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Sample records for technology helps patients

  1. Technology for helping people

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  2. Science and Technology Helps Farmers Get Rich

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER LIM

    1994-01-01

    LAIZHOU City in Shandong Province is situated in the northwest Jiaodong Peninsula of Bohai Bay. In the past ten years, the development of agricultural science and technology, especially folk scientific and technological institutions, which are engaged in scientific research according to market demands, and have carried out production, management, promotion of agricultural technology and services, and have helped to quickly develop poor agricultural areas. The women of Laizhou are a vital new force in this cause.

  3. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  4. Health information technology: help or hindrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchersid, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The practice of medicine in general and nephrology in particular grows increasingly complex with each passing year. In parallel with this trend, the purchasers of health care are slowly shifting the reimbursement paradigm from one based on rewarding transactions, or work performed, to one that rewards value delivered. Within this context, the health-care value equation is broadly defined as quality divided by costs. Health information technology has been widely recognized as 1 of the foundations for delivering better care at lower costs. As the largest purchaser of health care in the world, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has deployed a series of interrelated programs designed to spur the adoption and utilization of health information technology. This review examines our known collective experience in the practice of nephrology to date with several of these programs and attempts to answer the following question: Is health information technology helping or hindering the delivery of value to the nation's health-care system? Through this review, it was concluded overall that the effect of health information technology appears positive; however, it cannot be objectively determined because of the infancy of its utilization in the practice of medicine.

  5. Using multimedia technology to help combat the negative effects of protective isolation on patients: the Open Window project--an engineering challenge.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, F

    2012-02-01

    The Open Window project was established with the aim of creating a "virtual window" for each patient who is confined to protective isolation due to treatment for illness. This virtual window as developed provides a range of media or experiences. This paper describes the approach taken to the system design and discusses initial experiences with implementing such a system in a critical care setting. The system design was predicated on two guiding principles. Firstly it should be intuitive to use and the technology used to create the virtual window hidden from patient view. Secondly the system must be able to be installed at the point of care in a way that delivers the experience under the patient\\'s control, without compromising the function or safety of the clinical environment. Patient acceptance of the system is being measured as part of an on-going trial and at this interim phase of data analysis 100% (n=55) of participants in the intervention group have reported that the technology was easy to use. We conclude that the system as designed and installed is an effective, robust and reliable system upon which to base a multimedia interventions in a critical care room.

  6. Theological education with the help of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Oliver

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Theology seemingly does not have a major impact on society anymore. However, Christianity did not only change and form the western world over the past 2000 thousand years, it still has a substantial role to play in society. This could be done through the development of theologies, the recognition that religious topics are still major segments in the publishing industry and the transforming potential of the Christian message on people. Although theological training finds itself in a difficult position, technology offers support to teaching and learning, cuts costs and offers solutions to a number of current problems concerning the effective formation of ministers. It is no longer necessary to provide theological training through a one-size-fits-all approach – a style that kept the pre-network society boxed. The aim is to motivate educators in theology to embrace the opportunities provided by the network society in aiding with the training of ministers by utilising current and future trends of development in technology.

  7. Theological education with the help of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Oliver

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Theology seemingly does not have a major impact on society anymore. However, Christianity did not only change and form the western world over the past 2000 thousand years, it still has a substantial role to play in society. This could be done through the development of theologies, the recognition that religious topics are still major segments in the publishing industry and the transforming potential of the Christian message on people. Although theological training finds itself in a difficult position, technology offers support to teaching and learning, cuts costs and offers solutions to a number of current problems concerning the effective formation of ministers. It is no longer necessary to provide theological training through a one-size-fits-all approach – a style that kept the pre-network society boxed. The aim is to motivate educators in theology to embrace the opportunities provided by the network society in aiding with the training of ministers by utilising current and future trends of development in technology.

  8. Design should help use of patients' data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J C; Wright, P

    1998-10-24

    Checklists and other tools help doctors to use published evidence in clinical practice. Two other important sources of evidence, however, are the patient and his or her medical record. This series aims to advance the practice of evidence-based medicine by helping in redesign of medical records, drawing on insights from psychology, information design, and medical informatics; and by promoting changes analogous to those occurring in the medical literature. The four papers look at: the uses of medical records and importance of organising them so doctors can use the data they contain; different methods doctors use to search for data and how design of records can help or hinder these approaches; how we interpret data once found, and how record formatting assists this process; and the issues raised by computerisation of records.

  9. Importance of hemodialysis-related outcomes: comparison of ratings by a self-help group, clinicians, and health technology assessment authors with those by a large reference group of patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Inger M; Scheibler, Fueloep; Gerhardus, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    Background The selection of important outcomes is a crucial decision for clinical research and health technology assessment (HTA), and there is ongoing debate about which stakeholders should be involved. Hemodialysis is a complex treatment for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and affects many outcomes. Apart from obvious outcomes, such as mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), others such as, concerning daily living or health care provision, may also be important. The aim of our study was to analyze to what extent the preferences for patient-relevant outcomes differed between various stakeholders. We compared preferences of stakeholders normally or occasionally involved in outcome prioritization (patients from a self-help group, clinicians and HTA authors) with those of a large reference group of patients. Participants and methods The reference group consisted of 4,518 CKD patients investigated previously. We additionally recruited CKD patients via a regional self-help group, nephrologists via an online search and HTA authors via an expert database or personal contacts. All groups assessed the relative importance of the 23 outcomes by means of a discrete visual analog scale. We used descriptive statistics to rank outcomes and compare the results between groups. Results We received completed questionnaires from 49 self-help group patients, 19 nephrologists and 18 HTA authors. Only the following 3 outcomes were ranked within the top 7 outcomes by all 4 groups: safety, HRQoL and emotional state. The ratings by the self-help group were generally more concordant with the reference group ratings than those by nephrologists, while HTA authors showed the least concordance. Conclusion Preferences of CKD patients from a self-help group, nephrologists and HTA authors differ to a varying extent from those of a large reference group of patients with CKD. The preferences of all stakeholders should form the basis of a transparent approach so as to generate a

  10. PPARC: Grid technology helps astronomers keep pace with the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intelligent Agent" computer programs are roaming the Internet and watching the skies. These programs, using Grid computing technology, will help astronomers detect some of the most dramatic events in the universe, such as massive supernova explosions (1 page).

  11. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  12. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  13. Patient-empowerment interactive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggers, Carol S; Altizer, Roger A; Kessler, Robert R; Caldwell, Craig B; Coppersmith, Kurt; Warner, Laura; Davies, Brandon; Paterson, Wade; Wilcken, Jordan; D'Ambrosio, Troy A; German, Massiell L; Hanson, Glen R; Gershan, Lynn A; Korenberg, Julie R; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2012-09-19

    Video games capture the rapt attention of an individual player's mind and body, providing new opportunities for personalized health care. An example of therapeutic interactive technologies is an incentive-based video game that translates physical exercise into mental empowerment via motivational metaphoric visualization in order to help patients psychologically overcome cancer. Such nonpharmacological interventions may enhance patients' resilience toward various chronic disorders via neuronal mechanisms that activate positive emotions and the reward system.

  14. Wearable technology to help with visual challenges - two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kálmán, Viktor; Baczó, Csaba; Livadas, Makis; Csielka, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Today as embedded computing technology and sensors become cheaper and smaller wearable technologies experience an unprecedented boom. This article presents two wearable systems that aim to help people with low vision and the blind in performing everyday tasks and doing sports. DIGIGLASSES is a project aimed at creating a pair of augmented reality digital glasses that present controlled light and contrast levels and marks selectable features on the field of vision to aid in everyday tasks. BLINDTRACK is guidance system that uses wireless localization and an innovative haptic feedback belt to guide blind runners along the running track. Both systems are briefly presented along with the most relevant technical details and user feedback where applicable. Both projects were funded by the EU FP7. Corresponding author V. Kalman: viktor.kalman@ateknea.com.

  15. Helping at the bedside: spouses' preferences for helping critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Deborah

    2004-10-01

    Spouses of patients in intensive care units (ICU) need to be close and helpful to ill partners. According to adult attachment theory, emotional responses may be related to preferences for closeness and helpfulness, and according to control theory optimism also may influence spouses' emotional responses. Spouses' goals and helping behaviors were assessed in 88 spouses of ICU patients. Using a repeated-measures design, the relationships of closeness, helpfulness, and optimism to emotional outcomes were assessed. Preferences for closeness and helpfulness were strongly related, and together with optimism, predicted spouses' mood at some point of the illness trajectory. Spouses who were over-involved with partners' care requirements were at greater risk for emotional distress. Results suggest that closeness and helpfulness are integrated concepts, and that attachment dimensions of a relationship and optimism are useful for understanding spouses' emotional responses to critical illness.

  16. Helping Patients Going Through Separation and Divorce

    OpenAIRE

    Lyall, Alan

    1983-01-01

    The family doctor plays a very important role in the life of the patient who is going through separation or divorce. Separation is a form of mourning. People go through the stages of grief, including surprise, anger, depression, and acceptance. The physician must anticipate a wide range of emotions including disbelief and shock, anger, fear, uncertainty and depression. `Involved neutrality' is his most useful stance. It allows him to be inquiring, solicitous and concerned but to refrain from ...

  17. Asthma Drug May Help Kidney Patients Regain Sense of Smell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug May Help Kidney Patients Regain Sense of Smell Problem is common in chronic kidney disease and ... patients is a loss of the sense of smell, which could lead to an inadequate diet, researchers ...

  18. Artificial 'Voice Box' Implant Helps Cancer Patient Speak

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162873.html Artificial 'Voice Box' Implant Helps Cancer Patient Speak New device ... WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An artificial "voice box" has provided long-term relief for a ...

  19. Helping patients in Uganda overcome weight gain and obesity using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in America where it was found to be an effective way to enhance the ... management in addition to advice on lifestyle changes may be ... method to help patients change their behaviour through developing their .... World Health Organization.

  20. Helping hippocrates: a cross-functional approach to patient identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenly, Margaret A

    2006-08-01

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations National Patient Safety Goal 1, which requires the use of at least two patient identifiers, is the foundation for other patient safety goals. St. Francis Hospital involved staff and patients in the "Helping Hippocrates" Project, which used a "game" with staff and patients to ensure the accuracy of information on patients' identification (ID) bands. Members of all hospital departments assigned to a specific day were to compare the ID band with the patient census report and identify patients who had no ID band on their wrist and patients who had a band with inaccuracies. They were to also ask patients if the staff had checked the ID band before treatments or procedures. Also, the nurse manager was to select a patient to add to his or her own ID band a special band bearing the name Hippocrates. The department conducting the survey had to find Hippocrates. Internal data showed that patient identification errors declined from 8.2% to a sustained zero. Patient satisfaction data showed that since the inception of Helping Hippocrates, patients' perceptions of staffs compliance with ID verification showed steady improvement. Helping Hippocrates demonstrates the value of using an innovative problem-solving strategy that engages the entire organization.

  1. How NASA's Technology Can Help the Automotive Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence W.; Worden, Simon Peter

    2015-01-01

    Presentation describes how automobile companies developing self-driving cars and NASA face similar challenges which can be solved using similar technologies. To provide context, the presentation also describes how NASA Ames is working with automobile companies, such as Nissan, to research and development relevant technologies.

  2. Leveraging Educational Technology to Overcome Social Obstacles to Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation provides initial empirical evidence for Expectancy Value Theory for Help Sources and generates design recommendations for online courses based on the newfound understanding between theory and student behavior. (Abstract shortened by UMI.). [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest…

  3. Leveraging Educational Technology to Overcome Social Obstacles to Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation provides initial empirical evidence for Expectancy Value Theory for Help Sources and generates design recommendations for online courses based on the newfound understanding between theory and student behavior. (Abstract shortened by UMI.). [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest…

  4. Gene May Help Guide Black Patients' Opioid Addiction Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Gene May Help Guide Black Patients' Opioid Addiction Treatment Finding suggests they may need higher doses of ... News on: African American Health Genes and Gene Therapy Opioid Abuse and Addiction Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics African ...

  5. Colloquium: Digital Technologies--Help or Hindrance for the Humanities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Elton; Bissell, Chris; Hardwick, Lorna; Jones, Allan; Ridge, Mia; Wolffe, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers reflections arising from a recent colloquium at the Open University on the implications of the development of digital humanities for research in arts disciplines, and also for their interactions with computing and technology. Particular issues explored include the ways in which the digital turn in humanities research is also a…

  6. Can a physician refuse to help a patient? American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Virginia L

    2008-06-01

    Refusal to help means for most people declining to accept the duty to treat. The reasons for refusing to help and how we think about these reasons from an ethical and professional viewpoint are outlined by considering ethical principles, an historical perspective, the law, societal contracts, medicine as a moral enterprise, professional codes, a physician's personal beliefs, reasons for refusing to help and physician discretion. Refusing to help a patient is not consistent with the ethical principle of beneficence, the concept of the primacy of patient welfare or the obligation of the profession to care for the sick. However duty to treat should not be exploited by institutions or place physicians in circumstances that they consider morally, psychologically or physically unacceptable. Following the principle of distributive justice, physicians are obligated to participate in the public debate to ensure that all patients have their needs met by developing or improving health care systems and addressing the new ethical questions that are likely to be generated.

  7. Commentary: how can technology help us understand the communication process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann

    2012-08-01

    In this commentary, the author reflects on the articles chosen for the special section on communications analysis. These articles problematize communication and raise an interesting set of questions for both human factors and communication scholars to ponder. In the end, both sets of scholars seek the same goal: How do we better examine communication to improve it? Problematizing communication requires scholars to challenge their fundamental assumptions about the phenomenon as well as to tease out the distinctions of methodological approaches typically used by both human factors and communication scholars. Human factors scholars tend to favor forms of communication in which technology or task roles control who can communicate and how. Communication scholars tend to favor contexts in which information flows more freely with fewer explicit restrictions. Creating opportunities to collaborate in research on the communication process may create the best understanding of technology that can better serve our understanding of communication.

  8. Extended-stay rounds can help move patients along.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Weekly extended stay rounds help move along patients who have issues and barriers to a timely discharge, experts say. They recommend: Hold them at the same time and place each week and schedule an hour to an hour and a half for each meeting. Include the physician advisor for case management, a financial counselor, and representatives from case management, social work, therapy, nutrition, pharmacy, wound care, and other departments providing services to patients. Talk about the barriers and issues impeding discharge and brainstorm on solutions.

  9. Helping hands: caring for the upper extremity transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovasik, Darlene; Foust, Daniel E; Losee, Joseph E; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Gorantla, Vijay S

    2011-09-01

    Caring for upper extremity transplant recipients can offer challenges and opportunities to nursing staff in combining new patient procedures, new technologies, and complex patient care needs including unique physical care, monitoring and observation, rehabilitation expectations, and psychiatric/psychosocial support. Medical professionals continue to be apprehensive about the risks of immunosuppressive therapy and the possibility of acute and chronic rejection. The sustained development and research into reliable, reduced-dose immunosuppression or immunomodulatory strategies could expand the life-enhancing benefits of reconstructive transplantation.

  10. Using health psychology to help patients: promoting wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-08-11

    This article explores the construct of wellbeing. Research concerning the relationship between subjective wellbeing and health is discussed. Key components of wellbeing that are important to health include 'sense of coherence', 'optimism' and 'benefit finding and post-traumatic growth'. A range of positive psychology interventions that aim to increase positive thoughts, feelings and emotions in order to improve wellbeing have been developed. Mindfulness-based approaches to improving wellbeing are especially popular and are evidence based. These focus on helping the individual to develop an awareness of the present with acceptance and attention. Instead of trying to change uncomfortable thoughts or feelings, the individual practices accepting these, without judgement. Nurses can draw on the information in this article to provide evidence-based advice and guidance to help improve their patients' and their own wellbeing.

  11. Is technology assisted guided self-help successful in treating female adolescents with bulimia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gudrun; Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Nobis, Gerald; Mayerhofer, Anna; Schau, Johanna; Spitzer, Marion; Imgart, Hartmut; Karwautz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome of new technology assisted guided self-help in adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). One hundred and twenty-six patients with BN (29 adolescents and 97 adults) were randomly allocated to a cognitive behavioural therapy-based self-help program delivered by the Internet or bibliotherapy, both accompanied by e-mail guidance. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, 7 and 18 including remission rates and eating disorder associated psychopathology. In all, 44% of adolescents vs. 38.7% of adults were in remission at month 7, and 55% of adolescents vs. 62.5% of adults were in remission at follow-up. Objective binge eating and compensatory behaviour improved significantly over time in both groups, with the highest decrease during the first 4 months. A significant decrease over time and no group differences have been found in almost all EDI-2 subscales. E-mail guided self-help (delivered via the Internet or bibliotherapy) is equally effective for adolescents as for adults with BN, and can be recommended as an initial step of treatment for this younger age group.

  12. Using health psychology to help patients: theories of behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-09-08

    Behaviour change theories and related research evidence highlight the complexity of making and sticking to health-related behaviour changes. These theories make explicit factors that influence behaviour change, such as health beliefs, past behaviour, intention, social influences, perceived control and the context of the behaviour. Nurses can use this information to understand why a particular patient may find making recommended health behaviour changes difficult and to determine factors that may help them. This article outlines five well-established theories of behaviour change: the health belief model, the theory of planned behaviour, the stages of change model, self-determination theory, and temporal self-regulation theory. The evidence for interventions that are informed by these theories is then explored and appraised. The extent and quality of evidence varies depending on the type of behaviour and patients targeted, but evidence from randomised controlled trials indicates that interventions informed by theory can result in behaviour change.

  13. 76 FR 2144 - Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on December 6, 2010, applicable to workers of Quest Diagnostics, Inc... on-site at the West Norriton, Pennsylvania location of Quest Diagnostics, Inc.,...

  14. Strategies to help patients stop smoking: the optometrist's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy RD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ryan David Kennedy,1,2 Ornell Douglas2 1Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Institute for Global Tobacco Control, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada Abstract: The following review article discusses tobacco's toll on individual and public health, and presents what is currently known about cigarette smoking's risk to ocular health. The article also discusses what eye care professionals – specifically optometrists – can do to help address tobacco use with their patients. Smoking is a leading preventable cause of age-related macular degeneration, and is also causally associated with the development of cataract, thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, and uveitis. Smoking's causal association with vision loss is now used in some countries' health warning labels that appear on tobacco products and national social marketing materials including the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Despite this uptake in health promotion education, very few eye care professionals regularly engage their patients in discussions about tobacco use. Optometrists can be a helpful addition to a smoking cessation health care network that already involves more than a dozen health care professions including medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dental hygiene. Optometrists can further play an important role in educating younger non-smoking patients about the risk of smoking and vision loss to support tobacco-use prevention. Optometrists report that they feel that addressing tobacco use is "not their job" or argue that this is more appropriately done by a family physician/general practitioner. This review article presents the rationale that all primary care providers have a role and a responsibility to discuss tobacco use with their patients. This review article outlines some techniques and strategies that optometrists can use to

  15. Contemporary teaching strategies of exemplary community preceptors--is technology helping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stephen M; Schifferdecker, Karen E; Anthony, David; Chao, Jason; Chessman, Alexander W; Margo, Katherine; Seagrave, Martha; Leong, Shou Ling

    2014-01-01

    Many schools rely upon community preceptors for office-based education of medical students. These preceptors struggle to balance clinical care with the learning needs of students. We aim to gain a deeper understanding of the teaching rewards and challenges of current community preceptors. Five schools' family medicine clerkship directors conducted in-depth interviews of two exemplary preceptors at each of their programs. Following qualitative analysis of the interviews, three directors conducted one focus group at their school. The individual and group interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory. Exemplary community preceptors described strategies to improve the learning environment and specific teaching approaches. Well-known teaching strategies such as role modeling, adjusting instruction to the learner's needs, and selecting patients appropriate for a specific student were used. They also described newer techniques such as co-learning and integrating technology, for example, accessing online, current practice guidelines together with the student. They detailed challenges to teaching, including time constraints and too much content to cover and provided advice about teaching tools. While challenged by clinical demands, preceptors enjoyed teaching and found it rewarding. They used time-proven teaching strategies as well as technology and online resources to facilitate ambulatory teaching. Community preceptors continue to struggle to integrate learners and the priorities of the medical school curriculum into the clinical environment. Further development of electronic tools and other resources to support the teaching needs of preceptors may contribute to learning and help minimize preceptor burden.

  16. Does Technology Transfer Help Small and Medium Companies? Empirical Evidence from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hwan Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We challenge the view that technology transfer from big companies to small and medium (SM size companies helps SM companies to prosper. With a large dataset of SM companies in Korea, we utilize the stochastic production frontier (SPF model to examine the productivity of inputs and the generalized linear model (GLM to compare business performance between two groups of SM companies: SM companies that receive technology transfer and those that do not receive technology transfer from big companies. The empirical results demonstrate that the transfer of technology from big companies to SM companies help SM companies to enjoy productivity of capital. Nonetheless, SM companies receiving technology transfer were found to underperform in terms of labor productivity and profit margin compared to their counterparts. We further investigate the reasons why SM companies receiving technology transfer from big companies underperform relative to their counterparts, and our findings shows that the former do not export much of their product and face more difficulties such as lower price for their products imposed by big companies than the latter. By identifying the negative rather than the conventionally assumed positive effect of technology transfer, this paper contributes to the literature on the relationship between technology transfer and SM companies’ prosperity in the case of Korea. Our findings have important implications for how SM companies should strategize and rethink about the clauses embedded in the transfer of technology that they receive from big companies because technology transfer plays as a barrier to their prosperity.

  17. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  18. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  19. Lost in the Lifeworld: Technology Help Seeking and Giving on Diverse, Post-Secondary Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannis, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Information and communications technology (ICT) is integrated throughout a student's lived experience in their post-secondary learning environment. In order for students with limited or no background with ICT to achieve their academic goals, a central part of their adaptation involves an intensive period of ICT help seeking. Using anecdotes from…

  20. A patent survey case: how could technological forecasting help cosmetic chemists with product innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domicio Da Silva Souza, Ivan; Juliana Pinheiro, Bárbara; Passarini Takahashi, Vania

    2012-01-01

    Patents represent a free and open source of data for studying innovation and forecasting technological trends. Thus, we suggest that new discussions about the role of patent information are needed. To illustrate the relevance of this issue, we performed a survey of patents involving skin care products, which were granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) between 2006 and 2010, to identify opportunities for innovation and technological trends. We quantified the use of technologies in 333 patents. We plotted a life cycle of technologies related to natural ingredients. We also determined the cross impact of the technologies identified. We observed technologies related to processes applied to cosmetics (2.2%), functional packaging and applicators (2.9%), excipients and active compounds (21.5%), and cosmetic preparations (73.5%). Further, 21.6% of the patents were related to the use of natural ingredients. Several opportunities for innovation were discussed throughout this paper, for example, the use of peptides as active compounds or intracellular carriers (only 3.9% of the technologies in cosmetic preparations). We also observed technological cross impacts that suggested a trend toward multifunctional cosmetics, among others. Patent surveys may help researchers with product innovation because they allow us to identify available and unexplored technologies and turn them into whole new concepts.

  1. Video Helps Prepare Patients to Participate in Cancer Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who took part in a tailored, video-based educational program had a better understanding of and fewer concerns about participating in clinical trials than patients who received text-based educational.

  2. Community response grids: using information technology to help communities respond to bioterror emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T; Fleischmann, Kenneth R; Preece, Jennifer; Shneiderman, Ben; Wu, Philip Fei; Qu, Yan

    2007-12-01

    Access to accurate and trusted information is vital in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an emergency. To facilitate response in large-scale emergency situations, Community Response Grids (CRGs) integrate Internet and mobile technologies to enable residents to report information, professional emergency responders to disseminate instructions, and residents to assist one another. CRGs use technology to help residents and professional emergency responders to work together in community response to emergencies, including bioterrorism events. In a time of increased danger from bioterrorist threats, the application of advanced information and communication technologies to community response is vital in confronting such threats. This article describes CRGs, their underlying concepts, development efforts, their relevance to biosecurity and bioterrorism, and future research issues in the use of technology to facilitate community response.

  3. Rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing: how electronic technology can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Frank P

    2004-01-01

    Electronic technology can be used to overcome many of the barriers and other factors that restrict delivery of services to rural schools; it can also expand the world of rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Online college and high school Web sites that offer courses are listed, as well as a Web site for tutoring and one offering help for teachers of rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Recommendations are made for ways that legislatures and rural school districts can make Internet resources and assistive technology more widely available in rural educational settings.

  4. The effectiveness of self help technologies for emotional problems in adolescents: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Peter

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescence is a transition period that involves physiological, psychological, and social changes. Emotional problems such as symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop due to these changes. Although many of these problems may not meet diagnostic thresholds, they may develop into more severe disorders and may impact on functioning. However, there are barriers that may make it difficult for adolescents to receive help from health professionals for such problems, one of which is the limited availability of formal psychological therapy. One way of increasing access to help for such problems is through self help technology (i.e. delivery of psychological help through information technology or paper based formats. Although there is a significant evidence base concerning self help in adults, the evidence base is much weaker in adolescents. This study aims to examine the effectiveness of self help technology for the treatment of emotional problems in adolescents by conducting a systematic review of randomized and quasi-experimental evidence. Methods Five major electronic databases were searched: Medline, PsycInfo, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and CINAHL. In addition, nine journals were handsearched and the reference lists of all studies were examined for any additional studies. Fourteen studies were identified. Effect sizes were calculated across 3 outcome measures: attitude towards self (e.g. self esteem; social cognition (e.g. self efficacy; and emotional symptoms (i.e. depression and anxiety symptoms. Results Meta analysis showed small, non-significant effect size for attitude towards self (ES = -0.14, 95% CI = -0.72 to 0.43, a medium, non-significant effect size for social cognition (ES = -0.49, 95% CI = -1.23 to 0.25 and a medium, non-significant effect size for emotional symptoms (ES = -0.47, 95% CI = -1.00 to 0.07. However, these findings must be considered preliminary, because of the small number of

  5. New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Can Help Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160852.html New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Can Help Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed ... 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new form of electrical stimulation therapy can help rewire the brain and ...

  6. Can ultrasound help to manage patients with scrotal trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlan, T; Freeman, S J

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic injuries to the scrotum are uncommon but, when they do occur, frequently lead to serious complications. Early complications include testicular infarction, necrosis and abscess formation; in the longer-term trauma may result in testicular atrophy and subfertility. Early surgical intervention in patients with testicular rupture can significantly improve the clinical outcome and reduce the need for delayed orchidectomy. However, clinical examination of the scrotum following trauma is difficult and frequently inaccurate; this may result in incorrect triage of patients for surgical exploration. Scrotal ultrasound can reliably assess scrotal injuries and diagnose testicular rupture with a high level of accuracy. Additionally, ultrasound can provide important information regarding testicular perfusion, which can further inform decisions on surgical management. This article reviews the sonographic findings that may be encountered in patients with scrotal trauma, with an emphasis on blunt trauma. It describes the pivotal role that ultrasound can play in the accurate triage of these patients to surgical or conservative management.

  7. Helping patients and their family caregivers cope with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L

    2012-09-01

    Family caregivers face multiple demands as they care for their loved ones with cancer, and these demands have increased dramatically in recent years. Patients with cancer now receive toxic treatments in outpatient settings and return home to the care of their family members. Some patients receive in-home infusions, which were unheard of a few years ago. Family caregivers provide tasks that were previously provided by nurses; however, caregivers lack the educational preparation that nurses receive.

  8. Information technology for patient empowerment in healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Grando, Maria Adela; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The authors explore novel information-based mechanisms that are changing the way patients are involved in their own health care. The book covers models, frameworks and technologies to improve patient-to-provider communication, patient interaction with information technologies, patient education and involvement in health care decision processes, and patient access, understanding and control over their clinical data.

  9. How music-inspired weeping can help terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Kay

    2011-09-01

    Music's power to improve the 'human condition' has been acknowledged since ancient times. Something as counter-intuitive as weeping in response to music can ameliorate suffering for a time even for terminally ill patients. Several benefits-including catharsis, communication, and experiencing vitality-can be associated with grieving in response to "sad" music. In addressing the potential rewards of such an activity for terminally ill patients, this author combines concepts from philosopher Jerrold R. Levinson's article, entitled "Music and Negative Emotion," an illustration from a major motion picture, and supporting research from medical reports and aesthetic writings. Carefully offering this experience is recommended for patients who retain the capacity to express preference.

  10. [Swiss Bechterew's Disease Association: a patient self-help organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, H

    1991-06-04

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the third most common form of rheumatism and as such of considerable economic and social significance due to its early outbreak, its course of flare-ups and its remissions, chronic persistence and risk of early invalidity. As there is no basic therapy, the main emphasis of modern treatment lies on the practice of regular and intensive AS-specific physical exercise, complemented by suitable sports. In these circumstances, the active cooperation of the patients themselves is of utmost importance; therefore, it was obvious that the information of AS patients on their disease and their interest to improve their physical and psychological situation would be further encouraged by the foundation of a self-assistance organization for AS patients, thereby lightening the blow fate had dealt them. The Swiss Ankylosing Spondylitis Association (Schweizerische Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew, SVMB, Société de la spondylarthrite ankylosante, SSSA, Società svizzera morbo di Bechterew, SSMB), founded in 1978, has its headquarters in Zurich (Röntgenstrasse 22, CH-8005 Zurich, Tel. 01 272 78 66) and strives for the following: --the organization of local and regional therapy groups for AS gymnastics and sports --information for patients and their families on all aspects concerning AS --preparation of 'contact' meetings between AS patients to exchange experiences and thoughts --information for doctors on the latest developments in the field of AS and about the activities of the AS Society --promotion of research in the field of AS and its related diseases --information to the general population about the physical aspects of AS and the problems confronting AS patients --cooperation with other AS societies within the framework of the Ankylosing Spondylitis International Federation, ASIF.

  11. Community stroke rehabilitation helps patients return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, John; O'Connor, Rory J

    2013-09-01

    Around 150,000 people experience a stroke every year in the UK. Nearly one million people in England are living with the effects of a stroke; one third of whom are moderately to severely disabled. A quarter of stroke survivors are under the age of 65 meaning that many are in work and/or have responsibility for caring for children or elderly parents. With a comprehensive rehabilitation team, patients with more complex or severe disability can be rehabilitated in the community providing that the home environment can be suitably adapted. All patients will require regular review by their own doctor and some of these reviews will focus on standardised assessments of risk factors for stroke and implementation of appropriate secondary prevention. The GP has a role in identifying the emotional impact of stroke on the patient and the impact that the stroke has on relatives and carers. The core components of the community-based programme can be broadly defined as improving emotional wellbeing, communication, cognitive function and physical independence and supporting return to work. Antidepressants are effective in reducing emotional lability. Cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perception and planning are often affected by stroke. Assessment and treatment by the occupational therapy team and clinical psychologist can reduce the impact of these impairments. Speech and language therapy is instrumental in facilitating recovery as is training carers in supportive communication and providing aphasia-friendly information. NICE recommends that patients receive 45 minutes of each relevant therapy five times a week. Each therapy needs to be provided at an intensity that will produce a functional change. Most patients will be able to drive again if there is no significant visual field loss or uncontrolled epilepsy. Graded return to work programmes are more successful as people are gradually accustomed to the workplace.

  12. Using health psychology to help patients: theories of behaviour change

    OpenAIRE

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Behaviour change theories and related research evidence highlight the complexity of making and sticking to health-related behaviour changes. These theories make explicit factors that influence behaviour change, such as health beliefs, past behaviour, intention, social influences, perceived control and the context of the behaviour. Nurses can use this information to understand why a particular patient may find making recommended health behaviour changes difficult and to determine factors that ...

  13. Respiratory dysfunction in ventilated patients: can inspiratory muscle training help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A; Paratz, J D; Boots, R J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with prolonged and difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. This dysfunction in ventilator-dependent patients is multifactorial: there is evidence that inspiratory muscle weakness is partially explained by disuse atrophy secondary to ventilation, and positive end-expiratory pressure can further reduce muscle strength by negatively shifting the length-tension curve of the diaphragm. Polyneuropathy is also likely to contribute to apparent muscle weakness in critically ill patients, and nutritional and pharmaceutical effects may further compound muscle weakness. Moreover, psychological influences, including anxiety, may contribute to difficulty in weaning. There is recent evidence that inspiratory muscle training is safe and feasible in selected ventilator-dependent patients, and that this training can reduce the weaning period and improve overall weaning success rates. Extrapolating from evidence in sports medicine, as well as the known effects of inspiratory muscle training in chronic lung disease, a theoretical model is proposed to describe how inspiratory muscle training enhances weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Possible mechanisms include increased protein synthesis (both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibres), enhanced limb perfusion via dampening of a sympathetically-mediated metaboreflex, reduced lactate levels and modulation of the perception of exertion, resulting in less dyspnoea and enhanced exercise capacity.

  14. Travel medicine: helping patients prepare for trips abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, L

    1998-08-01

    One third of persons who travel abroad experience a travel-related illness, usually diarrhea or an upper respiratory infection. The risk of travelers' diarrhea can be reduced by eating only freshly prepared, hot foods. Combination therapy with a single dose of ofloxacin plus loperamide usually provides relief from travelers' diarrhea within 24 hours. Using a diethyltoluamide (deet)-containing insect repellent and wearing permethrin-coated clothing can reduce the risk of malaria, yellow fever and other diseases contracted from insects. Routine immunizations such as tetanus, measles, mumps and rubella, and influenza should be updated if necessary before the patient embarks on the trip. Hepatitis A immunization should be administered to persons traveling to places other than Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and western European countries. Typhoid vaccination should be considered for travelers going to developing countries. Yellow fever immunization is indicated for travelers going to endemic areas of South America and Africa. Malaria prophylaxis with chloroquine is indicated for travelers going to Mexico and Central America. Mefloquine is recommended for those traveling to areas where malaria is resistant to prophylactic treatment with chloroquine. Medical advice for patients planning trips abroad must be individualized and based on the most current expert recommendations.

  15. How to use mini-pills: helpful patient instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Progestin only birth control pills appeared on the US market in 1973. As there is no estrogen in these mini pills, they may have fewer dangerous side effects than the combined pills. Some clinics suggest mini pills for women who suffer from estrogen excess side effects. The 3 mini pills available in the U.S. are called Micronor, NOR-QD, and Ovrette. Instructions are presented for patients who are interested in using mini pills. The mini pills most likely work by affecting a women's fertility in several ways: act as a messenger to the woman's ovaries and uterus to prevent the release of an egg; thicken the mucous on the cervix, making it difficult for the sperm to "get through" the cervix and reach the egg; and change the lining of the uterus so that it may not develop properly for the fertilized egg to grow. The mini pills can be 97% effective is used perfectly. The mini pills are only effective for as long as a woman takes them. A woman must take a pill every day to prevent pregnancy. A woman should not use the mini pill if she has or ever has had any of these problems: blood clotting problems in veins; stroke; cancer of the breast or reproductive parts of the body; suspected pregnancy, current pregnancy; and undiagnosed, abnormal genital bleeding. Possible benefits for a woman using mini pills include: an effective method of birth control; a method for nursing mothers since it does not seem to affect the amount of their breast milk; and a possible reduction in premenstrual cramps. Possible risks for a woman using mini pills include: irregular periods; and a less effective method if the patient does not take a pill every day. The danger signals to look for are abdominal pain, chest pain, headaches, eye problems, and severe leg pain. A patient should revisit a clinic in the following situations: has not had a period within 45 days of the last period; severe abdominal pains while taking mini pills; experiences a warning signal; any time one thinks the pills are

  16. Whats 'App-ening': the help of new technologies in nutrition in digestive diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankersen, Dorit V; Weimers, Petra; Burisch, Johan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to review the basic concepts of electronic health (eHealth), with a focus on its nutritional applications and its usefulness for digestive diseases. eHealth applications for the treatment and monitoring of digestive disease are growing in number. ehealth helps patients in coping with their disease by promoting self-management, which increases adherence to medical treatment and diets, and leads to an improved quality of life. For irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there are multiple applications that provide dietary advice, for example, a low FODMAP (Fermentable Oligo, Mono, Disaccharides And Polyols) diet. However, many applications lack a symptom scoring function and do not include a module for assisting the essential reintroduction of high FODMAP foods. In general, there are very few applications that enable direct patient communication with healthcare professionals. A more holistic approach that educates patients and enables them to communicate directly with eCare provider through a web application is one of the functions most requested by patients. eHealth solutions for digestive diseases have a supportive function and a positive impact on patients. However, there is a need to increase patient education and further develop the possibility for care team-patient communication within eHealth solutions.

  17. Patient race and perceived illness responsibility: effects on provider helping and bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazione, Samantha; Silk, Kami J

    2013-08-01

    Health care disparities represent a major issue impacting the quality of care in the USA. Provider biases have been identified as contributing to health care disparities. This study examined the helping intentions and biases reported by medical students based on patient race and perceived patient responsibility. The study was guided by the responsibility-affect-helping model (RAHM), which proposes that helping behaviour is a function of perceived responsibility and affect. In a 2 × 3 online experiment, medical students (n = 231) viewed a health chart and dialogue for either a Black or a White patient, in which the dialogue included a manipulation of the patient's rationales for his non-compliance with diet recommendations (responsible, not responsible, no responsibility assigned). After viewing the manipulation, medical students completed measures regarding perceived patient responsibility, affect, intention to help, perceptions of the patient and ethnocentrism. The RAHM was supported, such that increased perceived patient responsibility led to increased provider anger and reduced provider helping intentions, whereas decreased perceived patient responsibility led to increased provider empathy and helping intentions. Additionally, an interaction effect between race and perceived patient responsibility occurred such that bias toward the Black patient was most likely to occur in the control condition. Perceived patient responsibility affects provider helping intentions and interacts with patient race to influence provider perceptions of patient characteristics. Communication on rationales for non-compliance as associated with perceived responsibility may lead to better or worse patient care as providers make attributions about patients based on these factors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The "T3 Support Centre" (Teaching, Technology and Testing - Not just another help desk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Miles

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Many faculty members embrace the challenge of responding to rising student demands for more technically advanced course supports by offering their courseware through a variety of media. However, it is often difficult for them to find the time required to become proficient in the use of the software packages, course management systems and web technologies at their disposal. These new realities of teaching point to the need for support systems for faculty members that go beyond the traditional computer services "help desk" with a more comprehensive support service that actually becomes involved in the development and modification of technology-based course materials and computerized test marking and analysis. Increasing demand for these types of services at Carleton University resulted in the establishment of the T3 (Teaching...Technology...Testing Support Centre. The service offers faculty members extended-hour phone-in and walk-in support as well as a variety of resources such as Scantron and Item Analysis service for multiple choice exams, the use of scanners and colour printers, as well as a variety of teaching publications and contacts. This paper details the planning, administration, and services offered of the T3 Service, including advice those attempting to establish a similar service. Usage statistics from the first year of operations will be delineated.

  19. The "T3 Support Centre" (Teaching, Technology and Testing - Not just another help desk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Miles

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Many faculty members embrace the challenge of responding to rising student demands for more technically advanced course supports by offering their courseware through a variety of media. However, it is often difficult for them to find the time required to become proficient in the use of the software packages, course management systems and web technologies at their disposal. These new realities of teaching point to the need for support systems for faculty members that go beyond the traditional computer services "help desk" with a more comprehensive support service that actually becomes involved in the development and modification of technology-based course materials and computerized test marking and analysis. Increasing demand for these types of services at Carleton University resulted in the establishment of the T3 (Teaching...Technology...Testing Support Centre. The service offers faculty members extended-hour phone-in and walk-in support as well as a variety of resources such as Scantron and Item Analysis service for multiple choice exams, the use of scanners and colour printers, as well as a variety of teaching publications and contacts. This paper details the planning, administration, and services offered of the T3 Service, including advice those attempting to establish a similar service. Usage statistics from the first year of operations will be delineated.

  20. [Successful patient-activated help call for a doctor during in-hospital stay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mette Mejlby; Hasselkvist, Birgith; Thordal, Sofie; Riiskjær, Erik; Kelsen, Jens

    2014-09-29

    Department of Medicine, Randers Regional Hospital, conducted a study of patient-activated help call, involving 1,050 patients with nearly 3,700 days in-hospital stay. Patients were encou-raged to bypass traditional clinical hierarchy of communication when they felt, that their concern was not met by the staff. Three help calls were related to the management of pain. In two cases it resulted in a surgical procedure. A survey including 104 patients revealed that one third reported that patient safety was improved by the initiative and nearly three quarters re-ported that they would be willing to activate the call.

  1. How Mockups, a Key Engineering Tool, Help to Promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Harry E.

    2010-01-01

    The United States ranking among the world in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is decreasing. To counteract this problem NASA has made it part of its mission to promote STEM education among the nation s youth. Mockups can serve as a great tool when promoting STEM education in America. The Orion Cockpit Working Group has created a new program called Students Shaping America s Next Space Craft (SSANS) to outfit the Medium Fidelity Orion Mockup. SSANS will challenge the students to come up with unique designs to represent the flight design hardware. There are two main types of project packages created by SSANS, those for high school students and those for university students. The high school projects will challenge wood shop, metal shop and pre-engineering classes. The university projects are created mainly for senior design projects and will require the students to perform finite element analysis. These projects will also challenge the undergraduate students in material selection and safety requirements. The SSANS program will help NASA in its mission to promote STEM education, and will help to shape our nations youth into the next generation of STEM leaders.

  2. Health Technology Assessment and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mulcahy

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA is a process used to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and costeffectiveness of health technologies by a systematic review of clinical, economic, and utilization research.

    Despite widespread investment in patient safety technologies in the U.K., U.S., and elsewhere, little HTA has been done to establish the clinical or cost-effectiveness of these technologies. The HTA and patient safety literature suggests there are four categories of patient safety HTA, including HTA for existing safety technologies, underutilized safety technologies, emerging safety technologies, as well as safety aspects of technologies with a non-safety primary purpose.

    Recent HTA and other research, including a 2002 evidencebased evaluation of patient safety technologies from the U.S. Agency for Health Research and Quality, provide an important foundation for a more comprehensive approach to patient safety HTA. However, HTA programs must address prioritization, methodology, and dissemination challenges introduced by patient safety technologies before significant progress can Te made.

  3. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

  4. Moving empirically supported practices to addiction treatment programs: recruiting supervisors to help in technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Maryann; Storti, Susan A; Larson, Mary Jo

    2010-05-01

    Federal and state funding agencies are encouraging or mandating the use of empirically supported treatments in addiction programs, yet many programs have not moved in this direction (Forman, Bovasso, and Woody, 2001 ; Roman and Johnson, 2002 ; Willenbring et al., 2004 ). To improve the skills of counselors in community addiction programs, the authors developed an innovative Web-based course on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), a widely accepted empirically-supported practice (ESP) for addiction. Federal funding supports this Web course and a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness. Since supervisors often play a pivotal role in helping clinicians transfer learned skills from training courses to the workplace, the authors recruited supervisor-counselor teams, engaging 54 supervisors and 120 counselors. Lessons learned focus on supervisor recruitment and involvement, supervisors' perceptions of CBT, their own CBT skills and their roles in the study, and implications for technology transfer for the addiction field as a whole. Recruiting supervisors proved difficult because programs lacked clinical supervisors. Recruiting counselors was also difficult because programs were concerned about loss of third-party reimbursement. Across the addiction field, technology transfer will be severely hampered unless such infrastructure problems can be solved. Areas for further investigation are identified.

  5. An Examination of the Career, Salary and Training Expectations of Information Technology Professionals Working in the Help Desk Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The Information Technology (IT) help desk positions serve as the gateway between the IT department and users. Although IT is one of the most employable job categories, and crucial for business, staffing these positions with properly trained and certified IT personnel and retaining them is a major challenge for IT help desk managers. What are the…

  6. Do advanced cancer patients in Denmark receive the help they need?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Pedersen, Lise;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the adequacy of help delivered by the healthcare system for 12 symptoms/problems in a national, randomly selected sample of advanced cancer patients in Denmark....

  7. Game on, science - how video game technology may help biologists tackle visualization challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihan Lv

    Full Text Available The video games industry develops ever more advanced technologies to improve rendering, image quality, ergonomics and user experience of their creations providing very simple to use tools to design new games. In the molecular sciences, only a small number of experts with specialized know-how are able to design interactive visualization applications, typically static computer programs that cannot easily be modified. Are there lessons to be learned from video games? Could their technology help us explore new molecular graphics ideas and render graphics developments accessible to non-specialists? This approach points to an extension of open computer programs, not only providing access to the source code, but also delivering an easily modifiable and extensible scientific research tool. In this work, we will explore these questions using the Unity3D game engine to develop and prototype a biological network and molecular visualization application for subsequent use in research or education. We have compared several routines to represent spheres and links between them, using either built-in Unity3D features or our own implementation. These developments resulted in a stand-alone viewer capable of displaying molecular structures, surfaces, animated electrostatic field lines and biological networks with powerful, artistic and illustrative rendering methods. We consider this work as a proof of principle demonstrating that the functionalities of classical viewers and more advanced novel features could be implemented in substantially less time and with less development effort. Our prototype is easily modifiable and extensible and may serve others as starting point and platform for their developments. A webserver example, standalone versions for MacOS X, Linux and Windows, source code, screen shots, videos and documentation are available at the address: http://unitymol.sourceforge.net/.

  8. Game on, science - how video game technology may help biologists tackle visualization challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhihan; Tek, Alex; Da Silva, Franck; Empereur-mot, Charly; Chavent, Matthieu; Baaden, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The video games industry develops ever more advanced technologies to improve rendering, image quality, ergonomics and user experience of their creations providing very simple to use tools to design new games. In the molecular sciences, only a small number of experts with specialized know-how are able to design interactive visualization applications, typically static computer programs that cannot easily be modified. Are there lessons to be learned from video games? Could their technology help us explore new molecular graphics ideas and render graphics developments accessible to non-specialists? This approach points to an extension of open computer programs, not only providing access to the source code, but also delivering an easily modifiable and extensible scientific research tool. In this work, we will explore these questions using the Unity3D game engine to develop and prototype a biological network and molecular visualization application for subsequent use in research or education. We have compared several routines to represent spheres and links between them, using either built-in Unity3D features or our own implementation. These developments resulted in a stand-alone viewer capable of displaying molecular structures, surfaces, animated electrostatic field lines and biological networks with powerful, artistic and illustrative rendering methods. We consider this work as a proof of principle demonstrating that the functionalities of classical viewers and more advanced novel features could be implemented in substantially less time and with less development effort. Our prototype is easily modifiable and extensible and may serve others as starting point and platform for their developments. A webserver example, standalone versions for MacOS X, Linux and Windows, source code, screen shots, videos and documentation are available at the address: http://unitymol.sourceforge.net/.

  9. Game On, Science - How Video Game Technology May Help Biologists Tackle Visualization Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Franck; Empereur-mot, Charly; Chavent, Matthieu; Baaden, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The video games industry develops ever more advanced technologies to improve rendering, image quality, ergonomics and user experience of their creations providing very simple to use tools to design new games. In the molecular sciences, only a small number of experts with specialized know-how are able to design interactive visualization applications, typically static computer programs that cannot easily be modified. Are there lessons to be learned from video games? Could their technology help us explore new molecular graphics ideas and render graphics developments accessible to non-specialists? This approach points to an extension of open computer programs, not only providing access to the source code, but also delivering an easily modifiable and extensible scientific research tool. In this work, we will explore these questions using the Unity3D game engine to develop and prototype a biological network and molecular visualization application for subsequent use in research or education. We have compared several routines to represent spheres and links between them, using either built-in Unity3D features or our own implementation. These developments resulted in a stand-alone viewer capable of displaying molecular structures, surfaces, animated electrostatic field lines and biological networks with powerful, artistic and illustrative rendering methods. We consider this work as a proof of principle demonstrating that the functionalities of classical viewers and more advanced novel features could be implemented in substantially less time and with less development effort. Our prototype is easily modifiable and extensible and may serve others as starting point and platform for their developments. A webserver example, standalone versions for MacOS X, Linux and Windows, source code, screen shots, videos and documentation are available at the address: http://unitymol.sourceforge.net/. PMID:23483961

  10. Association between interpersonal behaviour and helping alliance in substance-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weert-Van Oene, G H; Jörg, F; de Jong, C A J

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on exploring the association between the patient's perception of his own interpersonal behaviour on the one hand, and that of the therapist's behaviour and of helping alliance on the other hand. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 83 patients from substance dependence

  11. Patient safety and technology-driven medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Keinicke Fabricius, Pia

    2015-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. AIM: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. METHODS: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient......BACKGROUND: The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new...

  12. Exploring the relationship between technology use, hearing help-seeking, and hearing aid outcomes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz Ham, Heidi; Bunn, Paul; Meyer, Carly; Khan, Asad; Hickson, Louise

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore technology use and its relationship to help-seeking for hearing impairment (HI) and success with hearing aids among older adults. Previous research had suggested a link between higher levels of technology use and hearing aid success. General technology use was evaluated using a purposefully developed 25-item questionnaire. Twelve items related to everyday technology use (e.g. DVD player) and 13 related to advanced technology use (e.g. Bluetooth). Four groups of older adults with HI participated in the study: (1) non-consulters (n=49), (2) consulters (n=62), (3) unsuccessful hearing aid owners (n=61), and (4) successful hearing aid owners (n=79). Preliminary analyses revealed a main effect in the use of everyday and advanced technology across the four participant groups. However, it was found that age and living arrangements accounted for most of the variance in reported everyday technology use (p=.030; p=.029, respectively) and age and gender accounted for the variance in reported advanced technology use (ptechnology, an increase in age and living alone were associated with decreased technology use and for advanced technology use, age and female gender were associated with decreased technology use. Although we hypothesized that technology use would be less amongst non-consulters and unsuccessful hearing aid owners, our findings did not support this prediction. Technology use did not vary by group membership once the covariates of age, gender, and living arrangements were accounted for.

  13. A review of mobile applications to help adolescent and young adult cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley KM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly M Wesley,1 Philip J Fizur2 1Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 2Department of Psychology, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Objective: To review research articles utilizing mobile applications with adolescent and young adult (AYA cancer patients. Materials and methods: We identified articles via online searches and reference lists (eg, PsycInfo, PubMed. Articles were reviewed by two study team members for target population, stated purpose, technological utilization, sample size, demographic characteristics, and outcome data. Strengths and weaknesses of each study were described. Results: Of 19 identified manuscripts, six met full inclusion criteria for this review (four smartphone applications and two tablet applications. One additional article that included an application not specific to oncology but included AYA patients with cancer within the target sample was also reviewed. Uses of these applications included symptom tracking, pain management, monitoring of eating habits following bone marrow transplant, monitoring of mucositis, and improving medication management. Utility results from pilot studies are presented. Conclusion: Mobile applications are growing in number and increasingly available to AYAs with and without chronic illness. These applications may prove useful in helping to support AYAs throughout their cancer treatment and beyond. However, few applications provide empirical data supporting their utility. Numerous strengths and benefits of these applications include increased accessibility to educational resources and self-management strategies, more frequent physical and emotional symptom tracking, and increased access to peer support. Despite these strengths, numerous limitations are identified, highlighting the need for future research in this area. Keywords: adolescent, young adult, cancer, smartphone, mobile, applications

  14. Facilitating values awareness through the education of health professionals: Can web based decision making technology help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, Rosemary; Lees, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    Recent events in the health care landscape have focused nursing's collective mind on the role of values in health care delivery. For example, in England, the government has issued a mandate to health educators that places primacy on developing a workforce who prioritise and implement the core values of the National Health Service. In the current environment in which 'values' have become common currency, this paper begins by asking what values are, arguing for greater understanding and recognition of their intrinsic role in driving decisions. It then reports on research carried out in New Zealand exploring the potential of the Values Exchange web based educational technology to promote and facilitate a values aware health workforce. Qualitative thematic analysis from a cohort of pre-registration health professionals revealed new understandings about values through the facilitation of deeper, multi-layered thinking. The unique online space provided a safe pre-registration environment for deliberating complex cases, with students readily identifying advantages for future practice and patients. For lasting and meaningful change to occur, a fundamental shift is required in our understanding of values and how they ultimately impact on the way we individually and collectively deliver care to our patients. The Values Exchange may offer a contemporary and timely vehicle for achieving these goals.

