrees C; 95% CI -0.02 to 0.07, four trials), though the one trial that reported on episodes of hyperthermia found this to be statistically more common in the cot-nursing group (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.09). There were no statistically significant differences in weight gain. In the cot-nursing group, fewer infants were breast fed on discharge (typical RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.48 to 1.14, three trials, 150 infants) and fewer infants died prior to hospital discharge (typical RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.25, four trials, 235 infants) but these results failed to reach statistical significance. The comparison of cot-nursing using a heated water-filled mattress

  19. Conceptual design in electronic product development: case studies in incubated companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Perez Pagan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on current market behavior and its trends, the excellence in managing the Product Development Process (PDP is a crucial subject in organizations. Considering an environment with difficult technology access as Brazil, for incubated companies in the electronic industry, the technical innovation and the new product development makes PDP management even more critical. The aim of this study is multiple case studies that identifies the difficulties and explores how these companies execute the Conceptual Design phase of PDP, since it is an important phase for innovative companies. As a result, the research indentifies difficulties as technology access, dependency of public resources for development, substantial dissatisfaction with suppliers, and a lack of use of reference models of PDP.

  20. “孵化-加速”三位一体耦合对接:科技服务资源集成路径%The Three-dimensional Coupling and Matching of Incubation-Acceleration:Method of Science and Technology Resources Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪艳霞; 钟书华

    2015-01-01

    In the complex and dynamic “incubation‐acceleration” system ,incubation and acceleration modules and other modules form multiple relations ,like complementary ,alternative ,competition ,coordination as well as cooperation .Those modules will form such as tightly coupling ,loosely coupling ,decoupling and mismatching during service cooperation and in‐terest game .For realizing value coupling and matching of business“incubation‐acceleration” ,w e can guide ,detect and con‐trol it in the aspects of public service platforms ,management structure and organization culture .Public service platforms provide resource pool for the creation and innovation of systematic value .Customer‐oriented management pattern adjust resource combination dynamically so as to promoting the optimal allocation of resources ;the integration of organizational culture provides the soft power protection for ensuring the system stability and sustainable development .The system mo‐nitoring would help to enhance strategic resilience ,coupling and matching degree ,system stability and sustainable develop‐ment .%“孵化-加速”对接系统动态复杂,孵化、加速模块及其子模块之间存有互补、替代、竞争、协调、合作等多元关系,各模块之间在服务协作、利益博弈过程中呈现出紧密对接、松散对接、脱耦等联系。为确保实现对接价值,可从公共服务平台、管理架构、组织文化3个维度对其进行引导、检测和调控。公共服务平台为系统价值的创造和创新提供“资源池”;顾客导向的顾客体验式管理模式动态调节资源组合,促进资源优化配置;组织文化的融合为确保系统稳定和可持续发展提供软实力保障。三维一体的调控可以提高对接系统的战略适应力、系统耦合程度及系统稳定性。

  1. EMPOWERING IT ENTREPRENEURSHIPS: WHAT’S THE CONTRIBUTION OF BUSINESS INCUBATORS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wescley Silva Xavier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the contribution of Business Incubators for small IT business. In this way, a deep research in three Brazilian IT Incubators was developed. We investigated the perception of incubators’ managers, tenant and graduated entrepreneurs regarding to the key elements of incubation process, as support and infrastructure, university-incubator interaction, and management training. Our findings indicate some deficiencies in IT Incubators, predominantly in prospecting customers, attracting financial resources, and establishing relationships within universities and research centers.

  2. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the corresponding sensors and the analogue components of every canal, controlled with help of a microcontroller AT89C51 (ATMEL with adequate benefi ts for this type of application.

  3. Short communication. Effects of the time to change from incubation to hatching temperature on the artificial incubation of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Gomez-de-Travecedo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates, in red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa, the effects of the time to change from incubation to hatching temperature on egg weight loss, hatchability, chick weight at hatch, incubation length, and development stage at embryonic mortality. Five batches of 80 eggs each were incubated at 37.8ºC during the first 18, 19, 20, 21 or 22 d of incubation, and subsequently at 37.5ºC until hatching. Hatchability, development stage at embryonic mortality and chick weight at hatch were not affected by the time of temperature change (p > 0.05. However, incubation length and egg weight loss after 21 d of incubation as representative of that of developed embryos were influenced by the incubation treatment (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively. Thus, eggs maintained at the incubation temperature of 37.8ºC for 22 d not only hatched earlier (23.04 d but also with lower dispersion than eggs from the other treatments. As hatching may start around day 22 of incubation, to improve hatching synchrony we could recommend to move A. rufa eggs from the incubator, set at 37.8ºC, to the hatcher on the 21st d of incubation keeping the temperature unchanged, and reduce it to 37.5ºC on the 22nd d. Nevertheless, further research should be carried out to study the effect of this temperature scheduling on chick growth and performance.

  4. Aerospace Technology Innovation. Volume 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Janelle (Editor); Cousins, Liz (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    Commercializing technology is a daunting task. Of every 11 new product ideas, only one will successfully make it to the marketplace. Fully 46% of new product investment becomes sunk in cost. Yet, a few good companies consistently attain an 80% technology commercialization success rate and have lead the way in establishing best practices. The NASA Incubator program consists of nine incubators, each residing near a NASA research center. The purpose of the incubators is to use the best practices is to use the best practices of technology commercialization to help early stage businesses successfully launch new products that incorporate NASA technology.

  5. Low-power hybrid wireless network for monitoring infant incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D I; Shin, K H; Kim, I K; Park, K S; Lee, T S; Kim, S I; Lim, K S; Huh, S J

    2005-10-01

    We have created a pilot wireless network for the convenient monitoring of temperature and humidity of infant incubators. This system combines infrared and radio frequency (RF) communication in order to minimize the power consumption of slave devices, and we therefore call it a hybrid wireless network. The slave module installed in the infant incubator receives the calling signal from the host with an infrared receiver, and sends temperature and humidity data to the host with an RF transmitter. The power consumption of the host system is not critical, and hence it uses the maximum power of infrared transmission and continuously operating RF receiver. In our test implementation, we included four slave devices. The PC calls each slave device every second and then waits for 6 s, resulting in a total scan period of 10 s. Slave devices receive the calling signals and transmit three data values (temperature, moisture, and skin temperature); their power demand is 1 mW, and can run for about 1000 h on four AA-size nickel-hydride batteries.

  6. Dynamic programming approach for newborn's incubator humidity control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouattoura, D; Villon, P; Farges, G

    1998-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of the human skin have been studied for a long time. A special interest has been shown in the water permeability of the premature infant's skin, which is known to be an important factor in the maintenance of a controlled water and heat balance. The rate of evaporative heat exchange between the skin surface of a very premature infant and the surrounding incubator air may be so high that evaporative heat loss alone may exceed the infant's total metabolic heat production. However, it has been demonstrated in several investigations published in recent years that basal evaporative water loss can be consistently reduced by increasing the ambient humidity. Nevertheless, the passive humidification system (water reservoir) used in most incubators cannot achieve high and steady humidity levels. In this paper, we propose an active humidification system. The algorithm is based on a combination of optimal control theory and dynamic programming approach. The relative-humidity (R.H.) regulation is performed in range of 35-90% at 33 degrees C with small oscillations (+/- 0.5% R.H.) around the reference value (i.e., prescribed R.H.).

  7. Effect of comfort pads and incubator design on neonatal radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xia; Baad, Michael; Reiser, Ingrid; Feinstein, Kate A.; Lu, Zhengfeng [University of Chicago Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    There has been increasing interest in patient dose reduction in neonatal intensive care units. Removing comfort pads for radiography has been identified as a potential means to decrease patient dose. To assess the effect of comfort pads and support trays on detector entrance exposure (DEE) and image quality for neonatal radiography, and its implication for patient dose. Comfort pads and support trays from three incubator and warmer systems were examined. The attenuation of the primary beam by these structures was measured using a narrow beam geometry. Their effect on DEE and image quality was then assessed using typical neonatal chest radiography techniques with three configurations: (1) both the comfort pad and support included in the beam, (2) only the support tray included and (3) both the comfort pad and support tray removed. Comfort pads and support trays were found to attenuate the primary beam by 6-15%. Eliminating these structures from the X-ray beam's path was found to increase the detector entrance exposure by 28-36% and increase contrast-to-noise ratio by more than 21%, suggesting room for patient dose reduction when the same image quality is maintained. Comfort pads and tray support devices can have a considerable effect on DEE and image quality, with large variations among different incubator designs. Positioning the image detector directly underneath neonatal patients for radiography is a potential means for patient dose reduction. However, such benefit should be weighed against the risks of moving the patient. (orig.)

  8. Striped Bass, morone saxatilis, egg incubation in large volume jars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C.J.; Wrege, B.M.; Jeffery, Isely J.

    2010-01-01

    The standard McDonald jar was compared with a large volume jar for striped bass, Morone saxatilis, egg incubation. The McDonald jar measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. The experimental jar measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. The hypothesis is that there is no difference in percent survival of fry hatched in experimental jars compared with McDonald jars. Striped bass brood fish were collected from the Coosa River and spawned using the dry spawn method of fertilization. Four McDonald jars were stocked with approximately 150 g of eggs each. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96, and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg loading rate (??1 SE) in McDonald jars of 21.9 ?? 0.03 eggs/mL and in experimental jars of 10.9 ?? 0.57 eggs/mL. The major finding of this study was that average fry survival was 37.3 ?? 4.49% for McDonald jars and 34.2 ?? 3.80% for experimental jars. Although survival in experimental jars was slightly less than in McDonald jars, the effect of container volume on survival to 48 h (F = 6.57; df = 1,5; P > 0.05), 96 h (F = 0.02; df = 1, 4; P > 0.89), and 144 h (F = 3.50; df = 1, 4; P > 0.13) was not statistically significant. Mean survival between replicates ranged from 14.7 to 60.1% in McDonald jars and from 10.1 to 54.4% in experimental jars. No effect of initial stocking rate on survival (t = 0.06; df = 10; P > 0.95) was detected. Experimental jars allowed for incubation of a greater number of eggs in less than half the floor space of McDonald jars. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental jars offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing labor and operations cost. As survival was similar to McDonald jars, the experimental jar is suitable for striped bass egg incubation. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2010.

  9. [Collagenase production increases in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis synoviocytes incubated].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrull, H L; Brizuela, N Y; Demurtas, S L; Strusberg, A M; Spitale, L S; Meirovich, C I

    2000-01-01

    Cartilage is a specialized connective tissue. It contains few cells into an extracell matrix. The matrix mainly constituents are collagen and proteoglycans. Its degradation depends on synoviocytes activity, that secrete metalloproteases, agents to proteoglycans catabolism. There are two types of synoviocytes: macrophagics (type "A:') and fibroblastics (type "B"). The proteoglycan destruction can be LT-dependent or LT-independent. The aim of this work is synoviocytes function ex vívo study, free immune system influence. In order to do it, heparinized synovial fluid samples were obtained from 6 osteoarthritic (OA) and 6 arthritic (RA) both sex untreated patients, diagnosed according ACR criteria, which disease duration was longer than 6 months. Patients average age was 70 +/- 2 years. Control samples were synovial fluid from traumatic arthritis or non inflammatory bone-muscle pathology. Synovial fluid was centifugated at 1500 g for 30 minutes to isolate synoviocytes. Sediment containing cells was 6 hs incubed with Dulbecco-Eagles media, that has HEPES Gibco (26 mM); NaHCO3 (0.5 g/I); glutamine (2 mM), streptomicine (100 mg/l), G-penicillin (1 U/ml); anphotericine B (2.5 mg/l). Cells calification and viability were cytopathologically determined. Before and after incubation, collagenase activity was measured by ELISA-double-sandwich, using 10 micrograms/ml monoclonal anti-MMPs in phosphate-buffer-saline. The antigen-antibody complex production with inespecific proteins was blocked by bovine seric albumine. Streptavidin peroxidase was added and washed with 2,2,azin,di(3-ethyl-benztazoilinsuiphonic) acid to develop color. The link of labeled antibody by absorbance at 410 nm was determined in ELISA-spectrophothometer. RA patients earlier MMPs synoviocytes production was 1373 +/- 115 ng/ml. Then 6 hs incubation 2143 +/- 132 ng/ml was reached. The increase (56%) had high significance (p cartilago, because SF provides markers of joint disease. MMPs are giving information

  10. Getting better integrated into foreign markets supported by the incubator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr Ulrich, Anna Marie; Gretzinger, Susanne; Hollensen, Svend

    The challenges associated with entering foreign growth markets, like BRIC markets, remain significant, especially for inexperienced SMEs. These challenges can include inadequate knowledge about a host country’s culture, norms, values and business environment, and a lack of embeddedness...... in the industry networks abroad. Such barriers can often hinder successful foreign market entry. One concept to use for SMEs, which lack experiential knowledge when bridging new distant international growth markets, is the ‘incubator’. It is best described as a shared office-space facility, including a local...... into the following two propositions: - The higher the level of the company’s accumulated experiential knowledge, the faster integration into the foreign market. - The use of incubator facilitates a faster integration into a specific high growth foreign market....

  11. Rabies viral encephalitis with proable 25 year incubation period!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of rabies viral encephalitis in a 48-year-old male with an unusually long incubation period, historically suspected to be more than 20 years. The case was referred for histological diagnosis following alleged medical negligence to the forensic department. The histology and immunocytochemical demonstration of rabies viral antigen established the diagnosis unequivocally. The case manifested initially with hydrophobia and aggressive behavior, although he suddenly went to the bathroom and drank a small amount of water. History of dog bite 25 years back was elicited retrospectively following clinical suspicion. There was no subsequent history to suggest nonbite exposure to a rabid dog to consider recent event causing the disease, although this cannot be totally excluded.

  12. Prions in milk from ewes incubating natural scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroux, Caroline; Simon, Stéphanie; Benestad, Sylvie L; Maillet, Séverine; Mathey, Jacinthe; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Cassard, Hervé; Costes, Pierrette; Bergonier, Dominique; Weisbecker, Jean-Louis; Moldal, Torffin; Simmons, Hugh; Lantier, Frederic; Feraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Grassi, Jacques; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2008-12-01

    Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrP(Sc) accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 microg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species.

  13. Prions in milk from ewes incubating natural scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lacroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrP(Sc accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 microg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species.

  14. Incubator weaning in preterm infants and associated practice variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, R; Kirkby, S; Turenne, W; Greenspan, J

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship of weight of preterm infants when first placed into an open crib with days to full oral feedings, growth velocity and length of stay (LOS), and to identify unwarranted variation in incubator weaning after adjusting for severity indices. A retrospective study using the ParadigmHealth neonatal database from 2003 to 2006 reviewed incubator weaning to an open crib in appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) infants from 22 to weeks gestation. Primary outcome measurements included days to full oral (PO) feeding, weight gain from open crib to discharge and length of stay. Models were severity adjusted. To understand hospital practice variation, we also used a regression model to estimate the weight at open crib for the top 10 volume hospitals. In all 2908 infants met the inclusion criteria for the study. Their mean weight at open crib was 1850 g. On average every additional 100 g an infant weighed at the open crib was associated with increased time to full PO feeding by 0.8 days, decreased weight gained per day by 1 gram and increased LOS by 0.9 days. For the top 10 volume hospitals, severity variables alone accounted for 9% of the variation in weight at open crib, whereas the hospital in which the baby was treated accounted for an additional 19% of the variation. Even after controlling for severity, significant practice variation exists in weaning to an open crib, leading to potential delays in achieving full-volume oral feeds, decreased growth velocity and prolonged LOS.

  15. Biparental incubation-scheduling: no experimental evidence for major energetic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Martin; Cresswell, Will; Rutten, Anne L; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is energetically demanding, but it is debated whether these demands constrain incubation-scheduling (i.e., the length, constancy, and timing of incubation bouts) in cases where both parents incubate. Using 2 methods, we experimentally reduced the energetic demands of incubation in the semipalmated sandpiper, a biparental shorebird breeding in the harsh conditions of the high Arctic. First, we decreased the demands of incubation for 1 parent only by exchanging 1 of the 4 eggs for an artificial egg that heated up when the focal bird incubated. Second, we reanalyzed the data from the only published experimental study that has explicitly tested energetic constraints on incubation-scheduling in a biparentally incubating species (Cresswell et al. 2003). In this experiment, the energetic demands of incubation were decreased for both parents by insulating the nest cup. We expected that the treated birds, in both experiments, would change the length of their incubation bouts, if biparental incubation-scheduling is energetically constrained. However, we found no evidence that heating or insulation of the nest affected the length of incubation bouts: the combined effect of both experiments was an increase in bout length of 3.6min (95% CI: -33 to 40), which is equivalent to a 0.5% increase in the length of the average incubation bout. These results demonstrate that the observed biparental incubation-scheduling in semipalmated sandpipers is not primarily driven by energetic constraints and therefore by the state of the incubating bird, implying that we still do not understand the factors driving biparental incubation-scheduling.

  16. 78 FR 54911 - Certain Thermal Support Devices for Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Thermal Support Devices for Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers and Components.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Thermal Support Devices for Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers and Components Thereof, DN 2976; the Commission is soliciting...

  17. Effect of short-term pre-hatch heat shock of incubating eggs on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of short-term pre-hatch heat shock of incubating eggs on subsequent. ... of thermal conditioning of broiler chickens during embryonic development on subsequent ... Keywords: Heat stress, incubation, parent age, live weight, mortality

  18. Mobi-incubation user experience for rural entrepreneurs in emerging economies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chelule, E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Business incubation has long been a successful economic development tool in developed and emerging economies. It helps entrepreneurs start businesses that remain sustainable. However, business incubation theory designed for developed countries...

  19. Sustaining Johannesburg’s fashion design incubators : the role of fashion design education

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Internationally, design incubators have emerged as a result of clustering. These design incubators serve as artist studios, or as design centers providing opportunities for young emerging entrepreneurs to acquire studio workspaces located within a cluster of similar economic activities. In South Africa, design incubators, particularly fashion design incubators, have emerged in the Johannesburg Fashion District, situated within the central business district of Johannesburg. Research conducted ...

  20. A study of knowledge supernetworks and network robustness in different business incubators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Wenqing; Zhao, Liming

    2016-04-01

    As the most important intangible resource of the new generation of business incubators, knowledge has been studied extensively, particularly with respect to how it spreads among incubating firms through knowledge networks. However, these homogeneous networks do not adequately describe the heterogeneity of incubating firms in different types of business incubators. To solve the problem of heterogeneity, the notion of a knowledge supernetwork has been used both to construct a knowledge interaction model among incubating firms and to distinguish social network relationships from knowledge network relationships. The process of knowledge interaction and network evolution can then be simulated with a few rules for incubating firms regarding knowledge innovation/absorption, social network connection, and entry and exit, among other aspects. Knowledge and networks have been used as performance indicators to evaluate the evolution of knowledge supernetworks. Moreover, we study the robustness of incubating firms' social networks by employing four types of attack strategies. Based on our simulation results, we conclude that there have been significant knowledge interaction and network evolution among incubating firms on a periodic basis and that both specialized and diversified business incubators have every advantage necessary in terms of both knowledge and networks to cultivate start-up companies. As far as network robustness is concerned, there is no obvious difference between the two types of business incubators with respect to the stability of their network structures, but specialized business incubators have stronger network communication abilities than diversified business incubators.

  1. The see-saw a vertical-lift incubator designed for channel catfish egg masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channel catfish egg masses are typically incubated in baskets that are suspended in water that is agitated with rotating or oscillating paddles. We designed and tested a new vertical-lift incubator (the “See-Saw”) to incubate channel catfish egg masses. Preliminary research in commercial hatcheries...

  2. Soil respiration is not limited by reductions in microbial biomass during long-term soil incubations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declining rates of soil respiration are reliably observed during long-term laboratory incubations, but the cause is uncertain. We explored different controls on soil respiration during long-term soil incubations. Following a 707 day incubation (30 C) of soils from cultivated and forested plots at Ke...

  3. Partly versus Completely out of Your Mind: Effects of Incubation and Distraction on Resolving Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Nicholas; Smith, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Incubation has long been proposed as a mechanism in creative problem solving (Wallas, 1926). A new trial-by-trial method for observing incubation effects was used to compare the forgetting fixation hypothesis with the conscious work hypothesis. Two experiments examined the effects of incubation on initially unsolved Remote Associates Test (RAT)…

  4. Unpainting the black box : exploring mechanisms and practices of start-up incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weele, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Although incubators have become one of the most prominent instruments to stimulate the emergence and growth of start-ups, questions are being raised about their effectiveness. One major obstacle to evaluate the effectiveness of incubators is that the incubator remains a ‘black box’: the extant liter

  5. Morphofunctional disturbances of human sperm after incubation with organophosphorate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, H R; Badilla, J; Bustos-Obregón, E

    1999-08-01

    The organophosphorate pesticides are highly toxic for insects and mammals, but their effects in the male reproductive tract are scarcely known. Many alterations induced by organophosphorate pesticides have been described, such as: cytogenetic alterations in germinal cells, oligozoospermia and teratozoospermia in the mouse. Parathion, the pesticide mostly utilized in Chilean agriculture, is rapidly metabolized to paraoxon, the active metabolite, in mammalian organisms. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Parathion and paraoxon on different morphological and functional parameters of the sperm. Human spermatozoa were incubated with Parathion and paraoxon at different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mM). Vitality (tripan blue and eosin tests), acrosome reaction (triple stain test), plasma membrane integrity (HOS-test), and chromatin stability (sodium thioglycolate test) were determined. The observations were done by optical microscopy at 1000x of magnification and three hundred sperms were evaluated for each treatment. The results indicated that Parathion and paraoxon increase the percent of sperm with acrosome reaction and also increase the percentage of sperm with chromatin decondensation in a dose-dependent manner. The vitality and plasma membrane integrity decrease significantly in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest a direct action of Parathion and paraoxon on the different parameters studied. The morphofunctionality of sperm is altered significatively, suggesting that Parathion and paraoxon, thanks to their alkylating and electrophylic properties, could act on DNA and proteins respectively, to elicit these changes.

  6. Business Incubation as an Instrument of Innovation: The Experience of South America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haven Allahar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the experience of business incubation as an innovative developmental instrument based on the recent experience of the South American countries of Brazil and Chile and the Caribbean island nation of Trinidad and Tobago. A qualitative research method was adopted involving a review of published reports, journal articles and relevant case studies; and face-to-face semi-structured interviews with incubator managerial staff. The major findings are that there are great similarities among the incubators studied in terms of their links to universities, services offered, and funding challenges, but there is growing acceptance of incubation as a potentially valid tool for promoting business development and innovation although most incubators are at the early stage. The paper is original because the case study application to incubation in Trinidad and Tobago is new with only one related article published, and this study therefore adds value to the body of research because business incubation has been under-researched in the study area. The research is limited to the extent that the case study focuses on a comparison of selected incubator features and did not include the views of clients. The practical implications of this study is that sponsors of incubators and managers need to obtain a deeper understanding of the incubation ecosystem especially with regard to innovation-based incubators, if successful innovative businesses are to emerge. The results of the study can also be generalized over the small island developing states of the Caribbean.

  7. Effects of incubation at various 'room' temperatures on the sensitivity and specificity of Microstix-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akriotis, V J; Arbus, G S

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of room temperature incubation of Microstix-3 specimens to detect urinary tract infection was studied. This procedure, if successful, would allow home monitoring of patients and eliminate the need for an incubator. Four Microstix-3 strips were dipped into each of 1,241 urine specimens and incubated at 18, 22, 27 or 37 degree C. Results after incubation for 24 h at 27 degree C and after 48 h at 22 degree C were comparable to those after incubation for 18-24 h at 37 degree C. However, even after 72 h, incubation at 18 degree C did not produce results comparable to those obtained at 37 degree C. It appears that the incubator can be successfully eliminated at the higher temperatures tested if the limits of time outlined are observed.

  8. Effects of environmental factors on incubation patterns of Greater Sage-Grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Delehanty, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Birds in which only one sex incubates the eggs are often faced with a direct conflict between foraging to meet metabolic needs and incubation. Knowledge of environmental and ecological factors that shape life-history strategies of incubation is limited. We used continuous videography to make precise measurements of female Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) incubation constancy (percentage of time spent at the nest in a 24-hour period) and recess duration. We used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate incubation patterns in relation to grouse age, timing of incubation, raven abundance, microhabitat, weather, and food availability. Overall, sage-grouse females showed an incubation constancy of 96% and a distinctive bimodal distribution of brief incubation recesses that peaked at sunset and 30 min prior to sunrise. Grouse typically returned to their nests during low light conditions. Incubation constancy of yearlings was lower than that of adults, particularly in the later stages of incubation. Yearlings spent more time away from nests later in the morning and earlier in the evening compared to adults. Video images revealed that nearly all predation events by Common Ravens (Corvus corax), the most frequently recorded predator at sage-grouse nests, took place during mornings and evenings after sunrise and before sunset, respectively. These were the times of the day when sage-grouse typically returned from incubation recesses. Recess duration was negatively related to raven abundance. We found evidence that incubation constancy increased with greater visual obstruction, usually from vegetation, of nests. An understanding of how incubation patterns relate to environmental factors will help managers make decisions aimed at increasing productivity through successful incubation.

  9. Biparental incubation patterns in a high-Arctic breeding shorebird: how do pairs divide their duties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Martin; Valcu, Mihai; Rutten, Anne L; Kempenaers, Bart

    2014-01-01

    In biparental species, parents may be in conflict over how much they invest into their offspring. To understand this conflict, parental care needs to be accurately measured, something rarely done. Here, we quantitatively describe the outcome of parental conflict in terms of quality, amount, and timing of incubation throughout the 21-day incubation period in a population of semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) breeding under continuous daylight in the high Arctic. Incubation quality, measured by egg temperature and incubation constancy, showed no marked difference between the sexes. The amount of incubation, measured as length of incubation bouts, was on average 51min longer per bout for females (11.5h) than for males (10.7h), at first glance suggesting that females invested more than males. However, this difference may have been offset by sex differences in the timing of incubation; females were more often off nest during the warmer period of the day, when foraging conditions were presumably better. Overall, the daily timing of incubation shifted over the incubation period (e.g., for female incubation from evening-night to night-morning) and over the season, but varied considerably among pairs. At one extreme, pairs shared the amount of incubation equally, but one parent always incubated during the colder part of the day; at the other extreme, pairs shifted the start of incubation bouts between days so that each parent experienced similar conditions across the incubation period. Our results highlight how the simultaneous consideration of different aspects of care across time allows sex-specific investment to be more accurately quantified.

  10. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators.

  11. Characterizing the nutritional strategy of incubating king eiders Somateria spectabilis in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, R.L.; Powell, A.N.; Williams, T.D.; Kitaysky, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    We measured plasma concentrations of variables associated with lipid metabolism (free fatty acids, glycerol, triglyceride, and ??- hydroxybutyrate), protein metabolism (uric acid), and baseline corticosterone to characterize the nutritional state of incubating king eiders Somateria spectabilis and relate this to incubation constancy at two sites, Kuparuk and Teshekpuk, in northern Alaska. King eiders at both sites appeared to employ a partial-income incubation strategy, relying on both endogenous and exogenous energy resources. Females maintained high invariant levels of free fatty acids, ??-hydroxybutyrate, and glycerol throughout incubation, indicating that fat reserves were a major energy source, and not completely depleted during incubation. Similarly, uric acid did not increase, suggesting effective protein sparing or protein ingestion and adequate lipid reserves throughout incubation. Baseline corticosterone and triglyceride levels increased during incubation, indicative of an increase in foraging during late stages of incubation. Incubating females at Kuparuk had higher triglyceride concentrations but also had higher ??-hydroxybutyrate concentrations than females at Teshekpuk. This dichotomy may reflect a short-term signal of feeding overlaying the longer-term signal of reliance on endogenous lipid reserves due to higher food intake yet higher metabolic costs at Kuparuk because of its colder environment. Incubation constancy was not correlated with plasma concentrations of lipid or protein metabolites. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  12. Incubation temperature influences locomotor performance in young wood ducks (Aix sponsa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Brittney Cole; Durant, Sarah Elizabeth; Hepp, Gary Richard; Hopkins, William Alexander

    2011-06-01

    Incubation temperature is an important maternal effect in birds that can influence numerous offspring traits. For example, ducklings from eggs incubated at lower temperatures have lower growth rates, protein content, and are in poorer body condition than ducklings from eggs incubated at higher temperatures. Based on these observations, we predicted that incubation temperature would indirectly influence performance through its direct effects on body size. Wood duck (Aix sponsa) eggs were incubated at three ecologically relevant temperatures (35, 35.9, 37°C). After hatching, all ducklings were housed under identical conditions and were subjected to aquatic and terrestrial racing trials at 15 and 20 days posthatch (dph). Contrary to our prediction, incubation temperature did not influence most duckling body size parameters at 15 or 20 dph. However, incubation temperature did have a strong influence on locomotor performance independent of body size and body condition. Ducklings hatched from eggs incubated at the lowest temperature had significantly reduced maximum aquatic swim velocity than ducklings from higher temperatures. Maximum terrestrial sprint velocity followed a similar pattern, but did not differ statistically among incubation treatments. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that slight changes in incubation temperature can directly affect locomotor performance in avian offspring and thus provide a significant source of phenotypic variation in natural wood duck populations.

  13. Incubation temperature effects on hatchling performance in the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Fisher

    Full Text Available Incubation temperature has significant developmental effects on oviparous animals, including affecting sexual differentiation for several species. Incubation temperature also affects traits that can influence survival, a theory that is verified in this study for the Northwest Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta. We conducted controlled laboratory incubations and experiments to test for an effect of incubation temperature on performance of loggerhead hatchlings. Sixty-eight hatchlings were tested in 2011, and 31 in 2012, produced from eggs incubated at 11 different constant temperatures ranging from 27°C to 33°C. Following their emergence from the eggs, we tested righting response, crawling speed, and conducted a 24-hour long swim test. The results support previous studies on sea turtle hatchlings, with an effect of incubation temperature seen on survivorship, righting response time, crawling speed, change in crawl speed, and overall swim activity, and with hatchlings incubated at 27°C showing decreased locomotor abilities. No hatchlings survived to be tested in both years when incubated at 32°C and above. Differences in survivorship of hatchlings incubated at high temperatures are important in light of projected higher sand temperatures due to climate change, and could indicate increased mortality from incubation temperature effects.

  14. Anoxic incubation of sediment in gas-tight plastic bags: a method for biogeochemical process studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, JW; Thamdrup, B.; Jørgensen, BB

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of sediment in gas-tight plastic bags is described as a method for experimental studies of biogeochemical processes. Sediment incubation in these bags allows time-course experiments to be conducted on homogenised sediment without dilution, continuous stirring, or gaseous head......-space. Consequently, bag incubations of sediment combine the advantage of low heterogeneity in slurry incubations with the more natural conditions in jar and whole-core incubations. The bag material is a transparent laminated plastic comprised of Nylon, ethylenevinyl alcohol, and polyethylene with a low permeability...... for the studied gases: O-2, CO2, H2S, CH4, N-2, H-2, and He. Estimated fluxes of biologically active gases through the plastic bag during sediment incubation were insignificant compared to rates of microbial processes and to gas concentrations in coastal sediments. An exception was CH4, for which process...

  15. The Incubator Concept as an Entry Mode option for SME’s

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Marie Dyhr Ulrich; Svend Hollensen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the relevance of an alternative entry mode, the incubator concept. Such an alternative entry mode like the so-called incubator is increasingly being used as a shortcut or bridge to a distant market. In-depth qualitative research on a selected case (Kelsen Group selling butter cookies to India) reveals the reasoning behind the entry mode choice of a company entering an emergent market (India). The incubator option provides the opportunity for a company...

  16. Survival and Growth of American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) hatchlings after artificial incubation and repatriation

    OpenAIRE

    Temsiripong, Yosapong; Woodward, Allan R.; Ross, J. Perran; Kubilis, Paul S.; Percival, H. Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Hatchling American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) produced from artificially incubated wild eggs were returned to their natal areas (repatriated). We compared artificially incubated and repatriated hatchlings released within and outside the maternal alligator’s home range with naturally incubated hatchlings captured and released within the maternal alligator’s home range on Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Orange Lake in Florida. We used probability of recapture and total l...

  17. Incubation of Methamphetamine and Palatable Food Craving after Punishment-Induced Abstinence

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnova, Irina N.; Marchant, Nathan J.; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T.; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Shaham, Yavin; Cadet, Jean L.

    2014-01-01

    In a rat model of drug craving and relapse, cue-induced drug seeking progressively increases after withdrawal from methamphetamine and other drugs, a phenomenon termed ‘incubation of drug craving'. However, current experimental procedures used to study incubation of drug craving do not incorporate negative consequences of drug use, which is a common factor promoting abstinence in humans. Here, we studied whether incubation of methamphetamine craving is observed after suppression of drug seeki...

  18. Non-instrumented incubation of a recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of proviral HIV-1 DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Lillis

    Full Text Available Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs. However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS, diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25-43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100% HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100% reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose

  19. Small business incubators: An emerging phenomenon in South Africa’s SMME economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukovhe Masutha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa much policy attention is focused on the potential of the small, medium and micro-enterprise (SMME economy for job creation. Nevertheless, despite government support for the SMME economy, high mortality rates are experienced by start-up enterprises. In common with international experience South Africa has adopted business incubation as a strategic tool for assisting the survival as well as building the competitiveness of SMMEs. This article analyses the state of business incubation in South Africa drawing attention to marked differences between the groups of public sector business incubators as opposed to those business incubators which have been initiated by the private sector.

  20. Noise at the neonatal intensive care unit and inside the incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Eliana Moreira; Guinsburg, Ruth; Nabuco, Marco Antonio de Araujo; Kakehashi, Tereza Yoshiko

    2011-01-01

    The goal was to identify sound pressure level (SPL) at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and inside the incubator of a teaching hospital of a public university from São Paulo - SP, Brazil. SPL inside the NICU and the incubator were measured using four dosimeters in January/2010. SPL at the NICU varied from 52.6 dBA to 80.4 dBA and inside the incubator, from 45.4 dBA to 79.1 dBA. SPL both at the NICU and inside the incubator are above the recommended values, but levels were higher at the NICU than inside the incubator. Although there are some specific factors related to SPL inside the incubator, the NICU and incubator acoustic features present a system: an increase/decrease in SPL at the NICU usually tends to increase/decrease SPL inside the incubator. The study points to the need for simultaneous monitoring of SPL at the NICU and inside the incubator.

  1. Knowledge service decision making in business incubators based on the supernetwork model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liming; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Wenqing

    2017-08-01

    As valuable resources for incubating firms, knowledge resources have received gradually increasing attention from all types of business incubators, and business incubators use a variety of knowledge services to stimulate rapid growth in incubating firms. Based on previous research, we generalize the knowledge transfer and knowledge networking services of two main forms of knowledge services and further divide knowledge transfer services into knowledge depth services and knowledge breadth services. Then, we construct the business incubators' knowledge supernetwork model, describe the evolution mechanism among heterogeneous agents and utilize a simulation to explore the performance variance of different business incubators' knowledge services. The simulation results show that knowledge stock increases faster when business incubators are able to provide knowledge services to more incubating firms and that the degree of discrepancy in the knowledge stock increases during the process of knowledge growth. Further, knowledge transfer services lead to greater differences in the knowledge structure, while knowledge networking services lead to smaller differences. Regarding the two types of knowledge transfer services, knowledge depth services are more conducive to knowledge growth than knowledge breadth services, but knowledge depth services lead to greater gaps in knowledge stocks and greater differences in knowledge structures. Overall, it is optimal for business incubators to select a single knowledge service or portfolio strategy based on the amount of time and energy expended on the two types of knowledge services.

  2. SOCIAL ECONOMY INCUBATORS IN SFÂNTU GHEORGHE (CV, BACĂU AND CRAIOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polixenia Calagi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the strategy that served as the foundation of Social Economy Incubators within the ”Social Economy Model in Romania” project, in three development regions of the country. The article presents the role and the functioning mechanism of the Social Economy incubators and also the activity carried out by the staff employed by these three Social Economy Incubators. The three Social Economy incubators were set up in partnership with the Public Local Authorities from Sfântu Gheorghe (Center Development Region, Bacău (North-East Development Region and Craiova (South-West Oltenia Development Region.

  3. Impact of incubator type on the yield of in vitro produced bovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, B; Greve, T

    1992-01-01

    Because of suboptimal in vitro production of bovine blastocysts a new incubator model (Mini) was tested against the traditional (Heraeus). The difference between their properties seemed only to be the volume of the incubator space. No difference was noted between the CO2 or the temperature, but the data clearly showed a highly significant increase of the blastocyst rates, 6% versus 51% in the Heraeus and the Mini incubator, respectively, calculated as blastocysts per cleaved embryos. It was concluded that the incubator type or model may be a very important part of the in vitro production of bovine embryos, although we were not able to pin point specific causes for this difference.

  4. Recent updates on incubation of drug craving: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Caprioli, Daniele; Marchant, Nathan J

    2015-09-01

    Cue-induced drug craving progressively increases after prolonged withdrawal from drug self-administration in laboratory animals, a behavioral phenomenon termed 'incubation of drug craving.' Studies over the years have revealed several important neural mechanisms contributing to incubation of drug craving. In this mini-review, we first discuss three excellent Addiction Biology publications on incubation of drug craving in both human and laboratory animals. We then review several key publications from the past year on behavioral and mechanistic findings related to incubation of drug craving. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. [Effects of incubation temperature and substrate humidity on embryonic development of Mauremys mutica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Hong; Zhu, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Wei, Cheng-Qing; Chen, Yong-Le

    2010-01-01

    Yellow pond turtle (Mauremys mutica) eggs were incubated in vermiculite under nine combinations of temperature and humidity, i. e., 25 degrees C and -12 kPa, 29 degrees C and -12 kPa, 33 degrees C and -12 kPa, 25 degrees C and -150 kPa, 29 degrees C and -150 kPa, 33 degrees C and -150 kPa, 25 degrees C and -300 kPa, 29 degrees C and -300 kPa, and 33 degrees C and -300 kPa, aimed to study the effects of incubation temperature and its interaction with substrate humidity on the embryonic development of M. mutica. The initial egg mass, incubation temperature, substrate humidity, and the interaction of incubation temperature and substrate humidity had significant effects on the mass increment of egg in the course of hatching. At the same temperature, eggs incubated in wetter substrates (-12 kPa) gained more mass than those incubated in drier substrates (-150 kPa and -300 kPa). Incubation temperature affected hatching period significantly, while substrate humidity and its interaction with temperature did not. Both incubation temperature and substrate humidity affected hatching success and shell crack rate significantly. Abnormal hatchlings were found when incubated at 25 degrees C and 33 degrees C, but not at 29 degrees C. Incubation temperature had significant effects on the hatchling mass, carapace length and width, plastron length and width, body height, and tail length; while substrate humidity only affected hatchlings plastron length. The interaction of incubation temperature and substrate humidity did not affect the morphology of hatchlings.

  6. A meta-analysis of experiments linking incubation conditions with subsequent leg weakness in broiler chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Groves

    Full Text Available A series of incubation and broiler growth studies were conducted using one strain of broiler chicken (fast feathering dam line observing incubation effects on femoral bone ash % at hatch and the ability of the bird to remain standing at 6 weeks of age (Latency-To-Lie. Egg shell temperatures during incubation were consistently recorded. Parsimonious models were developed across eight studies using stepwise multiple linear regression of egg shell temperatures over 3-day periods and both bone ash at hatch and Latency-To-Lie. A model for bone ash at hatch explained 70% of the variation in this factor and revealed an association with lower egg shell temperatures during days 4-6 and 13-15 and higher egg shell temperatures during days 16-18 of incubation. Bone ash at hatch and subsequent Latency-To-Lie were positively correlated (r = 0.57, P<0.05. A model described 66% of the variation Latency-To-Lie showing significant association of the interaction of femoral ash at hatch and lower average egg shell temperatures over the first 15 days of incubation. Lower egg shell temperature in the early to mid incubation process (days 1-15 and higher egg shell temperatures at a later stage (days 16-18 will both tend to delay the hatch time of incubating eggs. Incubation profiles that resulted in later hatching chicks produced birds which could remain standing for a longer time at 6 weeks of age. This supports a contention that the effects of incubation observed in many studies may in fact relate more to earlier hatching and longer sojourn of the hatched chick in the final stage incubator. The implication of these outcomes are that the optimum egg shell temperature during incubation for broiler leg strength development may be lower than that regarded as ideal (37.8°C for maximum hatchability and chick growth.

  7. A meta-analysis of experiments linking incubation conditions with subsequent leg weakness in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Peter J; Muir, Wendy I

    2014-01-01

    A series of incubation and broiler growth studies were conducted using one strain of broiler chicken (fast feathering dam line) observing incubation effects on femoral bone ash % at hatch and the ability of the bird to remain standing at 6 weeks of age (Latency-To-Lie). Egg shell temperatures during incubation were consistently recorded. Parsimonious models were developed across eight studies using stepwise multiple linear regression of egg shell temperatures over 3-day periods and both bone ash at hatch and Latency-To-Lie. A model for bone ash at hatch explained 70% of the variation in this factor and revealed an association with lower egg shell temperatures during days 4-6 and 13-15 and higher egg shell temperatures during days 16-18 of incubation. Bone ash at hatch and subsequent Latency-To-Lie were positively correlated (r = 0.57, Pmodel described 66% of the variation Latency-To-Lie showing significant association of the interaction of femoral ash at hatch and lower average egg shell temperatures over the first 15 days of incubation. Lower egg shell temperature in the early to mid incubation process (days 1-15) and higher egg shell temperatures at a later stage (days 16-18) will both tend to delay the hatch time of incubating eggs. Incubation profiles that resulted in later hatching chicks produced birds which could remain standing for a longer time at 6 weeks of age. This supports a contention that the effects of incubation observed in many studies may in fact relate more to earlier hatching and longer sojourn of the hatched chick in the final stage incubator. The implication of these outcomes are that the optimum egg shell temperature during incubation for broiler leg strength development may be lower than that regarded as ideal (37.8°C) for maximum hatchability and chick growth.