  15. Detecting a proper patient with a help of medical data retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecka-Massalska, Teresa; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Wasiewicz, Piotr; Zaluska, Wojciech; Ksiazek, Andrzej

    2009-06-01

    Electric bioimpedance is one of methods to assess the hydrate status in hemodialyzed patients. It is also being used for assessing the hydration level among peritoneal dialysed patients, diagnosed with neoplastic diseases, patients after organ transplantations and the ones infected with HIV virus. During measurements sets were obtained from two groups, which were named a control (healthy volunteers) and test group (hemodialyzed patients). Zscored, discretized data and data retrieval results were computed in R language environment in order to find a simple rule for recognizing health problems. The executed experiments affirm possibilities of creating good classifiers for detecting a proper patient with the help of medical data sets, but only with previous training.

  16. Is information always a good thing? Helping patients make "good" decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubel, Peter A

    2002-09-01

    In most cases, patient preferences are crucial in making good health care decisions. For example, choices between chemotherapy and radiation treatment usually hinge on trade-offs that only patients can decide about. In recognition of the importance of patient preferences in clinical decisions, health services researchers have begun developing decision aids to help patients understand complex medical information. But these decision aids might lead to "bad choices"-choices that are inconsistent with people's stated preferences. In this paper, the author provides examples of how people make inconsistent medical decisions, and briefly discusses future directions for exploring ways of structuring information so that patients are less likely to make inconsistent choices.

  17. Clinical Inquiries: Can mobile technology improve weight loss in overweight and obese patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lisa M; Mounsey, Anne; Nashelsky, Joan

    2017-02-01

    Yes, this technology can help in the short term. Mobile technology compared with minimal or no intervention increases short-term (⟨6 months) weight loss (1.4 to 2.7 kg) in overweight and obese patients. Interventions that combine nonelectronic measures with mobile technology increase weight loss more effectively (3.7 kg) than no intervention.

  18. [Clinical nurses' attitudes toward the abilities to identify and help alcoholic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Divane

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive-exploratory study aimed to investigate nurses' attitudes towards the abilities to identify and to help alcoholic persons. Data were collected through an attitude scale in a sample of 171 nurses at a university hospital in São Paulo State. The results evidenced that the nurses feel skilled to help these patients achieve recovery, demonstrating positive attitudes; however, conflict was identified in attitudes towards the alcoholic patients' desire, revealing the influence of the moral model to explain alcoholism. It is concluded that overcoming these conflicts in attitudes will only be possible when they are acknowledged by the nurses and when this problem receives greater attention during professional education.

  19. Social Influences of Help-Seeking Behaviour Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lee Lan; Tong, Seng Fah; Low, Wah Yun

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the influence of social networks such as family members, friends, peers, and health care providers toward the help-seeking behaviour (HSB) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the public and private primary care settings. In-depth interviews of 12 patients, 9 family members, and 5 health care providers, as well as 3 focus groups among 13 health care providers were conducted. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim for qualitative analysis. Social influences play a significant role in the help-seeking process; once diagnosed, patients source information from people around them to make decisions. This significant influence depends on the relationship between patients and social networks or the level of trust, support, and comforting feeling. Thus, the impacts on patients' help-seeking behavior are varied. However, the help-seeking process is not solely an individual's concern but a dynamic process interacting with the social networks within the health care system. © 2015 APJPH.

  20. The Development of Sociocultural Competence with the Help of Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimova, Alina E.; Yashina, Marianna E.; Mukhamadiarova, Albina F.; Sharipova, Astrid V.

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the description of the process of development sociocultural knowledge and competences using computer technologies. On the whole the development of modern computer technologies allows teachers to broaden trainees' sociocultural outlook and trace their progress online. Observation of modern computer technologies and estimation…

  1. The Development of Sociocultural Competence with the Help of Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimova, Alina E.; Yashina, Marianna E.; Mukhamadiarova, Albina F.; Sharipova, Astrid V.

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the description of the process of development sociocultural knowledge and competences using computer technologies. On the whole the development of modern computer technologies allows teachers to broaden trainees' sociocultural outlook and trace their progress online. Observation of modern computer technologies and estimation…

  2. The use of aromasticks to help with sleep problems: A patient experience survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Jeannie; Cleary, Lise; McNeill, Sara; Ragsdale-Lowe, Maxine; Osland, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    To document the use of aromasticks to facilitate sleep in a cancer centre in the UK. Sleep disturbance is a common problem amongst patients diagnosed with cancer. Essential oils may be inhaled by means of an aromastick (a personal inhaler device containing essential oils) as a means of improving sleep. A prospective audit of aromasticks given to help facilitate sleep. Sixty-five aromasticks were given out over a 13 week period. 94% of patients reported that they did use their aromastick to help them sleep and 92% reported that they would continue to do so. An improvement of at least one point on a Likert scale measuring sleep quality was shown by 64% of patients following the use of an aromastick. Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) and sandalwood (Santalum austrocaladonicum); and frankincense (Boswellia carterii), mandarin (Citrus reticulata) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) were the essential oils used in the two blends chosen by patients.

  3. 'Co-active coaching' could help HIV patients. New type of counseling involves goal-setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, M; Blumenthal, E

    2001-08-01

    A counseling technique that takes an action-oriented approach to helping people make major life changes, much used by business executives and other professionals in recent years, now appears to offer some value to HIV patients. Co-active coaching could be a solution to mild depression and inertia for some HIV-infected patients who have difficulty making decisions about how to spend a life-time living with the disease.

  4. Self-help group and the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis - Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Eliášová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal of the pilot study was to compare the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis in the Presov region with or without the support of a self-help group. Design: The character of this pilot study on patients with MS was related to the use of self-help groups and their impact on the assessment of the quality of life of the respondents, with the help of a questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF. Methods: The research was carried out in the Prešov region with the help of the standardized WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Ninety-one patients with MS participated in the pilot study (46 respondents attended a self-help group and 35 did not. Results: The groups, when compared, aided by the statistically evaluated WHOQOL-BREF domains, were found to show significant differences in their evaluation of quality of life in three domains: domain one: physical health; domain two: surviving; domain three: social relations. Better scores were achieved in these domains by those who attended a group. In the physical sphere, we noticed significant differences in sleep quality, and sexual satisfaction (p < 0.001, while in social and economic areas, there were significant differences in satisfaction with personal relationships (p < 0.001, and economic circumstances (p < 0.01, self-contentment (p < 0.01, and coping with negative feelings (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Patients with multiple sclerosis can live normal lives provided they are supported by their families, friends, health care professionals, and self-help groups.

  5. Helping Mathematics Teachers Develop Noticing Skills: Utilizing Smartphone Technology for One-on-One Teacher/Student Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Theodore; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching mathematics for understanding requires listening to each student's mathematical thinking, best elicited in a one-on-one interview. Interviews are difficult to enact in a teacher's busy schedule, however. In this study, the authors utilize smartphone technology to help mathematics teachers interview a student in a virtual one-on-one…

  6. Predictors for good therapeutic outcome and drop-out in technology assisted guided self-help in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and bulimia like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Nobis, Gerald; Mayrhofer, Anna; Wanner, Christian; Schau, Johanna; Spitzer, Marion; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Karwautz, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Technology assisted guided self-help has been proven to be effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN). The aim of this study was to determine predictors of good long-term outcome as well as drop-out, in order to identify patients for whom these interventions are most suitable. One hundred and fifty six patients with BN were assigned to either 7 months internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) or to conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH), both guided by e-mail support. Evaluations were taken at baseline, after 4, 7, and 18 months. As potential predictors, psychiatric comorbidity, personality features, and eating disorder psychopathology were considered. Higher motivation, lower frequency of binge eating, and lower body dissatisfaction at baseline predicted good outcome after the end of treatment. Lower frequency of binge eating predicted good outcome at long-term follow-up. Factors prediciting drop-out were higher depression and lower self-directedness at baseline. Technology assisted self-help can be recommended for patients with a high motivation to change, lower binge-eating frequency and lower depression scores. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Transforming Schools with Technology: How Smart Use of Digital Tools Helps Achieve Six Key Education Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    In this timely and thoughtful book, Andrew Zucker argues that technology can and will play a central role in efforts to achieve crucial education goals, and that it will be an essential component of further improvement and transformation of schools. The book is marked not only by Zucker's cutting-edge sophistication about digital technologies, but…

  8. Mandatory use of technology-based self-service: does expertise help or hurt?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Machiel J.; Frambach, Ruud; Kleijnen, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to investigate the effects of two types of expertise (self-service technology and service type) on the disconfirmation of customers’ expectations and the use-related outcomes of technology-based self-service (TBSS).
    Design/methodology/approach – This empirical study pe

  9. Summer Program Helps Adolescents Merge Technology, Popular Culture, Reading, and Writing for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Salika A.; McNeal, Kelly; Yildiz, Melda N.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how faculty provided opportunities for urban high school students to develop literacy proficiencies in reading, writing, and technology. The 12 students participating in an on-campus summer program completed four projects using technology. The faculty collected and reviewed a variety of sources to gain insights into the…

  10. Improving Undergraduate Student Satisfaction with the Consumer Behavior Course: Will Interactive Technology Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline K.; Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we measure the impact of interactive technology on student satisfaction and find support for the hypothesis that students who find a class is more interesting because of the use of interactive technology will be more satisfied with the course. The results also support the hypothesis that if students like the course, they will be…

  11. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK.

  12. Feasibility of the Helping Alliance Questionnaire – II (HAq- II) in psychiatric patients receiving music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels Jørgensen; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer; Rodrigo, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: High adherence to music therapy in psychiatry may indicate the forming of a helping alliance. However, no prior attempts have been made to measure the alliance during music therapy. Objective: To evaluate the applicability of the Helping Alliance Questionnaire – II (HAq-II) in patients......, but the external validity of the questionnaire and the relationship between the scores and the therapy needs further evaluation in future longitudinal studies. However, already at this point routine use of HAq-II might be useful....

  13. Raising positive expectations helps patients with minor ailments: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassaert, Thijs; van Dulmen, Sandra; Schellevis, François; van der Jagt, Liesbeth; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Background Consultations for minor ailments constitute a large part of the workload of general practitioners (GPs). As medical interventions are not always available, specific communication strategies, such as active listening and positive communication, might help GPs to handle these problems adequately. This study examines to what extent GPs display both strategies during consultations for minor ailments and investigates how each of these relate to the patients' perceived health, consultation frequency and medication adherence. Methods 524 videotaped consultations between Dutch GPs and patients aged 18 years or older were selected. All patients presented a minor ailment, and none of them suffered from a diagnosed chronic illness. The observation protocol included the validated Active Listening Observation Scale (ALOS-global), as well as three domains of positive communication, i.e. providing reassurance, a clear explanation, and a favourable prognosis. Patients completed several questionnaires before, immediately after, and two weeks after the consultation. These included measures for state anxiety (STAI), functional health status (COOP/WONCA charts) and medication adherence (MAQ). Consultation frequency was available from an ongoing patient registration. Data were analysed using multivariate regression analyses. Results Reassurance was related to patients' better overall health. Providing a favourable prognosis was linked to patients feeling better, but only when accompanied by a clear explanation of the complaints. A clear explanation was also related to patients feeling better and less anxious, except when patients reported a low mood pre-visit. Active listening alone was positively associated with patients feeling worse. Among patients in a good mood state, active listening was associated with less adherence. Conclusion To some extent, it seems helpful when GPs are at the same time clear and optimistic about the nature and course of minor ailments. Yet, it

  14. Raising positive expectations helps patients with minor ailments: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consultations for minor ailments constitute a large part of the workload of general practitioners (GPs. As medical interventions are not always available, specific communication strategies, such as active listening and positive communication, might help GPs to handle these problems adequately. This study examines to what extent GPs display both strategies during consultations for minor ailments and investigates how each of these relate to the patients' perceived health, consultation frequency and medication adherence. Methods 524 videotaped consultations between Dutch GPs and patients aged 18 years or older were selected. All patients presented a minor ailment, and none of them suffered from a diagnosed chronic illness. The observation protocol included the validated Active Listening Observation Scale (ALOS-global, as well as three domains of positive communication, i.e. providing reassurance, a clear explanation, and a favourable prognosis. Patients completed several questionnaires before, immediately after, and two weeks after the consultation. These included measures for state anxiety (STAI, functional health status (COOP/WONCA charts and medication adherence (MAQ. Consultation frequency was available from an ongoing patient registration. Data were analysed using multivariate regression analyses. Results Reassurance was related to patients' better overall health. Providing a favourable prognosis was linked to patients feeling better, but only when accompanied by a clear explanation of the complaints. A clear explanation was also related to patients feeling better and less anxious, except when patients reported a low mood pre-visit. Active listening alone was positively associated with patients feeling worse. Among patients in a good mood state, active listening was associated with less adherence. Conclusion To some extent, it seems helpful when GPs are at the same time clear and optimistic about the nature and course of

  15. A PHYSICS LESSON DESIGNED ACCORDING TO 7E MODEL WITH THE HELP OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (LESSON PLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin GONEN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Students enter the classrooms with a preexisting knowledge of science concepts. These science concepts sometimes show inconsistency with the accepted ones by the scientists and called as misconceptions. Studies applied science field have to get possession of abilities that not only detect these misconceptions also help to solve these problems. Hence, instructional methods that correct students’ misconceptions become important. In this sense, a material related to the physics course is designed according to 7E model with the help of instructional technology.

  16. Classification of Patient Care Complexity: Cloud Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Riboldi, Caren; Macedo, Andrea Barcellos Teixeira; Mergen, Thiane; Dias, Vera Lúcia Mendes; da Costa, Diovane Ghignatti; Malvezzi, Maria Luiza Falsarella; Magalhães, Ana Maria Muller; Silveira, Denise Tolfo

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of the computerized structure to implement, in a university hospital in the South of Brazil, the Patients Classification System of Perroca, which categorizes patients according to the care complexity. This solution also aims to corroborate a recent study at the hospital, which evidenced that the increasing workload presents a direct relation with the institutional quality indicators. The tools used were the Google applications with high productivity interconnecting the topic knowledge on behalf of the nursing professionals and information technology professionals.

  17. Supernatural beliefs, aetiological models and help seeking behaviour in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have evaluated the supernatural beliefs of patients with schizophrenia. This study aimed to study the personal beliefs, aetiological models and help seeking behaviour of patients with schizophrenia using a self-rated questionnaire. Materials and Methods: Seventy three patients returned the completed supernatural Attitude questionnaire. Results: 62% of patients admitted that people in their community believed in sorcery and other magico-religious phenomena. One fourth to half of patients believed in ghosts/evil spirit (26%, spirit intrusion (28.8% and sorcery (46.6%. Two-third patients believed that mental illness can occur either due to sorcery, ghosts/evil spirit, spirit intrusion, divine wrath, planetary/astrological influences, dissatisfied or evil spirits and bad deeds of the past. 40% of the subjects attributed mental disorders to more than one of these beliefs. About half of the patients (46.6% believed that only performance of prayers was sufficient to improve their mental status. Few patients (9.6% believed that magico-religious rituals were sufficient to improve their mental illness but about one-fourth (24.7% admitted that during recent episode either they or their caregivers performed magico-religious rituals. Conclusion: Supernatural beliefs are common in patients with schizophrenia and many of them attribute the symptoms of mental disorders to these beliefs.

  18. Supernatural beliefs, aetiological models and help seeking behaviour in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep; Kulhara, Parmanand; Nehra, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the supernatural beliefs of patients with schizophrenia. This study aimed to study the personal beliefs, aetiological models and help seeking behaviour of patients with schizophrenia using a self-rated questionnaire. Seventy three patients returned the completed supernatural Attitude questionnaire. 62% of patients admitted that people in their community believed in sorcery and other magico-religious phenomena. One fourth to half of patients believed in ghosts/evil spirit (26%), spirit intrusion (28.8%) and sorcery (46.6%). Two-third patients believed that mental illness can occur either due to sorcery, ghosts/evil spirit, spirit intrusion, divine wrath, planetary/astrological influences, dissatisfied or evil spirits and bad deeds of the past. 40% of the subjects attributed mental disorders to more than one of these beliefs. About half of the patients (46.6%) believed that only performance of prayers was sufficient to improve their mental status. Few patients (9.6%) believed that magico-religious rituals were sufficient to improve their mental illness but about one-fourth (24.7%) admitted that during recent episode either they or their caregivers performed magico-religious rituals. Supernatural beliefs are common in patients with schizophrenia and many of them attribute the symptoms of mental disorders to these beliefs.

  19. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney MR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Reni Courtney,1 Christy Spivey,2 Kathy M Daniel1 1College of Nursing, 2College of Business, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA  Abstract: Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients.Keywords: nursing, message framing, defaults, incentives, social norms, commitment devices, health care

  20. From Sharing to Experimenting: How Mobile Technologies Are Helping Ordinary Citizens Regain Their Positions as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisch, Oswald; Veestraeten, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Citizen science is a term used to describe the engagement of ordinary citizens in scientific tasks like observation, measurement, and computation. A series of technological innovations, such as the Internet, the upgrade of mobile phones from communication devices to networked mobile personal measurement devices, and the introduction of…

  1. Five Steps to Help You Determine if You Need the New "It" Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikowski, Chester, III

    2010-01-01

    Technologists may find themselves alone on the bleachers trying to find supporters for the next "it" technology. Despite their enthusiasm, many times "it" ends up unused because a thorough evaluation was not performed prior to purchase. Before technologists lobby for approval or support of a new project, the author presents five questions for them…

  2. Do electronic health records standards help implementing patient bill of rights in hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Shirin; Ferdosi, Masoud

    2013-03-01

    Patient bill of rights (PBR) calls for equal rights to access health services for all patients. It makes a foundation for preserving good relationships between patients, doctors and other healthcare staffs. Third Edition of national PBR was published in Iran in 2009. On the other hand, developing national wide Electronic Health Records (EHR) is now one of the strategic goals of Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education. EHR as a basic repository for all related information provides access to the necessary data to organize, store and manage them. It also makes an additional support to the legal aspects of healthcare services, increases staff information about patient rights, and raises them to respect these rights. This article reviews how EHR standards can help to institutionalize the PBR. To do that, we have collected some important topics of PBR in Iran. Then we used some valid references on Electronic health record standards like ASTM, ISO, HL7 and CEN to review existing standards. The Main issues regarding patient rights derived from these standards were: privacy, confidentiality, and secrecy, access levels to patient information, medical care in emergency situations, patient autonomy and authentication (electronic signature). In each topic, the most relevant standard phrases are marked. Developing EHR creates an opportunity to establish patient rights in its structure. To internalize them, there are some reliable EHR standards like ASTM and ISO 13606-1 that implementing them could be very fruitful.

  3. Web-Based Resources to Help Students and Faculty Prepare to use Information Technology in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    provides examples of how this technology creates better (or at least different) learning opportunities for students; identifies barriers so that interested novices can effectively acquire, use, and maintain information technologies in field instruction; provides "how to" advice on the design and implementation of learning exercises; creates a collection of teaching activities to be used as models for others to follow; and, compiles the experience and advice of current practitioners to help identify "best practices" in using this technology. This website should help to minimize the technical, pedagogical, and practical barriers that make it difficult for novice users to efficiently and effectively use this technology in field instruction. Material on the website was contributed and shared by the "GeoPad Writing Group". This project was supported by NSF grant EAR 03-06708.

  4. Study Of Physician And Patient Communication Identifies Missed Opportunities To Help Reduce Patients' Out-Of-Pocket Spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubel, Peter A; Zhang, Cecilia J; Hesson, Ashley; Davis, J Kelly; Kirby, Christine; Barnett, Jamison; Hunter, Wynn G

    2016-04-01

    Some experts contend that requiring patients to pay out of pocket for a portion of their care will bring consumer discipline to health care markets. But are physicians prepared to help patients factor out-of-pocket expenses into medical decisions? In this qualitative study of audiorecorded clinical encounters, we identified physician behaviors that stand in the way of helping patients navigate out-of-pocket spending. Some behaviors reflected a failure to fully engage with patients' financial concerns, from never acknowledging such concerns to dismissing them too quickly. Other behaviors reflected a failure to resolve uncertainty about out-of-pocket expenses or reliance on temporary solutions without making long-term plans to reduce spending. Many of these failures resulted from systemic barriers to health care spending conversations, such as a lack of price transparency. For consumer health care markets to work as intended, physicians need to be prepared to help patients navigate out-of-pocket expenses when financial concerns arise during clinical encounters.

  5. More Efficient Operations of the Company with the Help of Communication Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tešić Mirjana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of the modern enterprise depends not only on its ability to develop a good product / service, to form an adequate price and your offer makes available to customers, but also on how to communicate with the target audience. For the management of modern enterprises, including small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs, is a major challenge that all activities are carried out in a proper manner and that adds value to which the various interested stakeholders. In recent times, are very important, and information and communication systems in the new economy because the rapid technological progress in the ICT sector started the process of creating a new economy, a new growth and economic development. Successful management is increasingly based on interactive communication and the adopting of marketing communication new technologies, all of which contribute to more efficient business for a company.

  6. Using archetypes and transitions theory to help patients move from active treatment to survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancour, Patrice

    2008-12-01

    Nurses historically have used the medical model to assess and intervene when individuals move transitionally into and out of the role of patients with cancer. Although assessing for clinical depression or other medical model designations is appropriate, using this as the sole model for helping patients with cancer emerge from their illness experiences and into the role of survivorship may rob them of the opportunity to actively use the illness for spiritual growth and self-actualization. The transition process is classified into three distinct stages: endings, the neutral zone, and beginnings. Each is characterized by its own unique qualities and challenges. Jungian metaphors and archetypes also can be used to evoke powerful images that help survivors find depth of meaning in their suffering and enhance healing. Nurses often are in ideal positions to create such healing experiences by helping survivors recognize "shadow" emotional experiences stemming from the recovery process, accepting the emotions as normal transitional phenomena, and using them to develop compassion for others. Individuals, therefore, are presented with opportunities to imagine newly emerging life purposes that far exceed their identification as survivors.

  7. A Brief Review of Literature on Using Technology to Help Language Learners to Improve Their Language Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyup Bayram Guzel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available People have been fairly interested in what technology offers to them around a scope of human necessities and it has become a part of human life. In this study, experimental studies were reviewed for the purpose of how technology helps language learners improve their phonemic awareness, reading comprehension and vocabulary development skills. As a conclusion, experimental studies demonstrated that students showed significant improvements up to 70% in phonological awareness, while they demonstrated up to 76% of improvements in reading comprehension and up to 77% in vocabulary development. The use of computer-assisted technologies and its positive outcomes were encouraged to be used more widely in order to meet the diverse needs of students.

  8. Number of patient-reported allergies helps distinguish epilepsy from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Larimer, Phillip; Bourgeois, James A; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2016-02-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are relatively common, accounting for 5-40% of visits to tertiary epilepsy centers. Inpatient video-electroencephalogram (vEEG) monitoring is the gold standard for diagnosis, but additional positive predictive tools are necessary given vEEG's relatively scarce availability. In this study, we investigated if the number of patient-reported allergies distinguishes between PNES and epilepsy. Excessive allergy-reporting, like PNES, may reflect somatization. Using electronic medical records, ICD-9 codes, and text-identification algorithms to search EEG reports, we identified 905 cases of confirmed PNES and 5187 controls with epilepsy but no PNES. Patients with PNES averaged more self-reported allergies than patients with epilepsy alone (1.93 vs. 1.00, p<0.001). Compared to those with no allergies, each additional allergy linearly increased the percentage of patients with PNES by 2.98% (R(2)=0.71) such that with ≥12 allergies, 12/28 patients (42.8%) had PNES compared to 349/3368 (11.6%) of the population with no allergies (odds ratio=6.49). This relationship remained unchanged with logistic regression analysis. We conclude that long allergy lists may help identify patients with PNES. We hypothesize that a tendency to inaccurately self-report allergies reflects a maladaptive externalization of psychologic distress and that a similar mechanism may be responsible for PNES in some patients with somatic symptom disorder.

  9. Bed leasing program helps hospitals discharge hard-to-place patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    UCLA Health's program that pays a negotiated daily rate to skilled nursing facilities to hold beds for patients who otherwise would stay in an acute care bed saved a total of 2,516 acute care days from June 2014 to July 2015. UCLA Health pays a negotiated daily rate if the beds are occupied or not. The rate covers boarding, nursing care, medications, and physical therapy and occupational therapy Nurse practitioners are embedded in the participating nursing homes and provide care for UCLA Health's patients every day, often treating problems that might cause a readmission. The program helps with emergency department throughput and frees up acute care beds for patients who need them.

  10. Preparing for the real world. Program helps rehabilitation patients perform everyday tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthemore, W

    1994-11-01

    St. Francis Health Care Centre in Green Springs, OH, decided in 1991 to enlist local merchants in a program in rehabilitative medicine. The program, named for Green Springs's main street, is "Broadway: A Route Home." Broadway is a program for persons who, because of severe illness or injury, require extended rehabilitation. Along with care for continuing physical or cognitive problems, such patients often need help in performing tasks--buying groceries, cashing a check, renting a video--that most people take for granted. Under the Broadway program patients can practice these tasks safely in shops, restaurants, and theaters in Green Springs and other nearby communities. Later, escorted by therapists, some patients journey to larger cities and, finally, to their own communities, to exercise everyday skills.

  11. Brainstorming Design for Health: Helping Patients Utilize Patient-Generated Information on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jina; Hartzler, Andrea; Munson, Sean; Anderson, Nick; Edwards, Kelly; Gore, John L; McDonald, David; O'Leary, Jim; Parker, Andrea; Streat, Derek; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Pratt, Wanda; Ackerman, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners show increasing sinterest in utilizing patient-generated information on the Web. Although the HCI and CSCW communities have provided many exciting opportunities for exploring new ideas and building broad agenda in health, few venues offer a platform for interdisciplinary and collaborative brainstorming about design challenges and opportunities in this space. The goal of this workshop is to provide participants with opportunities to interact with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and practices-researchers, practitioners, designers, programmers, and ethnographers-and together generate tangible design outcomes that utilize patient-generated information on the Web. Through small multidisciplinary group work, we will provide participants with new collaboration opportunities, understanding of the state of the art, inspiration for future work, and ideally avenues for continuing to develop research and design ideas generated at the workshop.

  12. Simple solution : VAC-Screen technology helps drillers recapture oil-based mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.

    2010-11-15

    Calgary-based FP Marangoni Inc. has developed a VAC-Screen drilling fluid recovery system that improves the efficiency and environmental performance of oil production operations. With 8 patents filed, FP Marangoni is currently the only oilfield service company in the world that has successfully established a way to blend vacuum and rig shakers to recapture oil-based mud, or any drilling fluid. The VAC-Screen system is now being used by many operators and has the potential to be used across a wide spectrum of drilling applications. The system gives operators a considerable advantage in meeting progressively more stringent environmental regulations for cuttings disposal. The genesis for the system began while the company was working in the Alberta Foothills and a client was losing drilling fluids off of the ends of shakers. A rotary vacuum dryer fluid recovery and cuttings drying system was ruled out for solving the problem because it would degrade the drilling cuttings. FP Marangoni initially opted for blowing mud through the shaker screen using compressed air and air knife drying systems, but the high velocity air created a fine mud mist which created a health hazard. FP Marangoni then opted to build a vacuum manifold, placed it underneath the shaker screen and attached it to the rig vacuum. This method dried the cuttings as hoped, but they froze right on the shaker screen. These issues were sorted out with some fine-tuning and the company was eventually able to run the VAC-Screen technology on any size of shaker screen. The fluid that comes out of the end of the shaker flows onto the vacuum manifolds where it is then recovered and the cuttings dry out. The newly-created design incorporates a processing area which ensures the cuttings are dried out efficiently and are easy to dispose of. A prototype VAC-Screen was run over a three-month period from February through April 2010, and the technology was commercially introduced in June 2010. The VAC-Screen technology is

  13. Can technology and the media help reduce dysfunctional parenting and increase engagement with preventative parenting interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calam, Rachel; Sanders, Matthew R; Miller, Chloe; Sadhnani, Vaneeta; Carmont, Sue-Ann

    2008-11-01

    In an evaluation of the television series "Driving Mum and Dad Mad," 723 families participated and were randomly assigned to either a standard or technology enhanced viewing condition (included additional Web-support). Parents in both conditions reported significant improvements from pre- to postintervention in their child's behavior, dysfunctional parenting, parental anger, depression, and self-efficacy. Short-term improvements were maintained at 6-months follow-up. Regressions identified predictors of program outcomes and level of involvement. Parents who watched the entire series had more severe problems at preintervention and high sociodemographic risk than parents who did not watch the entire series. Few sociodemographic, child, or parent variables assessed at preintervention predicted program outcomes or program engagement, suggesting that a wide range of parents from diverse socioeconomic status benefited from the program. Media interventions depicting evidence-based parenting programs may be a useful means of reaching hard to engage families in population-level child maltreatment prevention programs.

  14. [Helpful Factors of Ambulant Art Therapy in the Group and Changes of Experiences in Psychosomatic Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg; Moser, Anna Sophie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the experiences of patients suffering from mostly chronic psychosomatic disorders in an ambulant art therapy in the group. Especially, the focus was on the experienced changes, helpful factors and specifics of the therapy as well as on the experienced benefit. For this, 30 patients were interviewed in a semi-standardized way. Additionally, the symptom-based strain was psychometrically recorded in a part of the patients (21) at the beginning of the therapy and after at least 6 months of participation. The evaluation of those interviews with the qualitative analysis of the therapy subjects surrendered an improvement of the health state in most of the participants. Especially group factors, art as a mean of communication, becoming aware of feelings but also diversion and fun were proved to be beneficial. The art therapy also serves for structuring the week as well as a contact point and a resource in the interpersonal communication of everyday life. Nearly all of the patients referred to some important turning point pictures. Mostly, the benefit was valued as being high. But, in contrast, the psychometric measure did not show any significant change. The results emphasize the stabilizing function of art therapy in the examined patients, whereat the classification of the psychometric result is complicated by the absence of a control group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Guidelines for doctors on identifying and helping their patients who batter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D

    1996-01-01

    While there are a growing number of medical guides for assisting physicians to identify and help victims of domestic violence, there has been scant attention to how physicians can best respond to perpetrators. The medical model's deficient grasp of violence, combined with the minimizing and excuse-making strategies employed by batterers hinder physicians' ability to detect batterers in their practices and to prescribe the right solutions. Earlier detection is possible, however, when doctors adopt routine diagnostic procedures for all patients and ask informed follow-up questions when there are indications of domestic violence. Finally, physicians should become aware of the effective batterer treatment programs in their areas and make this information easily available to their patients who batter.

  16. When doctors are patients: a narrative study of help-seeking behaviour among addicted physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistrand, Jonatan

    2017-03-01

    In recent decades studies based on questionnaires and interviews have concluded that when doctors become ill they face significant barriers to seeking help. Several reasons have been proposed, primarily the notion that doctors' work environment predisposes them to an inappropriate help-seeking behaviour. In this article, the idea of the ill physician as a paradox in a medical drama is examined. Through a text-interpretive and comparative approach to historical illness narratives written by doctors suffering from one specific diagnosis, namely opioid addiction, the complex set of considerations guiding their behaviour as patients are to some extent revealed. The article concludes that, in the identity transition necessary to become a patient, doctors are held back by their professional status and that every step to assist them needs to take shape based on an awareness of the underlying principles of the medical drama. Written illness narratives by doctors, such as those highlighted in this article, might serve as a tool to increase such awareness.

  17. Six years of treatment with the HELP system of a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present report is to demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of heparin-induced extracorporeal lipoprotein precipitation (HELP of LDL-c and fibrinogen in the management of familial hypercholesterolemia. From June 1992 to June 1998 a 22-year-old young male patient with familial hypercholesterolemia (double heterozygote for C660X and S305C resistant to medication and diet and with symptomatic coronary artery disease (angina was treated weekly with 90-min sessions of the HELP system. The patient had also been previously submitted to right coronary artery angioplasty. The efficacy of the method was evaluated by comparing the reduction of total cholesterol, LDL-c and fibrinogen before and after the sessions and before and after initiation of the study (data are reported as averages for each year. During the study, angina episodes disappeared and there were no detectable adverse effects of the treatment. Total cholesterol (TC, fibrinogen, and LDL-c decreased significantly after each session by 59.6, 66.1 and 64%, respectively. HDL-c showed a nonsignificant reduction of 20.4%. Comparative mean values pre- and post-treatment values in the study showed significant differences: TC (488 vs 188 mg/dl, LDL-c (416.4 vs 145 mg/dl, and fibrinogen (144.2 vs 57.4 mg/dl. There was no significant change in HDL-c level: 29.4 vs 23 mg/dl. These data show that the HELP system, even for a long period of time, is a safe and efficient mode of treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia and is associated with disappearance of angina symptoms.

  18. Below population replacement fertility rates:Can assisted reproductive technology (ART) help reverse the trend?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Blyth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This paper considers the potential contribution that assisted reproductive technology (ART) may make to population replenishment in countries that have experienced extended periods of below-population-replacement Total Fertility Rates (TFR), by focusing on the specific situation of Singapore, which has recorded ‘ultra-low’ TFRs for many years. Methods: The factors contributing to ultra-low TFRs in Singapore, the economic and social consequences of endemic below-population-replacement fertility rates and remedial measures initiated by the government are critically analysed, focussing specifically on the government’s subsided ART provisions of the ‘Marriage and Parenthood’ package. In addition the paper provides a close analysis of available contemporary data regarding ART and ART outcomes both in Singapore and internationally. Results: Despite limited public accessibility to data concerning ART outcomes in Singapore, it is possible to make some assessment of the potential contribution of publicly-funded ART provision and the possible extension of access to elective oocyte preservation to population replenishment. Conclusions: Subsidised ART can-at best-make a marginal contribution to government population policy.

  19. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is

  20. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  1. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals’ Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs’ behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals’ quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog’s shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  2. Survival of patients with breast cancer attending Bristol Cancer Help Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, F S; Easton, D F; Harris, E; Chilvers, C E; McElwain, T J

    1990-09-08

    The Bristol Cancer Help Centre (BCHC) was set up in 1979 to offer various alternative therapies and treatments for patients with cancer. It attracted much public interest and a high demand for its services--and profound medical scepticism. In a study beginning in 1986 of 334 women with breast cancer attending the centre for the first time between June, 1986, and October, 1987, information about the diagnosis was obtained from case notes. Controls were a sample of 461 women with breast cancer attending a specialist cancer hospital or two district general hospitals. The same information was obtained for the control group as for the BCHC group. All patients have been followed up to June, 1988. 85% of patients with breast cancer attending the BCHC were aged under 55 at diagnosis. More than half had experienced recurrence of their disease before entry. For patients metastasis-free at entry, metastasis-free survival in the BCHC group was significantly poorer than in the controls (relapse rate ratio 2.85). Survival in relapsed cases was significantly inferior to that in the control group (hazard ratio 1.81). For cases metastasis-free at entry to the BCHC there was a significant difference in survival between cases and controls, confirming the difference in metastasis-free survival. There was no significant difference in survival or disease-free survival between the cancer hospital controls and other controls.

  3. Workplace telecommunications technology to identify mental health disorders and facilitate self-help or professional referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanfar, Ramesh; Locke, Steven E; Heeren, Timothy C; Stevens, Allison; Vachon, Louis; Thi Nguyen, Mai Khoa; Friedman, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Test the feasibility and impact of an automated workplace mental health assessment and intervention. Efficacy was evaluated in a randomized control trial comparing employees who received screening and intervention with those who received only screening. Workplace. 463 volunteers from Boston Medical Center, Boston University, and EMC and other employed adults, among whom 164 were randomized to the intervention (N  =  87) and control (N  =  77) groups. The system administers a panel of telephonic assessment instruments followed by tailored information, education, and referrals. The Work Limitation Questionnaire, the Medical Outcomes Questionnaire Short Form-12, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, question 10 from the Patient Health Questionnaire to measure functional impairment, and the Perceived Stress Scale-4 and questions written by study psychiatrists to measure emotional distress and social support respectively. The WHO-Five Well-being Index was administered to measure overall well-being. Independent sample t-tests and χ(2) tests as well as mean change were used to compare the data. No significant differences on 16 of the 20 comparisons at 3- and 6-month time points. The intervention group showed a significant improvement in depression (p ≤ .05) at 3 months and on two Work Limitation Questionnaire subscales, the Mental-Interpersonal Scale (p ≤ .05) and the Time and Scheduling Scale (p ≤ .05), at 3 and 6 months respectively with a suggestive improvement in mental health at 6 months (p ≤ .10). This is a potentially fruitful area for research with important implications for workplace behavioral interventions.

  4. Long-term follow-up data may help manage patient and parent expectations for pediatric patients undergoing thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lilah F; Waguespack, Steven G; Warneke, Carla L; Ryu, Haengrang; Ying, Anita K; Anderson, Barbara J; Sturgis, Erich M; Clayman, Gary L; Lee, Jeffrey E; Evans, Douglas B; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Perrier, Nancy D

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the incidence and impact of postoperative complications in children who underwent total thyroidectomy (TTx). The records of all pediatric patients undergoing TTx (2001-2011) at our institution were retrospectively reviewed for the occurrence of biochemical hypothyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone >10 mIU/mL), laboratory assessments, and medication nonadherence. The 74 patients (median age, 12.5 years) had thyroid cancer (differentiated, n = 39; medullary, n = 16) or benign pathology (n = 19; 16 with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A). The median postoperative follow-up was 3.2 years; 46 patients (62%) had ≥ 1 year follow-up. Forty-one percent had ≥ 1 period of medication nonadherence; this was not associated with age at TTx (P = .30). Non-treatment-related hypothyroidism occurred in 33% of patients during postoperative year (POY) 1. The number of POY1 laboratory assessments among the 30% of patients with parathyroid dysfunction was more than twice that among patients with normal parathyroid function (median assessments per year 8 vs 3; P pediatric patients were unable to fully adhere to postoperative medication regimens, and non-treatment-related hypothyroidism was common. Postoperative hypoparathyroidism doubled the number of laboratory assessments obtained. These data may help families better prepare for TTx sequelae. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Helping Kids Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, E. Renee

    2008-01-01

    Educators need to help kids help others so that they can help themselves. Volunteering does not involve competition or grades. This is one area where students don't have to worry about measuring up to the expectations of parents, teachers, and coaches. Students participate in charitable work to add another line to a college transcript or job…

  6. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Rajabzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-09-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems have been successfully applied in areas of manufacturing, supply chain, agriculture, transportation, healthcare, and services to name a few. However, the different advantages and disadvantages expressed in various studies of the challenges facing the technology of the use of the RFID technology have been met with skepticism by managers of healthcare organizations. The aim of this study was to express and display the role of RFID technology in improving patient safety and increasing the impact of it in healthcare. This study was non-systematical review, which the literature search was conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, PubMed databases and also search engines available at Google, Google scholar in which published between 2004 and 2013 during Febuary 2013. We employed the following keywords and their combinations; RFID, healthcare, patient safety, medical errors, and medication errors in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. The preliminary search resulted in 68 articles. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, a total of 33 papers was selected based on their relevancy. We should integrate RFID with hospital information systems (HIS) and electronic health records (EHRs) and support it by clinical decision support systems (CDSS), it facilitates processes and reduce medical, medication and diagnosis errors.

  7. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ajami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency identification (RFID systems have been successfully applied in areas of manufacturing, supply chain, agriculture, transportation, healthcare, and services to name a few. However, the different advantages and disadvantages expressed in various studies of the challenges facing the technology of the use of the RFID technology have been met with skepticism by managers of healthcare organizations. The aim of this study was to express and display the role of RFID technology in improving patient safety and increasing the impact of it in healthcare. Materials and Methods: This study was non-systematical review, which the literature search was conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, PubMed databases and also search engines available at Google, Google scholar in which published between 2004 and 2013 during Febuary 2013. We employed the following keywords and their combinations; RFID, healthcare, patient safety, medical errors, and medication errors in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. Results: The preliminary search resulted in 68 articles. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, a total of 33 papers was selected based on their relevancy. Conclusion: We should integrate RFID with hospital information systems (HIS and electronic health records (EHRs and support it by clinical decision support systems (CDSS, it facilitates processes and reduce medical, medication and diagnosis errors.

  8. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Rajabzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems have been successfully applied in areas of manufacturing, supply chain, agriculture, transportation, healthcare, and services to name a few. However, the different advantages and disadvantages expressed in various studies of the challenges facing the technology of the use of the RFID technology have been met with skepticism by managers of healthcare organizations. The aim of this study was to express and display the role of RFID technology in improving patient safety and increasing the impact of it in healthcare. Materials and Methods: This study was non-systematical review, which the literature search was conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, PubMed databases and also search engines available at Google, Google scholar in which published between 2004 and 2013 during Febuary 2013. We employed the following keywords and their combinations; RFID, healthcare, patient safety, medical errors, and medication errors in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. Results: The preliminary search resulted in 68 articles. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, a total of 33 papers was selected based on their relevancy. Conclusion: We should integrate RFID with hospital information systems (HIS) and electronic health records (EHRs) and support it by clinical decision support systems (CDSS), it facilitates processes and reduce medical, medication and diagnosis errors. PMID:24381626

  9. Can fMRI help optimise lifestyle behaviour change feedback from wearable technologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Whelan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs place severe financial strain on global health resources. Diabetes mellitus, the second most prevalent NCD, has been attributed to 8.4% of deaths worldwide for adults aged 20-79 years (International Diabetes Federation, 2013 with physical inactivity attributable to 7% of cases (Lee et al., 2012. The recent surge in commercially available wearable technology has begun to allow individuals to self-monitor their physical activity and sedentary behaviour as well as the physiological response to these behaviours (e.g., health markers such as glucose levels. Equipped with feedback obtained from such wearables, individuals are better able to understand the relationship between the lifestyle behaviours they take (e.g. going for a walk after dinner and health consequences (e.g. less glucose excursions (area under the curve. However, in order to achieve true behaviour change, the feedback must be optimised. Innovative communications research suggest that health messages (and in our case feedback that activates brain regions such as the medial prefrontal cortex (Falk, Berkman, Mann, Harrison & Lieberman, 2010 can predict and are associated with successful behaviour change. Fortunately, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI can map this neural activity whilst individuals receive various forms of personalised feedback. Such insight into the optimisation of feedback can improve the design and delivery of future behaviour change interventions. Aim Examine neural activity in response to personalised feedback in order to identify health messages most potent for behaviour change. Methods A mixed gender sample of 30 adults (aged 30-65 years will be recruited through campus advertisements at Loughborough University, UK. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour will be assessed using waist-worn ActiGraph GT3x-BT accelerometer (100Hz and LUMO posture sensor (30Hz, respectively. Both devices will be removed for sleep

  10. Can pharmacogenomics help to improve therapy in patients with high-grade osteosarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kager, Leo; Diakos, Christopher; Bielack, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Current standard treatment of patients with high-grade osteosarcoma (HGOS) includes complete surgical resection of the tumor and chemotherapy, most often with high-dose methotrexate, doxorubicin and cisplatin. With this approach > 60% of patients can be cured. However, conventional anticancer drugs have a narrow therapeutic index, and efficacy and toxicity vary considerably among patients. Pharmacogenomics aim to identify key genomic factors for drug effects (either desired or adverse) in normal host cells (germ-line variants) and cancer cells (somatic variants), and if an association between a genotype and a drug phenotype has been identified, validated and demonstrated to have a large effect size, these genotypes may be used to tailor therapy. In addition, pharmacogenomic models can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets. For example, germ-line variants in genes which potentially influence the disposition of methotrexate and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin have recently been identified. Moreover, next-generation sequencing combined with several analytical methods has identified the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR) pathway as a potential therapeutic target in HGOS. Herein, we discuss whether and how these novel pharmacogenomic insights may help to improve future therapy in HGOS.

  11. Can multilingual machine translation help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Kim, Hyeoneui; Rosemblat, Graciela; Keselman, Alla

    2010-01-01

    With the development of electronic personal health records, more patients are gaining access to their own medical records. However, comprehension of medical record content remains difficult for many patients. Because each record is unique, it is also prohibitively costly to employ human translators to solve this problem. In this study, we investigated whether multilingual machine translation could help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients who lack proficiency in the language of the records. We used a popular general-purpose machine translation tool called Babel Fish to translate 213 medical record sentences from English into Spanish, Chinese, Russian and Korean. We evaluated the comprehensibility and accuracy of the translation. The text characteristics of the incorrectly translated sentences were also analyzed. In each language, the majority of the translations were incomprehensible (76% to 92%) and/or incorrect (77% to 89%). The main causes of the translation are vocabulary difficulty and syntactical complexity. A general-purpose machine translation tool like the Babel Fish is not adequate for the translation of medical records; however, a machine translation tool can potentially be improved significantly, if it is trained to target certain narrow domains in medicine.

  12. A review of postnatal mental health websites: help for healthcare professionals and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donna; Ayers, Susan

    2011-12-01

    The internet offers an accessible and cost-effective way to help women suffering with various types of postnatal mental illness and also can provide resources for healthcare professionals. Many websites on postnatal mental illness are available, but there is little information on the range or quality of information and resources offered. The current study therefore aimed to review postnatal health websites and evaluate their quality on a variety of dimensions. A systematic review of postnatal health websites was conducted. Searches were carried out on four search engines (Google, Yahoo, Ask Jeeves and Bing) which are used by 98% of web users. The first 25 websites found for each key word and their hyperlinks were assessed for inclusion in the review. Websites had to be exclusively dedicated to postnatal mental health or have substantial information on postnatal mental illness. Eligible websites (n=114) were evaluated for accuracy of information, available resources and quality. Results showed that information was largely incomplete and difficult to read; available help was limited and website quality was variable. The top five postnatal mental illness websites were identified for (1) postnatal mental illness sufferers and (2) healthcare professionals. It is hoped these top websites can be used by healthcare professionals both for their own information and to advise patients on quality online resources.

  13. Commercializing Defense Technologies and Helping Defense Firms Succeed in Commercial Markets: A Report on the Objectives, Activities, and Accomplishments of the TAP-IN Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Technology Access for Product Innovation (TAP-IN), the largest technology deployment project funded by TRP, was competitively selected through a national solicitation for proposals. TAP-IN was created to help companies access and apply defense technologies and help defense-dependent companies enter new commercial markets. Defense technologies included technologies developed by DoD, DOE, NASA, and their contractors. TAP-IN was structured to provide region-based technology access services that were able to draw on technology resources nationwide. TAP-IN provided expert assistance in all stages of the commercialization process from concept through prototype design to capital sourcing and marketing strategy. TAP-IN helped companies locate new technology, identify business partners, secure financing, develop ideas for new products, identify new markets, license technology, solve technical problems, and develop company-specific applications of federal technology. TAP-IN leveraged NASA's existing commercial technology network to create an integrated national network of organizations that assisted companies in every state. In addition to NASA's six regional technology transfer centers (RTTCs), TAP-IN included business and technology development organizations in every state, the Industrial Designers Society of America, and the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC).

  14. Mood color choice helps to predict response to hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarrier Nicholas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately two thirds of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS respond well to hypnotherapy. However, it is time consuming as well as expensive to provide and therefore a way of predicting outcome would be extremely useful. The use of imagery and color form an integral part of the hypnotherapeutic process and we have hypothesised that investigating color and how it relates to mood might help to predict response to treatment. In order to undertake this study we have previously developed and validated a method of presenting colors to individuals for research purposes called the Manchester Color Wheel (MCW. Using this instrument we have been able to classify colors into positive, neutral and negative shades and this study aimed to assess their predictive role in hypnotherapy. Methods 156 consecutive IBS patients (aged 14-74, mean 42.0 years, 127 (81% females, 29 (19% males were studied. Before treatment, each patient was asked to relate their mood to a color on the MCW as well as completing the IBS Symptom Severity Score, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD Scale, the Non-colonic Symptom Scale, the Quality of Life Scale and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (TAS which is a measure of hypnotisability. Following hypnotherapy all these measures were repeated with the exception of the TAS. Results For patients with a positive mood color the odds of responding to hypnotherapy were nine times higher than that of those choosing either a neutral or negative color or no color at all (odds ratio: 8.889; p = 0.042. Furthermore, a high TAS score and the presence of HAD anxiety also had good predictive value (odds ratio: 4.024; p = 0.092, 3.917; p Conclusion A positive mood color, especially when combined with HAD anxiety and a high TAS score, predict a good response to hypnotherapy.

  15. Self-medication hypothesis in substance-abusing psychotic patients: Can it help some subjects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta Kumar Padhy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The evidence for gself.medication hypothesish (SMH in patients with dual diagnosis psychosis has been conflicting, though largely not supported, recently. But, still can SMH be a beneficial one in some patients with dual diagnosis remains a question. Methods: The study was conducted at Drug De.addiction and Treatment Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, a Tertiary Care Hospital in India. This cross.sectional comparative study had psychotic patients with substance use disorder as cases and those without substance use disorder as controls. Demographic details, clinical information, and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS scores were ascertained for cases and controls. Cases were additionally administered modified Stated Reasons Scale and modified Perceived Effects Scale. Results: Case and controls were comparable on demographic details and duration of psychotic illness, but cases had significantly lower scores on BPRS. The reasons reported for substance abuse in cases were more often nonhedonistic than hedonistic. Perceived effects of major substances of abuse (alcohol, cannabis, and opioids were different. Alcohol use was associated with perceived decrease in loneliness and cannabis was associated with perceived increase in suspiciousness and delusions. Considerable match was found between reasons for taking the substances and the effects perceived. Interpretation and Conclusions: Incorporating reasons for taking substance and their perceived effects in the treatment regimen would certainly help a subset of such difficult.to.treat patients. India being a low.resource country with a scarcity of experts and specialized dual diagnosis clinics, these findings may have an important implication in the clinical practice.

  16. Prostate Cancer: Can Multiparametric MR Imaging Help Identify Patients Who Are Candidates for Active Surveillance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Ho, Jennifer; Hoang, Anthony; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Agarwal, Harsh; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pang, Yuxi; Daar, Dagane; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Kaushal, Aradhana; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help identify patients with prostate cancer who would most appropriately be candidates for active surveillance (AS) according to current guidelines and to compare the results with those of conventional clinical assessment scoring systems, including the D’Amico, Epstein, and Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) systems, on the basis of findings at prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: This institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospectively designed study included 133 patients (mean age, 59.3 years) with a mean prostate-specific antigen level of 6.73 ng/mL (median, 4.39 ng/mL) who underwent multiparametric MR imaging at 3.0 T before radical prostatectomy. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were then retrospectively classified as to whether they would have met AS eligibility criteria or were better served by surgery. AS eligibility criteria for prostatectomy specimens were a dominant tumor smaller than 0.5 mL without Gleason 4 or 5 patterns or extracapsular or seminal vesicle invasion. Conventional clinical assessment scores (the D’Amico, Epstein, and CAPRA scoring systems) were compared with multiparametric MR imaging findings for predicting AS candidates. The level of significance of difference between scoring systems was determined by using the χ2 test for categoric variables with the level of significance set at P < .05. Results: Among 133 patients, 14 were eligible for AS on the basis of prostatectomy results. The sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), and overall accuracy, respectively, were 93%, 25%, and 70% for the D’Amico system, 64%, 45%, and 88% for the Epstein criteria, and 93%, 20%, and 59% for the CAPRA scoring system for predicting AS candidates (P < .005 for all, χ2 test), while multiparametric MR imaging had a sensitivity of 93%, a PPV of 57%, and an overall accuracy of 92% (P < .005). Conclusion

  17. Development, Usability, and Efficacy of a Serious Game to Help Patients Learn About Pain Management After Surgery: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondal, Katrin; Thue, David; Zoega, Sigridur; Thylen, Ingela; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2017-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain is a persistent problem after surgery and can delay recovery and develop into chronic pain. Better patient education has been proposed to improve pain management of patients. Serious games have not been previously developed to help patients to learn how to manage their postoperative pain. Objective The aim of this study was to describe the development of a computer-based game for surgical patients to learn about postoperative pain management and to evaluate the usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game. Methods A computer game was developed by an interdisciplinary team following a structured approach. The usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires (AttrakDiff2, Postoperative Pain Management Game Survey, Patient Knowledge About Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire), semi-structured interviews, and direct observation in one session with 20 participants recruited from the general public via Facebook (mean age 48 [SD 14]; 11 women). Adjusted Barriers Questionnaire II and 3 questions on health literacy were used to collect background information. Results Theories of self-care and adult learning, evidence for the educational needs of patients about pain management, and principles of gamification were used to develop the computer game. Ease of use and usefulness received a median score between 2.00 (IQR 1.00) and 5.00 (IQR 2.00) (possible scores 0-5; IQR, interquartile range), and ease of use was further confirmed by observation. Participants expressed satisfaction with this novel method of learning, despite some technological challenges. The attributes of the game, measured with AttrakDiff2, received a median score above 0 in all dimensions; highest for attraction (median 1.43, IQR 0.93) followed by pragmatic quality (median 1.31, IQR 1.04), hedonic quality interaction (median 1.00, IQR 1.04), and hedonic quality stimulation (median 0.57, IQR 0.68). Knowledge of

  18. Development, Usability, and Efficacy of a Serious Game to Help Patients Learn About Pain Management After Surgery: An Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingadottir, Brynja; Blondal, Katrin; Thue, David; Zoega, Sigridur; Thylen, Ingela; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2017-05-10

    Postoperative pain is a persistent problem after surgery and can delay recovery and develop into chronic pain. Better patient education has been proposed to improve pain management of patients. Serious games have not been previously developed to help patients to learn how to manage their postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to describe the development of a computer-based game for surgical patients to learn about postoperative pain management and to evaluate the usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game. A computer game was developed by an interdisciplinary team following a structured approach. The usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires (AttrakDiff2, Postoperative Pain Management Game Survey, Patient Knowledge About Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire), semi-structured interviews, and direct observation in one session with 20 participants recruited from the general public via Facebook (mean age 48 [SD 14]; 11 women). Adjusted Barriers Questionnaire II and 3 questions on health literacy were used to collect background information. Theories of self-care and adult learning, evidence for the educational needs of patients about pain management, and principles of gamification were used to develop the computer game. Ease of use and usefulness received a median score between 2.00 (IQR 1.00) and 5.00 (IQR 2.00) (possible scores 0-5; IQR, interquartile range), and ease of use was further confirmed by observation. Participants expressed satisfaction with this novel method of learning, despite some technological challenges. The attributes of the game, measured with AttrakDiff2, received a median score above 0 in all dimensions; highest for attraction (median 1.43, IQR 0.93) followed by pragmatic quality (median 1.31, IQR 1.04), hedonic quality interaction (median 1.00, IQR 1.04), and hedonic quality stimulation (median 0.57, IQR 0.68). Knowledge of pain medication and pain management

  19. Implementing emergency manuals: can cognitive aids help translate best practices for patient care during acute events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Sara N; Howard, Steven K

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we address whether emergency manuals are an effective means of helping anesthesiologists and perioperative teams apply known best practices for critical events. We review the relevant history of such cognitive aids in health care, as well as examples from other high stakes industries, and describe why emergency manuals have a role in improving patient care during certain events. We propose 4 vital elements: create, familiarize, use, and integrate, necessary for the widespread, successful development, and implementation of medical emergency manuals, using the specific example of the perioperative setting. The details of each element are presented, drawing from the medical literature as well as from our combined experience of more than 30 years of observing teams of anesthesiologists managing simulated and real critical events. We emphasize the importance of training clinicians in the use of emergency manuals for education on content, format, and location. Finally, we discuss cultural readiness for change, present a system example of successful integration, and highlight the importance of further research on the implementation of emergency manuals.

  20. How Spirituality Helps Cancer Patients with the Adjustment to their Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garssen, Bert; Uwland-Sikkema, Nicoline F; Visser, Anja

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that spirituality is associated with higher well-being, because it offers social support, improves the relationship with the partner, provides meaning, and reduces self-focus and worry. We performed a qualitative study among ten people with cancer, using the Consensual Qualitative Research method for the analysis of semi-structured interviews. Support was found for the mechanisms of meaning provision and of reduction of self-focus and worries. Participants also mentioned emotion-focused roles of spirituality: Feeling supported by a transcendental confidant, the expression of negative emotions (in prayer), acceptance, allowing feelings of misery, and viewing problems from a distance. There was no mention of a contribution of spirituality to adjustment through improved social support per se or a higher quality of the relationship with the partner. The results of the present study indicate that the role of spirituality in emotion regulation deserves attention in understanding how spirituality helps cancer patients to adjust to their disease.

  1. Patient and public involvement in scope development for a palliative care health technology assessment in europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brereton, L.; Goyder, E.; Ingleton, C.; Gardiner, C.; Chilcott, J.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oortwijn, W.; Mozygemba, K.; Lysdahl, K.B.; Sacchini, D.; Lepper, W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) helps to ensure that study findings are useful to end users but is under-developed in Health Technology Assessment (HTA). "INTEGRATE-HTA, (a co-funded European Union project -grant agreement 30614) is developing new methods to assess complex health te

  2. Data for global solutions: How new technologies can help people to re-imagine the future of cities and more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, J.; Gaffney, O.; Young, D.

    2016-12-01

    People are more willing to accept and act on the science surrounding global environmental change when they can see themselves in that change - or when they can understand how global processes like climate change impact their lives in concrete and intimate ways. The digital revolution presents unique opportunities to make those sorts of connections. We will explore how new technologies can help to immerse users in the challenges of global sustainability and deepen their sense of personal involvement. We will draw on case studies from the Future Earth Media Lab, a communications and research initiative that was formed by Future Earth, the International Council for Science (ICSU) and Globaïa in 2015. The Media Lab was set up to bring together partners from science, technology, art and design to co-create products and experiences that can change the way we communicate the challenges of the world's most intractable problems, with the potential to shift mindsets and behaviours. We are at the very beginning of this 10-year project to explore how advances in virtual reality, augmented reality, data visualization and artificial intelligence will reshape how non-scientific audiences engage with science. The session will focus on results of the most recent projects launched in 2016: a hackathon series with the Iris.AI artificial intelligence project to test the limits of AI for searches based on framed research questions; a global hackathon series around using virtual reality to communicate global change challenges and an immersive space co-created with data visualization experts at the UN's biggest conference on sustainable urbanization at Quito, Ecuador.

  3. [Self-help friendliness as an element of patient-centered rehabilitation--results of a model project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzien, M; Trojan, A

    2015-04-01

    The concept of self-help friendliness describes a systematic approach in health care institutions to strengthen patient-centeredness through closer collaboration with self-help groups. Self-help groups enable patients to better coping with their diseases. Organised as a participatory process 5 quality criteria for best practice in the cooperation between professionals in rehabilitation facilities and patient organizations were developed and tested. The process of standards development of ISQUA--International Society for Quality in Health Care guided the model project. Implementing the criteria is feasible and in line with institution-specific requirements. The process documentation is accessible via the network "Selbsthilfefreundlichkeit und Patientenorientierung im Gesundheitswesen" (www.selbsthilfefreundlichkeit.de). The discussion deals with problems of realization and perspectives concerning the transfer of results. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Patient-clinician agreement on treatment type and helpfulness: results from a WTC rescue and recovery worker cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikauf, John; Schechter, Clyde B; Marrone, Kathryn; Ozbay, Fatih; Rapoport, Alison; Sharma, Vanshdeep; Katz, Craig L

    2013-11-01

    This study assessed patient and clinician agreement about treatment type and its association with treatment helpfulness among World Trade Center rescue and recovery workers. A total of 187 outpatients and 280 clinicians completed a survey, which gathered information on patient characteristics, treatment types, and treatment helpfulness. Kappa statistics and sensitivity and specificity analyses were used, and the association between patient-clinician agreement and reported treatment benefit was determined. Patient-clinician agreement was highest for group therapy, medication management, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and couples therapy. Agreement about medication management, individual psychotherapy, and workers' compensation evaluation was associated with higher reported treatment benefits. Findings support the hypothesis that agreement regarding treatment type is associated with higher reported benefit and extend findings of previous studies to a linguistically diverse, naturalistic sample exposed to a disaster trauma. Results also highlight the need for better understanding of eclectic therapies offered in real-world clinical practice.

  5. Technologies of compliance? Telecare technologies and self-management of chronic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Telecare technologies are instruments that enable care at a distance via the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). One of the aims of telecare technologies is to support self-management strategies of chronic patients. However, the ways in which self-management is articulated in

  6. Could a Monetary Perk Help Keep HIV Patients on Their Meds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not already virally suppressed, or mobile app-based technology deployed to improve adherence, or funds allocated for ... Ph.D., medical director, Center for Young Adult, Adolescent and Pediatric HIV, Northwell Health, Great Neck, N. ...

  7. Patients' and carers' experiences of interacting with home haemodialysis technology: implications for quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkomar, Atish; Farrington, Ken; Mayer, Astrid; Walker, Diane; Blandford, Ann

    2014-12-11

    Little is known about patients' and carers' experiences of interacting with home haemodialysis (HHD) technology, in terms of user experience, how the design of the technology supports safety and fits with home use, and how the broader context of service provision impacts on patients' use of the technology. Data were gathered through ethnographic observations and interviews with 19 patients and their carers associated with four different hospitals in the UK, using five different HHD machines. All patients were managing their condition successfully on HHD. Data were analysed qualitatively, focusing on themes of how individuals used the machines and how they managed their own safety. Findings are organised by three themes: learning to use the technology, usability of the technology, and managing safety during dialysis. Home patients want to live their lives fully, and value the freedom and autonomy that HHD gives them; they adapt use of the technology to their lives and their home context. They also consider the machines to be safe; nevertheless, most participants reported feeling scared and having to learn through mistakes in the early months of dialysing at home. Home care nurses and technicians provide invaluable support. Although participants reported on strategies for anticipating problems and keeping safe, perceived limitations of the technology and of the broader system of care led some to trade off safety against immediate quality of life. Enhancing the quality and safety of the patient experience in HHD involves designing technology and the broader system of care to take account of how individuals manage their dialysis in the home. Possible design improvements to enhance the quality and safety of the patient experience include features to help patients manage their dialysis (e.g. providing timely reminders of next steps) and features to support communication between families and professionals (e.g. through remote monitoring).

  8. Help, I'm losing patient-centredness! Experiences of medical students and their teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombeke, Katrien; Symons, Linda; Debaene, Luc; De Winter, Benedicte; Schol, Sandrina; Van Royen, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Despite all educational efforts, the literature shows an ongoing decline in patient-centredness during medical education. This study explores the experiences of medical students and their teachers and supervisors in relation to patient-centredness in order to gain a better understanding of the factors that determine its development. We conducted 11 focus groups on the subject of learning and teaching about patient-centredness. We then carried out a constant comparative analysis of prior theory and the qualitative data collected in the focus groups using the 'sensitising concepts' provided by the Attitude-Social Influence-Self-Efficacy (ASE) model. Although students express positive attitudes towards patient-centredness and acquire patient-centred skills during medical education, this study indicates that these are not sufficient to attain the level of competent behaviour needed in today's challenging hospital environment. Clinical clerkships do provide students with ample opportunity to encounter patients and practise patient-centred skills. However, when students lack self-efficacy, when they face barriers (time pressure, tiredness) or when they are surrounded by non-patient-centred role models and are overwhelmed by powerful experiences, they lose their patient-centred focus. The study suggests that communication skills training protects students from negative social influences. Moreover, personal development, including developing the ability to deal with emotions and personal suffering, self-awareness and self-care are important qualities of the central phenomenon of the 'doctor-as-person', which is identified as a missing concept in the ASE model. The student-supervisor relationship is found to be key to learning patient-centredness and has several functions: it facilitates the direct transmission of patient-centred skills, knowledge and attitudes; it provides social support of students' patient-centred behaviour; it provides support of the 'student

  9. Art Therapy with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Helping Normal Children Cope with Abnormal Circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councill, Tracy

    1993-01-01

    Notes that art therapy with pediatric cancer patients addresses emotional and developmental needs of normal population under extreme stress. Reviews literature on the problems likely to be encountered by pediatric cancer patient and presents case examples to illustrate the emergence of these issues and their management in art therapy. (Author/NB)

  10. Time from first symptom experience to help seeking for colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Hvidberg, Line; Pedersen, Anette Fischer;

    2016-01-01

    anvendte vi Leventhals Common Sense Model til at undersøge forskellige aspekter af patienters symptomrepræsentationer, deres oplevede symptomer samt deres tidsintervaller op til diagnose. Vi indhentede data om sociodemografi fra Danmarks Statistik. Studiet viste, at det mediane patientinterval for hele...... score på timeline cyclical (fx personer der oplevede, at deres symptomer kom og gik) var mere tilbøjelig til at have langt patient interval. Studiet bidrager med ny viden om, hvordan patienter med kolorektal cancer tænker om deres symptomer før lægesøgning, og hvordan dette påvirker deres...

  11. Calling for Help? Considering Function and Meaning when Patients Drunk-Dial Psychotherapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; LaPaglia, Donna; Steinfeld, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Drunk-dialing is a term documented in both popular culture and academic literatures to describe a behavior in which a person contacts another individual by phone while intoxicated. In our collective clinical experience we have found that clients drunk-dial their clinicians too, particularly while in substance use treatment, and yet there is a noticeable absence of research on the topic to guide clinical decision-making within a process-based understanding of these events. As the parameters within which psychotherapy takes place become increasingly technologized, a literature base to document clients’ idiosyncratic use of technology will become increasingly necessary and useful. We provide a brief review of the existing research on drunk-dialing and conclude with specific questions to guide future research and practice. PMID:24023519

  12. May clinical neurophysiology help to predict the recovery of neurological early rehabilitation patients?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rollnik, Jens D

    2015-01-01

    .... Clinical and neurophysiological data of a large sample of 803 early rehabilitation cases of the BDH-Clinic Hessisch Oldendorf in Northern Germany have been carefully reviewed. Most patients (43.5...

  13. High-grade glioma in elderly patients: can the oncogeriatrician help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabouret E

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Emeline Tabouret,1 Louis Tassy,2 Olivier Chinot,1 ElodieCrétel,3 Frederique Retornaz,4 Frederique Rousseau5 1Department of Neuro-oncology, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France; 3Transveral Oncogeriatric Unit, University Hospital Timone, Marseille, France; 4Departmental Gerontologic Center, Marseille, France; 5Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France Abstract: Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors in adults. As the population ages in Western countries, the number of people being diagnosed with glioblastoma is expected to increase. Clinical management of elderly patients with primary brain tumors is difficult, owing to multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, decreased tolerance to chemotherapy, and an increased risk of radiation-induced neurotoxicity. A few specific randomized studies have shown a benefit for radiotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. For patients with poor performance status, chemotherapy (temozolomide has been shown to be associated with prolonged duration of response. Patients with methylated O6-alkylguanine deoxyribonucleic acid alkyltransferase promoter seem to have better outcomes. Oncogeriatrics proposes the geriatric evaluation of elderly patients to improve therapeutic choices and optimize the management of treatment toxicities and comorbidities. Keywords: brain tumor, older cancer patient, chemotherapy toxicity, oncogeriatric charter

  14. Helping COPD patients change health behavior in order to improve their quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagro P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pere Almagro, Alejandra CastroAcute Geriatric Care Unity, Internal Medicine Department, University Hospital Mútua de Terrassa, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the most prevalent and debilitating diseases in adults worldwide and is associated with a deleterious effect on the quality of life of affected patients. Although it remains one of the leading causes of global mortality, the prognosis seems to have improved in recent years. Even so, the number of patients with COPD and multiple comorbidities has risen, hindering their management and highlighting the need for futures changes in the model of care. Together with standard medical treatment and therapy adherence – essential to optimizing disease control – several nonpharmacological therapies have proven useful in the management of these patients, improving their health-related quality of life (HRQoL regardless of lung function parameters. Among these are improved diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities, prevention of COPD exacerbations, and greater attention to physical disability related to hospitalization. Pulmonary rehabilitation reduces symptoms, optimizes functional status, improves activity and daily function, and restores the highest level of independent physical function in these patients, thereby improving HRQoL even more than pharmacological treatment. Greater physical activity is significantly correlated with improvement of dyspnea, HRQoL, and mobility, along with a decrease in the loss of lung function. Nutritional support in malnourished COPD patients improves exercise capacity, while smoking cessation slows disease progression and increases HRQoL. Other treatments such as psychological and behavioral therapies have proven useful in the treatment of depression and anxiety, both of which are frequent in these patients. More recently, telehealthcare has been associated with improved quality of life and a reduction in exacerbations

  15. Tracking surgical day care patients using RFID technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S.G.L. Wauben; A.C.P. Guédon; D.F. de Korne (Dirk); J.J. van den Dobbelsteen (John)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Objective__: Measure wait times, characterise current information flow and define requirements for a technological information system that supports the patient’s journey. __Design__: First, patients were observed during eight random weekdays and the durations of act

  16. Tracking surgical day care patients using RFID technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wauben, L.S.G.L; Guédon, A.C.P; Korne, Dirk; Dobbelsteen, John

    2015-01-01

    ... (RFID) technology was installed and patients were tracked during 52 weekdays. Length of hospital stay, length of stay and wait times per phase, and differences in wait times between the two types of administered anaesthesia were analysed...

  17. Seven Affordances of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: How to Support Collaborative Learning? How Can Technologies Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes 7 core affordances of technology for collaborative learning based on theories of collaborative learning and CSCL (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning) practices. Technology affords learner opportunities to (1) engage in a joint task, (2) communicate, (3) share resources, (4) engage in productive collaborative learning…

  18. How Professional Organizations Can Help Meet the Professional Development Needs of Middle School Business and Technology Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Tena B.

    2007-01-01

    Middle school business and technology educators were surveyed to examine how professional organizations could meet their professional development needs. A 26 percent response rate (n = 148) was received from middle school educators in 37 states. This research was designed to identify the business and technology courses being taught at the middle…

  19. Pitfalls in communication with Hispanic and African-American patients: do translators help or harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, T R

    1992-11-01

    The Martin Luther King County General Hospital, Los Angeles, California, provides services for an equal number of Hispanics (most are recent immigrants from Mexico) and African Americans who have lived in the community since before the Watts riot in 1965. The hospital is staffed by a large percentage of foreign-trained doctors and other personnel who speak some English, but suffer from a lack of understanding of the Hispanic as well as the African-American patients. Very few trained interpreters are provided for the Spanish-speaking population, and no interpreters are provided for African Americans. A 100-question survey on common African-American expressions was conducted in the Department of Family Medicine, as well as an opinion poll to determine if adequate understanding existed between patients and providers. The data revealed that native African-American providers understood significantly more African-American expressions than foreign, white, and Hispanic providers. The opinion poll also revealed inadequate translation of medical complaints from patients through interpreters. In addition, the poll found that diagnoses and instructions were not adequately related to the patients. Furthermore, it was felt that trained interpreters should be provided for all patients who presented communication problems.

  20. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support.

  1. Using Behavioral Intervention Technologies to Help Low-Income and Latino Smokers Quit: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ricardo F; Bunge, Eduardo L; Barrera, Alinne Z; Wickham, Robert E; Lee, Jessica

    2016-06-14

    The Institute for International Internet Interventions for Health at Palo Alto University proposes to develop digital tools specifically to help low-income English- and Spanish-speaking smokers to quit. Individuals from lower-income countries and those with lower social status quit at lower rates than those from high-income countries and those with higher social status. We plan to launch a project designed to test whether a mobile-based digital intervention designed with systematic input from low-income English- and Spanish-speaking smokers from a public-sector health care system can significantly improve its acceptability, utilization, and effectiveness. Using human-centered development methods, we will involve low-income patients in the design of a Web app/text messaging tool. We will also use their input to improve our recruitment and dissemination strategies. We will iteratively develop versions of the digital interventions informed by our human-centered approach. The project involves three specific aims: (1) human-centered development of an English/Spanish smoking cessation web app, (2) improvement of dissemination strategies, and (3) evaluation of resulting smoking cessation web app. We will develop iterative versions of a digital smoking cessation tool that is highly responsive to the needs and preferences of the users. Input from participants will identify effective ways of reaching and encouraging low-income English- and Spanish-speaking smokers to use the digital smoking cessation interventions to be developed. This information will support ongoing dissemination and implementation efforts beyond the grant period. We will evaluate the effectiveness of the successive versions of the resulting stop smoking Web app by an online randomized controlled trial. Increased effectiveness will be defined as increased utilization of the Web app and higher abstinence rates than those obtained by a baseline usual care Web app. Recruitment will begin January 2016, the

  2. Effective governance: helping boards acquire, adapt and apply evidence to improve quality and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    They don't spend a lot of time treating patients. And they're seldom included on grand rounds. But health services boards of directors still have a significant role to play in quality and patient safety. Their responsibilities for quality go beyond those of boards in many other settings and so, therefore, does their need for specialized education and training. As Maura Davies, chief executive officer (CEO) of Saskatoon Health Region, has pointed out, "There is increasing awareness that health services boards cannot abdicate their responsibilities for ensuring quality and safety and need to take specific actions to address these duties" (Davies 2010: 37).

  3. Management of periodontally compromised patient by orthodontic treatment: Does it help esthetically and biologically?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adults are always keen to know whether they can still opt for orthodontic treatment and they often ask the same question to the orthodontist and the orthodontist replies, it primarily depends on the health of the bone supporting the teeth. Yes, it is the bone health which is of prime importance to undergo orthodontic treatment. Here is a case report of a patient who underwent orthodontic treatment because of lower midline spacing and protrusion of the upper anteriors. The bone health of the upper and lower anteriors was compromised. At the end of the treatment, there was marked improvement in the bone level and the profile of the patient.

  4. Evaluation of a pharmacy service helping patients to get a good start in taking their new medications for chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Dam, Pernille; Rossing, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    to the risk of non-adherence. Counseling at the pharmacy counter may not be structured appropriately to address issues of potential non-adherence to new medication. For these reasons, a new pharmacy service in Denmark was developed. The service consists of a 15-min face-to-face interview and a 10-min...... and a good start in taking the new medication due to the pharmacy service. The majority of patients reported being adherent, but a potential risk of non-adherence was identified in nearly 50% of patients. Only slight improvements in perceived concordance were reported. The positive outcome of the service...... was mainly due to the first interview. Some patients had concerns about their new situation, which they thought more important to resolve than issues of potential non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were satisfied with the pharmacy service and reported that staff helped them get a good start with the new...

  5. Using insights from behavioral economics and social psychology to help patients manage chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogler, Braden K; Shu, Suzanne B; Fox, Craig R; Goldstein, Noah J; Victor, Ronald G; Escarce, José J; Shapiro, Martin F

    2013-05-01

    Despite a revolution in therapeutics, the ability to control chronic diseases remains elusive. We present here a conceptual model of the potential role of behavioral tools in chronic disease control. Clinicians implicitly accept the assumption that patients will act rationally to maximize their self-interest. However, patients may not always be the rational actors that we imagine. Major behavioral barriers to optimal health behavior include patients' fear of threats to health, unwillingness to think about problems when risks are known or data are ambiguous, the discounting of risks that are far in the future, failure to act due to lack of motivation, insufficient confidence in the ability to overcome a health problem, and inattention due to pressures of everyday life. Financial incentives can stimulate initiation of health-promoting behaviors by reducing or eliminating financial barriers, but may not produce long-term behavior change without additional interventions. Strategies have been developed by behavioral economists and social psychologists to address each of these barriers to better decision-making. These include: labeling positive behaviors in ways consistent with patient life goals and priorities; greater focus on more immediate risks of chronic diseases; intermediate subgoals as steps to a large health goal; and implementation of specific plans as to when, where, and how an action will be taken. Such strategies hold promise for improving health behaviors and disease control, but most have not been studied in medical settings. The effectiveness of these approaches should be evaluated for their potential as tools for the clinician.

  6. Are oral protein supplements helpful in the management of malnutrition in dialysis patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Jeloka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized study was planned to compare the effects of whey and egg albumin protein supplements in dialysis patients. Fifty adult patients were randomized to receive either whey protein or egg albumin as per their deficit calculated from K/DOQI recommendations. Actual intake was calculated from three-day dietary diary. Assessment of nutritional status was done by serum albumin and bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA. Repeat evaluation was done after 6 months. The mean initial intake of protein in whey and egg albumin group was 0.74 ± 0.3 vs. 0.69 ± 0.2 g/kg/day, ( P = 0.5 and calorie intake was 20 ± 5.6 vs. 20.5 ± 5.1 kcal/kg/day, ( P = 0.8, respectively. Out of 50 patients, two died within 2 months and were excluded from the study and 14 (28% dropped out within one month because of side effects. The most common side effect in drop-outs was nausea and vomiting (43%. Out of remaining 34 patients who completed the study, 80% could not consume >50% of the recommended supplement because of side effects. The protein and calorie intake remained similar at baseline and 6 months in both the groups. The main side effects in whey group were bloating and nausea with vomiting, and in egg protein group were nausea with vomiting, bloating and anorexia. Oral protein supplements were not tolerated in dialysis patients and side effects resulted in high degree of non-compliance.

  7. Association of help-seeking behavior with depression and anxiety disorders among gastroenterological patients in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad D Alosaimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: There is a high prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among gastroenterological outpatients. Relatively few studies have been done on the help-seeking behavior among those who suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms with or without psychiatric disorders. We aimed to characterize the help-seeking behavior of gastroenterological outpatients and to evaluate if this behavior is linked to the presence of depression and anxiety. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in gastroenterology clinics in four hospitals in Riyadh between February and September 2013. A self-administrated questionnaire was developed and administered to patients. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7 questionnaires were used to diagnose depression and anxiety, respectively. Results: A total of 440 patients completed the study questionnaire. The average age was 36.0 ± 12.8 years and 69% of the patients were males. Complaints included abdominal pain (58%, heartburn (29%, diarrhea or constipation (25%, appetite or weight changes (22%, and nausea or vomiting (16%. Depression was diagnosed in 36%, while anxiety was diagnosed in 28% of the patients. The first intervention was use of medications (68% and undergoing endoscopy (16%, while few patients initially used herbs or Islamic incantation (7.5%. This first intervention was done primarily (59% in private sector hospitals rather than government sector hospitals (36%. The rates of depression and anxiety in our patients were higher among those who suffered from multiple complaints for longer durations and with less satisfaction with the offered services. Conclusion: Depression and anxiety are common comorbidities in gastroenterological outpatient population, especially those who have a chronic course of multiple gastrointestinal complaints.

  8. Innovation in practice: mobile phone technology in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Holly

    2008-04-01

    Mobile phones are becoming increasingly important in everyday life and now in healthcare. There has been a steady growth of information and communication technologies in health communication and technology is used progressively in telemedicine, wireless monitoring of health outcomes in disease and in the delivery of health interventions. Mobile phones are becoming an important method of encouraging better nurse-patient communication and will undoubtedly increase in application over coming years. This article presents recent developments and applications of mobile technology for health promotion and patient-monitoring in chronic disease.

  9. How technology is empowering patients? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo, Jorge; Román, Isabel; Roa, Laura M

    2015-10-01

    The term 'Patient Empowerment' (PE) is a growing concept – so in popularity as in application – covering situations where citizens are encouraged to take an active role in the management of their own health. This concept is serving as engine power for increasing the quality of health systems, but a question is still unanswered, 'how PE will be effectively achieved?' Beyond psychological implications, empowerment of patients in daily practice relies on technology and the way it is used. Unfortunately, the heterogeneity of approaches and technologies makes difficult to have a global vision of how PE is being performed. To clarify how technology is being applied for enhancing patient empowerment as well as to identify current (and future) trends and milestones in this issue. Searches for relevant English language articles using Medline, Scopus, ACM Digital Library, Springer Link, EBSCO host and ScienceDirect databases from the year 2000 until October 2012 were conducted. Among others, a selection criterion was to review articles including terms 'patient' and 'empowerment' in title, abstract or as keywords. Results state that practical approaches to empower patients vary in scope, aim and technology. Health literacy of patients, remote access to health services, and self-care mechanisms are the most valued ways to accomplish PE. Current technology already allows establishing the first steps in the road ahead, but a change of attitude by all stakeholders (i.e. professionals, patients, policy makers, etc.) is required. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Aspirin versus warfarin in atrial fibrillation: decision analysis may help patients' choice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2012-03-01

    the primary prevention of ischaemic stroke in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) typically involves consideration of aspirin or warfarin. CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc estimates annual stroke rates for untreated AF patients, which are reduced by 60% with warfarin and by 20% with aspirin. HAS-BLED estimates annual rates of major bleeding on warfarin. The latter risk with aspirin is 0.5-1.2% per year.

  11. Getting Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents & Students Home > Special Features > Getting Help Getting Help Resources from NIAAA Treatment for Alcohol Problems: Finding ... and find ways to make a change. Professional help Your doctor. Primary care and mental health practitioners ...

  12. Handling agents and patients: representational cospeech gestures help children comprehend complex syntactic constructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, Anna L; Coates, Anna; Holler, Judith

    2014-07-01

    Gesture is an important precursor of children's early language development, for example, in the transition to multiword speech and as a predictor of later language abilities. However, it is unclear whether gestural input can influence children's comprehension of complex grammatical constructions. In Study 1, 3- (M = 3 years 5 months) and 4-year-old (M = 4 years 6 months) children witnessed 2-participant actions described using the infrequent object-cleft-construction (OCC; It was the dog that the cat chased). Half saw an experimenter accompanying her descriptions with gestures representing the 2 participants and indicating the direction of action; the remaining children did not witness gesture. Children who witnessed gestures showed better comprehension of the OCC than those who did not witness gestures, both in and beyond the immediate physical context, but this benefit was restricted to the oldest 4-year-olds. In Study 2, a further group of older 4-year-old children (M = 4 years 7 months) witnessed the same 2-participant actions described by an experimenter and accompanied by gestures, but the gesture represented only the 2 participants and not the direction of the action. Again, a benefit of gesture was observed on subsequent comprehension of the OCC. We interpret these findings as demonstrating that representational cospeech gestures can help children comprehend complex linguistic structures by highlighting the roles played by the participants in the event. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such "unanchored" patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health.

  14. A Physics Lesson Designed According to 7E Model with the Help of Instructional Technology (Lesson Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Selahattin; Kocakaya, Serhat

    2010-01-01

    Students enter the classrooms with a preexisting knowledge of science concepts. These science concepts sometimes show inconsistency with the accepted ones by the scientists and called as misconceptions. Studies applied science field have to get possession of abilities that not only detect these misconceptions also help to solve these problems.…

  15. Translating Personality Psychology to Help Personalize Preventive Medicine for Young-Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Hancox, Robert J.; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by healthcare reform will soon increase demands on primary-care physicians. Physicians will face more young-adult patients which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the current study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults’ personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the Dunedin Study cohort of 1,000 individuals, we show that very brief measures of young adults’ personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness-to-Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health-risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for healthcare professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing healthcare electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient outcomes. PMID:24588093

  16. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  17. Can body mass index help predict outcome in patients with bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Cynthia; van de Velde, Caroline; Růžičková, Martina; Slaney, Claire; Garnham, Julie; Hajek, Tomas; O’Donovan, Claire; Alda, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported higher prevalence of obesity in patients suffering from bipolar disorder (BD). To study the relation of elevated body mass index (BMI) in patients with BD more closely, we investigated differences in sociodemographic, clinical, and medical characteristics with respect to BMI, with the hypothesis that BMI is related to prognosis and outcome. Methods We measured the BMI of 276 subjects of a tertiary care sample from the Maritime Bipolar Registry. Subjects were 16 to 83 years old, with psychiatric diagnoses of bipolar I disorder (n = 186), bipolar II disorder (n = 85), and BD not otherwise specified (n = 5). The registry included basic demographic data and details of the clinical presentation. We first examined the variables showing a significant association with BMI; subsequently, we modeled the relationship between BMI and psychiatric outcome using structural equation analysis. Results The prevalence of obesity in our sample was 39.1%. We found higher BMI in subjects with a chronic course (p < 0.001) and longer duration of illness (p = 0.02), lower scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (p = 0.02), and on disability (p = 0.002). Overweight patients had more frequent comorbid subthreshold social (p = 0.02) and generalized anxiety disorders (p = 0.05), diabetes mellitus type II (p < 0.001), and hypertension (p = 0.001). Subjects who achieved complete remission of symptoms on lithium showed significantly lower BMI (p = 0.01). Conclusions Our findings suggest that BMI is associated with the prognosis and outcome of BD. Whether this association is causal remains to be determined. PMID:19689507

  18. Bone biomarkers help grading severity of coronary calcifications in non dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Morena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoprotegerin (OPG and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23 are recognized as strong risk factors of vascular calcifications in non dialysis chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between FGF23, OPG, and coronary artery calcifications (CAC in this population and to attempt identification of the most powerful biomarker of CAC: FGF23? OPG? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 195 ND-CKD patients (112 males/83 females, 70.8 [27.4-94.6] years were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All underwent chest multidetector computed tomography for CAC scoring. Vascular risk markers including FGF23 and OPG were measured. Logistic regression analyses were used to study the potential relationships between CAC and these markers. The fully adjusted-univariate analysis clearly showed high OPG (≥10.71 pmol/L as the only variable significantly associated with moderate CAC ([100-400[ (OR = 2.73 [1.03;7.26]; p = 0.04. Such association failed to persist for CAC scoring higher than 400. Indeed, severe CAC was only associated with high phosphate fractional excretion (FEPO(4 (≥38.71% (OR = 5.47 [1.76;17.0]; p = 0.003 and high FGF23 (≥173.30 RU/mL (OR = 5.40 [1.91;15.3]; p = 0.002. In addition, the risk to present severe CAC when FGF23 level was high was not significantly different when OPG was normal or high. Conversely, the risk to present moderate CAC when OPG level was high was not significantly different when FGF23 was normal or high. CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest that OPG is associated to moderate CAC while FGF23 rather represents a biomarker of severe CAC in ND-CKD patients.

  19. Impact of Gender on Patient Preferences for Technology-Based Behavioral Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kim

    2014-08-01

    prevention, gender modified the relationship between other demographic factors and preference for technology-based health information; e.g., older age decreases interest in technology-based information for smoking cessation in women but not in men (aOR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.99 versus aOR 1.00, 95% CI 0.97-1.03. Conclusion: Our findings suggest ED patients’ gender may affect technology preferences. Receptivity to technology-based interventions may be a complex interaction between gender and other demographic factors. Considering gender may help target ED patient populations most likely to be receptive to technology-based interventions.

  20. Helping patients with diabetes: resources from the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Philip T

    2012-01-01

    To familiarize pharmacists with the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) and to demonstrate the value of NDEP materials in the care of patients with diabetes. The NDEP website (www.ndep.nih.gov) and PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). NDEP is a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and many organization partners. Since 1997, a large number of materials have been created by NDEP using an evidence-based, expert- and patient-reviewed approach to development. Materials are nonbranded and reflect current medical knowledge and practice. Educational materials are available for persons at risk for diabetes, those with diabetes, family members of persons with diabetes, employers, and professionals. The Pharmacy, Podiatry, Optometry, and Dentistry (PPOD) workgroup of NDEP promotes the value of pharmacists and other professionals in diabetes education and management. Resources are available to educate about the value of the PPOD professionals. NDEP provides evidence-based, high-quality educational materials that pharmacists will find useful in the counseling of persons with diabetes.

  1. Co-production in practice: how people with assisted living needs can help design and evolve technologies and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherton, Joseph; Sugarhood, Paul; Procter, Rob; Hinder, Sue; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2015-05-26

    The low uptake of telecare and telehealth services by older people may be explained by the limited involvement of users in the design. If the ambition of 'care closer to home' is to be realised, then industry, health and social care providers must evolve ways to work with older people to co-produce useful and useable solutions. We conducted 10 co-design workshops with users of telehealth and telecare, their carers, service providers and technology suppliers. Using vignettes developed from in-depth ethnographic case studies, we explored participants' perspectives on the design features of technologies and services to enable and facilitate the co-production of new care solutions. Workshop discussions were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. Analysis revealed four main themes. First, there is a need to raise awareness and provide information to potential users of assisted living technologies (ALTs). Second, technologies must be highly customisable and adaptable to accommodate the multiple and changing needs of different users. Third, the service must align closely with the individual's wider social support network. Finally, the service must support a high degree of information sharing and coordination. The case vignettes within inclusive and democratic co-design workshops provided a powerful means for ALT users and their carers to contribute, along with other stakeholders, to technology and service design. The workshops identified a need to focus attention on supporting the social processes that facilitate the collective efforts of formal and informal care networks in ALT delivery and use.

  2. User-centered design and interactive health technologies for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A; Mc Curry, Kenneth R; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design is an approach that involves end users throughout the development process so that technologies support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this article, we provide an overview of user-centered design and use the development of Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH) to illustrate how these principles and techniques were applied to involve patients in the development of this interactive health technology. Involving patient-users in the design and testing ensured functionality and usability, therefore increasing the likelihood of promoting the intended health outcomes.

  3. The Congressional Science Fellow Program and Other Efforts to Help Congress and the Public Make Wiser Decisions on Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Joel

    2004-05-01

    For thirty years the AAAS Congressional Science and Technology Fellow Program, with which the APS program is affiliated, has been bringing scientists and engineers to work on the staffs of Congress. During the same period, many independent technology policy groups at universities, professional societies including the APS, and non-profit organizations have prepared excellent reports. But despite these efforts, U.S. science and technology policy is often terrible! For example, the current Administration contends that there is not enough scientific evidence of global warming to actually begin to do something to slow the growth in fossil fuel use, but there is plenty of evidence to support deploying a missile defense system now, and we need to be ready to test new generations of nuclear weapons. We scientists must develop a bigger public constituency for good decisions. We need to present, not only sound recommendations backed up by convincing studies, but also wise moral leadership.

  4. Evaluation of My Medication Passport: a patient-completed aide-memoire designed by patients, for patients, to help towards medicines optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Susan; Thakkar, Kandarp; Marvin, Vanessa; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Bell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A passport-sized booklet, designed by patients for patients to record details about their medicines, has been developed as part of a wider project focusing on improving prescribing in the elderly (‘ImPE’). We undertook an evaluation of ‘My Medication Passport’ to gain an understanding of its value to patients and how it may be used in communications about medicines. Setting The Passport was launched in secondary care with the initial users being older people discharged home after an admission to one of the four North West London participating Trusts. The uptake subsequently spread to other (community) locations and other age groups. Participants We recruited more than 200 patients from a cohort who had been given a passport as part of the improvement projects at one of four sites. Of them, 63% (133) completed the structured telephone questionnaire including 27% for whom English was not their first language. Approximately half of the respondents were male and 40% were over 70 years of age. Results More than half of the respondents had found their medication passport useful or helpful in some way; 42% through sharing details from it with others (most frequently family, carer or doctor) or using it as a platform for conversations with healthcare professionals. One-third of those questioned carried the passport with them at all times. Conclusions My Medication Passport has been positively evaluated; we have a better understanding of how it is used by patients, what they are recording and how it can be an aid to dialogue about medicines with family, carers and healthcare professionals. Further development and spread is underway including an App for smartphones that will be subject to wider evaluation to include feedback from clinicians. PMID:25138809

  5. Can patients help teach professionalism and empathy to dental students? Adding patient videos to a lecture course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Barry; Bohay, Richard

    2012-02-01

    A key aspect of predoctoral dental education involves ethics/professionalism and interpersonal communications. Empathy is an integral aspect of both. This study at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, examined predoctoral students' perspectives to determine the impact of new educational methodologies designed to integrate patients' voices into a patient management lecture course. Videos of patients describing their dental experiences were added along with classroom discussion and students' reflective journals on the topics raised. Early results indicate that students perceived this innovation enhanced the teaching of professionalism, raised their awareness of the importance of empathy, and was a well-received addition to the course.

  6. Advances of information technology in communication with adolescent patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zisovska, Elizabeta; Serafimov, Aleksandar; Panova, Gordana; Simeonovska Joveva, Elena

    2013-01-01

    21.century is rapidly becoming an era of educated consumers/patients utilizing the most up-to-date technology to assume control over their health care. The computer will change the patient too. He is coming now with more and better information to the doctor. Adolescent patients particularly are fond of IT communication. On-line counseling becomes the health care environment of tomorrow. New definitions of quality therapeutic relationships occur.

  7. A review of technology-assisted self-help and minimal contact therapies for drug and alcohol abuse and smoking addiction: is human contact necessary for therapeutic efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G; Szkodny, Lauren E; Llera, Sandra J; Przeworski, Amy

    2011-02-01

    Technology-based self-help and minimal contact therapies have been proposed as effective and low-cost interventions for addictive disorders, such as nicotine, alcohol, and drug abuse and addiction. The present article reviews the literature published before 2010 on computerized treatments for drug and alcohol abuse and dependence and smoking addiction. Treatment studies are examined by disorder as well as amount of therapist contact, ranging from self-administered therapy and predominantly self-help interventions to minimal contact therapy where the therapist is actively involved in treatment but to a lesser degree than traditional therapy and predominantly therapist-administered treatments involving regular contact with a therapist for a typical number of sessions. In the treatment of substance use and abuse it is concluded that self-administered and predominantly self-help computer-based cognitive and behavioral interventions are efficacious, but some therapist contact is important for greater and more sustained reductions in addictive behavior.

  8. Lung sound analysis helps localize airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimoda T

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Terufumi Shimoda,1 Yasushi Obase,2 Yukio Nagasaka,3 Hiroshi Nakano,1 Akiko Ishimatsu,1 Reiko Kishikawa,1 Tomoaki Iwanaga1 1Clinical Research Center, Fukuoka National Hospital, Fukuoka, 2Second Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 3Kyoto Respiratory Center, Otowa Hospital, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: Airway inflammation can be detected by lung sound analysis (LSA at a single point in the posterior lower lung field. We performed LSA at 7 points to examine whether the technique could identify the location of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Patients and methods: Breath sounds were recorded at 7 points on the body surface of 22 asthmatic subjects. Inspiration sound pressure level (ISPL, expiration sound pressure level (ESPL, and the expiration-to-inspiration sound pressure ratio (E/I were calculated in 6 frequency bands. The data were analyzed for potential correlation with spirometry, airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO. Results: The E/I data in the frequency range of 100–400 Hz (E/I low frequency [LF], E/I mid frequency [MF] were better correlated with the spirometry, PC20, and FeNO values than were the ISPL or ESPL data. The left anterior chest and left posterior lower recording positions were associated with the best correlations (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity: r=–0.55 and r=–0.58; logPC20: r=–0.46 and r=–0.45; and FeNO: r=0.42 and r=0.46, respectively. The majority of asthmatic subjects with FeNO ≥70 ppb exhibited high E/I MF levels in all lung fields (excluding the trachea and V50%pred <80%, suggesting inflammation throughout the airway. Asthmatic subjects with FeNO <70 ppb showed high or low E/I MF levels depending on the recording position, indicating uneven airway inflammation. Conclusion: E/I LF and E/I MF are more useful LSA parameters for evaluating airway inflammation in bronchial asthma; 7-point lung

  9. Grow Your Personal Learning Network: New Technologies Can Keep You Connected and Help You Manage Information Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlick, David

    2009-01-01

    Personal learning networks (PLNs) are not new. People have long relied on their families, friends, colleagues, and acquaintances to supplement their knowledge about the world. But the times are changing. Information and communication technologies (ICT), including an ever-growing repertoire of open source applications, have freed content from the…

  10. Everybody matters. 1: How getting to know your patients helps to promote dignified care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Caroline; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Dale, Patricia; Wessel, Lucinda

    The Dignity in Care Project aims to develop practical interventions to promote dignified care in hospitals, embedded in the project slogan: "Everybody matters: sustaining dignity in care." It is a nurse led research collaboration with Royal Free Hampstead and Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals Trusts and City University. Practical interventions devised by the project are presented around three main themes that emerged from the views of older people and their relatives (Bridges et al, 2010; 2009). The first theme of "maintaining identity--see who I am" focuses on knowing about people, while the second of "creating community--connect with me" recognises that in the act of caring, nurses receive as well as give. The last theme of "shared decision making--involve me" looks at how decisions about care are made. This first article in a three part series summarises the project and focuses on the first theme. It reports on practical initiatives to enhance dignity in hospitals by enabling nurses and patients/carers to know and value each other as people.

  11. Staying the Course: Using Hypnosis to Help Cancer Patients Navigate Their Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginandes, Carol

    2017-07-01

    Although sometimes maligned and often misunderstood, clinical hypnosis can be utilized as a powerful adjunct for the treatment of mind-body conditions, including cancer. Unlike customary medical regimens that treat diseases of the body and psychotherapies that address disorders of the psyche, hypnosis is a uniquely customizable multi-tool that can augment the treatment of both physical and emotional disorders as well as their complex interactions. This article presents a longitudinal, phase-oriented, clinical model that uses hypnosis in a series of sequential interventions that incorporate targeted suggestions to address the unfolding phases of the cancer continuum. Five such phases of the cancer patient's trajectory, along with their associated medical and psychological challenges, are conceptualized. Each phase is illustrated by case examples from the author's clinical practice and by a discussion of relevant hypnotic approaches. On the somatic level, the intrinsic capacities of hypnotic phenomena, paired with suggestions, can be harnessed to effect perceptual and functional changes to offer symptom relief, re-establishment of systemic homeostasis, amelioration of cellular chemistry, and the acceleration of tissue healing. In the psychological realm, hypnotic strategies can be used to provide a much needed continuity of emotional support, a sense of mastery and self-agency, emotional regulation, and behavioral change.

  12. Smartphones as assistive technology following traumatic brain injury: a preliminary study of what helps and what hinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dana; Sinclair, Kelly; Seabrook, Elizabeth; McKay, Adam; Ponsford, Jennie

    2017-11-01

    Smartphones have great potential as a convenient, multifunction tool to support cognition and independence following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there has been limited investigation of their helpful and less helpful aspects for people with TBI. We aimed to investigate patterns of smartphone use amongst individuals with TBI, identify potential barriers to use, and examine the relationships between smartphone use and daily functioning. Twenty-nine participants with TBI and 33 non-injured participants completed the Smartphone Survey, and measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning, mood, and community integration. Smartphone use was equally common in both groups, and patterns of app use were similar. More participants with TBI than the comparison group listed using their smartphone as a memory aid as its main benefit. Difficulty in learning how to use the smartphone was identified by participants with TBI, however only 10% had been shown how to use it by a clinician. Those with poorer subjective cognitive function used memory/organisational apps more frequently; and higher communication app use with better social integration, in participants with TBI. These findings suggest that smartphones have potential in improving independence following TBI, but receiving support in using them is vital. Implications for Rehabilitation Smartphones are accessible, acceptable, convenient devices for most individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and are perceived as a useful memory and organizational aid as well as having multiple other helpful functions. Use of communication apps such as text messages and social media is associated with better social and community integration in people with TBI. Direct instruction on how to use smartphone apps is more important for people with TBI than for non-injured individuals. Developers of apps designed for this population should prioritize ease of app use, large displays, and availability of technical support

  13. How information technology can help sustainability and aid in combating global warming[ACI SP-234-44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratova, I.L.; Goldfarb, I. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Information Technology

    2006-07-01

    This presentation addressed the need to reduce the environmental impact of concrete production. Unit based carbon dioxide emissions in cement production vary from 0.73 to 0.99 kg carbon dioxide per kg of cement. As such, annual cement manufacturing contributes significantly to global warming. The challenge facing the concrete industry regarding sustainable growth was discussed. It was suggested that sustainable development in the cement industry can be accomplished not only by making an industry wide shift to conservation of energy and materials, but by making greater use of the Internet for information technology on sustainable construction materials such as lightweight aggregates and lightweight concrete. The paper outlined the evolution of various methods of disseminating research results on the durability of concrete at the United States Army Corps of Engineers Treat Island marine exposure site. The results indicated that structural lightweight and semi-lightweight concrete provides long-term durability in a marine environment. It was noted that knowledge utilization includes technology transfer, information dissemination and utilization, research utilization, innovation, and organizational change. The paper emphasized the use of web portals as a tool for improving access to practical information on a full range of sustainable industry practices, products and resources. These tools allow side-by side comparison of testing results for different concrete mixtures and support decision-making on the choice of environmentally sound and durable concrete. The authors demonstrated by advantages of using modern information technology tools by suggesting that with the development of a full scale Portal, the Expanded Shale, Clay, and Slate Institute (ESCSI) could become a global source of credible information and expertise in the area of lightweight concrete. As such ESCSI could be in a position to influence innovation and technology transfer to the industry. The paper

  14. Blade runner. Blade server and virtualization technology can help hospitals save money--but they are far from silver bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Daphne

    2009-03-01

    Blade servers and virtualization can reduce infrastructure, maintenance, heating, electric, cooling and equipment costs. Blade server technology is evolving and some elements may become obsolete. There is very little interoperability between blades. Hospitals can virtualize 40 to 60 percent of their servers, and old servers can be reused for testing. Not all applications lend themselves to virtualization--especially those with high memory requirements. CIOs should engage their vendors in virtualization discussions.