  8. Evaluation of a soil incubation method to characterize nitrogen release patterns of slow- and controlled-release fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, L Carolina; Sartain, Jerry B; Obreza, Thomas A; Hall, William L; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release patterns of slow-release fertilizers (SRF) and controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers, and are product-specific, based on the regulation and analysis of each SRF and CRF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize SRF and CRF materials, no standardized, validated method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased production and distribution of these materials in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify product claims and material performance. A soil incubation column leaching procedure was evaluated to determine its suitability as a standard method to estimate nitrogen (N) release patterns of SRFs and CRFs during 180 days. The influence of three soil/sand ratios, three incubation temperatures, and four soils on method behavior was assessed using five SRFs and three CRFs. In general, the highest soil/sand ratio increased the N release rate of all materials, but this effect was more marked for the SRFs. Temperature had the greatest influence on N release rates. For CRFs, the initial N release rates and the percentage N released/day increased as temperature increased. For SRFs, raising the temperature from 25 to 35 degreesC increased initial N release rate and the total cumulative N released, and almost doubled the percentage released/day. The percentage N released/day from all products generally increased as the texture of the soil changed from sandy to loamy (lowa>California>Pennsylvania>Florida). The soil incubation technique was demonstrated to be robust and reliable for characterizing N release patterns from SRFs and CRFs. The method was reproducible, and variations in soil/sand ratio, temperature, and soil had little effect on the results.

  9. Who's Got the Bridge? - Towards Safe, Robust Autonomous Operations at NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B. Danette; Cross, Charles D.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc; Trujillo, Anna C.; Crisp, Vicki K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA aeronautics research has made decades of contributions to aviation. Both aircraft and air traffic management (ATM) systems in use today contain NASA-developed and NASA sponsored technologies that improve safety and efficiency. Recent innovations in robotics and autonomy for automobiles and unmanned systems point to a future with increased personal mobility and access to transportation, including aviation. Automation and autonomous operations will transform the way we move people and goods. Achieving this mobility will require safe, robust, reliable operations for both the vehicle and the airspace and challenges to this inevitable future are being addressed now in government labs, universities, and industry. These challenges are the focus of NASA Langley Research Center's Autonomy Incubator whose R&D portfolio includes mission planning, trajectory and path planning, object detection and avoidance, object classification, sensor fusion, controls, machine learning, computer vision, human-machine teaming, geo-containment, open architecture design and development, as well as the test and evaluation environment that will be critical to prove system reliability and support certification. Safe autonomous operations will be enabled via onboard sensing and perception systems in both data-rich and data-deprived environments. Applied autonomy will enable safety, efficiency and unprecedented mobility as people and goods take to the skies tomorrow just as we do on the road today.

  10. Comparison of five incubation systems for rat liver slices using functional and viability parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olinga, P; Groen, K; Hof, IH; DeKanter, R; Leeman, WR; Rutten, AAJJL; VanTwillert, K; Groothuis, GMM; Koster, H

    1997-01-01

    Precision-cut liver slices are presently used for various research objects, e.g. to study metabolism, transport, and toxicity of xenobiotics. Various incubation systems are presently employed, but a systematic comparison between these incubation systems with respect to preservation of slice function

  11. Avian incubation inhibits growth and diversification of bacterial assemblages on eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawkey, Matthew D; Firestone, Mary K; Brodie, Eoin L; Beissinger, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria.

  12. Are they really helping? : an assessment of evolving business incubators'value proposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruneel, Johan; Ratinho, Tiago; Clarysse, Bart; Groen, Arend J.

    2010-01-01

    Most studies about business incubation describe an array of available services but often fail to present the tenants’ assessment quality. We set out to investigate if business incubators differ in terms of their value proposition. To do so, we identify three distinct generations of business

  13. Microbial infection affects egg viability and incubation behavior in a tropical passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark I. Cook; Steven R. Beissinger; Gary A. Toranzos; Roberto A. Arendt Rodriguez

    2004-01-01

    Many avian species initiate incubation before clutch completion, which causes eggs to hatch asynchronously. This influences brood competitive dynamics and often results in nestling mortality. The prevailing hypotheses contend that parents incubate early because asynchronous hatching provides fitness benefits to parents or surviving offspring. An alternative idea is...

  14. Avian incubation inhibits growth and diversification of bacterial assemblages on eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Shawkey

    Full Text Available Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria.

  15. Comparison of five incubation systems for rat liver slices using functional and viability parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olinga, P; Groen, K; Hof, IH; DeKanter, R; Leeman, WR; Rutten, AAJJL; VanTwillert, K; Groothuis, GMM; Koster, H

    1997-01-01

    Precision-cut liver slices are presently used for various research objects, e.g. to study metabolism, transport, and toxicity of xenobiotics. Various incubation systems are presently employed, but a systematic comparison between these incubation systems with respect to preservation of slice function

  16. Incubation in the Starling, Sturnus vulgaris : Resolution of the Conflict between Egg Care and Foraging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, R.H.; Tinbergen, J.M.; Biebach, H.

    1985-01-01

    Complementary studies on Starlings nesting on the Frisian island Schiermonnikoog included estimation of total energy expenditure of the parent birds, evaluation of the cost of incubation, experiments on the effect of manipulated nest temperature on incubation rhythm, and observation of prey intake r

  17. Automatic Incubator-type Temperature Control System for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaohua, Lu; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    An automatic air-cooling incubator is proposed to replace the manual water-cooling blanket to control the brain tissue temperature for brain hypothermia treatment. Its feasibility is theoretically discussed as follows: First, an adult patient with the cooling incubator is modeled as a linear dynamical patient-incubator biothermal system. The patient is represented by an 18-compartment structure and described by its state equations. The air-cooling incubator provides almost same cooling effect as the water-cooling blanket, if a light breeze of speed around 3 m/s is circulated in the incubator. Then, in order to control the brain temperature automatically, an adaptive-optimal control algorithm is adopted, while the patient-blanket therapeutic system is considered as a reference model. Finally, the brain temperature of the patient-incubator biothermal system is controlled to follow up the given reference temperature course, in which an adaptive algorithm is confirmed useful for unknown environmental change and/or metabolic rate change of the patient in the incubating system. Thus, the present work ensures the development of the automatic air-cooling incubator for a better temperature regulation of the brain hypothermia treatment in ICU.

  18. Hydrogel-based microfluidic incubator for microorganism cultivation and analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchberger-Enengl, Dietmar; van den Driesche, Sander; Krutzler, Christian; Keplinger, Franz; Vellekoop, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an array of microfluidic chambers for on-chip culturing of microorganisms in static and continuous shear-free operation modes. The unique design comprises an in-situ polymerized hydrogel that forms gas and reagent permeable culture wells in a glass chip. Utilizing a hydrophilic substrate increases usability by autonomous capillary priming. The thin gel barrier enables efficient oxygen supply and facilitates on-chip analysis by chemical access through the gel without introducing a disturbing flow to the culture. Trapping the suspended microorganisms inside a gel well allows for a much simpler fabrication than in conventional trapping devices as the minimal feature size does not depend on cell size. Nutrients and drugs are provided on-chip in the gel for a self-contained and user-friendly handling. Rapid antibiotic testing in static cultures with strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli is presented. Cell seeding and diffusive medium supply is provided by phaseguide technology, enabling simple operation of continuous culturing with a great flexibility. Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are utilized as a model to demonstrate continuous on-chip culturing.

  19. Assessment and Certification of Neonatal Incubator Sensors through an Inferential Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Medeiros de Araújo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurement and diagnostic systems based on electronic sensors have been increasingly essential in the standardization of hospital equipment. The technical standard IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission 60601-2-19 establishes requirements for neonatal incubators and specifies the calibration procedure and validation tests for such devices using sensors systems. This paper proposes a new procedure based on an inferential neural network to evaluate and calibrate a neonatal incubator. The proposal presents significant advantages over the standard calibration process, i.e., the number of sensors is drastically reduced, and it runs with the incubator under operation. Since the sensors used in the new calibration process are already installed in the commercial incubator, no additional hardware is necessary; and the calibration necessity can be diagnosed in real time without the presence of technical professionals in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Experimental tests involving the aforementioned calibration system are carried out in a commercial incubator in order to validate the proposal.

  20. Comparison of medium, temperature, and length of incubation for detection of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang D Hua; Evans, Kaye D; Goh, Rosalinda A; Tan, Grace L; Peterson, Ellena M

    2012-07-01

    Campylobacter (Campy; BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD), Spectra VRE (Remel, Lenexa, KS), and bile-esculin-azide-vancomycin (BEAV; Remel) agars were compared for their ability to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in 750 stool specimens. The media were compared at 24 h and 48 h of incubation at 35°C and 42°C. When incubated for 24 h at 35°C, Campy was the most sensitive (97.8%) and specific (99.9%) but was comparable to Spectra, which has a sensitivity of 95.6% and a specificity of 99.1%, whereas BEAV was significantly less sensitive (90%) and specific (96.1%). Incubation at 42°C or extended incubation at 35°C for 48 h yielded no advantage over incubation at 35°C for 24 h.

  1. Incubation stage and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener patterns in an altricial and precocial bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M; Custer, Thomas W; Thyen, Stefan; Becker, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    The composition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners was compared between non-incubated and embryonated eggs of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and little terns (Sterna albifrons) to determine if measurable changes in PCB congeners occurred during the embryonic period. There was no indication of changes in PCB congener patterns over the incubation period in tree swallows in 1999 and 2000 at a site with very high PCB exposure or a site with more modest PCB exposure. Additionally, congeners known to be either quickly metabolized or conserved based on experimental studies did not generally respond as predicted. Similarly, PCB congener patterns in eggs of little terns from Bottsand, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, did not differ between non-incubated and embryonated eggs. The results from both species suggest that the stage of incubation is not an important consideration when evaluating PCB congener patterns; comparisons and assessments can be made with eggs collected at all stages of incubation.

  2. Assessment and certification of neonatal incubator sensors through an inferential neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, José Medeiros; de Menezes, José Maria Pires; Moura de Albuquerque, Alberto Alexandre; da Mota Almeida, Otacílio; Ugulino de Araújo, Fábio Meneghetti

    2013-11-15

    Measurement and diagnostic systems based on electronic sensors have been increasingly essential in the standardization of hospital equipment. The technical standard IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) 60601-2-19 establishes requirements for neonatal incubators and specifies the calibration procedure and validation tests for such devices using sensors systems. This paper proposes a new procedure based on an inferential neural network to evaluate and calibrate a neonatal incubator. The proposal presents significant advantages over the standard calibration process, i.e., the number of sensors is drastically reduced, and it runs with the incubator under operation. Since the sensors used in the new calibration process are already installed in the commercial incubator, no additional hardware is necessary; and the calibration necessity can be diagnosed in real time without the presence of technical professionals in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Experimental tests involving the aforementioned calibration system are carried out in a commercial incubator in order to validate the proposal.

  3. Gas exchange and hatchability of chicken eggs incubated at simulated high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visschedijk, A H

    1985-02-01

    Chicken eggs laid at sea level were incubated at sea level (control conditions), at a simulated altitude of 5.5 km without any further measures (natural conditions), and at a simulated altitude of 5.7 km at optimal incubator gas composition (optimal conditions). Under optimal conditions the incubator relative humidity was 70% throughout incubation, the gas mixture supplied to the incubator contained 45% O2-55% N2, and the ventilation rate was reduced to 6% of control in order to maintain the normal air-space gas tensions and to compensate for the increased eggshell conductance at altitude. The embryos that developed under control conditions showed a normal CO2 production with 94% hatchability of fertile eggs. Under natural conditions at altitude all embryos died within a few days. Optimal conditions resulted in an almost normal gas exchange and in an improvement of hatchability from 0 to 81% of fertile eggs.

  4. The value of business incubation services for early stage start-ups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Brian; Tanev, Stoyan; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    that they could create value for the different stakeholders involved in their business ecosystem. The second issue is the need to categorize the various types of business incubators before examining the way they create value for early start-ups. In most national or regional entrepreneurial ecosystems...... there are different types of business incubators that do not necessarily offer the same types of services neither share a common vision about the way they should create value for their client companies. At the same time, early stage start-ups rely on the services provided by incubators and accelerators and need...... of the benefits from engaging in specific incubation programs. The objective of this paper is to investigate the value dimensions of specific types of business incubation services for early-stage start-ups in a way that may help such newly created firms to maximize the benefits from their participation...

  5. The effects of heterospecifics and climatic conditions on incubation behavior within a mixed-species colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Hothem, Roger L.; Howe, Kristy H.; Casazza, Michael L.; Eadie, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Parental incubation behavior largely influences nest survival, a critical demographic process in avian population dynamics, and behaviors vary across species with different life history breeding strategies. Although research has identified nest survival advantages of mixing colonies, behavioral mechanisms that might explain these effects is largely lacking. We examined parental incubation behavior using video-monitoring techniques on Alcatraz Island, California, of black-crowned night-heron Nycticorax nycticorax(hereinafter, night-heron) in a mixed-species colony with California gulls Larus californicus and western gulls L. occidentalis. We first quantified general nesting behaviors (i.e. incubation constancy, and nest attendance), and a suite of specific nesting behaviors (i.e. inactivity, vigilance, preening, and nest maintenance) with respect to six different daily time periods. We employed linear mixed effects models to investigate environmental and temporal factors as sources of variation in incubation constancy and nest attendance using 211 nest days across three nesting seasons (2010–2012). We found incubation constancy (percent of time on the eggs) and nest attendance (percent of time at the nest) were lower for nests that were located < 3 m from one or more gull nest, which indirectly supports the predator protection hypothesis, whereby heterospecifics provide protection allowing more time for foraging and other self-maintenance activities. To our knowledge, this is the first empirical evidence of the influence of one nesting species on the incubation behavior of another. We also identified distinct differences between incubation constancy and nest attentiveness, indicating that these biparental incubating species do not share similar energetic constraints as those that are observed for uniparental species. Additionally, we found that variation in incubation behavior was a function of temperature and precipitation, where the strength of these effects

  6. Factors affecting incubation patterns and sex roles of black oystercatchers in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Caleb S.; Haig, Susan M.; Goldstein, Michael I.; Huso, Manuela M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Studies examining the effects of human disturbance on avian parental behavior and reproductive success are fundamental to bird conservation. However, many such studies fail to also consider the influence of natural threats, a variable environment, and parental roles. Our work examines interactive relationships of cyclical (time of day, tide, temperature, seasonality) and stochastic (natural/human disturbance) processes with incubation patterns (attendance, bout lengths, recess rates) of the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani), a shorebird of conservation concern. We used 24-hour-per-day video monitoring of 13 molecularly-sexed breeding pairs to systematically examine incubation, revealing previously undocumented information that may inform conservation practices for the genus. Seven of 22 video-monitored nests failed, primarily from egg depredation by nocturnally-active mammals. Analyses of 3177 hrs of video footage indicated a near doubling of incubation bout lengths at night, corresponding to the increased risk of nighttime egg predation. Females had higher overall nest attendance (54% vs. 42%) and longer mean incubation bout lengths than males (88 min vs. 73 min). Uninterrupted incubation bouts were over twice as long as bouts interrupted by disturbance. Incubating males departed nests substantially more frequently due to nest-area disturbances than females in one, but not both, years of our study. Our findings suggest that sexes exhibit different, but complimentary, incubation patterns, facilitating efficient egg care in a dynamic environment with several nest threats. We emphasize the importance of considering natural influences when evaluating human threats to shorebird reproductive behavior and success.

  7. Predator-specific effects on incubation behaviour and offspring growth in great tits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Basso

    Full Text Available In birds, different types of predators may target adults or offspring differentially and at different times of the reproductive cycle. Hence they may also differentially influence incubation behaviour and thus embryonic development and offspring phenotype. This is poorly understood, and we therefore performed a study to assess the effects of the presence of either a nest predator or a predator targeting adults and offspring after fledging on female incubation behaviour in great tits (Parus major, and the subsequent effects on offspring morphological traits. We manipulated perceived predation risk during incubation using taxidermic models of two predators: the short-tailed weasel posing a risk to incubating females and nestlings, and the sparrowhawk posing a risk to adults and offspring after fledging. To disentangle treatment effects induced during incubation from potential carry-over effects of parental behaviour after hatching, we cross-fostered whole broods from manipulated nests with broods from unmanipulated nests. Both predator treatments lead to a reduced on- and off-bout frequency, to a slower decline in on-bout temperature as incubation advanced and showed a negative effect on nestling body mass gain. At the current state of knowledge on predator-induced variation in incubation patterns alternative hypotheses are feasible, and the findings of this study will be useful for guiding future research.

  8. Predator-specific effects on incubation behaviour and offspring growth in great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Alessandra; Richner, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    In birds, different types of predators may target adults or offspring differentially and at different times of the reproductive cycle. Hence they may also differentially influence incubation behaviour and thus embryonic development and offspring phenotype. This is poorly understood, and we therefore performed a study to assess the effects of the presence of either a nest predator or a predator targeting adults and offspring after fledging on female incubation behaviour in great tits (Parus major), and the subsequent effects on offspring morphological traits. We manipulated perceived predation risk during incubation using taxidermic models of two predators: the short-tailed weasel posing a risk to incubating females and nestlings, and the sparrowhawk posing a risk to adults and offspring after fledging. To disentangle treatment effects induced during incubation from potential carry-over effects of parental behaviour after hatching, we cross-fostered whole broods from manipulated nests with broods from unmanipulated nests. Both predator treatments lead to a reduced on- and off-bout frequency, to a slower decline in on-bout temperature as incubation advanced and showed a negative effect on nestling body mass gain. At the current state of knowledge on predator-induced variation in incubation patterns alternative hypotheses are feasible, and the findings of this study will be useful for guiding future research.

  9. A study of the effect of humidification on temperature of incubators in the nursery in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T; Hsieh, E; Hwang, B

    1989-07-01

    To test whether it is necessary to humidify incubators in Taiwan, over a one-year-period, 180 sets of simultaneous recordings including room temperature, room humidity, incubator temperature and incubator humidity were collected. Water was randomly added to half of the incubators. Cultures from those and swab cultures from the other half, or the dry humidifiers were presented simultaneously for examination. Results showed that incubator humidities were unaffected by seasonal changes, while room humidities did change with the seasons. Adding water to incubators could raise the humidity to a significantly higher level (mean +/- SD: 60.70 +/- 7.86%) than in those without water (mean +/- SD: 50.30 +/- 6.45% P less than 0.01). Bacterial growth rate of incubators with water was significantly higher (89.09%) than those without water (37.93%, p less than 0.01), but the organisms cultured could not be related to babids' illnesses on clinical and/or laboratory grounds.

  10. Early efforts in modeling the incubation period of infectious diseases with an acute course of illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incubation period of infectious diseases, the time from infection with a microorganism to onset of disease, is directly relevant to prevention and control. Since explicit models of the incubation period enhance our understanding of the spread of disease, previous classic studies were revisited, focusing on the modeling methods employed and paying particular attention to relatively unknown historical efforts. The earliest study on the incubation period of pandemic influenza was published in 1919, providing estimates of the incubation period of Spanish flu using the daily incidence on ships departing from several ports in Australia. Although the study explicitly dealt with an unknown time of exposure, the assumed periods of exposure, which had an equal probability of infection, were too long, and thus, likely resulted in slight underestimates of the incubation period. After the suggestion that the incubation period follows lognormal distribution, Japanese epidemiologists extended this assumption to estimates of the time of exposure during a point source outbreak. Although the reason why the incubation period of acute infectious diseases tends to reveal a right-skewed distribution has been explored several times, the validity of the lognormal assumption is yet to be fully clarified. At present, various different distributions are assumed, and the lack of validity in assuming lognormal distribution is particularly apparent in the case of slowly progressing diseases. The present paper indicates that (1 analysis using well-defined short periods of exposure with appropriate statistical methods is critical when the exact time of exposure is unknown, and (2 when assuming a specific distribution for the incubation period, comparisons using different distributions are needed in addition to estimations using different datasets, analyses of the determinants of incubation period, and an understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms.

  11. Effects of short gamete co-incubation in human in vitro fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Yong; Song Cheng; Zhang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally oocytes have been exposed to sperm overnight for 16-20 h.This long period of co-incubation,however,has been shown to create problems with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS),which may affect embryo viability and cause hardening of the zona pellucida.Recently,several positive and negative effects of reducing the co-incubation time to 90-120 min were reported.The objective of this review was to discuss whether short exposure of oocytes to sperm in vitro might affect the clinical results and several problems arose in short gamete co-incubation.

  12. Incubation time of heterogeneous growth of islands in the mode of incomplete condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    The incubation time necessary for the growth of surface islands on heterogeneous nucleation centers to begin has been theoretically analyzed depending on the material gas flow and surface temperature. It is shown that, under heterogeneous growth in the mode of incomplete condensation, the incubation time increases with temperature according to the Arrhenius law and is inversely proportional to the flow, irrespective of the mechanism of diffusion transport to islands. The results obtained have been qualitatively compared with the experimental data on the incubation time for three-dimensional GaN islands arising in the initial stage of self-induced growth of GaN nanowires.

  13. Direct Susceptibility testing of Urine samples after 6, 9 and 16 hours incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghatian, Khaled; Littauer, Pia; Llado, Minna Fyhn Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: At present, susceptibility testing of infective bacteria from urine samples, according to EUCAST, is interpretation of zones after 16 hours of incubation. Using a semi-automated sample processing, the Kiestra (BD) system, to incubate of the agar plates and digital image processing...... testing on urine samples. Methods: In total 675 consecutive urine samples from out-patients, were inoculated directly, according to our laboratory standard, as 10µL on each part of a bi-plate (oxoid chomogene agar and 5% horse blood-agar) and 10µL on a MH plate for resistance testing, using an Inoqula...... (Kiestra-BD). The plates were photographed at 6, 9 and 16 hours after incubation. As a gold standard, the susceptibility test was performed according to EUCAST, as a secondary susceptibility testing, for colonies identified on the biplates, and read after 16 hours incubation.The disks used (Oxoid, Termo...

  14. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation with human serum from oxidant-challenged individuals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Hoffer; T Machamid; A Tabak; Y Baum; A Tamir; Y Lerman

    2003-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals. These two groups were further subdivided either according to age or to smoking habits. The experiments showed that stimulated superoxide production from PMN was inhibited ( < 0.05) by serum from young smokers as compared to that of young nonsmokers, both from the unexposed group. Incubation of PMN with serum from elderly nonsmoking individuals decreased superoxide production as compared to incubation with serum from young nonsmoking individuals, both from the unexposed group. A decrease in superoxide production by incubation with serum of welders as compared to that of unexposed individuals was significant only when the comparison was carried out between the young, non-smoking subgroups. These findings suggest that age, smoking, and exposure to oxidants induce appearance in serum of factors that affect the PMN function.

  15. The design of multi temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junyu; Xu, Peng; Peng, Zitao; Qiang, Haonan; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is only one monitor of the temperature and humidity in an incubator, which may cause inaccurate or unreliable data, and even endanger the life safety of the baby. In order to solve this problem,we designed a multi-point temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubators. The system uses the STC12C5A60S2 microcontrollers as the sender core chip which is connected to four AM2321 temperature and humidity sensors. We select STM32F103ZET6 core development board as the receiving end,cooperating with Zigbee wireless transmitting and receiving module to realize data acquisition and transmission. This design can realize remote real-time observation data on the computer by communicating with PC via Ethernet. Prototype tests show that the system can effectively collect and display the information of temperature and humidity of multiple incubators at the same time and there are four monitors in each incubator.

  16. Mobile Incubation in Waved Albatross (Phoebastria irrorata: Associated Hatching Failure and Artificial Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Awkerman

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Waved albatrosses often relocate their eggs during incubation by placing the egg between the tarsi and shuffling forward. This behavior frequently results in eggs becoming lodged between rocks, accounting for at least 10%, and perhaps as much as 80%, of breeding failures. Because albatross populations worldwide are currently threatened, artificial means of augmenting reproductive success may be necessary to mitigate losses caused by anthropogenic effects. We characterize the frequency and extent of egg movement; test several hypotheses related to microhabitat, timing, and incubation location to explain the behavior; and investigate the utility of repositioning lodged eggs in a location in which breeding birds might resume incubation. Egg rescue increased both the likelihood of continued incubation as well as the hatching rate in our experiment, and provides an efficient, low-cost management option for this species.

  17. Effects of caffeine supplementation in post-thaw human semen over different incubation periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariz, J R; Hallak, J

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of caffeine supplementation in post-cryopreservation human semen over different incubation periods. After collection by masturbation, 17 semen samples were analysed according to World Health Organization criteria, processed and cryopreserved with TEST-yolk buffer (1 : 1) in liquid nitrogen. After a thawing protocol, samples were incubated with 2 mm of caffeine for 0, 5, 15, 30 or 60 min, followed by analysis of motility and mitochondrial activity using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB). Mean variance analysis was performed, and P caffeine was associated with an increase in sperm motility, particularly 15-min incubation, suggesting that incubation with caffeine can be an important tool in patients with worsening seminal quality undergoing infertility treatment.

  18. Improving turkey poult quality by correcting incubator humidity to match eggshell conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, M; Ar, A

    1987-06-01

    One of the most important factors determining hatchability of avian eggs is their proper water budget during incubation. We show here that water budget changes of turkey eggs effect not only hatchability but also poult quality. In addition to an increase in hatchability of 3.3%, poult quality was increased by 7.3%. This was achieved by sorting eggs into low (less than 18.5), medium (18.5 to 22.0) and high (greater than 22.0) eggshell mass-specific water vapour, conductance categories and incubating them in matching incubation humidities of 21.8, 26.6 and 31.4 Torr, corresponding to relative humidities of 45, 55 and 65% at 37.5 degrees C, respectively. A total diffusive water loss of 11.5% (range 10 to 14%) of the initial egg mass in 25 d of incubation yielded maximal hatchability and poult quality.

  19. Effect of Eggshell Temperature During Incubation on Embryo Development, Hatchability, and Posthatch Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, A.; Brand, van den H.; Meijerhof, R.; Kemp, B.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of different eggshell temperature (EST) profiles during incubation on embryo mortality, hatchability, and embryo development. Furthermore, chicks from different EST profiles were reared under low and high housing temperatures to investigate subsequent

  20. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) embryonic development from 7 to 42 days of incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Z; Cloete, S W P; Malecki, I A; Brown, C R

    2017-04-01

    1. Hatching success of ostrich eggs is poor (50-60% of fertile eggs). The current study was designed to identify the timing of key stages in the development of the ostrich embryo. 2. Growth of both embryo and wing length during 42 d of incubation was comparable and approximately linear, with a more or less weekly doubling in size up to 35 d of incubation. 3. The embryo eye size increased more rapidly than beak length and reached a maximum of ~16.2 mm by 28 d of incubation, whereas beak length increased continuously until hatching at 42 d. 4. Linear regression equations were derived from morphometric measurements of embryos between 7 and 42 d. 5. Information stemming from these results can be used to estimate the age of dead-in-shell embryos in an attempt to identify timing of incubation problems that potentially result in low hatchability of fertile eggs.

  1. Challenges and opportunities of innovation and incubators as a tool for knowledge-based economy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Mubaraki, Hanadi Mubarak; Busler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ... worldwide.Discussed innovation and incubators as a powerful tool for knowledge-based economy from different perspectives using different criteria to measure the key performance indicators of best practices...

  2. Science incubators: synthesis centers and their role in the research ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Allen; Alberts, Susan; Cranston, Karen; Kingsolver, Joel; Lapp, Hilmar; McClain, Craig; Smith, Robin; Vision, Todd; Weintraub, Jory; Wiegmann, Brian

    2013-01-01

    How should funding agencies enable researchers to explore high-risk but potentially high-reward science? One model that appears to work is the NSF-funded synthesis center, an incubator for community-led, innovative science.

  3. The incubation of a social movement? Preterm babies, parent activists, and neonatal productions in the US context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landzelius, Kyra

    2006-02-01

    This article explores health-based activism on the part of the US 'parents of preemies' movement, a mutual-help network mobilized around babies born precariously early and acutely dependent upon life-support incubators. The movement articulates two meta-agendas for parental empowerment: (1) the quest to access/exercise greater participatory inclusivity vis-à-vis the preterm baby within the biomedical domain; and, (2) the quest to secure/command greater representational authority over the preterm baby within the public domain. Seen in terms of the erosion of the status quo, it can be argued that the movement's tangible and intangible aims to chip away at these traditions have been softly revolutionary: heralding new working partnerships between medical practitioners and patients' families; radical shifts in the technological consciousness and competences of preemie parents; and cyborg changes in conventional categories of the person. Yet, seen in terms of a normative order of things, it can be argued that the movement has largely and willingly been "co/operated": meaning that it has been "cooperative," but equally "co-opted" and "operated into" the disciplinary trajectory of neonatal medicine as well as the historical march of biopolitics with its governance of the collective body populous. From this critical perspective, the movement qua social movement thus itself might be considered incubated--cocooned, gestated, disciplined--and brought into existence by the very powers and hegemonic (patriarchal) machinery that viable resistance might struggle to govern instead of serve.

  4. Using Web2.0 Aspect fro Designing a New Business Incubation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Brojeni, Roozbeh Abbasi

    2008-01-01

    This thesis work has examined and analyzed a new operating model in business incubation era, based on utilizing the second generation of web. The main objective of this survey is developing a model of representing many of business incubation services, by enlarging the network relationships between entrepreneurs (including innovative start-up firms), in order to let them share their own experiences, business knowledge, and abilities, in a mass-collaborative networking system. Business incubati...

  5. Antipredator behaviour of hatchling snakes: effects of incubation temperature and simulated predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger

    1998-09-01

    All animals that are exposed to predators must distinguish dangerous from nondangerous threats and respond correctly. In reptiles, emerging hatchlings are vulnerable to a wide range of predators, particularly if they emerge during daylight. In these experiments I tested the response of pine snake, Pituophis melanoleucus, hatchlings incubated at 22-23, 27-28, or 32-33 degreesC to visual and vibratory stimuli to examine antipredator behaviour. Emerging hatchlings were exposed to one of five conditions: (1) hawk model, (2) white head model with no facial features, (3) white head model with black eyes, (4) a person, or (5) a vibration without a visual stimulus. I tested the null hypotheses of no differences in response as a function of predator type or incubation temperature. Emergence behaviour when undisturbed was affected by incubating temperature, and antipredatory behaviour was affected by both predator type and incubation temperature. Pine snake hatchlings responded more protectively (withdrawal into tunnels) than defensively (striking), responded with less intensity to a vibration compared with visual predator stimuli, and required longer to respond to a head model without eyes than to all other predator types. Given the relatively small size of hatchlings, it is adaptive for them to withdraw into the nest rather than attack a predator. Hatchlings from eggs that were incubated at medium temperatures required less time to emerge from their underground nests when undisturbed, and had stronger protective responses than snakes incubated at other temperatures. These results suggest that hatchlings incubated at medium temperatures are generally less vulnerable to predators than hatchlings incubated at higher or lower temperatures. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  6. A novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure in one hour by pressure incubation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Pradip Nahar ### Abstract In this protocol, we describe a unique ELISA method for the detection of an antigen or antibody, in which ELISA steps are carried out by pressure incubation instead of conventional thermal incubation. Pressure-mediated ELISA (PELISA), carried out in 1 h shows more than a 2-fold increase in absorbance value than the control experiment carried out at the same time and temperature without applying pressure. Estimation of analyte by the 1-h PELISA method...

  7. Dysfunction of Murine Dendritic Cells Induced by Incubation with Tumor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengguang Gao; Xin Hui; Xianghuo He; Dafang Wan; Jianren Gu

    2008-01-01

    In vivo studies showed that dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction occurred in tumor microcnvironment. As tumors were composed of many kinds of cells, the direct effects of tumor cells on immature DCs (imDCs) are needed for further studies in vitro. In the present study, bone marrow-derived imDCs were incubated with lymphoma, hepatoma and menaloma cells in vitro and surface molecules in imDCs were determined by flow cytometry. Then, imDCs incubated with tumor cells or control imDCs were further pulsed with tumor lysates and then incubated with splenocytes to perform mixed lymphocyte reaction. The DC-dependent tumor antigen-specific T cell proliferation,and IL-12 secretion were determined by flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively.Finally, the DC-dependent tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL was determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The results showed that tumor cell-DC incubation down-regulated the surface molecules in imDCs, such as CD80, CD54, CDllb, CD11a and MHC class Ⅱ molecules. The abilities of DC-dependent antigen-specific T cell proliferation and IL-12 secretion were also decreased by tumor cell incubation in vitro. Most importantly, the ability for antigenic-specific CTL priming of DCs was also decreased by incubation with tumor cells. In the present in vitro study demonstrated that the defective abilities of DCs induced by tumor cell co-incubation and the co-incubation system might be useful for future study of tumor-immune cells direct interaction and for drug screen of immune-modulation.

  8. Foot-mediated incubation: Nazca booby (Sula granti) feet as surrogate brood patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephanie M; Ashley-Ross, Miriam A; Anderson, David J

    2003-01-01

    Incubation in most avian species involves transferring heat from parent to egg through a highly vascularized brood patch. Some birds, however, do not develop a brood patch. Unusual among birds, these species hold their eggs under the webs of their feet, but the role of the feet in heat transfer is uncertain. Often the webs are positioned between the feathered abdomen and the egg during incubation, suggesting that either the abdomen, the feet, or both could transfer heat to the egg. We studied heat transfer from foot webs to eggs during incubation in Nazca boobies by spatially separating the feet from the abdomen using an oversized egg. We found that feet transfer heat to eggs independently of any heat that may be transferred from the abdomen. In addition, we found that incubating boobies had significantly greater vascularization in their foot webs, measured as a percentage of web area covered by vessels, than nonincubating boobies. We also found that males, whether incubating or nonincubating, had significantly less web vascularization than females. We concluded that vascularized Nazca booby feet function in the same way during incubation that vascularized brood patches do, acting as surrogate brood patches.

  9. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  10. Incubating rainbow trout in soft water increased their later sensitivity to cadmium and zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, Christopher A.; Hennessy, Daniel P.; Dillon, Frank S.

    2010-01-01

    Water hardness is well known to affect the toxicity of some metals; however, reports on the influence of hardness during incubation or acclimation on later toxicity to metals have been conflicting. We incubated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) near the confluence of two streams, one with soft water and one with very-soft water (average incubation hardnesses of about 21 and 11 mg/L as CaCO3, respectively). After developing to the swim-up stage, the fish were exposed for 96-h to a mixture of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in water with a hardness of 27 mg/L as CaCO3. The fish incubated in the higher hardness water were about two times more resistant than the fish incubated in the extremely soft water. This difference was similar or greater than the difference that would have been predicted by criteria hardness equations had the fish been tested in the different acclimation waters. We think it is plausible that the energy demands for fish to maintain homeostasis in the lower hardness water make the fish more sensitive to metals that inhibit ionoregulation such as Cd and Zn. We suggest that if important decisions were to be based upon test results, assumptions of adequate hardness acclimation should be carefully considered and short acclimation periods avoided. If practical, incubating rainbow trout in the control waters to be tested may reduce uncertainties in the possible influences of differing rearing water hardness on the test results.

  11. Composition and location of simulated lake-shore redds influence incubation success in kokanee, Oncorhynchus nerka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincel, M.J.; Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for improving spawning habitat for lakeshore spawning kokanee, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), were explored by quantifying incubation success of embryos exposed to three substrate treatments in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, USA. Substrate treatments included no modification that used existing gravels in the lake (EXISTING), a cleaned substrate treatment where existing gravels were sifted in the water column to remove silt (CLEANED) and the addition of new, silt-free gravel (ADDED). Incubation success was evaluated using Whitlock-Vibert incubation boxes buried within each substrate treatment that contained recently fertilised embryos. Upon retrieval, live and dead sac fry and eyed eggs were enumerated to determine incubation success (sac fry and eyed eggs ?? 100/number of fertilised embryos). Incubation success varied significantly among locations and redd treatments. In general, incubation success among ADDED redds (0.0-13.0%) was significantly lower than that for EXISTING (1.4-61.0%) and CLEANED (0.4-62.5%) redds. Adding new gravel to spawning areas changed the morphometry of the gravel-water interface and probably exposed embryos to disturbance from wave action and reduced embryo survival. Moreover, efforts to improve spawning habitat for lakeshore spawning kokanee should consider water depth and location (e.g. protected shorelines) as important variables. Adding clean gravel to existing spawning areas may provide little benefit if water depth or lake-bottom morphometry are altered. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. An application of computational fluid mechanics to the air flow in an infant incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Hanai, S; Horio, H; Hasegawa, T

    1992-01-01

    An application of the computational fluid mechanical method to the air flow in a two-dimensional model of an infant incubator was described. The air flow in a numerical model was simulated and the Navier-Stokes equations were directly solved using a finite-volume method incorporating a body-fitted coordinate system on a mini-supercomputer. The model was based on a real infant incubator, slightly simplified for the sake of computing speed, and included a model of a baby. The number of computation grids was 101 x 61 = 6161. The calculation was carried out under the condition of unsteady, starting airflow and the results were examined by the means of color graphics animation. There were several very large scale eddies in the incubator free space, and their global structure did not show strong changes once they were established. Although the global structure did not change, small scale eddies were shown to be produced around the air inlet and convected down through the free space of the incubator. From these results, we believe that assuming steady and uniform flow in the incubator may not always be relevant when considering heat loss of a baby in an incubator. The steady and uniform flow has been previously assumed either implicitly or explicitly by most of the authors.

  13. Arsenic fractionation and bioaccessibility in two alkaline Texas soils incubated with sodium arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rupali; Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2007-05-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in urban soils with prolonged arsenical pesticide application history have increased the risk associated with accidental hand-to-mouth soil ingestion by children. Earlier work by the authors suggested that the conservative statement of 100% As bioaccessibility in soils was not valid for a set of acidic soils incubated with sodium arsenate. In this study, two alkaline Texas soils incubated with a commonly used As pesticide (sodium arsenate) were evaluated for their potential in reducing soil As bioaccessibility. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of incubation time and As load on soil As fractionation and bioaccessibility. Soils were subjected to a sequential As fractionation scheme, and bioaccessible As was quantified using an in vitro stomach phase test. Results showed a reduction in the water-soluble As fraction with incubation time (after 4 months), which remained unchanged after 12 months. This reduction with time was accompanied by an increase in the NaOH- and H(2)SO(4)-extractable As fractions, suggesting As sorption by amorphous Fe/Al hydroxides and/or Ca/Mg compounds, respectively. Organic/sulfides-bound As increased with incubation time after 12 months but not after 4 months of incubation. The aging effect was also observed with the amount of bioaccessible As at all As loads, showing significant positive correlations with the water-extractable and exchangeable As fractions. Bioaccessible As concentrations even after 12 months of incubation were not significantly reduced, suggesting that natural attenuation might prove inadequate to control As bioaccessibility in these alkaline soils.

  14. Neutral temperature range in incubators: performance of equipment in current use and new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, J P; Bach, V; Farges, G

    1997-01-01

    Low-birth-weight neonates should be nursed at thermoneutrality inside incubators. Thermoneutrality control is essential to enhance body growth and to reduce neonatal illnesses and mortality. Guidelines have been published to provide the thermoneutral range, but the recommendations did not always take into account all ambient and physiological parameters influencing thermoneutrality. In most marketed incubators, the heat supply is controlled through convective air flow (closed incubators) or through radiant power density (radiant warmer beds). The heating unit (on/off cycling or adjustable proportional control) is activated by an error signal calculated from the difference between a controlled temperature and a reference value preset by the clinician. The controlled variable can be either the incubator air or the skin temperature of the anterior abdominal region of the neonate. The neonate's size, thermal properties of the mattress and of incubator walls, air temperature and humidity, air velocity, incubator wall temperatures all influence the heat exchanges between the neonate and the surroundings, and, consequently, modify the obtention of thermoneutrality. Moreover, studies of the physiological mechanisms by which the neonate regulates body heat storage suggest that metabolic rate, behavior, vigilance level, nursing care, and heater control processes should also be taken into account. Little attention has been paid to these factors, and incubator performances are often disappointing. This article reviews the different factors that modify thermoneutral condition. An attempt is made to suggest new ways to design equipment incorporating these factors in algorithms controlling heater processes in order to reach the optimal thermal environment in which the neonate should be nursed.