  15. False Recognition Helps to Distinguish Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Amnestic MCI from Patients with Other Kinds of Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Haldenwanger, A.; Eling, P.A.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Two recent reviews on neuropsychological assessment argue that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deficits in delayed recall and that this allows differentiating AD from other types of dementia. We attempted to differentiate patients with AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) fro

  16. Ethical perspectives on recommending digital technology for patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Glenn, Tasha; Monteith, Scott; Bauer, Rita; Whybrow, Peter C; Geddes, John

    2017-12-01

    The digital revolution in medicine not only offers exciting new directions for the treatment of mental illness, but also presents challenges to patient privacy and security. Changes in medicine are part of the complex digital economy based on creating value from analysis of behavioral data acquired by the tracking of daily digital activities. Without an understanding of the digital economy, recommending the use of technology to patients with mental illness can inadvertently lead to harm. Behavioral data are sold in the secondary data market, combined with other data from many sources, and used in algorithms that automatically classify people. These classifications are used in commerce and government, may be discriminatory, and result in non-medical harm to patients with mental illness. There is also potential for medical harm related to poor quality online information, self-diagnosis and self-treatment, passive monitoring, and the use of unvalidated smartphone apps. The goal of this paper is to increase awareness and foster discussion of the new ethical issues. To maximize the potential of technology to help patients with mental illness, physicians need education about the digital economy, and patients need help understanding the appropriate use and limitations of online websites and smartphone apps.

  17. Cloud computing and patient engagement: leveraging available technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblin, Alice; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Servan, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technology has the potential to transform medical practices and improve patient engagement and quality of care. However, issues such as privacy and security and "fit" can make incorporation of the cloud an intimidating decision for many physicians. This article summarizes the four most common types of clouds and discusses their ideal uses, how they engage patients, and how they improve the quality of care offered. This technology also can be used to meet Meaningful Use requirements 1 and 2; and, if speculation is correct, the cloud will provide the necessary support needed for Meaningful Use 3 as well.

  18. INTERBED: internet-based guided self-help for overweight and obese patients with full or subsyndromal binge eating disorder. A multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Zwaan Martina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Binge eating disorder (BED is a prevalent clinical eating disorder associated with increased psychopathology, psychiatric comorbidity, overweight and obesity, and increased health care costs. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, a few randomized controlled trials (RCTs have suggested efficacy of book-based self-help interventions in the treatment of this disorder. However, evidence from larger RCTs is needed. Delivery of self-help through new technologies such as the internet should be investigated in particular, as these approaches have the potential to be more interactive and thus more attractive to patients than book-based approaches. This study will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-based guided self-help program (GSH-I and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT, which has been proven in several studies to be the gold standard treatment for BED, in a prospective multicenter randomized trial. Methods The study assumes the noninferiority of GSH-I compared to CBT. Both treatments lasted 4 months, and maintenance of outcome will be assessed 6 and 18 months after the end of treatment. A total of 175 patients with BED and a body mass index between 27 and 40 kg/m2 were randomized at 7 centers in Germany and Switzerland. A 20% attrition rate was assumed. As in most BED treatment trials, the difference in the number of binge eating days over the past 28 days is the primary outcome variable. Secondary outcome measures include the specific eating disorder psychopathology, general psychopathology, body weight, quality of life, and self-esteem. Predictors and moderators of treatment outcome will be determined, and the cost-effectiveness of both treatment conditions will be evaluated. Results The methodology for the INTERBED study has been detailed. Conclusions Although there is evidence that CBT is the first-line treatment for BED, it is not widely available. As BED is still a recent diagnostic category, many cases likely remain

  19. High-tech cargo : logistics technologies are evolving to help improve efficiencies in moving oil and gas equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stastny, P.

    2007-10-15

    Like electronic data interchange (EDI), radio frequency identification (RFID) is a logistics tool developed to aid companies in managing their assets efficiently. RFID is used by companies improve shipment tracking, as well as to improve supply chain efficiencies. The technology uses tiny devices called RFID tags or transponders encoded with specific data about shipments. The tag emits a signal that is read by remote control as it passes through a warehouse gate. While RFID is currently used for pallets, it is hoped that the technology will soon be used for individual objects. Web-based systems are now being used to directly trace and monitor shipments as well as to identify potential delays. Schenker International has recently introduced a transportation management system (TMS) for oil and gas clients. The system is a website that manages shipments from purchase order to site delivery, and functions as a forum for all parties to each shipment. It was concluded that use of the TMS allows oil and gas operators to improve planning efficiencies. 1 fig.

  20. Empowering Patients through Healthcare Technology and Information? The Challenge of becoming a Patient 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In the mid-2000s, the term Patient 2.0 began to be used to denote a new patient role: empowered patients were expected to engage with various types of information and specific technologies in order to manage their own illnesses. Headlines such as Future patients will take care of themse......Abstract: In the mid-2000s, the term Patient 2.0 began to be used to denote a new patient role: empowered patients were expected to engage with various types of information and specific technologies in order to manage their own illnesses. Headlines such as Future patients will take care......), and domestication (Silverstone, 1989; Lie and S Keywords: patient empowerment; Patient 2.0; self-management; future healthcare system; change in healthcare practices; chronic/treated challenges...

  1. Persuasive Interventions for Controversial Cancer Screening Recommendations: Testing a Novel Approach to Help Patients Make Evidence-Based Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Barry G; Mazor, Kathleen M; Luckmann, Roger; Cutrona, Sarah L; Hayes, Marcela; Gorodetsky, Tatyana; Esparza, Nancy; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate novel decision aids designed to help patients trust and accept the controversial, evidence-based, US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations about prostate cancer screening (from 2012) and mammography screening for women aged 40 to 49 years (from 2009). We created recorded vignettes of physician-patient discussions about prostate cancer screening and mammography, accompanied by illustrative slides, based on principles derived from preceding qualitative work and behavioral science literature. We conducted a randomized crossover study with repeated measures with 27 men aged 50 to 74 years and 35 women aged 40 to 49 years. All participants saw a video intervention and a more traditional, paper-based decision aid intervention in random order. At entry and after seeing each intervention, they were surveyed about screening intentions, perceptions of benefits and harm, and decisional conflict. Changes in screening intentions were analyzed without regard to order of intervention after an initial analyses showed no evidence of an order effect. At baseline, 69% of men and 86% of women reported wanting screening, with 31% and 6%, respectively, unsure. Mean change on a 3-point, yes, unsure, no scale was -0.93 (P = <.001) for men and -0.50 (P = <.001) for women after seeing the video interventions vs 0.0 and -0.06 (P = .75) after seeing the print interventions. At the study end, 33% of men and 49% of women wanted screening, and 11% and 20%, respectively, were unsure. Our novel, persuasive video interventions significantly changed the screening intentions of substantial proportions of viewers. Our approach needs further testing but may provide a model for helping patients to consider and accept evidence-based, counterintuitive recommendations. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  2. Clinical Effectiveness Of Dynamic Out-Patient Control Technology Over Hypertensive Patients Based On Computer System And Mobile Phone Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Posnenkova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new follow-up technology of dynamic out-patient control based on system of mobile monitoring of patients with arterial hypertension (SMMAH has been created in Saratov Scientific Research Institute of Cardiology. SMMAH is based on exchange of information between patient and doctor with the help of Internet and standard short mobile messages. The aim of the present work is to study the effectiveness of SMMAH for follow-up control of hypertensive patients for the period of 12 months. 79 patients with hypertension aged 49±11 were included in the investigation. Control period lasted 12 months. Control visits were made in the 1st, 6th and 12th months. The number of patients became out of control, its causes, percentage of patients who achieved and maintained target blood pressure (BP were analyzed after each visit. Data were presented as M (95% confidence interval. As a result in 1 month period of investigation 88,6% of patients regularly used mobile messages, 11% of patients were out of control. In 6 months period 68,4% of participants were under control, 31,6% of patients dropped out. In 12 months period — 67% and 33% of patients accordingly. Target BP was maintained in 87% (77%-96% of patients in 1 month period, in 78% (66%-90% of patients in 6 months period and in 68% of patients (53%-84% in 12 months period. High clinical effectiveness of SMMAH has been proved during the study: 67% of patients have followed prescribed therapy after the investigation period and 68% of them have maintained target BP level.

  3. Implementation and sustainability of a global ICT company's programme to help teachers integrate technology into learning and teaching in Germany, France and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Arati

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the implementation of the professional development programme ‘‘Intel† Teach'' in Germany, the UK and France, as a publicprivate partnership. The programme is designed to help school teachers to effectively integrate technology into learning and teaching and to help students develop key ‘‘twenty-first century skills''. The implementation of the programme, which has so far involved over 400,000 teachers spread across the three countries since 2004, followed different models in the three countries, as a result of differing national education policies, systems and needs. Data from the external evaluation of the programme in Germany are used to examine the factors on a systemic level, which affected the implementation, effectiveness and sustainability of the programme. These factors are grouped into three categories: (1 concept transfer, (2 experience transfer and (3 establishing standards.

  4. Development of sterilized porridge for patients by combined treatment of food technology with radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaehun; Choi, Jongil; Song, Beomseok; and others

    2010-09-15

    This research was conducted to develop patient foods of high quality using a radiation fusion technology with food processing. Radiation technique to increase calorie of porridge was established, and it was investigated that radiation effects on functional materials, which can could be added to increase functionality of patient foods. Moreover, sterilized semi-fluid meal (milk porridge) for patients with higher calorie was developed by a sterilization process by gamma irradiation, combined treatments to improve the sensory qualities, and fortification with various nutrients. Also, sensory survey on irradiated commercial patient foods was performed to find the problems and improvement points of the developed products. Optimal packaging material was selected by evaluation of effect of irradiation in packaging materials and a convenient package for consuming by patients was decided. Safety of the irradiated milk porridge was confirmed by in-vivo genotoxicological test, and its nutritional composition for patients was evaluated by nutritional analysis. Finally, the milk porridge was developed as liquid, dried, powdered, and pellet type products. This research may contribute to improve life quality of patients by supplement of various foods with high quality to immuno-compromised patients. Furthermore, economic profits and technological advances are expected by commercialization of the patient foods.

  5. Information on video format can help patients with localised prostate cancer to be partners in decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Sandra

    2003-03-01

    A video was produced to inform men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer of the different management options for their disease. It was tested for increased knowledge and understanding on a healthy population of similar age (n=10), who were assessed before and after watching the video (20 interviews). The video was then shown to 12 men who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer but had not started any treatment for their disease (24 interviews). Interviews among the healthy cohort revealed not only the lack of knowledge of anatomy and physiology but also the way in which these men used past experiences to help explain and remember complex medical procedures. The patients focused on the treatments and outcomes, remembering less of the technicalities. All men interviewed vividly remembered the patients participating in the video; they drew inferences and developed affinity towards specific individuals. Both groups felt that video provided information in a user friendly way. Although remembering few anatomical terms all participants described a visual image that led to a perception of understanding rather than a definitive increase in knowledge. Patients, however, felt they had a clearer understanding of the disease and its treatment, and therefore better able to be active informed partners in the decision-making process.

  6. Public Interest in Medical Research Participation: Does It Matter if Patients or Community Members Have Helped Design the Study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Enesha M; Gebremariam, Achamyeleh; Singer, Dianne; Davis, Matthew M

    2015-10-01

    We determined national levels of public participation in medical research study design. We compared public interest in medical research participation (MRP) in studies overall, versus studies explicitly designed with public involvement. Cross-sectional household survey of US population in June 2013. Descriptive statistics estimated participation in medical research study design. Chi-square test compared levels of interest in MRP if respondent knew patients or community members helped design the study. Of 2,048 respondents (participation rate 60%), 5% knew someone who had helped design a medical research study. There was no association between having known someone or personal participation in study design and willingness to engage in MRP. Although the overall proportion of respondents who would consider MRP initially (51%) was similar to the proportion who would consider MRP with community member involvement in study design (49%), the changes in respondents' views across the different scenarios were significantly greater than what would have been expected by chance. We found similar levels of interest in MRP whether or not the public is involved in medical research study design. This finding may indicate that public involvement in study design, like community-based participatory research, may not affect overall rates of MRP. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic Determinants of Parkinson's Disease: Can They Help to Stratify the Patients Based on the Underlying Molecular Defect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redenšek, Sara; Trošt, Maja; Dolžan, Vita

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a sporadic progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder with a relatively strong genetic background. We have reviewed the current literature about the genetic factors that could be indicative of pathophysiological pathways of PD and their applications in everyday clinical practice. Information on novel risk genes is coming from several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and their meta-analyses. GWASs that have been performed so far enabled the identification of 24 loci as PD risk factors. These loci take part in numerous cellular processes that may contribute to PD pathology: protein aggregation, protein, and membrane trafficking, lysosomal autophagy, immune response, synaptic function, endocytosis, inflammation, and metabolic pathways are among the most important ones. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms are usually located in the non-coding regions and their functionality remains to be determined, although they presumably influence gene expression. It is important to be aware of a very low contribution of a single genetic risk factor to PD development; therefore, novel prognostic indices need to account for the cumulative nature of genetic risk factors. A better understanding of PD pathophysiology and its genetic background will help to elucidate the underlying pathological processes. Such knowledge may help physicians to recognize subjects with the highest risk for the development of PD, and provide an opportunity for the identification of novel potential targets for neuroprotective treatment. Moreover, it may enable stratification of the PD patients according to their genetic fingerprint to properly personalize their treatment as well as supportive measures.

  8. A proposed solution for addressing the challenge of patient cries for help through an analysis of unsolicited electronic mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, D M; D'Alessandro, M P; Colbert, S I

    2000-06-01

    Unsolicited electronic mail (e-mail) is e-mail sent to a physician from a person unknown to the physician, who is seeking professional help. The purpose of this project was to analyze unsolicited e-mails sent to a digital textbook author to: 1) characterize the e-mails, 2) determine what resources would be necessary to answer the e-mails, and 3) propose a standard approach to reply to e-mails in a helpful yet medicolegally-responsive manner. All e-mails (315) sent to a digital textbook author from October 1995 through October 1998 were abstracted. Variables included: date and location, sender type, patient age, subject, medical content, and resources necessary to answer the question. Data frequencies were obtained. The most common location was the.com domain (47.6%). The most common senders were laypersons (66%). Overall, 44.4% of the e-mails concerned children. Detailed, patient-specific information was sent in 63.2% of the e-mails. The most common subjects were overviews of a disease or problem (32.4%), differential diagnosis (16.8%), and therapy/treatment questions (15.9%). The medical content covered a broad range of specialties. Specialists were overwhelmingly the resource necessary to answer the e-mails (74.9%). Pediatricians with educational information on the Internet can expect an increase in the number of unsolicited e-mails as Internet usage expands. Laypersons regard even short passages to mean the author is an expert in that particular area. Pediatricians need to consider the ethical and medicolegal implications of responding to unsolicited e-mails. A nonpersonalized, standard e-mail reply is proposed that directs the sender to quality information resources that may be of further assistance. unsolicited electronic mail, e-mail, medical informatics, legal issues, ethical issues, digital libraries.

  9. Ethics and technology transfer: patients, patents, and public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Deborah

    2011-06-01

    Universities and academic medical centers have been increasing their focus on technology transfer and research commercialization. With this shift in focus, academic-industry ties have become prevalent. These relationships can benefit academic researchers and help then to transform their research into tangible societal benefits. However, there also are concerns that these ties and the greater academic focus on commercialization might lead to conflicts of interest, especially financial conflicts of interest. This paper briefly explores some of these conflicts of interest, particularly relating to research and training. This paper also discusses some of the policies that have been, and are being, developed to try to mitigate and manage these conflicts so that academic involvement in technology transfer and commercialization can continue without jeopardizing academic work or the public's trust in them.

  10. Multimodal Guided Self-Help Exercise Program to Prevent Speech, Swallowing, and Shoulder Problems Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients : A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C.; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Aalders, IJke J.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; de Bree, Remco; Doornaert, Patricia; Rietveld, Derek H. F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Witte, Birgit I.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: During a 6-week course of (chemo) radiation many head and neck cancer patients have to endure radiotherapy-induced toxicity, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Pretreatment counseling combined with self-help exercises could be provided to inform patients and possibly prevent

  11. Multimodal Guided Self-Help Exercise Program to Prevent Speech, Swallowing, and Shoulder Problems Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients : A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C.; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Aalders, IJke J.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; de Bree, Remco; Doornaert, Patricia; Rietveld, Derek H. F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Witte, Birgit I.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: During a 6-week course of (chemo) radiation many head and neck cancer patients have to endure radiotherapy-induced toxicity, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Pretreatment counseling combined with self-help exercises could be provided to inform patients and possibly prevent

  12. Use of Multimedia Technology in the Doctor-Patient Relationship for Obtaining Patient Informed Consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Andrzej; Stopa, Marcin; Miśkowiak, Bogdan

    2016-10-26

    Patient informed consent for surgery or for high-risk methods of treatment or diagnosis means that unlawful breach of the patient's personal interests is avoided and the patient accepts the risk of surgery and takes the brunt of it. Patient awareness - their knowledge of the condition and circumstances of continued therapeutic procedure, including offered and available methods of treatment and their possible complications - constitutes a particular aspect of the informed-consent process. The rapid development of technologies and methods of treatment may cause communication problems between the doctor and the patient regarding the scope and method of patient education prior to surgery. The use of multimedia technology (e.g., videos of surgical procedures, computer animation, and graphics), in addition to media used in preoperative patient education, may be a factor in improving the quality of the informed consent process. Studies conducted in clinical centers show that with use of multimedia technology, patients remember more of the information presented. The use of new technology also makes it possible to reduce the difference in the amount of information assimilated by patients with different levels of education. The use of media is a way to improve the quality of preoperative patient education and, at the same time, a step towards their further empowerment in the healing process.

  13. How CAGE, RAPS4QF and AUDIT can help practitioners for patients admitted with acute alcohol intoxication in emergency departments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eBrousse

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To help clinicians to identify the severity of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD from optimal thresholds found for recommended scales. Especially, taking account of the high prevalence of alcohol dependence among patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED for acute alcohol intoxication (AAI, we propose to define thresholds of severity of dependence based on the AUDIT score.Methods: All patients admitted to the ED with AAI (blood alcohol level >0.8g/L, in a two-month period, were assessed using the CAGE, RAPS-QF and AUDIT, with the alcohol dependence/abuse section of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI used as the gold standard. To explore the relation between the AUDIT and the MINI the sum of the positive items on the MINI (dependence as a quantitative variable and as an ordinal parameter were analyzed. From the threshold score (TS found for each scale we proposed intervals of severity of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs. Results: The mean age of the sample (122 males, 42 females was 46 years. Approximately 12 % of the patients were identified with alcohol abuse and 78 % with dependence (DSM-IV. Cut points were determined for the AUDIT in order to distinguish mild and moderate dependence from severe dependence. A strategy of intervention based on levels of severity of AUD was proposed. Conclusion: Different thresholds proposed for the CAGE, RAPS4-QF and AUDIT could be used to guide the choice of intervention for a patient: brief intervention, brief negotiation interviewing or longer more intensive motivational intervention.

  14. Touch and technology: Two paradigms of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, S

    1984-03-01

    Technology violates human dignity only to the extent that its use reduces persons to the moral status of objects. The prevalence of technology in health care is an extension of the scientific paradigm, in which the body is reduced to an object void of subjectivity. The empathie paradigm, in contrast, is based upon the moral primacy of subjectivity. Empathic touch-as distinct from instrumental and philanthropic touch-establishes a clinical relation of intersubjectivity, affirming in patients the dignity and worth that morally distinguish persons from objects.

  15. Heart Failure Patients' Perceptions and Use of Technology to Manage Disease Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Amanda K.; Dodd, Virginia; Harris, Amy; McArthur, Kara; Dacso, Clifford; Colton, Lara M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Technology use for symptom management is beneficial for both patients and physicians. Widespread acceptance of technology use in healthcare fuels continued development of technology with ever-increasing sophistication. Although acceptance of technology use in healthcare by medical professionals is evident, less is known about the perceptions, preferences, and use of technology by heart failure (HF) patients. This study explores patients' perceptions and current use of technolog...

  16. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work....... explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed...

  17. USE OF TECHNOLOGIES OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE MICROSURGERY IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH WRIST PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Kutyanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the results of treatment of 44 patients with injuries and tumors of wrist. The main aims of microsurgical interventions in such patients were replacement of bone defects (40,9%, replacement of skin defects (25,0%, and also elimination of contractures of wrist joint and fingers (20,5%. At the same time high frequency of use of bony flaps was caused mostly not by the need in replacement of defects of bones, but by the need in stabilization of wrist joint aiming to create the conditions for normal function of fingers. It has been stated that the use of technologies of plastic and reconstructive microsurgery in patients with wrist pathology is not the main factor determing the good result of treatment. The good result of treatment is mainly determined by the condition of fingers, not only appropriate surgical treatment but also adequate rehabilitation helps them achieve their necessary function.

  18. Help LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Carreras,R; Lehmann,P

    1988-01-01

    première partie: Help LEP ou le tunnel de l'infini- pièce radiophonique intéréssant sur l'origine de la matière deuxième partie: Help LEP débat; suite à cette pièce interview avec 3 physiciens du Cern sur le projet LEP et le but du Cern qui est la recherche fondamentale

  19. Improving patient access to novel medical technologies in Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, Peter

    2012-02-03

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) organized a one-day workshop with clinicians, health economic experts, and health technology appraisal experts to discuss the equity of patient access to novel medical technologies in Europe. Two index technologies were considered: implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and drug-eluting stents (DES). The use of ICDs range from 35 implants\\/million population in Portugal to 166 implants\\/million population in Germany, whereas for implants of DES (as percentage of total stents) it is lowest in Germany at 14% and high in Portugal at 65%. These differences can in part be explained by a lack of structured implementation of guidelines, the direct cost in relation to the overall healthcare budget, and to differences in procedures and models applied by Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies in Europe. The workshop participants concluded that physicians need to be involved in a more structured way in HTA and need to become better acquainted with its methods and terminology. Clinical guidelines should be systematically translated, explained, disseminated, updated, and adopted by cardiologists in Europe. Clinically appropriate, consistent and transparent health economic models need to be developed and high-quality international outcome and cost data should be used. A process for funding of a technology should be developed after a positive recommendation from HTA agencies. Both the ESC and the national cardiac societies should build-up health economic expertise and engage more actively in discussions with stakeholders involved in the provision of healthcare.

  20. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approache......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work.......The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed...

  1. Shared networks of interpreter services, at relatively low cost, can help providers serve patients with limited english skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Leos, Ginelle Sanchez; Rathouz, Paul J; Fu, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Language barriers in health care-a large and growing problem in the United States-contribute to disparities in health care quality and outcomes in populations with limited English proficiency. Providing access to adequate interpreter services has been shown to reduce health disparities in these populations. However, many health care organizations do not provide such services because of the perceived high cost. In this observational study we calculated the costs incurred by a group of California public hospitals that formed a network to make trained interpreters available via videoconference and telephone. We found that encounters in this network where interpreters helped patients and providers communicate lasted an average of 10.6 minutes and cost an average of $24.86 per encounter. Such costs should be weighed against the likely alternatives, such as the opportunity costs of having other hospital staff act as ad hoc interpreters; medical errors that could result from inadequate interpretation; and the fact that not providing such services may leave providers out of compliance with federal law. We also discuss ways in which providers could be compensated for providing interpreter services.

  2. Enhancing Lay Counselor Capacity to Improve Patient Outcomes with Multimedia Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Reuben N; Mellins, Claude A; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Abrams, Elaine J; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J; Remien, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Multimedia technologies offer powerful tools to increase capacity of health workers to deliver standardized, effective, and engaging antiretroviral medication adherence counseling. Masivukeni-is an innovative multimedia-based, computer-driven, lay counselor-delivered intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve optimal adherence. This pilot study examined medication adherence and key psychosocial outcomes among 55 non-adherent South African HIV+ patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least 6 months, who were randomized to receive either Masivukeni or standard of care (SOC) counseling for ART non-adherence. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the SOC and Masivukeni groups on any outcome variables. At post-intervention (approximately 5-6 weeks after baseline), -clinic-based pill count adherence data available for 20 participants (10 per intervention arm) showed a 10 % improvement for-participants and a decrease of 8 % for SOC participants. Masivukeni participants reported significantly more positive attitudes towards disclosure and medication social support, less social rejection, and better clinic-patient relationships than did SOC participants. Masivukeni shows promise to promote optimal adherence and provides preliminary evidence that multimedia, computer-based technology can help lay counselors offer better adherence counseling than standard approaches.

  3. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om Prakash; Mekonnen, Dawit; Malarvili, M B

    2015-01-01

    This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620) followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741). Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet.

  4. Series: Clinical Epidemiology in South Africa. Paper 3: Logic models help make sense of complexity in systematic reviews and health technology assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Anke; Pfadenhauer, Lisa; Burns, Jacob; Brereton, Louise; Gerhardus, Ansgar; Booth, Andrew; Oortwijn, Wija; Rehfuess, Eva

    2017-03-01

    To describe the development and application of logic model templates for systematic reviews and health technology assessments (HTAs) of complex interventions. This study demonstrates the development of a method to conceptualize complexity and make underlying assumptions transparent. Examples from systematic reviews with specific relevance to Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and other low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) illustrate its usefulness. Two distinct templates are presented: the system-based logic model, describing the system in which the interaction between participants, intervention, and context takes place; and the process-orientated logic model, which displays the processes and causal pathways that lead from the intervention to multiple outcomes. Logic models can help authors of systematic reviews and HTAs to explicitly address and make sense of complexity, adding value by achieving a better understanding of the interactions between the intervention, its implementation, and its multiple outcomes among a given population and context. They thus have the potential to help build systematic review capacity-in SSA and other LMICs-at an individual level, by equipping authors with a tool that facilitates the review process; and at a system-level, by improving communication between producers and potential users of research evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lymphopenia-induced proliferation in aire-deficient mice helps to explain their autoimmunity and differences from human patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt; Laan, Martti

    2014-01-01

    Studies on autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) and its mouse model - both caused by mutant AIRE - have greatly advanced the understanding of thymic processes that generate a self-tolerant T-cell repertoire. Much is now known about the molecular mechanisms by which AIRE induces tissue-specific antigen expression in thymic epithelium, and how this leads to negative selection of auto-reactive thymocytes. However, we still do not understand the processes that lead to the activation of any infrequent naïve auto-reactive T-cells exported by AIRE-deficient thymi. Also, the striking phenotypic differences between APECED and its mouse models have puzzled researchers for years. The aim of this review is to suggest explanations for some of these unanswered questions, based on a fresh view of published experiments. We review evidence that auto-reactive T-cells can be activated by the prolonged neonatal lymphopenia that naturally develops in young Aire-deficient mice due to delayed export of mature thymocytes. Lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) helps to fill the empty space; by favoring auto-reactive T-cells, it also leads to lymphocyte infiltration in the same tissues as in day 3 thymectomized animals. The LIP becomes uncontrolled when loss of Aire is combined with defects in genes responsible for anergy induction and Treg responsiveness, or in signaling from the T-cell receptor and homeostatic cytokines. In APECED patients, LIP is much less likely to be involved in activation of naïve auto-reactive T-cells, as humans are born with a more mature immune system than in neonatal mice. We suggest that human AIRE-deficiency presents with different phenotypes because of additional precipitating factors that compound the defective negative selection of potentially autoaggressive tissue-specific thymocytes.

  6. [Prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with parodontitis based upon the use of 3D-technologies--clinical case example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riakhovskiĭ, A N

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case of prosthetic rehabilitation of patient (female) with generalized parodontitis complicated by defects and deformations of dentitions was offered. Using 3D-technologies position of teeth was corrected with the help of a series of temporary transparent splints-modifiers with subsequent guy splintage and esthetic 3D-planning of front teeth forms. Teeth forms correction was made by composite using preliminary prepared templet.

  7. [Supervised administration of Alzheimer's patients using information communication technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yasuha; Sakata, Yoshifumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Uemura, Kengo; Kihara, Takeshi; Kimura, Toru; Ino, Masashi; Tsuji, Teruyuki; Hayashi, Michiyuki; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2014-12-01

    Drug adherence is central to the treatment of dementia, which might reduce compliance due to memory loss, particularly among home-based patients with dementia. In order to improve drug adherence, we suggest the efficient and effective supervised administration by use of information communication technology(ICT). ICT makes face-to-face real-time communication possible, and it also enables picture sharing. Therefore, it might be useful to apply ICT to controlling and supervising medication for patients with dementia to improve drug adherence. Accordingly, we enrolled patients who were supposed to take a newly prescribed anti-dementia patch containing the choline esterase inhibitor rivastigmine(Rivastach®)and investigated the effect of ICT-based intervention for drug adherence, emotional change, and cognitive change, utilizing Skype, a free communication software program. Scheduled Skype interventions increased drug adherence ratio, levels of subjective satisfaction, and instrumental activities of daily living(IADL). Furthermore, we can provide patients and their caregivers with a feeling of safety through regular bidirectional communication, as patients can easily consult medical staff regarding the adverse effects of newly prescribed drugs. Instead of frequent visits to their primary physicians, ICT-based communications can be used as a substitute for supervision of medication, given the availability of the telecommunication system. By directly connecting the medical institution to the home, we expect that this ICT-based system will expand into the geriatric care field, including the care of elderly individuals living alone.

  8. Patients welcome the Sickle Cell Disease Mobile Application to Record Symptoms via Technology (SMART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmish; Jonassaint, Jude; De Castro, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones among patients provides a unique opportunity for the development of mobile health intervention designed specifically for sickle cell disease, which will improve self-management as well as health care delivery. Our objective was to determine the receptiveness of patients with sickle cell disease to technology and a mobile application (app) designed for sickle cell disease. Phase I included 100 patients who completed a survey inquiring about receptiveness to technology and use of mobile devices to self-manage and communicate with providers. Phase II surveyed 17 additional patients who tested a newly developed sickle cell disease app, to report its usability and utility. In Phase I, on a 0-10 Likert scale where 0 is not comfortable, and 10 is extremely comfortable, 87.0% of participants reported >5 comfort level using a mobile device for health care management. Participants were comfortable with texting (81.0%) and emailing (77.0%) but not with social media (40.0%). Most participants (84.0%) owned computer devices (desktops, laptops, tablets, or iPads), and 92.0% owned mobile devices. In Phase II, participants reported that the app tested was useful to track pain (88.0%), and 94.0% reported that it was easy to use, practical, and useful for health self-management. All reported that the app was useful to help one communicate with providers. Following the use of our app, patients found it an extremely valuable tool for tracking pain, health management, and communicating with providers. We conclude that mobile technology might provide an appropriate venue for sickle cell disease healthcare management.

  9. Toward an agent-based patient-physician model for the adoption of continuous glucose monitoring technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verella, J Tipan; Patek, Stephen D

    2009-03-01

    Health care is a major component of the U.S. economy, and tremendous research and development efforts are directed toward new technologies in this arena. Unfortunately few tools exist for predicting outcomes associated with new medical products, including whether new technologies will find widespread use within the target population. Questions of technology adoption are rife within the diabetes technology community, and we particularly consider the long-term prognosis for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology. We present an approach to the design and analysis of an agent model that describes the process of CGM adoption among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), their physicians, and related stakeholders. We particularly focus on patient-physician interactions, with patients discovering CGM technology through word-of-mouth communication and through advertising, applying pressure to their physicians in the context of CGM device adoption, and physicians, concerned about liability, looking to peers for a general level of acceptance of the technology before recommending CGM to their patients. Repeated simulation trials of the agent-based model show that the adoption process reflects the heterogeneity of the adopting community. We also find that the effect of the interaction between patients and physicians is agents. Each physician, say colored by the nature of the environment as defined by the model parameters. We find that, by being able to represent the diverse perspectives of different types of stakeholders, agent-based models can offer useful insights into the adoption process. Models of this sort may eventually prove to be useful in helping physicians, other health care providers, patient advocacy groups, third party payers, and device manufacturers understand the impact of their decisions about new technologies.

  10. Transforming Patient Care in Adventist Health (West) Through Use of Information Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, Wynelle J.; Bancarz, Gloria P.

    2009-07-01

    In 2002, Adventist Health(West) embarked upon a major project to better serve its communities by enhancing the safety, quality and clinical outcomes of the patients served by its 20 hospitals, i.e. the transformation of patient care through the use of information technology. The project is the implementation of the Cerner Millenium clinical information system (CIS) entitled Project IntelliCare. Budgeted allocations will go toward the training of 'super users' in 5-7 California Sites scheduled for installation and go-live of Phases I and II in 2005 and early 2006. Numerous super users in each hospital must be educated to provide support for every shift, every unit/department throughout the hospital. The hospitals experience significant costs associated with training these super users to thoroughly understand the CIS software, to train clinical users, to support the 'go-live' installations, and be there as a 'cheerleader to encourage and support all clinical users, and most importantly help guide users to transform their work processes using this information technology to provide the safest, highest quality care possible. Indeed, super users are critical to the success of Project IntelliCare. The 'super users' contributed significantly to the success of the 'go-live' impementations as well as ongoing support. Care has been transformed through clinicians use of information technology.

  11. Help Others,Help Me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    WHEN they first came to Xingcheng, Huang Jing and her husband Ma Shiyu didn’t come to help others. They came to seek their own fortune in this small, ancient coastal town where they saw prospects of prosperity. So when the couple decided to move to Xingcheng, they didn’t know their coming would be a turning point for many locals. too.

  12. Help Us to Help Ourselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Local authorities have a strong tradition of supporting communities to help themselves, and this is nowhere better illustrated than in the learning they commission and deliver through the Adult Safeguarded Learning budget. The budget was set up to protect at least a minimum of provision for adult liberal education, family learning and learning for…

  13. Patient innovation: an analysis of patients' designs of digital technology support for everyday living with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille; Nohr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify characteristics of patients' contributions to innovation in health information technology (HIT). The paper outlines a theoretical definition of patient innovation and presents an analysis of four digital prototypes and 22 low-fidelity mock-ups designed by people affected by the chronic illness diabetes mellitus. Seventeen families (a total of 60 people) with one or more diabetic family members participated in design activities in a four-year research project focused on the design of digital support for everyday living with diabetes. Our analysis documented the originality of the analysed patient designs and identified three characteristics of patients' designs: socio-technical networks, objects with associated personal meanings and technology supporting the expression of identity. The paper concludes that patient innovation is defined by what is perceived as new by patients and/or others within the social system of adaptation. The analysed patient designs are original (as distinct from replications of or improvements on known products), and their characteristics are innovative contributions to the social system of everyday living with diabetes (i.e. they are perceived as new to the patients in the research study). The results of the analysis contribute to the credentials of patients as key actors in HIT innovation and call for participatory approaches in health informatics.

  14. Remote Patient Monitoring via Non-Invasive Digital Technologies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Melody; Angelaccio, Michele; Arcona, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: We conducted a systematic literature review to identify key trends associated with remote patient monitoring (RPM) via noninvasive digital technologies over the last decade. Materials and Methods: A search was conducted in EMBASE and Ovid MEDLINE. Citations were screened for relevance against predefined selection criteria based on the PICOTS (Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes, Timeframe, and Study Design) format. We included studies published between January 1, 2005 and September 15, 2015 that used RPM via noninvasive digital technology (smartphones/personal digital assistants [PDAs], wearables, biosensors, computerized systems, or multiple components of the formerly mentioned) in evaluating health outcomes compared to standard of care or another technology. Studies were quality appraised according to Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Results: Of 347 articles identified, 62 met the selection criteria. Most studies were randomized control trials with older adult populations, small sample sizes, and limited follow-up. There was a trend toward multicomponent interventions (n = 26), followed by smartphones/PDAs (n = 12), wearables (n = 11), biosensor devices (n = 7), and computerized systems (n = 6). Another key trend was the monitoring of chronic conditions, including respiratory (23%), weight management (17%), metabolic (18%), and cardiovascular diseases (16%). Although substantial diversity in health-related outcomes was noted, studies predominantly reported positive findings. Conclusions: This review will help decision makers develop a better understanding of the current landscape of peer-reviewed literature, demonstrating the utility of noninvasive RPM in various patient populations. Future research is needed to determine the effectiveness of RPM via noninvasive digital technologies in delivering patient healthcare benefits and the feasibility of large-scale implementation. PMID:27116181

  15. Creating a testing field where delta technology and water innovations are tested and demonstrated with the help of citizen science methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sandra; Rutten, Martine; de Vries, Liselotte; Anema, Kim; Klop, Tanja; Kaspersma, Judith

    2017-04-01

    In highly populated deltas, much work is to be done. Complex problems ask for new and knowledge driven solutions. Innovations in delta technology and water can bring relief to managing the water rich urban areas. Testing fields form a fundamental part of the knowledge valorisation for such innovations. In such testing fields, product development by start-ups is coupled with researchers, thus supplying new scientific insights. With the help of tests, demonstrations and large-scale applications by the end-users, these innovations find their way to the daily practices of delta management. More and more cities embrace the concept of Smart Cities to tackle the ongoing complexity of urban problems and to manage the city's assets - such as its water supply networks and other water management infrastructure. Through the use of new technologies and innovative systems, data are collected from and with citizens and devices - then processed and analysed. The information and knowledge gathered are keys to enabling a better quality of life. By testing water innovations together with citizens in order to find solutions for water management problems, not only highly spatial amounts of data are provided by and/or about these innovations, they are also improved and demonstrated to the public. A consortium consisting of a water authority, a science centre, a valorisation program and two universities have joined forces to create a testing field for delta technology and water innovations using citizen science methods. In this testing field, the use of citizen science for water technologies is researched and validated by facilitating pilot projects. In these projects, researchers, start-ups and citizens work together to find the answer to present-day water management problems. The above mentioned testing field tests the use of crowd-sourcing data as for example hydrological model inputs, or to validate remote sensing applications, or improve water management decisions. Currently the

  16. Leveraging information technology to drive improvement in patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Mary; Pestrue, Justin; Geier, Peter; Sharp, Karen; Helder, Amy; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2010-01-01

    A healthcare organization's commitment to quality and the patient experience requires senior leader involvement in improvement strategies, and accountability for goals. Further, improvement strategies are most effective when driven by data, and in the world of patient satisfaction, evidence is growing that nurse leader rounding and discharge calls are strategic tactics that can improve patient satisfaction. This article describes how The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) leveraged health information technology (IT) to apply a data-driven strategy execution to improve the patient experience. Specifically, two IT-driven approaches were used: (1) business intelligence reporting tools were used to create a meaningful reporting system including dashboards, scorecards, and tracking reports and (2) an improvement plan was implemented that focused on two high-impact tactics and data to hardwire accountability. Targeted information from the IT systems enabled clinicians and administrators to execute these strategic tactics, and senior leaders to monitor achievement of strategic goals. As a result, OSUMC's inpatient satisfaction scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey improved from 56% nines and tens in 2006 to 71% in 2009.

  17. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  18. Development and application of the informational and communication technologies in quality standards of health care management for patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smііanov, V; Smiianova, O; Tarasenko, S

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health technologies improve the quality of health care service. The information and communication technology is developed and applied to remind patients with arterial hypertension to follow medical recommendations. The feedback system from general practitioners was developed (the reminder system for patients sending the feedbacks). It helped to supervise follow-up patients online. Suggested system provides for forming the database for summarized analysis of online survey of the patients, who receive medical care at health care institution, to take managerial decisions concerning the improvements of medical services quality. Evaluation of efficiency of the applied technology assured that the number of patients, who checked regularly his/her arterial pressure, increased by 31.00%. The number of patients, who visited doctors for preventive purpose two or more times during given year, rose by 18.24%. The number of patients with target pressure grew by 24.51% and composed 38.55±4.26%.

  19. Help-seeking Behaviors Among Caregivers of Schizophrenia and other Psychotic Patients: A Hospital-based Study in Two Geographically and Culturally Distinct Indian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Kumar Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is a country of several diversities and cultures, which may influence the help-seeking behavior of mentally ill patients and families. Only a few Indian studies have focused on help seeking, especially for severe mental disorders. Objective: The study aimed to describe and compare the help-seeking behaviors among caregivers of psychotic patients visiting psychiatric clinics at two distinct cities of India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional exploratory study of key caregivers (N=50 of patients with a DSM-IV TR diagnosis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, visiting psychiatric out-patient departments of VIMHANS, New Delhi, and CIMS, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh. After due informed consent was taken, a semi-structured proforma was administered for socio-demographic profile, illness details, causative beliefs, and information on help seeking. Results: Supernatural forces were held responsible by 40% of the Bilaspur sample in contrast to 8% in New Delhi sample. Faith-healers were initial contacts for 56% and 64% of sample, respectively, at New Delhi and Bilaspur. Faith-healers followed by a psychiatrist formed the commonest pathway of care at both centers (32% and 36%, respectively. The sample at New Delhi spent significantly more money (median: $4000 vs. $10 and traveled greater distances (median: 35 km vs. 10 km for faith-healers during the course of illness. Two-thirds of sample in New Delhi and one-third at Bilaspur were aware of the nearby psychiatrist at the time of initial help seeking; however, only 28% and 12%, respectively, chose psychiatrist as an initial contact. The New Delhi sample reported a fear of medication adverse effects and stigma as perceived disadvantages of psychiatric help. The median time lost at both the centers was 1 month, with a maximum of 8.4 years in New Delhi and 4.9 years in Bilaspur. Of the total, 16% caregivers at New Delhi and 32% at Bilaspur center reported an intention to

  20. Impact, meaning and need for help and support: The experience of parents caring for children with disabilities, life-limiting/life-threatening illness or technology dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Parenting a child with complex needs or disabilities is a challenging proposition. This study, which drew upon of the experiences of the parents of 34 children (in 33 families), set out to explore the themes of impact, need for help and support and meaning/sense-making as they were related by parents. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, and an emerging theoretical framework was validated through the use of a series of mind-maps(®) which were presented to individual parents as the basis for a second round (verificational) interview. Parents were nominated into the study by health care professions who were asked to identify the subject children to one of three separate sub-groups: children with a disability; children with a life-limiting/life-threatening illness or children with a technology dependence. Comparisons were made between the three study sub-groups in order to identify areas of consistency and of inconsistency. A fourth study theme - 'battleground' emerged from entirely within the data set. Sense-making occupied a central position within the overall theoretical framework for the study and parental perception of 'battleground' presented as significant element of parental sense-making, particularly in the context of their relationships with professional staff.

  1. Robotic technologies and rehabilitation: new tools for stroke patients' therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Patrizia; Morone, Giovanni; Rosati, Giulio; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The role of robotics in poststroke patients' rehabilitation has been investigated intensively. This paper presents the state-of-the-art and the possible future role of robotics in poststroke rehabilitation, for both upper and lower limbs. We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, and PeDRO databases using as keywords "robot AND stroke AND rehabilitation." In upper limb robotic rehabilitation, training seems to improve arm function in activities of daily living. In addition, electromechanical gait training after stroke seems to be effective. It is still unclear whether robot-assisted arm training may improve muscle strength, and which electromechanical gait-training device may be the most effective for walking training implementation. In the field of robotic technologies for stroke patients' rehabilitation we identified currently relevant growing points and areas timely for developing research. Among the growing points there is the development of new easily transportable, wearable devices that could improve rehabilitation also after discharge, in an outpatient or home-based setting. For developing research, efforts are being made to establish the ideal type of treatment, the length and amount of training protocol, and the patient's characteristics to be successfully enrolled to this treatment.

  2. How trained volunteers can improve the quality of hospital care for older patients. A qualitative evaluation within the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, Bas; van der Mast, Roos; Strijbos, Marije J.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using a mixed-methods design, the added value of a trained Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) volunteer to the quality of hospital care in the Netherlands. The trained volunteers daily stimulate older patients, at risk of a delirium, to eat, to drink, and to

  3. The association between duration of untreated psychosis in first psychotic episode patients and help seeking behaviors in Jogjakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchira, Carla R.; Supriyanto, Irwan; Subandi; Soewadi; Good, Byron J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Help seeking is predictor of prognosis in the first episode of psychotic disorders. Caregivers play a key role in deciding from whom to seek help. In Indonesia, caregivers often seek help from alternative healers first and health professionals later, which is believed to result in delayed psychiatric treatment and risk for poor prognosis. This study measured the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) in a sample of 100 persons being treated for a first episode of psychosis in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. We attempted to measure and determine associations among caregivers’ explanatory models, help seeking behaviors and DUP in this sample. The data were then statistically analyzed. The DUP for this population was very short. Most caregivers were parents or spouses (72 and 12%, respectively) and at the time of being interviewed described medical explanatory models for the psychotic symptoms (60%). A majority described having visited traditional/alternative healers prior to their visit to health professionals (67%). Despite this, the DUP was not significantly different for these two groups. Thus, first resort to traditional/alternative healers did not predict prolonged DUP. Further study with a larger sample is needed to better understand the relationship between care seeking, use of alternative healers and DUP in Indonesia. PMID:27226809

  4. Examining the effect of peer helping in a coping skills intervention: a randomized controlled trial for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; Secinti, Ekin; Johns, Shelley A; O'Neil, Bert H; Helft, Paul R; Shahda, Safi; Jalal, Shadia I; Champion, Victoria L

    2017-06-10

    At the end of life, spiritual well-being is a central aspect of quality of life for many patients and their family caregivers. A prevalent spiritual value in advanced cancer patients is the need to actively give. To address this need, the current randomized trial examined whether adding a peer helping component to a coping skills intervention leads to improved meaning in life and peace for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their caregivers. Feasibility and acceptability outcomes were also assessed. Advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and caregivers (n = 50 dyads) were randomly assigned to a 5-session, telephone-based coping skills intervention or a peer helping + coping skills intervention. One or both dyad members had moderate-severe distress. Peer helping involved contributing to handouts on coping skills for other families coping with cancer. Patients and caregivers completed measures of meaning in life/peace, fatigue, psychological symptoms, coping self-efficacy, and emotional support. Patient pain and caregiver burden were also assessed. Small effects in favor of the coping skills group were found regarding meaning in life/peace at 1 and 5 weeks post-intervention. Other outcomes did not vary as a function of group assignment, with both groups showing small decreases in patient and caregiver fatigue and caregiver distress and burden. High recruitment and retention rates supported feasibility, and high participant satisfaction ratings supported acceptability. Although a telephone-based intervention is feasible and acceptable for this population, peer helping in the context of a coping skills intervention does not enhance spiritual well-being relative to coping skills alone.

  5. Possibilities of technologies that replace in-patient facilities in uroandrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Derevyanko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in improvement of medical service became invasion of stationary substitute technologies. In Stavropol since 2007 has been organized the Men, s health protection service based on Regional clinical specialized uroandrological center. In uroandrological short stay surgical department successfully provides treatment in all forms of male genital in children and adult pathology with using minimally invasive methodics in short stay conditions and absence postsurgical complications. The operation rooms are staffed with all necessary equipment for carry out activities in full volume. All patients treated in urological department had sorted by anaesthesiological and somatic criterias.The main strategical directions are male reproductive health, pediatric urology-andrology, oncouroandrology. Human resources, high technology staff and intelligent work organization are fundamental for modern stationary substitute service. Human resource conception is urologist-andrologist – urologist – surgeon with laparoscopic, transurethral, microsurgery, reconstructive and plastic technique with endocrinology and psychiatric skills.Work indicators of medical center tells about high effectiveness and possibility of release profile urological beds for “big” surgical help and transfer male genital surgery on stationary substitute technologies.

  6. [Helping reintegration of patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal diseases with decreased working ability in the National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest, Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallai, Julianna Rozália; Hunka, Aniella; Héjj, Gábor; Bálint, Géza; Poór, Gyula

    2017-04-01

    An important task of our institute is to support social reintegration: including occupational rehabilitation of patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal diseases with decreased working ability. The aim of the authors was to provide informations of their daily practice, how they perform patient education, giving information for their patients about their disease, the rehabilitation possibilities, how they support the patients with decreased working ability to take part in their own rehabilitation. Patients taking part in in-patient rehabilitation received teaching and education about their disease and rehabilitation options in groups. Patients interested in part-time jobs were individually interviewed by a 30-120 minutes talk about their educational level and training, social conditions and about the available part time jobs. The part time jobs were available with the help of the Motivation Foundation of the National Association of the Societies of Motion Disabled, and the Alfa Rehabilitation Nonprofit Rt. The data of patients receiving in-patient rehabilitation betwen the 1st of January 2009 and 31st of December 2014 were analyzed. Out of the 230 patients seeking our help for part time job, our social service could organise jobs for 180 disabled persons, all town-inhabitants, but was unsuccesful in getting jobs for patients living in villages and separated farms. Part time jobs can be organized for musculoskeletal disabled living in cities and towns. For village-dwellers there are no suitable jobs and working places. It is necessary to organize rehabilitation working possibitities for musculoskeletal disabled patients living in villages. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(17): 662-667.

  7. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620 followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741. Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet.

  8. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om Prakash; Mekonnen, Dawit; Malarvili, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620) followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741). Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet. PMID:27006940

  9. Breast cancer stories on the internet : improving search facilities to help patients find stories of similar others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overberg, Regina Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to gain insight into which search facilities for spontaneously published stories facilitate breast cancer patients in finding stories by other patients in a similar situation. According to the narrative approach, social comparison theory, and social cognitive theory

  10. Patients' perspectives on high-tech home care: a qualitative inquiry into the user-friendliness of four technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehoux Pascale

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The delivery of technology-enhanced home care is growing in most industrialized countries. The objective of our study was to document, from the patient's perspective, how the level of user-friendliness of medical technology influences its integration into the private and social lives of patients. Understanding what makes a technology user-friendly should help improve the design of home care services. Methods Four home care interventions that are frequently used and vary in their technical and clinical features were selected: Antibiotic intravenous therapy, parenteral nutrition, peritoneal dialysis and oxygen therapy. Our qualitative study relied on the triangulation of three sources of data: 1 interviews with patients (n = 16; 2 interviews with carers (n = 6; and 3 direct observation of nursing visits of a different set of patients (n = 16. Participants of varying socioeconomic status were recruited through primary care organizations and hospitals that deliver home care within 100 km of Montreal, the largest urban area in the province of Quebec, Canada. Results The four interventions have both a negative and positive effect on patients' lives. These technologies were rarely perceived as user-friendly, and user-acceptance was closely linked to user-competence. Compared with acute I.V. patients, who tended to be passive, chronic patients seemed keener to master technical aspects. While some of the technical and human barriers were managed well in the home setting, engaging in the social world was more problematic. Most patients found it difficult to maintain a regular job because of the high frequency of treatment, while some carers found their autonomy and social lives restricted. Patients also tended to withdraw from social activities because of social stigmatization and technical barriers. Conclusions While technology contributes to improving the patients' health, it also imposes significant constraints on their lives

  11. Are Postprandial Bile Acid Levels Helpful in Predicting Perinatal Complications in Patients with Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy?

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    Kudret Erkenekli

    2015-06-01

    Results: Gestational diabetes and preterm delivery occurred more frequently in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy patients. The rate of primary cesarean delivery was more common in in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy patients. The rate of growth-restricted infants was higher in the patients who received ursodeoxycholic acid. Nenoatal intensive care unit admissions and overall neonatal complications, as well as spontaneous preterm deliveries, were similar among in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy regardless of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy. In the receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under curve values for postprandial and fasting bile acids to predict neonatal complications were 0.64 and 0.70, respectively. Conclusion: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy patients increases certain perinatal complications, such as preterm deliveries and neonatal morbidity. Postprandial serum bile acid levels are inferior to fasting serum bile acid levels in the prediction of obstetric complications. ursodeoxycholic acid does not seem to improve perinatal outcomes. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 212-220

  12. Impact of Hearing Aid Technology on Outcomes in Daily Life I: The Patients' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robyn M; Johnson, Jani A; Xu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    difference in outcomes between premium- and basic-feature devices. Participants did not report better outcomes with premium processing with any measure. It could reasonably be asserted that the patient's perspective is the gold standard for hearing aid effectiveness. While the acoustical processing provided by premium features can potentially improve scores on tests conducted in contrived conditions in a laboratory, or on specific items in a questionnaire, this does not ensure that the processing will be of noteworthy benefit when the hearing aid is used in the real world challenges faced by the patient. If evidence suggests the patient cannot detect that premium features yield improvements over basic features in daily life, what is the responsibility of the provider in recommending hearing aid technology level? In the present research, there was no evidence to suggest that premium-feature devices yielded better outcomes than basic-feature devices from the patient's point of view. All of the research hearing aids were substantially, but equally, helpful. Further research is needed on this topic with other hearing aids and other manufacturers. In the meantime, providers should insist on scientifically credible independent evidence to support effectiveness claims for any hearing help devices.