  15. Effects of eggshell cuticle removal and incubation humidity on embryonic development and hatchability of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, E D; Brake, J; Gildersleeve, R P

    1987-05-01

    The effects of eggshell cuticle removal and two levels of incubation humidity 28.3 C [50% relative humidity (RH)] and 30.0 C (55% RH) wetbulb temperature (WB) on embryonic mortality and hatchability were determined from broiler hatching eggs laid during 38, 42, 48, and 54 weeks of age. Variables measured were: egg weight loss during the first 17 days of incubation, hatch at Days 19.5 and 20.5 of incubation, hatch of fertile eggs, stage of embryonic mortality, and chick weight at 21.5 days of incubation. Day 0 to 17 percentage egg weight loss was increased when the incubation humidity was lowered and the loss was greater than that observed after cuticle removal. A greater percentage of chicks hatched on Day 19.5 at 28.3 C than at 30.0 C WB. The percentage hatch of 38-week fertile eggs was improved at the higher humidity; the higher humidity also decreased late dead and increased pipped embryonic mortalities. Cuticle removal decreased early dead and increased late dead mortality. At Week 38 cuticle removal and lower humidity resulted in a decrease in chick weight at 21.5 days of incubation. For Weeks 42, 48, and 54 combined, pipped mortality was increased by higher humidity and late dead mortality was increased by cuticle removal. Water loss from the egg was increased by cuticle removal or by lowering incubation humidity from 30.0 C to 28.3 C WB, or by both, but lowering humidity was more effective. Changes in humidity and cuticle removal may affect vital gas exchange to different degrees.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Comparison of the egg flotation and egg candling techniques for estimating incubation day of Canada Goose nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, M.E.; Andersen, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Both egg flotation and egg candling have been used to estimate incubation day (often termed nest age) in nesting birds, but little is known about the relative accuracy of these two techniques. We used both egg flotation and egg candling to estimate incubation day for Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) nesting near Cape Churchill, Manitoba, from 2000 to 2007. We modeled variation in the difference between estimates of incubation day using each technique as a function of true incubation day, as well as, variation in error rates with each technique as a function of the true incubation day. We also evaluated the effect of error in the estimated incubation day on estimates of daily survival rate (DSR) and nest success using simulations. The mean difference between concurrent estimates of incubation day based on egg flotation minus egg candling at the same nest was 0.85 ?? 0.06 (SE) days. The positive difference in favor of egg flotation and the magnitude of the difference in estimates of incubation day did not vary as a function of true incubation day. Overall, both egg flotation and egg candling overestimated incubation day early in incubation and underestimated incubation day later in incubation. The average difference between true hatch date and estimated hatch date did not differ from zero (days) for egg flotation, but egg candling overestimated true hatch date by about 1 d (true - estimated; days). Our simulations suggested that error associated with estimating the incubation day of nests and subsequently exposure days using either egg candling or egg flotation would have minimal effects on estimates of DSR and nest success. Although egg flotation was slightly less biased, both methods provided comparable and accurate estimates of incubation day and subsequent estimates of hatch date and nest success throughout the entire incubation period. ?? 2008 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  17. Time allocation between feeding and incubation in uniparental arctic-breeding shorebirds: energy reserves provide leeway in a tight schedule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulp, I.Y.M.; Schekkerman, H.

    2006-01-01

    Birds with uniparental incubation may face a time allocation problem between incubation and feeding. Eggs need regular warming to hatch successfully, but the parent must leave the nest to feed and safeguard its own survival. Time allocation during incubation is likely to depend on factors influencin

  18. Construction of Agricultural University Students’ Entrepreneurship Incubation Base – Taking Sichuan Agricultural University as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Yao; Jianping Xie; Linchun He

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, as an effective practice in university students’ entrepreneurship education, construction of university students’ entrepreneurship incubation base has been rapidly developed in different universities. This paper takes construction of the entrepreneurship incubation base in Sichuan Agricultural University as a case study, analyzes the current status of university students’ entrepreneurship incubation base and makes a discussion on establishment of management institution, f...

  19. Time allocation between feeding and incubation in uniparental arctic-breeding shorebirds: energy reserves provide leeway in a tight schedule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulp, I.Y.M.; Schekkerman, H.

    2006-01-01

    Birds with uniparental incubation may face a time allocation problem between incubation and feeding. Eggs need regular warming to hatch successfully, but the parent must leave the nest to feed and safeguard its own survival. Time allocation during incubation is likely to depend on factors

  20. Developing a Model for a "Ladder of Incubation" Linked to Higher and Further Education Institutions in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisey, Pam; Gornall, Lynne; Jones, Paul; Thomas, Brychan

    2005-01-01

    Business incubators play a critical role in economic regeneration through the development and support of new and sustainable enterprises. Many UK incubator projects are funded by the European Commission through the higher education sector. This study compares and contrasts six business incubation case studies and identifies significant criteria…

  1. Factors related to shell deaths during artificial incubation of ostrich eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Brand

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available he ostrich industry experiences a high rate of embryonic mortalities during artificial incubation of eggs. Embryonic deaths were studied from data recorded on 37 740 fertile eggs incubated artificially during the 1998-2005 breeding seasons. Roughly 10 000 eggs that sustained embryonic mortalities were classified according to the stage and nature of death, i.e. before 21 days of incubation, after 21 days of incubation, deaths after pipping and rotten eggs. Although infection may have played a role in ~1300 rotten eggs, no detailed knowledge of the pathogens involved was available. The remainder of deaths could not be related to pathogens and the deaths were thus generally referred to as non-infectious. The overall level of embryonic mortality in all the eggs studied was 28.5 %. Overall embryonic mortality was affected by incubator, with higher levels (57.0 % found in eggs incubated in an African Incubator(R and also in eggs that were transferred between incubators during incubation (38.1 %. Overall embryonic mortality also increased in eggs produced by older females. Eggs produced in the autumn had the highest level of embryonic mortality at 53.6 %, whereas eggs produced in the winter had a marginally higher level of embryonic mortalities of 29.2 % compared with eggs produced during summer (27.4 %. Eggs produced by South African (SA Black males crossed to Zimbabwean Blue females had high levels of embryonic losses of 45.7 %. The embryonic mortality of eggs produced by SA Blacks or Zimbabwean Blue breeding birds subjected to pure breeding was similar at ~33-34 %, but embryonic mortality was improved in eggs produced by Zimbabwean Blue males crossed to SA Black females (27 %. Embryonic mortality was increased in eggs that were set directly (32.0 % or subjected to longer than 6 days of storage (43.5 %. Embryonic mortality was affected by year. The results that were obtained will assist in determining non-infectious factors that have a negative

  2. Effect of incubation humidity and flock age on hatchability traits and posthatch growth in Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hanoun, A M; Rizk, R E; Shahein, E H A; Hassan, N S; Brake, J

    2012-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of incubation relative humidity (RH) from 14 to 24 d of incubation during 3 parental ages on hatchability and posthatching growth of Pekin ducklings. Egg production was divided into 3 age groups (25-35, 36-55, and 56-65 wk). A total of 21,600 hatching eggs was subjected to 55, 60, 65, and 70% RH from 14 to 24 d, whereas standard conditions were used from 0 to 14 d and 24 to 28 d of incubation. All eggs were individually weighed before setting in the incubator and again at 14 and 24 d of incubation to determine egg weight loss. A sample of 20 eggs from unhatched and hatched eggs from each group were randomly taken on the hatching day and used to determine eggshell thickness and pore number. Duckling weight at hatching was recorded and BW gain, feed consumption, feed conversion, and viability were then recorded to 21 d of age. Egg weight increased with hen age but did not differ by incubation treatment. Increasing RH from 55% to 60, 65, and 70% decreased percentage egg weight loss in a stepwise manner irrespective of parental age. Shell thickness was less for hatched eggs compared with nonhatched eggs within each parental age. Shell thickness decreased while pore density increased with increased parental age for both nonhatched and hatched eggs. The lowest embryonic mortality among the incubation periods (14-24 and 0-24 d) and best hatchability of fertile eggs was recorded with 60% RH during the first parental age (25-35 wk), 65% RH during 36-55 wk of age, and 70% RH during 56-65 wk of age. The best incubation results were directly associated with the greatest duckling BW at hatching and at 21 d of age, BW gain, feed conversion, and viability during each parental age period. It was concluded that duck eggs produced within a specific parental age period require a specific incubation RH to attain the best hatchability and posthatching duckling performance.

  3. Effect of Incubation Time and Sucrose Addition on the Characteristics of Cheese Whey Yoghurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhartadi, E.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Sari, A. M.; Widowati, E.; Sanjaya, A. P.; Esnadewi, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of incubation time and concentration of sucrose addition on the characteristics of cheese whey yogurt (lactic acid content, pH, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, viscosity) and sensory characteristics (color, odor, flavor, consistency, and overalls) were investigated. The cheese whey yogurt fermentation process was carried out for 24h and 36h with the addition of sucrose 8, 10, and 12% (w/w) of total solid, respectively. The results showed that the lactic acid content, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and viscosity of cheese whey yogurt were affected by the incubation time and sucrose addition. The level of pH of yogurt which was incubated at 24h and 36h were relatively in the same levels, which were 4.51 up to 4.63. Due the sensory characteristic of cheese whey yogurt the panellists gave the high score for the cheese whey yogurt which was incubated at 24h and sucrose addition 12% (w/w) of total solid. The cheese whey yogurt has 0.41% lactic acid content; pH 4.51; 7.09 log total lactic acid bacteria cells / ml; 5.78% antioxidant activity; and 5.97 cP viscosity. The best sensory and physico-chemical characteristic of cheese whey yogurt was achieved by 24h incubation time and 12% concentration of sucrose addition.

  4. Exposing broiler eggs to green, red and white light during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, G S

    2017-07-01

    Previous work has shown that exposing broiler eggs to white light during incubation can improve hatchability and post-hatch animal welfare. It was hypothesized that due to how different wavelengths of light can affect avian physiology differently, and how pigmented eggshells filter light that different monochromatic wavelengths would have differential effects on hatchability and post-hatch animal welfare indicators. To determine, we incubated chicken eggs (n=6912) under either no light (dark), green light, red light or white light; the light level was 250 lux. White and red light were observed to increase hatch of fertile (P0.05). Fear response of during isolation and tonic immobility was reduced (P0.05) from dark incubated broilers. All light incubated broilers had lower (Plight and red light that is a component of it are possibly the key spectrum to improving hatchability and lower fear and stress susceptibility, whereas green light is not as effective. Incubating broiler eggs under these spectrums could be used to improve hatchery efficiency and post-hatch animal welfare at the same time.

  5. Experimental cooling during incubation leads to reduced innate immunity and body condition in nestling tree swallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardia, Daniel R; Pérez, Jonathan H; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2010-06-22

    Nest microclimate can have strong effects that can carry over to later life-history stages. We experimentally cooled the nests of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor). Females incubating in cooled nests reduced incubation time and allowed egg temperatures to drop, leading to extended incubation periods. We partially cross-fostered nestlings to test carry-over effects of cooling during incubation on nestling innate constitutive immunity, assessed through bacteria killing ability (BKA) of blood. Nestlings that had been cooled as eggs showed a lower ability to kill bacteria than control nestlings, regardless of the treatment of their foster mother. However, there was no effect of treatment of rearing females on nestling BKA in control nestlings, even though cooled females made significantly fewer feeding visits than did control females. This suggests that the effect of cooling occurred during incubation and was not due to carry-over effects on nestling condition. Nestlings that were exposed to experimental cooling as embryos had lower residual body mass and absolute body mass at all four ages measured. Our results indicate that environmental conditions and trade-offs experienced during one stage of development can have important carry-over effects on later life-history stages.

  6. Female but not male zebra finches adjust heat output in response to increased incubation demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Davina L; Lindström, Jan; McCafferty, Dominic J; Nager, Ruedi G

    2014-04-15

    In many incubating birds, heat transfer from parent to egg is facilitated by the brood patch, an area of ventral abdominal skin that becomes highly vascularised, swells and loses its down feathers around the time of laying. Only the female develops a brood patch in most passerine species, but males of some species can incubate and maintain the eggs at similar temperatures to females even without a brood patch. Here we used a novel application of infrared thermography to examine sex differences in parental care from a physiological perspective. Using incubating male and female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), a species in which the male lacks a brood patch, we measured the surface temperature of the ventral plumage overlying the abdomen and a reference area that does not contact the eggs (thorax) twice per pair. In half of the pairs, clutch size was experimentally enlarged between the two sets of measurements to increase incubation demand. We found that the temperature differential between abdomen and thorax plumage was greater in females than in males, and that abdomen plumage was warmer after clutch enlargement than before in females but not in males. These findings are consistent with morphological sex differences in brood patch development and suggest that male and female zebra finches differ in the way they regulate abdomen versus general body surface temperature in response to variation in incubation demand.

  7. Dissolution and aggregation of Cu nanoparticles in culture media: effects of incubation temperature and particles size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingxiangyu [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology (China); Fernández-Cruz, María Luisa; Connolly, Mona [Spanish National Institute for Agricultural and Food Research and Technology - INIA, Department of Environment (Spain); Schuster, Michael [Technische Universität München, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Navas, José María, E-mail: jmnavas@inia.es [Spanish National Institute for Agricultural and Food Research and Technology - INIA, Department of Environment (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Here, the effects of incubation temperature and particle size on the dissolution and aggregation behavior of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in culture media were investigated over 96 h, equivalent to the time period for acute cell toxicity tests. Three CuNPs with the nominal sizes of 25, 50, and 100 nm and one type of micro-sized particles (MPs, ∼500 nm) were examined in culture media used for human and fish hepatoma cell lines acute tests. A large decrease in sizes of CuNPs in the culture media was observed in the first 24 h incubation, and subsequently the sizes of CuNPs changed slightly over the following 72 h. Moreover, the decreasing rate in size was significantly dependent on the incubation temperature; the higher the incubation temperature, the larger the decreasing rate in size. In addition to that, we also found that the release of copper ions depended on the incubation temperature. Moreover, the dissolution rate of Cu particles increased very fast in the first 24 h, with a slight increase over the following 72 h.

  8. Biodegradation of the low concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil by microbial consortium during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Lin, Xin; Li, Peijun; Liu, Wan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Chukwuka, K S

    2009-12-30

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (8.15 mg PAHs kg(-1) soil) in aged contaminated soil by isolated microbial consortium (five fungi and three bacteria) during the incubation of 64d is reported. The applied treatments were: (1) biodegradation by adding microbial consortium in sterile soils (BM); (2) biodegradation by adding microbial consortium in non-sterile soils (BMN); and (3) biodegradation by in situ "natural" microbes in non-sterile soils (BNN). The fungi in BM and BMN soils grew rapidly 0-4d during the incubation and then reached a relative equilibrium. In contrast the fungi in BNN soil remained at a constant level for the entire time. Comparison with the fungi, the bacteria in BNN soils grew rapidly during the incubation 0-2d and then reached a relative equilibrium, and those in BM and BMN soils grew slowly during the incubation of 64 d. After 64 d of incubation, the PAH biodegradations were 35%, 40.7% and 41.3% in BNN, BMN and BM, respectively. The significant release of sequestrated PAHs in aged contaminated soil was observed in this experiment, especially in the BM soil. Therefore, although bioaugmentation of introduced microbial consortium increased significantly the biodegradation of PAHs in aged contaminated soil with low PAH concentration, the creation of optimum of the environmental situation might be the best way to use bioremediation successfully in the field.

  9. Influence of incubation temperature on biofilm formation and corrosion of carbon steel by Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Devianto, Hary; Kurniawan, Ignatius Chandra; Utomo, Josephine Christine

    2017-01-01

    Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion is one type of corrosion, directly or indirectly influenced by microbial activities, by forming biofilm and adhering on the metal surface. When forming biofilm, the microorganisms can produce extracellular products which influence the cathodic and anodic reactions on metal surfaces. This will result in electrochemical changes in the interface between the biofilm and the metal surface, leading to corrosion and deterioration of the metal. MIC might be caused by various types of microorganism which leads to different corrosion mechanism and reaction kinetics. Furthermore, this process will also be influenced by various environmental conditions, such as pH and temperature. This research is aimed to determine the effect of incubation temperature on corrosion of carbon steel caused by Serratia marcescens in a mixture solution of synthetic seawater with Luria Bertani medium with a ratio of 4:1. The incubation was performed for 19 days with incubation temperature of 30, 37, and 50°C. The analyses of biofilm were conducted by total plate count (TPC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Biofilm was found to be evenly growth on the surface and increasing with increasing incubation temperature. It consists of functional group of alcohol, alkane, amine, nitro, sulfate, carboxylic acid, and polysulfide. The analyses of the corrosion were conducted by gravimetric and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Higher incubation temperature was found to increase the corrosion rate. However, the corrosion products were not detected by XRD analysis.

  10. Effects of incubation substrates on hatch timing and success of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Michael J.; Kofoot, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act in 1994 because several decades of failed spawning had put the population at risk of extinction. Natural spawning is known to occur at several locations in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but there is little natural recruitment. Microhabitat where embryo incubation occurs is known to be an important factor in white sturgeon reproductive success. This study was conducted to address questions regarding the suitability of different substrates as egg attachment and incubation sites for these fish. A comparative laboratory study using six types of incubation substrates—clean river rocks, periphyton- and algae-covered rocks, waterlogged wood, sand, riparian vegetation, and clean glass plates—tested the hypothesis that survival to hatch of white sturgeon eggs differs among incubation substrates. The results showed that sand was unsuitable as an incubation substrate, as the adhesive embryos were easily dislodged. Periphyton- and algae-covered rocks had the lowest hatch success, and all other substrates had similar hatch success.

  11. Deimination level and peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 expression are elevated in astrocytes with increased incubation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Serra, Horacio M

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes respond to environmental cues, including changes in temperatures. Increased deimination, observed in many progressive neurological diseases, is thought to be contributed by astrocytes. We determined the level of deimination and expression of peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in isolated primary astrocytes in response to changes on either side (31°C and 41°C) of the optimal temperature (37°C). We investigated changes in the astrocytes by using a number of established markers and accounted for cell death with the CellTiter-Blue assay. We found increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, ALDH1L1, and J1-31, resulting from increased incubation temperature and increased expression of TSP1, S100β, and AQP4, resulting from decreased incubation temperature vs. optimal temperature, suggesting activation of different biochemical pathways in astrocytes associated with different incubation temperatures. Mass spectrometric analyses support such trends. The PAD2 level was increased only as a result of increased incubation temperature with a commensurate increased level of deimination. Actin cytoskeleton and iso[4]LGE, a lipid peroxidase modification, also showed an increase with higher incubation temperature. Altogether, these results suggest that temperature, as an environmental cue, activates astrocytes in a different manner on either side of the optimal temperature and that increase in deimination is associated only with the higher temperature side of the spectrum.

  12. Rancang Bangun Incubator dengan Suhu dan Kelembaban Udara Terkendali untuk Penetesan Telur Ulat Sutera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Made Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silkworms were the poikilothermic animals with life cycle strongly affected by environment condition such as temperature, humidity, light and wind. In other the silkworm’s egg hatcheries uniformly at the same day, it was considered necessary to use the temperature and humidity controllable room (incubation room according to their optimum hatcheries condition. The incubation room consisted of four actuators i.e: the heater, the cooler, the mist maker, and the water content absorber. All of that actuators were controlled based on the output signal from the sensor (SHT11. In this research the temperature was controlled at the value of 25°C, while the humidity was controlled at the value of 75 %. The experimental result of the incubator machine without silkworm egg shown that the incubator was able to control the temperature at the value of 25°C with maximum 25.4°C. It was also able to control humidity at optimum interval i.e: 73.9 % to 76.1 %. Experimental result with silkworm egg showed that the incubator was able to increase the uniformity of the hatcheries day, even though the hatcheries day was late about two days compared to the conventional method.

  13. Increasing hatchability of turkey eggs by matching incubator humidity to shell conductance of individual eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, M; Nir, A; Ar, A

    1984-08-01

    One of the most important factors determining hatchability of avian eggs is the proper water balance of the eggs during incubation. In turkey eggs, a total diffusive water loss (F) of 12 +/- 1% SD initial egg mass in 28 days, yielded maximal hatchability irrespective of the combination of eggshell water vapor conductance (G) and incubator humidity (PI), which brought about this water loss. A good correlation was found between G as obtained at the beginning of incubation and the final F in a given PI. The G in a random sample of 1256 fresh turkey eggs was normally distributed around the mean of 18.70 +/- 2.87 SD milligrams (100 g X day X torr)-1 (Coefficient of variation = 15.3%). The distribution of G in eggs with dead in the shell embryos had, in addition, two more peaks of G values [around 22.5 and 13.0 mg (100 g X day X torr)-1]. When eggs were sorted into low (less than 17), medium (17 to 20), and high (greater than 20) G categories, and incubated at low (19.4), medium (26.6), and high (33.9) torr PI, respectively, hatchability increased by a factor of 1.08. Poor hatchabilities were obtained in mismatching humidities and conductances. It seems that hatchability success may be experimentally improved if a correct rate of water loss is fitted to sorted eggs during incubation.

  14. Web-based remote monitoring of infant incubators in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D I; Huh, S J; Lee, T S; Kim, I Y

    2003-09-01

    A web-based real-time operating, management, and monitoring system for checking temperature and humidity within infant incubators using the Intranet has been developed and installed in the infant Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We have created a pilot system which has a temperature and humidity sensor and a measuring module in each incubator, which is connected to a web-server board via an RS485 port. The system transmits signals using standard web-based TCP/IP so that users can access the system from any Internet-connected personal computer in the hospital. Using this method, the system gathers temperature and humidity data transmitted from the measuring modules via the RS485 port on the web-server board and creates a web document containing these data. The system manager can maintain centralized supervisory monitoring of the situations in all incubators while sitting within the infant ICU at a work space equipped with a personal computer. The system can be set to monitor unusual circumstances and to emit an alarm signal expressed as a sound or a light on a measuring module connected to the related incubator. If the system is configured with a large number of incubators connected to a centralized supervisory monitoring station, it will improve convenience and assure meaningful improvement in response to incidents that require intervention.

  15. Cold spots in neonatal incubators are hot spots for microbial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goffau, Marcus C; Bergman, Klasien A; de Vries, Hendrik J; Meessen, Nico E L; Degener, John E; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2011-12-01

    Thermal stability is essential for the survival and well-being of preterm neonates. This is achieved in neonatal incubators by raising the ambient temperature and humidity to sufficiently high levels. However, potentially pathogenic microorganisms also can thrive in such warm and humid environments. We therefore investigated whether the level of microbial contamination (i.e., the bacterial load) inside neonatal incubators can be predicted on the basis of their average temperature and relative humidity settings, paying special attention to local temperature differences. Swab samples were taken from the warmest and coldest spots found within Caleo incubators, and these were plated to determine the number of microbial CFU per location. In incubators with high average temperature (≥ 34°C) and relative humidity (≥ 60%) values, the level of microbial contamination was significantly higher at cold spots than at hot spots. This relates to the fact that the local equilibrium relative humidity at cold spots is sufficiently high to sustain microbial growth. The abundance of staphylococci, which are the main causative agents of late-onset sepsis in preterm neonates, was found to be elevated significantly in cold areas. These findings can be used to improve basic incubator hygiene.

  16. Information management: The case of companies participating in the programo of business incubation of Universidade Federal de Goiás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Gomes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to point out the information management strategic profile of companies participating in the program of business incubation of Universidade Federal de Goiás (PROINE-UFG. This new alignment of social network aims to promote the competitiveness of micro and small business by approaching them to the knowledge producers that, in the Brazilian case, are the universities. The strategic information aligning model, proposed by Marchand, was used as the theoretical framework. The research took the design of a case study, as it limited to study the UFG incubation program. Nine companies of PROINE-UFG were investigated. The main conclusions are that the PROINE-UFG companies have a tendency of proactivity. Nevertheless the financial and technological resources are scarce to monitor the external environment as demanded by the strategy. They use few information sources and the interaction with the university is still incipient

  17. A Theory for the Incubation Period Following a Stress Reduction During Creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde-Sørensen, Jørgen

    1978-01-01

    A dislocation model is presented for the phenomena following a stress reduction during creep. It is suggested that an incubation period for the production of new mobile dislocations arises because attractive junctions on the verge of breaking just before the stress reduction are no longer so after...... the stress reduction. The breaking stress of the junctions must be lowered by climb movements in the surrounding network before the junctions can break and release new mobile dislocations. On the basis of these concepts, an expression is derived for the length of the incubation period. This theoretical...... incubation period is much shorter than the time needed to establish an equilibrium structure at the new lower stress. The dependence of dislocation line tension upon line length is taken into account; as a result of this, recovery rates are predicted to depend on stress to a power larger than three...

  18. Male songbirds provide indirect parental care by guarding females during incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedy, B.C.; Martin, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Across many taxa, guarding of fertile mates is a widespread tactic that enhances paternity assurance. However, guarding of mates can also occur during the nonfertile period, and the fitness benefits of this behavior are unclear. Male songbirds, for example, sometimes guard nonfertile females during foraging recesses from incubation. We hypothesized that guarding postreproductive mates may have important, but unrecognized, benefits by enhancing female foraging efficiency, thereby increasing time spent incubating eggs. We tested the hypothesis in 2 songbird species by examining female behavior during natural and experimentally induced absences of males. Male absence caused increased vigilance in foraging females that decreased their efficiency and resulted in less time spent incubating eggs. Male guarding of nonfertile females can thus provide a previously unrecognized form of indirect parental care.

  19. In vitro incubation of human spermatozoa promotes reactive oxygen species generation and DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicaré, J; Caille, A; Zumoffen, C; Ghersevich, S; Bahamondes, L; Munuce, M J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative process associated with sperm capacitation and its impact on DNA fragmentation and sperm function. Redox activity and lipid peroxidation were analysed in human spermatozoa after 3, 6 and 22 h of incubation in Ham's F10 medium plus bovine albumin at 37° and 5% CO2 for capacitation. DNA status, tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and induced acrosome reaction were evaluated after capacitating conditions. At 22 h of incubation, there was a significant (P DNA fragmentation. These results indicate that when spermatozoa are incubated for several hours (22 h), a common practice in assisted reproductive techniques, an increase in oxidative sperm metabolism and in the proportion of fragmented DNA should be expected. However, there was no effect on any of the other functional parameters associated with sperm fertilising capacity. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. N Mineralisation from Bioresources Incubated at 12.5°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Ives

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils treated with lime-amended biosolids (LAB, poppy seed waste (PSW, anaerobically digested biosolids (ADB and poppy mulch (PM and incubated at 12.5°C for 56 days released 45%, 36%, 25%, and −8%, respectively, of total applied N as plant available nitrogen (PAN by the end of the incubation. The mineralisation rates were contrary to expectations based on the C : N ratios of the four products: LAB (5 : 1, PSW (7 : 1, ADB (3 : 1, and PM (16 : 1. PM showed a significant negative priming effect over the incubation period. These results have implications for production agriculture in temperate regions where application and incorporation of bio-resources traditionally occurs in autumn and spring when soil and air temperatures are relatively low. Current application times may not be suitable for nitrogen release to satisfy crop demand.

  1. Effect of particle size and microbial phytase on phytate degradation in incubated maize and soybean meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ton Nu, Mai Anh; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2014-01-01

    by 88% in maize, 84% in maize–SBM and 75% in SBM after 2 h of incubation (Pmodel was fitted to the feeds with microbial phytase to analyse the effect......The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of screen size (1, 2 and 3 mm) and microbial phytase (0 and 1000 FTU/kg as-fed) on phytate degradation in maize (100% maize), soybean meal (100% SBM) and maize–SBM (75% maize and 25% SBM) incubated in water for 0, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h at 38°C...... reduced APS by 48% in maize, 30% in SBM and 26% in maize–SBM. No interaction between screen size and microbial phytase on phytate degradation was observed, but the interaction between microbial phytase and incubation time was significant (P

  2. Perceptions on the use of a corporate business incubator to enhance knowledge management at Eskom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Steyn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge economy impacts on the way enterprises should address their business requirements, forcing many of them to review the potential mechanisms they could employ to improve their competitive advantage. The business incubator approach is one such mechanism. This article explores the application of knowledge management, knowledge creation and innovation in a corporate incubator. It focuses on the process of knowledge management, to ensure that a culture and appropriate strategies conducive to enhancing knowledge creation are developed in an enterprise. Innovation as a strategic imperative is considered, as well as the challenge of driving it within an enterprise. The purpose of this empirical survey was to determine whether the corporate incubator model applied by Eskom conforms to the attributes of knowledge management, knowledge creation and innovation, and whether the synergies to be exploited amongst these disciplines can be harnessed to give Eskom a competitive advantage.

  3. Mathematical modelling of thermoregulation processes for premature infants in closed convectively heated incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraguela, Andrés; Matlalcuatzi, Francisca D; Ramos, Ángel M

    2015-02-01

    The low-weight newborns and especially the premature infants have difficulty in maintaining their temperature in the range considered to be normal. Several studies revealed the importance of thermal environment and moisture to increase the survival rate of newborns. This work models the process of heat exchange and energy balance in premature newborns during the first hours of life in a closed incubator. In addition, a control problem was proposed and solved in order to maintain thermal stability of premature newborns to increase their rate of survival and weight. For this purpose, we propose an algorithm to control the temperature inside the incubator. It takes into account the measurements of the body temperature of a premature newborn which are recorded continuously. We show that using this model the temperature of a premature newborn inside the incubator can be kept in a thermal stability range. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. ACCELERATING NANO-TECHNOLOGICAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Stissing; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    By viewing the construction industry as a technological innovation system (TIS) this paper discusses possible initiatives to accelerate nanotechnological innovations. The point of departure is a recent report on the application of nano-technology in the Danish construction industry, which concludes...... of the system are furthermore poorly equipped at identifying potentials within high-tech areas. In order to exploit the potentials of nano-technology it is thus argued that an alternative TIS needs to be established. Initiatives should identify and support “incubation rooms” or marked niches in order...

  5. Electrically heated simulator for relative evaluation of alternative infant incubator environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultman, J S; Berman, S; Kirlin, P; Vreslovic, J M; Baer, C B; Marks, K H

    1988-02-01

    A 10.9-cm diameter, copper ellipsoid was electrically heated to provide a simulation of sensible heat transfer from a newborn infant. The use of this simulator to determine mean radiant temperature and convective heat-transfer coefficient was demonstrated in three commercial incubators: the Isolette (Model C-86, Narco/Air Shields); the Armstrong Care-ette (Ohio Medical Products); and the I. C. (Ohmeda). The relative performance of these environmental therapeutic devices in shielding an infant against radiant heat loss was judged by the deviation of mean radiant temperature from incubator air temperature, which was varied from 32-36 degrees C. Whereas the I. C. incubator exhibited a radiant temperature always 0.5 degrees C less than air temperature, the Care-ette incubator showed radiant temperatures of 4.0-5.5 degrees C below air temperature, and the Isolette displayed radiant temperatures of 2.7-4.7 degrees C (inner wall removed) and 2.0-3.8 degrees C (inner wall inserted) below air temperature. The relative performance of the incubators in preventing convective heat loss was judged from the magnitude of the convective heat-transfer coefficient, hv. The I. C. incubator had an hv = 4.52 W/m2/degrees C; the Care-ette, 5.55 W/m2/degrees C; and the Isolette 7.19 W/m2/degrees C (inner wall removed) and 6.23 W/m2/degrees C (inner wall inserted). Although an ellipsoid simulator is not an anatomically correct substitute for an infant, it does provide a reliable and convenient comparison of steady-state heat transfer characteristics of alternative environmental devices.

  6. Fate of lignin, cutin and suberin in soil organic matter fractions - an incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Carsten W.; Mueller, Kevin E.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Ingrid, Kögel-Knabner

    2010-05-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) is controlled by its chemical composition, its spatial accessibility and the association with the mineral phase. Separation of bulk soils by physical fractionation and subsequent chemical analysis of these fractions should give insights to how compositional differences in SOM drive turnover rates of different size-defined carbon pools. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the relative abundance and recalcitrance of lignin, cutin and suberin in aggregated bulk soils and SOM fractions in the course of SOM decomposition. Bulk soils and physically-separated size fractions (sand, silt and clay) of the Ah horizon of a forest soil (under Picea abies L.Karst) were parallel incubated over a period of one year. In order to differentiate between particulate OM (POM) and mineral-associated SOM the particle size fractions were additionally separated by density after the incubation experiment. We used solid-state 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS (after copper oxide oxidation and solvent extraction) to analyze the composition of the incubated samples. The abundance and isotopic composition (including 13C and 14C) of the respired CO2 further enabled us to monitor the dynamics of SOM mineralization. This approach allowed for differentiating between C stabilization of soil fractions due to accessibility/aggregation and to biochemical recalcitrance at different scales of resolution (GC-MS, NMR). We found a relative enrichment of alkyl C and decreasing lignin contents in the order of sand < silt < clay by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS within soils and fractions before the incubation, resulting in increased lipid to lignin ratios with decreasing particle size. An accumulation of aliphatic C compounds was especially found for the small silt and clay sized particulate OM (POM). For the fresh particulate OM (POM) of the sand fraction a clear decay of lignin was observed in the course of the incubation experiment, indicated by

  7. Business Incubators – Favorable Environment for Small and Medium Enterprises Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia MORARU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The biggest problem for many small and medium enterprises (SMEs is not the idea or the product provided and neither its customers, but their needs. High prices of production and office space are critical to the survival of a small business. Incubators come as a response to the needs of small and medium enterprises in key steps of a business, such as initiation and market penetration. An incubator aims to have a positive effect on the economic health of an area, of a community.

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes for drug delivery: Efficiency related to length and incubation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, Niccolò; Fedeli, Stefano; Paoli, Paolo; Brandi, Alberto; Chiarugi, Paola; Severi, Mirko; Cicchi, Stefano

    2017-02-13

    Batches of oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes differing in length were adopted to prepare two drug delivery systems (DDS) loaded with doxorubicin. The different internalization of the two batches, verified by atomic emission spectroscopy onto cell lysates, was also confirmed by the different toxicity of the same DDS loaded with doxorubicin. In vitro experiments evidenced, after 48h of incubation, the superior efficacy of the shortest nanotubes. However, upon prolonging the incubation time up to 72h the difference in efficiency was minimized due to the spontaneous release of doxorubicin by the non-internalized long nanotubes.

  9. An outbreak of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium infections with an unusually long incubation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John T; Matyas, Bela T; Fontana, John; DeGroot, Mary Ann; Beuchat, Larry R; Hoekstra, Michael; Friedman, Cindy R

    2012-03-01

    A 1998 investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium infections among children tasting unpasteurized milk during tours of a dairy farm demonstrated a distribution of unusually long incubation periods (median, 8 days; interquartile range [IQR], 6-14 days). Bacterial isolates were highly acid tolerant and contained genes associated with protection against destructive phagocytic reactive oxygen intermediates. We hypothesize that exposure to low-dose oral inoculum of a pathogen with these properties could have contributed to cases of non-typhoidal salmonellosis with the longest incubation period reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

  10. Student experimenter and sponsor display SE83-9 'Chix in Space' incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Student experimenter John C. Vellinger (left) explains components of an incubator for his Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' to be carried onboard STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Mark S. Deusser, representing the sponsoring organization, holds up the incubator for inspection by STS-29 crewmembers who will monitor in-space operation of the experiment. Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer is partially visible in the lower right foreground. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  11. Effects of low humidity on small premature infants in servocontrol incubators. I. Decrease in rectal temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgaumkar, T K; Scott, K

    1975-01-01

    19 small premature infants in servocontrol incubators, whose abdominal skin temperature was 36.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C, were subjected to alternate high- and low-humidity environments. With low humidity, rectal temperature dropped significantly below abdominal skin temperature. Skin was the predominant site of evaporative heat loss. The temperature was lower on naked skin than on an area covered by adhesive tape. Thus, servocontrol with low humidity increases evaporative heat loss and engenders a cycle of events that results in paradoxical body temperature decrease as the incubator temperature increases.

  12. Analysis of Characteristics of Business Incubators in Colombia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús C. Peña-Vinces

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the research methodology of case study, in this article we analyze the main characteristics that condition business’s survival of four business’s incubators in Colombia (Bucaramanga, Créame, ParqueSoft and Gestando. The researchers applied the guide of best practices of the business’s incubators of Nodriza as a tool for the exploratory analysis. The results reveal that 70% of the companies comply with this guide, allowing them to continue surviving at the domestic and international market.

  13. Extended incubation affects larval morphology, hatching success and starvation resistance in a terrestrially spawning fish, Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns 1842).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens, D; Swearer, S E

    2011-10-01

    The effect of extended incubation (delayed hatching) on larval morphology in the terrestrially spawning common galaxias Galaxias maculatus was investigated by inducing larvae to hatch 1 and 2 weeks after the normal 2 week incubation period. After 1 week of extended incubation, larvae were larger (longer in standard length, L(S), and greater in body depth) compared to controls (larvae that experienced normal incubation durations). After 2 weeks of extended incubation, larvae were smaller (shorter in L(S) and smaller in body depth) than larvae that experienced 1 week of extended incubation. Furthermore, eye area increased while yolk-sac size decreased monotonically with increasing incubation duration. These results suggest that larvae experiencing long periods of extended incubation are using somatic tissue to meet their metabolic demands. Larvae that experienced 2 weeks of extended incubation succumbed to starvation sooner than control larvae, but hatching success was not significantly different. Temperature mediated the effect of extended incubation on the morphology of larvae at hatching, most likely, through its effects on developmental rate and efficiency of yolk utilization. This study demonstrates some of the consequences of terrestrial spawning with extended incubation, which will assist in determining why this intriguing behaviour has evolved several times in a diverse range of taxa.

  14. Effect of temperature on incubation period, embryonic mortality, hatch rate, egg water loss and partridge chick weight (Rhynchotus rufescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakage ES

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incubation temperature (34.5; 35.5; 36.5; 37.5 and 38.5ºC, on incubation period, embryonic mortality, hatching rate, water loss and chick weight at hatch, using daily incubation of partridge (Rhynchotus rufescens eggs. The highest hatching percentage was obtained between 35.5 and 36.5ºC. Incubation length and temperature were inversely proportional. Water loss was lower in eggs incubated at low temperatures as compared to high temperatures. There was no difference among incubation temperatures in absolute and relative hatchling weights. Early embryonic mortality increased at low temperatures (36.5ºC. Our results show that, under conditions of daily incubation of eggs in the same incubator, higher hatching rate can be obtained using temperatures between 35.5ºC and 36.5ºC; incubation temperature is inversely proportional to incubation length, and absolute and relative weights of partridge chicks are not affected by incubation temperature.

  15. Relationship between Incubator Managers and Incubated Enterprises and its Impact on Enterprise Innovation Performance%孵化器管理方与在孵企业间关系对企业技术创新绩效的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费钟琳; 许景; 王朦

    2014-01-01

    科技企业孵化器是科技型企业创业成长的重要平台。当前孵化器数量不断增长,但在运行机制、服务质量、创业文化等方面尚有不足,单方面提高孵化器管理方的服务能力与水平不足以解决问题。以组织间关系理论为基础,分析孵化器管理方与在孵企业间的相互信任、信息交流、互惠承诺对在孵企业技术创新绩效的影响,以及相互信任与信息交流、互惠承诺的相互促进关系。结果显示:孵化器管理方与在孵企业间较强的相互信任、信息交流、互惠承诺有助于提升在孵企业技术创新绩效,为孵化器管理方通过改善与在孵企业的关系提升服务效果提供了启示。%Incubator for science and technology start-ups has become an important platform for the growth of tech-nological enterprises. Yet with the number of incubators constantly increasing, the operation mechanism, service quality and entrepreneurial culture remain unsatisfying. Unilateral improvement of service level by the incubator management is not sufficient. The dimensions of relationship between incubator managers and incubated enterpri-ses and their impacts on the enterprises′innovation performance are not studied enough in current literature, with much less empirical studies. Based on IORs theory, this article analyzes the impacts of mutual trust, information exchange and reciprocal commitment on the enterprises′innovation performance. Results from the survey data in-dicate that these dimensions of relationship have positive effect on the improvement of enterprises′innovation per-formance and vice versa. The conclusion inspires the incubator managers to enhance service efficiency by impro-ving the relationship between the incubated enterprises.

  16. Co-Incubation of Human Spermatozoa with Anti-VDAC Antibody Reduced Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianjiang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC, a channel protein, exists in the outer mitochondrial membrane of somatic cells and is involved in multiple physiological and pathophysiological processes. Up until now, little has been known about VDAC in male germ cells. In the present study, the relationship between VDAC and human sperm motility was explored. Methods: Highly motile human spermatozoa were incubated in vitro with anti-VDAC antibody. Total sperm motility, straight line velocity (VSL, curvilinear velocity (VCL, and average path velocity (VAP were recorded. Intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i, pH value (pHi, and ATP content were determined. Results: Co-incubation with anti-VDAC antibody reduced VSL, VCL, and VAP of spermatozoa. Co-incubation further reduced [Ca2+]i. Anti-VDAC antibody did not significantly alter total sperm motility, pHi and intracellular ATP content. Conclusion: The data suggest that co-incubation with anti-VDAC antibody reduces sperm motility through inhibition of Ca2+ transmembrane flow. In this way, VDAC participates in the modulation of human sperm motility through mediating Ca2+ transmembrane transport and exchange.

  17. Identification of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids released during microsomal incubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushee, Jennifer L; Liang, Guiqing; Dunne, Christine E; Harriman, Shawn P; Argikar, Upendra A

    2014-08-01

    1. In vitro clearance in liver microsomes is routinely measured in drug discovery and development for new chemical entities. Literature reports indicate that long chain fatty acids such as arachidonic, linoleic and oleic acids may be released over a period of time during microsomal incubations. Some fatty acids have been shown to interfere with oxidative and conjugative reactions in microsomes, thus potentially inhibiting microsomal clearance of compounds. 2. The present study was aimed at deciphering the fatty acids present or released from microsomes. Analytical methods were developed to characterize and quantitatively assess the fatty acids without chemical derivatization in rat, monkey and human liver microsomes. Additionally, incubations with uridine-5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA) were utilized to trap the released fatty acids as their glucuronate esters, which were characterized and confirmed by high-resolution LC-MS/MS. 3. Our results indicate for the first time that timnodonic, trans-eicosenoic, gondoic, behenic, and nervonic acid were released during microsomal incubations. Additionally, α- and γ-linolenic, timnodonic, palmitoleic, linoleic, arachidonic, palmitic, oleic, and stearic acid were identified as their corresponding acyl-glucuronides in rat, monkey and human liver microsomes, providing the first direct evidence that the released fatty acids are capable of forming glucuronides under incubation conditions.

  18. Effect of semen preparation technique and its incubation on sperm quality in the Moroccan population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulmaouahib, S; Madkour, A; Kaarouch, I; Saadani, B; Sefrioui, O; Louanjli, N; Copin, H; Cadi, R; Benkhalifa, M

    2016-09-05

    In in vitro fertilisation (IVF), sperm preparation as critical part and influencing the sperm quality is especially dependent on the chosen technique itself and incubation parameters including temperature and CO2. In this study, we compared firstly density-gradient centrifugation technique (DGC) to the adapted DGC using the sperm pellet of 80% fraction (DGC/80P) in order to improve the sperm yield. Secondly, this study led to evaluate different sperm incubation conditions based on temperature effect (room temperature (RT = 23°C) versus 35°C) and in the other hand, with or without 5% CO2 during 24 hrs. Based on evaluating sperm conventional parameters and the DNA damage using TUNEL assay, our result showed that DGC/80P increased sperm quality compared to DGC with 25% of improvement. For temperature incubation effect after 24 hrs, 35°C increased the DNA damage and decreased the sperm quality while RT could improve sperm motility by 38%. Moreover, the sperm incubation with 5% CO2 after 24 hrs realised a negative impact on sperm parameters and its DNA damage. Indeed, for current IVF practice, a good sperm quality can be maintained for several hours at room temperature, while the sperm preparation is processed using the DGC/80P without CO2.

  19. Release of native and amended boron from arid zone soils after varying incubation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we evaluated the boron (B) release from soils containing elevated native B and examined the extent to which incubation time affected B release. Five soils varying in initial pH and clay content were selected for the study. The soils were spiked with five varying doses of B as H3BO3 (...

  20. Calcareous Sodic Soil Reclamation as Affected by Corn Stalk Application and Incubation:A Laboratory Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fa-Hu; R.KEREN

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory lysimeter experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of forage corn (Zea mays L.) stalk application on the CO2 concentration in soil air and calcareous sodic soil reclamation.The experimental treatments tested were soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) levels of 1,11,and 19,added corn stalk contents of 0 to 36 g kg-1,and incubation durations of 30 and 60 days.The experimental results indicated that corn stalk application and incubation significantly increased CO2 partial pressure in soil profile and lowered pH value in soil solution,subsequently increased native CaCO3 mineral dissolution and electrolyte concentration of soil solution,and finally significantly contributed to reduction on soil sodicity level.The reclamation efficiency of calcareous sodic soils increased with the added corn stalk.When corn stalks were added at the rates of 22 and 34 g kg-1 into the soil with initial ESP of 19,its ESP value was decreased by 56% and 78%,respectively,after incubation of 60 days and the leaching of 6.5 pore volumes (about 48 L of percolation water) with distilled water.Therefore,crop stalk application and incubation could be used as a choice to reclaim moderate calcareous sodic soils or as a supplement of phytoremediation to improve reclamation efficiency.

  1. The correlation between infectivity and incubation period of measles, estimated from households with two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Don; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2011-09-07

    The generation time of an infectious disease is the time between infection of a primary case and infection of a secondary case by the primary case. Its distribution plays a key role in understanding the dynamics of infectious diseases in populations, e.g. in estimating the basic reproduction number. Moreover, the generation time and incubation period distributions together characterize the effectiveness of control by isolation and quarantine. In modelling studies, a relation between the two is often not made specific, but a correlation is biologically plausible. However, it is difficult to establish such correlation, because of the unobservable nature of infection events. We have quantified a joint distribution of generation time and incubation period by a novel estimation method for household data with two susceptible individuals, consisting of time intervals between disease onsets of two measles cases. We used two such datasets, and a separate incubation period dataset. Results indicate that the mean incubation period and the generation time of measles are positively correlated, and that both lie in the range of 11-12 days, suggesting that infectiousness of measles cases increases significantly around the time of symptom onset. The correlation between times from infection to secondary transmission and to symptom onset could critically affect the predicted effectiveness of isolation and quarantine.

  2. Are business incubators helping? The role of BIs in facilitating tenants development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2010-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) are among a variety of initiatives to stimulate economic growth by promoting the creation and development of new companies. The rapid growth of BIs in recent years confirms their importance in the economic fabric. In this study, we conceptualize BIs using insights from

  3. ANTIMICROBIAL BIO-NONWOVEN FABRICS FOR EYES'S SWATH AND DIAPERS FOR INFANT'S INCUBATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElSayed A. ElNashar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An infant incubator is a piece of equipment common to pediatric hospitals, birthing centers and neonatal intensive care units. While the unit may serve several specific functions, it is generally used to provide a safe and stable environment for newborn infants, often those who were born prematurely or with an illness or disability that makes them especially vulnerable for the first several months of life. The objective of this research was to gain a better understanding of New Approach for a Bio-Nonwoven fabrics and infant's incubator in terms of the specific materials as MaterBi/PCL® as Bioplastic and the elements of comfort, drivers associated with it and its waste biodegradation by different methods. Shortly after birth, the beginning in first hours of life babies with neonatal, a byproduct of the red blood cells decomposition. Many convenient features to consider with tow basic disposable eyes` swathe and diapers on infant’s incubator options: cloth of basic disposable eyes` swathe and diapers, with their end use properties. The form design of eyes` swathe® and diapers® shapes, for infant’s incubator stage then consider convenience, cost, and environmental waste.

  4. Are they helping? An examination of business incubators' impact on tenant firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago

    2011-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established throughout the world as spurs to economic growth. Promoters and BIs‟ managers claim an important role in creating companies, support them till graduation and therefore often boast their contribution to job and wealth creation. Particularly since the

  5. Fitness cost of incubation in great tits (Parus major) is related to clutch size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heij, Maaike E.; van den Hout, Piet J.; Tinbergen, Joost M.

    2006-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that parents produce the number of offspring that maximizes their fitness. In birds, natural selection on parental decisions regarding clutch size may act during egg laying, incubation or nestling phase. To study the fitness consequences of clutch size during the

  6. Extended scrapie incubation time in goats singly heterozygous for PRNP S146 or K222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen N; Reynolds, James O; Waldron, Daniel F; Schneider, David A; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2012-06-10

    Scrapie is the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of sheep and goats, and scrapie eradication in sheep is based in part on strong genetic resistance to classical scrapie. Goats may serve as a scrapie reservoir, and to date there has been no experimental inoculation confirming strong genetic resistance in goats. Two prion protein variants (amino acid substitutions S146 and K222) in goats have been significantly underrepresented in scrapie cases though present in scrapie-exposed flocks, and have demonstrated low cell-free protein conversion efficiency to the disease form (PrP(D)). To test degree of genetic resistance conferred in live animals with consistent exposure, we performed the first oral scrapie challenge of goats singly heterozygous for either PRNP S146 or K222. All N146-Q222 homozygotes became clinically scrapie positive by an average of 24months, but all S146 and K222 heterozygotes remain scrapie negative by both rectal biopsy and clinical signs at significantly longer incubation times (Pscrapie, suggesting these alleles do not confer complete resistance in the heterozygous state but rather extend incubation. The oral challenge results presented here confirm extended incubation observed in a recent intracerebral challenge of K222 heterozygotes, and to our knowledge provide the first demonstration of extended incubation in S146 heterozygotes. These results suggest longer relevant trace-back histories in scrapie-eradication programs for animals bearing these alleles and strengthen the case for additional challenge experiments in both homozygotes to assess potential scrapie resistance.

  7. Immediate incubation of blood cultures outside routine laboratory hours of operation accelerates antibiotic switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kerremans (Jos); A.K. van der Bij (Akke); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.C. Vos (Margreet)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was to assess the impact of immediate incubation of blood cultures delivered to the laboratory outside its hours of operation on turnaround times, antibiotic prescription practices, and patient outcomes. A continuously moni

  8. Experimental and numerical studies on convective heat transfer in a neonatal incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y H; Kwon, C H; Yoo, S C

    2002-01-01

    Thermo-neutrality is one of the major environmental factors affecting a premature or low-birth-weight neonate inside an incubator. Severe temperature differences inside an incubator lead to neonate heat loss, hypothermia and apnoea, which are closely related to air flow and air velocity. In the study, flow visualisations, hot-wire velocity measurements and computational fluid dynamics simulate the airflow inside a neonatal incubator. An anatomically correct neonate model is designed using a three-dimensional laser scanner system and a rapid prototyping machine. Flow visualisations demonstrate that large-scale rotating airflow is produced inside the chamber, and a number of small, stationary eddies are found in regions between the air inlet and the neonate. Hot-wire measurements show that air velocities along the long inlets are not uniform. Computational fluid dynamics show relatively uniform temperatures of about 34 degrees C on the neonate's anterior aspect and the highest temperature of 36.1 degrees C at the right armpit and the crotch. Flow fields from airflow visualisations, hot-wire measurements and computational fluid dynamics are very similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The small eddies produced between the neonate and the mattress could interfere with convective and evaporative heat transfers from the neonate. Therefore it is important to eliminate eddies around the neonate in future designs of neonatal incubators.

  9. The Incubator Concept as an Entry Mode Option for Danish SME's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Dyhr Ulrich, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Group selling butter cookies to India) reveals the reasoning behind the entry mode choice of a company entering an emergent market (India). The incubator option provides the opportunity for a company to bridge the ‘gap’ between a low-control entry mode (e.g. importer or distributor) and high...

  10. A sandwich-designed temperature-gradient incubator for studies of microbial temperature responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner

    2002-01-01

    A temperature-gradient incubator (TGI) is described, which produces a thermal gradient over 34 aluminium modules (15x30x5 cm) intersected by 2-mm layers of partly insulating graphite foil (SigraFlex Universal). The new, sandwich designed TGI has 30 rows of six replicate sample wells for incubatio...

  11. Cold Spots in Neonatal Incubators Are Hot Spots for Microbial Contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Bergman, Klasien A.; de Vries, Hendrik J.; Meessen, Nico E. L.; Degener, John E.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability is essential for the survival and well-being of preterm neonates. This is achieved in neonatal incubators by raising the ambient temperature and humidity to sufficiently high levels. However, potentially pathogenic microorganisms also can thrive in such warm and humid environments.

  12. Effects of low humidity on small premature infants in servocontrol incubators. II. Increased severity of apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgaumkar, T K; Scott, K E

    1975-01-01

    Apneic spells were recorded in 8 of 19 premature infants nursed in high and low humidity alternately in servocontrol incubators. A significantly greater proportion of severe apnea occurred in low than in high humidity. It is postulated that this frequency and severity was due to the increased (as well as widely fluctuating) ambient temperature during low humidity.

  13. Oxygen consumption and temperature control of premature infants in a double-wall incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, K H; Lee, C A; Bolan, C D; Maisels, M J

    1981-07-01

    The effects of a double wall in a forced convection-heated incubator were studied on ten naked, nondistressed, premature infants by measuring their mean skin temperature, esophageal temperature, and oxygen consumption when they were in thermal steady state, with, and without, the double wall in place. The incubator air temperature was maintained within the recommended thermoneutral zone during the consecutive paired experiments. Ambient room temperature and relative humidity were constant and the infant's activity (quiet sleep) and postprandial state were the same in both conditions. Together with a significant rise in operative temperature (P less than .05) induced by the double wall (accounted for by a 0.9 C mean increased in incubator wall temperature nearest the baby), their mean skin temperature and esophageal temperatures increased (P less than .025), while a decrease in oxygen consumption occurred in nine of the ten infants (P less than .05). These findings suggest that the double wall reduced radiant and total heat loss from the baby by diminishing the temperature gradient between the skin and incubator surfaces and that metabolic heat production (oxygen consumption) was reduced when the double wall was in place.

  14. Are they helping? An examination of business incubators' impact on tenant firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho Antunes de Oliveira, Tiago Filipe

    2011-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established throughout the world as spurs to economic growth. Promoters and BIs‟ managers claim an important role in creating companies, support them till graduation and therefore often boast their contribution to job and wealth creation. Particularly since the 198

  15. Calcium Imaging of AM Dyes Following Prolonged Incubation in Acute Neuronal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Morven; Kékesi, Orsolya; Morley, John W; Tapson, Jonathan; Breen, Paul P; van Schaik, André; Buskila, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging is a sensitive method for monitoring calcium dynamics during neuronal activity. As intracellular calcium concentration is correlated to physiological and pathophysiological activity of neurons, calcium imaging with fluorescent indicators is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroscience today. Current methodologies for loading calcium dyes into the tissue require prolonged incubation time (45-150 min), in addition to dissection and recovery time after the slicing procedure. This prolonged incubation curtails experimental time, as tissue is typically maintained for 6-8 hours after slicing. Using a recently introduced recovery chamber that extends the viability of acute brain slices to more than 24 hours, we tested the effectiveness of calcium AM staining following long incubation periods post cell loading and its impact on the functional properties of calcium signals in acute brain slices and wholemount retinae. We show that calcium dyes remain within cells and are fully functional >24 hours after loading. Moreover, the calcium dynamics recorded >24 hrs were similar to the calcium signals recorded in fresh tissue that was incubated for 24hrs after dissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but also may reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals.

  16. Fitness cost of incubation in great tits (Parus major) is related to clutch size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heij, Maaike E.; van den Hout, Piet J.; Tinbergen, Joost M.

    2006-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that parents produce the number of offspring that maximizes their fitness. In birds, natural selection on parental decisions regarding clutch size may act during egg laying, incubation or nestling phase. To study the fitness consequences of clutch size during the incubat

  17. Design of an Incubator for Premature Infant Based on LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; Zhou, Runjing

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the system structure, hardware circuits, control algorithms, and software program of the incubator for premature infant based on LabVIEW. The main advantages of this device are that preheating is less time than others, the capability of meeting of emergency is provided, control track of temperature and humidity are visible, operation is easy to clinical practice, and maintainability is possessed.

  18. INCUBATORS AND GOVERNMENT POLICY FOR DEVELOPING IT INDUSTRY AND REGION IN EMERGING ECONOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atiqah Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Incubation, a concept supported by a variety of economic cluster theories, is a vital element in economic development in developed countries. The entrepreneurial businesses that they house often improve the developed economies in terms of not only jobs but also wealth creation. The question that this article embraces is as follows: "Do incubators play the same vital role in economic development in developing regions of the world?" We use the case study methodology to develop this query in a focus area of regional development in an emerging economy. We examine the implementation of three incubators located in designated cybercities. The cybercity concept is one of the Malaysian government's initiatives to encourage the development of the IT industry within the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC Program. This study takes advantage of the 10-year development of cybercities by performing a longitudinal study. We found that these incubators did well in achieving their initial performance objectives, but they need to catch up with developed countries' continued rapid progress.

  19. Are Business Incubators helping? The role of BIs in facilitating tenants’ development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Aard

    2010-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) are among a variety of initiatives to stimulate economic growth by promoting the creation and development of new companies. The rapid growth of BIs in recent years confirms their importance in the economic fabric. In this study, we conceptualize BIs using insights from knowl

  20. Science incubators: synthesis centers and their role in the research ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Rodrigo

    Full Text Available How should funding agencies enable researchers to explore high-risk but potentially high-reward science? One model that appears to work is the NSF-funded synthesis center, an incubator for community-led, innovative science.

  1. A combined study of heat and mass transfer in an infant incubator with an overhead screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginalski, Maciej K; Nowak, Andrzej J; Wrobel, Luiz C

    2007-06-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the major physical processes taking place inside an infant incubator, before and after modifications have been made to its interior chamber. The modification involves the addition of an overhead screen to decrease radiation heat losses from the infant placed inside the incubator. The present study investigates the effect of these modifications on the convective heat flux from the infant's body to the surrounding environment inside the incubator. A combined analysis of airflow and heat transfer due to conduction, convection, radiation and evaporation has been performed, in order to calculate the temperature and velocity fields inside the incubator before and after the design modification. Due to the geometrical complexity of the model, computer-aided design (CAD) applications were used to generate a computer-based model. All numerical calculations have been performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FLUENT, together with in-house routines used for managing purposes and user-defined functions (UDFs) which extend the basic solver capabilities. Numerical calculations have been performed for three different air inlet temperatures: 32, 34 and 36 degrees C. The study shows a decrease of the radiative and convective heat losses when the overhead screen is present. The results obtained were numerically verified as well as compared with results available in the literature from investigations of dry heat losses from infant manikins.

  2. A Model for Promoting Poultry Industry Development in Togo: Part 1. Management Practices and Incubation Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tona, K.; Agbonon, A.; Eklu-Gadegbeku, K.; Teteh, A.; Simons, P.; Buyse, J.; Everaert, N.; Kemp, B.; Decuypere, E.; Gbeassor, M.

    2014-01-01

    In commercial poultry husbandry practice, the hatchery takes over the incubation of bird eggs in order to provide as many day-old chicks as needed at any time to farmers. The main bottleneck for poultry industry development in Togo is the lack of day-old chick supply. Indeed, there is no proficient

  3. The Incubator Concept as an Entry Mode Option for Danish SME's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Dyhr Ulrich, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Group selling butter cookies to India) reveals the reasoning behind the entry mode choice of a company entering an emergent market (India). The incubator option provides the opportunity for a company to bridge the ‘gap’ between a low-control entry mode (e.g. importer or distributor) and high...

  4. The minimal incubation period from the onset of Barrett's oesophagus to symptomatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); M. van Blankenstein (Mark); J. Dees (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground:The interval between the onset of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) and oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) can be termed the incubation period. However, the unrecorded onset of BO precludes its direct observation.Methods:Determining the range of intervals between BO diagnosis and OAC wi

  5. Fundamental Space Biology-1: HHR and Incubator for ISS Space Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirven-Brooks, M.; Fahlen, T.; Sato, K.; Reiss-Bubenheim, D.

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is developing an Incubator and a Habitat Holding Rack (HHR) to support life science experiments aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The HHR provides for cooling and power needs, and supports data transfer (including telemetry, commanding, video processing, Ethernet), video compression, and data and command storage). The Incubator is a habitat that provides for controlled temperature between +4 C and +45 C and air circulation. It has a set of connector ports for power, analog and digital sensors, and video pass-through to support experiment-unique hardware within the Incubator specimen chamber. The Incubator exchanges air with the ISS cabin. The Fundamental Space Biology-1 (FSB-1) Project will be delivering, the HHR and two Incubators to ISS. The two inaugural experiments to be conducted on ISS using this hardware will investigate the biological effects of the space environment on two model organisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae; yeast) and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; nematode). The {M}odel {Y}east {C}ultures {o}n {S}tation (MYCOS) experiment will support examination of the effect of microgravity and cosmic radiation on yeast biology. In the second series of experiments during the same increment, the effects of microgravity and space environment radiation on C. elegans will be examined. The {F}undamental Space Biology {I}ncubator {E}xperiment {R}esearch using {C}. {e}legans (FIERCE) study is designed to support a long duration, multi-generational study of nematodes. FIERCE on-orbit science operations will include video monitoring, sub-culturing and periodic fixation and freezing of samples. For both experiments, investigators will be solicited via an International Space Life Sciences Research Announcement. In the near future, the Centrifuge Accommodation Module will be delivered to ISS, which will house the SSBRP 2.5 m Centrifuge Rotor. The Incubator can be placed onto the Centrifuge

  6. Effect of incubation on freezability of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin treated buffalo (Bubalus bubalis spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Lone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of incubation on freezability of cholesterol loaded cyclodextrin (CLC treated buffalo spermatozoa. Materials and Methods: Semen samples with mass motility of 3+ and greater, collected from Murrah buffalo bulls were utilized. Immediately after collection, four equal groups of semen sample were made. Group I was kept as control and diluted with Tris upto concentration of 60×106 sperm/ml, where as Groups II, III, and IV were treated with CLC at 3 mg/120× 106 spermatozoa, incubated at 37°C for action of CLC for 10, 15 and 20 min, respectively, and diluted with tris upto concentration of 60×106 sperm/ml. All groups were subjected to equilibration and freezing. The evaluation of semen samples from all groups was carried out at fresh, pre-freeze and post-thaw stage for progressive motility, viability and hypo-osmotic swelling response (HOS response. Results: At the pre-freeze stage, significantly (p<0.05 higher percentage of progressive motility and viability was observed in treatment groups as compared to control with no significant difference among treatment groups. HOS response was significantly (p<0.05 higher in treatment groups as compared to control at pre-freeze stage. At post-thaw stage, significantly (p<0.05 higher percentage of progressive motility, viability and HOS response was recorded in Group II as compared to control and other treatment groups (III and IV. Group II retained significant post-thaw motility and viability at various post-thaw incubation periods. Conclusion: Incubation period of 10 min for CLC treated buffalo spermatozoa yielded significantly higher results in terms of freezability as compared to incubation for 15 and 20 min.

  7. Shaping of Competencies of Managers in Academic Incubators of Entrepreneurship in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurowska-Pysz Joanna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Participation of future entrepreneurs in Academic Incubators of Entrepreneurship (AIE in Poland is one of the innovative paths to shape their managerial competences. The aim of the paper is to analyse and evaluate the activities of the AIEs as an environment inside of which managerial competencies are formed, and formulate recommendations concerning the improvement of AIEs, in terms of the development of managerial skills of future entrepreneurs. Design/methodology/approach: The author relied on research - study surveys and empirical, qualitative, exploratory research, which were supported by figures. The author focused on four important issues: - Motives of researchers and students interested in the support of AIE; - The quality of support offered by the incubator to its participants as well as the frequency of use of this support by future entrepreneurs; - The possibility of extending the support system for AIE participants; - Traits / managerial and entrepreneurial competences desired in people running their own businesses. Results: AIE participants are focused primarily on implementing their business ventures and to a much lesser extent, care about the simultaneous development of their managerial competencies to manage these projects. It is manifested, among other by differentiated assessment of the suitability of certain forms of support from the incubator and the low intensity of use of this support. Despite this, AIE participants perceive the development of desirable traits and strengthening of specific entrepreneurial, management competencies. It is not a very dynamic growth, although it translates into their motivation to start a business after leaving the incubator. Conclusion: It is recommended to place greater emphasis on mobilizing the future entrepreneurs to make use of forms of support for the development of their managerial competences. It is necessary for complex preparation of future entrepreneurs to

  8. Effect of Incubation Temperature on the Somatic Development of the Snail-Eating Turtle Malayemys macrocephala

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rangsima PEWPHONG; Jirarach KITANA; Noppadon KITANA

    2013-01-01

    The rising average global temperature can lead to changes both in the physical and biological environments and affect the survival of organisms. Freshwater turtles are considered to be susceptible species since their development is dependent on incubation temperature. In Thailand, although several species of freshwater turtle are present, the extent of their susceptibility to temperature change is unknown due to the lack of information on their developmental patterns. This research, therefore, is aimed at examining the effects of temperature on somatic development in Malayemys macrocephala, a native species and the most common freshwater turtle in Thailand. Turtle eggs were collected from rice ifelds in the central part of Thailand during December 2011 to February 2012 inclusive. Eggs (237-238 per condition) were incubated in microprocessor-controlled incubators at three different temperatures (26 °C, 29 °C and 32 °C) with a relative humidity in excess of 80%. Each week, until the remaining eggs hatched, eggs were randomly selected, removed and dissected to reveal the developing embryo to screen for developmental stage and any abnormalities. The incubation period (lay to hatch) was not signiifcantly different among the three temperatures (115 ± 11.3 d, 115 ± 20.3 d and 109 ± 17.8 d, respectively), but the growth patterns, as indicated by the stages of development and carapace lengths, were signiifcantly different. At a high temperature (32 °C), turtle embryos showed a signiifcantly faster growth rate than at the intermediate and low temperatures (29 °C and 26 °C), but had a signiifcantly (over 3.3-fold) higher incidence of developmental abnormalities (especially deformed bodies) than at the lower temperatures. Overall, the results indicate that incubation temperature is an important variable affecting the somatic development of this tropical freshwater turtle species, whilst abnormalities in the embryonic body may be a sensitive indicator of extreme

  9. Environmental temperature control in very low birth weight infants (less than 1000 grams) cared for in double-walled incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessex, P; Blouet, S; Vaucher, J

    1988-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of fluctuations in environment and body temperatures on preterm infants, we recorded these variables in very immature newborn infants (birth weight less than 1000 gm) cared for in double-walled incubators (Air-Shields model C-100 and Ohio model IC). Both incubators maintained environmental temperatures corresponding overall to the set point, despite incubator openings. Under skin temperature servocontrol, however, environmental temperature fluctuations were greater than 2 degrees C even in strictly controlled conditions. The pattern of incubator temperature fluctuations depended on the set point rather than on the type of incubator (conventionally heated or heated by warm air blown between the double walls). The long-term clinical significance of the incubator temperature variability remains to be determined; the choice between air and skin servocontrolling should depend in part on the need for environmental stability.

  10. Contrasting agronomic response of biochar amendment to a Mediterranean Cambisol: Incubation vs. field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Rosa, José M.; Paneque, Marina; De Celis, Reyes; Miller, Ana Z.; Knicker, Heike

    2015-04-01

    wood biochars. The FESEM-EDS distinguished compositional and structural differences of the studied biochars such as macropores on the surface of pyrolysis wood biochars. In the frame of a pot experiment, the biochar characteristics (physical properties and chemical composition) were related to the germination rates and to the plant biomass production of a Lolium perenne. Incubation was carried out in 300 mL pots during 79 days in which a calcic Cambisol [3] was amended with 10, 20 and 40 t ha-1 biochar. After adjusting the soil humidity to 60% of the maximum water holding capacity (WHC), the pots were placed into a greenhouse under similar conditions than those reported by [4]. Biochar amendment improved significantly germination rates and soil fertility (excepting kiln wood biochar), and had no negative pH impact on the already alkaline soil. Application of sewage sludge biochar, the richest in minerals and nitrogen, resulted in the highest soil fertility. In this case, increase of the dose went along with an enhancement of plant production. Considering further costs due to production and transport of biochar, the application of 10 t ha-1 turned out as the most efficient for the crop and soil used in the incubation experiment [further details in 5]. The field study was performed with seeds of Helianthus annuus, at the experimental station "La Hampa", located in the Guadalquivir river valley (SW Spain; 37° 21.32' N, 6° 4.07' W), Seville. The calcic Cambisol which was also used as matrix for the pot experiments was amended with doses equivalent to 0 (control), 1.5 and 15 t ha-1 of the five biochars, making a total of 12 different treatments. Soil properties and composition were monitored during the growing time including elemental composition, pH, water holding capacity and soil microbial biomass. After 6 months of growth, sunflower plants were harvested. Plant height, chlorophyll content and sunflower seeds production were recorded. Results of this field experiment

  11. Phenotypic responses of hatchlings to constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures in the multi-banded krait, Bungarus multicintus (Elapidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Gao, Jian-Fang; Han, Jun

    2007-04-01

    Most studies on egg incubation in reptiles have relied on constant temperature incubation in the laboratory rather than on simulations of thermal regimes in natural nests. The thermal effects on embryos in constant-temperature studies often do not realistically reflect what occurs in nature. Recent studies have increasingly recognized the importance of simulating natural nest temperatures rather than applying constant-temperature regimes. We incubated Bungarus multicintus eggs under three constant and one fluctuating-temperature regimes to evaluate the effects of constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures on hatching success and hatchling phenotypes. Hatching success did not differ among the four treatments, and incubation temperature did not affect the sexual phenotype of hatchlings. Incubation length decreased as incubation temperature increased, but eggs incubated at fluctuating temperatures did not differ from eggs incubated at constant temperatures with approximately the same mean in incubation length. Of the hatchling phenotypes examined, residual yolk, fat bodies and locomotor performance were more likely affected by incubation temperature. The maximal locomotor speed was fastest in the fluctuating-temperature and 30 degrees C treatments and slowest in the 24 degrees C treatment, with the 27 degrees C treatment in between. The maximal locomotor length was longest in the fluctuating-temperature treatment and shortest in the 24 degrees C and 27 degrees C treatments, with the 30 degrees C treatment in between. Our results show that fluctuating incubation temperatures do not influence hatching success and hatchling size and morphology any differently than constant temperatures with approximately the same mean, but have a positive effect on locomotor performance of hatchlings.

  12. Incubation conditions are more important in determining early thermoregulatory ability than posthatch resource conditions in a precocial bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRant, S E; Hopkins, W A; Carter, A W; Stachowiak, C M; Hepp, G R

    2013-01-01

    Recent research in birds suggests that investing in incubation is one mechanism by which parents can enhance the phenotype of their offspring. Posthatch environmental conditions can also shape an individual's phenotype, and it is thus possible for pre- and posthatch conditions to have interactive effects on an individual's phenotype. In this study, we examined the individual and interactive effects of prehatch incubation temperature and posthatch food availability on growth, food consumption, and thermoregulatory ability in wood duck (Aix sponsa) ducklings. Eggs were incubated at one of three temperatures (35.0°, 35.9°, or 37.0°C), and then ducklings were reared on an either ad lib. or time-restricted diet for 12 d after hatching. We found that food availability influenced duckling growth, with the slowest growth occurring in ducklings fed the restricted diet. Incubation temperature also interacted with food conditions to influence duckling growth: ducklings fed ad lib. from the lowest incubation temperature grew slower than ducklings fed ad lib. from the higher incubation temperatures. Most importantly, we found that the improvement in a duckling's ability to maintain body temperature in the face of a thermal challenge was influenced by embryonic incubation temperature but not feeding conditions. Ducklings from the highest incubation temperature experienced the greatest improvement in thermoregulatory performance with age. Our findings suggest that the prehatch environment is more important than posthatch resource conditions in determining some physiological functions and underscores the important role that incubation temperature plays in determining offspring phenotype in birds.

  13. Soil Test Phosphorus Recovery from Livestock Manures Compared with Inorganic Fertilizer in Soil Incubations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Craig Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compared dairy and hen manure P recovery relative to fertilizer P recovery for two Nova Scotia soils with different antecedent soil test P (STP, incubated for 5, 15, 30, 60, and 110 days. Fertilizer equivalence of manure P was expressed as P recovery ratio in percentage points (%PRR. Repeated measures analysis with soil pH covariate revealed: (1 manure %PRR averaged 72% (low-STP soil and 80% (medium-STP soil, (2 there were no significant differences in %PRR between dairy and hen manure, and (3 manure %PRR decreased with incubation time for the low-STP soil but not for the medium-STP soil. The soil pH covariate was significant for both low- and medium-STP soils, and the relationship with %PRR was positive for low- but not for the medium-STP soil.

  14. Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoy, Emmanuel E; Mikol, Jacqueline; Luccantoni-Freire, Sophie; Correia, Evelyne; Lescoutra-Etchegaray, Nathalie; Durand, Valérie; Dehen, Capucine; Andreoletti, Olivier; Casalone, Cristina; Richt, Juergen A; Greenlee, Justin J; Baron, Thierry; Benestad, Sylvie L; Brown, Paul; Deslys, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-30

    Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is the only animal prion disease reputed to be zoonotic, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans and having guided protective measures for animal and human health against animal prion diseases. Recently, partial transmissions to humanized mice showed that the zoonotic potential of scrapie might be similar to c-BSE. We here report the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to cynomolgus macaque, a highly relevant model for human prion diseases, after a 10-year silent incubation period, with features similar to those reported for human cases of sporadic CJD. Scrapie is thus actually transmissible to primates with incubation periods compatible with their life expectancy, although fourfold longer than BSE. Long-term experimental transmission studies are necessary to better assess the zoonotic potential of other prion diseases with high prevalence, notably Chronic Wasting Disease of deer and elk and atypical/Nor98 scrapie.

  15. Effect of incubation temperature on the diagnostic sensitivity of the glanders complement fixation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Wieler, L H; Saqib, M; Melzer, F; Santana, V L D A; Neubauer, H; Elschner, M C

    2014-12-01

    The complement fixation test (CFT) is the only serological test prescribed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) for the diagnosis of glanders in international trading of equids. However, false-positive reactions have caused financial losses to the animal owners in the past, and false-negative tests have resulted in the introduction of glanders into healthy equine populations in previously glanders-free areas. Both warm (incubation at 37°C for 1 h) and cold (overnight incubation at 4°C) procedures are recommended by the OIE for serodiagnosis of glanders. In a comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques, using the United States Department of Agriculture antigen, warm CFT was found to be significantly less sensitive (56.8%; p glanders but a lower diagnostic specificity has to be accepted. The immunoblot was used as the gold standard.

  16. Modulating intracellular acidification by regulating the incubation time of proton caged compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    A proton caged compound, the 1-(2-nitrophenyl)- ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS), was dosed into HEK-293 at different incubation times. Samples were irradiated with filtered UV light for inducing photolysis of the HDNS and then probed by infrared spectroscopy. The intracellular acidification reaction can be followed by monitoring the consequent CO2 peak intensity variation. The total CO2 produced is similar for all the samples, hence it is only a function of the initial HDNS concentration. The way it is achieved, though, is different for the different incubation times and follows kinetics, which results in a combination of a linear CO2 increase and a steep CO2 increase followed by a decay. This is interpreted in terms of confinement of the HDNS into intracellular vesicles of variable average size and sensitive to UV light when they reach critical dimensions.

  17. Influx of CO2 from Soil Incubated Organic Residues at Constant Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukat Ali Abro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature induced CO2 from genotypic residue substances is still less understood. Two types of organic residues (wheat- maize were incubated at a constant temperature (25°C to determine the rate and cumulative influx of CO2 in laboratory experiment for 40 days. Further, the effect of surface and incorporated crop residues with and without phosphorus addition was also studied. Results revealed that mixing of crop residues increased CO2-C evolution significantly & emission rare was 37% higher than that of control. At constant temperature, soil mixed residues, had higher emission rates CO2-C than the residues superimposed. There was linear correlation of CO2-C influxed for phosphorus levels and residue application ways with entire incubation at constant temperature. The mixing of organic residues to soil enhanced SOC levels and biomass of microbially bound N; however to little degree ammonium (NH4-N and nitrate NO3-N nitrogen were decreased.

  18. How can the gap between educations and student incubators be bridged at higher educational institutes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mette Lindahl; Rasmussen, Jan Erik Røjkjær; Brandt, Erika Zimmer

    2015-01-01

    ). It is in the DNA of some educational institutes like Babson and in some educational programs like the business degrees to work with entrepreneurship. But it comes natural for a minority of the total student body to see them self as entrepreneurs and act as such. At some educations and educational institutes......Student incubators in various shapes and forms are found at many higher educational institutes, they are becoming an increasingly important part of solving the challenges of educating entrepreneurial graduates that has arisen in the wake of the second academic revolution (Etzkowitz, 2003...... entrepreneurship is student incubators is considered a privilege for carefully selected students, though reality is that for most other educations, students enrol in the education with an image of becoming employees. This foster a mind-set where problems are given and the sensitivity towards spotting opportunities...

  19. Study on the Ultrastructure and its Change of Eggshell of Chukar during Incubation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Chukar is a kind of very important wild economical bird species. The research to the eggshell is very use- ful not only in biology but also in economics. The structure of eggshell of Chukar is the same as the fowl. The structural changes of the inner and outer surfaces, the transverse section of the eggshell, and the outer sur- face of its membrane during incubation had been observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), There was a great change happened for the surface structrue of eggshell and its membrane during incubation. The tortoise-shaped crackles became smaller and longer,and the fibres of the membrane became thinner and short- er. At the same time ,the transverse section of eggshell also became thicker.

  20. Image quality associated with the use of an MR-compatible incubator in neonatal neuroimaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, K

    2012-04-01

    MRI in the neonate poses significant challenges associated with patient transport and monitoring, and the potential for diminished image quality owing to patient motion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a dedicated MR-compatible incubator with integrated radiofrequency coils in improving image quality of MRI studies of the brain acquired in term and preterm neonates using standard MRI equipment.

  1. Effects of temperature, light and incubation period on production, germination and bioactivity of Trichoderma atroviride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryaei, A; Jones, E E; Ghazalibiglar, H; Glare, T R; Falloon, R E

    2016-04-01

    The goal was to determine the effect of temperature, light and incubation period on production, germination and bioactivity of Trichoderma atroviride LU132 against Rhizoctonia solani. The incubation temperatures of 20, 25 or 30°C were assessed on the production of T. atroviride conidia under constant light over a 25 and 50 days periods. The resulting conidia were also studied for germination and bioactivity. Conidium production was maximum at 25°C after 20 days. The second peak of conidium production occurred at 45-50 days. Incubation at 25°C after 15 days showed optimum production of T. atroviride LU132. Conidia produced at 30°C gave the greatest germination and bioactivity in comparison with incubation at 20 or 25°C. This study indicates that the temperature at which conidia of T. atroviride are produced affects germination and bioactivity. Formulations based on production of the high conidia yield may not result in optimal bioactivity and there is a trade-off between quantity and quality of T. atroviride LU132 conidia. Conidium production was shown to be a continuous process, and increased under a dark/light regime. This is the first report of bimodal conidium production in a Trichoderma biological control agent (BCA), which is likely to be on 20 days cycle, and is dependent on colony age rather than abiotic factors. Conidia produced after 15 days are likely to be the most suitable for use in commercial production of this strain as a BCA. Most studies on Trichoderma-based BCA have only shown the effect of culture conditions on the high conidia yield regardless of conidium quality. This study is the first report on conidium quality affected by principal culture conditions for Trichoderma biological control formulations. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. In vitro characterization of borneol metabolites by GC-MS upon incubation with rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Liu, Chang-hui; Huang, Tian-lai; Wang, Ning-sheng; Mi, Sui-qing

    2008-01-01

    The metabolism of borneol is studied by the analysis of incubations of in vitro-prepared rat liver microsomes. A sensitive gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) method is developed for the identification of borneol and its metabolites. Four novel metabolites, which have not previously been reported, are isolated and confirmed by comparison of the GC-MS method. The biotransformation pathway of borneol in rat liver microsomes is proposed based on the in vitro results.

  3. Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnova, Irina N; Marchant, Nathan J; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T; Panlilio, Leigh V; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin; Cadet, Jean L

    2014-07-01

    In a rat model of drug craving and relapse, cue-induced drug seeking progressively increases after withdrawal from methamphetamine and other drugs, a phenomenon termed 'incubation of drug craving'. However, current experimental procedures used to study incubation of drug craving do not incorporate negative consequences of drug use, which is a common factor promoting abstinence in humans. Here, we studied whether incubation of methamphetamine craving is observed after suppression of drug seeking by adverse consequences (punishment). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine or palatable food for 9 h per day for 14 days; reward delivery was paired with a tone-light cue. Subsequently, for one group within each reward type, 50% of the lever-presses were punished by mild footshock for 9-10 days, whereas for the other group lever-presses were not punished. Shock intensity was gradually increased over time. Next, we assessed cue-induced reward seeking in 1-h extinction sessions on withdrawal days 2 and 21. Response-contingent punishment suppressed extended-access methamphetamine or food self-administration; surprisingly, food-trained rats showed greater resistance to punishment than methamphetamine-trained rats. During the relapse tests, both punished and unpunished methamphetamine- and food-trained rats showed significantly higher cue-induced reward seeking on withdrawal day 21 than on day 2. These results demonstrate that incubation of both methamphetamine and food craving occur after punishment-induced suppression of methamphetamine or palatable food self-administration. Our procedure can be used to investigate mechanisms of relapse to drug and palatable food seeking under conditions that more closely approximate the human condition.

  4. Mouse spermatozoa contain a nuclease that is activated by pretreatment with EGTA and subsequent calcium incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Segal M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W Steven

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into approximately 50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl(2) and CaCl(2) in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl(2) alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl(2) had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to digest the sperm DNA by SDD. Spermatozoa were extracted with salt and dithiothreitol to remove protamines and then incubated with EGTA. Next, the EGTA was removed and divalent cations were added. We found that Mn(2+), Ca(2+), or Zn(2+) could each activate SDD in spermatozoa but Mg(2+) could not. When the reaction was slowed by incubation on ice, EGTA pretreatment followed by incubation in Ca(2+) elicited the reversible fragmentation of sperm DNA evident in SCF. When the reactions were then incubated at 37 degrees C they progressed to the more complete degradation of DNA by SDD. EDTA could also be used to activate the nuclease, but required a higher concentration than EGTA. This EGTA-activatable nuclease activity was found in each fraction of the vas deferens plasma: in the spermatozoa, in the surrounding fluid, and in the insoluble components in the fluid. These results suggest that this sperm nuclease is regulated by a mechanism that is sensitive to EGTA, possibly by removing inhibition of a calcium binding protein.

  5. The Effect of Supplemental Carbon Dioxide in Chicken Incubation with Eggs from Heavy Breeder Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu Carlea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study followed the results of 0.85% CO2 influence on chick embryonic development. Biological material wascomposed of chicken eggs obtained from COBB500 hybrid broiler breeder parents. After weight determination ofchick embryos in different stages of development, egg components and embryos annexes, pH measurements ofalbumen and yolk sac were made. All of this analysis was made in order to determine the positive influence of 0.85%CO2 level on multistage chick incubation.

  6. Effect of Waterlogged and Aerobic Incubation on Enzyme Activities in Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Chang; LU Qin

    2006-01-01

    An incubation experiment with soil water content treatments of 0.15 (W1), 0.20 (W2), and 0.40 (W3) g g-1 soil was carried out for two months to investigate the activities of important enzymes involved in C, N, P, and S cycling in a paddy soil from the Taihu Lake region, China, under waterlogged and aerobic conditions. Compared with air-dried soil,waterlogging resulted in a significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05) of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) andβ-D-glucosidase activities,and this effect was enhanced with increasing waterlogging time. Waterlogging also significantly inhibited (P ≤ 0.05)arylsulfatase as well as alkaline and acid phosphatase activities, but did not decrease the activities with the increase in waterlogging time. Short-term waterlogging did not affect urease activity, but prolonged waterlogging decreased it markedly. In contrast, the aerobic incubation (W1 and W2 treatments) significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) FDA, alkaline phosphatase, and β-D-glucosidase activities. With aerobic treatments the activities of FDA and alkaline phosphatase increased with incubation time, whereas β-D-glucosidase activity decreased. A significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) was usually observed between the W1 and W2 treatments for the activities of FDA as well as alkaline and acid phosphatase;however,β-D-glucosidase and urease were usually not significant (P ≤ 0.05). No activity differences were observed between waterlogging and aerobic incubation for arylsulfatase and urease.