  13. Capsule endoscopy retention as a helpful tool in the management of a young patient with suspected small-bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chryssostomos Kalantzis; Periklis Apostolopoulos; Panagiota Mavrogiannis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Xenofon Papacharalampous; Ioannis Bramis; Nikolaos Kalantzis

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an easy and painless procedure permitting visualization of the entire small-bowel during its normal peristalsis. However, important problems exist concerning capsule retention in patients at risk of small bowel obstruction. The present report describes a young patient who had recurrent episodes of overt gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, 18 years after small bowel resection in infancy for ileal atresia.Capsule endoscopy was performed, resulting in capsule retention in the distal small bowel. However, this event contributed to patient management by clearly identifying the site of obstruction and can be used to guide surgical intervention, where an anastomotic ulcer is identified.

  14. Estimation of serum insulin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and C-peptide can help identify possible cardiovascular disease risk in thyroid disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi Purohit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed at evaluating the cardiovascular disease (CVD risk of thyroid disorder patients at diagnosis, using the traditional lipid profile, apo-B and apo-A1 in correlation with serum insulin and insulin resistance (IR and C-peptide. Background: With an ever increasing incidence of CVD in most urban populations, there has been a demand for newer techniques that could help in the early detection of the risk of this disease complex. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 100 healthy controls and 150 hypothyroid and 70 hyperthyroid patients, coming for the first time to our OPDs. The patients were selected on the basis of symptomatology and serum T3, T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH evaluations. They were then analyzed for body mass index (BMI, blood pressure (BP, serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, C-peptide, lipid profile and apo-B and -A1. Statistical analysis was done using Student′s "t" test and Spearman′s coefficient of correlation. Results: The hypothyroid patients presented with high BMI, diastolic hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, IR and raised serum C-peptide. There was highly significant correlation of serum insulin, HOMA-IR and C-peptide with lipid fractions and CVD risk ratios, T. chol/HDLc and apo-B/apo-A1, in hypothyroid patients. The hyperthyroid patients presented with systolic hypertension and a significant correlation of T. chol/HDLc with HOMA-IR. Hyperthyroid patients also had hyperinsulinemia, but reduced serum C-peptide levels. Conclusion: We conclude that the estimation of traditional lipid profile along with serum insulin, IR, C-peptide, apo-A1 and apo-B would not only help assess the thyroid status, but can also help in the early evaluation of a possible risk of CVD.

  15. Preoperative evaluation of basal free triiodothyronine in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Does it help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kishore Tiwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available noBackground & Objectives: The postoperative Low T3 syndrome has been considered as a possible source of reduced myocardial contractility, resulting in increased mortality after CABG. Effect of preoperative Low T3 has not been well studied in patients undergoing CABG surgery. Aim of our study is to evaluate effect of preoperative Low T3 syndrome in patients undergoing CABG surgery.Materials & Methods: Six hundred and six patients undergoing CABG were included in this prospective study. The impact of the base-line FT3 concentration and of preoperative low T3 syndrome on the risk of postoperative low cardiac output and hospital death was analyzed.Results: Fifteen patients (2.3% postoperatively and 159 (26.2% developed major complications. At univariate analysis a reduced EF, the presence of peripheral vascular disease, the NYHA class, the surgical urgency, the aortic cross-clamp time, the CPB time and the FT3 concentration at admission were significantly associated with low CO and higher mortality. At multivariate analysis, the CPB time, an emergency procedure, a reduced LVEF, and the fT3 concentration were independently related to the development of low CO. However, in multivariate analysis low EF, and the fT3 concentration were the only predictors of hospital death.Conclusion: We conclude that preoperative low EF and low T3 syndrome independently causes low cardiac output and higher mortality in patients undergoing CABG. Therefore, all patients undergoing CABG should be evaluated for low T3 syndrome and patients with low T3 syndrome should be considered at increased risk. Appropriate preoperative T3 replacement therapy could decrease the postoperative complications in patients undergoing CABG.JCMS Nepal. 2015; 11(2:1-7

  16. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and patient safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ajami, Sima; Rajabzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    .... However, the different advantages and disadvantages expressed in various studies of the challenges facing the technology of the use of the RFID technology have been met with skepticism by managers...

  17. Urinary free light chains may help to identify infection in patients with elevated systemic inflammation due to rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Carsten P; Froelich, Britta; Wallbach, Manuel; Minguet, Joan; Grupp, Clemens; Deutsch, Cornelia; Bramlage, Peter; Müller, Gerhard A; Koziolek, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The risk of infection in patients with rheumatic diseases is elevated, but a clear marker to differentiate the cause of the systemic inflammation is missing. We assessed the ability urinary immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) to indicate the presence of infection in patients with rheumatic disease. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with rheumatic disease attending the Georg-August University Hospital in Goettingen, Germany, from January 2011 to December 2013. Subjects were included if they had urine levels of κ and λ FLCs available. A reference group of patients without autoimmune disease, but with documented infection, was constructed. A total of 1500 patients had their urinary FLCs quantified during the study period. Of the 382 patients with rheumatic disease, 172 (45%) displayed no systemic inflammation, 162 (42%) had inflammation due to the underlying disease activity, and 48 (13%) had inflammation due to a confirmed infection. Urinary FLC concentrations were much higher in patients with rheumatic diseases and infection (κ 68.8 ± 81.8 mg/L, λ 31.4 ± 53.5 mg/L) compared to those with inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity (κ 22.7 ± 26.3 mg/L, λ 8.1 ± 9.1 mg/L, κ p inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity from that due to the additional presence of infection. The ability to quantify these proteins in urine provides a simple alternative to the use of blood.

  18. Effect of Health Literacy on Help-seeking Behavior in Morbidly Obese Patients Agreeing to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayci, Haci Murat; Erdogdu, Umut Eren; Demirci, Hakan; Ardic, Aykut; Topak, Nevruz Yildirim; Taymur, İbrahim

    2017-08-18

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of health literacy on agreement for bariatric surgery among morbidly obese patients. The data of 242 morbidly obese patients (body mass index-BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2)) were evaluated in a cross-sectional case-control pattern. The patients were classified into two groups as those who were attending the clinic for the purpose of receiving bariatric surgery (n = 138) and those who did not (n = 104). The Turkish version of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q47), consisting of 47 questions, was used for the health literacy evaluation. It was seen that patients who accepted bariatric surgery were younger and had higher weight and BMI values (p bariatric surgery and 26.04 (8.33:46.88) in the group who did not agree to bariatric surgery, and a statistically significant difference was determined between the two groups (p bariatric surgery and 45.2% of the group who did not (p  25-33) (respectively, 36.2%, 37.5%, p = 0.840). A sufficient level (> 33-42) and a perfect level were higher in the group who agreed to bariatric surgery (respectively, 42.8%, 18.1%, p bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients. The higher the health literacy level, the more the agreement to bariatric surgery increased.

  19. [Technological advances and micro-inflammation in dialysis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Giuseppe; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Ferrari, Elisa; Romoli, Elena; Michelassi, Stefano; Caiani, David; Pizzarelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    As currently performed, on line hemodiafiltration reduces, but does not normalize, the micro-inflammation of uremic patients. Recent technological advances make it possible to further reduce the inflammation connected to the dialysis treatment. 
Short bacterial DNA fragments are pro-inflammatory and can be detected in the dialysis fluids. However, their determination is not currently within normal controls of the quality of the dialysate. The scenario may change once the analysis of these fragments yields reliable, inexpensive, quick and easy to evaluate the results. At variance with standard bicarbonate dialysate, Citrate dialysate induces far less inflammation both for the well-known anti-inflammatory effect of such buffer and also because it is completely acetate free, e.g. a definitely pro-inflammatory buffer. However, the extensive use of citrate dialysate in chronic dialysis is prevented because of concerns about its potential calcium lowering effect. In our view, high convective exchange on line hemodiafiltration performed with dialysate, whose sterility and a-pirogenicity is guaranteed by increasingly sophisticated controls and with citrate buffer whose safety is certified, can serve as the gold standard of dialysis treatments in future.

  20. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Trujillo Gómez

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking.To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose.A qualitative, descriptive-interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer's notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme.Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers.Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations. Nevertheless, ICTs could not

  1. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábregas Escurriola, Mireia; Lozano Moreno, Maribel; Burón Leandro, Raquel; Gomez Quintero, Ana María; Ballve, Jose Luis; Clemente Jiménez, María Lourdes; Puigdomènech Puig, Elisa; Casas More, Ramón; Garcia Rueda, Beatriz; Casajuana, Marc; Méndez-Aguirre, Marga; Garcia Bonias, David; Fernández Maestre, Soraya; Sánchez Fondevila, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking. Objectives To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose. Methods A qualitative, descriptive–interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer’s notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme. Results Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers. Conclusions Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations

  2. Balance and steadiness correction of the upright posture of patients having withstood an ischemic stroke with the help of stabilographic rehabilitation training equipment with biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bredikhina Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain ischemic mortality rate in Russia occupies the third position. As a result, a recovery period after an ischemic stroke could undermine social and economic well-being of patients and their close relatives. One of the major consequences of a stroke includes the firm-motor defects. Their degree can be reduced with the help of rehabilitation measures intended to revive the motor function of paralyzed limbs and to train a patient to remain firm upright. A stabilographic rehabilitation training apparatus with biofeedback represents one of the variants of the posture training. This training in a playful way helps a patient to improve the balance and firmness indices of the upright position. This rehabilitation method improved considerably the patients’ clinical and stabilographic indices of the balance and firmness function in comparison with the patients whose programmes did not include this method. A patient could sense better that he/she was standing on the both lower limbs. The sensitivity in the lower limbs was intensifying or reviving. According to the additional stabilographic control tests, the total scatter of the pressure centre and the scatter in the sagittal plane, the rate of the pressure centre movement were decreasing; Romberg coefficient became normal.

  3. How do queuing concepts and tools help to efficiently manage hospitals when the patients are impatient? A demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Shanmugam

    2014-06-01

    Results: Using the new ideas and formulas of this article, the data in the emergency wing of a hospital in Malta (a largest island of an archipelago situated in the center of the Mediterranean with a total population of a million are analyzed and interpreted. The results clearly explain why there were a prolonged waiting times at the emergency department creating public dissatisfaction and patients were leaving without waiting to be seen. The total time spent by non-urgent patients with nurse and casualty officer is more in the second shift and lesser and lesser in the third and fourth shifts. The interactive time with a nurse by patient is statistically same in all three types: life-threatening, non-life threatening but urgent, and non-urgent. Very strikingly, the patients in all three groups wait longer to be seen by the nurse in shift three and lesser time in shifts two or four. Conclusion: In 21st century with flourishing globalized medical tourism, a standardized approach to minimize efficiently the waiting time in emergency and other wings of the hospitals in developing as much as in developed nations is a necessity as this auricle has pointed out. The impediments and the remedies for an efficient standardization are overdue. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 1076-1084

  4. Does Interpersonal Therapy Help Patients with Binge Eating Disorder Who Fail to Respond to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agras, W. Stewart; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of group interpersonal therapy (IPT) in treating overweight, binge-eating patients. Participants were randomly allocated to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or to an assessment-only group. After 12 weeks, those who did not respond to CBT were assigned 12 weeks of IPT. IPT led to no further improvement. (JPS)

  5. Thrombotic risk assessment questionary helps increase the use of thromboprophylaxis for patients with pelvic and acetabular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haili Wang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The assessment table can significantly improve the use of thromboprophylaxis after pelvic and acetabular fractures, which will likely reduce the incidence of DVT. Developing individual hospital prophylaxis strategy is an effective way to determine whether hospitalized patients should receive pharmacologic and/or mechanical prophylaxis or not.

  6. Temporal tuning of daily rhythms helps advanced cancer patients and cancer survivors feel better, live better, and live longer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrushesky W

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available William Hrushesky,1–5 James F Grutsch,6 Dinah Faith Q Huff,1 Linda Tavolacci,7 Thomas Kazlausky7 1Oncology Analytics, Inc., Plantation, FL, USA; 2South Carolina College of Pharmacy, 3Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 4Hollings Cancer Center, 5Department of Public Health Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 6Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois School of Public Health, Chicago, IL, USA; 7Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA Abstract: There is now little doubt that disrupted day/night (circadian time structures are involved in the initiation and promotion of neoplastic disease. It has been established that the incidence of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and prostate cancer is increased as a result of nocturnal exposure to light and circadian function disruption and that cancer patient survival is diminished. So the question is: what public health measures can be implemented to minimize these health hazards? In addition, untreated cancer patients experience the symptom cluster of brief, interrupted, and poor nighttime sleep; depressed mood/anxiety; daytime fatigue/lethargy; and anorexia/early satiety/diminished taste sensation – each of which is virtually pathognomonic of a disrupted circadian temporal organization. Direct measurements of patients' activities and their timing and intensity using actigraphy reveal that untreated cancer patients experience severe deterioration in the robustness (amplitude and day-to-day phase stability of their daily rest/activity rhythms – and one of the most personal and socially destructive results of such circadian disorientation is unplanned, unwanted, and avoidable temporal isolation from family, friends, and society. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of the circadian clock is a powerful tool for improving cancer patients' quality of life (QOL, making life more worth living and perhaps

  7. MRI-based score helps in assessing the severity and in follow-up of pediatric patients with perianal Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sakil; Gomara, Roberto; Reeves-Garcia, Jesse; Hernandez, Erick; Restrepo, Ricardo

    2014-02-01

    The radiologic healing of perianal fistulizing Crohn disease (PfCD) lags behind the clinical healing. Contrast-enhanced pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the radiologic study of choice used to diagnose PfCD in children. The aim was to study whether the various MRI-based radiologic parameters and score can help in staging and follow-up of patients with PfCD. We performed a retrospective chart review of children with PfCD who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI of the pelvis. The demographic profile, clinical status, and laboratory data of the patients at the time of each MRI examination were noted. Based on the clinical status of the patient at the time of MRI examinations, the MRIs were classified into 3 groups: severe disease, mild-to-moderate disease, and asymptomatic. Each MRI examination was reviewed by a radiologist, who was blinded to the clinical status of the patient. Of the radiologic parameters, the number of fistulas, the complexity of fistulas, and the number of abscesses were significantly lower in the asymptomatic group compared with the mild-to-moderate and severe disease groups. The Van Assche MRI-based score was significantly lower in the asymptomatic group compared with the mild-to-moderate disease (P = 0.01) and the severe disease group (P = 0.002). The percentage increase in fistula activity after gadolinium administration was significantly lower in the asymptomatic group compared with the mild-to-moderate disease (P = 0.026) and severe disease (P = 0.019) groups. The MRI-based scores were significantly higher in the MRI examinations performed at diagnosis compared with those that were performed while the patients were receiving the treatment (P = 0.017). The Van Assche MRI score and the percentage increase in fistula activity after gadolinium administration help in assessing the severity perianal Crohn disease. The Van Assche MRI score may be helpful in documenting healing during therapy of perianal Crohn disease.

  8. Can breathing circuit filters help prevent the spread of influenza A (H1N1 virus from intubated patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuer, Jan F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: In March 2010, more than 213 countries worldwide reported laboratory confirmed cases of influenza H1N1 infections with at least 16,813 deaths. In some countries, roughly 10 to 30% of the hospitalized patients were admitted to the ICU and up to 70% of those required mechanical ventilation. The question now arises whether breathing system filters can prevent virus particles from an infected patient from entering the breathing system and passing through the ventilator into the ambient air.We tested the filters routinely used in our institution for their removal efficacy and efficiency for the influenza virus A H1N1 (A/PR/8/34.Methods: Laboratory investigation of three filters (PALL Ultipor 25, Uor 100 and Pall BB50T Breathing Circuit Filter, manufactured by Pall Life Sciences using a monodispersed aerosol of human influenza A (H1N1 virus in an air stream model with virus particles quantified as cytopathic effects in cultured canine kidney cells (MDCK. Results: The initial viral load of 7.74±0.27 log was reduced to a viral load of ≤2.43 log, behind the filter. This represents a viral filtration efficiency of ≥99.9995%. Conclusion: The three tested filters retained the virus input, indicating that their use in the breathing systems of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients can reduce the risk of spreading the virus to the breathing system and the ambient air.

  9. Smartphone Applications for Educating and Helping Non-motivating Patients Adhere to Medication That Treats Mental Health Conditions: Aims and Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos P. Kassianos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients prescribed with medication that treats mental health conditions benefit the most compared to those prescribed with other types of medication. However, they are also the most difficult to adhere. The development of mobile health (mHealth applications (“apps” to help patients monitor their adherence is fast growing but with limited evidence on their efficacy. There is no evidence on the content of these apps for patients taking psychotropic medication. The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate the aims and functioning of available apps that are aiming to help and educate patients to adhere to medication that treats mental health conditions.Method: Three platform descriptions (Apple, Google, and Microsoft were searched between October 2015 and February 2016. Included apps need to focus on adherence to medication that treats mental health conditions and use at least a reinforcement strategy. Descriptive information was extracted and apps evaluated on a number of assessment criteria using content analysis.Results: Sixteen apps were identified. All apps included self-monitoring properties like reminders and psycho-educational properties like mood logs. It was unclear how the latter were used or how adherence was measured. Major barriers to medication adherence like patients' illness and medication beliefs and attitudes were not considered nor where information to patients about mediation side effects. Very few apps were tailored and none was developed based on established theories explaining the processes for successful medication adherence like cognitions and beliefs. Reported information on app development and validation was poor.Discussion: A variety of apps with different properties that tackle both intentional and unintentional non-adherence from a different perspective are identified. An evidence-based approach and co-creation with patients is needed. This will ensure that the apps increase the possibility to

  10. The medium is the (health) measure: patient engagement using personal technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H; Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Lindblad, Staffan; Mazowita, Garey; McQuillen, Kelly; Nelson, Eugene C

    2012-01-01

    With the phrase "the medium is the message", Marshall McLuhan argued that technologies are the messages themselves and not just the medium. Almost 50 years later, we understand that modern information and communication technologies expand our ability to perceive our world to an extent that would be impossible without the medium. In this article, we contend that information and communication technologies are becoming the dominant medium for patient engagement. Information and communication technologies will efficiently change patient-reported measurement into much more behaviorally sophisticated information that will create a very different interaction between patients and a new kind of health care workforce.

  11. Neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients via motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Sun; Yang Xiang; Mingdao Yang

    2011-01-01

    The present study utilized motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology combined with rehabilitation training in 20 stroke patients. Results from the Berg Balance Scale and the Holden Walking Classification were significantly greater at 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01), which suggested that motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology improved balance and walking in stroke patients.

  12. Abdominal admittance helps to predict the amount of fluid accumulation in patients with acute heart failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tatsunori; Hamano, Go; Koide, Masao; Hirooka, Keiji; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Kusuoka, Hideo; Ohtani, Tomohito; Sakata, Yasushi; Yasumura, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    Predicting fluid volume that needs to be removed in acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) patients remains challenging. Thoracic admittance (TA), the reciprocal of thoracic impedance measured by bioelectrical impedance, reflects the amount of fluid in the thorax. Abdominal organs play an important role in AHFS as systemic fluid reservoirs. We investigated the relationship between abdominal admittance (AA) at the time of admission for AHFS and net fluid loss (NFL) during hospitalization. Sixty-two consecutive patients hospitalized for AHFS [age 71±10 years, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 39±17%] were studied. The admittance values, i.e. the reciprocals of the impedance values, were derived using a BioZ(®) (CardioDynamics, San Diego, CA, USA). The change in weight from admission to discharge was used as a surrogate of amount of NFL. At the time of admission, a significant correlation was detected between TA and AA (r=0.46, p=0.0001). TA at admission was significantly correlated with the LV structural variables (end-diastolic dimension and end-systolic dimension), and serum sodium level. AA at admission was significantly correlated with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and plasma BNP, and also correlated with LVEF and variables related to systemic congestion [minimal inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter and tricuspid regurgitation grade]. Neither TA nor AA values were significantly correlated with weight at admission. During hospitalization, TA and AA declined from 44±8kΩ(-1) to 36±6kΩ(-1) (pfluid volume to be removed in patients with AHFS. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Technology Competencies for Public Services’ Staff Has Limited External Validity. A Review of: Wong, G. K. W. (2010. Information commons help desk transactions study. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36(3, 235-241.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Martin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To develop an understanding of the types of technology questions asked at an information commons help desk for the purposes of staffing the desk and training. Specifically, the study looked to answer the following questions:1. What kind of assistance do users seek from the help desk?2. How complex is it to handle the technology questions?3. What are the key competencies desirable of the help desk staff?Design - Qualitative analysis of transactions completed at an information commons help desk.Setting - A medium sized academic library located in Hong Kong.Data - 1,636 transactions completed at an information commons help desk between January 2007 and May 2009.Methods - From the opening in 2006, the staff of the information commons help desk recorded all transactions electronically using a modified version of the open source software LibStats. The author examined the transactions for roughly the second and third weeks of each month from January 2007 to May 2009 in an effort to determine the types of questions asked and their complexity.Main Results - In response to question one, 86.3% of questions asked at the help desk concerned technology; the majority of those questions (76.5% were about printing, wireless connection, and various software operation. For question two, 82% of technology questions were determined to be of the lowest tier (Tier 1 of complexity, one-third of the questions required only “direct answers,” and 80% of questions could be answered consistently via the creation of a “knowledge base of answers for these foreseeable questions.” For question three, a list of fourteen competencies for help desk staff were created.Conclusion - With the low complexity of the technology questions asked, the creation of a knowledge base of common questions and answers, and proper training of staff based on the competencies identified in the study, an information commons could be effective with one integrated desk staffed by a

  14. Assessment of diabetes acceptance can help identify patients with ineffective diabetes self-care and poor diabetes control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, A; Reimer, A; Kulzer, B; Haak, T; Gahr, A; Hermanns, N

    2014-11-01

    To estimate the associations between insufficient diabetes acceptance and relevant diabetes outcomes. A total of 320 patients completed questionnaires on diabetes non-acceptance (the Acceptance and Action Diabetes Questionnaire), diabetes distress (the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale), depressive mood (the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), coping with illness (the Freiburg Questionnaire of Coping with Illness), self-care activities (the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure) and quality of life (the Short Form-36 Health Questionnaire). A six-item version of the Acceptance and Action Diabetes Questionnaire showing good reliability and validity was established, and the associations between insufficient acceptance and clinical outcomes were estimated. Higher diabetes non-acceptance correlated significantly with less active coping (-0.37), reduced self-care (-0.43) and higher HbA1c levels (0.31), higher diabetes distress (0.53) and more depressive symptoms (0.36). Correlations of diabetes non-acceptance with diabetes self-care/glycaemic control were significantly higher than were those of depressive mood or diabetes distress with these criteria. Low diabetes acceptance is associated with impaired self-care and glycaemic control. Assessment of diabetes acceptance may facilitate the detection of patients at high risk and may present an essential target for treatments to improve diabetes control that is more relevant than elevated depressive mood or diabetes distress. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  15. Unknotting night-time muscle cramp: a survey of patient experience, help-seeking behaviour and perceived treatment effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blyton Fiona

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Night-time calf cramping affects approximately 1 in 3 adults. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of night-time calf cramp; if and where people seek treatment advice; and perceived treatment effectiveness. Methods 80 adults who experienced night-time calf cramp at least once per week were recruited from the Hunter region, NSW, Australia through newspaper, radio and television advertisements. All participants completed a pilot-tested survey about muscle cramp. Quantitative data were analysed with independent-sample t-tests, Chi square tests and Fisher's tests. Qualitative data were transcribed and sorted into categories to identify themes. Results Median recalled age of first night-time calf cramp was 50 years. Most participants recalled being awoken from sleep by cramping, and experiencing cramping of either calf muscle, calf-muscle soreness in the days following cramp and cramping during day-time. Despite current therapies, mean usual pain intensity was 66 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Participants described their cramps as being 'unbearable', 'unmanageable' and 'cruel'. One participant stated that 'sometimes I just wish I could cut my legs open' and another reported 'getting about 2 h sleep a night due to cramps'. Most participants had sought advice about their night-time calf cramps from a health professional. Participants identified 49 different interventions used to prevent night-time calf cramp. Of all treatment ratings, 68% described the intervention used to prevent cramp as being 'useless' or of 'a little help'. Of 14 participants who provided additional information regarding their use of quinine, eight had a current prescription of quinine for muscle cramp at the time of the survey. None had been asked by their prescribing doctor to stop using quinine. Conclusion Night time calf cramps typically woke sufferers from sleep, affected either leg and caused ongoing pain. Most participants

  16. Feasibility randomised controlled trial of a self-help acceptance and commitment therapy intervention for grief and psychological distress in carers of palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Esther L; Deane, Frank P; Lyons, Geoffrey Cb; Barclay, Gregory D; Bourne, Joan; Connolly, Vivienne

    2017-06-01

    We tested the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy self-help intervention for grief and psychological distress in carers of patients in palliative care. Carers were randomised to the control group, which received treatment as usual, or the intervention group, which received treatment as usual plus an acceptance and commitment therapy-based self-help booklet and telephone support call. Questionnaires were completed at baseline, 1-month post-allocation and 6 months post-loss. Results indicated that the intervention was generally feasible and viewed as acceptable to carers. Preliminary effectiveness analyses showed at least a small effect in acceptance, valued-living, grief and psychological distress.

  17. Educating patients about warfarin therapy using information technology: A survey on healthcare professionals’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullan J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore healthcare professionals’ views about the benefits and challenges of using information technology (IT resources for educating patients about their warfarin therapy.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of both community and hospital-based healthcare professionals (e.g., doctors, pharmacists and nurses involved using a purpose-designed questionnaire. The questionnaires were distributed using a multi-modal approach to maximise response rates.Results: Of the total 300 questionnaires distributed, 109 completed surveys were received (43.3% response rate. Over half (53.2% of the healthcare participants were aged between 40-59 years, the majority (59.5% of whom were female. Fifty nine (54.1% participants reported having had no access to warfarin-specific IT-based patient education resources, and a further 19 (38.0% of the participants who had IT-access reported that they never used such resources. According to the healthcare participants, the main challenges associated with educating their patients about warfarin therapy included: patient-related factors, such as older age, language barriers, cognitive impairments and/or ethnic backgrounds or healthcare professional factors, such as time constraints. The healthcare professionals reported that there were several aspects about warfarin therapy which they found difficult to educate their patients about which is why they identified computers and interactive touch screen kiosks as preferred IT devices to deliver warfarin education resources in general practices, hospital-based clinics and community pharmacies. At the same time, the healthcare professionals also identified a number of facilitators (e.g., to reinforce warfarin education, to offer reliable and easily comprehensible information and barriers (e.g., time and costs of using IT resources, difficulty in operating the resources that could impact on the effective implementation of these devices in educating patients about their

  18. Understanding the reasons for the refusal of cholecystectomy in patients with cholelithiasis: how to help them in their decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Adilson; Schliemann, Ana Laura; Almeida, Fernando Antonio de

    2014-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is prevalent surgical disease, with approximately 60,000 admissions per year in the Unified Health System in Brazil. Is often asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic and major complications arise from the migration of calculi to low biliary tract. Despite these complications are severe and life threatening, some patients refuse surgical treatment. To understand why individuals with cholelithiasis refuse cholecystectomy before complications inherent to the presence of gallstones in the bile duct and pancreatitis occur. To investigate the universe of the justifications for refusing to submit to surgery it was performed individual interviews according to a predetermined script. In these interviews, was evaluate the knowledge of individuals about cholelithiasis and its complications and the reasons for the refusal of surgical treatment. Were interviewed 20 individuals with cholelithiasis who refused or postponed surgical treatment without a plausible reason. To these interviews, was applied the technique of thematic analysis (Minayo, 2006). The majority of respondents had good knowledge of their disease and its possible complications, were well oriented and had surgical indications by their physicians. The refusal for surgery was justified primarily on negative experiences of themselves or family members with surgery, including anesthesia; fear of pain or losing their autonomy during surgery and postoperative period, preferring to take the risk and wait for complications to then solve them compulsorily. The reasons for the refusal to surgical resolution of cholelithiasis were diverse, but closely related to personal (or related persons) negative surgical experiences or complex psychological problems that must be adequately addressed by the surgeon and other qualified professionals.

  19. It is feasible and effective to help patients with severe mental disorders to quit smoking: An ecological pragmatic clinical trial with transdermal nicotine patches and varenicline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria P; Garcia-Alvarez, Leticia; Sarramea, Fernando; Galvan, Gonzalo; Diaz-Mesa, Eva; Bobes-Bascaran, Teresa; Al-Halabi, Susana; Elizagarate, Edorta; Iglesias, Celso; Saiz Martínez, Pilar A; Bobes, Julio

    2016-10-01

    Despite the proven association between smoking and high rates of medical morbidity and reduced life expectancy in people with severe mental disorders (SMD), their smoking rates do not decline as they do in the general population. We carried out a non-randomized, open-label, prospective, 9-month follow-up multicentre trial to investigate the clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of a 12-week smoking cessation programme for patients with SMD in the community under real-world clinical conditions. Eighty-two adult outpatients with schizophrenic/bipolar disorder smoking ≥15 cigarettes/day were assigned by shared decision between doctors and patients to transdermal nicotine patches (TNP) [36(46.2%)] or varenicline [39(50%)]. Short-term efficacy: The 12-week 7-day smoking cessation (self-reported cigarettes/day=0 and breath carbon monoxide levels≤9ppm) prevalence was 49.3%, without statistically significant differences between medications (TNP 50.0% vs varenicline 48.6%, chi-square=0.015, p=1.000). Long-term efficacy: At weeks 24 and 36, 41.3 and 37.3% of patients were abstinent, with no statistically significant differences between treatments. Safety and Tolerability: no patients made suicide attempts/required hospitalization. There was no worsening on the psychometric scales. Patients significantly increased weight [TNP 1.1(2.8) vs varenicline 2.5(3.3), p=0.063], without significant changes in vital signs/laboratory results, except significant decreases in alkaline phosphatase and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in the varenicline group. Patients under varenicline more frequently presented nausea/vomiting (p<0.0005), patients under TNP experienced skin reactions more frequently (p=0.002). Three patients under varenicline had elevated liver enzymes. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that in real-world clinical settings it is feasible and safe to help patients with stabilized severe mental disorders to quit smoking.

  20. Distributed Computing and Monitoring Technologies for Older Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonovs, Juris; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Krüger, Volker

    , telemonitoring, ambient intelligence, ambient assisted living, gerontechnology, and aging-in-place technology. The book discusses relevant experimental studies, highlighting the application of sensor fusion, signal processing and machine learning techniques. Finally, the text discusses future challenges...

  1. How do technologies influence the interaction between nurse and patient?

    OpenAIRE

    Chalabalová, Zdeňka

    2016-01-01

    The thesis deals with technologies that nurses use in their work. These technologies are computers and tablets when nurses write electronic nursing documentation, use barcode readers when administering medications to clients of health services and in collecting blood and other laboratory samples. The theoretical part is devoted to medical and nursing documentation what legislation is in force, what the content of documentation is. After that there are presented companies that provide digitiza...

  2. Using information technology for patient education: realizing surplus value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Arjen P; van't Riet, Annemarie; Berg, Marc

    2004-08-01

    Computer-based patient information systems are introduced to replace traditional forms of patient education like brochures, leaflets, videotapes and, to a certain extent, face-to-face communication. In this paper, we claim that though computer-based patient information systems potentially have many advantages compared to traditional means, the surplus value of these systems is much harder to realize than often expected. By reporting on two computer-based patient information systems, both found to be unsuccessful, we will show that building computer-based patient information systems for patient education requires a thorough analysis of the advantages and limitations of IT compared to traditional forms of patient education. When this condition is fulfilled, however, these systems have the potential to improve health status and to be a valuable supplement to (rather than a substitute for) traditional means of patient education.

  3. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  4. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  5. Caregiver Use of the Core Components of Technology-Enhanced Helping the Noncompliant Child: A Case Series Analysis of Low-Income Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Margaret T; Jones, Deborah J; Cuellar, Jessica; Forehand, Rex; Gonzalez, Michelle; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Newey, Greg; Edwards, Alex; Jacobs, Mary; Pitmman, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Children from low-income families are more likely to develop early-onset disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) compared to their higher income counterparts. Low-income families of children with early-onset DBDs, however, are less likely to engage in the standard-of-care treatment, behavioral parent training (BPT), than families from other sociodemographic groups. Preliminary between-group findings suggested technology-enhanced BPT was associated with increased engagement and boosted treatment outcomes for low-income families relative to standard BPT. The current study used a case series design to take this research a step further by examining whether there was variability in use of, and reactions to, the smartphone enhancements within technology-enhanced BPT and the extent to which this variability paralleled treatment outcome. Findings provide a window into the uptake and use of technology-enhanced service delivery methods among low-income families, with implications for the broader field of children's mental health.

  6. USE OF TECHNOLOGIES OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE MICROSURGERY IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH PATHOLOGY OF ELBOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Rodomanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the results of using modern technologies of plastic and reconstructive microsurgery in treatment of 39 patients with pathology of elbow. We have stated that while using microsurgical technologies as independent and exhaustive method of treating such patients the operations have mainly mobilizing character. They aim to delete scarry contractures and recreate motion in elbow joint. The use of microsurgical technologies in a system of the specialized orthopedic treatment opens a lot of additional opportunities for the reabilitation of patients with pathology of elbow. It mainly concerns indications for performing total elbow arthroplasty and improving its results.

  7. Does Health Information in Mass Media Help or Hurt Patients? Investigation of Potential Negative Influence of Mass Media Health Information on Patients' Beliefs and Medication Regimen Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Heewon; Huh, Jisu

    2017-03-01

    As an important public health issue, patient medication non-adherence has drawn much attention, but research on the impact of mass media as an information source on patient medication adherence has been scant. Given that mass media often provide confusing and contradicting information regarding health/medical issues, this study examined the potential negative influence of exposure to health information in mass media on patients' beliefs about their illnesses and medications, and medication adherence, in comparison with the effects of exposure to another primary medication information source, physicians. Survey data obtained from patients on blood thinner regimens revealed that the frequency of exposure to health information in mass media was negatively related to accuracy of patients' beliefs about their medication benefits and patient medication adherence. On the other hand, frequency of visits with physicians was positively associated with patients' beliefs about their medication benefits but had no significant relation to medication regimen adherence. The implications of the study findings are discussed, and methodological limitations and suggestion for future research are presented.

  8. The doctor/patient relationship for the 21st century. Clash of 'cultural creatives' and 'traditionals' helps focus the future of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottles, K

    2001-01-01

    The doctor/patient relationship is at a crossroads. Some patients--traditionals--want the doctor calling all the shots, deciding the best treatment path to follow. But cultural creatives--heavily influenced by bioethics--desire more of a give and take when it comes to their health care. They see the physician as an advisor, and they want to decide the best treatment on their own terms. Take a close-up look at factors influencing the doctor/patient relationship in the 21st Century.

  9. Effectiveness of educational technology to improve patient care in pharmacy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Benedict, Neal

    2015-02-17

    A review of the literature on the effectiveness of educational technologies to teach patient care skills to pharmacy students was conducted. Nineteen articles met inclusion criteria for the review. Seven of the articles included computer-aided instruction, 4 utilized human-patient simulation, 1 used both computer-aided instruction and human-patient simulation, and 7 utilized virtual patients. Educational technology was employed with more than 2700 students at 12 colleges and schools of pharmacy in courses including pharmacotherapeutics, skills and patient care laboratories, drug diversion, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) orientation. Students who learned by means of human-patient simulation and virtual patients reported enjoying the learning activity, whereas the results with computer-aided instruction were mixed. Moreover, the effect on learning was significant in the human-patient simulation and virtual patient studies, while conflicting data emerged on the effectiveness of computer-aided instruction.

  10. Science and Technology Networks : A Helping Hand to Boost Implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trogrlić, RobertŠakić; Cumiskey, Lydia; Triyanti, Annisa; Duncan, Melanie J.; Eltinay, Nuha; Hogeboom, Rick J.; Jasuja, Mansi; Meechaiya, Chinaporn; Pickering, Christina J.; Murray, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 underlines the importance of Science and Technology (S&T) and S&T networks for effective disaster risk reduction (DRR). The knowledge of existing S&T networks and their exact role in DRR, however, is limited. This opinion piece initiates a d

  11. EPA Funding to Help Syracuse Small Business Develop New Green Technology, Advanced Recovery and Recycling, LLC Receives $100,000 for New Approach that Reduces Electronic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $100,000 to Advanced Recovery and Recycling, LLC of Onondaga County, New York to continue its development of an efficient technology that recycles circuit board components to reduce elec

  12. The feasibility of using technology to enhance the transition of palliative care for rural patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Diane E; Vanderboom, Catherine E; Ingram, Cory J; Dose, Ann Marie; Borkenhagen, Lynn S; Skadahl, Phyllis; Pacyna, Joel E; Austin, Christine M; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2014-06-01

    Palliative care services for patients with life-limiting conditions enhance their quality of life. Most palliative care services, however, are located in hospitals with limited transitional care for patients who live in distant locations. The long-term goal of this program of research is to use existing technology for virtual visits to provide transitional care for patients initially hospitalized in an urban setting by a nurse practitioner located closer to patients' homes in distant, rural settings. The purpose of this proof-of-concept study was to determine the resources needed to use the system (efficiency) and the quality of the audio and visual components (effectiveness) to conduct virtual visits between a clinician at an academic center and community-dwelling adults living in rural locations. Guided by the Technology Acceptance Model, a mixed-methods field design was used. Because of the burden of testing technology with patients with life-limiting conditions, the sample included eight healthy adults. Participant satisfaction and perceptions of the ease of using the technology were also measured. Virtual visits were conducted using a 3G-enabled Apple iPad, cellular phone data service, and a Web-based video conference service. Participants and clinicians perceived the technology as easy to use. Observations revealed the importance of the visual cues provided by the technology to enhance communication, engagement, and satisfaction. Findings from this study will inform a subsequent study of technology-enhanced transitional care with palliative care patients.

  13. Empowering Patients with COPD Using Tele-Homecare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. This paper describes how a tele-rehabilitation program using home tele-monitoring empowers patients with COPD. The paper is based on findings from an ongoing research and innovation project, called “Telehomecare, chronic patients and the integrated healthcare system” (the TELEKAT project......) that employs triple interventions related to patients, professionals, and the organisation of care. The ways COPD patients utilize home tele-monitoring in the TELEKAT project points to the relevance of empowerment, as rooted in ideologies of social action, and focusing on the improvement of both personal...

  14. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors’ workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions with their seniors, assisting the interchange between explicit and tacit knowledge. By supporting accurate prescribing and treatment planning, the electronic library contributed to enhanced patient care. Trainees were more rapidly able to medicate patients to reduce pain and more quickly call for specific assessments. However, clinical decision-making often requires dialogue: what Smartphone technology can do is augment, not replace, discussion with their colleagues in the community of practice. PMID:23336964

  15. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors’ workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardyman Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded “iDoc”, a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Methods Data on trainee doctors’ (Foundation Year 2 workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260. iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193 collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117 detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Results Most frequently (daily used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline; peers (70%; 58%; and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets. Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p  Preferred information source varied by question type: hard copy texts for information-based questions; varied resources for skills queries; and seniors for more complex problems. Case reports showed mobile technology used for simple (information-based, complex (problem-based clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios. From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors’ discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this ‘just-in-time’ access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. Conclusion A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions with their seniors, assisting the interchange between explicit and tacit knowledge. By

  16. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors' workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyman, Wendy; Bullock, Alison; Brown, Alice; Carter-Ingram, Sophie; Stacey, Mark

    2013-01-21

    The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit) and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded "iDoc", a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Data on trainee doctors' (Foundation Year 2) workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260). iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193) collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117) detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Most frequently (daily) used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline); peers (70%; 58%); and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets). Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p < 0.01). Foundation Year 1 (newly qualified) was judged the most useful time to have a Smartphone library because of increased responsibility and lack of knowledge/experience.Preferred information source varied by question type: hard copy texts for information-based questions; varied resources for skills queries; and seniors for more complex problems. Case reports showed mobile technology used for simple (information-based), complex (problem-based) clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios). From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors' discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this 'just-in-time' access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions

  17. Assessing the quality of decision support technologies using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards instrument (IPDASi).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; O'Connor, A.M.; Bennett, C.; Newcombe, R.G.; Politi, M.; Durand, M.A.; Drake, E.; Joseph-Williams, N.; Khangura, S.; Saarimaki, A.; Sivell, S.; Stiel, M.; Bernstein, S.J.; Col, N.; Coulter, A.; Eden, K.; Harter, M.; Rovner, M.H.; Moumjid, N.; Stacey, D.; Thomson, R.; Whelan, T.; Weijden, G.D.E.M. van der; Edwards, A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development, validation and inter-rater reliability of an instrument to measure the quality of patient decision support technologies (decision aids). DESIGN: Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing. SETT

  18. Does Kapandji wiring help in older patients? A retrospective comparative review of displaced intra-articular distal radial fractures in patients over 55 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, T; Kocialkowski, A; Andrew, G

    1999-12-01

    Forty-six patients aged 55-90 with intra-articular displaced fractures of the distal radius were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were treated with either manipulation and plaster of Paris or Kapandji wiring. Radiographic and functional review was performed by an independent observer a mean of 17 months after the fracture. The results showed superior anatomical and functional results in the group treated with Kapandji wiring. The mean dorsal angle was significantly better in the wired group, and the improvement in dorsal angle, radial angle and radial length from presentation to final result was also significantly better. Functional results were excellent or good in 19/23 of the wired group, compared with 12/23 of the plaster group. There was a strong correlation between functional outcome and both dorsal angle and radial length at union. These results support the use of this method of wire fixation in older patients, as the technique is simple and complications were few.

  19. Facilitating patient self-management through telephony and web technologies in seasonal influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Nagykaldi

    2010-03-01

    Conclusions Primary care patients and their clinicians can adopt and successfully utilise influenza self-management technologies. Our pilot study suggests that web resources combined with telephony technology are feasible to set up and easy to use in primary care settings.

  20. Involving patient in the early stages of health technology assessment (HTA): a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Candas, Bernard; Desmartis, Marie; Gagnon, Johanne; Roche, Daniel La; Rhainds, Marc; Coulombe, Martin; Dipankui, Mylène Tantchou; Légaré, France

    2014-01-01

    Background Public and patient involvement in the different stages of the health technology assessment (HTA) process is increasingly encouraged. The selection of topics for assessment, which includes identifying and prioritizing HTA questions, is a constant challenge for HTA agencies because the number of technologies requiring an assessment exceeds the resources available. Public and patient involvement in these early stages of HTA could make assessments more relevant and acceptable to them. ...

  1. Empowering patients with COPD using Tele-homecare technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huniche, Lotte; Dinesen, Birthe; Grann, Ove; Toft, Egon; Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses how a tele-rehabilitation program using home tele-monitoring may empower patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper is based on preliminary findings from an ongoing research and innovation project, called "Tele-homecare, chronic patients and the integrated healthcare system" (the TELEKAT project) that employs triple interventions related to patients, professionals, and the organization of care. The ways COPD patients make use of home tele-monitoring in the TELEKAT project points to the relevance of a concept of empowerment rooted in ideologies of social action, and focusing on the improvement of both personal and social conditions at the intersection of individual, organizational and community development.

  2. The Impact of Technology on Patients, Providers, and Care Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerhaugh, Shizuko; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examines the problems technical innovation has brought to health care professionals, administrators, and patients from the standpoints of increased specialization, equipment obsolescence, bureaucracy, retraining, regulations, high costs of services, depersonalization, and ethical dilemmas. (CT)

  3. Being in front of the patient. Nurse-patient interaction and use of technology in emergency services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeimy Yesenia Granados-Pembertty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study sought to describe how the use of technology intervenes in the nurse-patient relationship, from the nurse's point of view. Methodology. This was a qualitative research with tools from grounded theory. Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in emergency services in three municipalities of Colombia. Results. Four categories emerged: 1 direct care, the maximum interaction or being in front of the patient; 2 fairly direct care; 3 indirect care, institutional management; and 4 minimum interaction; technology as facilitator of the interaction and awareness of the necessity for interaction. Conclusion. This study shows the irreplaceable nature of the nurse and the fundamental necessity of technology. The dual mediations of technology constitute a paradoxical matter that reveals the importance of placing it as a means; warning on the danger of converting it an end in and of itself.

  4. Purchasing medical innovation the right technology, for the right patient, at the right price

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, James C

    2015-01-01

    Innovation in medical technology generates a remarkable supply of new drugs, devices, and diagnostics that improve health, reduce risks, and extend life. But these technologies are too often used on the wrong patient, in the wrong setting, or at an unaffordable price. The only way to moderate the growth in health care costs without undermining the dynamic of medical innovation is to improve the process of assessing, pricing, prescribing, and using new technologies. Purchasing Medical Innovation analyzes the contemporary revolution in the purchasing of health care technology, with a focus on th

  5. Treatment of binge eating disorder in racially and ethnically diverse obese patients in primary care: randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of self-help and medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Masheb, Robin M; White, Marney A; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Barnes, Rachel D; Walsh, B Timothy; McKenzie, Katherine C; Genao, Inginia; Garcia, Rina

    2014-07-01

    The objective was to determine whether treatments with demonstrated efficacy for binge eating disorder (BED) in specialist treatment centers can be delivered effectively in primary care settings to racially/ethnically diverse obese patients with BED. This study compared the effectiveness of self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (shCBT) and an anti-obesity medication (sibutramine), alone and in combination, and it is only the second placebo-controlled trial of any medication for BED to evaluate longer-term effects after treatment discontinuation. 104 obese patients with BED (73% female, 55% non-white) were randomly assigned to one of four 16-week treatments (balanced 2-by-2 factorial design): sibutramine (N = 26), placebo (N = 27), shCBT + sibutramine (N = 26), or shCBT + placebo (N = 25). Medications were administered in double-blind fashion. Independent assessments were performed monthly throughout treatment, post-treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups (16 months after randomization). Mixed-models analyses revealed significant time and medication-by-time interaction effects for percent weight loss, with sibutramine but not placebo associated with significant change over time. Percent weight loss differed significantly between sibutramine and placebo by the third month of treatment and at post-treatment. After the medication was discontinued at post-treatment, weight re-gain occurred in sibutramine groups and percent weight loss no longer differed among the four treatments at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. For binge-eating, mixed-models revealed significant time and shCBT-by-time interaction effects: shCBT had significantly lower binge-eating frequency at 6-month follow-up but the treatments did not differ significantly at any other time point. Demographic factors did not significantly predict or moderate clinical outcomes. Our findings suggest that pure self-help CBT and sibutramine did not show long-term effectiveness relative to placebo for treating BED in

  6. A patient centred framework for improving LTC quality of life through Web 2.0 technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulman, Andy

    2010-03-01

    The NHS and Social Care Model - a blueprint supporting organisations in improving services for people with long-term conditions (LTCs) - noted options to support people with LTCs might include technological tools supporting personalised care and choice and providing resources for patients to self-care and self-manage. Definitions concerning the integration of health information and support with Web 2.0 technology are primarily concerned with approaches from the healthcare perspective. There is a need to design a patient centred framework, encapsulating the use of Web 2.0 technology for people with LTCs who want to support, mitigate or improve quality of life. Existing theoretical frameworks offer a means of informing the design and measurement of this framework. This article describes how Web 2.0 technology could impact on the quality of life of individuals with LTCs and suggests a starting point for developing a theoretically informed patient centred framework.

  7. New technologies in treatment of atrial fibrillation in cardiosurgical patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Bykov, A. N.; Sergeev, V. S.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the evaluation of the results of clinical application of penetrating radiofrequency ablation techniques on atrial myocardium. Total operated on 241 patients with valvular heart disease and coronary heart disease complicated with atrial fibrillation. All operations were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegia. The main group consists of 141 patients which were operated using penetrating technique radiofrequency exposure. The control group consisted of 100 patients who underwent surgery with the use of "classical" monopolar RF-ablation technique. Both groups were not significantly different on all counts before surgery. Patients with previous heart surgery were excluded during the selection of candidates for the procedure, due to the presence of adhesions in the pericardium, that do not allow good visualization of left atrium, sufficient to perform this procedure. Penetrating technique has significantly higher efficiency compared to the "classic" technique in the early and long-term postoperative periods. In the early postoperative period, its efficiency is 93%, and in the long term is 88%. The efficacy of "classical" monopolar procedure is below: 86% and 68% respectively.

  8. Methodic of skills’ formation of light athletics motor actions with the help of inter-disciplinary communications and informational technologies, worked out for senior form pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out and substantiate technologies of motor and intellectual aspects’ integral influence on development of basic light athletics movements’ technique. Material: in the research 2 groups of schoolchildren participated: control group (n = 34 and experimental group (n = 33. Results: it was determined that main direction of motor skills’ development in light athletics trainings is a holistic approach. Such approach implies mastering of principal movements of light athletics on the base of analogies with rational and economical movements in Nature and on the base of laws of mechanics. Conclusions: it is recommended to consider in trainings the fact that improvement of motor skills’ mastering facilitates strengthening of demand in motor functioning. This demand is a condition of organism functioning’s improvement.

  9. From discard ban to exemption: How can gear technology help reduce catches of undersized Nephrops and hake in the Bay of Biscay trawling fleet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Camille; Kopp, Dorothée; Méhault, Sonia

    2017-01-15

    On January 1st, 2016, the French mixed Nephrops and hake fishery of the Grande Vasière, an area located in the Bay of Biscay, fell under the discard ban implemented as part of the new European Common Fisheries Policy. The fleet records historically high levels of discard despite numerous gear selectivity studies. Together with high discards survival, new technological solutions to minimize catches of undersized individuals could justify local exemptions from the discard ban. Our study focuses on the effects of two selective devices, a square mesh cylinder (SMC) and a grid, on the escapement of undersized individuals and discard reduction. Relative catch probability of the modified gear compared with the traditional gear was modelled using the catch comparison method. Potential losses from the commercial fraction of the catch were taken into account to assess their influence on the economic viability of fishing with the modified gears. The two devices had similar effects on undersized Nephrops escapement and on discard reduction, with median values of 26.5% and 23.6% for the SMC and of 30.4% and 21.4% for the grid, respectively. Only the grid was efficient for undersized hake, recording median values of escapement and discard reduction equal to 25.0% and 20.6%, respectively. Some loss from the commercial fraction of the catch was to be expected with both devices, which could be compensated for in the long term by the contribution of undersized individuals to the stock biomass. Our results support the use of selective gears technology as part of an integrated framework including control and management measures to mitigate the effect of the discard ban both for fishers and for the ecosystem. Further work is needed to quantify the effect of additional escapement from the gear on stock dynamics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. COHERENT EFFORT FOR COPD PATIENTS  WITH A SPECIAL FOCUS ON WELFARE TECHNOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard*, Kitt; Bagger, Bettan; Jensen, Lars Heegaard

    2014-01-01

    is given by health professionals whom they have feel safe with and related to. Some expressed that they did not feel familiar with technology and therefore do not expect to use it in their daily life. Others felt that the new experiences with technological aid would make them feel more secure in daily life......Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective, promoting consistent quality in health care (1, 2), including the care pathways for individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Welfare technology has been found to ensure more freedom and responsibility for ones...... own illness leading to prevention of hospitalizations (3, 4). Technologies therefore are assumed to enhance the quality and consistency of treatment programs for patients with COPD. Prior to implementation of welfare technology in the Region of Zealand, Denmark, University College Zealand and COPD...