  7. Microbial-based inoculants impact nitrous oxide emissions from an incubated soil medium containing urea fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Pamela; Watts, Dexter B; Ames, Robert N; Kloepper, Joseph W; Torbert, H Allen

    2013-01-01

    There is currently much interest in developing crop management practices that will decrease NO emissions from agricultural soils. Many different approaches are being investigated, but to date, no studies have been published on how microbial inoculants affect NO emissions. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that microbial-based inoculants known to promote root growth and nutrient uptake can reduce NO emissions in the presence of N fertilizers under controlled conditions. Carbon dioxide and CH fluxes were also measured to evaluate microbial respiration and determine the aerobic and anaerobic conditions of the incubated soil. The microbial-based treatments investigated were SoilBuilder (SB), a metabolite extract of SoilBuilder (SBF), and a mixture of four strains of plant growth-promoting spp. Experiments included two different N fertilizer treatments, urea and urea-NHNO 32% N (UAN), and an unfertilized control. Emissions of NO and CO were determined from soil incubations and analyzed with gas chromatography. After 29 d of incubation, cumulative NO emissions were reduced 80% by SB and 44% by SBF in soils fertilized with UAN. Treatment with spp. significantly reduced NO production on Days 1 and 2 of the incubation in soils fertilized with UAN. In the unfertilized treatment, cumulative emissions of NO were significantly reduced 92% by SBF. Microbial-based treatments did not reduce NO emissions associated with urea application. Microbial-based treatments increased CO emissions from soils fertilized with UAN, suggesting a possible increase in microbial activity. Overall, the results demonstrated that microbial-based inoculants can reduce NO emissions associated with N fertilizer application, and this response varies with the type of microbial-based inoculant and fertilizer.

  8. Antifungal treatments in artificial incubation of crayfish eggs (Pacifastacus leniusculus, Astacidae: Searching for alternatives to formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Carral

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the concerns about the safety of the use of formaldehyde as antifungal agent, the effects of three alternative chemicals (potassium sorbate, copper hydroxide and magnesium chloride were tested in the artificial incubation of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus eggs. Eight treatments were performed during 15 min every other day: formaldehyde at 3000 ppm (control, potassium sorbate at 5000 and 10000 ppm, copper hydroxide at 40, 60, 80 and 200 ppm, and magnesium chloride at 10000 ppm. Eggs were incubated in a flow through system at a density of 20 eggs·cm−2. After 61 days of incubation, the highest efficiencies were obtained with 200 ppm of copper hydroxide (77.6% of survivors to stage 2 with no significant differences from the control (74.3%. Lower concentrations of copper hydroxide resulted in high egg mortality whereas potassium sorbate and magnesium chloride were ineffective to avoid fungal growth and total egg mortality took place. From the obtained results, copper hydroxide baths at 200 ppm could be considered as a good alternative to formaldehyde.

  9. Only child syndrome in snakes: Eggs incubated alone produce asocial individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Fabien; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J R; Blanvillain, Gaëlle

    2016-10-20

    Egg-clustering and communal nesting behaviours provide advantages to offspring. Advantages range from anti-predatory benefits, maintenance of moisture and temperature levels within the nest, preventing the eggs from rolling, to enabling hatching synchrony through embryo communication. It was recently suggested that embryo communication may extend beyond development fine-tuning, and potentially convey information about the quality of the natal environment as well as provide an indication of forthcoming competition amongst siblings, conspecifics or even heterospecifics. Here we show that preventing embryos from communicating not only altered development rates but also strongly influenced post-natal social behaviour in snakes. Clutches of water snakes, Natrix maura, were split evenly into half-clutches and incubated as (1) clusters (i.e. eggs in physical contact with each other) or (2) as single eggs placed in individual goblets (i.e. no physical contact amongst sibling eggs). Single incubated eggs produced less-sociable young snakes than their siblings that were incubated in a cluster: the former were more active, less aggregated and physically contacted each other less often than the latter. Potential long-term effects and evolutionary drivers for this new example of informed dispersal are discussed.

  10. Parachlamydia acanthamoeba is endosymbiotic or lytic for Acanthamoeba polyphaga depending on the incubation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2003-06-01

    Parachlamydiaceae are potential emerging pathogens that naturally infect free-living amoebae. We investigated the affects of incubation temperature on the growth and cytopathic effect of P. acanthamoeba in Acanthamoeba polyphaga. A. polyphaga were infected with P. acanthamoeba and incubated at different temperatures for ten days. Bacterial growth was quantified by real-time PCR. Cytopathic effects were determined by counting the number of cysts and viable amoebae (unstained with trypan blue) in Nageotte counting chambers. Uninfected amoebae cultures were used as negative control. At 32, 35, and 37 degrees C, we observed a significant decrease in the number of viable A. polyphaga that contrasted with the delayed and smaller decrease in the number of living A. polyphaga observed at 25, 28, and 30 degrees C. Higher incubation temperature, which is associated with amoebal lysis, surprisingly was not associated with increased growth rate. P. acanthamoeba is lytic for A. polyphaga at 32-37 degrees C but endosymbiotic at 25-30 degrees C. This suggests that A. polyphaga may be a reservoir of endosymbionts at the lower temperature of the nasal mucosa, which may be liberated by lysis at higher temperature, for instance, when the amoeba is inhaled and reaches the lower respiratory tract.

  11. Incubation temperature, morphology and performance in loggerhead (Caretta caretta turtle hatchlings from Mon Repos, Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Sim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine turtles are vulnerable to climate change because their life history and reproduction are tied to environmental temperatures. The egg incubation stage is arguably the most vulnerable stage, because marine turtle eggs require a narrow range of temperatures for successful incubation. Additionally, incubation temperature affects sex, emergence success, morphology and locomotor performance of hatchlings. Hatchlings often experience high rates of predation in the first few hours of their life, and increased size or locomotor ability may improve their chances of survival. Between 2010 and 2013 we monitored the temperature of loggerhead (Caretta caretta; Linnaeus 1758 turtle nests at Mon Repos Rookery, and used these data to calculate a mean three day maximum temperature (T3dm for each nest. We calculated the hatching and emergence success for each nest, then measured the mass, size and locomotor performance of hatchlings that emerged from those nests. Nests with a T3dm greater than 34°C experienced a lower emergence success and produced smaller hatchlings than nests with a T3dm lower than 34°C. Hatchlings from nests with a T3dm below 34°C performed better in crawling and swimming trials than hatchlings from nests with a T3dm above 34°C. Thus even non-lethal increases in global temperatures have the potential to detrimentally affect fitness and survival of marine turtle hatchlings.

  12. Microbiological response of Japanese quail eggs to disinfection and location in the setter during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczewski, Sebastian; Szablewski, Tomasz; Cegielska-Radziejewska, Renata; Kontecka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ethyl alcohol (75%) disinfection of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) hatching eggs and analysis of microbial contamination of eggs during incubation, depending on their location in the setter. Disinfected eggshells were found to have lower total bacteria (TBC) and fungi (TFC) count. Concerning the vertical location of eggs (top, middle, bottom), disinfected eggs were characterized by similar values of the TBC (x = 1.54 log CFU/shell surface). For eggs without disinfection, it was found that those from middle and bottom levels of the setter had similar and lower TBC (by about 1.22 log CFU/shell surface) as compared to eggs from the top level. No statistically significant differences between levels were found in the case of TFC. Hatch breakouts (dead-in-shell embryos) from non-disinfected eggs were characterized by higher TBC (on average 0.37 log CFU/g). Disinfected eggs, located at the middle and bottom levels of the incubator, had similar and lower TBC in comparison with eggs from the top level. There were no microscopic fungi inside disinfected eggs of hatch breakouts. On the other hand, the non-disinfected eggs, placed on trays from the middle level of the incubator, had greater TFC (by about 0.9 log CFU/g) than those from top and bottom levels. Regardless of whether the eggs were disinfected or not, the largest group of microscopic fungi included Aspergillus and Penicillium.

  13. A meta-analysis of estimates of the AIDS incubation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, P C; Myers, L E; Hamill, D N

    1996-06-01

    Information from 12 studies is combined to estimate the AIDS incubation distribution with greater precision than is possible from a single study. The analysis uses a hierarchy of parametric models based on a four-parameter generalized F distribution. This general model contains four standard two-parameter distributions as special cases. The cases are the Weibull, gamma, log-logistic, lognormal distributions. These four special cases subsume three distinct asymptotic hazard behaviors. As time increases beyond the median of approximately 10 years, the hazard can increase to infinity (Weibull), can plateau at some constant level (gamma), or can decrease to zero (log-logistic and lognormal). The Weibull, gamma and 'log-logistic distributions' which represent the three distinct asymptotic hazard behaviors, all fit the data as well as the generalized F distribution at the 25 percent significance level. Hence, we conclude that incubation data is still too limited to ascertain the specific hazard assumption that should be utilized in studies of the AIDS epidemic. Accordingly, efforts to model the AIDS epidemic (e.g., back-calculation approaches) should allow the incubation distribution to take several forms to adequately represent HIV estimation uncertainty. It is recommended that, at a minimum, the specific Weibull, gamma and log-logistic distributions estimated in this meta-analysis should all be used in modeling the AIDS epidemic, to reflect this uncertainty.

  14. Incubation of human blood fractions leads to changes in apparent miRNA abundance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jørgensen, Stine Thuen; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    A basic investigation on the presence and composition of miRNA species and their reaction to in vitro incubation and stimulation (borosilicate glass beads), in plasma, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), red blood cells (RBC), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells...... in significant changes in the abundance of miR-21, miR-155, Let-7c and Let 7f in plasma, miR-21, miR-23a and miR-150 in RBC and miR-15b, miR-126, miR155 and Let-7g in PBMC, while no change was seen in PRP and PMN. Interestingly, in the samples incubated with glass beads, no miRNAs were significantly affected...... in plasma, RBC, PBMC and PMN, while expression of miR-25, miR15a, miR-126 and miR223 was significantly changed in PRP. Thus, PRP, as the only blood fraction depended on stimulation to change its miRNA profile upon incubation. For the other fractions, stimulation either leveled out the changes induced...

  15. An adaptable stage perfusion incubator for the controlled cultivation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Felix; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Bärtschi, Christoph A; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a stage perfusion incubation system that allows for the cultivation of mammalian cells within PDMS microfluidic devices for long-term microscopic examination and analysis. The custom-built stage perfusion incubator is adaptable to any x-y microscope stage and is enabled for temperature, gas and humidity control as well as equipped with chip and tubing holder. The applied double-layered microfluidic chip allows the predetermined positioning and concentration of cells while the gas permeable PDMS material facilitates pH control via CO2 levels throughout the chip. We demonstrate the functionality of this system by culturing C2C12 murine myoblasts in buffer free medium within its confines for up to 26 hours. We moreover demonstrated the system's compatibility with various chip configurations, other cells lines (HEK-293 cells) and for longer-term culturing. The cost-efficient system are applicable for any type of PDMS-based cell culture system. Detailed technical drawings and specification to reproduce this perfusion incubation system is provided in the ESI.

  16. Preliminary data on growth and enzymatic abilities of soil fungus Humicolopsis cephalosporioides at different incubation temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elíades, Lorena Alejandra; Cabello, Marta N; Pancotto, Verónica; Moretto, Alicia; Rago, María Melisa; Saparrat, Mario C N

    2015-01-01

    Nothofagus pumilio (Poepp & Endl.) Krasser, known as "lenga" is the most important timber wood species in southernmost Patagonia (Argentina). Humicolopsis cephalosporioides Cabral & Marchand is a soil fungus associated with Nothofagus pumilio forests, which has outstanding cellulolytic activity. However, there is no information about the ability of this fungus to use organic substrates other than cellulose, and its ability to produce different enzyme systems, as well as its response to temperature. The aim of this study was to examine the role of H. cephalosporioides in degradation processes in N. pumilio forests in detail by evaluating the in vitro ability of four isolates of this fungus to grow and produce different lytic enzyme systems, and their response to incubation temperature. The ability of the fungi to grow and produce enzyme systems was estimated by inoculating them on agar media with specific substrates, and the cultures were incubated at three temperatures. A differential behavior of each strain in levels of growth and enzyme activity was found according to the medium type and/or incubation temperature. A intra-specific variability was found in H. cephalosporioides. Likewise a possible link between the saprotrophic role of this fungus in N. pumilio forests and the degradation of organic matter under stress conditions, such as those from frosty environments, was also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Buying Time—The Immune System Determinants of the Incubation Period to Respiratory Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Moran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses cause disease in humans characterized by an abrupt onset of symptoms. Studies in humans and animal models have shown that symptoms are not immediate and appear days or even weeks after infection. Since the initial symptoms are a manifestation of virus recognition by elements of the innate immune response, early virus replication must go largely undetected. The interval between infection and the emergence of symptoms is called the incubation period and is widely used as a clinical score. While incubation periods have been described for many virus infections the underlying mechanism for this asymptomatic phase has not been comprehensively documented. Here we review studies of the interaction between human pathogenic respiratory RNA viruses and the host with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms used by viruses to inhibit immunity. We discuss the concept of the “stealth phase”, defined as the time between infection and the earliest detectable inflammatory response. We propose that the “stealth phase” phenomenon is primarily responsible for the suppression of symptoms during the incubation period and results from viral antagonism that inhibits major pathways of the innate immune system allowing an extended time of unhindered virus replication.

  18. Co-incubation of Acanthamoeba castellanii with strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alters the survival of amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, A M; Harmis, N; Stapleton, F

    2000-06-01

    Enhanced survival of Acanthamoeba castellanii has previously been reported following co-incubation with a single strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different strains of P. aeruginosa on amoebae survival. Four contact lens solutions were challenged with A. castellanii for between 6 and 24 h, and survival rates of amoeba were calculated. Subsequently, A. castellanii was co-incubated with different strains of P. aeruginosa (strain 6294, an invasive isolate; 6206, a cytotoxic isolate; and Paer 001, a null isolate). Differences in amoeba survival over time between solutions for each bacterial strain were analysed. Non-neutralized hydrogen peroxide was the most effective system against A. castellani at all time points (P<0.05). Survival rates were not different between multipurpose solutions and neutralized hydrogen peroxide. Co-incubation with P. aeruginosa altered amoeba survival, and maximum survival occurred in the presence of the invasive strain of P. aeruginosa. Enhanced amoeba survival may occur in the presence of certain strains of Gram-negative bacteria, and with certain types of contact lens disinfection systems.

  19. Manufacturing Innovation and Technological Superiority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Defense AT&L: September-October 2016 2 From the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisit ion, Technology, and Logist ics Manufacturing Innovation ...English advantages in mechanized textile manufacturing in the early 1800s drove the performance of the British economy, just as Carnegie’s steel...program to establish Manufacturing Innovation Institutes (MIIs) that would create incubators for advanced manufacturing technology in key

  20. Offspring sex in a TSD gecko correlates with an interaction between incubation temperature and yolk steroid hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guo-Hua; Yang, Jing; Wang, Jin; Ji, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    We incubated eggs of the Japanese gecko Gekko japonicus at three temperatures, and measured yolk testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels at three time points in embryonic development (oviposition, 1/3 of incubation, and 2/3 of incubation), to examine whether maternal influence on offspring sex via yolk steroid hormone deposition is significant in the species. Eggs incubated at 24 °C and 32 °C produced mostly females, and eggs incubated at 28 °C almost a 50:50 sex ratio of hatchlings. Female-producing eggs were larger than male-producing eggs. Clutches in which eggs were incubated at the same temperature produced mostly same-sex siblings. Yolk T level at laying was negatively related to eggs mass, and yolk E2/T ratio was positively related to egg mass. Results of two-way ANOVA with incubation temperature and stage as the factors show that: yolk E2 level was higher at 32 °C than at 24 °C; yolk T level was higher, whereas yolk E2/T ratio was smaller, at 28 °C than at 24 °C; yolk E2 and T levels were higher at 2/3 than at 1/3 of incubation. Our data in G. japonucus show that: (1) maternal influence on offspring sex via yolk steroid hormone deposition is significant; (2) incubation temperature affects the dynamics of developmental changes in yolk steroid hormones; (3) influences of yolk steroid hormones on offspring sex are secondary relative to incubation temperature effects; and (4) offspring sex correlates with an interaction between incubation temperature and yolk steroid hormones.

  1. Does the variance of incubation temperatures always constitute a significant selective force for origin of reptilian viviparity?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong LI; Zheng WANG; Ce CHEN; Xiang JI

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the variance of incubation temperature may have constituted a significant selective force for reptilian viviparity,we incubated eggs of the slender forest skink Scincella modesta in five thermally different natural nests and at two constant temperatures (18 ℃ and 21 ℃).Our manipulation of incubation temperature had significant effects on incubation length and several hatchling traits (snout-vent length,tail length,fore-limb length,and sprint speed),but not on hatching success and other hatchling traits examined (body mass,head size,and hind-limb length).Incubation length was nonlinearly sensitive to temperature,but it was not correlated with the thermal variance when holding the thermal mean constant.The 18 ℃ treatment not only produced smaller sized hatchlings but also resulted in decreased sprint speed.Eggs in the nest with the greatest proportion of temperatures higher than 28 ℃ also produced smaller sized hatchlings.None of the hatchling traits examined was affected by the thermal variance.Thermal fluctuations did result in longer incubation times,but females would benefit little from maintaining stable body temperatures or selecting thermally stable nests in terms of the reduced incubation length.Our data show that the mean rather than the variance of temperatures has a key role in influencing incubation length and hatchling phenotypes,and thus do not support the hypothesis tested.

  2. Responses of indigenous microorganisms to soil incubation as viewed by transmission electron microscopy of cell thin sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, h. C.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Indigenous soil microorganisms were cultivated in their soil habitat with 50% moisture capacity at 30 C for two weeks. Changes in microorganism cells were studied by electron microscopy during incubation, with particular attention to the dormant cell growth and to the ability of cystlike cells to germinate and reencyst. The responses of various cell species to incubation conditions are described and illustrated by photomicrographs.

  3. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  4. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26{degree}C and downshifted 30-26-30{degree}C) and females (constant 30{degree}C and upshifted 26-30-26{degree}C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26{degree}C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30{degree}C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26{degree}C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30{degree}C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25{degree}C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30{degree}C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  5. IN Like Flint: How the Innovation Incubator at UM-Flint Fosters Social Entrepreneurship in a City Remaking Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Nic

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how the University of Michigan-Flint's Innovation Incubator supports emerging for-profit businesses and nonprofit organizations through programming, business plan development, and ongoing mentorship. The Incubator is especially interested in supporting start-ups that address key social issues in the surrounding community,…

  6. Does the variance of incubation temperatures always constitute a significant selective force for origin of reptilian viviparity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong LI, Zheng WANG, Ce CHEN, Xiang JI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that the variance of incubation temperature may have constituted a significant selective force for reptilian viviparity, we incubated eggs of the slender forest skink Scincella modesta in five thermally different natural nests and at two constant temperatures (18 °C and 21 °C. Our manipulation of incubation temperature had significant effects on incubation length and several hatchling traits (snout-vent length, tail length, fore-limb length, and sprint speed, but not on hatching success and other hatchling traits examined (body mass, head size, and hind-limb length. Incubation length was nonlinearly sensitive to temperature, but it was not correlated with the thermal variance when holding the thermal mean constant. The 18 °C treatment not only produced smaller sized hatchlings but also resulted in decreased sprint speed. Eggs in the nest with the greatest proportion of temperatures higher than 28 °C also produced smaller sized hatchlings. None of the hatchling traits examined was affected by the thermal variance. Thermal fluctuations did result in longer incubation times, but females would benefit little from maintaining stable body temperatures or selecting thermally stable nests in terms of the reduced incubation length. Our data show that the mean rather than the variance of temperatures has a key role in influencing incubation length and hatchling phenotypes, and thus do not support the hypothesis tested [Current Zoology 58 (6: 812–819, 2012].

  7. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT INCUBATOR MODELS ON MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED CHANGES IN NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: Devise a method to standardize responses of cells to MF-exposure in different incubator environments. METHODS: We compared the cell responses to generated MF in a standard cell-culture incubator (Forma, model #3158) with cell responses to the same exposure when a mu-m...

  8. Dinosaur incubation periods directly determined from growth-line counts in embryonic teeth show reptilian-grade development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gregory M.; Zelenitsky, Darla K.; Kay, David Ian; Norell, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Birds stand out from other egg-laying amniotes by producing relatively small numbers of large eggs with very short incubation periods (average 11–85 d). This aspect promotes high survivorship by limiting exposure to predation and environmental perturbation, allows for larger more fit young, and facilitates rapid attainment of adult size. Birds are living dinosaurs; their rapid development has been considered to reflect the primitive dinosaurian condition. Here, nonavian dinosaurian incubation periods in both small and large ornithischian taxa are empirically determined through growth-line counts in embryonic teeth. Our results show unexpectedly slow incubation (2.8 and 5.8 mo) like those of outgroup reptiles. Developmental and physiological constraints would have rendered tooth formation and incubation inherently slow in other dinosaur lineages and basal birds. The capacity to determine incubation periods in extinct egg-laying amniotes has implications for dinosaurian embryology, life history strategies, and survivorship across the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction event. PMID:28049837

  9. Effect of age wise incubation programme on broiler breeder hatchability and post hatch performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbar A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and humidity are most important environmental factors during incubation. The age of birds affect the eggs, its internal as well as external quality, that’s why dissimilar conditions require for incubation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of age wise incubation profile on hatchability and chick’s performance. For this experiment, eggs were collected from Ross-308 breeders which were divided into four groups according to the age of breeders having equal number of eggs in all groups (n=538560 eggs. Group A (Young, 24-31 weeks, B (Prime, 32-50 weeks, C (Old, 50+weeks and D (control. For groups, A, B and C duration of incubation in setter machine was 456 hours (19th day while for D (control, incubator duration was 449 hours (18.7 days. Fertility of eggs were performed through candling and shifted to hatchers for next 50 hours for A, B and C while 56 hours for D. Group B was significantly better (P<0.05 as compare to A in term of hatchability. Candling was significantly better for group B (P<0.05 than C. Group C was significantly (P<0.05 better for candling than A and D which contain same candling i.e. A and D. Groups A and B have significantly (P< 0.05 same dead in shell (DIS (6.18±0.29 and 6.20±0.37 respectively as compare to C (7.13±0.60. Group D (6.70±0.67 was same for DIS as groups A, B and C. Excellent performances of chicks with mortality (P<0.01 for A (2.93±0.60, B (2.77±0.49, C (2.85±0.53, D (3.10±0.82, weight gain (gram/bird (P<0.01 for A (1972.66±0.33, B (2012.33±35.92, C (1996±14, D (1985.33±18.58, FCR (P<0.01 for A (1.55±0.12, B (1.51±0.15, C (1.54±0.13, D (1.57±0.11 and feed intake (gram/bird (P<0.01 for A (3146.92±189.13, B (3138.63±203.4, C (3139.75±201.55, D (3166.72±154.84 all were same in all groups. Water loss was different for A (11.93±0.60 then B (12.34±0.76, C (12.24±0.65 as compare to D (10.17±0.55. Chick yield was same for A (69.28±0.18, B (69.51±1.12 and C (69.28

  10. Transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus during the incubation period in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Stenfeldt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the quantitative characteristics of a pathogen’s capability to transmit during distinct phases of infection is important to enable accurate predictions of the spread and impact of a disease outbreak. In the current investigation, the potential for transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV during the incubation (preclinical phase of infection was investigated in seven groups of pigs that were sequentially exposed to a group of donor pigs that were infected by simulated-natural inoculation. Contact-exposed pigs were co-mingled with infected donors through successive eight-hour time slots spanning from 8 to 64 hours post inoculation (hpi of the donor pigs. The transition from latent to infectious periods in the donor pigs was clearly defined by successful transmission of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD to all contact pigs that were exposed to the donors from 24 hpi and later. This onset of infectiousness occurred concurrent with detection of viremia, but approximately 24 hours prior to the first appearance of clinical signs of FMD in the donors.Thus, the latent period of infection ended approximately 24 hours earlier than the end of the incubation period. There were significant differences between contact-exposed groups in the time elapsed from virus exposure to the first detection of FMDV shedding, viremia and clinical lesions. Specifically, the onset and progression of clinical FMD was more rapid in pigs that had been exposed to the donor pigs during more advanced phases of disease, suggesting that these animals had received a higher effective challenge dose. These results demonstrate transmission and dissemination of FMD within groups of pigs during the incubation period of infection. Furthermore, the findings suggest that under current conditions, shedding of FMDV in oropharyngeal fluids is a more precise proxy for FMDV infectiousness than clinical signs of infection. These findings may impact modeling of the propagation of

  11. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  12. Arsenic release from Floridan Aquifer rock during incubations simulating aquifer storage and recovery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Norton, Stuart B; Annable, Michael D; Harris, Willie G

    2016-05-01

    While aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is becoming widely accepted as a way to address water supply shortages, there are concerns that it may lead to release of harmful trace elements such as arsenic (As). Thus, mechanisms of As release from limestone during ASR operations were investigated using 110-day laboratory incubations of core material collected from the Floridan Aquifer, with treatment additions of labile or refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) or microbes. During the first experimental phase, core materials were equilibrated with native groundwater lacking in DO to simulate initial non-perturbed anaerobic aquifer conditions. Then, ASR was simulated by replacing the native groundwater in the incubations vessels with DO-rich ASR source water, with DOM or microbes added to some treatments. Finally, the vessels were opened to the atmosphere to mimic oxidizing conditions during later stages of ASR. Arsenic was released from aquifer materials, mainly during transitional periods at the beginning of each incubation stage. Most As released was during the initial anaerobic experimental phase via reductive dissolution of Fe oxides in the core materials, some or all of which may have formed during the core storage or sample preparation period. Oxidation of As-bearing Fe sulfides released smaller amounts of As during the start of later aerobic experimental phases. Additions of labile DOM fueled microbially-mediated reactions that mobilized As, while the addition of refractory DOM did not, probably due to mineral sorption of DOM that made it unavailable for microbial utilization or metal chelation. The results suggest that oscillations of groundwater redox conditions, such as might be expected to occur during an ASR operation, are the underlying cause of enhanced As release in these systems. Further, ASR operations using DOM-rich surface waters may not necessarily lead to additional As releases.

  13. Recycling vs. stabilisation of soil sugars - a long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-06-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a three year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labeled glucose. The compound specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined soils, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose (fuc) and mannose (man) showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose (gal) and rhamnose (rha) were characterised by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition.

  14. Effects of turning duration during incubation on embryo growth, utilization of albumen, and stress regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tona, K; Onagbesan, O; Bruggeman, V; Mertens, K; Decuypere, E

    2005-02-01

    Eggs from Cobb broiler breeders were incubated for 18 d. Eggs were not turned (T0) or were turned until 9 (T9), 12 (T12), 15 (T15), or 18 (T18) d. First, the effects of turning on embryo and albumen weights were studied. Samples of eggs were opened at d 9, 12, 15, and 18 for embryo and albumen weighing. The results show that embryos from unturned eggs had lower weights and higher remaining albumen weights than those from turned eggs. At d 18, albumen utilization was completed in the T12, T15, and T18 groups only. Also, further turning until d 15 and 18 increased embryo weights. The responsiveness of the embryo after adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection was studied to test stress control in embryos. Blood samples were collected from embryos at 60 and 150 min after injection at d 12, 15, and 18 and were analyzed for corticosterone concentrations. The results showed that basal corticosterone levels increased with embryo age. At 60 min after ACTH injection, corticosterone levels were lower at d 12 than at d 15 and 18. At 150 min after ACTH injection, corticosterone levels followed different trends according to incubation stage and turning duration. The highest basal corticosterone levels were obtained with the T15 group at d 15 and 18. Also at d 18, corticosterone levels in the T15 group were the highest at 150 min after ACTH injection. We concluded that egg turning was required during incubation until d 12, at least, and should not be stopped until after d 15.

  15. Microbial and chemical factors influencing methane production in laboratory incubations of low-rank subsurface coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen H.; Smith, Richard L.; Barker, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Lignite and subbituminous coals were investigated for their ability to support microbial methane production in laboratory incubations. Results show that naturally-occurring microorganisms associated with the coals produced substantial quantities of methane, although the factors influencing this process were variable among different samples tested. Methanogenic microbes in two coals from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, produced 140.5-374.6 mL CH4/kg ((4.5-12.0 standard cubic feet (scf)/ton) in response to an amendment of H2/CO2. The addition of high concentrations (5-10 mM) of acetate did not support substantive methane production under the laboratory conditions. However, acetate accumulated in control incubations where methanogenesis was inhibited, indicating that acetate was produced and consumed during the course of methane production. Acetogenesis from H2/CO2 was evident in these incubations and may serve as a competing metabolic mode influencing the cumulative amount of methane produced in coal. Two low-rank (lignite A) coals from Fort Yukon, Alaska, USA, demonstrated a comparable level of methane production (131.1-284.0 mL CH4/kg (4.2-9.1 scf/ton)) in the presence of an inorganic nutrient amendment, indicating that the source of energy and organic carbon was derived from the coal. The concentration of chloroform-extractable organic matter varied by almost three orders of magnitude among all the coals tested, and appeared to be related to methane production potential. These results indicate that substrate availability within the coal matrix and competition between different groups of microorganisms are two factors that may exert a profound influence on methanogenesis in subsurface coal beds.

  16. Mathematical models for growth in alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) embryos developing at different incubation temperatures.

    OpenAIRE

    Bardsley, W G; Ackerman, R A; Bukhari, N A; Deeming, D.C.; Ferguson, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of model-based (growth models) and model-free (cubic splines, exponentials) equations were fitted using weighted-nonlinear least squares regression to embryonic growth data from Alligator mississippiensis eggs incubated at 30 and 33 degrees C. Goodness of fit was estimated using a chi 2 on the sum of squared, weighted residuals, and run and sign tests on the residuals. One of the growth models used (Preece & Baines, 1978) was found to be superior to the classical growth models (expo...

  17. A simple system for in-droplet incubation and quantification of agglutination assays

    KAUST Repository

    Castro, David

    2013-10-28

    This work reports on a simple system for quantitative sensing of a target analyte based on agglutination in micro-channels. Functionalized microbeads and analyte with no prior incubation are flowed in droplets (~2μL) through a thin silicone tube filled with mineral oil at a flow rate of 150 μL/min. Hydrodynamic forces alone produce a highly efficient mixing of the beads within the droplet, without the need of complex mixing structures or magnetic actuation. The setup allows rapid observation of agglutination (<2 min), which is quantified using image analysis, and has potential application to high-throughput analysis.

  18. The Incubation Period of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Viral Dynamics and Immunologic Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Dunmire

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus that causes acute infectious mononucleosis and is associated with cancer and autoimmune disease. While many studies have been performed examining acute disease in adults following primary infection, little is known about the virological and immunological events during EBV's lengthy 6 week incubation period owing to the challenge of collecting samples from this stage of infection. We conducted a prospective study in college students with special emphasis on frequent screening to capture blood and oral wash samples during the incubation period. Here we describe the viral dissemination and immune response in the 6 weeks prior to onset of acute infectious mononucleosis symptoms. While virus is presumed to be present in the oral cavity from time of transmission, we did not detect viral genomes in the oral wash until one week before symptom onset, at which time viral genomes were present in high copy numbers, suggesting loss of initial viral replication control. In contrast, using a sensitive nested PCR method, we detected viral genomes at low levels in blood about 3 weeks before symptoms. However, high levels of EBV in the blood were only observed close to symptom onset-coincident with or just after increased viral detection in the oral cavity. These data imply that B cells are the major reservoir of virus in the oral cavity prior to infectious mononucleosis. The early presence of viral genomes in the blood, even at low levels, correlated with a striking decrease in the number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells well before symptom onset, which remained depressed throughout convalescence. On the other hand, natural killer cells expanded only after symptom onset. Likewise, CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells decreased two fold, but only after symptom onset. We observed no substantial virus specific CD8 T cell expansion during the incubation period, although polyclonal CD8 activation was detected in

  19. How do students from Student Incubators (SI) use networks and how can SI support the activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Mariendal

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines Student Entrepreneur’s (SE) use of networks as part of their activities in a Student Incubator (SI). Recommendations are made as to how SI can create activities to support students' use of internal and external relationships and discusses the paradox between running a learning...... is on SEs because students are likely to have a smaller (in size), less well-founded and limited professional network. In addition, an SI is assumed to be characterized by “limitations” related to their student status. So far none has paid any attention to how SEs "compensate for" and/or develop relevant...... and "performance" (revenues, survival rate, growth) of the SE....

  20. Binding of mescaline with subcellular fractions upon incubation of brain cortex slices with [14C] mescaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1977-01-01

    Incubation of brain cortex slices in the presence of glucose resulted in the permeation of about 65% of [14C] mescaline into slices. Of this, about one-third radioactivity was bound with nuclei, mitochondria, microsomes, and ribosomes. Dialysis of subcellular fractions did not markedly reduce the amounts of radioactivity bound to the fractions. The permeation into slices and the binding of mescaline to subcellular fractions were fairly time-dependent, but were inhibited by the presence of potassium cyanide, or by the absence of glucose and by heating to 80 degrees C for 1 min.

  1. Effects of breeder feeding restriction programs and incubation temperatures on progeny footpad development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, M J; Oviedo-Rondón, E O; Wineland, M J; Wilson, J; Montiel, E

    2014-08-01

    Footpad dermatitis begins early in life, and there is evidence of individual susceptibility. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the carryover effects of breeder feed restriction programs and incubation temperatures (TEM) on progeny footpad development at hatch, and 7 and 22 d. Cobb 500 fast feathering breeders were subjected to 2 dietary feed restriction programs during rearing: skip-a-day (SAD) and every-day feeding (EDF). At 60 wk of age, eggs from each group were collected and incubated according to 2 TEM, standard (S) eggshell temperature (38.1°C) and early-low late-high (LH). This second profile had low (36.9°C) eggshell temperature for the first 3 d, and standard temperature until the last 3 d when eggs were subjected to elevated (38.9°C) eggshell temperature. At hatch, 15 chicks from each treatment combination were sampled to obtain footpads for histological analysis. Seventy-two chicks per treatment were placed in 48 cages (6/cage), and raised to 22 d. At 7 and 22 d, 1 and 2 chickens, respectively, were sampled for footpads. The BW and group feed intake were recorded to obtain BW gain and feed conversion ratio at 7 and 21 d. Histological analysis assessed thickness and total area of stratus corneum (SC), epidermis, and dermis, and total papillae height. Data were analyzed as randomized complete block design in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. There was a negative effect of LH TEM on performance at both ages. An interaction effect on SC area and papillae height was observed at hatch. Additionally, SAD treatment increased thickness and area of footpad dermis. At 7 d, the SC parameters of the SAD progeny were increased. Epidermis thickness was affected by treatment interaction. Furthermore, LH TEM decreased epidermis thickness and dermis area. At 22 d, interaction effects were observed in thickness and area of SC and epidermis. Incubation S TEM increased thickness and area of dermis. It was concluded that breeder feed restriction programs

  2. Evolution of parental incubation behaviour in dinosaurs cannot be inferred from clutch mass in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchard, Geoffrey F; Ruta, Marcello; Deeming, D Charles

    2013-08-23

    A recent study proposed that incubation behaviour (i.e. type of parental care) in theropod dinosaurs can be inferred from an allometric analysis of clutch volume in extant birds. However, the study in question failed to account for factors known to affect egg and clutch size in living bird species. A new scaling analysis of avian clutch mass demonstrates that type of parental care cannot be distinguished by conventional allometry because of the confounding effects of phylogeny and hatchling maturity. Precociality of young but not paternal care in the theropod ancestors of birds is consistent with the available data.

  3. Energetic domains and conformational analysis of human serum albumin upon co-incubation with sodium benzoate and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, F; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Bohlooli, M; Habibi-Rezaei, M; Hadi Alijanvand, H; Amanlou, M; Sheibani, N; Saboury, A A; Ahmad, F

    2014-01-01

    Sodium benzoate (SB), a powerful inhibitor of microbial growth, is one of the most commonly used food preservative. Here, we determined the effects of SB on human serum albumin (HSA) structure in the presence or absence of glucose after 35 days of incubation under physiological conditions. The biochemical, biophysical, and molecular approaches including free amine content assay (TNBSA assay), fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and molecular docking and LIGPLOT studies were utilized for structural studies. The TNBSA results indicated that SB has the ability to bind Lys residues in HSA through covalent bonds. The docking and LIGPLOT studies also determined another specific site via hydrophobic interactions. The CD results showed more structural helicity for HSA incubated with SB, while HSA incubated with glucose had the least, and HSA incubated with glucose + SB had medium helicity. Fluorescence spectrophotometry results demonstrated partial unfolding of HSA incubated with SB in the presence or absence of glucose, while maximum partial unfolding was observed in HSA incubated with glucose. These results were confirmed by DSC and its deconvoluted thermograms. The DSC results also showed significant changes in HSA energetic structural domains due to HSA incubation with SB in the presence or absence of glucose. Together, our studies showed the formation of three different intermediates and indicate that biomolecular investigation are effective in providing new insight into safety determinations especially in health-related conditions including diabetes.

  4. Effects of incubational humidity and hen age on embryo composition in broiler hatching eggs from young breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, E D; Burnham, M R; Gardner, C W; Brake, J; Bruzual, J J; Gerard, P D

    2001-09-01

    There is a paucity of information regarding the influence of incubational humidity on the characteristics of broiler embryos from young hens that often produce chicks of marginal quality. Therefore, the effects of broiler breeder age (26, 28, and 30 wk) in young broiler breeders and incubator humidity (43, 53, and 63% RH) on embryonic growth between 16 and 21 d of incubation, hatching chick weight, and embryo and chick body compositions were evaluated. Hatching broiler chick BW at 21 d was lower for 26-wk-old breeders compared to those at 28 and 30 wk, and the lowest RH decreased relative wet embryo weight. Embryonic growth, on wet and DM bases, was increased in eggs from the youngest hens. Embryo moisture content (EM) was lower at 16, 17, and 19 d of incubation in eggs from breeders at 26 wk when compared to those at 28 wk of age. The effects of RH on embryo crude protein and fat composition were not consistent and varied with breeder age and length of incubation. It was demonstrated that broiler breeder age affects embryogenesis and hatching chick BW. Furthermore, EM was influenced by breeder age, and changes in incubational RH between 43 and 63% affected embryogenesis without having associated effects on EM or consistent effects on embryo crude fat and protein content. Nevertheless, a depression in embryogenesis with a reduction in incubational RH to 43% may accentuate poor posthatch performance of chicks from young breeders.

  5. Effect of egg storage length on hatchability and weight loss in incubation of egg and meat type Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Romao

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The quail raising in Brazil has increased through the last years and the incubation procedures are important to maintenance and improvement of quail egg production. To obtain a sufficient number of eggs to fill an incubator, eggs are usually accumulated in storage over a period from 1 day up to 3 weeks before incubation. The objective of this research was to verify the effect of egg storage on hatchability and egg weight loss for two lineages of Japanese quails. Sixty four Japanese quails were divided in two groups: G1 (n=32 for meat production and G2 (n=32 for egg production. They were used for serial egg collections that were performed every day, during 15 consecutively days, totaling 600 eggs. After collection they were placed in refrigerated room (20°C and 60% of relative humidity and submitted to different periods of storage, from 0 day until 14 days, according to their collection day. The incubation occurred at 37.6°C and 60% RH. The weight measurements were done during storage, incubation and hatching. The results showed that for Meat type and Egg type quails, the egg hatchability was around 84% until 10 days of storage, and then this rate decreased significantly. Both types of quail eggs presented similar weight loss during storage and incubation. The research showed that quail eggs present great hatchability until 10 days of storage and that eggs submitted to storage present a reduced weight loss during incubation.

  6. Effect of incubation on bacterial communities of eggshells in a temperate bird, the Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Young Lee

    Full Text Available Inhibitory effect of incubation on microbial growth has extensively been studied in wild bird populations using culture-based methods and conflicting results exist on whether incubation selectively affects the growth of microbes on the egg surface. In this study, we employed culture-independent methods, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, to elucidate the effect of incubation on the bacterial abundance and bacterial community composition on the eggshells of the Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica. We found that total bacterial abundance increased and diversity decreased on incubated eggs while there were no changes on non-incubated eggs. Interestingly, Gram-positive Bacillus, which include mostly harmless species, became dominant and genus Pseudomonas, which include opportunistic avian egg pathogens, were significantly reduced after incubation. These results suggest that avian incubation in temperate regions may promote the growth of harmless (or benevolent bacteria and suppress the growth of pathogenic bacterial taxa and consequently reduce the diversity of microbes on the egg surface. We hypothesize that this may occur due to difference in sensitivity to dehydration on the egg surface among microbes, combined with the introduction of Bacillus from bird feathers and due to the presence of antibiotics that certain bacteria produce.

  7. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  8. Dynamic failure of dry and fully saturated limestone samples based on incubation time concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Petrov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the results of experimental study of the dynamic rock failure based on the comparison of dry and saturated limestone samples obtained during the dynamic compression and split tests. The tests were performed using the Kolsky method and its modifications for dynamic splitting. The mechanical data (e.g. strength, time and energy characteristics of this material at high strain rates are obtained. It is shown that these characteristics are sensitive to the strain rate. A unified interpretation of these rate effects, based on the structural–temporal approach, is hereby presented. It is demonstrated that the temporal dependence of the dynamic compressive and split tensile strengths of dry and saturated limestone samples can be predicted by the incubation time criterion. Previously discovered possibilities to optimize (minimize the energy input for the failure process is discussed in connection with industrial rock failure processes. It is shown that the optimal energy input value associated with critical load, which is required to initialize failure in the rock media, strongly depends on the incubation time and the impact duration. The optimal load shapes, which minimize the momentum for a single failure impact, are demonstrated. Through this investigation, a possible approach to reduce the specific energy required for rock cutting by means of high-frequency vibrations is also discussed.

  9. Edible crabs "go west": migrations and incubation cycle of Cancer pagurus revealed by electronic tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan Hunter

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are key components of marine ecosystems which, like other exploited marine taxa, show seasonable patterns of distribution and activity, with consequences for their availability to capture by targeted fisheries. Despite concerns over the sustainability of crab fisheries worldwide, difficulties in observing crabs' behaviour over their annual cycles, and the timings and durations of reproduction, remain poorly understood. From the release of 128 mature female edible crabs tagged with electronic data storage tags (DSTs, we demonstrate predominantly westward migration in the English Channel. Eastern Channel crabs migrated further than western Channel crabs, while crabs released outside the Channel showed little or no migration. Individual migrations were punctuated by a 7-month hiatus, when crabs remained stationary, coincident with the main period of crab spawning and egg incubation. Incubation commenced earlier in the west, from late October onwards, and brooding locations, determined using tidal geolocation, occurred throughout the species range. With an overall return rate of 34%, our results demonstrate that previous reluctance to tag crabs with relatively high-cost DSTs for fear of loss following moulting is unfounded, and that DSTs can generate precise information with regards life-history metrics that would be unachievable using other conventional means.