  11. Poster COHERENT EFFORT FOR COPD PATIENTS  WITH A SPECIAL FOCUS ON WELFARE TECHNOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard*, Kitt; Bagger, Bettan; Bech, Lone

    2014-01-01

    is given by health professionals whom they have feel safe with and related to. Some expressed that they did not feel familiar with technology and therefore do not expect to use it in their daily life. Others felt that the new experiences with technological aid would make them feel more secure in daily life......Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective, promoting consistent quality in health care (1, 2), including the care pathways for individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Welfare technology has been found to ensure more freedom and responsibility for ones...... own illness leading to prevention of hospitalizations (3, 4). Technologies therefore are assumed to enhance the quality and consistency of treatment programs for patients with COPD. Prior to implementation of welfare technology in the Region of Zealand, Denmark, University College Zealand and COPD...

  12. Trialling computer touch-screen technology to assess psychological distress in patients with gynaecological cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Halkett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCancer impacts on the psychological well-being of many cancer patients. Appropriate tools can be used to assist health professionals in identifying patient needs and psychological distress. Recent research suggests that touchscreen technology can be used to administer surveys. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a touchscreen system in comparison to written questionnaires in a large tertiary hospital in Western Australia (WA.Method Patients who were scheduled to commence treatment for gynaecological cancer participated in this study. Patients were assigned to complete either a written questionnaire or the same survey using the touchscreen technology. Both methods of survey contained the same scales. All participants were asked to complete a follow-up patient satisfaction survey. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals to elicit views about the implementation of the technology and the available referral pathways. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. ResultsThirty patients completed the touchscreen questionnaires and an equal number completed the survey on paper. Participants who used the touchscreens were not significantly more satisfied than other participants. Four themes were noted in the interviews with health professionals: usability of technology, patients’ acceptance of technology, advantages of psychological screening and the value of the instruments included.ConclusionAlthough previous studies report that computerised assessments are a feasible option for assessing cancer patients’ needs, the data collected in this study demonstrates that the technology was not reliable with significant practical problems. The technology did not serve these patients better than pen and paper.

  13. Patients' perspectives in health technology assessment: a route to robust evidence and fair deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facey, Karen; Boivin, Antoine; Gracia, Javier; Hansen, Helle Ploug; Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Mossman, Jean; Single, Ann

    2010-07-01

    There is increasing emphasis on providing patient-focused health care and ensuring patient involvement in the design of health services. As health technology assessment (HTA) is meant to be a multidisciplinary, wide-ranging policy analysis that informs decision making, it would be expected that patients' views should be incorporated into the assessment. However, HTA is still driven by collection of quantitative evidence to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of a health technology. Patients' perspectives about their illness and the technology are rarely included, perhaps because they are seen as anecdotal, biased views. There are two distinct but complementary ways in which HTAs can be strengthened by: (i) gathering robust evidence about the patients' perspectives, and (ii) ensuring effective engagement of patients in the HTA process from scoping, through evidence gathering, assessment of value, development of recommendations and dissemination of findings. Robust evidence eliciting patients' perspectives can be obtained through social science research that is well conducted, critically appraised and carefully reported, either through meta-synthesis of existing studies or new primary research. Engagement with patients can occur at several levels and we propose that HTA should seek to support effective patient participation to create a fair deliberative process. This should allow two-way flow of information, so that the views of patients are obtained in a supportive way and fed into decision-making processes in a transparent manner.

  14. Does Cytokeratin7/20 immunoreactivity help to distinguish Barrett's esophagus from gastric intestinal metaplasia? Results of a prospective study of 75 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, D; Spiethoff, A; Rosenbaum, Anika; Hartmann, D; Eickhoff, A; Jakobs, R; Weickert, U; Rebe, M; Bohrer, M H; Riemann, J F

    2005-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a recognized risk factor for the development of esophageal dysplasia and carcinoma. Unfortunately, gastric incomplete intestinal metaplasia arising in Short Segment Barrett's esophagus can be indistinguishable histologically on hematoxylin/eosin stains. Distinct patterns of CK 7 and CK 20 immunohistochemical expression have been demonstrated to be both highly sensitive and specific for Barrett's esophagus, but have not been found in gastric metaplasia. The aim of our study was to test whether immunostaining with CK 7/20 helps to distinguish between Barrett's epithelium and gastric incomplete metaplasia. Cases of long segment Barrett's esophagus, short segment Barrett's esophagus, and cases with a normal gastroesophageal junction, as well as specimens with gastric antral intestninal metaplasia, were examined: three patterns were defined. Barrett's pattern (superficial CK 20 staining; superficial and crypt CK 7 staining); gastric pattern (superficial and crypt staining of both markers); other patterns (different from Barrett and gastric types). Seventy-five patients were enrolled in this study, 26 with long segment Barrett's esophagus, 21 with short segment esophagus, 13 with intestinal metaplasia of the cardia, and 18 with antral intestinal metaplasia. The Barrett pattern showed a high specificity of 97%, but a sensitivity of only 30% in patients with short segment Barrett esophagus. Our results do not confirm the hypothesis that CK 7/20 immunostaining can be used for a reliable differentiation between incomplete intestinal metaplasia and Barrett's epithelium.

  15. [Researching subordinate personality atavism in schizophrenia from the perspective of physical, mental and spiritual healing, and helping the patient to recover].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tien-Sheng

    2007-06-01

    Schizophrenia is not an incurable condition. If we had not understood the operating model of schizophrenia in its spiritual phase, we would not know what its causes were, and there would be no cure for it. The author has studied The Seth Material for more than twenty years. New Age thinking has it that schizophrenia can be redefined as a phenomenon of subordinate personality or secondary personality. This new definition has directly pointed out and solved the core problems of schizophrenia. It has provided a perfect explanation of phenomenology. Also, the etiology of schizophrenia has been built. A guide to diagnosis and the new treatment has been produced. The secondary personality, as described above, prevents the patient from being willing to face and grow with his main personality, and causes him to split from it. A new vision of mind and spirit enables a schizophrenic episode to be seen in fact as a process which forces him to face himself and push him to grow into one and self-heal. According to the symptoms of schizophrenia (auditory hallucinations, thought withdrawal, insertion and interruption, thought broadcasting, somatic hallucinations, delusional perception, external agents), which are the key points of recovery, the author proposes the theory of recorder as a spiritual prescription for healing which has succeeded in helping our patients.

  16. Medication administration technologies and patient safety: a mixed-method systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Kelly; Cummings, Greta G; Marck, Patricia; Yurtseven, Ozden

    2011-10-01

    Healthcare leaders need evidence-based information on nursing medication administration technologies to guide the design of improvements to patient safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the research evidence on relationships between the use of medication administration technologies and incidence of medication administration incidents and preventable adverse drug events to inform decision-making about existing technology options. Thirteen electronic databases and seven relevant patient safety websites were searched for the years 1980-2009. A mixed-method systematic literature review of research on medication administration technologies and associated links to patient safety, operationalized as medication administration incidents and preventable adverse drug events, was conducted. Twelve studies (two qualitative, five pre- and postinterventions and five correlational) met the inclusion criteria. All were assessed as medium quality with low generalizability of study findings. Only two studies sampled more than one hospital and none of the studies was driven by an explicit theoretical framework. The studies included in this review are generally positive towards medication administration technologies and their potential benefits, yet the level of evidence overall is equivocal. The majority of studies pointed to the development of workarounds by nurses following medication administration technology implementation that could compromise patient safety. More theoretically driven research is needed to determine which medication administration technologies should be implemented in what ways to most effectively reduce medication administration incidents and preventable adverse drug events and minimize the development of potentially unsafe workarounds. Further evidence is required to accurately assess the actual contribution of medication administration technologies for improving patient safety. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell

  17. A Qualitative Study on Patient Perceptions Towards mHealth Technology Among High Risk, Chronic Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Phillip Rico

    2015-01-01

    Background: For over 17 years, the Prevention and Access to Care and Treatment (PACT) Project has actively developed a Community Health Worker model for care of chronically ill, high risk patients. Given the high burden of chronic disease and associated rising health expenditures, mHealth technology has emerged as a promising low cost, high efficacy intervention for delivery of patient-centered care and as a tool for self-management of chronic disease Objective: Attitudes and perceptions r...

  18. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy...

  19. Health information technologies in systemic lupus erythematosus: focus on patient assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Chiara; Trieste, Leopoldo; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Cannizzo, Sara; Turchetti, Giuseppe; Mosca, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in health information technologies (HIT) in systemic lupus erythematosus have included electronic databases and registries, computerised clinical charts for patient monitoring, computerised diagnostic tools, computerised prediction rules and, more recently, disease-specific applications for mobile devices for physicians, health care professionals, and patients. Traditionally, HIT development has been oriented primarily to physicians and public administrators. However, more recent development of patient-centered Apps could improve communication and empower patients in the daily management of their disease. Economic advantages could also result from the use of HIT, including these Apps by collecting real life data that could be used in both economic analyses and to improve patient care.

  20. [The contribution of Web 2.0 technologies to the empowerment of active patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Mora, Martí; Iñiguez-Rueda, Lupicinio

    2017-03-01

    The Spanish health system has recently been marked by the emergence of more active patients who are characterized as being better informed about their disease, having a more participatory attitude, wanting to have a greater influence in making decisions about their health and asserting their rights as patients. Therefore, this article aims to report on how the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies can contribute to the empowering of more active patients. To achieve this, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and representatives of patient associations who have used Web 2.0 technologies to interact with other patients or to communicate with health professionals. From the results obtained, we highlight the fact that Web 2.0 technologies provide greater access to health-related information, improve communication between patients and health professionals, and enable the creation of new spaces of interaction among patients. All of the facts above contribute to the formation of a more active role on the part of patients.

  1. Making an IMPAKT; Improving care of Chronic Kidney Disease patients in the community through collaborative working and utilizing Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Major, Rupert; Shepherd, David; Brunskill, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious long-term condition, which if left untreated causes significant cardiovascular sequele. It is well recognized management of modifiable risk factors, such as blood pressure (BP), can lead to improved long-term outcomes. A novel information technology (IT) solution presents a possible solution to help clinicians in the community identify and manage at risk patients more efficiently. The IMproving Patient care and Awareness of Kidney disease progression Together (IMPAKT) IT tool was used to identify patients with CKD and uncontrolled hypertension in the community. A CKD nurse utilized the tool at primary care practices to identify patients who warranted potential intervention and disseminated this information to clinical staff. Blood pressure management targets and incidence of coded CKD were used to evaluate the project. Altogether 48 practices participated in an 18 month project from April 2014, and data from 20 practices, with a total adult population of 121,362, was available for analysis. Two full consecutive QI (Quality Improvement) audit cycles were completed. There was an increase in the mean recorded prevalence of coded CKD patients over the course of the project. Similarly, there was an increase in the percentage of patients with BP been recorded and importantly there was an accompanying significant increase in CKD patients achieving BP targets. At the end of the project an additional 345 individuals with CKD achieved better blood pressure control. This could potentially prevent 9 cardiovascular events in the CKD group, translating to a cost saving of £320,000 for the 20 practices involved. The most significant change in clinical markers occurred during cycle 1 of the audit, the improvement was maintained throughout cycle 2 of the audit. Our results show the real-life clinical impact of a relatively simple and easy to implement QI project, to help improve outcomes in patients with CKD. This was achieved through more

  2. Making an IMPAKT; Improving care of Chronic Kidney Disease patients in the community through collaborative working and utilizing Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Major, Rupert; Shepherd, David; Brunskill, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious long-term condition, which if left untreated causes significant cardiovascular sequele. It is well recognized management of modifiable risk factors, such as blood pressure (BP), can lead to improved long-term outcomes. A novel information technology (IT) solution presents a possible solution to help clinicians in the community identify and manage at risk patients more efficiently. The IMproving Patient care and Awareness of Kidney disease progression Together (IMPAKT) IT tool was used to identify patients with CKD and uncontrolled hypertension in the community. A CKD nurse utilized the tool at primary care practices to identify patients who warranted potential intervention and disseminated this information to clinical staff. Blood pressure management targets and incidence of coded CKD were used to evaluate the project. Altogether 48 practices participated in an 18 month project from April 2014, and data from 20 practices, with a total adult population of 121,362, was available for analysis. Two full consecutive QI (Quality Improvement) audit cycles were completed. There was an increase in the mean recorded prevalence of coded CKD patients over the course of the project. Similarly, there was an increase in the percentage of patients with BP been recorded and importantly there was an accompanying significant increase in CKD patients achieving BP targets. At the end of the project an additional 345 individuals with CKD achieved better blood pressure control. This could potentially prevent 9 cardiovascular events in the CKD group, translating to a cost saving of £320,000 for the 20 practices involved. The most significant change in clinical markers occurred during cycle 1 of the audit, the improvement was maintained throughout cycle 2 of the audit. Our results show the real-life clinical impact of a relatively simple and easy to implement QI project, to help improve outcomes in patients with CKD. This was achieved through more

  3. Can the surgical checklist reduce the risk of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics? - can the checklist help? Supporting evidence from analysis of a national patient incident reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleary Kevin

    2011-04-01

    incidents. Discussion Orthopaedic surgery is a high volume specialty with major technical complexity in terms of equipment demands and staff training and familiarity. There is therefore an increased propensity for errors to occur. Wrong-site surgery still occurs in this specialty and is a potentially devastating situation for both the patient and surgeon. Despite the limitations of inclusion and reporting bias, our study highlights the need to match technical precision with patient safety. Tools such as the WHO surgical checklist can help us to achieve this.

  4. USE OF TECHNOLOGIES OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE MICROSURGERY IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH PATHOLOGY OF KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Rodomanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the results of surgical treatment of 63 patients with knee-joint pathology who were treated in Vreden’s Scientific-research Institute of traumatology and orthopaedics (Saint-Petersburg, Russia within the period from 2000 to 2011. All the patients had pedicled flap transfer or free tissue transfer. 53 patients (84,1% had additionally various orthopedic operations on the knee joint: 42 patients had primary or revision total knee arthroplasty, 6 patients had resections of bony tumors and total knee arthroplasty, 4 - knee arthrodesis, 1 - open reduction and internal fixation of patella. The results of treatment were estimated according to WOMAC knee score. 4 patients had total necrosis of flap what demanded repeated reconstructive microsurgical operation. 6 patients had knee arthroplasty surgical site infection, 1 patient had recidive of osteoblastic sarcoma and he was made leg amputation. 65,7% of patients had good results according to WOMAC knee score, 28,6% patients had satisfactory results. Microsurgical operations in patients with pathology of knee-joint mainly aim to correct various pathological changes of tissues located in this particular area. In cases of scarry deformations and defects of tissues located in the area of knee-joint microsurgical technologies increase the opportunities for fulfilling total knee arthroplasty and improve its results as well as results of other orthopedical operations. At the same time microsurgical technologies may be used as preparative operations, single-step maneuvers and operations fulfilled in case of development of local infectious complications.

  5. Patient Outcomes as Transformative Mechanisms to Bring Health Information Technology Industry and Research Informatics Closer Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krive, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fast pace of recent innovation within the health information technology and research informatics domains, there remains a large gap between research and academia, while interest in translating research innovations into implementations in the patient care settings is lacking. This is due to absence of common outcomes and performance measurement targets, with health information technology industry employing financial and operational measures and academia focusing on patient outcome concerns. The paper introduces methodology for and roadmap to introduction of common objectives as a way to encourage better collaboration between industry and academia using patient outcomes as a composite measure of demonstrated success from health information systems investments. Along the way, the concept of economics of health informatics, or "infonomics," is introduced to define a new way of mapping future technology investments in accordance with projected clinical impact.

  6. Unmet Communication and Information Needs for Patients with IBD: Implications for Mobile Health Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sameer; Dasrath, Florence; Farghaly, Sara; Otobo, Emamuzo; Riaz, Muhammad Safwan; Rogers, Jason; Castillo, Anabella; Atreja, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop an application that addresses the most significant challenges facing IBD patients, this qualitative study explored the major hurdles of living with IBD, the information needs of IBD patients, and how application technology may be used to improve quality of life. 15 IBD patients participated in two focus groups of 120 minutes each. Data collection was achieved by combining focus groups with surveys and direct observation of patients looking at a patient-engaged app (HealthPROMISE) screenshots. The survey elicited information on demographics, health literacy and quality of life through the Short IBD Questionnaire (SIBDQ). The needs of IBD patients center around communication as it relates to both patient information needs and navigating the social impacts of IBD on patients' lives: Communication Challenges regarding Information Needs: Patients cited a doctor-patient communication divide where there is a continued lack of goal setting when discussing treatments and a lack of objectivity in disease control. When objectively compared with the SIBDQ, nearly half of the patients in the focus groups wrongly estimated their IBD control.Communication Challenges regarding Social Impacts of IBD: Patients strongly felt that while IBD disrupts routines, adds significant stress, and contributes to a sense of isolation, the impact of these issues would be significantly alleviated through more conversation and better support.Implication for Mobile Health Solutions: Patients want a tool that improves tracking of symptoms, medication adherence and provides education. Physician feedback to patient input on an application is required for long-term sustainability. IBD patients need mobile health technologies that evaluate disease control and the goals of care. Patients feel an objective assessment of their disease control, goal setting and physician feedback will greatly enhance utilization of all mobile health applications.

  7. Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Assistive Technology Assistive technology (AT) is any service or tool that helps ... be difficult or impossible. For older adults, such technology may be a walker to improve mobility or ...

  8. Remote patient management: technology-enabled innovation and evolving business models for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coye, Molly Joel; Haselkorn, Ateret; DeMello, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Remote patient management (RPM) is a transformative technology that improves chronic care management while reducing net spending for chronic disease. Broadly deployed within the Veterans Health Administration and in many small trials elsewhere, RPM has been shown to support patient self-management, shift responsibilities to non-clinical providers, and reduce the use of emergency department and hospital services. Because transformative technologies offer major opportunities to advance national goals of improved quality and efficiency in health care, it is important to understand their evolution, the experiences of early adopters, and the business models that may support their deployment.

  9. Three technological enhancements in nursing education: informatics instruction, personal response systems, and human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rebecca; Meyer, Linda; Sternberger, Carol

    2009-03-01

    With the healthcare system in a state of flux, nursing education faces many challenges. Nursing faculty must design a dynamic curriculum that deals with the explosion of information, the complexity of the healthcare system, and optimal patient outcomes while addressing the diverse expectations of learners. Inclusion of information management and interactive technology facilitates learner engagement promoting critical thinking and improving clinical judgment. This paper details the faculty's vision for an ubiquitous information technology curricula, highlighting an undergraduate informatics course, use of a personal response system, and integration of human patient simulations.

  10. Aesthetic treatment option for completely edentulous patients using CAD/CAM technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Alejandro; Avendano, Sergio; Leyva, Francisco

    2008-04-01

    In recent years, advancements have been made in CAD/CAM technology that have allowed for the development of different treatments regarding the rehabilitation of patients with natural dentition, as well as patients with dental implants. Contemporary systems can also allow prosthetic rehabilitation for partially and completely edentulous patients. This article describes a restorative alternative to fixed implant-supported reconstruction of completely edentulous patients, utilizing a CAD/CAM-generated framework and CAD/CAM-generated all-ceramic cement-retained crowns. In addition to delivering an optimally aesthetic restoration, this design permits a precise and passive prosthetic fit.

  11. Designing a patient monitoring system for bipolar disorder using Semantic Web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermolia, Chryssa; Bei, Ekaterini S; Petrakis, Euripides G M; Kritsotakis, Vangelis; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    The new movement to personalize treatment plans and improve prediction capabilities is greatly facilitated by intelligent remote patient monitoring and risk prevention. This paper focuses on patients suffering from bipolar disorder, a mental illness characterized by severe mood swings. We exploit the advantages of Semantic Web and Electronic Health Record Technologies to develop a patient monitoring platform to support clinicians. Relying on intelligently filtering of clinical evidence-based information and individual-specific knowledge, we aim to provide recommendations for treatment and monitoring at appropriate time or concluding into alerts for serious shifts in mood and patients' non response to treatment.

  12. Sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer patients using surgical navigation system based on fluorescence molecular imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Introduction: Precision and personalization treatments are expected to be effective methods for early stage cancer studies. Breast cancer is a major threat to women's health and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is an effective method to realize precision and personalized treatment for axillary lymph node (ALN) negative patients. In this study, we developed a surgical navigation system (SNS) based on optical molecular imaging technology for the precise detection of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in breast cancer patients. This approach helps surgeons in precise positioning during surgery. Methods: The SNS was mainly based on the technology of optical molecular imaging. A novel optical path has been designed in our hardware system and a feature-matching algorithm has been devised to achieve rapid fluorescence and color image registration fusion. Ten in vivo studies of SLN detection in rabbits using indocyanine green (ICG) and blue dye were executed for system evaluation and 8 breast cancer patients accepted the combination method for therapy. Results: The detection rate of the combination method was 100% and an average of 2.6 SLNs was found in all patients. Our results showed that the method of using SNS to detect SLN has the potential to promote its application. Conclusion: The advantage of this system is the real-time tracing of lymph flow in a one-step procedure. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the system for providing accurate location and reliable treatment for surgeons. Our approach delivers valuable information and facilitates more detailed exploration for image-guided surgery research.

  13. A cancer help centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, R

    1996-06-01

    The diagnosis of cancer can be shattering to all involved. The treatment of cancer is intense and often very challenging. Prevailing attitudes to cancer are sometimes fearful, negative and depressing. This combination may leave those affected by cancer shocked, disorientated and without hope. Even worse than this, on asking consultants 'What can I do to help myself?' patients are frequently told 'Absolutely nothing'--crushing in one fell swoop their remaining fighting spirit. Not so in the case of Penny Brohn, who, when faced with the diagnosis of breast cancer, travelled the world to find alternative cancer treatments, and having successfully brought her own cancer under control, dedicated her life to creating a Centre for others wishing to fight their disease.

  14. Hospital based patient coordination for ethnic minority patients - a health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    especially on public medicine expenses and social services. Ethnic minority patients can achieve increased empowerment & Equity in type and quality of hospital care through cross dicplinary cross specialty cultural case management & support between hospital departments and primary sectors......A cross diciplinary, cross specialty, cross sectoral hospital based approach to cultural management of ethnic minority patients is effective in creating more approprite patient flows, better quality of care and increases functional level of patients. Surprisingly the aggregated effect saves...

  15. Strengthen high-end technology skilled personnel training, help to realize dream"vocational education"%加强高端技术技能型人才培养助力实现“职教梦”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙军辉

    2013-01-01

    高端技术技能型人才培养的探索需要站在哲学、社会、教育、科技、管理等高度上进行研究,把“德育为先”、文化素质教育、技能培养模式、高端技术技能型人才评价体系、校企合作模式作为重点研究,建立新型的高端技术技能型人才培养体系,实现高等职业教育的人才培养目标,助力实现“职教梦”。%Exploration of high-end technology skilled talents need to stand on philosophical, social, education, science and technology, management and so on high up, the"moral education ifrst", the cultural quality education, skills, training mode, high-end technology skilled talents evaluation system, university-enterprise cooperation pattern, as the key to establish a new high-end technical skilled personnel training system, realize the talents training goal of higher vocational education, help to realize dream"vocational education".

  16. Technology-assisted patient access to clinical information: an evaluation framework for blue button.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Timothy P; Nazi, Kim M; Luger, Tana M; Amante, Daniel J; Smith, Bridget M; Barker, Anna; Shimada, Stephanie L; Volkman, Julie E; Garvin, Lynn; Simon, Steven R; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-03-27

    Patient access to clinical information represents a means to improve the transparency and delivery of health care as well as interactions between patients and health care providers. We examine the movement toward augmenting patient access to clinical information using technology. Our analysis focuses on "Blue Button," a tool that many health care organizations are implementing as part of their Web-based patient portals. We present a framework for evaluating the effects that technology-assisted access to clinical information may have on stakeholder experiences, processes of care, and health outcomes. A case study of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) efforts to make increasing amounts of clinical information available to patients through Blue Button. Drawing on established collaborative relationships with researchers, clinicians, and operational partners who are engaged in the VA's ongoing implementation and evaluation efforts related to Blue Button, we assessed existing evidence and organizational practices through key informant interviews, review of documents and other available materials, and an environmental scan of published literature and the websites of other health care organizations. Technology-assisted access to clinical information represents a significant advance for VA patients and marks a significant change for the VA as an organization. Evaluations of Blue Button should (1) consider both processes of care and outcomes, (2) clearly define constructs of focus, (3) examine influencing factors related to the patient population and clinical context, and (4) identify potential unintended consequences. The proposed framework can serve as a roadmap to guide subsequent research and evaluation of technology-assisted patient access to clinical information. To that end, we offer a series of related recommendations.

  17. Technology-Assisted Patient Access to Clinical Information: An Evaluation Framework for Blue Button

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazi, Kim M; Luger, Tana M; Amante, Daniel J; Smith, Bridget M; Barker, Anna; Shimada, Stephanie L; Volkman, Julie E; Garvin, Lynn; Simon, Steven R; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient access to clinical information represents a means to improve the transparency and delivery of health care as well as interactions between patients and health care providers. We examine the movement toward augmenting patient access to clinical information using technology. Our analysis focuses on “Blue Button,” a tool that many health care organizations are implementing as part of their Web-based patient portals. Objective We present a framework for evaluating the effects that technology-assisted access to clinical information may have on stakeholder experiences, processes of care, and health outcomes. Methods A case study of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) efforts to make increasing amounts of clinical information available to patients through Blue Button. Drawing on established collaborative relationships with researchers, clinicians, and operational partners who are engaged in the VA’s ongoing implementation and evaluation efforts related to Blue Button, we assessed existing evidence and organizational practices through key informant interviews, review of documents and other available materials, and an environmental scan of published literature and the websites of other health care organizations. Results Technology-assisted access to clinical information represents a significant advance for VA patients and marks a significant change for the VA as an organization. Evaluations of Blue Button should (1) consider both processes of care and outcomes, (2) clearly define constructs of focus, (3) examine influencing factors related to the patient population and clinical context, and (4) identify potential unintended consequences. Conclusions The proposed framework can serve as a roadmap to guide subsequent research and evaluation of technology-assisted patient access to clinical information. To that end, we offer a series of related recommendations. PMID:24675395

  18. Literacy disparities in patient access and health-related use of Internet and mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stacy C; O'Conor, Rachel; Bojarski, Elizabeth A; Mullen, Rebecca; Patzer, Rachel E; Vicencio, Daniel; Jacobson, Kara L; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Age and race-related disparities in technology use have been well documented, but less is known about how health literacy influences technology access and use. To assess the association between patients' literacy skills and mobile phone ownership, use of text messaging, Internet access, and use of the Internet for health-related purposes. A secondary analysis utilizing data from 1077 primary care patients enrolled in two, multisite studies from 2011-2013. Patients were administered an in-person, structured interview. Patients with adequate health literacy were more likely to own a mobile phone or smartphone in comparison with patients having marginal or low literacy (mobile phone ownership: 96.8 vs. 95.2 vs. 90.1%, respectively, P text messaging (78.6 vs. 75.2 vs. 53.1%, P literacy-related disparities in technology access and use are widespread, with lower literate patients being less likely to own smartphones or to access and use the Internet, particularly for health reasons. Future interventions should consider these disparities and ensure that health promotion activities do not further exacerbate disparities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Mobile Health Technology for Atrial Fibrillation Management Integrating Decision Support, Education, and Patient Involvement: mAF App Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Chen, Yundai; Lane, Deirdre A; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-08-26

    Mobile Health technology for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation is unknown. The simple mobile AF (mAF) App was designed to incorporate clinical decision-support tools (CHA2DS2-VASc [Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years, Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or TIA, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category], HAS-BLED [Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/alcohol concomitantly], SAMe-TT2R2 [Sex, Age App vs usual care) in a cluster randomized design pilot study. Patients' knowledge, quality of life, drug adherence, and anticoagulation satisfaction were evaluated at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability of the mAF App were assessed at 1 month. A total of 113 patients were randomized to mAF App intervention (mean age, 67.4 years; 57.5% were male; mean follow-up, 69 days), and 96 patients were randomized to usual care (mean age, 70.9 years; 55.2% were male; mean follow-up, 95 days). More than 90% of patients reported that the mAF App was easy, user-friendly, helpful, and associated with significant improvements in knowledge compared with the usual care arm (P values for trend App versus usual care (all P App arm versus usual care, with anxiety and depression reduced (all P App, integrating clinical decision support,education, and patient-involvement strategies, significantly improved knowledge, drug adherence, quality of life, and anticoagulation satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting Personal Healthcare Management: Impact of Individual Characteristics on Patient Use of Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan Heath

    2017-01-01

    The use of health information and health information technology by consumers is a major factor in the current healthcare systems' effort to address issues related to quality, cost, and access. Patient engagement in the healthcare process through access to information related to diagnoses, procedures, and treatment has the potential to improve…

  1. The dynamics of gene expression changes in a mouse model of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies in patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jean-Philippe; Tortereau, Antonin; Caulin, Carlos; Le Texier, Vincent; Lavergne, Emilie; Thomas, Emilie; Chabaud, Sylvie; Perol, David; Lachuer, Joël; Lang, Wenhua; Hong, Waun Ki; Goudot, Patrick; Lippman, Scott M; Bertolus, Chloé; Saintigny, Pierre

    2016-06-14

    A better understanding of the dynamics of molecular changes occurring during the early stages of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies. We generated genome-wide expression profiles of microdissected normal mucosa, hyperplasia, dysplasia and tumors derived from the 4-NQO mouse model of oral tumorigenesis. Genes differentially expressed between tumor and normal mucosa defined the "tumor gene set" (TGS), including 4 non-overlapping gene subsets that characterize the dynamics of gene expression changes through different stages of disease progression. The majority of gene expression changes occurred early or progressively. The relevance of these mouse gene sets to human disease was tested in multiple datasets including the TCGA and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project. The TGS was able to discriminate oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) from normal oral mucosa in 3 independent datasets. The OSCC samples enriched in the mouse TGS displayed high frequency of CASP8 mutations, 11q13.3 amplifications and low frequency of PIK3CA mutations. Early changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with a trend toward a shorter oral cancer-free survival in patients with oral preneoplasia that was not seen in multivariate analysis. Progressive changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with an increased sensitivity to 4 different MEK inhibitors in a panel of 51 squamous cell carcinoma cell lines of the areodigestive tract. In conclusion, the dynamics of molecular changes in the 4-NQO model reveal that MEK inhibition may be relevant to prevention and treatment of a specific molecularly-defined subgroup of OSCC.

  2. Factors influencing the health related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: long-term results (2001--2005) of patients in the German Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Organization (LULA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, T; Fischer-Betz, R; Beer, S; Winkler-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, M

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine disease-specific and individual factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) organized in the German Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Organization. Three hundred and seventeen patients aged between 11 and 77 years participated annually in five surveys carried out between 2001 and 2005. Regression analyses were carried out for physical and mental HRQOL as dependent variables. Factors influencing HRQOL were the respective HRQOL scores of the previous year, SLE activity as measured by the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ), and impairments in everyday life. Social support indicated by living in marriage or in a marriage-like partnership had a positive influence on both mental and physical HRQOL, whereas individual factors such as education seemed to be of minor importance.

  3. 羞耻感对社区女性尿失禁患者求医态度的影响%The impact of shame on Help Seeking Attitude of Female Urinary Incontinence Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴琼芳; 李春梅; 余黎静; 苏红侠

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of shame on Help Seeking Attitude of female Urinary Incontinence patients. Methods: A total of 232 female urinary incontinence patients were recruited from ifve community hospitals in Wenzhou by convenience sampling method. They were investigated with Urinary Incontinence knowledge questionnaire, Help Seeking Attitude Scale of Female Urinary Incontinence patients, and Shame Experience Scale. The relationship between shame and Help Seeking Attitude of Female Urinary Incontinence patients was analyzed. Results: The total score of Help Seeking Attitude of Female Urinary Incontinence patients was (31.88±3.79). There were signiifcant negative correlations between score of shame of female Urinary Incontinence patients and Help Seeking Attitude. Regression analysis showed that the factor scores of shame of female Urinary Incontinence patients such as behavioral shame and family shame could independently explain 30.7% of the variance for Help Seeking Attitude after controlling demographic variables. Conclusion: Clinical medical staff should focus on the shortcomings of Help Seeking Attitude of female Urinary Incontinence patients, and take effective measures to reduce shame of female Urinary Incontinence patients to improve the Help Seeking Attitude of female Urinary Incontinence patients.%目的:调查羞耻感对社区女性尿失禁患者求医态度的影响。方法:采用便利抽样法抽取温州市5所社区医院的女性尿失禁患者232名进行问卷调查,了解女性尿失禁患者羞耻感和求医态度的现状,并探讨两者之间的关系。结果:社区女性尿失禁患者的求医态度总分为(31.88±3.79)分,女性尿失禁患者的羞耻感与其求医态度呈负相关,回归分析显示,控制人口学变量之后,行为羞耻、家庭羞耻共可以解释女性尿失禁患者求医态度的30.7%。结论:临床医护工作者应重视女性尿失禁患者求医态度的现状,制

  4. Simulated human patients and patient-centredness: The uncanny hybridity of nursing education, technology, and learning to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Aileen V

    2017-01-01

    Positioned within a hybrid of the human and technology, professional nursing practice has always occupied a space that is more than human. In nursing education, technology is central in providing tools with which practice knowledge is mobilized so that students can safely engage with simulated human patients without causing harm to real people. However, while there is an increased emphasis on deploying these simulated humans as emissaries from person-centred care to demonstrate what it is like to care for real humans, the nature of what is really going on in simulation-what is real and what is simulated-is very rarely discussed and poorly understood. This paper explores how elements of postcolonial critical thought can aid in understanding the challenges of educating nurses to provide person-centred care within a healthcare culture that is increasingly reliant on technology. Because nursing education is itself a hybrid of real and simulated practice, it provides an appropriate case study to explore the philosophical question of technology in healthcare discourse, particularly as it relates to the relationship between the human patient and its uncanny simulated double. Drawing on postcolonial elements such as the uncanny, diaspora, hybridity, and créolité, the hybrid conditions of nursing education are examined in order to open up new possibilities of thinking about how learning to care is entangled with this technological space to assist in shaping professional knowledge of person-centred care. Considering these issues through a postcolonial lens opens up questions about the nature of the difficulty in using simulated human technologies in clinical education, particularly with the paradoxical aim of providing person-centred care within a climate that increasingly characterized as posthuman. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Electronic game: A key effective technology to promote behavioral change in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Safdari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer diagnosis is a very unpleasant and unbelievable experience. Appropriate management and treatment of these diseases require a high degree of patient engagement. Interactive health electronic games are engaging, fun, challenging, and experiential and have the potential to change the attitude and behavior, which can improve the player's health. The use of these digital tools, as one of the most attractive and entertaining modern technologies, canem power patients, provide suitable palliative care, promote health behavior change strategies, increase patient engagement, enhance healthy lifestyle habits, improve self.management, and finally improve the quality of life of the patients. Finally, the aim of this article was to describe electronic games and their effects on the promotion of behavior change in cancer patients. In addition, this article describes categories, characteristic features, and benefits of this digital media in the lifestyle modification of cancer patients.

  6. Electronic game: A key effective technology to promote behavioral change in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Goodini, Azadeh; Mirzaee, Mahboobeh; Farzi, Jebraeil

    2016-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is a very unpleasant and unbelievable experience. Appropriate management and treatment of these diseases require a high degree of patient engagement. Interactive health electronic games are engaging, fun, challenging, and experiential and have the potential to change the attitude and behavior, which can improve the player's health. The use of these digital tools, as one of the most attractive and entertaining modern technologies, canem power patients, provide suitable palliative care, promote health behavior change strategies, increase patient engagement, enhance healthy lifestyle habits, improve self.management, and finally improve the quality of life of the patients. Finally, the aim of this article was to describe electronic games and their effects on the promotion of behavior change in cancer patients. In addition, this article describes categories, characteristic features, and benefits of this digital media in the lifestyle modification of cancer patients.

  7. Internet, technology help Estonia's transformation / James Thorner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Thorner, James

    2008-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese esinemisest Lõuna-Florida Tampa ülikoolis. Riigipea rääkis Eesti edust ja e-riigi arengust. Artiklis on antud ka lühiülevaade president T. H. Ilvese elukäigust. Vabariigi President töövisiidil Ameerika Ühendriikides 17.-23.04.2008

  8. Internet, technology help Estonia's transformation / James Thorner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Thorner, James

    2008-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese esinemisest Lõuna-Florida Tampa ülikoolis. Riigipea rääkis Eesti edust ja e-riigi arengust. Artiklis on antud ka lühiülevaade president T. H. Ilvese elukäigust. Vabariigi President töövisiidil Ameerika Ühendriikides 17.-23.04.2008

  9. Helping the Retina Regenerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Briefs > Helping the retina regenerate Helping the retina regenerate NEI Audacious Goals Initiative report outlines strategies to replace or reprogram neurons in the retina News Brief 03/30/17 ...

  10. Acceptability of robotic technology in neuro-rehabilitation: preliminary results on chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Turchetti, Giuseppe; Palla, Ilaria; Posteraro, Federico; Dario, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    During the last decade, different robotic devices have been developed for motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors. These devices have been shown to improve motor impairment and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms underlying motor recovery after a stroke. The assessment of the robotic technology for rehabilitation assumes great importance. The aim of this study is to present preliminary results on the assessment of the acceptability of the robotic technology for rehabilitation on a group of thirty-four chronic stroke patients. The results from questionnaires on the patients' acceptability of two different robot-assisted rehabilitation scenarios show that the robotic approach was well accepted and tolerated by the patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychosocial support for patients in pediatric oncology: the influences of parents, schools, peers, and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Lalita K; Kato, Pamela M

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer can be associated with profound psychosocial changes in the life of young patients. Although nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals are important sources of support, psychosocial support is also available through parents, schools, and peers. This article presents a review of the literature on how parents, schools, and peers affect the coping and adjustment of young patients with cancer and critically reviews interventions directed at improving functioning in these areas. Special attention is paid to recent interventions that exploit technology such as video games, CD-ROMs, and the Internet to provide creative new forms of support for patients in pediatric oncology. Existing research on both technological and interpersonal forms of intervention and support shows promising results, and suggestions for further study are provided.

  12. A helping hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjam de Klerk; Alice de Boer; Sjoerd Kooiker; Inger Plaisier; Peggy Schyns

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Hulp geboden   The help provided to people with a care need is about to undergo major changes in the Netherlands. People who need help will be expected to rely more on help from members of their network. What are the opportunities for informal carers and volunteers, and where do the

  13. Towards a wireless patient: chronic illness, scarce care and technological innovation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Carl; Finch, Tracy; Mair, Frances; Mort, Maggie

    2005-10-01

    'Modernization' is a key health policy objective in the UK. It extends across a range of public service delivery and organizational contexts, and also means there are radical changes in perspective on professional behaviour and practice. New information and communications technologies have been seen as one of the key mechanisms by which these changes can be engendered. In particular, massive investment in information technologies promises the rapid distribution and deployment of patient-centred information across internal organizational boundaries. While the National Health Service (NHS) sits on the edge of a pound sterling 6 billion investment in electronic patient records, other technologies find their status as innovative vehicles for professional behaviour change and service delivery in question. In this paper, we consider the ways that telemedicine and telehealthcare systems have been constructed first as a field of technological innovation, and more recently, as management solutions to problems around the distribution of health care. We use NHS responses to chronic illness as a medium for understanding these shifts. In particular, we draw attention to the shifting definitions of 'innovation' and to the ways that these shifts define a move away from notions of technological advance towards management control.

  14. Developing next-generation telehealth tools and technologies: patients, systems, and data perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J; Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth?

  15. Incorporating Novel Mobile Health Technologies Into Management of Knee Osteoarthritis in Patients Treated With Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid: Rationale and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Donald; Skrepnik, Nebojsa; Toselli, Richard M; Leroy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. One relatively new strategy that could be helpful in the management of OA is the use of mHealth technologies, as they can be used to increase physical activity and promote exercise, which are key components of knee OA management. Objective Currently, no published data on the use of a mHealth approach to comprehensively monitor physical activity in patients with OA are available, and sim...

  16. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  17. Help Me Remember My Meds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Rachel M; Panther, Shannon G

    2016-01-01

    Nonadherence has led to increased health consequences and higher health care costs. A study surveyed subjects using either blister pack or a Philips Medication Dispenser machine to determine medication adherence. Although there is still a research gap associated with medication packaging, it has great potential to help patients who have difficulty managing their multiple medications.

  18. Healthcare model with use of information and communication technology for patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew

    2016-07-15

    The healthcare system is positioned in the patient's environment and works with other determinants of the treatment. Patient care requires a whole system compatible to the needs of organizational and technical solutions. The purpose of this study is to present a new model of patient-oriented care, in which the use of information and communication technology (ICT) can improve the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the process of healthcare for chronically ill patients. Knowledge of the circumstances surrounding ecosystem and of the patients' needs, taking into account the fundamental healthcare goals allows us to build a new models of care, starting with the economic assumptions. The method used is modeling the construction of efficient healthcare system with the patient-centered model using ICT tools. We present a new systemic concept of building patient's environment in which he is the central figure of the healthcare organization - so called patient centered system. The use of ICT in the model of chronic patient's healthcare can improve the effectiveness of this kind of care. The concept is a vision to making wide platform of information management in chronic disease in a real environment ecosystem of patient using ICT tools. On the basis of a systematic approach to the model of chronic disease, and the knowledge of the patient itself, a model of the ecosystem impacts and interactions through information feedback and the provision of services can be constructed. ICT assisted techniques will increase the effectiveness of patient care, in which nowadays information exchange plays a key role.

  19. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. T. Miller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (. The majority of participants were males (63%, black (93%, and Hispanic (11.4% and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%. Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%. The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%. Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE < 10. Ninety-six percent reported owning a mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily ( and use their phone for text messages (. The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  20. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher W T; Himelhoch, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (SD = 9.2). The majority of participants were males (63%), black (93%), and Hispanic (11.4%) and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%). Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%). The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%). Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily (P = 0.03) and use their phone for text messages (P = 0.002). The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  1. Development and Evaluation of CAHPS® Questions to Assess the Impact of Health Information Technology on Patient Experiences with Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, D. Keith; Brown, Julie A.; Hays, Ron D.; Gallagher, Patricia; Ralston, James D.; Hugh, Mildred; Kanter, Michael; Serrato, Carl A.; Cosenza, Carol; Halamka, John; Ding, Lin; Cleary, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about whether health information technology (HIT) affects patient experiences with health care. Objective To develop HIT questions that assess patients care experiences not evaluated by existing ambulatory CAHPS measures. Research Design We reviewed published articles and conducted focus groups and cognitive testing to develop survey questions. We collected data, using mail and the internet, from patients of 69 physicians receiving care at an academic medical center and two regional integrated delivery systems in late 2009 and 2010. We evaluated questions and scales about HIT using factor analysis, item-scale correlations, and reliability (internal consistency and physician-level) estimates. Results We found support for three HIT composites: doctor use of computer (2 items), e-mail (2 items), and helpfulness of provider’s website (4 items). Corrected item-scale correlations were 0.37 for the two doctor use of computer items and 0.71 for the two e-mail items, and ranged from 0.50 to 0.60 for the provider’s website items. Cronbach’s alpha was high for e-mail (0.83) and provider’s website (0.75), but only 0.54 for doctor use of computer. As few as 50 responses per physician would yield reliability of 0.70 for e-mail and provider’s website. Two HIT composites, doctor use of computer (p<0.001) and provider’s website (p=0.02), were independent predictors of overall ratings of doctors. Conclusions New CAHPS HIT items were identified that measure aspects of patient experiences not assessed by the CAHPS C&G 1.0 survey. PMID:23064271

  2. Analysis of the concept of nursing educational technology applied to the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cruz Esmeraldo Áfio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is aimed at analyzing the concept of educational technology, produced by nursing, applied to the patient. Rodgers´ Evolutionary Method of Concept Analysis was used, identifying background, attributes and consequential damages. 13 articles were selected for analysis in which the background was identified: knowledge deficiency, shortage of nursing professionals' time, to optimize nursing work, the need to achieve the goals of the patients. Attributes: tool, strategy, innovative approach, pedagogical approach, mediator of knowledge, creative way to encourage the acquisition of skills, health production instrument. Consequences: to improve the quality of life, encouraging healthy behavior, empowerment, reflection and link. It emphasizes the importance of educational technologies for the care in nursing, to boost health education activities.

  3. Coherent efforts in relation to COPD patients with special emphasis on the quality and technological solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Vestergaard*, Kitt; Andresen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    with respect to COPD patients. National Board of Health has produced series of recommendations to ensure quality based among others on The Chronic Care Model. But how do COPD patients and health professionals define quality themselves in daily life? University College Zealand and COPD Competence Center......, Hospital Naestved investigate COPD patients’ and health professionals’ perspectives with respect to their assessments of quality in clinical pathways and daily life focusing on clinical pathways, interdisciplinary sharing of knowledge and use of technology. Identification of parameters will be important...... insights in developing new ways of interconnections between key players in strengthening quality and consistency of patient care in pathways between sectors for the COPD patient. Aims: - To explore parameters for quality focusing on clinical pathways, competencies and daily life with respect to COPD...

  4. Advanced lightweight cooling-garment technology: functional improvements in thermosensitive patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Heim, A; Rothmaier, M; Weder, M; Kool, J; Schenk, P; Kesselring, J

    2007-03-01

    Cooling of thermosensitive patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) can improve clinical symptoms. In order to study the effectiveness of an advanced lightweight cooling-garment technology based on aquatic evaporation, a single-blinded balanced crossover study was performed on 20 patients with an Expanded Disability Status Scale score garment prototype for peripheral cooling suggest improvement of a timed-walking test, leg-strength, fine-motor skills and subjective benefits. Preliminary data of the heart rate variability (HRV) including six patients suggest that the MS patients show an abnormal HRV after sham condition, which is normalized after cooling. Technical information was gained about the cooling activity and the practicability and handling of the device. These encouraging findings promote further adaptations of the prototype to increase its cooling properties and ameliorate the practicability of the cooling garment.

  5. Empathic engineering: helping deliver dignity through design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Ian; Cornish, Katie; Bradley, Mike; Clarkson, P. John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dignity is a key value within healthcare. Technology is also recognized as being a fundamental part of healthcare delivery, but also a potential cause of dehumanization of the patient. Therefore, understanding how medical devices can be designed to help deliver dignity is important. This paper explores the role of empathy tools as a way of engendering empathy in engineers and designers to enable them to design for dignity. A framework is proposed that makes the link between empathy tools and outcomes of feelings of dignity. It represents a broad systems view that provides a structure for reviewing the evidence for the efficacy of empathy tools and also how dignity can be systematically understood for particular medical devices. PMID:26453036

  6. A technology-enabled adherence enhancement system for people with bipolar disorder: results from a feasibility and patient acceptance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Michael S Davis,2 Kristin A Cassidy,3 Joseph Nestor,2 Johnny Sams,3 Edna Fuentes-Casiano3 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurological and Behavioral Outcomes Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2MedicaSafe, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: As poor medication adherence is common in bipolar disorder (BD, technology-assisted approaches may help to monitor and enhance adherence. This study evaluated preliminary feasibility, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence, BD knowledge, and BD symptoms associated with the use of a multicomponent technology-assisted adherence enhancement system. Methods: This prospective study tested the system in five BD patients over a 15-day period. System components included: 1 an automated pill cap with remote monitoring sensor; 2 a multimedia adherence enhancement program; and 3 a treatment incentive program. This study evaluated system usability, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence (Morisky scale, knowledge (treatment knowledge test [TKT], and symptoms (internal state scale [ISS]. Results: Mean age of the sample was 62 years, 4/5 (80% Caucasian, and 4/5 (80% single/divorced or widowed. Most participants (4/5, 80% were on a single BD medication. Participants had BD for an average of 21 years. Challenges included attaching the pill sensor to standard pharmacy bottles for individuals using very large pill containers or those with multiday pill boxes. Three of five (60% individuals completed the full 15-day period. Usability scores were high overall. Mean Morisky scores improved. Means on all four subscales of the ISS were all in the direction of improvement. On the TKT, there was a 40% increase in mean scores. Conclusion: A multicomponent technology-assisted BD

  7. [Use of plasma technology in treatment of patients with pyo-inflammatory diseases of soft tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanov, A G; Nikmatsianov, S S; Nurtdinov, M A; Bakiev, I M; Men'shikov, A M; Shaĭbakov, D G

    2007-01-01

    The authors substantiated the method of treatment of pyo-inflammatory diseases based on experiments in white rats, using plasma flow at different stages of the process. The plasma technology was used in the clinic in 130 patients that allowed shortening the period of preparing the wounds to operative treatment and reducing the period of hospital stay from 15.3 to 9.2 days, improving results of treatment by 20% and saving on expensive bandaging materials and medicines.

  8. User-experiences with a web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on acceptance and commitment therapy and self-compassion: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhle, Nadine; Drossaert, Constance H C; Jaran, Jasmijn; Schreurs, Karlein M G; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck-de; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2017-02-28

    Partners of cancer patients are the cornerstone of supportive cancer care. They assume different roles and responsibilities that optimally support the patient. Such support is highly demanding, and many partners report (mental) health problems. However, many of them do not use professional supportive care themselves. Offering a Web-based self-help intervention based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and self-compassion could be an important resource to support this group. This qualitative study aimed to examine user-experiences with a Web-based self-help intervention based on ACT and self-compassion among partners of cancer patients. Individual in-depth interviews, about partners' appreciation of the intervention and lessons learned, were conducted with 14 partners of cancer patients who used the Web-based self-help intervention. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by three independent coders both deductively and inductively. In general, partners appreciated the intervention, however, they also expressed ambivalent feelings towards peer support, the content of the feedback of their counselor, and the 'tunneled' structure of the intervention. The majority of the partners reported being more self-compassionate accepting that they experienced negative thoughts and feelings, they reported that they learned to increase the distance between their thoughts and themselves, they indicated being more aware of their personal values, and they thought that they were better able to commit to those values. They also reported other (non-specific) helpful processes such as insight and acknowledgement, positivity, the possibility to tell their story, time for themselves, and feeling closer and more connected with their partner (the patient). Partners of cancer patients indicated to appreciate the Web-based self-help intervention based on ACT and self-compassion. They felt that the intervention helped them to cope with negative emotions

  9. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  10. Incorporating Novel Mobile Health Technologies Into Management of Knee Osteoarthritis in Patients Treated With Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid: Rationale and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrepnik, Nebojsa; Toselli, Richard M; Leroy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. One relatively new strategy that could be helpful in the management of OA is the use of mHealth technologies, as they can be used to increase physical activity and promote exercise, which are key components of knee OA management. Objective Currently, no published data on the use of a mHealth approach to comprehensively monitor physical activity in patients with OA are available, and similarly, no data on whether mHealth technologies can impact outcomes are available. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth technology as part of a tailored, comprehensive management strategy for patients with knee OA. Methods The study will assess the impact of a smartphone app that integrates data from a wearable activity monitor (thereby both encouraging changes in mobility as well as tracking them) combined with education about the benefits of walking on patient mobility. The results from the intervention group will be compared with data from a control group of individuals who are given the same Arthritis Foundation literature regarding the benefits of walking and wearable activity monitors but who do not have access to the data from those monitors. Activity monitors will capture step count estimates and will compare those with patients’ step goals, calories burned, and distance walked. Patients using the novel smartphone app will be able to enter information on their daily pain, mood, and sleep quality. The relationships among activity and pain, activity and mood, and sleep will be assessed, as will patient satisfaction with and adherence to the mobile app. Results We present information on an upcoming trial that will prospectively assess the ability of a mobile app to improve mobility for knee OA patients who are treated with intra-articular hyaluronic acid. Conclusions We anticipate the results of this study will support the concept that m

  11. Helping Children Understand Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    Children of divorced parents may bring many problems along when they come to school. Teachers can recognize these troubles and help children learn to handle them. They may be able to help children better understand their feelings about their parents' divorce. (CJ)

  12. Handi Helps, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handi Helps, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The six issues of Handi Helps presented here focus on specific issues of concern to the disabled, parents, and those working with the disabled. The two-page handi help fact sheets focus on the following topics: child sexual abuse prevention, asthma, scoliosis, the role of the occupational therapist, kidnapping, and muscular dystrophy. Each handi…

  13. Help! It's Hair Loss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Help! It's Hair Loss! KidsHealth > For Kids > Help! It's Hair Loss! Print A A A What's in ... part above the skin, is dead. (That's why it doesn't hurt to get a haircut!) This ...

  14. Design and methods of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), a multicomponent targeted intervention to prevent delirium in hospitalized older patients: efficacy and cost-effectiveness in Dutch health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, Marije J; Steunenberg, Bas; van der Mast, Roos C; Inouye, Sharon K; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2013-07-23

    The Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) has been shown to be highly efficient and (cost-)effective in reducing delirium incidence in the USA. HELP provides multicomponent protocols targeted at specific risk factors for delirium and introduces a different view on care organization, with trained volunteers playing a pivotal role. The primary aim of this study is the quantification of the (cost-)effectiveness of HELP in the Dutch health care system. The second aim is to investigate the experiences of patients, families, professionals and trained volunteers participating in HELP. A multiple baseline approach (also known as a stepped-wedge design) will be used to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of HELP in a cluster randomized controlled study. All patients aged 70 years and older who are at risk for delirium and are admitted to cardiology, internal medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics and surgery at two participating community hospitals will be included. These eight units are implementing the intervention in a successive order that will be determined at random. The incidence of delirium, the primary outcome, will be measured with the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Secondary outcomes include the duration and severity of delirium, quality of life, length of stay and the use of care services up to three months after hospital discharge. The experiences of patients, families, professionals and volunteers will be investigated using a qualitative design based on the grounded theory approach. Professionals and volunteers will be invited to participate in focus group interviews. Additionally, a random sample of ten patients and their families from each hospital unit will be interviewed at home after discharge. We hypothesize that HELP will reduce delirium incidence during hospital admission and decrease the duration and severity of delirium and length of hospital stays among these older patients, which will lead to reduced health care costs. The results of this study may

  15. Patient Insights Into the Design of Technology to Support a Strengths-Based Approach to Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansdottir, Olöf Birna; Stenberg, Una; Krogseth, Tonje; Stange, Kurt C; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of research studies in the psychological and biobehavioral sciences support incorporating patients’ personal strengths into illness management as a way to empower and activate the patients, thus improving their health and well-being. However, lack of attention to patients’ personal strengths is still reported in patient–provider communication. Information technology (IT) has great potential to support strengths-based patient–provider communication and collaboration, but knowledge about the users’ requirements and preferences is inadequate. Objective This study explored the aspirations and requirements of patients with chronic conditions concerning IT tools that could help increase their awareness of their own personal strengths and resources, and support discussion of these assets in consultations with health care providers. Methods We included patients with different chronic conditions (chronic pain, morbid obesity, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and used various participatory research methods to gain insight into the participants’ needs, values, and opinions, and the contexts in which they felt strengths-based IT tools could be used. Results Participants were positive toward using technology to support them in identifying and discussing their personal strengths in clinical consultation, but also underlined the importance of fitting it to their specific requirements and the right contexts of use. Participants recommended that technology be designed for use in preconsultation settings (eg, at home) and felt that it should support them in both identifying strengths and in finding out new ways how strengths can be used to attain personal health-related goals. Participants advocated use of technology to support advance preparation for consultations and empower them to take a more active role. IT tools were suggested to be potentially useful in specific contexts, including individual or group consultations with

  16. Application of RFID technology in patient tracking and medication traceability in emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, María; Cabrero-Canosa, Mariano; Vizoso Hermida, José; Carrajo García, Lino; Llamas Gómez, Daniel; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Martín Herranz, Isabel

    2012-12-01

    One of the most important factors that directly affects the quality of health care is patient safety. Minimize the occurrence of adverse events is one of the main challenges for health professionals. This requires continuous tracking of the patient by different areas and services, a process known as traceability and proper patient identification and medication prescribed. This article presents an information system for patient tracking and drugs developed for the Emergency Department of Hospital A Coruña. The systems use RFID technology to perform various tasks: (1) locate patients in different areas; (2) measure patient care times and waiting times; (3) identify unitary doses of medication; and (4) ensure the correct matching between the patient and the medication prescribed by the doctor. The hardware infrastructure as well as the optimal configuration of devices interconnected via a wireless network was determined by conducting a detailed coverage study. To support all the functionality needed, specific tools were designed and integrated with proprietary software applications. The RFID system was evaluated positively by staff from different professional profiles involved in its development or subsequent implementation.

  17. Design simplicity influences patient portal use: the role of aesthetic evaluations for technology acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Allison J; Watkins, Ivan; Mackert, Michael S; Xie, Bo; Stephens, Keri K; Shalev, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    This study focused on patient portal use and investigated whether aesthetic evaluations of patient portals function are antecedent variables to variables in the Technology Acceptance Model. A cross-sectional survey of current patient portals users (N = 333) was conducted online. Participants completed the Visual Aesthetics of Website Inventory, along with items measuring perceived ease of use (PEU), perceived usefulness (PU), and behavioral intentions (BIs) to use the patient portal. The hypothesized model accounted for 29% of the variance in BIs to use the portal, 46% of the variance in the PU of the portal, and 29% of the variance in the portal's PEU. Additionally, one dimension of the aesthetic evaluations functions as a predictor in the model - simplicity evaluations had a significant positive effect on PEU. This study provides evidence that aesthetic evaluations - specifically regarding simplicity - function as a significant antecedent variable to patients' use of patient portals and should influence patient portal design strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Technology-dependency among patients discharged from a children's hospital: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Virginia

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in medical technology may be increasing the population of children who are technology-dependent (TD. We assessed the proportion of children discharged from a children's hospital who are judged to be TD, and determined the most common devices and number of prescription medications at the time of discharge. Methods Chart review of 100 randomly selected patients from all services discharged from a children's hospital during the year 2000. Data were reviewed independently by 4 investigators who classified the cases as TD if the failure or withdrawal of the technology would likely have adverse health consequences sufficient to require hospitalization. Only those cases where 3 or 4 raters agreed were classified as TD. Results Among the 100 randomly sampled patients, the median age was 7 years (range: 1 day to 24 years old, 52% were male, 86% primarily spoke English, and 54% were privately insured. The median length of stay was 3 days (range: 1 to 103 days. No diagnosis accounted for more than 5% of cases. 41% were deemed to be technology dependent, with 20% dependent upon devices, 32% dependent upon medications, and 11% dependent upon both devices and medications. Devices at the time of discharge included gastrostomy and jejeunostomy tubes (10%, central venous catheters (7%, and tracheotomies (1%. The median number of prescription medications was 2 (range: 0–13, with 12% of cases having 5 or more medications. Home care services were planned for 7% of cases. Conclusion Technology-dependency is common among children discharged from a children's hospital.

  19. Patient-Specific Therapy via Cell-Reprogramming Technology: a Curative Potential for Patients with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haizhao; Wang, Xianbao; Zhang, Ruyi; Chen, Youping; Shu, Yi; Li, Huixian; Chen, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapeutics provides great opportunities for curing diabetes. Numerous attempts have been made to establish a safe and high-efficiency gene delivery strategy, but all of them are unsuccessful. To achieve an ideal transfection, a novel gene delivery strategy was presented in this research. The novel system proposed was transfection mediated by the combination of ultrasound with microbubbles and cross-linked polyethylenimines (PEIs). Ultrasound with microbubbles enhances the permeability of target cells; moreover, cross-linked PEIs enabled DNA to escape from endosomes into the cytoplasm. If the proposed method is feasible and effective, the endogenous secretion system of insulin would be re-established in patients with diabetes.

  20. Leveraging electronic healthcare record standards and semantic web technologies for the identification of patient cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, José Alberto; Marcos, Mar; Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Moner, David; Torres-Sospedra, Joaquín; Esteban-Gil, Angel; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-12-01

    The secondary use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) often requires the identification of patient cohorts. In this context, an important problem is the heterogeneity of clinical data sources, which can be overcome with the combined use of standardized information models, virtual health records, and semantic technologies, since each of them contributes to solving aspects related to the semantic interoperability of EHR data. To develop methods allowing for a direct use of EHR data for the identification of patient cohorts leveraging current EHR standards and semantic web technologies. We propose to take advantage of the best features of working with EHR standards and ontologies. Our proposal is based on our previous results and experience working with both technological infrastructures. Our main principle is to perform each activity at the abstraction level with the most appropriate technology available. This means that part of the processing will be performed using archetypes (ie, data level) and the rest using ontologies (ie, knowledge level). Our approach will start working with EHR data in proprietary format, which will be first normalized and elaborated using EHR standards and then transformed into a semantic representation, which will be exploited by automated reasoning. We have applied our approach to protocols for colorectal cancer screening. The results comprise the archetypes, ontologies, and datasets developed for the standardization and semantic analysis of EHR data. Anonymized real data have been used and the patients have been successfully classified by the risk of developing colorectal cancer. This work provides new insights in how archetypes and ontologies can be effectively combined for EHR-driven phenotyping. The methodological approach can be applied to other problems provided that suitable archetypes, ontologies, and classification rules can be designed.

  1. Help&Us: teleasistencia aplicada

    OpenAIRE

    Barbeta Sola, Josep; Cerrato Cortes, Santiago Jose

    2015-01-01

    The project is to develop a mobile application for a elderly people. The application will allow relatives and attendants of the person control of medicines and the location and use must be very simple for the patient. The project includes all aspects of product development from market research to technological, functional design, business plan, etc.

  2. Using Active Learning to Identify Health Information Technology Related Patient Safety Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Howe, Jessica L; Adams, Katharine T; Ratwani, Raj M

    2017-01-18

    The widespread adoption of health information technology (HIT) has led to new patient safety hazards that are often difficult to identify. Patient safety event reports, which are self-reported descriptions of safety hazards, provide one view of potential HIT-related safety events. However, identifying HIT-related reports can be challenging as they are often categorized under other more predominate clinical categories. This challenge of identifying HIT-related reports is exacerbated by the increasing number and complexity of reports which pose challenges to human annotators that must manually review reports. In this paper, we apply active learning techniques to support classification of patient safety event reports as HIT-related. We evaluated different strategies and demonstrated a 30% increase in average precision of a confirmatory sampling strategy over a baseline no active learning approach after 10 learning iterations.

  3. Using technology and collaborative working for a positive patient experience and to improve safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Usha

    2016-09-01

    Clinicians who treat patients with wounds need access to the resources that will enable them to deliver the best and most appropriate treatments. A partnership working initiative between Greenwich CCG Medicines management (commissioner), Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust (provider) and ConvaTec (commercial partner) was set up to provide wound-care dressings and products to patients via the community services. It lead to improved access, greater patient benefits, a reduction in dressings waste, and an increase in clinical confidence to make cost-effective, evidence-based prescribing decisions. This inspired the commissioners to collaborate with BlueBay (technology partner) to 'trailblaze' the development and introduction of an electronic wound care template for practice nurses and doctors in primary care to use in conjunction with VISION and EMIS, clinical software systems used in GP practices. This interoperability of clinical systems to improve wound care is, to date, the only one of its kind in the UK.

  4. Assessing the quality of decision support technologies using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards instrument (IPDASi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Elwyn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe the development, validation and inter-rater reliability of an instrument to measure the quality of patient decision support technologies (decision aids. DESIGN: Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing. SETTING: There has been increasing use of decision support technologies--adjuncts to the discussions clinicians have with patients about difficult decisions. A global interest in developing these interventions exists among both for-profit and not-for-profit organisations. It is therefore essential to have internationally accepted standards to assess the quality of their development, process, content, potential bias and method of field testing and evaluation. METHODS: Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five researcher-members of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration worked together to develop the instrument (IPDASi. In the fourth Stage (reliability study, eight raters assessed thirty randomly selected decision support technologies. RESULTS: IPDASi measures quality in 10 dimensions, using 47 items, and provides an overall quality score (scaled from 0 to 100 for each intervention. Overall IPDASi scores ranged from 33 to 82 across the decision support technologies sampled (n = 30, enabling discrimination. The inter-rater intraclass correlation for the overall quality score was 0.80. Correlations of dimension scores with the overall score were all positive (0.31 to 0.68. Cronbach's alpha values for the 8 raters ranged from 0.72 to 0.93. Cronbach's alphas based on the dimension means ranged from 0.50 to 0.81, indicating that the dimensions, although well correlated, measure different aspects of decision support technology quality. A short version (19 items was also developed that had very similar mean scores to IPDASi and high correlation

  5. A web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy : a protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohle, Nadine; Drossaert, Constance H. C.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a growing recognition that cancer not only affects the lives of the patients, but also the lives of their partners. Partners of cancer patients are highly involved in the illness trajectory by providing informal care and they often experience distress. However, supporting interv

  6. Helping Kids Handle Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide to Getting Involved ... With Stress Teens Talk About Stress (Video) Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress How Can I Help My Child ...

  7. Can Reading Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Ponders the effect of September 11th on teenagers. Proposes that reading books can help teenagers sort out complicated issues. Recommends young adult novels that offer hope for overcoming tragedy. Lists 50 short story collections worth reading. (PM)

  8. Helping Parents Say No.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duel, Debra K.

    1988-01-01

    Provides some activities that are designed to help students understand some of the reasons why parents sometimes refuse to let their children have pets. Includes mathematics and writing lessons, a student checklist, and a set of tips for parents. (TW)

  9. Help with Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appropriate treatment has established normal hearing for your child, a speech-language pathologist can help to correct your child’s speech and language errors. A speech-language pathologist and audiologist can ...

  10. Health Information Technology, Patient Safety, and Professional Nursing Care Documentation in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Mary Ann; Harper, Ellen; Barr, Nancy

    2015-04-14

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a documentation tool that yields data useful in enhancing patient safety, evaluating care quality, maximizing efficiency, and measuring staffing needs. Although nurses applaud the EHR, they also indicate dissatisfaction with its design and cumbersome electronic processes. This article describes the views of nurses shared by members of the Nursing Practice Committee of the Missouri Nurses Association; it encourages nurses to share their EHR concerns with Information Technology (IT) staff and vendors and to take their place at the table when nursing-related IT decisions are made. In this article, we describe the experiential-reflective reasoning and action model used to understand staff nurses' perspectives, share committee reflections and recommendations for improving both documentation and documentation technology, and conclude by encouraging nurses to develop their documentation and informatics skills. Nursing issues include medication safety, documentation and standards of practice, and EHR efficiency. IT concerns include interoperability, vendors, innovation, nursing voice, education, and collaboration.

  11. CT texture analysis can help differentiate between malignant and benign lymph nodes in the mediastinum in patients suspected for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Brun; Harders, Stefan Walbom; Ganeshan, Balaji;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma NSCLC the lymph node staging in the mediastinum is important due to impact on management and prognosis. Computed tomography texture analysis (CTTA) is a postprocessing technique that can evaluate the heterogeneity of marked regions...... in images. PURPOSE: To evaluate if CTTA can differentiate between malignant and benign lymph nodes in a cohort of patients with suspected lung cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: With tissue sampling as reference standard, 46 lymph nodes from 29 patients were analyzed using CTTA. For each lymph node, CTTA...... in differentiating between malignant and benign lymph nodes in the mediastinum in patients suspected for lung cancer, with a low intra-observer variance....

  12. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease.

  13. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF PATIENT NEED FOR A TECHNOLOGY-ENABLED REMOTE EXERCISE REHABILITATION PROGRAMME AMONG A CHRONIC ILLNESS POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Walsh

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: This study provides evidence of patient desire for a technology-enabled remote exercise rehabilitation programme. Further to this, the current study provides promising preliminary evidence for both the high level of technology use and capability among a cohort of people with chronic illness.

  15. A proposal for monitoring patients with heart failure via "smart phone technology"-based electrocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madias, John E

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous smart phone/device technology (SPT) has enabled the safe acquisition/transmission (A/T) of clinical and laboratory patient data, including the electrocardiogram (ECG). SPT-based A/T of the ECG has been found useful in the detection of atrial fibrillation, in monitoring of the QTc interval, in patients undergoing antiarrhythmic drug loading, and in management of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Previous work has shown a relationship between changes in the voltage of the ECG QRS complexes, with perturbations in the edematous state of various etiologies, including heart failure (HF). It is proposed herein to employ serially SPT-based 3-lead ECG A/T for the monitoring and management of patients with HF in their ambient environment. The proposed method will enable patients with HF to acquire/transmit their 3-lead ECG to the caring HF team, using only their smart phone and it takes into consideration the advanced degrees of physical incapacitation and age-related infirmities inherent to the HF population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Information and communication technologies for better patient self-management and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioudi, Stamatia; Lazakidou, Athina; Tsironi, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Achieving benefits from the introduction of ICTs as part of processes aimed at building sustainable self-efficacy and self-management is very difficult, not least because of a desire to avoid simply replacing patient dependency on health professionals with dependency on technology. Chronic illnesses require ongoing attention that differs from traditional, encounter-based care for acute illnesses. Patients with chronic illnesses such as asthma, cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes, heart failure and migraine headaches play a central role in managing the broad array of factors that contribute to their health. Individuals with diabetes, for example, provide close to 95% of their own care. Self-efficacy is enhanced when patients succeed in solving patient-identified problems. Patients with chronic conditions make day-to-day decisions about - self-manage - their illnesses. The paper highlights that in deploying ICTs, it is important to ensure that solutions implemented are based on a detailed understanding of users, their needs and complex interactions with health professionals, the health system and their wider environment.

  17. Sustainability of Endovenous Iron Deficiency Anaemia Treatment: Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment in IBD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Poscia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is the main extraintestinal manifestation affecting patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The Health Technology Assessment approach was applied to evaluate the sustainability of intravenous (IV iron formulations in the Italian hospital setting, with particular focus on ferric carboxymaltose. Data on the epidemiology of IBD and associated IDA, in addition to the efficacy and safety of IV iron formulations currently used in Italy, were retrieved from scientific literature. A hospital-based cost-analysis of the outpatient delivery of IV iron treatments was performed. Organizational and ethical implications were discussed. IDA prevalence in IBD patients varies markedly from 9 to 73%. IV iron preparations were proven to have good efficacy and safety profiles, and ferric carboxymaltose provided a fast correction of haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels in iron-deficient patients. Despite a higher price, ferric carboxymaltose would confer a beneficial effect to the hospital, in terms of reduced cost related to individual patient management and additionally to the patient by reducing the number of infusions and admissions to healthcare facilities. Ethically, the evaluation is appropriate due to its efficacy and compliance. This assessment supports the introduction of ferric carboxymaltose in the Italian outpatient setting.

  18. The Scottish Emergency Care Summary – an evaluation of a national shared record system aiming to improve patient care: technology report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libby MM Morris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background In Scotland, out-of-hours calls are all triaged by the National Health Service emergency service (NHS24 but the clinicians receiving calls have no direct access to patient records.Objective To improve the safety of patient care in unscheduled consultations when the usual primary care record is not available.Technology The Emergency Care Summary (ECS is a record system offering controlled access to medication and adverse reactions details for nearly every person registered with a general practice in Scotland. It holds a secure central copy of these parts of the GP practice record and is updated automatically twice daily. It is accessible under specified unplanned clinical circumstances by clinicians working in out-of-hours organisations, NHS24 and accident and emergency departments if they have consent from the patient and a current legitimate relationship for that patient’s care.Application We describe the design of the security model, management of data quality, deployment, costs and clinical benefits of the ECS over four years nationwide in Scotland, to inform the debate on the safe and effective sharing of health data in other nations.Evaluation Forms were emailed to 300 NHS24 clinicians and 81% of the 113 respondents said that the ECS was helpful or very helpful and felt that it changed their clinical management in 20% of cases.Conclusion The ECS is acceptable to patients and helpful for clinicians and is used routinely for unscheduled care when normal medical records are unavailable. Benefits include more efficient assessment and reduced drug interaction, adverse reaction and duplicate prescribing.

  19. A comparative review of patient safety initiatives for national health information technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magrabi, Farah; Aarts, Jos; Nøhr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    by searching the websites of regional and national agencies and programmes in a non-exhaustive set of exemplar countries including England, Denmark, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada and Australia. Initiatives were categorised by type and software systems covered. RESULTS: We found 27 patient safety initiatives...... regulations in some countries, the safety of the most common types of HIT systems such as EHRs and CPOE without decision support is not being explicitly addressed in most nations. Appropriate mechanisms for safety assurance are required for the full range of HIT systems for health professionals and consumers......OBJECTIVE: To collect and critically review patient safety initiatives for health information technology (HIT). METHOD: Publicly promulgated set of advisories, recommendations, guidelines, or standards potentially addressing safe system design, build, implementation or use were identified...

  20. Multilayer flow modulator stent technology: a treatment revolution for US patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh

    2015-05-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic repair is a high-risk procedure in most experienced centers, not only because of anatomical complexity but also due to the fragility of the patients in whom these aneurysms occur. Such repairs are complex, time-consuming and impose a systemic injury upon the patients, regardless of whether the repair is performed by open surgery or via a fenestrated/branched technique. The substantive risks associated with such repairs include death, dialysis and paralysis. The multilayer flow modulator (MFM) is a disruptive technology which promises a minimally invasive reproducible treatment option, with clinical results demonstrating physiological modulation of the aortic sac with abolition of spinal injury. The mode of action of MFM forces us to completely rethink aneurysm pathogenesis and, consequently, it has been met with much cynicism. We aim to uncloak some of the mystery surrounding the MFM, clarify its mode of action and explore the truth behind its clinical effectiveness.

  1. How to Break the 9-1-1 Language Barrier. Services are available to help providers communicate with patients who don’t speak English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Joseph J

    2015-09-01

    America's multiethnic composition can create havoc in answering emergency calls and translating patient information on scene. It is incumbent upon EMS services to have a translation strategy and protocol in place to mitigate delays in providing emergency care. While digital translation programs may be of assistance, exercise caution in ensuring information is accurately downloaded to obtain an accurate translation.

  2. HelpDesk answers: is it safe to add long-acting β-2 agonists to inhaled corticosteroids in patients with persistent asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Laurie; Madlon-Kay, Diane J

    2015-06-01

    Possibly. Long-acting β-2 agonists (LABAs) used in combination with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) don't appear to increase all-cause mortality or serious adverse events in patients with persistent asthma compared with ICS alone. Studies showing an increase in catastrophic events had serious methodologic issues. A large surveillance study is ongoing.

  3. Treating tinnitus distress via the Internet: A mixed methods approach of what makes patients seek help and stay motivated during Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: There are several motivational factors that tinnitus patients consider relevant for beginning and continuing ICBT. Particularly, focusing on specific targets that do not involve the tinnitus itself, and encouraging participants to take an active role in treatment may increase treatment effectiveness. However, further hypothesis-guided research is necessary to confirm our explorative results.

  4. Do advanced statistical techniques really help in the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome in patients treated with second-generation antipsychotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schependom, Jeroen; Yu, Weiping; Gielen, Jeroen; Laton, Jorne; De Keyser, Jacques; De Hert, Marc; Nagels, Guy

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in patients with schizophrenia have gained a lot of interest in recent years. Developing an algorithm to detect the metabolic syndrome based on readily available variables would eliminate the need for blood sampling, which is considered expensive and inconvenient in this population. All patients fulfilled DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. We used the International Diabetes Federation criteria (European population) to diagnose the metabolic syndrome. We used logistic regression and optimized artificial neural networks and support vector machines to detect the metabolic syndrome in a cohort of schizophrenic patients of the University Psychiatric Center Kortenberg, KU Leuven, Belgium. Testing was done on one-third of the included cohort (202 patients); training was performed using a 10-fold stratified cross-validation scheme. The data were collected between 2000 and 2008. All 3 methods yielded similar results, with satisfying accuracies of about 80%. However, none of the advanced statistical methods could improve on the results obtained using a very simple and naive model including only central obesity and information on blood pressure. Although so-called pattern recognition techniques bear high promise in improving clinical decision making, the results should be presented with caution and preferably in comparison with a less complicated technique. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  5. [Innovative patient access schemes for the adoption of new technology: risk-sharing agreements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espín, Jaime; Oliva, Juan; Rodríguez-Barrios, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The incorporation of new treatments, procedures and technologies into the services' portfolio of healthcare providers should aim to improve three areas equally: patient access to innovative solutions, the sustainability of the health system and compensation for innovation. However, traditional schemes based on fixed prices that fail to consider the product's appropriate use or its results in terms of effectiveness may lead to inefficient decision-making processes. Recently, risk-sharing agreements have appeared as new access schemes based on results that aim to reduce the uncertainty of the distinct health care players involved in reaching an agreement on new health technology financing and conditions of use. Key elements in the debate on these instruments are the huge variety of instruments available (especially those based on results), the implications for different players involved in their design and supervision, and their possible implementation in Spain. Our main conclusion is that risk-sharing agreements should be used in highly limited cases when standard conditions of access cannot be applied due to uncertainty about long-term effectiveness. These measures are aimed not only at regulating price but also at acting on the appropriate use of new technology. However, because international experience is limited, drawing a solid conclusion on the final results of the application of risk-sharing agreements would be premature. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas da Silva Muniz

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. METHODS: This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. RESULTS: The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (p<0.05 in participants' post-intervention performance and satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: Assistive technology devices may be useful therapeutic tools to enhance autonomy/independence and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

  7. Design of the study: How can health care help female breast cancer patients reduce their stress symptoms? A randomized intervention study with stepped-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordin Karin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A life threatening illness such as breast cancer can lead to a secondary diagnosis of PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder with intrusive thoughts and avoidance as major symptoms. In a former study by the research group, 80% of the patients with breast cancer reported a high level of stress symptoms close to the diagnosis, such as intrusive thoughts and avoidance behavior. These symptoms remained high throughout the study. The present paper presents the design of a randomized study evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a stress management intervention using a stepped-care design. Method Female patients over the age of 18, with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer and scheduled for adjuvant treatment in the form of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and/or hormonal therapy are eligible and will consecutively be included in the study. The study is a prospective longitudinal intervention study with a stepped-care approach, where patients will be randomised to one of two interventions in the final stage of treatment. The first step is a low intensity stress-management intervention that is given to all patients. Patients who do not respond to this level are thereafter given more intensive treatment at later steps in the program and will be randomized to more intensive stress-management intervention in a group setting or individually. The primary out-come is subjective distress (intrusion and avoidance assessed by the Impact of Event Scale (IES. According to the power-analyses, 300 patients are planned to be included in the study and will be followed for one year. Other outcomes are anxiety, depression, quality of life, fatigue, stress in daily living and utilization of hospital services. This will be assessed with well-known psychometric tested questionnaires. Also, the cost-effectiveness of the intervention given in group or individually will be evaluated. Discussion This randomized clinical trial will provide

  8. Single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin helps patients of diverse ethnicity attain recommended goals for blood pressure and lipids (the Gemini-AALA study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdine, S; Ro, Y M; Tse, H-F; Howes, L G; Aguilar-Salinas, C A; Chaves, H; Guindy, R; Chopra, P; Moller, R A; Schou, I M

    2009-03-01

    The Gemini-AALA (Australia, Asia, Latin America, Africa/Middle East) study evaluated the efficacy and safety of single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin (Caduet) for the treatment of patients of diverse ethnicity with concomitant hypertension and dyslipidaemia. This was a 14-week, open-label study including patients from 27 countries across the Middle East, Asia-Pacific, Africa and Latin America. Eight dosage strengths of single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin (5/10, 10/10, 5/20, 10/20, 5/40, 10/40, 5/80 and 10/80 mg) were titrated to improve blood pressure and lipid control. Blood pressure and lipid goals were determined according to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP ATP III) guidelines, respectively (blood pressure, or=1 cardiovascular risk factor (as defined by NCEP ATP III guidelines) in addition to hypertension/dyslipidaemia, and 61.7% had coronary heart disease/risk equivalent. At baseline, mean blood pressure was 146.6/88.3 mm Hg and LDL-C was 3.4 mmol l(-1) (130.2 mgdl(-1)). At week 14, 55.2% of patients reached both blood pressure and lipid goals, 61.3% reached blood pressure goal and 87.1% reached lipid goal (34.0% were at lipid goal at baseline). Mean blood pressure reduction was 20.2/11.4 mm Hg. For patients who were lipid-lowering drug naive at baseline, mean reduction in LDL-C was 41.0%. Treatment-related adverse events led to the discontinuation of 3.6% of patients. Single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin therapy was well tolerated and effective for the reduction of blood pressure and lipids to recommended goals in patients from diverse ethnic backgrounds.

  9. Patient safety and technology-driven medication - A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia; Lefevre, Rikke S; Møller, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Web versus app: compliance of patients in a telehealth diabetes management programme using two different technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Günter; Eckmann, Harald; Hayn, Dieter; Kreiner, Karl; Kastner, Peter; Lovell, Nigel

    2012-12-01

    Patients with diabetes were enrolled into a telemonitoring programme. They were offered the choice of collecting their health data either by using Near Field Communication (NFC) enabled mobile phones equipped with a dedicated application (App), or by means of a web-browser based user interface (Web). At the end of the study, each patient was categorized as belonging to either the App or Web group, based on the proportion of data they had transmitted using each method. Of the 403 patients, there were 291 in the App group and 112 in the Web group. The two groups were similar in their demographics, except for gender distribution where 68% of men preferred using the App method in contrast to 95% for women (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a steady decline of the compliance rate for both groups, at a similar rate during the first year. It also showed a more rapid decline of the compliance rate thereafter for the Web group, which resulted in a significantly higher rate for the App group over the whole observation period (P = 0.03). We conclude that different types of data acquisition technologies may have an important effect on patients' willingness to participate in telehealth programmes in the long-term.

  11. Use of mobile technologies in patients with psychosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, Lucia; Izquierdo, Clara; Escartí, Maria Jose; Sancho, José Vicente; Arce, David; Blanquer, Ignacio; Sanjuan, Julio

    There is a growing interest in mobile Health interventions (m-Health) in patients with psychosis. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review in order to analysethe current state of research in this area. The search of articles was carried out following the PRISMA criteria, focusing on those studies that used mobile technologies in patients with psychosis during the period from 1990 to 2016. A total of 20 articles were selected from the 431 studies found. Three types of studies are distinguished: 1) Analysis of quality and usability, 2) Improving treatment adherence and reducing hospital admissions, and 3) Analysisof patient symptoms. m-Health interventions are feasible, and are easy to use for patients with psychosis. They evaluate the evolution of psychotic symptoms more efficiently, and improve adherence to treatment, as well as symptoms and hospital admissions. However, a particular strategy does not stand out over the rest, because differences in methodology make them difficult to compare. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. El Camino Hospital: using health information technology to promote patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukunt, Susan; Hunter, Christine; Perkins, Sharon; Russell, Diana; Domanico, Lee

    2005-10-01

    El Camino Hospital is a leader in the use of health information technology to promote patient safety, including bar coding, computerized order entry, electronic medical records, and wireless communications. Each year, El Camino Hospital's board of directors sets performance expectations for the chief executive officer, which are tied to achievement of local, regional, and national safety and quality standards, including the six Institute of Medicine quality dimensions. He then determines a set of explicit quality goals and measurable actions, which serve as guidelines for the overall hospital. The goals and progress reports are widely shared with employees, medical staff, patients and families, and the public. For safety, for example, the medication error reduction team tracks and reviews medication error rates. The hospital has virtually eliminated transcription errors through its 100% use of computerized physician order entry. Clinical pathways and standard order sets have reduced practice variation, providing a safer environment. Many projects focused on timeliness, such as emergency department wait time, lab turnaround time, and pneumonia time to initial antibiotic. Results have been mixed, with projects most successful when a link was established with patient outcomes, such as in reducing time to percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  13. Serum Protein Fingerprint of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer by SELDI Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ning; GE Chun-lin; LUAN Feng-ming; YAO Dian-bo; HU Chao-jun; LI Ning; LIU Yong-feng

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To study the serum protein fingerprint of patients with pancreatic cancer and to screen for protein molecules closely related to pancreatic cancer during the onset and progression of the disease using surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization time of fight mass spectrometry(SELDI-TOF-MS).Methods:Serum samples from 20 pancreatic cancers,20 healthy volunteers and 18 patients with other pancreatic diseases.WCX magnetic beans and PBSII-C protein chips reader(Ciphergen Biosystems Ins.)were used.The protein fingerprint expression of all the Serum samples and the resulting profiles between cancer and normal were analyzed with Biomarker Wizard system.Results:A group of proteomic peaks were detected.Four differently expressed potential biomarkers were identified with the relative molecular weights of 5705 Da,4935 Da,5318 Da and 3243 Da.Among them,two proteins with m/z5705,5318Da down-regulated,and two proteins with m/z 4935,3243 Da were up-regulated in pancreatic cancers.Conclusion:SELDI technology can be used to screen significant proteins of differential expression in the serum of pancreatic cancer patients.These different proteins could be specific biomarkers of the patients with pancreatic cancer in the serum and have the potential value of further investigation.

  14. Improving patient outcomes with technology and social media in paediatric diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze May

    2015-01-01

    The UK has the highest number of children and young people with diagnosed Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in Europe, but the lowest numbers attaining good diabetes control (1, 2). Novel strategies and incorporation of digital strategies were identified in the team for development to improve overall patient care and outcomes in our population of children and young people with T1DM. Within a dual-site integrated care organisation, 3 digital initiatives were proposed from 2012-2013 to 1) establish Facebook communications with parents/patients, 2) to implement an electronic diabetes information management system (using Twinkle.Net) and 3) to undertake routine uploading of blood glucose meters and insulin pumps (using DIASEND®) with the aim to improve outcomes in paediatric diabetes care. Key objectives for the three initiatives were aimed to optimise the following outcomes: • Reduce HbA1c levels • Decrease emergency admissions, reduce diabetes-related complications and minimise the length of hospital stays • Improve patient satisfaction and communication • Improve efficiencies with mandatory audit submissions • Empower patients, parents, and the multidisciplicnary team with accurate, real-time information. These digital initiatives showed effective use of technology and social media in achieving significant improvements in all the outcomes within the objectives.

  15. The MADE help system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Haindl; M.M. de Ruiter

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMADE is the acronym for the ESPRIT project 6307, whose aim is to develop an object oriented multimedia application development environment. As part of this project the MADE help system is designed to be a distributed hypermedia system with additional support for run-time object monitori

  16. You Can Help, Too

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Beijing starts recruiting volunteers for the 2008 Olympic Games A recruitment drive for 100,000 Olympic volunteers aimed at helping Chinese people and foreigners get involved in the 2008 Games was officially launched on August 28 in Beijing. Organizers say that applications are expected to start flooding in from around the city, while mainland applicants from outside Beijing can apply for positions start-

  17. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  18. Self-Help Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert H.

    1973-01-01

    The author believes that there is a distinct need for professionals to become competent in providing materials for self-help lay efforts. Colleges and universities must provide for the facilitation of personal growth through self administered procedures by either a clinical approach (in counseling centers) or a didactic one (in classes as, for…

  19. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  20. Profile: parents help themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G E

    1981-01-01

    A short account is given of a voluntary organization, PACE, formed by parents of young handicapped children in Leeds. PACE provides friendship and help to other parents, arranges the toy library, riding for the disabled and other activities for the children. It also raises money that is needed for special projects.

  1. Help for Stressed Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Denise Clarke; Simon, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The authors argue that increased focus and pressure for high academic achievement, particularly among more highly-motivated and successful students, may have serious negative consequences. They present a number of strategies designed to help reduce both causes and consequences associated with academic stress and improve students' mental and…

  2. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  3. Brain Chip Helps Paralyzed 'Type' with Their Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Brain Chip Helps Paralyzed 'Type' With Their Mind Researchers report patients showed fastest speeds seen yet ... helped paralyzed patients "type" on a computer via mind control, at the fastest speeds yet seen in ...

  4. Health information technology to facilitate communication involving health care providers, caregivers, and pediatric patients: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Stephen James; Lokker, Cynthia; McKibbon, K Ann

    2010-06-18

    Pediatric patients with health conditions requiring follow-up typically depend on a caregiver to mediate at least part of the necessary two-way communication with health care providers on their behalf. Health information technology (HIT) and its subset, information communication technology (ICT), are increasingly being applied to facilitate communication between health care provider and caregiver in these situations. Awareness of the extent and nature of published research involving HIT interventions used in this way is currently lacking. This scoping review was designed to map the health literature about HIT used to facilitate communication involving health care providers and caregivers (who are usually family members) of pediatric patients with health conditions requiring follow-up. Terms relating to care delivery, information technology, and pediatrics were combined to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL for the years 1996 to 2008. Eligible studies were selected after three rounds of duplicate screening in which all authors participated. Data regarding patient, caregiver, health care provider, HIT intervention, outcomes studied, and study design were extracted and maintained in a Microsoft Access database. Stage of research was categorized using the UK's Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Quantitative and qualitative descriptive summaries are presented. We included 104 eligible studies (112 articles) conducted in 17 different countries and representing 30 different health conditions. The most common conditions were asthma, type 1 diabetes, special needs, and psychiatric disorder. Most studies (88, 85%) included children 2 to 12 years of age, and 73 (71%) involved home care settings. Health care providers operated in hospital settings in 96 (92%) of the studies. Interventions featured 12 modes of communication (eg, Internet, intranets, telephone, video conferencing, email, short message service [SMS], and

  5. [Scales to evaluate pain in elderly patients suffering from dementia. Help-tools for the physiotherapist, doctor, nurse and occupational therapist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; Jiménez-Palomares, María; González-López-Arza, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which scales are being used to evaluate pain in old people suffering from dementia. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all articles (randomized controlled trials and clinical trials without randomization) published in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library Plus, PEDro and Dialnet and BMC Geriatrics from January 2000 to January 2012. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not use scales for evaluating pain in elderly patients suffering from dementia, and other type of articles (case studies, reviews...). Finally, 13 studies were included in this review. From the results obtained it appears that more studies are needed to confirm the pain scales used for the elderly suffering from dementia. Observational scales may be useful to evaluate pain in these patients. Copyright © 2012 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Does Ultrasound-Guided Directional Vacuum-Assisted Removal Help Eliminate Abnormal Nipple Discharge in Patients with Benign Intraductal Single Mass?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Na Ri Ya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Seon [Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Se Yeong [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Mi Jung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate whether the removal of an intraductal mass using an ultrasound (US)-guided directional vacuum-assisted device can eliminate symptoms in patients presenting with abnormal nipple discharge. Between March 2004 and October 2006, 36 patients who presented with abnormal nipple discharge, underwent US-guided, 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy for a benign intraductal single mass on US. The ability of the procedure to eliminate nipple discharge was evaluated by physical examination during follow-up US. Lesion characteristics, biopsy variables, and histologic features were analyzed to identify factors affecting symptom resolution. Of the 36 lesions, 25 (69%) were intraductal papillomas, 10 (28%) were fibrocystic changes, and one (3%) was a fibroadenoma. The nipple discharge disappeared in 69% (25 of 36) of the women at a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range 12-42 month). There was no difference in the lesion characteristics, biopsy variables, and the histologic features between groups that eliminated the symptom compared those with persistent nipple discharge. US-guided directional vacuum-assisted removal of an intraductal mass appears to eliminate nipple discharge in only 69% of patients and thus, it should not be considered as an alternative to surgical excision.

  7. Implementing healthcare information security: standards can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Andrej; Bernik, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Using widely spread common approaches to systems security in health dedicated controlled environments, a level of awareness, confidence and acceptance of relevant standardisation is evaluated. Patients' information is sensitive, so putting appropriate organisational techniques as well as modern technology in place to secure health information is of paramount importance. Mobile devices are becoming the top priorities in advanced information security planning with healthcare environments being no exception. There are less and less application areas in healthcare without having a need for a mobile functionality which represents an even greater information security challenge. This is also true in emergency treatments, rehabilitation and homecare just to mention a few areas outside hospital controlled environments. Unfortunately quite often traditional unsecured communications principles are still in routine use for communicating sensitive health related information. The security awareness level with users, patients and care professionals is not high enough so potential threats and risks may not be addressed and the respective information security management is therefore weak. Standards like ISO/IEC 27000 ISMS family, the ISO/IEC 27799 information security guidelines in health are often not well known, but together with legislation principles such as HIPAA, they can help.

  8. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill Acquisition model,…

  9. Novel X-ray image noise reduction technology reduces patient radiation dose while maintaining image quality in coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, T.J. ten; Wely, M.H. van; Gehlmann, H.R.; Mauti, M.; Camaro, C.; Reifart, N.; Suryapranata, H.; Boer, M.J. de

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The consequences of high radiation dose for patient and staff demand constant improvements in X-ray dose reduction technology. This study assessed non-inferiority of image quality and quantified patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology for an anatomy-specific optimised cine

  10. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill…

  11. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill Acquisition model,…

  12. Toward a model for field-testing patient decision-support technologies : a qualitative field-testing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, R.; Elwyn, G.; Edwards, A.; Watson, E.; Austoker, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Field-testing is a quality assurance criterion in the development of patient decision-support technologies (PDSTs), as identified in the consensus statement of the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration. We incorporated field-testing into the development of a Web-bas

  13. Information and communication technology in patient education and support for people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli; Lahti, Mari; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Adams, Clive E

    2012-10-17

    Poor compliance with treatment often means that many people with schizophrenia or other severe mental illness relapse and may need frequent and repeated hospitalisation. Information and communication technology (ICT) is increasingly being used to deliver information, treatment or both for people with severe mental disorders. To evaluate the effects of psychoeducational interventions using ICT as a means of educating and supporting people with schizophrenia or related psychosis. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (2008, 2009 and September 2010), inspected references of identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. All clinical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ICT as a psychoeducational and supportive tool with any other type of psychoeducation and supportive intervention or standard care. We selected trials and extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated fixed-effect risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). We assessed risk of bias using the criteria described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We included six trials with a total of 1063 participants. We found no significant differences in the primary outcomes (patient compliance and global state) between psychoeducational interventions using ICT and standard care.Technology-mediated psychoeducation improved mental state in the short term (n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.00; n = 30, 1 RCT, MD -0.51, 95% CI -0.90 to -0.12) but not global state (n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.42). Knowledge and insight were not effected (n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.15; n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.03). People allocated to technology-mediated psychoeducation perceived that they received more social support than people allocated to the standard care group (n = 30, 1 RCT, MD

  14. BMT Roadmap: A User-Centered Design Health Information Technology Tool to Promote Patient-Centered Care in Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runaas, Lyndsey; Hanauer, David; Maher, Molly; Bischoff, Evan; Fauer, Alex; Hoang, Tiffany; Munaco, Anna; Sankaran, Roshun; Gupta, Rahael; Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Cohn, Amy; An, Larry; Tewari, Muneesh; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-05-01

    Health information technology (HIT) has great potential for increasing patient engagement. Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a setting ripe for using HIT but in which little research exists. "BMT Roadmap" is a web-based application that integrates patient-specific information and includes several domains: laboratory results, medications, clinical trial details, photos of the healthcare team, trajectory of transplant process, and discharge checklist. BMT Roadmap was provided to 10 caregivers of patients undergoing first-time HCT. Research assistants performed weekly qualitative interviews throughout the patient's hospitalization and at discharge and day 100 to assess the impact of BMT Roadmap. Rigorous thematic analysis revealed 5 recurrent themes: emotional impact of the HCT process itself; critical importance of communication among patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers; ways in which BMT Roadmap was helpful during inpatient setting; suggestions for improving BMT Roadmap; and other strategies for organization and management of complex healthcare needs that could be incorporated into BMT Roadmap. Caregivers found the tool useful and easy to use, leading them to want even greater access to information. BMT Roadmap was feasible, with no disruption to inpatient care. Although this initial study is limited by the small sample size and single-institution experience, these initial findings are encouraging and support further investigation.

  15. Changes in clinician ability to assess risk and help patients determine the need for hiv testing: a comparison of three teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Springer, Lucy A; Everett, Mauritha R; Rotach, Elizabeth G; Vojir, Carol P

    2006-12-01

    An estimated one of four people with HIV in the United States do not know they have the infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages HIV testing in clinical settings, but there is evidence that this is not done on a regular basis. The purposes of this study were to (a) compare two less traditional teaching methods with a classroom method to determine whether the less traditional methods resulted in greater improvement of clinician knowledge, skill, and willingness to perform HIV risk assessment as the basis for recommending HIV testing; and (b) find out whether there were significant differences in convenience, cost, learner preference, or learner acceptance that would make one method more desirable than the others. Findings from participants in the standardized patient interaction with facilitator feedback (FB) and the case-based self-study module (SSM) were not different from those of participants in the interactive classroom education method (CL). Generally, there were positive changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors over time. Participants preferred standardized patient interaction (FB) and interactive classes (CL) to self-study modules (SSM).

  16. Hinder, More Than Help

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余习榜

    2008-01-01

    @@ Ladies and gentlemen, I'm honored to stand here on behalf of my school to share my experiences and opinions with you. Some people say that our mother ton-gue is of great help to our learning English. However, for my point of view, too much use of Chinese will definitely exert nega-tive effects and tend to hinder the learning progress.

  17. A Little Help

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    More government changes needed to clarify role of NGOs in China As China's first NGOs to receive state funding embark on a pilot program to help poverty-stricken villages, experts say the work of aid groups in a country trying to ease a significant rich-poor divide remains hamstrung by regulations and bureaucracy. In February, the China Foundation for Poverty Alleviation (CFPA) announced that

  18. Call...For Help!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Graham

    1998-01-01

    Discusses computer-assisted language learning for foreign-language teachers, examining the history of educational technology and highlighting CD-ROM for foreign language learning. Looks at various frustrations foreign-language teachers may experience when working with new hardware and software, discusses various types of hardware and software, and…

  19. The Helpful House

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Many everyday tasks are difficult—even impossible for people confined to wheelchairs.Now a unique house near Baltimore,Md., demonstrates how technology can make a building truly accessible. Developed by Volunteers for Medical Engineering in conjunction with several nonprofit organizations, Future Home takes advantage of off-the-shelf electronic controls that operate nearly all electrical and mechanical systems.

  20. A Helping Hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Chinese companies, those in the sensitive resource sector in particular, may seek cooperation with foreign PE (private equity) firms in order to navigate overseas markets with dexterity china’s top telecom network equip-ment maker Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.

  1. Adding maximum standard uptake value of primary lesion and lymph nodes in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET helps predict distant metastasis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Shi

    Full Text Available To find out the most valuable parameter of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for predicting distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.From June 2007 through December 2010, 43 non-metastatic NPC patients who underwent 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT before radical Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy were enrolled and reviewed retrospectively. PET parameters including maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max, mean standardized uptake value (SUV mean, metabolic tumor volume (MTV, and total lesion glucose (TLG of both primary tumor and cervical lymph nodes were calculated. Total SUV max were recorded as the sum of SUV max of primary tumor and cervical lymph nodes. Total SUV mean, Total MTV and Total TLG were calculated in the same way as Total SUV max.The median follow-up was 32 months (range, 23-68 months. Distant metastasis was the main pattern of treatment failure. Univariate analysis showed higher SUV max, SUV mean, MTV, and TLG of primary tumor, Total SUV max, Total MTV, Total TLG, and stage T3-4 were factors predicting for significantly poorer distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.042, p = 0.008, p = 0.023, p = 0.023, p = 0.024, p = 0.033, p = 0.016, p = 0.015. In multivariate analysis, Total SUV max was the independent predictive factor for distant metastasis (p = 0.046. Spearman Rank correlation analysis showed mediate to strong correlationship between Total SUV max and SUV max-T, and between Total SUV max and SUV max-N(Spearman coefficient: 0.568 and 0.834; p = 0.000 and p = 0.000.Preliminary results indicated that Total SUV max was an independently predictive factor for distant metastasis in patients of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy.

  2. Using risk factors to help in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with non-diagnostic electrocardiogram changes in emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Arhami Dolatabadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the association of cardiac risk factors and the risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI in Emergency Department (ED patients with non-diagnostic ECG changes. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the ED of Imam Hossein Hospital during a period of one year. In this study, patients with symptoms suggestive of AMI including chest pain, dyspnea, palpitation, syncope, cerebrovascular incidents, nausea, vomitting, dizziness and loss of consciousness were included. The demographic data and risk factors, such as age, gender, history of diabetes, Hypertension (HTN, Hyperlipidemia (HLP, renal failure, positive family history of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD, smoking, substance abuse, alcohol consumption within the past 24 hours and cocaine use within the past 48 hours were recorded. Non-diagnostic ECG included: normal, non-specific, abnormal without ischemic symptoms such as old bundle branch block, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH, etc. The final diagnosis of AMI was determined by Creatine Phosphokinase-MB (CPK-MB serum markers and Troponin I. The data were analyzed by using SPSS V. 20 and the level of statistical significance was considered to be P< 0.05. Results: HTN, HLP, family history of heart disease were significantly higher in those who had non-diagnostic ECG (P< 0.05. However, the ischemic heart diseases were significantly lower in those with non-diagnostic ECG. History of diabetes, stroke, renal failure, alcohol or opium and menopause showed no significant association with non-diagnostic or diagnostic ECG. Conclusion: Overall, the risk factors are limitedly associated with the occurrence of Myocardial Infarction (MI in cases where ECG is not diagnostic and it is better to use other criteria to diagnose AMI.