  10. Edible crabs "go west": migrations and incubation cycle of Cancer pagurus revealed by electronic tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ewan; Eaton, Derek; Stewart, Christie; Lawler, Andrew; Smith, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Crustaceans are key components of marine ecosystems which, like other exploited marine taxa, show seasonable patterns of distribution and activity, with consequences for their availability to capture by targeted fisheries. Despite concerns over the sustainability of crab fisheries worldwide, difficulties in observing crabs' behaviour over their annual cycles, and the timings and durations of reproduction, remain poorly understood. From the release of 128 mature female edible crabs tagged with electronic data storage tags (DSTs), we demonstrate predominantly westward migration in the English Channel. Eastern Channel crabs migrated further than western Channel crabs, while crabs released outside the Channel showed little or no migration. Individual migrations were punctuated by a 7-month hiatus, when crabs remained stationary, coincident with the main period of crab spawning and egg incubation. Incubation commenced earlier in the west, from late October onwards, and brooding locations, determined using tidal geolocation, occurred throughout the species range. With an overall return rate of 34%, our results demonstrate that previous reluctance to tag crabs with relatively high-cost DSTs for fear of loss following moulting is unfounded, and that DSTs can generate precise information with regards life-history metrics that would be unachievable using other conventional means.

  11. Research of the incubation and hybridization instrument with vibration for nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Deng, Yan; Li, Qihua; Liu, Bin; Xia, Yun; Du, Yuhang; He, Nongyue

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles are the largest and most widely used nanomaterial in biomedical research nowadays, which are always used in solution. However, traditional techniques, such as hybridization oven are not appropriate for the incubation and hybridization of nanoparticles. Thus designing and developing an effective method and instrument for hybridization of nanoparticles is very essential to solve these present problems. This paper introduced and successfully designed a hybridization instrument, including insulated and closed chamber, temperature control system, motion control system input and output control system. The instrument can not only control temperature precisely to meet various requirements for chemical and biological molecule's incubation and hybridization on nanomaterials, but also make liquid flow slowly and shake according to a certain frequency for mixing to improve hybridization efficiency significantly. The control algorithm of temperature applied PID and fuzzy-PID, the accuracy is improved and stable. Vibration is the most obvious and advantageous feature of the instrument. Furthermore the core control system was improved whose core is C8051F060 MCU and designed into panel.

  12. [Development of Human Health Discoveries. 10 years results of Young Innovative Company incubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is evolving every day in its operating procedures and the services offered to patients, emphasizing personalized medicine, safety and medical benefits. The individual patient is more than ever the hub of healthcare organization. Medical innovation is thus a public health priority. However it requires an accurate assessment of medical utility and risk-benefit ratios, and in-depth analysis of economic and organizational impacts. Ten years of experience in the Paris Biotech Santé company incubator has identified key actions for effective support of research projects and the success of innovative companies. Strong expertise is needed to prepare development plans, ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and obtain research funding. During its first decade, this incubator has created 87 innovative companies employing 1500 people, raised more than 90 million euros of funding, and reached a cumulative company value of 1200 million euros. Key factors of success have been identified, but an analysis of the causes of failure shows that operational adjustments are mandatory, particularly a strong commitment from medical experts, in order to promote access to new and useful products for patients while at the same time assessing their social impact.

  13. Latitudinal variation in avian incubation attentiveness and a test of the food limitation hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, A.D.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    Avian incubation attentiveness has important fitness consequences through its influence on the number and quality of hatched young and energetic costs imposed on parents. Nest attentiveness is highly variable across species and geographical regions. We reviewed the literature and found a worldwide pattern that nest attentiveness of passerines is generally lower in south temperate and tropical regions than in north temperate regions. We also conducted a food manipulation experiment to assess the extent to which nest attentiveness may reflect proximate responses versus an evolved behaviour. We used the karoo prinia, Prinia maculosa, in South Africa, which has very low nest attentiveness (???49%) compared with that of many passerine birds. We provided supplemental food during early incubation to experimental females and compared nest attentiveness and on- and off-bout lengths of experimental and paired control females.??Nest attentiveness of females at food-provisioned nests was significantly higher than that of control females (57% versus 49%). Food-supplemented females also spent significantly less time off the nest than did control females, whereas mean on-bout lengths did not differ. However, mean nest attentiveness of food-provisioned females was still substantially below that of other similar bird species worldwide. Food can be an important proximate influence on parental care behaviour, but proximate influences of food do not explain broad latitudinal patterns of attentiveness. ?? 2007 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  14. Effect of incubation atmosphere on the production and composition of staphylococcal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kentaro; Yamada, Keiko; Yagi, Tetsuya; Baba, Hisashi; Kawamura, Ichiro; Ohta, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are pathogenic bacteria that often cause invasive infections in humans. In this study, we characterized the composition and growth characteristics of staphylococcal biofilms under various incubation atmospheres. We assessed the effect of incubation atmosphere (aerobic, 5% CO2, anaerobic, and microaerobic) on the biofilm production capabilities of S. aureus strains isolated from healthy volunteers and from patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection. In addition, the composition of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms was determined by assessment of biofilm degradation after treatment with DNase I, proteinase K, and dispersin B. The strains obtained from healthy volunteers and patients showed similar biofilm formation capabilities. Biofilms of S. aureus were rich in proteins when developed under ambient atmospheric conditions, 5% CO2, and microaerobic condition, whereas S. epidermidis biofilms contained large amounts of poly-β (1, 6)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine when developed under ambient atmospheric conditions and microaerobic condition. The biofilm-producing capability of S. epidermidis was considerably higher than that of S. aureus under aerobic condition. Staphylococcal isolates obtained from healthy individuals and patients with catheter-related infections have similar biofilm-forming capabilities. Under microaerobic conditions, S. aureus and S. epidermidis form protein-rich and poly-β (1, 6)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-rich biofilms, respectively. These components may play an important role in the development of biofilms inside the body and may be the target molecules to prevent catheter-related infections caused by these organisms.

  15. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  16. Using Soil Incubation Experiments to Enhance Urban Elementary School Student Understanding of Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittinghill, K. A.; van Vleck, H. E.; Dechaine, J. M.; Faber, N.

    2007-12-01

    Soil incubations provide a simple and low-cost way to introduce inquiry into the elementary school curriculum. As part of the University of Minnesota's NSF-funded GK-12 program, we used a replicated soil experiment to enhance a unit on global warming and carbon cycling for a 4th grade enrichment group at an urban elementary school. After completing several global warming related, inquiry based activities, the students designed an experiment to test their hypothesis that increasing temperature increases soil respiration. Students used soil from the playground placed at different temperatures within the school (computer server room, classroom, and refrigerator) to carry out their experiment. With the help of GK-12 graduate fellows, students used an infrared gas analyzer to quantify the production of carbon dioxide by the soil within mason jars. The students analyzed their data and discussed the relevance of their findings to previous lessons on global climate change. We will discuss the incubation experiment in the context of our collaboration between scientists and elementary school classrooms, inquiry based science education, and our 4th grade unit on global climate change.

  17. Prolonged Incubation of Acute Neuronal Tissue for Electrophysiology and Calcium-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Morven A; Kekesi, Orsolya; Morley, John W; Bellot-Saez, Alba; Kueh, Sindy; Breen, Paul; van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan; Buskila, Yossi

    2017-02-15

    Acute neuronal tissue preparations, brain slices and retinal wholemount, can usually only be maintained for 6 - 8 h following dissection. This limits the experimental time, and increases the number of animals that are utilized per study. This limitation specifically impacts protocols such as calcium imaging that require prolonged pre-incubation with bath-applied dyes. Exponential bacterial growth within 3 - 4 h after slicing is tightly correlated with a decrease in tissue health. This study describes a method for limiting the proliferation of bacteria in acute preparations to maintain viable neuronal tissue for prolonged periods of time (>24 h) without the need for antibiotics, sterile procedures, or tissue culture media containing growth factors. By cycling the extracellular fluid through UV irradiation and keeping the tissue in a custom holding chamber at 15 - 16 °C, the tissue shows no difference in electrophysiological properties, or calcium signaling through intracellular calcium dyes at >24 h postdissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but will reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals, and will set a gold standard for acute neuronal tissue incubation.

  18. Incubation period of Hemileia vastatrix in coffee plants in Brazil simulated under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ghini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Risk analysis of climate change on plant diseases has great importance for agriculture since it allows the evaluation of management strategies to minimize future damages. This work aimed to simulate future scenarios of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix epidemics by elaborating geographic distribution maps using a model that estimates the pathogen incubation period and the output from three General Circulation Models (CSIRO-Mk3.0, INM-CM3.0, and MIROC3.2.medres. The climatological normal from 1961-1990 was compared with that of the decades 2020s, 2050s and 2080s using scenarios A2 and B1 from the IPCC. Maps were prepared with a spatial resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 degrees of latitude and longitude for ten producing states in Brazil. The climate variables used were maximum and minimum monthly temperatures. The maps obtained in scenario A2 showed a tendency towards a reduction in the incubation period when future scenarios are compared with the climatological normal from 1961-1990. A reduction in the period was also observed in scenario B1, although smaller than that in scenario A2.

  19. [Constructing meanings and possibilities: the incubation team's experience of a supportice undertaking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Priscila Tagliaferro; Filizola, Carmen Lúcia Alves

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to analyze the experience of an incubation team in a supportive undertaking regarding mental healthcare clients. Interviews were conducted with seven team members, and the data were analyzed using content data analysis. The analysis revealed four categories: considering incubation as a process - learning and finding the meanings of support; pointing out the easy and difficult aspects in the process of constructing the undertaking; seeing results of the inclusion through work - noticing the clients' improvement; and pointing out the need for changes in the process, expecting greater autonomy of clients and formalization of the undertaking. The experience revealed itself as a new and fulfilling job for the team, allowing for learning, exchanging knowledge and attachment. We identified that the technician plays the role of educator/facilitator of the process. In addition to the simple aspects and the recognition of the relevance of the work in terms of the clients' lives, the team faces challenges in generating satisfactory revenue.

  20. [Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood culture isolates from briefly incubated solid medium cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero-Téllez, Mónica; Recacha, Esther; de Cueto, Marina; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-02-16

    Mass spectrometry Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) helps in the rapid identification of microorganisms causing blood stream infection. Rapid and reliable methods are required to decrease the turnaround time for reporting antimicrobial susceptibility results from blood culture isolates. An evaluation was performed on the reliability of a method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood culture isolates from briefly incubated solid medium cultures. The agreement between the evaluated and standard methods was 99.3%. The major and minor error rates were 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively, and no very major errors were observed. The inoculation of briefly incubated solid medium cultures into antimicrobial susceptibility testing panels is an easy and reliable technique, and helps to decrease the turnaround time for reporting antimicrobial susceptibility results of positive blood cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting nitrous oxide emissions from manure properties and soil moisture: An incubation experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baral, Khagendra Raj; Arthur, Emmanuel; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Field-applied manure is a source of essential plant nutrients, but benefits may be partly offset by high rates of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, as modified by manure characteristics and soil properties. In a 28-d incubation experiment we quantified short-term emissions of N2O from a sandy loam...... soil amended with digestate (DI), pig slurry (PS) or cattle slurry (CS), and unamended soil (Ctrl), when incubated at 60, 70 and 80% water-filled pore space (WFPS). The soil was amended with 15N-labelled nitrate to distinguish sources of N2O. Emissions of N2O were not related to N input...... and corresponded to between 0.04 and 2.42% of manure N, decreasing in the order CS > DI > PS > Ctrl within each WFPS level. Recovery of 15N in N2O indicated that heterotrophic denitrification constituted at least 64–77% of total emissions at 70 and 80% WFPS, while nitrification was more important for the low...

  2. Failure to turn eggs during incubation: effects on embryo weight, development of the chorioallantois and absorption of albumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullett, S G; Deeming, D C

    1987-06-01

    Turning eggs during incubation is essential for good hatchability. In the present paper additional effects on the development of the chorioallantois, absorption of albumen and growth of the embryo are recorded. The ability of an unturned egg to hatch was not affected by egg weight, egg shell porosity or water loss during incubation. The ability of the chorioallantois to spread around the inner surface of the inner shell membrane and the degree of absorption of the residual albumen affected the growth of the embryo and its ability to hatch. Unturned eggs hatched later than eggs which were turned throughout incubation.

  3. Humidity control of an incubator using the microcontroller-based active humidifier system employing an ultrasonic nebulizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, I; Burunkaya, M

    2002-01-01

    Relative humidity levels of an incubator were measured and controlled. An ultrasonic nebulizer system as an active humidifier was used to humidify the incubator environment. An integrated circuit-type humidity sensor was used to measure the humidity level of the incubator environment. Measurement and control processes were achieved by a PIC microcontroller. The high-performance and high-speed PIC provided the flexibility of the system. The developed system can be used effectively for the intensive care of newborns and/or premature babies. Since the humidifier generates an aerosol in ambient conditions, it is possible to provide the high relative humidity level for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in medicine.

  4. Towards gene banking amphibian maternal germ lines: short-term incubation, cryoprotectant tolerance and cryopreservation of embryonic cells of the frog, Limnodynastes peronii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Lawson

    Full Text Available Gene banking is arguably the best method available to prevent the loss of genetic diversity caused by declines in wild populations, when the causes of decline cannot be halted or reversed. For one of the most impacted vertebrate groups, the amphibians, gene banking technologies have advanced considerably, and gametes from the male line can be banked successfully for many species. However, cryopreserving the female germ line remains challenging, with attempts at cryopreserving oocytes unsuccessful due to their large size and yolk content. One possible solution is to target cryopreservation of early embryos that contain the maternal germ line, but consist of smaller cells. Here, we investigate the short term incubation, cryoprotectant tolerance, and cryopreservation of dissociated early embryonic cells from gastrulae and neurulae of the Striped Marsh Frog, Limnodynastes peronii. Embryos were dissociated and cells were incubated for up to 24 hours in various media. Viability of both gastrula and neurula cells remained high (means up to 40-60% over 24 hours of incubation in all media, although viability was maintained at a higher level in Ca(2+-free Simplified Amphibian Ringer; low speed centrifugation did not reduce cell viability. Tolerance of dissociated embryonic cells was tested for two cryoprotectants, glycerol and dimethyl sulphoxide; dissociated cells of both gastrulae and neurulae were highly tolerant to both-indeed, cell viability over 24 hours was higher in media containing low-to-medium concentrations than in equivalent cryoprotectant-free media. Viability over 24 hours was lower in concentrations of cryoprotectant higher than 10%. Live cells were recovered following cryopreservation of both gastrula and neurula cells, but only at low rates. Optimal cryodiluents were identified for gastrula and neurula cells. This is the first report of a slow cooling protocol for cryopreservation of amphibian embryonic cells, and sets future research

  5. Towards gene banking amphibian maternal germ lines: short-term incubation, cryoprotectant tolerance and cryopreservation of embryonic cells of the frog, Limnodynastes peronii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Bianca; Clulow, Simon; Mahony, Michael J; Clulow, John

    2013-01-01

    Gene banking is arguably the best method available to prevent the loss of genetic diversity caused by declines in wild populations, when the causes of decline cannot be halted or reversed. For one of the most impacted vertebrate groups, the amphibians, gene banking technologies have advanced considerably, and gametes from the male line can be banked successfully for many species. However, cryopreserving the female germ line remains challenging, with attempts at cryopreserving oocytes unsuccessful due to their large size and yolk content. One possible solution is to target cryopreservation of early embryos that contain the maternal germ line, but consist of smaller cells. Here, we investigate the short term incubation, cryoprotectant tolerance, and cryopreservation of dissociated early embryonic cells from gastrulae and neurulae of the Striped Marsh Frog, Limnodynastes peronii. Embryos were dissociated and cells were incubated for up to 24 hours in various media. Viability of both gastrula and neurula cells remained high (means up to 40-60%) over 24 hours of incubation in all media, although viability was maintained at a higher level in Ca(2+)-free Simplified Amphibian Ringer; low speed centrifugation did not reduce cell viability. Tolerance of dissociated embryonic cells was tested for two cryoprotectants, glycerol and dimethyl sulphoxide; dissociated cells of both gastrulae and neurulae were highly tolerant to both-indeed, cell viability over 24 hours was higher in media containing low-to-medium concentrations than in equivalent cryoprotectant-free media. Viability over 24 hours was lower in concentrations of cryoprotectant higher than 10%. Live cells were recovered following cryopreservation of both gastrula and neurula cells, but only at low rates. Optimal cryodiluents were identified for gastrula and neurula cells. This is the first report of a slow cooling protocol for cryopreservation of amphibian embryonic cells, and sets future research directions for

  6. Importance of sub-embryonic fluid and albumen in the embryo's response to turning of the egg during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, D C

    1989-09-01

    1. The effects of removal of sub-embryonic fluid and albumen on the development of the fowl embryo were investigated. 2. A deficiency of sub-embryonic fluid on day 7 of incubation resulted in a reduction in the volume of the yolk sac and of allantoic fluid, and a reduction in the mass of the embryo later in incubation. 3. A deficiency of albumen on day 3 of incubation led to a reduction in allantoic fluid and embryo mass after day 12 incubation. 4. The results suggest that the physiology of embryos in unturned eggs is better modelled by eggs deprived of albumen than by eggs deprived of sub-embryonic fluid.

  7. Temperature - Impact of chiller failure on the short-term temperature variation in the incubation of salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In salmon recovery programs it is commonly necessary to chill incubation and early rearing temperatures to match wild development times. The most common failure mode...

  8. Chiller Design Model - Impact of chiller failure on the short-term temperature variation in the incubation of salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In salmon recovery programs it is commonly necessary to chill incubation and early rearing temperatures to match wild development times. The most common failure mode...

  9. A critical assessment of the occurrence and extend of oxygen contamination during anaerobic incubations utilizing commercially available vials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Thamdrup, Bo; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2012-01-01

    For rate determinations of anaerobic metabolism it is essential to maintain strictly anoxic conditions throughout the experiment. However, even if oxygen contamination can be avoided while preparing the incubation containers, it is still possible that the incubation containers themselves...... contaminate the samples by oxygen diffusing from or through their plastic or rubber components. In this study, we investigated the sources and extent of oxygen contamination during anoxic incubations, and present solutions to minimize oxygen contamination. In particular, we investigated oxygen contamination...... in Labco® Exetainers, glass vials with a butyl rubber septum in the screw cap, which are frequently used in microbiological experiments. Our results show that significant oxygen contamination occurred at different stages during the incubation. Contamination occurred when Exetainers were either filled...

  10. Innovation incubators – entities of support of small and medium-sized enterprises’ competitiveness in the Modern economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Lidia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Innovation incubators are entities of the infrastructure network of support of small and medium-sized enterprises. At the stage of SMEs’ maximum vulnerability, they improve the survival of innovative businesses through the range of services and facilities provided. They are designed to mitigate the problems faced by SMEs, which develop and implement innovations, ensuring sustainability and competitiveness. Along with promoting the entrepreneurial spirit, innovation incubators play an essential role in promoting knowledge and innovation transfer, introduction of the research results into economic circuit, creating links between businesses, universities, research institutions, etc., links between people, talents and resources.In this article, we will focus on innovation incubators, their role in the development of SMEs in the world and in the Republic of Moldova, making an accent in the creation and development of the country's first Innovation Incubator „Inovatorul”.

  11. Transmission of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus during the Incubation Period in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Pacheco, Juan M.; Brito, Barbara P.; Moreno-Torres, Karla I.; Branan, Matt A.; Delgado, Amy H.; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the quantitative characteristics of a pathogen’s capability to transmit during distinct phases of infection is important to enable accurate predictions of the spread and impact of a disease outbreak. In the current investigation, the potential for transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) during the incubation (preclinical) period of infection was investigated in seven groups of pigs that were sequentially exposed to a group of donor pigs that were infected by simulated-natural inoculation. Contact-exposed pigs were comingled with infected donors through successive 8-h time slots spanning from 8 to 64 h post-inoculation (hpi) of the donor pigs. The transition from latent to infectious periods in the donor pigs was clearly defined by successful transmission of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) to all contact pigs that were exposed to the donors from 24 hpi and later. This onset of infectiousness occurred concurrent with detection of viremia, but approximately 24 h prior to the first appearance of clinical signs of FMD in the donors. Thus, the latent period of infection ended approximately 24 h before the end of the incubation period. There were significant differences between contact-exposed groups in the time elapsed from virus exposure to the first detection of FMDV shedding, viremia, and clinical lesions. Specifically, the onset and progression of clinical FMD were more rapid in pigs that had been exposed to the donor pigs during more advanced phases of disease, suggesting that these animals had received a higher effective challenge dose. These results demonstrate transmission and dissemination of FMD within groups of pigs during the incubation period of infection. Furthermore, these findings suggest that under current conditions, shedding of FMDV in oropharyngeal fluids is a more precise proxy for FMDV infectiousness than clinical signs of infection. These findings may impact modeling of the propagation of FMD outbreaks that initiate

  12. Gene expression changes following extinction testing in a heroin behavioral incubation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Willard M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of gene expression studies have investigated changes induced by drug exposure, but few reports describe changes that persist following relapse. In this study, genome-wide analysis of gene expression was conducted following an extinction session (90 min in rats that expressed behavioral incubation of heroin-seeking and goal-directed behavior. As an important modulator of goal-directed behavior, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC was the target of genomic analysis. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin during 3 h daily sessions for 14 d. Following the self-administration period, rats were reintroduced to the self-administration chambers for a 90-minute extinction session in which they could seek heroin, but received none. Extinction sessions were conducted on groups after either 1 d or 14 d of drug-free enforced abstinence to demonstrate behavioral incubation. Results Behavioral data demonstrated incubation (increased expression of heroin-seeking and goal-directed behavior after the 14 d abstinent period. That is, following 14 d of enforced abstinence, animals displayed heightened drug-seeking behavior when returned to the environment where they had previously received heroin. This increased drug-seeking took place despite the fact that they received no drug during this extinction session. Whole genome gene expression analysis was performed and results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR. Microarrays identified 66 genes whose expression was identified as changed by at least 1.4 fold (p bdnf, calb1, dusp5, dusp6, egr1, npy, rgs2. Conclusion Ontological analysis indicates that several of the genes confirmed to be changed are important for neuroplasticity, and through that role may impact learning and behavior. The importance of drug-seeking behavior and memory of previous drug-taking sessions suggest that such genes may be important for relapse. The global gene expression analysis adds to the

  13. A case study of incubation of tourism activities in the region of Subotica as a chance of tourism management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zedi Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tourism at the micro level can be channeled through various aspects of the implementation of business ideas. One of the features of modern mechanisms is the use of business incubators and their ability to implement business ideas of tourist industry. Specific target groups, who want to do business in the field of tourism, with the support of the incubator can get through the first 3 years of operations, which are needed to stabilize. Incubation of tourism services, so far hasn't been the subject of the research and study in our region, because the incubators were big news in our country. The micro-entrepreneurship, in the sector in which has a lot of beginners in the field of tourism, the problems of management and its development are closely related to the usual problems of starting his own business, with the risks that are specific to the tourism sector. The tourism sector is a very sensitive sector of the economy, who right now, very quickly respond to any changes in the environment. This paper discusses about the possibility of using business incubators for incubation of tourist services, the conditions for the development of management skills, to overcome the risk in the business, the link of business incubation of micro level with the development of the tourism industry, through case studies. The aim is to conclude as specified instructions that will help Micro-entrepreneurs in the process of incubation of tourist services and developing their own organizational management in practice. They will apply normative methods, namely: observation, comparison, analysis and synthesis, inference of induction and deduction.

  14. Effects of incubator humidity and hen age on yolk composition in broiler hatching eggs from young breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, M R; Peebles, E D; Gardner, C W; Brake, J; Bruzual, J J; Gerard, P D

    2001-10-01

    The effects of broiler breeder age (26, 28, and 30 wk) and incubator relative humidity (43, 53, and 63% RH) on yolk sac weight and composition in broiler hatching eggs between 16 and 19 d of incubation were evaluated. Percentage yolk sac weight was reduced in eggs from the youngest (26 wk) breeder hens and in eggs incubated at 53% RH. Percentage yolk moisture, in eggs from the youngest hens, was lowest at 16 d and was highest at 19 d, and percentage yolk lipid was highest at 16 and 17 d of incubation in eggs from 30-wk-old hens. Percentage yolk lipid content was higher at 63% RH compared with 53% RH in eggs from 26-wk-old breeders but was lower in eggs incubated at a 43% RH compared with 53 and 63% RH from 30-wk-old breeders. Yolk stearic and arachidonic acid concentrations were higher and myristic acid concentration was lower in eggs from the 26-wk-old hens. Conversely, the highest yolk concentrations of linolenic and palmitoleic acids occurred in eggs from 30- and 28-wk-old breeders, respectively. At 16, 17, 18, and 19 d of incubation, yolk oleic acid concentrations were significantly, but variably, affected by breeder age, whereas linoleic acid concentration was highest in 26-wk-old breeders only at 19 d. Palmitic acid concentration at 17 d was lower in eggs incubated at 53% RH compared with 43 and 63% RH. Rate of yolk uptake from the yolk sac by embryos may be increased by incubating eggs at 53% RH, and the effects of changes in RH between 43 and 63% on yolk lipid content are influenced by breeder age.

  15. Exposure of embryos to cyclically cold incubation temperatures durably affects energy metabolism and antioxidant pathways in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyau, T; Collin, A; Yenisey, C; Crochet, S; Siegel, P B; Akşit, M; Yalçin, S

    2014-08-01

    Cyclically cold incubation temperatures have been suggested as a means to improve resistance of broiler chickens to ascites; however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Nine hundred eggs obtained from 48 wk Ross broiler breeders were randomly assigned to 2 incubation treatments: control I eggs were incubated at 37.6°C throughout, whereas for cold I eggs the incubation temperature was reduced by 1°C for 6 h daily from 10 to 18 d of incubation. Thereafter, chickens were reared at standard temperatures or under cold exposure that was associated or not with a postnatal cold acclimation at d 5 posthatch. At hatch, hepatic catalase activity and malondialdehyde content were measured. Serum thyroid hormone and triglyceride concentrations, and muscle expression of several genes involved in the regulation of energy metabolism and oxidative stress were also measured at hatch and 5 and 25 d posthatch. Cold incubation induced modifications in antioxidant pathways with higher catalase activity, but lower expression of avian uncoupling protein 3 at hatch. However, long-term enhancement in the expression of avian uncoupling protein 3 was observed, probably caused by an increase in the expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α. These effects were not systematically associated with an increase in serum triiodothyronine concentrations that were observed only in chickens exposed to both cold incubation and later acclimation at 5 d with cold rearing. Our results suggest that these conditions of cyclically cold incubation resulted in the long-term in changes in antioxidant pathways and energy metabolism, which could enhance the health of chickens reared under cold conditions.

  16. Estimating the Distribution of the Incubation Periods of Human Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virlogeux, Victor; Li, Ming; Tsang, Tim K.; Feng, Luzhao; Fang, Vicky J.; Jiang, Hui; Wu, Peng; Zheng, Jiandong; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Cao, Yu; Qin, Ying; Liao, Qiaohong; Yu, Hongjie; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel avian influenza virus, influenza A(H7N9), emerged in China in early 2013 and caused severe disease in humans, with infections occurring most frequently after recent exposure to live poultry. The distribution of A(H7N9) incubation periods is of interest to epidemiologists and public health officials, but estimation of the distribution is complicated by interval censoring of exposures. Imputation of the midpoint of intervals was used in some early studies, resulting in estimated mean incubation times of approximately 5 days. In this study, we estimated the incubation period distribution of human influenza A(H7N9) infections using exposure data available for 229 patients with laboratory-confirmed A(H7N9) infection from mainland China. A nonparametric model (Turnbull) and several parametric models accounting for the interval censoring in some exposures were fitted to the data. For the best-fitting parametric model (Weibull), the mean incubation period was 3.4 days (95% confidence interval: 3.0, 3.7) and the variance was 2.9 days; results were very similar for the nonparametric Turnbull estimate. Under the Weibull model, the 95th percentile of the incubation period distribution was 6.5 days (95% confidence interval: 5.9, 7.1). The midpoint approximation for interval-censored exposures led to overestimation of the mean incubation period. Public health observation of potentially exposed persons for 7 days after exposure would be appropriate. PMID:26409239

  17. Effect of Additional Carbonates on CO2 Emission from Calcareous Soil During the Closed-Jar Incubation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yan-Jie; CAI Miao; LIANG Bin; ZHOU Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    The closed-jar incubation method is widely used to estimate the mineralization of soil organic C.There are two C pools (i.e.,organic and inorganic C) in calcareous soil.To evaluate the effect of additional carbonates on CO2 emission from calcareous soil during closed-jar incubation,three incubation experiments were conducted by adding different types (CaCO3 and MgCO3) and amounts of carbonate to the soil.The addition of carbonates significantly increased CO2 emission from the soil; the increase ranged from 12.0% in the CaCO3 amended soil to 460% in the MgCO3 amended soil during a 100-d incubation.Cumulative CO2 production at the end of the incubation was three times greater in the MgCO3 amended soil compared to the CaCO3 amended one.The CO2 emission increased with the amount of CaCO3 added to the soil.In contrast,CO2 emission decreased as the amount of MgCO3 added to the soil increased.Our results confirmed that the closed-jar incubation method could lead to an overestimate of organic C mineralization in calcareous soils.Because of its effect on soil pH and the dissolution of carbonates,HgC12 should not be used to sterilize calcareous soil if the experiment includes the measurement of soil CO2 production.

  18. Accumulation of trace metals in the embryos and hatchlings of Chelonia mydas from Peninsular Malaysia incubated at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Olszowy, Henry; Francis, Rod; Ibrahim, Kamarruddin; Whittier, Joan

    2013-04-15

    A variety of trace metals were measured in the egg contents of three clutches of Chelonia mydas collected from Kuala Terengganu state in Peninsular Malaysia. We quantified Mn, Cu, Zn, Se (essential trace metals) and As (anthropogenic pollutant) at several developmental stages obtained by incubating eggs at two different temperatures (27 °C and 31 °C). The incubation temperatures were chosen because they produce predominantly male or predominantly female hatchlings, respectively. The eggs were removed from the sand and washed before being placed in incubators, to ensure that the only possible source of the detected metals was maternal transfer. Other metals: Mo, Co, Ni, Cd, Sn, Sb, Hg, Tl and Pb (all non-essential metals) were detected at concentrations below the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ). Trace metal concentrations, particularly [Zn], increased during development, other metals (Cu, As, Se and Cr) accumulated to a lesser degree than zinc but no significant differences were observed between the incubation temperatures at any stage of incubation. To date, only a few studies on trace metals in turtle embryos and hatchlings have been reported; this study will provide basic knowledge on the accumulation of trace metals during development at two different incubation temperatures.

  19. Differences in Incubation Length and Hatchling Morphology among Five Species of Oviparous Phrynocephalus Lizards (Agamidae) from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng WANG; Li MA; Min SHAO; Xiang JI

    2013-01-01

    We incubated eggs of five Phrynocephalus species (P. albolineatus, P. axillaries, P. grumgrzimailoi, P. helioscopus and P. przewalskii) at three constant temperatures (24 °C, 28 °C and 32 °C) to examine differences in incubation length and hatchling morphology among species and among temperature treatments. We combined data from this study with those reported previously for P. frontalis and P. versicolor to examine whether embryonic stage at laying is a causal factor for interspeciifc variation in incubation length, and whether the phylogenetic relationship inferred from hatchling morphology is consistent with the relationship based on mitochondrial DNA data. Mean values for incubation length differed among the ifve species studied herein and, in all these ifve species, incubation length decreased at a decreasing rate as temperature increased. In none of the ifve species did hatchling size (snout-vent length and body mass) and other morphological variables differ among the three temperature treatments. The seven oviparous Phrynocephalus lizards found in China differ from each other in hatchling morphology, and embryonic stage at laying is a causal factor of inter-and intra-speciifc variation in incubation length. The phylogenetic relationship inferred from hatchling morphology is not always consistent with the currently known relationship based on mitochondrial DNA data. Data from this study and those reported previously allow the conclusion that any Phrynocephalus species may have its unique position along the axis deifned by hatchling morphology.

  20. Incubation of saccharin craving and within-session changes in responding for a cue previously associated with saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, K; Barnes, J; Grimm, J W

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent increases in cue-induced sucrose seeking after forced abstinence have been described in rats with a history of sucrose self-administration, suggesting sucrose craving "incubates". In the present study, we examined whether the incubation of craving generalizes to the artificial sweetener, saccharin. Thirty-one male Long-Evans rats lever pressed for 0.3% saccharin solution 1h/day for 10 days. On either Day 1 or 30 of forced abstinence, rats responded for 1h for presentation of a tone+light cue previously presented with every saccharin delivery during self-administration training. Rats responded more during this cue-reactivity test session following 30 vs. 1 day of forced abstinence ("incubation of craving"). This result is the first demonstration of the "incubation of saccharin craving" and suggests that a post-ingestive caloric consequence of self-administration is not a necessary condition for the development of incubation of sucrose craving. We also examined the time course (within-session decreases) of active-lever responding during the 1-h cue-reactivity test session. Rats in the Day 30 group responded more than rats in the Day 1 group from the beginning of the test session. In addition, within-session decreases in responding were shallower in slope in the Day 30 than the Day 1 group. These results indicate that "incubation of saccharin craving" enhances the persistence of seeking behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 230 Helicobacter pylori strains: importance of medium, inoculum, and incubation time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartzen, S H; Andersen, L P; Bremmelgaard, A;

    1997-01-01

    No standardized method of susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is currently available, so before a large agar dilution study comprising 230 H. pylori strains belonging to more than 80 genetically different groups was initiated, we performed a relatively small preliminary study....../spot) as the inoculum and 72 h as the incubation time. A modest inoculum effect was noted for amoxicillin and metronidazole. By the methodology derived from our preliminary study, the susceptibilities of 230 H. pylori strains to six antibiotics were subsequently determined. The results were generally in accord...... with those of others, and apart from metronidazole, the MIC of which for approximately 25% of the strains tested was >8 microg/ml, resistance was low in Denmark. The situation might, however, quickly change when and if the number of indications for antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections increase...

  2. Effect of incubation temperatures for inactivation of Escherichia coli and related bacteria after gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakauma, Makoto; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Tada, Mikiro [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    2000-09-01

    Irradiated fresh meat or fishery products have been expected to store and distribute under refrigerated temperature below 10degC. From previous reports, growth of coliform bacteria in these products were suppressed by gamma-irradiation below expected doses obtained at 30-37degC. This research was performed to observe the irradiation effect on the inactivation of Escherichia coli and related bacteria at different incubation temperatures of 10-40degC on plate agar after irradiation. From this study, D10 values of all strains decreased 17- 45% at 10degC compared with maximum D10 values at 30- 40degC. Radiation sensitivities were related to the ability to grow at low temperatures in which psychrotrophic type E. coli A4-1 indicated most sensitive to radiation, next of Salmonella enteritidis YK-2, E. coli S2, B4 whereas most resistant at Enterobacter agglomerans K3-1. (author)

  3. Age-dependent branching processes for surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases with incubation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marusia N Bojkova

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review the recent results of the authors in the area of infectious disease modelling by means of branching stochastic processes. This is a new approach involving age-dependent branching models, which turned out to be more appropriate and flexible for describing the spread of an infection in a given population, than discrete time ones. Concretely, Bellman-Harris and Sevast’yanov’s branching processes are investigated. It is justified that the proposed models are proper candidates as models of infectious diseases with incubation period like measles, mumps, avian flu, etc. It is worth to notice that in general the developed methodology is applicable to the diseases that follow the so-called SIR (susceptible- infected-removed scheme in terms of epidemiological models. Two policies of extra-vaccination level are proposed and compared on the ground of simulation examples.

  4. NMR Based Cerebrum Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Simultaneous Interconnected Changes during Chick Embryo Incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yue; Zhu, Hang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xuxia; Xu, Fuqiang; Tang, Huiru; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili

    2015-01-01

    To find out if content changes of the major functional cerebrum metabolites are interconnected and formed a network during the brain development, we obtained high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) 1H NMR spectra of cerebrum tissues of chick embryo aged from incubation day 10 to 20, and postnatal day 1, and analyzed the data with principal component analysis (PCA). Within the examined time window, 26 biological important molecules were identified and 12 of them changed their relative concentration significantly in a time-dependent manner. These metabolites are generally belonged to three categories, neurotransmitters, nutrition sources, and neuronal or glial markers. The relative concentration changes of the metabolites were interconnected among/between the categories, and, more interestingly, associated with the number and size of Nissl-positive neurons. These results provided valuable biochemical and neurochemical information to understand the development of the embryonic brain.

  5. Automatic Evaluation of Colonies Growth rate of Yeasts incubated in Petri dishes using Mobile Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecsander Pereira Martins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automatic method based on computer vision implemented in mobile platform capable of monitoring the growth of microbial colonies incubated in Petri dishes. The developed optimized image processing algorithm performs this task without human intervention from images of colonies of the microorganism in different evolution phases. The contribution of this paper is the development of a fast and robust mobile tool to assist bioprocess experts in monitoring the growth of colonies without using the conventional error prone evaluation techniques. The obtained results successfully demonstrated dimensional alterations in colonies in a faster and more precise fashion when compared with the conventional method, with the additional advantage of versatility in producing reliable estimation of the growth rates with higher statistical significance.

  6. Successful isolation of Helicobacter pylori after prolonged incubation from a patient with failed eradication therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Yin; Li-Hua He; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori), a gastric pathogen, is a major cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is an important risk factor for the development of gastric malignancies. Culture of the bacterium from gastric biopsy is essential for the determination of drug resistance of H pylori. However, the isolation rates of H pylori from infected individuals vary from 23.5% to 97% due to a number of factors such as biopsy preparation, cultural environment, medium and the method adopted. In the present case, we found that a prolonged incubation period of up to 19 d allowed successful isolation of H pylori from a patient who received triple therapy that failed to eradicate the bacterium.

  7. A study of the incubation of microbead agglutination assays in a microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Castro, David

    2016-12-19

    This work reports on a quantitative study of the incubation of a microbead-based agglutination assay inside a microfluidic system. In this system, a droplet (1.25µL) consisting of a mixture of functionalized microbeads and analyte is flowed through a 0.51mm internal diameter silicone tube. Hydrodynamic forces alone produce a very efficient mixing of the beads within the droplet. We tested the agglutination at different speeds and show a robust response at the higher range of speeds (150 – 200µL/min), while also reaching a completion in the agglutination process. At these velocities, a length of 180cm is shown to be sufficient to confidently measure the agglutination assay, which takes between 2.5 – 3 minutes. This high throughput quantification method has the potential of accelerating the measurements of various types of biomarkers, which can greatly benefit the fields of biology and medicine.

  8. Cypripedium calceolus germination in situ: seed longevity, and dormancy breakage by long incubation and cold winters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne N. Rasmussen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A successful in situ germination experiment with Cypripedium calceolus, the European Lady’s slipper, is reported here for the first time. The seeds originated from controlled pollinations within and between two closely related Danish populations. The seeds were sown ripe in seed packets in proximity of mother plants. Germination was first observed after 4.5 y in the ground, following two successive cold and snowy winters, and only in one population. Seedlings expanded through the sides of the broken testa and were hair-less. A corresponding set of seeds, germinated in vitro as asymbiotic controls, responded positively to repeated cold stratifications after long incubation, suggesting that time (leaching? and chilling are dormancy breakage factors.

  9. Correction of the Negative Effects of Moisture Stress by Iodine-containing Preparations During Incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indyuhova E.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A positive impact transovarial supply iodine-containing preparation on the physiological and biochemical profile and the quality of day-old chickens egg crossing «Shaver 2000», derived from eggs incubated at high humidity. Effect of the preparation resulted in stimulation of the synthesis of thyroid hormones which determined the more effective implementation of their antioxidant properties as evidenced by a decrease in the intensity of lipid peroxidation. Optimization of physiological and biochemical profile in day-old chicks hatching resulted in an increase in the 8.40% compared with the control. It is also detected synchronization mass withdrawal of young chickens at processing iodine-containing preparation.

  10. Phosphorus cycling in the red tide incubator region of Monterey Bay in response to upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the cycling of phosphorus (P in the euphotic zone following upwelling in northeastern Monterey Bay (the Red Tide Incubator region of coastal California, with particular emphasis on how phytoplankton and bacteria mediate and respond to changes in P availability. In situ measurements of nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton community composition, and cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (determined via enzyme labeled fluorescence assay were measured during 3 cruises. Upwelling led to a 10-fold increase in dissolved inorganic (DIP in surface waters, reaching ~0.5 mol L-1. This DIP was drawn down rapidly as upwelling relaxed over a period of 1 week. Relatively low ratios of nitrate to DIP uptake (~5:1 suggest that luxury P uptake was occurring as phytoplankton bloomed. Dissolved organic (DOP remained relatively constant (~0.3mol L-1 before and immediately following upwelling, but doubled as upwelling relaxed, likely due to phytoplankton excretion and release during grazing. This transition from a relatively high DIP:DOP ratio to lower DIP:DOP ratio was accompanied by a decline in the abundance of diatoms, which had low AP activity, toward localized, spatially-heterogeneous blooms of dinoflagellates in the genera Prorocentrum, Ceratium, Dinophysis, Alexandrium, and Scrippsiella that showed high AP activity regardless of ambient DIP levels. A nutrient addition incubation experiment showed that phytoplankton growth was primarily limited by nitrate, followed by DIP and then DOP, suggesting that P is a regulating, rather than limiting, nutrient in this region. AP activity was observed in bacteria associated with lysed cell debris and aggregates of particulate organic material, where it may serve to facilitate P regeneration, as well as affixed to the surfaces of intact phytoplankton cells, possibly indicative of close, beneficial phytoplankton-bacteria interactions.