  3. Yogurt containing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 helps resolve moderate diarrhea and increases CD4 count in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anukam, Kingsley C; Osazuwa, Emanual O; Osadolor, Humphrey B; Bruce, Andrew W; Reid, Gregor

    2008-03-01

    HIV/AIDS is changing the human landscape in sub-Saharan Africa. Relatively few patients receive antiretroviral therapy, and many suffer from debilitating diarrhea that affects their quality of life. Given the track record of probiotics to alleviate diarrhea, conventional yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbruekii var bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus was supplemented with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14. Twenty-four HIV/AIDS adult female patients (18 to 44 y) with clinical signs of moderate diarrhea, CD4 counts over 200, and not receiving antiretrovirals or dietary supplements, consumed either 100 mL supplemented or unsupplemented yogurt per day for 15 days. Hematologic profiles, CD4 cell counts, and quality of life was evaluated at baseline, 15 and 30 days postprobiotic-yogurt feeding. There was no significant alteration in the hematologic parameters of both groups before and after the probiotic-yogurt feeding. The probiotic yogurt group at baseline, 15 and 30 days had a mean WBC count of 5.8+/-0.76 x 10(9)/L, 6.0+/-1.02 x 10(9)/L, and 5.4+/-0.14 x 10(9)/L, respectively. However, the mean CD4 cell count remained the same or increased at 15 and 30 days in 11/12 probiotic-treated subjects compared to 3/12 in the control. Diarrhea, flatulence, and nausea resolved in 12/12 probiotic-treated subjects within 2 days, compared to 2/12 receiving yogurt for 15 days. This is the first study to show the benefits of probiotic yogurt on quality of life of women in Nigeria with HIV/AIDS, and suggests that perhaps a simple fermented food can provide some relief in the management of the AIDS epidemic in Africa.

  4. Real-world scenarios help improve selection of radiology employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, C L; Groff, K; Phillips, M

    1998-01-01

    Choosing the right candidate through the interview process is critical, particularly in light of rapidly changing skills in various technologies. The authors have changed the interviewing process at Jeanes Hospital in Philadelphia in order to examine and evaluate multiple objectives simultaneously. To do this, they created an instrument that elicits impromptu responses to real-world radiology situations. Such responses help assess a potential candidate's training, emotional strength, technical experience and growth potential. They also determine how much additional training the potential candidate will need to be effective in the department. Using the instrument helps sharpen the assessment of candidate traits such as face-to-face communication skills and response time. The impact on hiring is positive. Quality staff, improved patient care and improved patient safety are only some of the results. Many of the questions included on the instrument come from past problem situations and help the interviewers to determine whether a candidate understands underlying issues and the seriousness of situations. The goal is to ensure that patient care and productivity are not hampered by unusual situations. When a concrete difference is detected between a candidate's response and the department's needs, it is possible to assess the cost-effectiveness of training for the discrepancy. For entry-level candidates, the question is whether the person is trainable. Consistently using this interview document forces hiring managers to identify specific abilities, traits and experience desirable in the workplace.

  5. A comparative review of patient safety initiatives for national health information technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magrabi, Farah; Aarts, Jos; Nøhr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To collect and critically review patient safety initiatives for health information technology (HIT). METHOD: Publicly promulgated set of advisories, recommendations, guidelines, or standards potentially addressing safe system design, build, implementation or use were identified...... with blood bank and image management software which is regulated in the USA. Of the 16 initiatives directed at unregulated software, 11 were aimed at increasing standardisation using guidelines and standards for safe system design, build, implementation and use. Three initiatives for unregulated software...... were aimed at certification in the USA, Canada and Australia. Safety is addressed alongside interoperability in the Australian certification programme but it is not explicitly addressed in the US and Canadian programmes, though conformance with specific functionality, interoperability, security...

  6. Mobile teledermatology: As doctors and patients are increasingly mobile, technology keeps us connected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidi, Dina; Craft, Noah; Ochoa, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    With advancements in electronics and health informatics, telemedicine has emerged as a cost-effective tool capable of increasing care to remote regions, facilitating specialist consults, supporting self-management by patients, and sharing knowledge over great distances. In this review, the authors discuss existing telemedicine modalities, highlight examples of mobile systems documented in the literature to date, and emphasize the data supporting the feasibility of telecommunication technologies to deliver dermatology services and education remotely. While many studies have suggested the potential for teledermatology to increase access to care in developing countries with few dermatologists, the authors share some of the most recent developments, including the use of diagnostic decision support software. The authors encourage a thriving and open network that will enhance the ongoing research and development of innovative and useful products. This network will also connect dermatologists willing to volunteer their consultation to health care workers in remote areas lacking specialists.

  7. Information and communication technology use in asthmatic patients: a cross-sectional study in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Juan; Cherrez, Annia; Ramón, Germán Darío; Lopez Jove, Orlando; Baptist, Alan; Matos, Edgar; Morfín Maciel, Blanca; Calero, Erick; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Cherrez, Sofia; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Cherrez Ojeda, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Rapid diffusion, low cost and broad availability of information and communication technologies (ICTs) make them an attractive platform for managing care, communication and interventions in asthma. There is little information in Latin America about usage frequency of ICTs in asthmatic patients. The analysis undertaken consisted of an observational, cross-sectional study that aimed to identify the frequency and type of ICTs most often used by asthmatics. The Spanish version of the Michigan questionnaire was employed in five Latin American countries. Age and educational level was categorised. Logistic regression was performed among these groups concerning the frequency of ICT usage and the level of interest shown in seeking and receiving information about asthma. In total, 673 asthma patients were surveyed. The mean age was 43.44 years. Over two-thirds of the participants were female (68.4%). The most used ICT was the short message service (SMS) (69.9%). SMS and E-mail are useful tools for communicating (i.e. receiving and seeking information) with all asthma patients, irrespective of their age. WhatsApp (61.5%) and Facebook (32.0%) were rated as being the most interesting channels of communication for receiving information. Regression analysis showed that younger asthmatics and asthmatics with higher educational levels were most likely to use almost all forms of ICTs. ICTs are generally an attractive platform for managing care, communication and interventions to improve asthma care. SMS and E-mail were found to be the preferred ICT forms among users. However, social media forms such as WhatsApp and Facebook may also be appropriate for certain types of patient.

  8. 借助私有云技术构建HIS自助管理平台%Construction of HIS Self-help Management Platform By Private Cloud Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文岐; 刘一

    2015-01-01

    To build self-service management platform using cloud technology, to enhance the quality of service for the purpose of accelerating the hospital information construction. Let the clinical nursing work and the system of administrative examination and approval separation, the medical staff can devote to medical work. At the same time, the development of an Android based mobile client to approval verification, security of hospitalized patients with fluency and integrity in the process of. Lay the foundation for an unmanned service departments, enhance the user experience of clinical information, management platform as a supplement to the HIS application also can maintain the medical workstation daily problems.%利用云技术搭建自助管理平台,以提高服务质量为目的,加速医院信息化建设。让临床护理工作与行政审批制度分离,使医务人员能全身心投入到医疗工作中。同时开发基于安卓系统的移动客户端来进行审批验证,保障患者住院过程中的流畅性和完整性。为科室无人坚守服务打下了基础,增强临床用户的信息化体验,管理平台作为HIS应用的补充也可以维护医护工作站日常出现的问题。

  9. The Impact of Health Information Technology on the Doctor-Patient Relationship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    As health information technology continues to expand and permeate medicine, there is increasing concern for the effect on the therapeutic relationship between patient and psychiatrist. This article explores this impact, seeking wisdom from adult psychiatry and more broadly from general medical disciplines to draw conclusions regarding how the child psychiatry encounter may be affected. Several proposed strategies to mitigate potential negative impacts of health information technology on the therapeutic relationship across practice settings are offered.

  10. Application of 3D rapid prototyping technology in posterior corrective surgery for Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyuan; Li, Chao; Li, Yanming; Zhao, Yingchuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Zhang, Guoyou; Fan, Jianping; Ni, Haijian; Chen, Ziqiang; Bai, Yushu; Li, Ming

    2015-02-01

    A retrospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-dimensional rapid prototyping (3DRP) technology in corrective surgery for Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. 3DRP technology has been widely used in medical field; however, no study has been performed on the effectiveness of 3DRP technology in corrective surgery for Lenke 1 AIS patients. Lenke 1 AIS patients who were preparing to undergo posterior corrective surgery from a single center between January 2010 and January 2012 were included in this analysis. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In group A, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology was used to create subject-specific spine models in the preoperative planning process. Group B underwent posterior corrective surgery as usual (by free hand without image guidance). Perioperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were compared between 2 groups, including operation time, perioperative blood loss, transfusion volume, postoperative hemoglobin (Hb), postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay. Radiological outcomes were also compared, including the assessment of screw placement, postoperative Cobb angle, coronal balance, sagittal vertical axis, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis. Subgroup was also performed according to the preoperative Cobb angle: mean Cobb angle 50°. Besides, economic evaluation was also compared between 2 groups. A total of 126 patients were included in this study (group A, 50 and group B, 76). Group A had significantly shorter operation time, significantly less blood loss and transfusion volume, and higher postoperative Hb (all, P 0.05). There was also no significant difference in misplacement of screws in total populations (16.90% vs 18.82%, P = 0.305), whereas a low misplacement rate of pedicle screws was observed in patients whose mean Cobb angle was >50° (9.15% vs 13.03%, P = 0.02). Besides, using 3DRP increased the economic burden of patients (157,000 ± 9948.85 Ren Min Bi

  11. Learning effect of humphrey matrix frequency doubling technology perimetry in patients with ocular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centofanti, Marco; Fogagnolo, Paolo; Oddone, Francesco; Orzalesi, Nicola; Vetrugno, Michele; Manni, Gianluca; Rossetti, Luca

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the learning effect of Frequency Doubling Technology (FDT) perimetry using the Humphrey Matrix-FDT perimetry (Matrix) 24-2 full-threshold program on patients with ocular hypertension experienced with standard automated perimetry. Twenty-four patients with ocular hypertension underwent 5 full-threshold Matrix tests at intervals of 5+/-2 days. Learning effect was defined as an improvement at results for duration, perimetric indices, foveal sensitivity, Glaucoma Hemifield Test, and the number of points with a Plearning effect. Test-retest variability was also calculated for each repetition as the mean of the point-to-point interindividual standard deviations. A learning effect was demonstrated for mean defect (P=0.031, analysis of variance) and foveal sensitivity (P=0.009) and it only affected the first test for both parameters. All the other parameters did not show any significant learning effect. The effect was independent from eccentricity and quadrant or hemifield sensitivities. The results of this study demonstrate that the learning effect for Matrix-FDT is mild and it may affect only the first test. Caution is needed in the analysis of the first Matrix-FDT examination and retest may be advisable in the presence of low mean defect.

  12. Impact of new X-ray technology on patient dose in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Joris D; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Lagerweij, Martine C M; Knollema, Siert; Slump, Cornelis H; Jager, Pieter L

    2017-01-01

    New X-ray technology providing new image processing techniques may reduce radiation exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure reduction for patients during pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. In this retrospective study, 1185 consecutive patients who had undergone de novo pacemaker or ICD implantation during a 2-year period were included. All implantations in the first year were performed using the reference technology (Allura Xper), whereas in the second year, the new X-ray technology (AlluraClarity) was used. Radiation exposure, expressed as the dose area product (DAP), was compared between the two time periods to determine the radiation exposure reduction for pacemaker and ICD implantations without cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and with CRT. Procedure duration and contrast volume were used as measures to compare complexity and image quality. The study population consisted of 591 patients who had undergone an implantation using the reference technology, and 594 patients with the new X-ray technology. The two groups did not differ in age, gender, or body mass index. The DAP decreased with 69 % from 16.4 ± 18.5 to 5.2 ± 6.6 Gy cm(2) for the non-CRT implantations (p pacemaker and ICD implantation while image quality was unaffected.

  13. Dosimetry study of different irradiation technologies for patients with recurrence of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian NING

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the dosimetric characteristics of intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT,three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3D-CRT and super gamma knife arc conformal radiotherapy(SGS-CRT for patients with recurrence of cervical cancer.Methods Treatment planning of IMRT,3D-CRT and SGS-CRT for 15 patients with recurrence of cervical cancer was designed,and the prescription dose(50Gy,2.0Gy×25 covered 95% of the planning target volume(PTV.The dosimetric characteristics of the 3 irradiation technologies in target region and organs at risk were compared by analyzing dose-volume histogram(DVH.Results The target volume of 95% prescription dose was significantly higher in 3D-CRT(99.9%±0.2% than in IMRT(99.5%±0.5% and SGS-CRT(99.3%±0.8%,P < 0.05;the dose gradient of target region was significantly higher in SGS-CRT(85%±20% than in IMRT(10%±7% and 3D-CRT(8%±5%,P < 0.05;the conformal index of target region was higher in IMRT(0.9±0.3 than in SGS-CRT(0.8±0.2,P < 0.05,and the latter was higher than that in 3D-CRT(0.7±0.5,P < 0.05.The DVH showed that the radiation volumes of bladder was lower in SGS-CRT(27.8% than in IMRT(40.1% and 3D-CRT(57.4%,P < 0.05 when the dosage ranged from 10 to 30 Gy,and the radiation volumes of rectum was lower in SGS-CRT(25.4% than in IMRT(48.9% and 3D-CRT(73.2%,P < 0.05 when the dosage ranged from 5 to 45 Gy,while there was no significant difference among the 3 irradiation technologies of the radiation volumes of small bowel.Conclusion SGS-CRT shows some dosimetric advantages in treating patients with recurrence of cervical cancer.

  14. Using health information technology to manage a patient population in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Frances M; Rundall, Thomas G; Shortell, Stephen M; Bloom, Joan R

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the current landscape of health information technology (HIT) in early accountable care organizations (ACOs), the different strategies ACOs are using to develop HIT-based capabilities, and how ACOs are using these capabilities within their care management processes to advance health outcomes for their patient population. Design/methodology/approach - Mixed methods study pairing data from a cross-sectional National Survey of ACOs with in-depth, semi-structured interviews with leaders from 11 ACOs (both completed in 2013). Findings - Early ACOs vary widely in their electronic health record, data integration, and analytic capabilities. The most common HIT capability was drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction checks, with 53.2 percent of respondents reporting that the ACO possessed the capability to a high degree. Outpatient and inpatient data integration was the least common HIT capability (8.1 percent). In the interviews, ACO leaders commented on different HIT development strategies to gain a more comprehensive picture of patient needs and service utilization. ACOs realize the necessity for robust data analytics, and are exploring a variety of approaches to achieve it. Research limitations/implications - Data are self-reported. The qualitative portion was based on interviews with 11 ACOs, limiting generalizability to the universe of ACOs but allowing for a range of responses. Practical implications - ACOs are challenged with the development of sophisticated HIT infrastructure. They may benefit from targeted assistance and incentives to implement health information exchanges with other providers to promote more coordinated care management for their patient population. Originality/value - Using new empirical data, this study increases understanding of the extent of ACOs' current and developing HIT capabilities to support ongoing care management.

  15. Evaluation of hyperspectral imaging technology in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Nathaniel; Jain, Jitendra K; Sleigh, Jamie; Vasudevan, Thodur

    2017-05-22

    Hyperspectral imaging technology is a novel method of using transcutaneous measurement of oxyhemoglobin (HT-Oxy) and deoxyhemoglobin (HT-Deoxy) concentrations to create a two-dimensional, color-coded "oxygen map." The aims of this study were to compare the use of a hyperspectral imaging device with the transcutaneous oxygen measurement (TCOM), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and severity of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and to assess their correlations. This prospective study recruited 294 participants divided into three distinct groups composed of healthy volunteers and patients with PVD. Patients underwent measurements of lower limbs at a standardized point over the head of the first metatarsal on the plantar aspect using the hyperspectral imaging device, generating four outputs including HT-Oxy, HT-Deoxy, oxygen saturation (HT-Sat), and skin temperature, and the TCOM system, generating transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (TcpO2) and carbon dioxide (TcpCO2). Demographic data, severity of PVD, ABI, and other pertinent information were obtained from both the participants and medical records. Interoperator reliability ranged from 86% to 94% across the four hyperspectral imaging device outputs, whereas intraoperator reliability ranged from 92% to 94%. The HT-Oxy, HT-Sat, TcpCO2, and ABI of the diseased limb correlated significantly with the severity of PVD. HT-Sat significantly correlated with TcpO2 (R = 0.19), TcpCO2 (R = -0.26), ABI (R = 0.42), and skin temperature (R = 0.56). HT-Deoxy also correlated with TcpCO2 (R = 0.27). This study demonstrates the reliability of hyperspectral imaging in comparison to TCOM, ABI, skin temperature, and severity of PVD in a series of patients. Its correlation to other established modalities and low interoperator and intraoperator variability could enable this modality to be a useful screening tool in PVD. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How technology in care at home affects patient self-care and self-management: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, José M; Wiegers, Therese A; Friele, Roland D

    2013-10-29

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients' role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence for effects of technology in home-based care on patients' self-care and self-management. Using suitable search terms we searched the databases of Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, Picarta and NIVEL dating from 2002 to 2012. Thirty-three studies (six review studies and twenty-seven individual studies) were selected. Effects were extracted from each study and were classified. In almost all the studies, the concepts self-care and self-management are not clearly defined or operationalized. Therefore, based on a meta-analysis, we made a new classification of outcome measures, with hierarchical levels: (1) competence (2) illness-management (3) independence (social participation, autonomy). In general, patient outcomes appear to be positive or promising, but most studies were pilot studies. We did not find strong evidence that technology in care at home has (a positive) effect on patient self-care and self-management according to the above classification. Future research is needed to clarify how technology can be used to maximize its benefits.

  17. Hurdles overcome in technology transfer for AIET and Positive outcome in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedeepiya V

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cell based immunotherapies have been in practice in Japan for the past two decades with established clinical trials on its efficacy in both solid tumours and hematological malignancies including gastric cancer, ovarian cancer , lung cancer and liver cancer. [1,2,3,4] In India, NCRM has been providing Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET using autologous Natural Killer (NK cells and activated T Lymphocytes for Cancer since 2005 following the established protocols practiced by the Biotherapy Institute of Japan. Significant outcome achieved after AIET in advanced pancreatic cancer, Acute Myeloid leukemia (AML in Indian patients have already been reported. [5, 6] Here we report our experience in few more patients and present the hurdles overcome and lessons learned in translating the technology from Japan to India Case Details: Case 1: A 54 year-old female presented with Stage IV recurrent ovarian malignancy in 2010 with a history of previous surgery and chemotherapy for ovarian malignancy in June 2009. The CA-125 level of 243 U/ml. CT scan revealed lesions in the liver, spleen, along the greater curvature of body of stomach and in the perisplenic region, between the medial aspect of liver and stomach and in the right inguinal region. She was suggested six cycles of chemotherapy with Doxorubicin (50 mg and Carboplatin (450 mg along with AIET. After proper informed consent, the peripheral blood was withdrawn and the in vitro expansion of the NK cells, activated T Lymphocytes from the peripheral blood was performed using the protocol reported earlier. [7] Average cell count after the in vitro expansion was 1.2 X 108 cells. Six transfusions of the in vitro expanded NK cells and activated T lymphocytes were administered following which the CA-125 decreased to 4.7 U/mL. CT scan taken in December 2010 showed a regression of the lesions in the spleen and perisplenic peritoneal deposits, stable hepatic lesions and resolution of

  18. Getting mobile with a walking-help

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    Ethnomethodology has been one of the few fields were mundane experiences and social ordering such as walking have been a focus of interest (e.g. Ryave and Schenkein 1974). In the present paper we want to discuss how this mundane practice sometimes needs to be achieved through the help of technology...... people with acquired brain injury were introduced to a new walking help that should enable them to walk (better). Our multimodal interaction analysis (Goodwin 2000) of the data will show how the practice of walking with this specific technology is dependent on the interplay of the material affordances...... of the technology (e.g. Gaver 1996), the bodily affordances (e.g. Sheller 2011) of the user and, furthermore, the scaffolding by an accompanying helper. The paper will discuss how movement as an enabled experience can be analysed as an entanglement of these three aspects. To do that, the situations of walk...

  19. A pilot study examining patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into type 2 diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Kathleen G; Hall, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Approximately half of individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have suboptimal self-management, which could be improved by using assistive technologies in self-management regimes. This study examines patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into T2DM self-management. Forty-four participants (M = 58.7 years) with T2DM were recruited from diabetes education classes in the southwestern Ontario, Canada, between February and April 2014. Participants completed a self-reported in-person survey assessing demographic characteristics, current diabetes management, and attitudes toward using assistive technologies in their diabetes self-management. Demographics, disease characteristics, and current technology use and preferences of the cohort were examined, followed by a correlational analysis of descriptive characteristics and attitudes and intentions to use technology in self-management. The majority of (but not all) participants felt that using Internet applications (65%) and smartphone (53.5%) applications for self-management was a good idea. The majority of participants did not currently use an Internet (92.5%) or mobile (96%) application for self-management. Of participants, 77% intended to use an Internet application to manage their diabetes in the future and 58% intended to use mobile applications. Younger age was associated with more positive attitudes (r = -.432, P = .003) and intentions (r = -.425, P = .005) to use assistive technologies in diabetes self-management. Findings suggest that patients, especially those younger in age, are favorable toward adopting assistive technologies into management practice. However, attitudes among older adults are less positive, and few currently make use of such technologies in any age group. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  20. Evaluation the effectiveness of remote blood pressure monitoring technology in patients with hypertension on the basis of clinical recommendations performance measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnenkova O.M.

    2015-06-01

    Material and Methods ― Remote BP monitoring was organized on the basis of computer system which automatically in text messages send requests about BP level to Htn patients. Obtained BP results were stored in the system and automatically worked. A doctor corrected a patient’s therapy if necessary based on this information. To evaluate the effectiveness of a new technology one year observation of 97 Htn patients was organized (54.6% – male aged 49±11 years. Patients regularly responded to automated SMS requests the computer system about the level of blood pressure. The effectiveness was evaluated with the help of the following hypertension guidelines performance measures: 1 a part of patients with four or more BP results during the previous 12 months; 2 a part of patients with BP above the goal level who prescribed two or more antihypertensive drugs on the last visit during the previous 12 months; 3 a part of patients with BP above the goal level 140/90 mm Hg who prescribed two or more antihypertensive drugs on the last visit during the previous 12 months; 4 a part of patients with goal blood pressure (less than 140/90 mmHg on the last visit during the previous 12 months. To evaluate a performance of these measures before BP monitoring the data extracted from patients’ ambulatory cards were used. Results ― 62 patients completed one-year BP monitoring A part of patients with four or more BP results during the previous 12 months increased from 21% to 100% (p<0.001. From 70% to 82% increased the part of patients who were prescribed two or more antihypertensive drugs (p=0.091. From 31% to 15% reduced the part of hypertensives with uncontrolled BP who were prescribed less than two antihypertensive drugs on the last visit (p=0.044. After one-year monitoring a goal BP was registered in 77% of Htn patients versus 13% at the start of the observation (p<0.001. Conclusion ― Htn guidelines performance measures allowed evaluate quantitatively the positive influence

  1. Adult Co-morbidity Evaluation 27 scores of head and neck cancer patients using touch-screen technology: patient satisfaction and clinical verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, C; Dawson, D; Joseph, M; Tipper, J; Jemmet, T; Liew, L; Spinou, C; Grew, N; Pigadas, N; Rehman, K

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to assess head and neck cancer patient satisfaction with the use of a touch-screen computer patient-completed questionnaire for assessing Adult Co-morbidity Evaluation 27 co-morbidity scores prior to treatment, along with its clinical reliability. A total of 96 head and neck cancer patients were included in the audit. An accurate Adult Co-morbidity Evaluation 27 co-morbidity score was achieved via patient-completed questionnaire assessment for 97 per cent of participants. In all, 96 per cent of patients found the use of a touch-screen computer acceptable and would be willing to use one again, and 62 per cent would be willing to do so without help. Patients were more likely to be willing to use the computer again without help if they were aged 65 years or younger (χ2 test; p = 0.0054) or had a performance status of 0 or 1 (χ2 test; p = 0.00034). Use of a touch-screen computer is an acceptable approach for assessing Adult Co-morbidity Evaluation 27 scores at pre-treatment assessment in a multidisciplinary joint surgical-oncology clinic.

  2. Woman Helps Patients Find Their Voices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    THE director of the China Revocalization Association sat opposite me, talking with ease and fluency. Her voice was clear and I couldn’t believe that she was once rendered mute after an operation to remove her vocal cords because of throat cancer.

  3. BARRIERS AND MOTIVATORS IN ENGAGING WITH TECHNOLOGY-ENABLED CARDIAC REHABILITATION: A PATIENT AND HEALTH PROFESSIONAL PERSPECTIVE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Walsh

    2015-10-01

    This formative work has outlined key patient and stakeholder concerns regarding engagement with a technology enabled behavior change intervention in CR. Factors that inhibit and promote engagement have been explored using the COM-B framework. Motivational factors related to social interaction were deemed one of the integral aspects for engagement and adherence to PATHway. In terms of capability factors, technology ease- of-use was highlighted among patient and stakeholders as important for uptake and continued use. This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Action under Grant Agreement no. 643491. PATHway: Technology enabled behavioural change as a pathway towards better self-management of CVD (www.pathway2health.eu

  4. How technology in care at home affects patient self-care and self-management: a scoping review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.M.; Wiegers, T.A.; Friele, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients’ role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence fo

  5. Social representations of nurses about professional autonomy and the use of technologies in the care of patients with wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érick Igor dos Santos

    Full Text Available Objective.To identify the social representations by nurses about professional autonomy in the care of patients with wounds and analyze their interfaces with the constant incorporation of technologies in this care. Methods. This is a qualitative research, outlined from the Theory and method of social representations in its procedural approach and performed with 31 nurses. The interviews were submitted to thematic content analysis software NVivo instrumentalized by 10. Results. The representational content on autonomy is linked mainly to the level of knowledge, power of decision, vocational training and institutional factors. The subjects are positioned favorably to the incorporation of care technologies in professional practice, which involves elements such as cost-effective structure, training, and other resources. Conclusion. It is concluded that autonomy is configured as a prerequisite for the full use of technology and technology is configured as a facilitator for nurses to become more autonomous

  6. MO-H-19A-03: Patient Specific Bolus with 3D Printing Technology for Electron Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, W; Swann, B; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; Zhang, M [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Fisher, T [Memorial Medical Center, Modesto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Bolus is widely used in electron radiotherapy to achieve desired dose distribution. 3D printing technologies provide clinicians with easy access to fabricate patient specific bolus accommodating patient body surface irregularities and tissue inhomogeneity. This study presents the design and the clinical workflow of 3D printed bolus for patient electron therapy in our clinic. Methods: Patient simulation CT images free of bolus were exported from treatment planning system (TPS) to an in-house developed software package. Bolus with known material properties was designed in the software package and then exported back to the TPS as a structure. Dose calculation was carried out to examine the coverage of the target. After satisfying dose distribution was achieved, the bolus structure was transferred in Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file format for the 3D printer to generate the machine codes for printing. Upon receiving printed bolus, a quick quality assurance was performed with patient resimulated with bolus in place to verify the bolus dosimetric property before treatment started. Results: A patient specific bolus for electron radiotherapy was designed and fabricated in Form 1 3D printer with methacrylate photopolymer resin. Satisfying dose distribution was achieved in patient with bolus setup. Treatment was successfully finished for one patient with the 3D printed bolus. Conclusion: The electron bolus fabrication with 3D printing technology was successfully implemented in clinic practice.

  7. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  8. Time, space and technology in radiotherapy departments: how do these factors impact on patients' experiences of radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, S; O'Connor, M; Halkett, G

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapists (RTs) plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment for patients diagnosed with cancer. They need to communicate regularly with their patients and may have a role to play in reducing patient anxiety and distress. The objectives were to explore how the environment of radiotherapy departments supports or inhibits communication generally and information giving and supportive care provision in particular. An ethnographic approach was used to gather rich descriptive data through observations and interviews conducted in two Australian radiotherapy centres. Time, space and a technology driven culture was found to negatively affect the quality of interaction that occurred between RTs and their patients. This research has shown design/modification of spaces is needed in the radiotherapy environment to reflect a patient care centred culture and to enhance opportunities for RTs to provide supportive care for their patients.

  9. Safety and Traceability in Patient Healthcare through the Integration of RFID Technology for Intravenous Mixtures in the Prescription-Validation-Elaboration-Dispensation-Administration Circuit to Day Hospital Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Martínez Pérez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the integration of the RFID technology with the aim of ensuring the traceability of patients and minimization of adverse events during the process of prescription-validation-elaboration-dispensation-administration of medication by means of the implementation of various passive and active WIFI RFID systems in the Pharmacy and Day Hospital services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña. Obtaining patient traceability and using the patient/drug binomial during this process allows us to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. The key points in this work are the unmistakably unique identification and accurate real time location of the controlled items (patients and medication. RFID technology has proved to be invaluable in assisting with the everyday clinical practice of a hospital, and has been successfully implemented in this environment and others. In services such as the day hospital, the implementation of said technology is further justified by the high costs of the service and the high risk to the patient.

  10. Safety and Traceability in Patient Healthcare through the Integration of RFID Technology for Intravenous Mixtures in the Prescription-Validation-Elaboration-Dispensation-Administration Circuit to Day Hospital Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, María; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Dafonte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the integration of the RFID technology with the aim of ensuring the traceability of patients and minimization of adverse events during the process of prescription-validation-elaboration-dispensation-administration of medication by means of the implementation of various passive and active WIFI RFID systems in the Pharmacy and Day Hospital services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña. Obtaining patient traceability and using the patient/drug binomial during this process allows us to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. The key points in this work are the unmistakably unique identification and accurate real time location of the controlled items (patients and medication). RFID technology has proved to be invaluable in assisting with the everyday clinical practice of a hospital, and has been successfully implemented in this environment and others. In services such as the day hospital, the implementation of said technology is further justified by the high costs of the service and the high risk to the patient. PMID:27483269

  11. Safety and Traceability in Patient Healthcare through the Integration of RFID Technology for Intravenous Mixtures in the Prescription-Validation-Elaboration-Dispensation-Administration Circuit to Day Hospital Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, María; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Dafonte, Carlos

    2016-07-28

    This work presents the integration of the RFID technology with the aim of ensuring the traceability of patients and minimization of adverse events during the process of prescription-validation-elaboration-dispensation-administration of medication by means of the implementation of various passive and active WIFI RFID systems in the Pharmacy and Day Hospital services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña. Obtaining patient traceability and using the patient/drug binomial during this process allows us to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. The key points in this work are the unmistakably unique identification and accurate real time location of the controlled items (patients and medication). RFID technology has proved to be invaluable in assisting with the everyday clinical practice of a hospital, and has been successfully implemented in this environment and others. In services such as the day hospital, the implementation of said technology is further justified by the high costs of the service and the high risk to the patient.

  12. What can be expected of information and communication technologies in terms of patient empowerment in health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemire, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Implementing information and communication technologies (ICT) is often mentioned as a strategy that can foster public involvement and responsibility in health. The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the possibilities and issues afforded by the social uses of ICT for personal empowerment in health. The paper discusses evidence from four case studies that characterize current computerization and networking processes in health. The studies shared a global framework comprising four interpretative paradigms of personal empowerment: the professional, technocratic, consumerist and democratic paradigms. The results show the coexistence of four empowerment logics in ICT use. Two trends proved dominant: a strengthening of the control and standardization processes tied to the typical power relationships in health, and a reinforcement of personal autonomy and self-assertion processes, either through commercial relationships or through the social relationships that are also present. The paper supports the argument that in order to understand the opportunities for personal empowerment offered by ICT the logic underlying user practices in their respective contexts must be examined. The paper uses data from four case studies to illustrate the contradictory logics shaping the personal empowerment process. Under these logics, an ICT user may play roles as patient, client, consumer, or citizen.

  13. Technology combined with a counseling protocol to stimulate physical activity of chronically ill patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwey, R; van der Weegen, S; Spreeuwenberg, M; Tange, H; van der Weijden, T; de Witte, L

    2014-01-01

    An iterative user-centered design method was used to develop and test mobile technology (the It's LiFe! tool/monitor) embedded in primary care, followed by a three months feasibility study with 20 patients and three nurses. The tool consists of an accelerometer that transfers data to an app on a Smartphone, which is subsequently connected to a server. Physical activity levels are measured in minutes per day compared to pre-set activity goals, which are set by patients in dialogue with nurses. Nurses can monitor patients' physical activity via a secured website. The counseling protocol is based on the Five A's model and consists of a limited number of behavior change consultations intertwined with interaction with and responses from the tool. The technology supports nurses when performing physical activity counseling. Provided that no connectivity problems occur, the It's LiFe! intervention is feasible, and its longitudinal effects will be tested in a cluster RCT.

  14. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background In Ontario, current treatment for eligible patients who have an acute ischemic stroke is intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). However, there are some limitations and contraindications to IVT, and outcomes may not be favourable for patients with stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. An alternative is mechanical thrombectomy with newer devices, and a number of recent studies have suggested that this treatment is more effective for improving functional independence and clinical outcomes. The objective of this health technology assessment was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices (with or without IVT) compared to IVT alone (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature, limited to randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy using stent retrievers and thromboaspiration devices for patients with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) versus IVT alone (if eligible), calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios using a 5-year time horizon, and conducted sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the estimates. Results There was a substantial, statistically significant difference in rate of functional independence (GRADE: high quality) between those who received mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) and IVT alone (odds ratio [OR] 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.88–3.04). We did not observe a difference in mortality (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.60–1.07) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.66–1.87). In the base-case cost-utility analysis, which had a 5 year time horizon, the costs and effectiveness for

  15. [Health Technology Dependency: A Concept Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-02-01

    Health technology dependence is a widely recognized concept that refers to the utilization of technology, including drugs, equipment, instruments, and related devices, to compensate for a physical disability or to prevent the progression of a disability. Although technology may significantly prolong the life of a patient, technology may also increase the psychological pressure of these patients and the burdens of their caregivers. There is a current dearth of related research and discussions related to the concept of "health technology dependency". Therefore, the present paper uses the strategies of concept analysis described by Walker & Avant (2010) to analyze this concept. The characteristic definition of health technology dependence addresses individuals who: (1) currently live with health technology, (2) may perceive physical or psychological burdens due to health technology, and (3) feel physical and psychological well-being when coping positively with their health technology dependency and, further, regard health technology as a part of their body. Further, the present paper uses case examples to help analyze the general concept. It is hoped that nurses may better understand the concept of "health technology dependency", consider the concerns of health-technology-dependent patients and their families, and develop relevant interventions to promote the well-being of these patients and their families.

  16. Developing Next-Generation Telehealth Tools and Technologies: Patients, Systems, and Data Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman, Michael J.; Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P.; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K.

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehea...

  17. Informative value of Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) in Health Technology Assessment (HTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettschneider, Christian; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2011-02-02

    "Patient-Reported Outcome" (PRO) is used as an umbrella term for different concepts for measuring subjectively perceived health status e. g. as treatment effects. Their common characteristic is, that the appraisal of the health status is reported by the patient himself. In order to describe the informative value of PRO in Health Technology Assessment (HTA) first an overview of concepts, classifications and methods of measurement is given. The overview is complemented by an empirical analysis of clinical trials and HTA-reports on rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer in order to report on type, frequency and consequences of PRO used in these documents. For both issues systematic reviews of the literature have been performed. The search for methodological literature covers the publication period from 1990 to 2009, the search for clinical trials of rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer covers the period 2005 to 2009. Both searches were performed in the medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI). The search for HTA-reports and methodological papers of HTA-agencies was performed in the CRD-Databases (CRD = Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) and by handsearching the websites of INAHTA member agencies (INAHTA = International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment). For all issues specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCT) was assessed by a modified version of the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. For the methodological part information extraction from the literature is structured by the report's chapters, for the empirical part data extraction sheets were constructed. All information is summarized in a qualitative manner. Concerning the methodological issues the literature search retrieved 158 documents (87 documents related to definition or classification, 125 documents related to operationalisation of PRO). For the empirical analyses

  18. Informative value of Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO in Health Technology Assessment (HTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brettschneider, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Patient-Reported Outcome” (PRO is used as an umbrella term for different concepts for measuring subjectively perceived health status e. g. as treatment effects. Their common characteristic is, that the appraisal of the health status is reported by the patient himself. In order to describe the informative value of PRO in Health Technology Assessment (HTA first an overview of concepts, classifications and methods of measurement is given. The overview is complemented by an empirical analysis of clinical trials and HTA-reports on rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer in order to report on type, frequency and consequences of PRO used in these documents. Methods: For both issues systematic reviews of the literature have been performed. The search for methodological literature covers the publication period from 1990 to 2009, the search for clinical trials of rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer covers the period 2005 to 2009. Both searches were performed in the medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI. The search for HTA-reports and methodological papers of HTA-agencies was performed in the CRD-Databases (CRD = Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and by handsearching the websites of INAHTA member agencies (INAHTA = International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment. For all issues specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCT was assessed by a modified version of the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. For the methodological part information extraction from the literature is structured by the report’s chapters, for the empirical part data extraction sheets were constructed. All information is summarized in a qualitative manner. Results: Concerning the methodological issues the literature search retrieved 158 documents (87 documents related to definition or classification, 125 documents related to

  19. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Page Content Article Body Teens are more likely ... time they had intercourse. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure “The pressure on teenagers to have sex is ...

  20. Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... you can increase acceptance by helping to stop bullying of children with TS. Bullying doesn't just ...

  1. Yoga May Help Ease Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167586.html Yoga May Help Ease Depression It's not a cure- ... HealthDay News) -- If you've ever taken a yoga class, you probably know that it can help ...

  2. Exercises to help prevent falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000493.htm Exercises to help prevent falls To use the sharing features on this page, ... even more serious injuries. Exercising can help prevent falls because it can: Make your muscles stronger and ...

  3. Measurement and Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviours in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Emphasis on Mobile Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Dale S; Thomas, J Graham

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB-i.e. activities involving low-energy expenditure and a sitting/reclining posture) may each have significant implications for weight loss and other bariatric surgery outcomes. While early studies suggested that patients typically comply with clinical recommendations to adopt habitual PA, these data were based on retrospective questionnaires. Conversely, recent studies incorporating mobile health (mHealth) technologies (e.g. objective monitors), which assess PA and SB in real time and in the natural environment, show that most patients are inactive and highly sedentary pre-operatively and only make modest changes in these behaviours postoperatively. In addition to using mHealth technologies for obtaining accurate and detailed information on PA and SB, they are increasingly being employed to intervene on patients' PA and SB and/or evaluate intervention outcomes. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to consider the benefits of using mHealth technology when studying and treating PA and SB in bariatric surgery patients.

  4. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  5. A Theoretical Model of Health Information Technology Usage Behaviour with Implications for Patient Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2009-01-01

    Primary objective: much research and practice related to the design and implementation of information technology in health care has been atheoretical. It is argued that using extant theory to develop testable models of health information technology (HIT) benefits both research and practice. Methods and procedures: several theories of motivation,…

  6. The use of information and communication technology to meet chronically ill patients' needs when living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe influences, benefits, and limitations in using information and communication technology to meet chronically ill patients' needs when living at home. The study is a descriptive, exploratory designed pilot study and the intervention was performed using an electronic communication program enabling communication between ill persons and the district nurse in real time by web cam pictures and sound. The participant used the programme once or twice a week from February to August 2008. Data were collected by means of repeated interviews and logbook notes, and were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The results showed that all participants appreciated being able to communicate regardless of time and place and their experiences of using information and communication technology revealed that it created feelings of safety and security. The information and communication technology became a tool in their communication and improved nursing care among seriously chronically ill persons living at home.

  7. Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at anyone who is interested in learning more about living technology, whether coming from business, the government, policy centers, academia, or anywhere else. Its purpose is to help people to learn what living technology is, what it might develop into, and how it might impact...... our lives. The phrase 'living technology' was coined to refer to technology that is alive as well as technology that is useful because it shares the fundamental properties of living systems. In particular, the invention of this phrase was called for to describe the trend of our technology becoming...... increasingly life-like or literally alive. Still, the phrase has different interpretations depending on how one views what life is. This book presents nineteen perspectives on living technology. Taken together, the interviews convey the collective wisdom on living technology's power and promise, as well as its...

  8. Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at anyone who is interested in learning more about living technology, whether coming from business, the government, policy centers, academia, or anywhere else. Its purpose is to help people to learn what living technology is, what it might develop into, and how it might impact...... our lives. The phrase 'living technology' was coined to refer to technology that is alive as well as technology that is useful because it shares the fundamental properties of living systems. In particular, the invention of this phrase was called for to describe the trend of our technology becoming...... increasingly life-like or literally alive. Still, the phrase has different interpretations depending on how one views what life is. This book presents nineteen perspectives on living technology. Taken together, the interviews convey the collective wisdom on living technology's power and promise, as well as its...

  9. Enhancing mHealth Technology in the Patient-Centered Medical Home Environment to Activate Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Multisite Feasibility Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Williams, Joel E; Dye, Cheryl J; Chen, Liwei; Crawford, Paul; Shry, Eric A; Griffin, Sarah F; Jones, Karyn O; Sherrill, Windsor W; Truong, Khoa; Little, Jeanette R; Edwards, Karen W; Hing, Marie; Moss, Jennie B

    2017-01-01

    Background The potential of mHealth technologies in the care of patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions has captured the attention of clinicians and researchers. Efforts to date have incorporated a variety of tools and techniques, including Web-based portals, short message service (SMS) text messaging, remote collection of biometric data, electronic coaching, electronic-based health education, secure email communication between visits, and electronic collection of lifestyle and quality-of-life surveys. Each of these tools, used alone or in combination, have demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness. Some of the more promising results have been demonstrated using regular collection of biometric devices, SMS text messaging, secure email communication with clinical teams, and regular reporting of quality-of-life variables. In this study, we seek to incorporate several of the most promising mHealth capabilities in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) workflow. Objective We aim to address underlying technology needs and gaps related to the use of mHealth technology and the activation of patients living with type 2 diabetes. Stated differently, we enable supporting technologies while seeking to influence patient activation and self-care activities. Methods This is a multisite phased study, conducted within the US Military Health System, that includes a user-centered design phase and a PCMH-based feasibility trial. In phase 1, we will assess both patient and provider preferences regarding the enhancement of the enabling technology capabilities for type 2 diabetes chronic care management. Phase 2 research will be a single-blinded 12-month feasibility study that incorporates randomization principles. Phase 2 research will seek to improve patient activation and self-care activities through the use of the Mobile Health Care Environment with tailored behavioral messaging. The primary outcome measure is the Patient Activation Measure scores. Secondary outcome

  10. Optical sensor feedback assistive technology to enable patients to play an active role in the management of their body dynamics during radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, J. M.; Price, G. J.; Sharrock, P. J.; Stratford, J.; Moore, C. J.

    2013-04-01

    Patient motion during treatment is well understood as a prime factor limiting radiotherapy success, with the risks most pronounced in modern safety critical therapies promising the greatest benefit. In this paper we describe a real-time visual feedback device designed to help patients to actively manage their body position, pose and motion. In addition to technical device details, we present preliminary trial results showing that its use enables volunteers to successfully manage their respiratory motion. The device enables patients to view their live body surface measurements relative to a prior reference, operating on the concept that co-operative engagement with patients will both improve geometric conformance and remove their perception of isolation, in turn easing stress related motion. The device is driven by a real-time wide field optical sensor system developed at The Christie. Feedback is delivered through three intuitive visualization modes of hierarchically increasing display complexity. The device can be used with any suitable display technology; in the presented study we use both personal video glasses and a standard LCD projector. The performance characteristics of the system were measured, with the frame rate, throughput and latency of the feedback device being 22.4 fps, 47.0 Mbps, 109.8 ms, and 13.7 fps, 86.4 Mbps, 119.1 ms for single and three-channel modes respectively. The pilot study, using ten healthy volunteers over three sessions, shows that the use of visual feedback resulted in both a reduction in the participants' respiratory amplitude, and a decrease in their overall body motion variability.

  11. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology PATIENTS Patient Information What Is SART? Risks of IVF Third Party Reproduction A Patient's Guide to Assisted Reproductive Technology Frequently Asked ...

  12. Towards personalised management of atherosclerosis via computational models in vascular clinics: technology based on patient-specific simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa; Di Tomaso, Giulia; Agu, Obiekezie; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    The development of a new technology based on patient-specific modelling for personalised healthcare in the case of atherosclerosis is presented. Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in the world and it has become a burden on clinical services as it manifests itself in many diverse forms, such as coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease/stroke and peripheral arterial disease. It is also a multifactorial, chronic and systemic process that lasts for a lifetime, putting enormous financial and clinical pressure on national health systems. In this Letter, the postulate is that the development of new technologies for healthcare using computer simulations can, in the future, be developed as in-silico management and support systems. These new technologies will be based on predictive models (including the integration of observations, theories and predictions across a range of temporal and spatial scales, scientific disciplines, key risk factors and anatomical sub-systems) combined with digital patient data and visualisation tools. Although the problem is extremely complex, a simulation workflow and an exemplar application of this type of technology for clinical use is presented, which is currently being developed by a multidisciplinary team following the requirements and constraints of the Vascular Service Unit at the University College Hospital, London.

  13. The impact of mobile handheld technology on hospital physicians' work practices and patient care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prgomet, Mirela; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2009-01-01

    The substantial growth in mobile handheld technologies has heralded the opportunity to provide physicians with access to information, resources, and people at the right time and place. But is this technology delivering the benefits to workflow and patient care promised by increased mobility? The authors conducted a systematic review to examine evidence regarding the impact of mobile handheld technology on hospital physicians' work practices and patient care, focusing on quantification of the espoused virtues of mobile technologies. The authors identified thirteen studies that demonstrated the ability of personal digital assistants (PDAs) to positively impact on areas of rapid response, error prevention, and data management and accessibility. The use of PDAs demonstrates the greatest benefits in contexts where time is a critical factor and a rapid response crucial. However, the extent to which these devices improved outcomes and workflow efficiencies because of their mobility was largely absent from the literature. The paucity of evidence calls for much needed future research that asks explicit questions about the impact the mobility of devices has on work practices and outcomes.

  14. Results of a nurse-led intervention: connecting pediatric cancer patients from the hospital to the school using videoconferencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sarah J; Drew, Donna; Wakefield, Claire E; Saikal, Samra L; Punch, Deborah; Cohn, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility and perceived academic/psychosocial outcomes of a pilot program using videoconferencing facilities to connect children with cancer to their home school. Eight parents, three patients, and five teachers (n = 16) participated in semistructured interviews evaluating the efficacy/feasibility of this program. Results were analyzed using the qualitative framework of Miles and Huberman. Parents reported that videoconferencing provided the family with a sense of normalcy and connection to the outside world (4/8), often boosting patients' mood (6/8). Further benefits included stronger relationships with classmates and teachers (15/16) and improved peer acceptance and school reintegration. There were no notable impacts on patients' academic progression. Reported barriers included: costs, time commitments, bureaucratic hurdles, and technical and logistical difficulties. Videoconferencing technologies provide an important tool to connect childhood cancer patients to their classrooms; however, further solution-based investigation is warranted to overcome existing barriers.

  15. With a little help from a... machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Ditte-Marie

    2015-01-01

    with machine creates a stronger focus on (self-) maintenance of physical health, diminishing social and mental aspects of health care. These hypotheses divide the article into three main parts. The first scrutinises policy documents behind the emergence of digital welfare technologies, and their presented......This article discusses the role of technology as a new political welfare strategy in relation to health care, health promotion, and human welfare. The transitions into the era of digital welfare and the implementation of welfare technologies alter previous notions of treatment, prevention...... in the hands of health professionals, the patient is designated greater responsibility. This means that with the introduction of digital welfare technologies, that is, telemedicine, human interaction between health professionals and patients is transformed, and in some cases is absent. Replacing man...

  16. A Technological Review of the Instrumented Footwear for Rehabilitation with a Focus on Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Kofoed, Lise; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    with this purpose, we go through several applications used in different scenarios when gait detection and rehabilitation are considered. We present developments of the designs, possible improvements, and software challenges and requirements. We conclude that in order to build successful systems for PD patients......’ gait rehabilitation, technological solutions from several studies have to be applied and combined with knowledge from auditory and haptic cueing....

  17. Requirements of a new communication technology for handover and the escalation of patient care: a multi-stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Maximilian J; King, Dominic; Arora, Sonal; Cooper, Kerri; Panda, Neha Aparajita; Gosling, Rebecca; Singh, Kaushiki; Sanders, Bradley; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2014-08-01

    In order to enable safe and efficient information transfer between health care professionals during clinical handover and escalation of care, existing communication technologies must be updated. This study aimed to provide a user-informed guide for the development of an application-based communication system (ABCS), tailored for use in patient handover and escalation of care. Current methods of inter-professional communication in health care along with information system needs for communication technology were identified through literature review. A focus group study was then conducted according to a topic guide developed by health innovation and safety researchers. Fifteen doctors and 11 nurses from three London hospitals participated in a mixture of homogeneous and heterogeneous sessions. The sessions were recorded and transcribed verbatim before being subjected to thematic analysis. Seventeen information system needs were identified from the literature review. Participants identified six themes detailing user perceptions of current communication technology, attitudes to smartphone technology and anticipated requirements of an application produced for handover and escalation of care. Participants were in favour of an ABCS over current methods and expressed enthusiasm for a system with integrated patient information and group-messaging functions. Despite concerns regarding confidentiality and information governance a robust guide for development and implementation of an ABCS was produced, taking input from multiple stakeholders into account. Handover and escalation of care are vital processes for patient safety and communication within these must be optimized. An ABCS for health care professionals would be a welcome innovation and may lead to improvements in patient safety. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The Use of Information and Communication Technology to Meet Chronically Ill Patients? Needs when Living at Home

    OpenAIRE

    Sk?r, Lisa; S?derberg, Siv

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe influences, benefits, and limitations in using information and communication technology to meet chronically ill patients? needs when living at home. The study is a descriptive, exploratory designed pilot study and the intervention was performed using an electronic communication program enabling communication between ill persons and the district nurse in real time by web cam pictures and sound. The participant used the programme once or twice a week from Fe...

  19. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  20. Impact of advanced dialysis technology on the prevalence of dialysis-related amyloidosis in long-term maintenance dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffl, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) is a unique type of amyloidosis (beta-2 microglobulin) predominantly in end-stage renal disease. Its clinical manifestations add to increased morbidity and reduced quality of life. There seems to be a relative risk reduction in DRA manifestations when hemodialysis (HD) patients are treated with advanced HD technology, but changes of the course of DRA are uncertain. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in long-term dialysis patients receiving either conventional or high-flux, online-produced ultrapure dialysis fluid. The cross-sectional study included 147 HD patients (at least 10 years). The definitive diagnosis of CTS was made histologically or by the coexistence of CTS with other radiological DRA manifestations (bone cysts, arthropathies). The two HD patient groups did not differ significantly in age at start of HD, gender, major co-morbid diseases, anuria, and dialysis vintage. The conventional HD group had significantly higher circulating beta-2 microglobulin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The prevalence of DRA was 68% for the conventional HD group and 28% for the advanced HD group. Duration of dialysis treatment was the only significant risk factor for the development of clinical DRA manifestations in both study groups, but CTS, bone cysts, or arthropathies occurred significantly earlier in conventional HD patients. The prevalence and severity of DRA have decreased with advances in dialysis technology during the last two decades, although its occurrence is simply delayed.