  11. Effect of a photoperiodic green light programme during incubation on embryo development and hatch process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Q; McGonnell, I M; Demmers, T G M; Roulston, N; Bergoug, H; Romanini, C E; Verhelst, R; Guinebretière, M; Eterradossi, N; Berckmans, D; Exadaktylos, V

    2017-08-24

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a 12-h light, 12-h dark (12L : 12D) photoperiod of green light during day 1 to day 18 of incubation time, on embryo growth, hormone concentration and the hatch process. In the test group, monochromatic light was provided by a total of 204 green light-emitting diodes (522 nm) mounted in a frame which was placed above the top tray of eggs to give even spread of illumination. No light-dark cycle was used in the control group. Four batches of eggs (n=300/group per batch) from fertile Ross 308 broiler breeders were used in this experiment. The beak length and crown-rump length of embryos incubated under green light were significantly longer than that of control embryos at day 10 and day 12, respectively (Pgreen light-exposed embryos had a longer third toe length compared with control embryos at day 10, day 14 and day 17 (P=0.02). At group level (n=4 batches), light stimulation had no effect on chick weight and quality at take-off, the initiation of hatch and hatch window. However, the individual hatching time of the light exposure focal chicks (n=33) was 3.4 h earlier (P=0.49) than the control focal chicks (n=36) probably due to the change in melatonin rhythm of the light group. The results of this study indicate that green light accelerates embryo development and alters hatch-related hormones (thyroid and corticosterone), which may result in earlier hatching.

  12. Design, construction, and optimization of a novel, modular, and scalable incubation chamber for continuous viral inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Raquel; Godfrey, Scott; Coffman, Jon; Amarikwa, Linus; Parker, Stephanie; Hernandez, Lindsay; Wachuku, Chinenye; Mai, Ben; Song, Brian; Hoskatti, Shashidhar; Asong, Jinkeng; Shamlou, Parviz; Bardliving, Cameron; Fiadeiro, Marcus

    2017-02-11

    We designed, built or 3D printed, and screened tubular reactors that minimize axial dispersion to serve as incubation chambers for continuous virus inactivation of biological products. Empirical residence time distribution data were used to derive each tubular design's volume equivalent to a theoretical plate (VETP) values at a various process flow rates. One design, the Jig in a Box (JIB), yielded the lowest VETP, indicating optimal radial mixing and minimal axial dispersion. A minimum residence time (MRT) approach was employed, where the MRT is the minimum time the product spends in the tubular reactor. This incubation time is typically 60 minutes in a batch process. We provide recommendations for combinations of flow rates and device dimensions for operation of the JIB connected in series that will meet a 60-min MRT. The results show that under a wide range of flow rates and corresponding volumes, it takes 75 ± 3 min for 99% of the product to exit the reactor while meeting the 60-min MRT criterion and fulfilling the constraint of keeping a differential pressure drop under 5 psi. Under these conditions, the VETP increases slightly from 3 to 5 mL though the number of theoretical plates stays constant at about 1326 ± 88. We also demonstrated that the final design volume was only 6% ± 1% larger than the ideal plug flow volume. Using such a device would enable continuous viral inactivation in a truly continuous process or in the effluent of a batch chromatography column. Viral inactivation studies would be required to validate such a design. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  13. The cooling time of fertile chicken eggs at different stages of incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Gaonac'h-Lovejoy, Vanda

    2016-01-01

    We asked whether or not the thermal characteristics of fertile avian eggs changed throughout incubation. The cooling and warming times, expressed by the time constant τ of the egg temperature response to a rapid change in ambient temperature, were measured in fertile chicken eggs at early (E7), intermediate (E11) and late (E20) stages of embryonic development. Same measurements were conducted on eggs emptied of their content and refilled with water by various amounts. The results indicated that (1) the τ of a freshly laid egg was ~50 min; (2) τ decreased linearly with the drop in egg water volume; (3) the dry eggshell had almost no thermal resistance but its wet inner membrane contributed about one-third to the stability of egg temperature; (4) the egg constituents (yolk, albumen and embryonic tissues) and the chorioallantoic circulation had no measurable effect on τ; (5) the presence of an air pocket equivalent in volume to the air cell of fertile eggs reduced τ by about 3 min (E7), 5 min (E11) and 11 min (E20). Hence, in response to warming the egg τ at E20 was slightly shorter than at E7. In response to cooling, the egg τ at E20 was similar to, or longer than, E7 because embryonic thermogenesis (evaluated by measurements of oxygen consumption during cold) offset the reduction in τ introduced by the air cell. In conclusion, until the onset of thermogenesis the thermal behavior of a fertile egg is closely approximated by that of a water-filled egg with an air volume equivalent to the air cell. It is possible to estimate the cooling τ of avian eggs of different species from their weight and incubation time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chicks incubated in hypomagnetic field need more exogenous noradrenaline for memory consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Wang, Qian; Xu, Mu-Ling; Jiang, Jin-Chang; Li, Bing

    2009-07-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is one of the essential characteristics of the terrestrial environment but does not apply in outer space. The elimination of GMF may interfere with the normal activities of life in many aspects. Previous behavioral experiments have found that long-term memory is impaired in chicks incubated in a near-zero magnetic environment (i.e. hypomagnetic field or HMF). The present study was designed to evaluate the possible involvement of noradrenergic change in the functional abnormality observed before. A HMF space was produced by nullifying the natural GMF with three pairs of Helmholtz coils. The one-trial passive avoidance learning paradigm was performed on day-old chicks incubated in either the HMF space or the natural GMF. Exogenous noradrenaline was administered by intracerebral injections and the effect on memory consolidation was compared between the two categories of subjects. In the behavioral paradigm, the HMF chicks had a higher elimination rate than the GMF chicks and displayed a significant reduction in overall responsiveness. The administration of moderate doses (0.1-0.5 nmol/hemisphere) of noradrenaline led to fairly good memory retention in GMF chicks but had little effect on HMF chicks. However, long-term memory of HMF chicks could be elevated to the normal level by much higher doses (1.0-1.75 nmol/hem) of the drug. These results suggest that prolonged exposure to HMF may induce disorders in the noradrenergic system in the brain and indicate a potentiality of counteracting the ill-effect of GMF deprivation with appropriate pharmacological manipulation.

  15. Analysis of climate and extrinsic incubation of Dirofilaria immitis in southern South America

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    Pablo F. Cuervo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilariosis, caused by Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens, is spreading in several geographic regions. The deve - lopment of infective larvae in the mosquito vector (extrinsic incubation needs an accumulated total of 130 degree-days above the 14 ºC threshold, normally expressed as heartworm development units (HDUs. Based on this information, temperature- based models have been developed and applied to evaluate the distribution and spread of Dirofilaria infections in various countries and continents. Despite the confirmed presence of D. immitis in most South American countries, the available information about its epidemiology remains scarce. We analysed the temporal and spatial extrinsic incubation of this parasite in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, taking into account daily temperatures from 49 meteorological stations during a 30-year period (1982-2012. The theoretically possible number of D. immitis generations was calculated based on the number of meteorological stations that reached the 130-HDUs threshold. The resulting information was spatially interpolated using the inverse weighted distance (IWD model to produce thematic maps. The model shows that 41 of the meteorological stations reach the threshold needed and that D. immitis transmission is markedly seasonal with a peak in late spring (December, stable during summer (January to March and declining in the autumn (April and May. Suitable temperatures exist in Uruguay and most of Argentina, whereas D. immitis transmission in Chile is only possible in the north and in the central inlands. The results suggest that the climatic impact on D. immitis transmission must have been minimal in the countries investigated since the annual meteorological records did not change much during the 30-year period analysed.

  16. Glutamate and CO2 production from glutamine in incubated enterocytes of adult and very old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynial-Denis, Dominique; Bielicki, Guy; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Mignon, Michelle; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Glutamine is the major fuel for enterocytes and promotes the growth of intestinal mucosa. Although oral glutamine exerts a positive effect on intestinal villus height in very old rats, how glutamine is used by enterocytes is unclear. Adult (8 months) and very old (27 months) female rats were exposed to intermittent glutamine supplementation for 50% of their age lifetime. Treated rats received glutamine added to their drinking water, and control rats received water alone. Jejunal epithelial cells (~300×10(6) cells) were incubated in oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer for 30 min containing [1-(13)C] glutamine (~17 M) for analysis of glutamine metabolites by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR). An aliquot fraction was incubated in the presence of [U-(14)C] glutamine to measure produced CO2. Glutamine pretreatment increased glutamate production and decreased CO2 production in very old rats. The ratio CO2/glutamate, which was very high in control very old rats, was similar at both ages after glutamine pretreatment, as if enterocytes from very old rats recovered the metabolic abilities of enterocytes from adult rats. Our results suggest that long-term treatment with glutamine started before advanced age (a) prevented the loss of rat body weight without limiting sarcopenia and (b) had a beneficial effect on enterocytes from very old rats probably by favoring the role of glutamate as a precursor for glutathione, arginine and proline biosynthesis, which was not detected in (13)C NMR spectra in our experimental conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Promoting ICT Entrepreneurship in the Campania Region of Italy: A Network of Academic Incubators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Eugenio; Torello, Rita Ilenia

    2004-01-01

    The government of the Campania region in southern Italy has established a technology transfer centre for the information and communications technology (ICT) sector. The Regional Centre for ICT Competencies (RCICT) promotes the transfer of ICT to local small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and encourages the creation of new knowledge-based…

  18. RUMINAL FERMENTATION KINETICS OF MORINGA AND PELTIPHYLLUM SUPPLEMENTS DURING EARLY INCUBATION PERIOD IN THE IN VITRO READING PRESSURE TECHNIQUE

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    A. Jayanegara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was aimed to observe rumen fermentation kinetics of alternative supplements, i.e.Moringa oleifera and Peltiphyllum peltatum leaves added to maize silage diet as compared to aconventional supplement (barley-soya. A total of six treatments were investigated in the present study,which consisted of: maize silage (A, M. oleifera (B, P. peltatum (C, maize silage + concentrate (56:44,w/w; D, maize silage + M. oleifera (56:44, w/w; E, and maize silage + concentrate + P. peltatum(47:37:16, w/w/w; F. The feeds were incubated in vitro in three replicates (completely randomizedusing the Reading Pressure Technique system. Approximately 800 mg of the feeds were mixed by 75 mlof buffered rumen liquor. The incubation was carried out up to 12 h in bottles and gas pressure wasrecorded and released in regular intervals. Repeated sampling was conducted for analysis offermentation products at 1, 6 and 12 h of incubation period. The results showed that the nutritionalquality of Moringa and its fermentation pattern was comparable to that of barley-soya concentrate. PlainMoringa incubation resulted the highest production of iso-SCFA and soluble protein concentrationamong all treatments after 12 h incubation (P<0.05. Incubation of sole Peltiphyllum peltatum highlyhampered the fermentation rate. Production of iso-SCFA both for plain Peltiphyllum and its mixturewere comparatively low. Supplementation of Peltiphyllum increased significantly soluble proteinconcentration during 12 h incubation (P<0.05. Peltiphyllum also had a very low C2+C4/C3 ratiocompared to other treatments. It could be concluded that Moringa oleifera is a potential alternativesupplement to replace either partially or completely concentrate as a conventional supplement, andPeltiphyllum peltatum supplementation could reduce excessive protein degradation and fermentation ofthe concentrate in the rumen.

  19. Separating soil CO2 efflux into C-pool-specific decay rates via inverse analysis of soil incubation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Christina; Luo, Yiqi; David Evans, R; Fei, Shenfeng; Schaeffer, Sean M

    2013-03-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is heterogeneous in structure and has been considered to consist of various pools with different intrinsic turnover rates. Although those pools have been conceptually expressed in models and analyzed according to soil physical and chemical properties, separation of SOM into component pools is still challenging. In this study, we conducted inverse analyses with data from a long-term (385 days) incubation experiment with two types of soil (from plant interspace and from underneath plants) to deconvolute soil carbon (C) efflux into different source pools. We analyzed the two datasets with one-, two- and three-pool models and used probability density functions as a criterion to judge the best model to fit the datasets. Our results indicated that soil C release trajectories over the 385 days of the incubation study were best modeled with a two-pool C model. For both soil types, released C within the first 10 days of the incubation study originated from the labile pool. Decomposition of C in the recalcitrant pool was modeled to contribute to the total CO2 efflux by 9-11 % at the beginning of the incubation. At the end of the experiment, 75-85 % of the initial soil organic carbon (SOC) was modeled to be released over the incubation period. Our modeling analysis also indicated that the labile C-pool in the soil underneath plants was larger than that in soil from interspace. This deconvolution analysis was based on information contained in incubation data to separate carbon pools and can facilitate integration of results from incubation experiments into ecosystem models with improved parameterization.

  20. Changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of pink chicken eggshells with different pigment intensity during incubation

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    Yue Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of chicken eggshells with different intensities of pink pigment during the incubation period. We also investigated the effects of the region (small pole, equator and large pole and pink pigment intensity of the chicken eggshell on the percent transmission of light passing through the chicken eggshells. Method. Eggs of comparable weight from a meat-type breeder (Meihuang were used, and divided based on three levels of pink pigment (light, medium and dark in the eggshells. During the incubation (0–21 d, the values of the eggshell pigment (ΔE, L∗, a∗, b∗ were measured. The percent transmission of light for different regions and intensities of eggshell pigmentation was measured by using the visible wavelength range of 380–780 nm. Result. Three measured indicators of eggshell color, ΔE, L∗ and a∗, did not change significantly during incubation. Compared with other regions and pigment intensities, eggshell at the small pole and with light pigmentation intensity showed the highest percent transmission of light. The transmission value varied significantly (P < 0.001 with incubation time. The element analysis of eggshells with different levels of pink pigment showed that the potassium content of the eggshells for all pigment levels decreased significantly during incubation. Conclusion. In summary, pigment intensity and the region of the eggshell influenced the percent transmission of light of eggshell. Differences in the spectral characteristics of different eggshells may influence the effects of photostimulation during the incubation of eggs. All of these results will be applicable for perfecting the design of light intensity for lighted incubation to improve productivity.

  1. [The practice and proposals for standardized management of neonatal insulation technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Xiong, Ying; Hu, Yanling; Zhang, Xuelong

    2012-05-01

    In clinical practice, incubators can contribute to better diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Currently, insulation medical equipment used for the newborn are mainly warm-boxes. With the use popularity of warm-boxes in the country, medical accidents caused by improper use are on the increase. According to neonatal insulation technology and standardized management of practice, this article puts forward technical requirements of infant incubators with constant temperature and humidity, operation regulations and management specifications to better regulate the use of such devices. Meanwhile, it also suggests national related departments to formulate "incubator technology management norms" and "warm-box technology and practice", intending to standardize industry behaviors and ensure medical safety.

  2. A pan-Arctic synthesis of CH4 and CO2 production from anoxic soil incubations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, C.C.; Natali, Susan M.; Ernakovich, Jessica; Iverson, Colleen M.; Lupasco, Massimo; McGuire, Anthony; Norby, Richard J.; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Richter, Andreas; Šantrůčková, Hana; Schädel, C.; Schuur, Edward A.G.; Sloan, Victoria L.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; Waldrop, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Permafrost thaw can alter the soil environment through changes in soil moisture, frequently resulting in soil saturation, a shift to anaerobic decomposition, and changes in the plant community. These changes, along with thawing of previously frozen organic material, can alter the form and magnitude of greenhouse gas production from permafrost ecosystems. We synthesized existing methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production measurements from anaerobic incubations of boreal and tundra soils from the geographic permafrost region to evaluate large-scale controls of anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production and compare the relative importance of landscape-level factors (e.g., vegetation type and landscape position), soil properties (e.g., pH, depth, and soil type), and soil environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative water table position). We found fivefold higher maximum CH4 production per gram soil carbon from organic soils than mineral soils. Maximum CH4 production from soils in the active layer (ground that thaws and refreezes annually) was nearly four times that of permafrost per gram soil carbon, and CH4 production per gram soil carbon was two times greater from sites without permafrost than sites with permafrost. Maximum CH4 and median anaerobic CO2 production decreased with depth, while CO2:CH4 production increased with depth. Maximum CH4 production was highest in soils with herbaceous vegetation and soils that were either consistently or periodically inundated. This synthesis identifies the need to consider biome, landscape position, and vascular/moss vegetation types when modeling CH4 production in permafrost ecosystems and suggests the need for longer-term anaerobic incubations to fully capture CH4 dynamics. Our results demonstrate that as climate warms in arctic and boreal regions, rates of anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production will increase, not only as a result of increased temperature, but also from shifts in vegetation and increased

  3. Short-term incubation studies on degradation of biochar in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Giacomo; Wirth, Stephan; Geßler, Arthur; Kern, Jürgen; Mumme, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Biochar is considered a stable, recalcitrant substance, which holds potential to store carbon in soils for prolonged time and therefore would provide a long-term carbon sink. Furthermore, biochar is discussed to enhance soil fertility and plant productivity, and may improve water and nutrient holding capacity. However, mineralisation to CO2 may occur, as for any soil organic carbon pool, depending on char composition, soil properties and environmental conditions. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the stability of its carbon structure and the dynamics of decay processes in soil. The evaluation of biochar stability in soil is complicated by the impact of external factors thus as soil moisture and temperature, soil nutrient status and moreover by extended decay timescales. To overcome these difficulties, we performed dynamic incubation experiments under laboratory conditions, using a multi-channel, automated infra-red gas analysis system at 20°C for up to 10 days to detect CO2 emission over time. Our aim was to compare the decay dynamics of different biochar preparations added to soil, i.e. HTC-char and pyrochar from maize silage with and without biological post-processing (anaerobic digestion), as compared to unmodified maize straw. Digestate from a maize silage-fed anaerobic biogas reactor was also tested. As a result, the addition of charred or digested materials to soil resulted in much lower CO2 emission rates as compared to the unmodified maize straw, proving stability of biochar carbon compounds. Pyrochar showed to be the most stable of all substrates added, as the CO2 emission was hardly distinguishable from that of the control soil. Soil enriched with HTC-char emitted significantly more CO2 compared to soil enriched with pyrochar, but the post-processing was effective in reducing the emissions. Furthermore, HTC-char showed a two-step decay kinetics, which cannot apparently be explained with a simple double-pool model. In conclusion, the short

  4. Considerations for conducting incubations to study the mechanisms of As release in reducing groundwater aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radloff, Kathleen A. [Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)], E-mail: kar2108@columbia.edu; Manning, Anya R.; Mailloux, Brian [Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zheng Yan [Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); Moshiur Rahman, M.; Rezaul Huq, M.; Ahmed, Kazi M. [Department of Geology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Geen, Alexander van [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Microbial Fe reduction is widely believed to be the primary mechanism of As release from aquifer sands in Bangladesh, but alternative explanations have been proposed. Long-term incubation studies using natural aquifer material are one way to address such divergent views. This study addresses two issues related to this approach: (1) the need for suitable abiotic controls and (2) the spatial variability of the composition of aquifer sands. Four sterilization techniques were examined using orange-colored Pleistocene sediment from Bangladesh and artificial groundwater over 8 months. Acetate (10 mM) was added to sacrificial vials before sterilization using either (1) 25 kGy of gamma irradiation, (2) three 1-h autoclave cycles, (3) a single addition of an antibiotic mixture at 1x or (4) 10x the typical dose, and (5) a 10 mM addition of azide. The effectiveness of sterilization was evaluated using two indicators of microbial Fe reduction, changes in diffuse spectral reflectance and leachable Fe(II)/Fe ratios, as well as changes in P-extractable As concentrations in the solid phase. A low dose of antibiotics was ineffective after 70 days, whereas autoclaving significantly altered groundwater composition. Gamma irradiation, a high dose of antibiotics, and azide were effective for the duration of the experiment. Using gamma irradiation as an abiotic control, shallow grey sediment and groundwater from 3 closely spaced locations along a gradient of dissolved As concentrations (60-130-210 {mu}g/L) in Bangladesh were incubated for 8 months with and without organic C addition (0.9 and 0.6 mM of acetate and lactate). Unexpectedly, levels of dissolved As (64 {+-} 68, 92 {+-} 70, 217 {+-} 68 {mu}g/L) and P-extractable As (0.7 {+-} 0.2, 2.1 {+-} 0.5 and 2.0 {+-} 0.3 mg/kg) at each location were highly variable over the duration of the experiment and prevented the detection of the relatively small levels of As release that were anticipated. Maintenance of an adsorptive equilibrium

  5. Does lighting manipulation during incubation affect hatching rhythms and early development of sole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Vives, B; Aliaga-Guerrero, M; Cañavate, J P; Muñoz-Cueto, J A; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2011-05-01

    Light plays a key role in the development of biological rhythms in fish. Previous research on Senegal sole has revealed that both spawning rhythms and larval development are strongly influenced by lighting conditions. However, hatching rhythms and the effect of light during incubation are as yet unexplored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the light spectrum and photoperiod on Solea senegalensis eggs and larvae until day 7 post hatching (dph). To this end, eggs were collected immediately after spawning during the night and exposed to continuous light (LL), continuous darkness (DD), or light-dark (LD) 12L:12D cycles of white light (LD(W)), blue light (LD(B); λ(peak) = 463 nm), or red light (LD(R); λ(peak) = 685 nm). Eggs exposed to LD(B) had the highest hatching rate (94.5% ± 1.9%), whereas LD(R) and DD showed the lowest hatching rate (54.4% ± 3.9% and 48.4% ± 4.2%, respectively). Under LD conditions, the hatching rhythm peaked by the end of the dark phase, but was advanced in LD(B) (zeitgeber time 8 [ZT8]; ZT0 representing the onset of darkness) in relation to LD(W) and LD(R) (ZT11). Under DD conditions, the same rhythm persisted, although with lower amplitude, whereas under LL the hatching rhythm split into two peaks (ZT8 and ZT13). From dph 4 onwards, larvae under LD(B) showed the best growth and quickest development (advanced eye pigmentation, mouth opening, and pectoral fins), whereas larvae under LD(R) and DD had the poorest performance. These results reveal that developmental rhythms at the egg stage are tightly controlled by light characteristics, underlining the importance of reproducing their natural underwater photoenvironment (LD cycles of blue wavelengths) during incubation and early larvae development of fish.

  6. Arsenic speciation in arsenic-rich Brazilian soils from gold mining sites under anaerobic incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, J. W. V.; Talbott, J.L.; Scott, J.; Roy, W.R.; Stucki, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Arsenic speciation in environmental samples is essential for studying toxicity, mobility and bio-transformation of As in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Although the inorganic species As(III) and As(V) have been considered dominant in soils and sediments, organisms are able to metabolize inorganic forms of arsenic into organo-arsenic compounds. Arsenosugars and methylated As compounds can be found in terrestrial organisms, but they generally occur only as minor constituents. We investigated the dynamics of arsenic species under anaerobic conditions in soils surrounding gold mining areas from Minas Gerais State, Brazil to elucidate the arsenic biogeochemical cycle and water contamination mechanisms. Methods. Surface soil samples were collected at those sites, namely Paracatu Formation, Banded Iron Formation and Riacho dos Machados Sequence, and incubated in CaCl2 2.5 mmol L-1 suspensions under anaerobic conditions for 1, 28, 56 and 112 days. After that, suspensions were centrifuged and supernatants analyzed for soluble As species by IC-ICPMS and HPLC-ICPMS. Results. Easily exchangeable As was mainly arsenite, except when reducible manganese was present. Arsenate was mainly responsible for the increase in soluble arsenic due to the reductive dissolution of either iron or manganese in samples from the Paracatu Formation and Riacho dos Machados Sequence. On the other hand, organic species of As dominated in samples from the Banded Iron Formation during anaerobic incubation. Discussion. Results are contrary to the expectation that, in anaerobic environments, As release due to the reductive dissolution of Fe is followed by As(V) reduction to As(III). The occurrence of organo-arsenic species was also found to be significant to the dynamics of soluble arsenic, mainly in soils from the Banded Iron Formation (BIF), under our experimental conditions. Conclusions. In general, As(V) and organic As were the dominant species in solution, which is surprising

  7. CO2 dinamics and priming effect of different Hungarian soils based on laboratory incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacháry, Dóra; Szalai, Zoltán; Filep, Tibor; Kovács, József; Jakab, Gergely

    2017-04-01

    Soil processes are particularly important in terms of global carbon cycle, as soils globally contain approximately 2000 Gt carbon, which is higher than the carbon stock of the atmosphere and the terrestrial ecosystem together. Therefore small alterations in the soils' carbon sequestration potential can generate rapid and significant changes in the atmosphere carbon concentration. Soil texture is one of the most important soil parameters which plays a significant role in soil carbon sequestration. Fine textured soils generally considered containing more microbial biomass, and having a lower rate of biomass turnover and organic matter decomposition than coarse textured soils. In spite of this, several recent studies have shown contradicting trends. Our aim was to investigate the influence of the basic soil properties (texture, pH, organic matter content, etc.) on the biological and physicochemical processes determining the soil CO2 emission. Thirteen Hungarian soil samples (depth of 0-20 cm) were incubated during six months. The samples are mainly high clay and organic matter content forest soils, but two forest soils developed on sand were also collected. The soils are derived from C3 forests and C3 croplands from different sites of Hungary. C4 maize residues were added to the soils in order to get natural 13C enrichment for stable isotope measurement purposes and for quantifying the priming effect caused by the crop residue addition. The temperature (20°C) and humidity (70% field capacity) conditions were kept constant in an incubator. The soil respiration was measured at specified intervals (on day 3, 8, 15, 30, 51, 79, 107, 135 and 163) and trapped in 2M NaOH and quantified by titration with 1M HCl. Our first results based on the cumulative CO2 respiration values show positive priming for all type of soils. Results confirm the statement that in certain cases fine textured soils release more CO2. To determine which soil properties influence the most the soil CO2

  8. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectra (EEMS) of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced during Microbial Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, N.; Nelson, N. B.; Parsons, R.

    2013-12-01

    The chromophoric or light-absorbing fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is present ubiquitously in natural waters and has a significant impact on ocean biogeochemistry, affecting photosynthesis and primary production as well direct and indirect photochemical reactions (Siegel et al., 2002; Nelson et al., 2007). It has been largely researched in the past few decades, however the exact chemical composition remains unknown. Instrumental methods of analysis including simultaneous excitation-emission fluorescence spectra have allowed for further insight into source and chemical composition. While certain excitation-emission peaks have been associated with ';marine' sources, they have not been exclusively linked to bacterial production of CDOM (Coble, 1996; Zepp et al., 2004). In this study, ';grazer diluted' seawater samples (70% 0.2μm filtered water; 30% whole water) were collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) site in the Sargasso Sea (31° 41' N; 64° 10' W) and incubated with an amendment of labile dissolved organic carbon (10μM C6H12O6), ammonium (1μM NH4Cl) and phosphate (0.1μM K2HPO4) to facilitate bacterial production. These substrates and concentrations have been previously shown to facilitate optimum bacterial and CDOM production (Nelson et al., 2004). Sample depths were chosen at 1m and 200m as water at these depths has been exposed to UV light (the Subtropical Mode Water at 200m has been subducted from the surface) and therefore has low initial concentrations of CDOM. After the samples were amended, they were incubated at in-situ temperatures in the dark for 72 hours, with bacteria counts, UV-Vis absorption and EEMS measurements taken at 6-8 hour intervals. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements were collected daily. For the surface water experiment specific bacteria populations were investigated using Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis. Results showed a clear production of bacteria and production of CDOM, which

  9. Nitrogen mineralization of a loam soil supplemented with organic-inorganic amendments under laboratory incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaleem ABBASI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of nitrogen (N supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aim of the present study was to determine the potential mineralization of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM, wheat (Triticum aestivum L. straw residues (WSR, and urea N (UN applied to a loam soil and incubated periodically over 140 days period. Treatments included PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized. Added amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg−1. Nitrogen supplying capacity of added materials was determined by measuring changes in total mineral N (ammonium-nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen [NH4+–N + NO3––N] and accumulation of NO3––N over different incubation periods. Changes in soil organic matter content and total N concentration were also monitored during the study. Results indicated that added amendments released substantial N into the mineral N pool (net cumulative N mineralized [NCNM] ranged between 39 and 147 mg N kg−1, lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50+PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net inorganic N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. Total inorganic N derived from PM increased from 2.3 mg kg−1 at d 1, to a maximum of 102 to 105 mg kg−1 at 63, 84 and 105 d after PM application. The values were further increase from 31.5 mg kg−1 at d 0 to a maximum of 165 mg kg−1 at d 49 in UN50 + PM50 treatment. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN varied between 16 and 126 mg kg−1, highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. Soil amended with WSR100 showed negative values both for mineralization and nitrification until day 84, displaying net immobilization. On average, percentage conversion of added N into

  10. Sensitivity of Arctic Permafrost Carbon in the Mackenzie River Basin: A substrate addition and incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgpeth, A.; Beilman, D.; Crow, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization processes are fundamental to the functioning of high latitude soils in relation to nutrients, stability, and feedbacks to atmospheric CO2 and climate. The arctic permafrost zone covers 25% of the northern hemisphere and contains 1672Pg of soil carbon (C). 88% of this C currently resides in frozen soils that are vulnerable to environmental change. For instance, arctic growing seasons may be lengthened, resulting in an increase in plant productivity and rate of below ground labile C inputs as root exudates. Understanding controls on Arctic SOM dynamics requires recognition that labile C inputs have the potential to significantly affect mineralization of previously stable SOM, also known as 'priming effects'. We conducted a substrate addition incubation experiment to quantify and compare respiration in highly organic (42-48 %C) permafrost soils along a north-south transect in western Canada. Near surface soils (10-20 cm) were collected from permafrost peatland sites in the Mackenzie River Basin from 69.2-62.6°N. The surface soils are fairly young (Δ14C values > -140.0) and can be assumed to contain relatively reactive soil carbon. To assess whether addition of labile substrate alters SOM decomposition dynamics, 4.77-11.75 g of permafrost soil were spiked with 0.5 mg D-glucose g-1 soil and incubated at 5°C. A mass balance approach was used to determin substrate-induced respiration and preliminary results suggest a potential for positive priming in these C-rich soils. Baseline respiration rates from the three sites were similar (0.067-0.263 mg CO2 g-1 soil C) yet show some site-specific trends. The rate at which added substrate was utilized within these soils suggests that other factors besides temperature and soil C content are controlling substrate consumption and its effect on SOM decomposition. Microbial activity can be stimulated by substrate addition to such an extent that SOM turnover is enhanced, suggesting that

  11. A general method for evaluating incubation of sucrose craving in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jeffrey W; Barnes, Jesse; North, Kindsey; Collins, Stefan; Weber, Rachel

    2011-11-04

    For someone on a food-restricted diet, food craving in response to food-paired cues may serve as a key behavioral transition point between abstinence and relapse to food taking. Food craving conceptualized in this way is akin to drug craving in response to drug-paired cues. A rich literature has been developed around understanding the behavioral and neurobiological determinants of drug craving; we and others have been focusing recently on translating techniques from basic addiction research to better understand addiction-like behaviors related to food. As done in previous studies of drug craving, we examine sucrose craving behavior by utilizing a rat model of relapse. In this model, rats self-administer either drug or food in sessions over several days. In a session, lever responding delivers the reward along with a tone+light stimulus. Craving behavior is then operationally defined as responding in a subsequent session where the reward is not available. Rats will reliably respond for the tone+light stimulus, likely due to its acquired conditioned reinforcing properties. This behavior is sometimes referred to as sucrose seeking or cue reactivity. In the present discussion we will use the term "sucrose craving" to subsume both of these constructs. In the past decade, we have focused on how the length of time following reward self-administration influences reward craving. Interestingly, rats increase responding for the reward-paired cue over the course of several weeks of a period of forced-abstinence. This "incubation of craving" is observed in rats that have self-administered either food or drugs of abuse. This time-dependent increase in craving we have identified in the animal model may have great potential relevance to human drug and food addiction behaviors. Here we present a protocol for assessing incubation of sucrose craving in rats. Variants of the procedure will be indicated where craving is assessed as responding for a discrete sucrose-paired cue following

  12. Mathematical models for adjustment of in vitro gas production at different incubation times and kinetics of corn silages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Velho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, with whole plant silage corn at different stages of maturity, aimed to evaluate the mathematical models Exponential, France, Gompertz and Logistic to study the kinetics of gas production in vitro incubations for 24 and 48 hours. A semi-automated in vitro gas production technique was used during one, three, six, eight, ten, 12, 14, 16, 22, 24, 31, 36, 42 and 48 hours of incubation periods. Model adjustment was evaluated by means of mean square of error, mean bias, root mean square prediction error and residual error. The Gompertz mathematical model allowed the best adjustment to describe the gas production kinetics of maize silages, regardless of incubation period. The France model was not adequate to describe gas kinetics of incubation periods equal or lower than 48 hours. The in vitro gas production technique was efficient to detect differences in nutritional value of maize silages from different growth stages. Twenty four hours in vitro incubation periods do not mask treatment effects, whilst 48 hour periods are inadequate to measure silage digestibility.

  13. Comparison of incubation period distribution of human infections with MERS-CoV in South Korea and Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virlogeux, Victor; Fang, Vicky J; Park, Minah; Wu, Joseph T; Cowling, Benjamin J

    2016-10-24

    The incubation period is an important epidemiologic distribution, it is often incorporated in case definitions, used to determine appropriate quarantine periods, and is an input to mathematical modeling studies. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS) is an emerging infectious disease in the Arabian Peninsula. There was a large outbreak of MERS in South Korea in 2015. We examined the incubation period distribution of MERS coronavirus infection for cases in South Korea and in Saudi Arabia. Using parametric and nonparametric methods, we estimated a mean incubation period of 6.9 days (95% credibility interval: 6.3-7.5) for cases in South Korea and 5.0 days (95% credibility interval: 4.0-6.6) among cases in Saudi Arabia. In a log-linear regression model, the mean incubation period was 1.42 times longer (95% credibility interval: 1.18-1.71) among cases in South Korea compared to Saudi Arabia. The variation that we identified in the incubation period distribution between locations could be associated with differences in ascertainment or reporting of exposure dates and illness onset dates, differences in the source or mode of infection, or environmental differences.

  14. Effects of forced convection of heated air on insensible water loss and heat loss in preterm infants in incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okken, A; Blijham, C; Franz, W; Bohn, E

    1982-07-01

    To assess the effect of forced convection of heated air exchange in preterm infants in conventional incubators, we measured insensible water loss and total heat loss in preterm infants in a conventional forced convection incubator (air velocity 15 to 25 cm/second) and in a specially constructed still-air incubator (air velocity 0 to 2 cm/second) at equal operative temperature and humidity. Under the forced conditions, insensible water loss in the preterm infants increased by a mean 52% from 1.04 +/- 0.24 (mean +/- SD) to 1.58 +/- 0.51 ml/kg/hour (P less than 0.001). The ensuing increase in evaporative heat loss was partly reflected in the small but significant increase in total heat loss from 1.65 +/- 0.47 to 1.80 +/- 0.44 kcal/kg/hour (P less than 0.02). In the forced convection incubator, the increased evaporative heat loss in preterm infants was apparently partly compensated by a decreased nonevaporative heat loss. If reduction of insensible water loss is required, preterm infants should not be subjected to forced convection in incubators.

  15. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

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    Abuzar Elnager

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM. After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM. The 50% effective dose (ED50 of CAPE (based on DD was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted.

  16. Mainstem Clearwater River study: Assessment for Salmonid Spawning, Incubation, and Rearing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, William P.; Pishl, Markley J.; Whitman, Marc A.

    1990-06-01

    This is the second annual progress report for studies conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe to evaluate the potential for increasing fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations and establishing summer chinook salmon spawning in the lower 57.5 km of the mainstem Clearwater River (LMCR) of Idaho. The report presents study methods and preliminary results for the 1988--1989 phase of the study. The overall study plan was designed to quantitatively evalulate the available spawning, incubation and rearing habitat for fall and summer chinook salmon. We also studied steelhead trout (O. mykiss) rearing habitat since there is a stable population of these fish in the LMCR's tributaries and their parr are known to rear periodically in the mainstem. Resident fish were studied to assess the potential for habitat overlap with that of anadromous fish. Based on these findings the Nez Perce Tribe could determine chinook salmon habitat conditions for selected stocks under existing flow and temperature regimes and consult with the US Army Corps of Engineering concerning the effects of Dworshak Dam operation on flows and measures to restore or establish stocks identified in this study. 38 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Emission of carbon dioxide influenced by different water levels from soil incubated organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M B; Puteh, A B

    2013-01-01

    We studied the influence of different organic residues and water levels on decomposition rate and carbon sequestration in soil. Organic residues (rice straw, rice root, cow dung, and poultry litter) including control were tested under moistened and flooding systems. An experiment was laid out as a complete randomized design at 25°C for 120 days. Higher CO₂-C (265.45 mg) emission was observed in moistened condition than in flooding condition from 7 to 120 days. Among the organic residues, poultry litter produced the highest CO₂-C emission. Poultry litter with soil mixture increased 121% cumulative CO₂-C compared to control. On average, about 38% of added poultry litter C was mineralized to CO₂-C. Maximum CO₂-C was found in 7 days after incubation and thereafter CO₂-C emission was decreased with the increase of time. Control produced the lowest CO₂-C (158.23 mg). Poultry litter produced maximum cumulative CO₂-C (349.91 mg). Maximum organic carbon was obtained in cow dung which followed by other organic residues. Organic residues along with flooding condition decreased cumulative CO₂-C, k value and increased organic C in soil. Maximum k value was found in poultry litter and control. Incorpored rice straw increased organic carbon and decreased k value (0.003 g d⁻¹) in soil. In conclusion, rice straw and poultry litter were suitable for improving soil carbon.

  18. Isolation of Uncultured Bacteria from Antarctica Using Long Incubation Periods and Low Nutritional Media

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    Andre A. Pulschen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Uncultured microorganisms comprise most of the microbial diversity existing on our planet. Despite advances in environmental sequencing and single-cell genomics, in-depth studies about bacterial metabolism and screening of novel bioproducts can only be assessed by culturing microbes in the laboratory. Here we report uncultured, or recalcitrant, microorganisms from an Antarctic soil sample, using relatively simple methods: oligotrophic media, extended incubation periods, observation under stereo microscopy, and selection of slow-growing bacteria. We managed to isolate several rare microorganisms belonging to infrequently isolated or recently described genera, for example Lapillicoccus, Flavitalea, Quadrisphaera, Motilibacter, and Polymorphobacter. Additionally, we obtained isolates presenting 16S rRNA sequence similarity ranging from 92.08 to 94.46% with any other known cultured species, including two distinct isolates from the class Thermoleophilia, that although common in Antarctic soils (as identified by metagenomics, was never reported to be isolated from such samples. Our data indicates that simple methods are still useful for cultivating recalcitrant microorganisms, even when dealing with samples from extreme environments.

  19. Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Degradation Modeled Through Microbial Incubations of Vascular Plant Leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, J.; Hernes, P.; Chuang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as is in the atmosphere, provides the main link between terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs, and fuels the microbial food web. The fate and removal of DOM is a result of several complex conditions and processes, including photodegradation, sorption/desorption, dominant vascular plant sources, and microbial abundance. In order to better constrain factors affecting microbial degradation, laboratory incubations were performed using Sacramento River water for microbial inoculums and vascular plant leachates. Four vascular plant sources were chosen based on their dominance in the Sacramento River Valley: gymnosperm needles from Pinus sabiniana (foothill pine), angiosperm dicot leaves from Quercus douglassi (blue oak), angiosperm monocot mixed annual grasses, and angiosperm monocot mixed Schoenoplectus acutus (tule) and Typha spp. (cattails). Three concentrations of microbial inoculum were used for each plant material, ranging from 0.2% to 10%. Degradation was monitored as a function of time using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and was compared across vascular plant type and inoculum concentration.

  20. Depolarization of the tegument precedes morphological alterations in Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces incubated with ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Serrano, J; Grosman, C; Urrea-París, M A; Denegri, G; Casado, N; Rodríguez-Caabeiro, F

    2001-10-01

    The nematocidal activity of ivermectin (IVM) largely arises from its activity as a potent agonist of muscular and neuronal glutamate-gated chloride channels. A cestocidal effect has also been suggested following in vitro treatments, but the molecular basis of this activity is not clear. We studied the effect of IVM on the metacestode stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus by assessing the viability, ultrastructure, and tegumental membrane potential as a function of drug concentration and incubation time. Concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 microg/ml of IVM had no effect on any of these three parameters for up to 6 days of treatment. A concentration of 10 microg/ml, however, elicited a sequence of alterations that started with a approximately 20-mV depolarization of the tegumental membrane, and was followed by rostellar disorganization, rigid paralysis and, eventually, loss of viability. It is likely that the IVM-induced depolarization of the tegument acts as the signal that initiates the cascade of degenerative processes that leads to the parasite's death. This would place the tegument as the primary target of action of IVM on cestodes. As an appropriate chemotherapy for the hydatid disease is still lacking, the cestocidal effect of IVM reported here is worth considering.

  1. Cyclic variations in incubation conditions induce adaptive responses to later heat exposure in chickens: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyau, T; Bedrani, L; Berri, C; Métayer-Coustard, S; Praud, C; Coustham, V; Mignon-Grasteau, S; Duclos, M J; Tesseraud, S; Rideau, N; Hennequet-Antier, C; Everaert, N; Yahav, S; Collin, A

    2015-01-01

    Selection programs have enabled broiler chickens to gain muscle mass without similar enlargement of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems that are essential for thermoregulatory efficiency. Meat-type chickens cope with high ambient temperature by reducing feed intake and growth during chronic and moderate heat exposure. In case of acute heat exposure, a dramatic increase in morbidity and mortality can occur. In order to alleviate heat stress in the long term, research has recently focused on early thermal manipulation. Aimed at stimulation of long-term thermotolerance, the thermal manipulation of embryos is a method based on fine tuning of incubation conditions, taking into account the level and duration of increases in temperature and relative humidity during a critical period of embryogenesis. The consequences of thermal manipulation on the performance and meat quality of broiler chickens have been explored to ensure the potential application of this strategy. The physiological basis of the method is the induction of epigenetic and metabolic mechanisms that control body temperature in the long term. Early thermal manipulation can enhance poultry resistance to environmental changes without much effect on growth performance. This review presents the main strategies of early heat exposure and the physiological concepts on which these methods were based. The cellular mechanisms potentially underlying the adaptive response are discussed as well as the potential interest of thermal manipulation of embryos for poultry production.

  2. Comparative hatchability of lake trout eggs differing in contaminant burden and incubation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac, M.J.; Berlin, W.H.; Rottiers, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    In 1972, fertilized eggs of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Marquette (Michigan) State Fish Hatchery (where levels of contaminants are relatively low) and eggs from lake trout collected in Michigan waters of Lake Michigan near Saugatuck and Charlevoix (where levels of PCB's and DDE are elevated) were incubated at hatchery temperatures (6° C) and at temperatures simulating the natural temperature cycle of Lake Michigan (1-8° C). Survival to yolk absorption of larvae from these three sources ranged from 40.3 to 65.5%, and no correlation was observed between survival and the level of PCB's and DDE in the eggs. Additional studies in 1975 with lake trout eggs from the same three sources confirmed previous observations that the elevated levels of PCB's and DDE in eggs from Lake Michigan did not appear to affect the percent hatch of lake trout eggs or survival of the fry to the swim-up stage. When fry hatched from eggs with an elevated contaminant burden were starved for several weeks, we observed no abnormal increase in posthatching mortality during the period when the yolk stores were being consumed.

  3. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  4. Sodium chloride as effective antifungal treatment for artificial egg incubation in Austropotamobius pallipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Policar T.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, sodium chloride at three different concentrations, 30 000 ppm (S30, 60 000 ppm (S60 and 90 000 ppm (S90, and formaldehyde at one concentration, 3000 ppm (F, were tested as antifungal chemicals during artificial incubation (AI of Austropotamobius pallipes eggs. Two treatments were tested without chemicals as control groups with (R and without (C the removal of dead eggs. After AI, formaldehyde treatment ensured high survival of stage 1 (89.7 ± 2.3% and stage 2 (85.5 ± 2.4% of juveniles. However, comparable survival rate to stage 1 and stage 2 (85.5 ± 5.5% and 80.6 ± 3.2% were also found in the treatment with the highest sodium chloride concentration (S90. Significantly lower survival rate of juveniles (stage 1: 60.6–70.3% and stage 2: 56.1–67.3% were evident in groups S60, S30 and R. However, group R demanded high labor and related costs. The lowest juvenile survival levels to stage 1 (46.4 ± 8.2% and stage 2 (45.2 ± 6.8% were observed in treatments without fungicide chemicals and removal of dead eggs (C.

  5. Sound levels inside incubators and oxygen hoods used with nebulizers and humidifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, R W; Mishoe, S C

    1982-01-01

    Degree of hearing loss in the infant is related to high-intensity or high-frequency sound (noise). We measured sound levels of 6 models of pneumatic nebulizers and 8 models of humidifiers at various flowrates, FIO2 settings, and water levels, when they were attached to incubators and oxygen hoods; we also evaluated sound levels from 2 models of ultrasonic nebulizers at various output settings. Among the pneumatic nebulizers, the recommended 58-dbA maximum sound level was exceeded by the Aquapak 621, Ohio Deluxe, and Puritan All-Purpose devices. The Bard Parker, Foregger, and Inspiron pneumatic nebulizers' sound levels were 58 dbA or below except during the dry water-level condition. Among the humidifiers, all produced sound levels below the recommended 58-dbA maximum except the Travenol humidifier; the Bennett Cascade, Conchapak, Foregger, and Hudson humidifiers produced mean sound levels in the 43.0- to 43.5-dbA range. Sound levels increased under all conditions when the devices were used with oxygen hoods. The ultrasonic nebulizers produced low sound levels, but the high-frequency ultrasound they also produce may be undesirable for infants; this question requires further investigation.

  6. Cell cultivation under different gravitational loads using a novel random positioning incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides Damm, Tatiana; Walther, Isabelle; Wüest, Simon L; Sekler, Jörg; Egli, Marcel

    2014-06-01

    Important in biotechnology is the establishment of cell culture methods that reflect the in vivo situation accurately. One approach for reaching this goal is through 3D cell cultivation that mimics tissue or organ structures and functions. We present here a newly designed and constructed random positioning incubator (RPI) that enables 3D cell culture in simulated microgravity (0 g). In addition to growing cells in a weightlessness-like environment, our RPI enables long-duration cell cultivation under various gravitational loads, ranging from close to 0 g to almost 1 g. This allows the study of the mechanotransductional process of cells involved in the conversion of physical forces to an appropriate biochemical response. Gravity is a type of physical force with profound developmental implications in cellular systems as it modulates the resulting signaling cascades as a consequence of mechanical loading. The experiments presented here were conducted on mouse skeletal myoblasts and human lymphocytes, two types of cells that have been shown in the past to be particularly sensitive to changes in gravity. Our novel RPI will expand the horizon at which mechanobiological experiments are conducted. The scientific data gathered may not only improve the sustainment of human life in space, but also lead to the design of alternative countermeasures against diseases related to impaired mechanosensation and downstream signaling processes on earth.

  7. Variability in microbial communities attached to minerals and glasses incubated in young ocean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Colwell, F. S.; Popa, R.; Fisk, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    To investigate whether mineral chemistry influences the distribution and composition of attached subseafloor microbial communities, we initiated a four-year incubation of twelve igneous minerals and glasses in IODP Hole 1301A on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Minerals were suspended at 278 meters below seafloor, within the warm basalt basement, with an osmotic pump to ensure fluid flow. Post-recovery, we performed high-throughput sequencing of the V4-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene from genomic DNA extracted from all minerals and glasses using bacterial and archaeal primers. Archaeoglobaceae was the dominant family on all samples; however almost no archaeal sequences were recovered from the high-Fe mineral fayalite. Bacteria were diverse, and included Clostridia, Ralstonia, Thermosipho, and representatives of the deep-branching candidate division OP1. Low-Fe olivine had the most diverse community, and the least diverse community was found on diopside. Several mineral communities were similar to each other, yet many were dissimilar to all other communities. Our results suggest that the composition of microbial communities colonizing subseafloor basalts is influenced by the chemistry of the minerals present, and that communities are heterogeneously distributed in basalts. These findings have important implications for understanding the role of attached subseafloor communities in geochemical cycling of elements and the weathering of basalts.

  8. Evolutionary potential of the extrinsic incubation period of dengue virus in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yixin H; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Carrasco, Alison M; Allen, Scott L; Frentiu, Francesca D; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Beebe, Nigel W; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most common arboviral disease worldwide. It is caused by dengue viruses (DENV) and the mosquito Aedes aegypti is its primary vector. One of the most powerful determinants of a mosquito's ability to transmit DENV is the length of the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), the time it takes for a virus to be transmitted by a mosquito after consuming an infected blood meal. Here, we repeatedly measured DENV load in the saliva of individual mosquitoes over their lifetime and used this in combination with a breeding design to determine the extent to which EIP might respond to the evolutionary forces of drift and selection. We demonstrated that genetic variation among mosquitoes contributes significantly to transmission potential and length of EIP. We reveal that shorter EIP is genetically correlated with reduced mosquito lifespan, highlighting negative life-history consequences for virus-infected mosquitoes. This work highlights the capacity for local genetic variation in mosquito populations to evolve and to dramatically affect the nature of human outbreaks. It also provides the impetus for isolating mosquito genes that determine EIP. More broadly, our dual experimental approach offers new opportunities for studying the evolutionary potential of transmission traits in other vector/pathogen systems. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Mineralization of nitrogen from pelletized sewage sludge - a laboratory incubation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattiez, Anne-Laure

    2000-07-01

    Nitrogen limits the productivity of most ecosystems, but can also cause environmental problems. With the increasing amount of sludge generated by better wastewater treatment, land application of pelletized sludge appears as a combined solution to waste disposal and plant nitrogen nutrition issues. Six types of sludge pellets/granules, containing different mixtures of sludge, ash and/or lime have been inoculated and incubated for 8 weeks at 20 deg C in the dark, to study N net mineralisation rates. Laboratory results showed no indication of general differences between sludge/ash and sludge/lime mixtures, with respect to N mineralisation and nitrification, but some differences between Umeaa pellets and GaevIe granules were discernible. The higher net N mineralisation rates in pellets appeared to be related to sludge properties. On the contrary pellets had a low level of nitrification, which might be explained by preliminary heat treatment of the sludge and the seemingly slow recolonization of nitrifiers. It is also believed that considerable amounts of N were lost, and that the major route for these losses was ammonia volatilisation. From an economical point of view, sludge pelletisation appears to be the most cost-effective means of disposal. It transforms sludge into a valuable, odourless and storable fertiliser or heat source. Some income could even be expected. The benefits obtained from an increased tree growth could justify forest fertilisation with pelletized sludge, but further research is needed to determine more precisely the possible growth increment and the consequences on the environment.

  10. Dynamical Behavior and Stability Analysis in a Hybrid Epidemiological-Economic Model with Incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid SIR vector disease model with incubation is established, where susceptible host population satisfies the logistic equation and the recovered host individuals are commercially harvested. It is utilized to discuss the transmission mechanism of infectious disease and dynamical effect of commercial harvest on population dynamics. Positivity and permanence of solutions are analytically investigated. By choosing economic interest of commercial harvesting as a parameter, dynamical behavior and local stability of model system without time delay are studied. It reveals that there is a phenomenon of singularity induced bifurcation as well as local stability switch around interior equilibrium when economic interest increases through zero. State feedback controllers are designed to stabilize model system around the desired interior equilibria in the case of zero economic interest and positive economic interest, respectively. By analyzing corresponding characteristic equation of model system with time delay, local stability analysis around interior equilibrium is discussed due to variation of time delay. Hopf bifurcation occurs at the critical value of time delay and corresponding limit cycle is also observed. Furthermore, directions of Hopf bifurcation and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions are studied. Numerical simulations are carried out to show consistency with theoretical analysis.

  11. Effects of Total Dissolved Gas on Chum Salmon Fry Incubating in the Lower Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Panther, Jenny; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Dawley, Earl M.; Elston, Ralph A.

    2008-01-30

    This report describes research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 2007 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to characterize the effects of total dissolved gas (TDG) on the incubating fry of chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) in the lower Columbia River. The tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of three objectives are summarized: * to conduct a field monitoring program at the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites, collecting empirical data on TDG to obtain a more thorough understanding of TDG levels during different river stage scenarios (i.e., high-water year versus low-water year) * to conduct laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry at gas levels likely to occur downstream from Bonneville Dam * to sample chum salmon sac fry during Bonneville Dam spill operations to determine if there is a physiological response to TDG levels. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the study methdology and results are provided in Appendixes A through D.

  12. Progress of Glaciology and Geocryology Incubation Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Guodong; Zhang Yaonan; Wang Zhengwen

    2007-01-01

    The 10th 5-year Plan for National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) for fostering competent research teams and highly qualified scholars in fundamental research in glaciology and geocryology was based on the strategy of incubating "competitive, problem-solving oriented and motivated fledgling scientists, who can effectively lead and greatly advance the aimed subjects and conduct the cutting edge research". This principle has been playing crucial roles in restructuring the team aiming at world-first-class research projects and at solving critical problems in national key projects. It was under the guidance of this strategy that the key research team for mitigating the challenging and differential frost and thaw hazards along the Qinghai-Tibet Railway (QTR) had been formed, that a strong group focused on the cryosphere (snow, ice and permafrost ) research was re-established and enhanced. These accomplishments have facilitated the formation and growth of highly motivated competitive research teams on comprehensive and integrated fundamental research, which promoted, intensified, and expanded the research programs in glaciology and geocryology.

  13. Human African trypanosomiasis with 7-year incubation period: clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, Oliver; Kopp, Marcel; Siebert, Eberhard; Stenzel, Werner; Hegasy, Guido; Suttorp, Norbert; Stich, August; Zoller, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also referred to as "sleeping sickness", is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Diagnosing imported HAT outside endemic areas is difficult and diagnosis is often delayed. We report a case of imported human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense with an unusually long incubation period of at least 7 years. A 33 year old male African patient, a former resident of Cameroon, presented with a 4-month history of progressive personality changes. A few weeks before presentation the patient had first been admitted to a psychiatric ward and received antidepressant treatment, until a lumbar puncture showed pleocytosis and then antibiotic treatment for suspected neuroborreliosis was initiated. The patient continued to deteriorate during antibiotic treatment and became increasingly lethargic. Under antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory treatment, the condition of the patient gradually improved over the following months and he recovered completely after 24 months of follow-up. This well-documented case illustrates typical difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis outside endemic areas and provides an overview of typical clinical, neuropathological and neuroimaging findings in T. b. gambiense trypanosomiasis, guiding the clinician in establishing the correct diagnosis in this rare disease.

  14. Redox oscillation affecting mercury mobility from highly contaminated coastal sediments: a mesocosm incubation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emili A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg mobility at the sediment-water interface was investigated during a laboratory incubation experiment on highly contaminated sediments (up to 23 μg g−1 of the Gulf of Trieste. Undisturbed sediment was collected in front of the Isonzo River mouth, which inflows Hg-rich suspended material originating from the Idrija (NW Slovenia mining district. Since hypoxic and anoxic conditions at the bottom are frequently observed, a redox oscillation was simulated in the laboratory at in situ temperature, using a dark flux chamber. Temporal variations of several parameters were monitored simultaneously: dissolved Hg and methylmercury (MeHg, O2, NH4+, NO3−+NO2−, PO43−, H2S, dissolved Fe and Mn, dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC. Benthic fluxes of Hg and MeHg were higher under anoxic conditions while re-oxygenation caused concentrations of MeHg and Hg to rapidly drop, probably due to re-adsorption onto Fe/Mn oxyhydroxides and enhanced demethylation. Hence, during anoxic events, sediments of the Gulf of Trieste may be considered as an important source of dissolved Hg species for the water column. However, re-oxygenation of the bottom compartment mitigates Hg and MeHg release from the sediment, thus acting as a natural “defence” from possible interaction between the metal and the aquatic organisms.

  15. Calcification process dynamics in coral primary polyps as observed using a calcein incubation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ohno

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcification processes are largely unknown in scleractinian corals. In this study, live confocal imaging was used to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of the calcification process in aposymbiotic primary polyps of the coral species Acropora digitifera. The fluorophore calcein was used as a calcium deposition marker and a visible indicator of extracellular fluid distribution at the tissue-skeleton interface (subcalicoblastic medium, SCM in primary polyp tissues. Under continuous incubation in calcein-containing seawater, initial crystallization and skeletal growth were visualized among the calicoblastic cells in live primary polyp tissues. Additionally, the distribution of calcein-stained SCM and contraction movements of the pockets of SCM were captured at intervals of a few minutes. Our experimental system provided several new insights into coral calcification, particularly as a first step in monitoring the relationship between cellular dynamics and calcification in vivo. Our study suggests that coral calcification initiates at intercellular spaces, a finding that may contribute to the general understanding of coral calcification processes.

  16. In-Situ Incubation of Iron-Sulfide Mineral in Seawater Reveals Colonization by Iron-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and Zetaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, R. A.; Ramírez, G. A.; Sylvan, J. B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide mineral precipitation occurs at mid-ocean ridge (MOR) spreading centers, both in the form of plume particles and massive sulfide structures. A common constituent of MOR sulfide mineral is pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS). This mineral was chosen as a substrate for in-situ incubation studies in the shallow waters of Catalina Islands, CA to investigate the colonization of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria largely dominated the bacterial community on pyrrhotite samples incubated in the water column. Pyrrhotite samples incubated at the sediment/water column interface showed more even dominance by Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Cultivations that originated from these pyrrhotite samples resulted in the enrichment of Zetaproteobacteria with either twisted-stalks (Mariprofundus) or sheath structures. Additionally, a candidate novel Gammaproteobacterium was isolated and shown to grow autotrophically via the oxidation of iron.

  17. Microwave-assisted antigen retrieval and incubation with cox-2 antibody of archival paraffin-embedded human oligodendroglioma and astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Sehime G; Minbay, F Zehra; Kahveci, Zeynep; Jennes, Lothar

    2006-09-30

    Immunohistochemistry is an important tool that is often used for the diagnosis of pathologies; however, the length of time required to process the tissue is relatively long. Furthermore, the quality and sensitivity of immunohistochemical staining is affected by formalin fixation which results in variable loss of antigenicity, known as masking effect. Here we assess the effect of microwave irradiation on the incubation time required to obtain high quality immunohistochemical staining for cox-2 using archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas. The results show that intermittent microwave irradiation during the incubation with the primary antibody reduced the time requirement to 5 min while the staining quality was indistinguishable from 1 or 24 h long incubations. Thus, the use of this procedure results in a significant saving of time which is important for a timely diagnosis of pathological conditions that await treatment.

  18. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron-reducing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2015-02-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron was measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454 pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We be Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  19. Influence of incubation time of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai and antifungal activity of culture filtrate against Bipolaris oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Juniors Pérez Torres

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was developed at Agriculture Microbiology laboratory in the Agriculture Faculty at Universidad Central “Martha Abreu” de Las Villas, with the aim to evaluate the influence of incubation time of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai on antifungal activity of its culture filtrates against Bipolaris oryzae. Flask with Czapek broth was used for growing T. harzianum, then one disc of mycelium were incubated during 20 and 30 days at 28±1ºC and dark. Trichoderma harzianum (strain A-34 was submited to filtration process, and comparison were done among concentration of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% (v/v. Major inhibition porcentaje were observed in concentrations of 75% y 100% both at 20 and 30 days of incubation. At 20 day the inhibition porcentaje was greater in comparsison with 30 days.

  20. MR imaging of newborns by using an MR-compatible incubator with integrated radiofrequency coils: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüml, Stefan; Friedlich, Philippe; Erberich, Stephan; Wood, John C; Seri, Istvan; Nelson, Marvin D

    2004-05-01

    To meet the needs of term and preterm neonates undergoing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, an MR-compatible incubator with air, temperature, and humidity regulators and integrated radiofrequency coils was evaluated. Nine brain, two cardiac, and two pelvic examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T clinical MR imaging unit. The axillary temperature of the newborns varied by less than 0.8 degrees C, their vital signs remained stable, and no complications were encountered. The diagnostic quality of images obtained with the MR-compatible incubator was superior to that of images obtained with the standard MR imaging equipment. The use of an MR-compatible incubator for examinations of ill neonates is feasible and safe and yields excellent MR images.

  1. Potential for Extrinsic Incubation Temperature to Alter Interplay Between Transmission Potential and Mortality of Dengue-Infected Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Mores, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic incubation period is a critical component in the assessment of arboviral transmission potential. It defines the time it takes for a mosquito to become infectious following exposure to an arbovirus. Since this is a temporal process, the lifespan of a mosquito is intimately tied to the extrinsic incubation period and thus transmission potential of these viruses. Temperature is a known effector of both vector competence (the ability of a vector to transmit a pathogen) and mosquito mortality, but the interaction among temperature, vector competence, and mosquito mortality is not well characterized. Herein, we investigate this interaction for dengue virus, serotype 2, and its primary vector Aedes aegypti where we found that at 30 °C, infection and/or dissemination shortened the average lifespan of the mosquito and that when considering only mosquitoes with a disseminated infection, those incubated at 26 °C lived significantly longer. PMID:27478382

  2. Cereulide formation by Bacillus weihenstephanensis and mesophilic emetic Bacillus cereus at temperature abuse depends on pre-incubation conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Budde, Birgitte Bjørn; Henrichsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    -producing bacterium. Applied and EnvironmentalMicrobiology, 72, 5118-5121.]. Although recent findings indicated B. weihenstephanensis as a cereulide producer only limited information is available regarding environmental conditions affecting cereulide production. In the present study a model agar system was used....... weihenstephanensis MC67 occurred in stationary growth phase, as previously observed for B. cereus, and biomass formation and cereulide formation showed a linear correlation. During incubation at 5 °C for 1, 2 and 3 weeks growth was inhibited and as a consequence no detectable cereulide production occurred for any...... of the three strains. Similar resultswere obtained for the mesophilic B. cereus strains when incubated at 8 °C, whereas B. weihenstephanensis MC67 grew to stationary phase and produced 0.002 µg cereulide/cm2 agar surface in 1 week. Raising the temperature from 5 °C to 25 °C for 24 h after 1 week of incubation...

  3. Computational fluid mechanical study of the convective heat transfer in a closed space simulating an infant incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Taylor, T W; Okino, H; Horio, H; Hasegawa, T

    1996-01-01

    The uneven distribution of the ambient temperature in a model of an infant incubator was demonstrated using the computational fluid mechanical (CFM) simulation of the air flow. A finite volume method of CFM calculation was performed on a three-dimensional (3D) model of an infant incubator including a model baby. The time course of the temperature distribution was computed solving the heat transfer equations simultaneously with the momentum equations. An uneven temperature distribution was observed for a long period (60 s) after the warm inflow was introduced into the incubator chamber. The temperature distribution was complex in 3D space and unsteady even after a long time, suggesting that it may take a considerable time to settle and may continue to be unsteady even if the inflow velocity is steady.

  4. Standard plate counts of drinking water: a comparison between incubation temperatures of 20 and 30 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinedi, C; Gisin, M

    1990-08-01

    Standard plate counts of 5085 drinking water samples gathered in the Region of Basle were carried out over a period of 9 years (1977 to 1985). Two conditions of incubation were evaluated: 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C for 72 h. In ground water samples (3048 samples) colony forming units (cfu) at 30 degrees C were found to be higher than counts at 20 degrees C incubation, 45% of the samples contained greater than or equal to 2 cfu/ml at 30 degrees versus 35% at 20 degrees C. The median was 1 cfu/ml at both temperatures. In spring water samples (2036 samples) bacterial counts at 20 degrees C were found to be higher than counts at 30 degrees C incubation, 61% of the samples contained greater than 10 cfu/ml at 20 degrees C versus 51% at 30 degrees C. The median was 19 cfu/ml at 20 degrees C incubation versus 11 cfu/ml at 30 degrees C. These differences were statistically significant with p less than 0.001 (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test). No correlation was found between bacterial counts at 20 degrees C and bacterial counts at 30 degrees C, nor between bacterial counts and original water temperatures. It appears that incubation temperatures of 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C favor the growth of different populations of bacteria and temperature is not the only factor. However, from a practical point of view the use of only one incubation temperature seems to be justified for the purpose of judging the sanitary quality of drinking water.

  5. Elevated corticosterone levels and severe weather conditions decrease parental investment of incubating Adélie penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Massemin, Sylvie; Handrich, Yves; Raclot, Thierry

    2013-03-01

    Corticosterone, the main stress hormone in birds, mediates resource allocation, allowing animals to adjust their physiology and behaviour to changes in the environment. Incubation is a time and energy-consuming phase of the avian reproductive cycle. It may be terminated prematurely, when the parents' energy stores are depleted or when environmental conditions are severe. In this study, the effects of experimentally elevated baseline corticosterone levels on the parental investment of incubating male Adélie penguins were investigated. Incubation duration and reproductive success of 60 penguins were recorded. The clutches of some birds were replaced by dummy eggs, which recorded egg temperatures and rotation rates, enabling a detailed investigation of incubation behaviour. Corticosterone levels of treated birds were 2.4-fold higher than those of controls 18 days post treatment. Exogenous corticosterone triggered nest desertion in 61% of the treated birds; consequently reducing reproductive success, indicating that corticosterone can reduce or disrupt parental investment. Regarding egg temperatures, hypothermic events became more frequent and more pronounced in treated birds, before these birds eventually abandoned their nest. The treatment also significantly decreased incubation temperatures by 1.3°C and lengthened the incubation period by 2.1 days. However, the number of chicks at hatching was similar among successful nests, regardless of treatment. Weather conditions appeared to be particularly important in determining the extent to which corticosterone levels affected the behaviour of penguins, as treated penguins were more sensitive to severe weather conditions. This underlines the importance of considering the interactions of organisms with their environment in studies of animal behaviour and ecophysiology.

  6. Decreased prolactin levels reduce parental commitment, egg temperatures, and breeding success of incubating male Adélie penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Brajon, Sophie; Massemin, Sylvie; Handrich, Yves; Chastel, Olivier; Raclot, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Hormones regulate many aspects of an individual's phenotype, including various physiological and behavioral traits. Two hormones have been described as important players in the regulation of parental investment in birds: the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone and prolactin, a pituitary hormone, widely involved in mediating parental behavior. In comparison with corticosterone, the role of prolactin on parental investment remains poorly documented, and most studies so far have been correlative. In this study, the effects of an experimental decrease of prolactin levels on the incubation behavior of a long-lived seabird species were assessed. Male Adélie penguins were treated with self-degradable bromocriptine pellets, inhibiting prolactin secretion. Filming and subsequent video analysis allowed the determination of a behavioral time budget for birds and their position on the nest, while dummy eggs recorded incubation parameters. Incubation duration and breeding success at hatching were also monitored. As expected, bromocriptine-treatment significantly decreased plasma prolactin levels, but did not affect corticosterone levels. The behavioral time budget of penguins was not affected by the treatment. However, treated birds spent significantly more time in an upright position on the nest. These birds also incubated their eggs at lower temperatures and turned their eggs more frequently than controls, resulting in a lengthened incubation period. Despite this, the treatment was insufficient to trigger nest desertion and eggs of treated birds still hatched, indicating that several endocrine signals are required for the induction of nest abandonment. We suggest that the decreased prolactin levels in treated birds offset their timeline of breeding, so that birds displayed behavior typical of early incubation.

  7. Evaluation of 100 brain examinations using a 3 Tesla MR-compatible incubator - safety, handling, and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Goericke, Sophia L.; Kinner, Sonja; Schweiger, Bernd [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Huening, Britta M.; Stein, Anja; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula [University Hospital Essen, Department of Neonatology, Division of Pediatrics I, Essen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Several studies have revealed the importance of brain imaging in term and preterm infants. The aim of this retrospective study was to review safety, handling, and image quality of MR brain imaging using a new 3 Tesla MR-compatible incubator. Between 02/2011 and 05/2012 100 brain MRIs (84 infants, mean gestational age 32.2 {+-} 4.7 weeks, mean postmenstrual age at imaging 40.6 {+-} 3.4 weeks) were performed using a 3 Tesla MR-compatible incubator with dedicated, compatible head coil. Seventeen examinations (13 infants, mean gestational age 35.1 {+-} 5.4 weeks, mean postmenstrual age at imaging 47.8 {+-} 7.4 weeks) with a standard head coil served as a control. Image analysis was performed by a neuroradiologist and a pediatric radiologist in consensus. All but two patients with known apnea were transferred to the MR unit and scanned without problems. Handling was easier and faster with the incubator; relevant motion artifacts (5.9 vs. 10.8 %) and the need for repetitive sedation (43.0 vs. 86.7 %) were reduced. Considering only images not impaired by motion artifacts, image quality (4.8 {+-} 0.4 vs. 4.3 {+-} 0.8, p = 0.047) and spatial resolution (4.7 {+-} 0.4 vs. 4.2 {+-} 0.6, p = 0.011) of T2-weighted images were scored significantly higher in patients imaged with the incubator. SNR increased significantly (171.6 {+-} 54.5 vs. 80.5 {+-} 19.8, p < 0.001) with the use of the incubator. Infants can benefit from the use of a 3 Tesla MR-compatible incubator because of its safety, easier, and faster handling (compared to standard imaging) and possibility to obtain high-quality MR images even in unstable patients. (orig.)

  8. Delayed incubation as an alternative method to sample storage for enumeration of E. coli and culturable bacteria in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardabassi, L; Gravesen, J; Lund, C; Bagge, L; Dalsgaard, A

    2002-11-01

    The effects of sample storage on enumeration of Escherichia coli in marine bathing water and culturable bacteria in drinking water were evaluated. Results showed that overnight storage at 0-5 degrees C significantly reduced the counts of E. coli in bathing water (p = 0.0001) with a mean reduction of 25%. A similar effect of sample storage was observed for the enumeration of culturable bacteria in drinking water at 22 +/- 2 degrees C for 66 +/- 4 h (p = 0.0074; mean reduction = 25%) or at 36 +/- 2 degrees C for 44 +/- 4h (p = 0.0353; mean reduction = 6%). The use of a delayed incubation method, i.e. overnight storage at 0-5 degrees C of inoculated agar plates prior to incubation, did not significantly affect the counts of culturable bacteria when plates were incubated at 22 + 2 degrees C for 66 +/- 4 h, whereas it resulted in a significant increase of the bacterial numbers when plates were incubated at 36 +/- 2 degrees C for 44 +/- 4 h (p = 0.0002; mean increase = 32%). Based on these results, it is suggested to avoid the use of overnight or longer sample storage for the enumeration of E. coli in bathing water samples, as well as for the enumeration of culturable bacteria in drinking water. The delayed incubation method appears to be a reliable procedure for the enumeration of culturable bacteria and could represent a valid alternative to sample storage in order to overcome problems associated with the performance of bacteriological counts during weekends or statutory holidays. However, a multi-laboratory study is needed to evaluate the reproducibility of the delayed incubation method for the enumeration of culturable bacteria and its possible use for the enumeration of E. coli by membrane filtration.

  9. Free-radical production after post-thaw incubation of ram spermatozoa is related to decreased in vivo fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Olmo, Enrique; Bisbal, Alfonso; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Ramón, Manuel; Jiménez-Rabadán, Pilar; Anel-López, Luis; Soler, Ana J; Garde, J Julián; Fernández-Santos, María R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA changes on male fertility. For that purpose, six rams with significantly different pregnancy rates were used; these were classified as having high fertility, i.e. 59.4% average pregnancy rate, or low fertility, i.e. 23.1% average pregnancy rate. Sperm quality was assessed after a two-step process of sample thawing followed by an incubation of 2h, either in the freezing extender (37°C) or after dilution in synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF; 38°C, 5%CO2). Sperm viability (YO-PRO-1), ROS production (5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA)) and undamaged chromatin (sperm chromatin structure assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling, chromomycin A3) were evaluated by flow cytometry. Although no significant differences in sperm viability were observed, our results showed increased ROS production during incubation in the freezing extender as well as in SOF medium. Comparison between fertility groups showed significant differences in ROS production after 2h of incubation for the two treatments. Regarding DNA integrity, our results showed no significant differences either between treatments and incubation times or fertility groups. Linear regression analysis showed that ROS production determined by CM-H2DCFDA was a good indicator parameter for in vivo male fertility of SOF-incubated samples, yielding a fair correlation between both parameters (r=-0.92). These results indicate that detection of ROS production by CM-H2DCFDA and flow cytometry after 2h of incubation in SOF could be a useful procedure for predicting fertility of ram spermatozoa.

  10. Comparative assessment of the access of albendazole, fenbendazole and triclabendazole to Fasciola hepatica: effect of bile in the incubation medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L I; Mottier, M L; Lanusse, C E

    2004-01-01

    The work reported here describes the comparative ability of albendazole (ABZ), fenbendazole (FBZ) and triclabendazole (TCBZ) to penetrate through the tegument of mature Fasciola hepatica, and the influence of the physicochemical composition of the incubation medium on the drug diffusion process. The data obtained from the trans-tegumental diffusion kinetic studies were complemented with the determination of lipid-to-water partition coefficients (octanol-water) for the benzimidazole (BZD) anthelmintic drugs assayed. Sixteen-week-old F. hepatica were obtained from untreated artificially infected sheep. The flukes were incubated (37 degrees C) over 60 and 90 min in incubation media (pH 7.4) prepared with different proportions of ovine bile and Krebs' Ringer Tris (KRT) buffer (100, 75, 50, 25 and 0% of bile) containing either ABZ, FBZ or TCBZ at a final concentration of 5 nmol/ml. After the incubation time expired, the liver fluke material was chemically processed and analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to measure drug concentrations within the parasite. Additionally, the octanol-water partition coefficients (PC) for each molecule were calculated (as an indicator of drug lipophilicity) using reversed phase HPLC. The 3 BZD molecules were recovered from F. hepatica at both incubation times in all incubation media assayed. The trans-tegumental diffusion of the most lipophilic molecules ABZ and FBZ (higher PC values) tended to be greater than that observed for TCBZ. Interestingly, the uptake of ABZ by the liver flukes was significantly greater than that measured for TCBZ, the most widely used flukicidal BZD compound. This differential uptake pattern may be a relevant issue to be considered to deal with TCBZ-resistant flukes. Drug concentrations measured within the parasite were lower in the incubations containing the highest bile proportions. The highest total availabilities of the 3 compounds were obtained in liver flukes incubated in the absence of

  11. Response to prey chemical cues by hatchling pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus): Effects of incubation temperature and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J

    1991-06-01

    The ability of hatchling pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) to select and follow or avoid chemical odors of prey (mice,Mus musculus) on a shavings and paper substrate was investigated in Y-maze experiments, as a function of incubation temperature and experience. Incubation temperature affected behavior in the maze, and the maze choices of naive snakes, but not of snakes that had already eaten a mouse. The data indicate that snakes that have eaten, preferentially enter the arm bearing chemical stimuli from mice, whereas those that have not eaten show no preference.

  12. Optimization of Cell Adhesion on Mg Based Implant Materials by Pre-Incubation under Cell Culture Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Willumeit

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium based implants could revolutionize applications where orthopedic implants such as nails, screws or bone plates are used because they are load bearing and degrade over time. This prevents a second surgery to remove conventional implants. To improve the biocompatibility we studied here if and for how long a pre-incubation of the material under cell culture conditions is favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. For two materials, Mg and Mg10Gd1Nd, we could show that 6 h pre-incubation are already enough to form a natural protective layer suitable for cell culture.

  13. Incubation periods under various anti-retroviral therapies in homogeneous mixing and age-structured dynamical models: A theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Arni S R Srinivasa

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. We consider previously well-known models in epidemiology where the parameter for incubation period is used as one of the important components to explain the dynamics of the variables. Such models are extended here to explain the dynamics with respect to a given therapy that prolongs the incubation period. A deconvolution method is demonstrated for estimation of parameters in the situations when no-therapy and multiple therapies are given to the infected population. The models and deconvolution method are extended in order to study the impact of therapy in age-structured populations. A generalisation for a situation when n-types of therapies are available is given.

  14. An AIDS model with distributed incubation and variable infectiousness: applications to i.v. drug users in Latium, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, M; Loro, R; Milner, F; Pugliese, A; Rabbiolo, G

    1992-07-01

    An AIDS model with distributed incubation and variable infectiousness is considered and simulated via a second-order numerical method. The method is applied to the HIV epidemic among IV drug users in the Latium region of Italy, using available data on the length of the incubation period before the onset of AIDS, on the infectivity of infected individuals during that period, and on the demography of drug users. The contact rate is adjusted to match the actual number of AIDS cases. The sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the parameters is finally investigated, by performing several simulations.

  15. Kinetic limit for incubation period of primary phase produced by the combination reaction between two solid heterogeneous pure metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG diangTao; LI JingLong; ZHANG FuSheng; LIN Xin; HUANG WeiDong

    2008-01-01

    An irreversible thermodynamics model was constructed to study the combination reaction of two heterogeneous pure metals in diffusion bonding based on the theorem of minimum entropy production and the Curie principle. The correlation between the irreversible reaction and diffusion was discussed, which provided the kinetic inevitability of an incubation period of a primary phase. The analytical de-scriptions of the incubation period and the kinetically critical grain size of the pri-mary phase were deduced. Comparison of the experimental results of AI/Mo inter-facial reaction with the calculations indicated that the performed theoretical analy-sis was reliable.

  16. Soil structure and microbial activity dynamics in 20–month field–incubated organic-amended soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, E.; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per;

    2014-01-01

    -dispersible clay (WDC) and fluorescein diacetate activity (FDA). After incubation, WDC and FDA were measured on air-dried 1–2-mm aggregates. Tensile strength was measured on four aggregate classes (1–2, 1–4, 4–8 and 8–16 mm) and results used to assess soil friability and workability. Intact cores were also sampled...... community (65–100% increase in FDA). Incubation led to significant macroaggregate formation (>2 mm) for all soils. Friability and strength of newly-formed aggregates were negatively correlated with clay content and carbon content, respectively. Soil workability was best for the kaolinite-rich soil...

  17. Temperature induced decoupling of enzymatic hydrolysis and carbon remineralization in long-term incubations of Arctic and temperate sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Steen, Andrew;

    2010-01-01

    , and 20 ºC. The short-term temperature response of the active microbial community was tested in temperature gradient block incubations. The temperature optimum of extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, as measured with a polysaccharide (chondroitin sulfate), differed between Arctic and temperate habitats...... by about 8–13 C in fresh sediments and in sediments incubated for 24 months. In both Arctic and temperate sediments, the temperature response of chondroitin sulfate hydrolysis was initially similar to that of sulfate reduction. After 24 months, however, hydrolysis outpaced sulfate reduction rates...

  18. Effect of In-Ovo Ascorbic Acid Injection on the Bone Development of Broiler Chickens Submitted to Heat Stress During Incubation and Rearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sgavioli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of in-ovo ascorbic acid (AA injection on the bone development of broilers submitted to heat stress during incubation and rearing. One thousand (1,000 Cobb(rfertile broiler eggs were randomly distributed according to the weight into five incubators, with 200 eggs per incubator. The incubation treatments were: eggs not injected with AA and incubated at 37.5°C; eggs not injected with AA and incubated at 39°C; and eggs injected with 6 µg AA/100 µL water prior to incubation and incubated at 39ºC. The hatched birds were reared at three different house temperatures: cold, thermoneutral, or and hot. The high incubation temperature negatively influenced broilers' bone characteristics. The femur of the birds hatched from eggs incubated at 39°C and injected with AA presented lower shaft mineral density, lower maximum force and lower elongation at maximum force. Their tibia presented reduced mineral density at the proximal and distal epiphysis. In-ovo AA injection of eggs incubated at high temperature did not minimize the negative effects of high rearing temperature on the performance andbone development of broiler chickens reared until 42 days of age.

  19. Isolation and mycelial growth of Diehliomyces microsporus: effect of culture medium and incubation temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Soares do Nascimento

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The false truffle is one of the main problems in the production of the Agaricus brasiliensis in Brazil and the control of this fungal competitor has been rather difficult due to difficulties in the isolation and cultivation of this pathogen. This experiment was conducted in three stages, the first consisting of the isolation of Diehliomyces microsporus starting from portions of the fruiting body and through the ascospores suspension; second, D. microsporus cultivated in vitro at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35ºC in six different culture media (CSDA, OCDA, PCDA, ODA, PDA, CDA; third, D. microsporus was inoculated on sterilized compost for formation of the fruiting body. The colony formation from tissue of D. microsporus starting from portions of fruiting body was more efficient than germination of the ascospores. Compost medium (CDA allowed a larger diameter of the D. microsporus colony, followed by the medium made up of compost and potato mixture, favoring a denser composition. The largest mycelial growth speed of D. microsporus occurred when the culture was incubated at 28 and 30ºC. Incubation temperatures lower than 15ºC or above 35ºC inhibited the mycelial growth of D. microsporus completely. The fruiting bodies were obtained easily in sterilized compost and later inoculated along with mycelial competitor.A falsa trufa está sendo um dos principais problemas na produção do Agaricus brasiliensis cultivado no Brasil e o controle deste fungo competidor tem sido difícil, devido às dificuldades encontradas no isolamento e cultivo do patógeno. Este experimento foi conduzido em três etapas, sendo a primeira constituída pelo isolamento de Diehliomyces microsporus a partir de porções do ascostroma e através da suspensão de ascósporos; a segunda, o cultivo in vitro de D. microsporus nas temperaturas de 15, 20, 25, 30 e 35ºC e em seis meios de cultura (CTDA, ACDA, BCDA, ADA, BDA e CDA e a terceira pela inoculação de D. microsporus no composto

  20. Survival of the recombinant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron strain BTX in in vitro rumen incubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, M A; Whitehead, T R; Rasmussen, M A

    1997-06-01

    The survival of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron strain BTX under rumen-simulating conditions was studied. Strain BTX is a recombinant variant of strain 5482 engineered for the production of high levels of xylanase, an enzyme important in the degradation of hemicellulose. Strain BTX was not inhibited by compounds present in rumen fluid and it grew well in media containing rumen fluid (up to 75%) or high concentrations of volatile fatty acids (total concentration, 100 mmol l-1). The ability of strain BTX to compete with other microorganisms under rumen-like conditions was studied in in vitro incubations of rumen contents. These experiments employed a consecutive batch culture (CBC) system consisting of alfalfa suspended in a rum flid buffer inoculated with blended rumen contents and maintained by transfers (10%, v/v) at 48 h intervals. CBC cultures contained a diversity of microbial morphotypes and accumulated fermentation products in rumen-like proportions. WHen added alone, the numbers of BTX cells were maintained for only a few hours, and then declined precipitously until undetectable after 48 h. If CBC cultures were also supplemented with chondroitin sulphate (a mucopolysaccharide used by Bact. thetaiotaomicron), strain BTX grew and the pattern of its population generally followed that of the total population of ruminal bacteria in these cultures. When transferred into fresh CBC cultures containing chondroitin sulphate, BTX was again able to grow and increase in numbers, but to a diminished degree. Although BTX was able to survive and maintain itself in chondroitin sulphate supplemented cultures, this was at a very low level (10(5) ml-1). The potential for manipulation of rumen function by inoculation with recombinant bacteria is discussed.